WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer clinical treatment

  1. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. PMID:24623991

  2. Clinical treatment planning in gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Damsker, J.I.; Karlsson, U.L.; Amendola, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment planning in gynecologic cancer is a complicated and difficult procedure. It requires an adequate preoperative assessment of the true extent of the patient's disease process and oftentimes this can be achieved not only by conventional studies but must employ surgical exploratory techniques in order to truly define the extent of the disease. However, with contemporary sophisticated treatment planning techniques that are now available in most contemporary departments of radiation oncology, radiation therapy is reemerging as an important and major treatment technique in the management of patients with gynecologic cancer

  3. Clinical confrontation results of diagnostics and treatment of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter of book authors investigated the clinical confrontation results of diagnostics and treatment of skin cancer. They noted that diagnostic of skin cancer have to foresee the determination morphologic implements and degree of malignancy tumorous process why in general depend prognosis of illness

  4. Metachronous Lung Cancer: Clinical Characteristics and Effects of Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzechonek, Adam; Błasiak, Piotr; Muszczyńska-Bernhard, Beata; Pawełczyk, Konrad; Pniewski, Grzegorz; Ornat, Maciej; Grzegrzółka, Jędrzej; Brzecka, Anna

    2018-01-01

    The occurrence of a second lung tumor after surgical removal of lung cancer usually indicates a lung cancer metastasis, but sometimes a new lesion proves to be a new primary lung cancer, i.e., metachronous lung cancer. The goal of the present study was to conduct a clinical evaluation of patients with metachronous lung cancer and lung cancer metastasis, and to compare the early and distant outcomes of surgical treatment in both cancer types. There were 26 age-matched patients with lung cancer metastases and 23 patients with metachronous lung cancers, who underwent a second lung cancer resection. We evaluated the histological type of a resected cancer, the extent of thoracosurgery, the frequency of early postoperative complications, and the probability of 5-year survival after the second operation. The findings were that metachronous lung cancer was adenocarcinoma in 52% of patients, with a different histopathological pattern from that of the primary lung cancer in 74% of patients. In both cancer groups, mechanical resections were the most common surgery type (76% of all cases), with anatomical resections such as segmentectomy, lobectomy, or pneumectomy being much rarer conducted. The incidence of early postoperative complications in metachronous lung cancer and lung cancer metastasis (30% vs. 31%, respectively) and the probability of 5-year survival after resection of either cancer tumor (60.7% vs. 50.9%, respectively) were comparable. In conclusion, patients undergoing primary lung cancer surgery require a long-term follow-up due to the risk of metastatic or metachronous lung cancer. The likelihood of metachronous lung cancer and pulmonary lung cancer metastases, the incidence of postoperative complications, and the probability of 5-year survival after resection of metachronous lung cancer or lung cancer metastasis are similar.

  5. Oligometastatic prostate cancer: definitions, clinical outcomes, and treatment considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J.; Gorin, Michael A.; Ross, Ashley E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2018-01-01

    The oligometastatic state has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metastases. With improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging, oligometastatic prostate cancer is being diagnosed with greater frequency than ever before. Furthermore, the paradigm for treatment of advanced prostate cancers is shifting toward a more aggressive approach. Many questions surround the understanding of the process and consequences of oligometastasis, meaning that the contemporary literature offers a wide variety of definitions of oligometastatic prostate cancer. Until genomic data exist to provide a biological component to the definition of oligometastatic disease, a clinical diagnosis made on the basis of up to five extrapelvic lesions is reasonable for use. Retrospective studies suggest that interventions such as radical prostatectomy and local or metastasis-directed radiotherapy can be performed in the metastatic setting with minimal risk of toxic effects. These therapies seem to decrease the need for subsequent palliative interventions, but insufficient data are available to draw reliable conclusions regarding their effect on survival. Thus, a protocol for clinicians to manage the patient presenting with oligometastatic prostate cancer would be a useful clinical tool. PMID:27725639

  6. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF METACHRONOUS TESTICULAR CANCER: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kalpinsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of bilateral testicular cancer is 5% in the total cohort of patients. Synchronous and metachronous testicular cancers are detected in 1-2 and 3% of cases, respectively. The standard treatment for testicular cancer is orchifuniculectomy and that for synchronous or metachronous cancer is organ-saving treatment, testectomy.The paper describes a clinical case of multiple primary metachronous testicular cancer. A 24-year-old patient underwent surgery (orchifuniculectomy and received 4 courses of BEP polychemotherapy for embryonal carcinoma of the left testicle at the P.A. Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute. After 55 months, a dynamic control examination diagnosed a 9-mm tumor in his single right testis that was thereafter resected. Its histological examination revealed embryonal carcinoma with solitary structures in the immature teratoma. Following 22 months, a control examination showed a recurrence of the disease, for which orchifuniculectomy of the single right testis, followed by hormone replacement therapy, was performed. The follow-up period was 80 months; no recurrence is now observed.

  7. Surgical treatment for progressive prostate cancer: A clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of its existing standards, the treatment of patients with progressive prostate cancer (PC remains a matter of debate. Ensuring that the patients have good quality of life is also relevant. The paper describes a clinical case of a patient with progressive PC after hormone therapy, brachytherapy, salvage prostatectomy, enucleation of the testicular parenchyma, and salvage lymphadenectomy. A phallic prosthesis and an artificial urinary sphincter have been implanted to improve quality of life. The results of preoperative examination and the technological features of surgical interventions are given.

  8. Heavy particle beam cancer treatment apparatus, HIMAC, and clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Fuminori

    1994-01-01

    The clinical trial was begun in June, 1994, on the treatment of cancer patients using heavy particle beam for the first time in Japan in National Institute of Radiological Sciences. It is the result of promoting the construction of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with the first period construction cost of 32.6 billion yen as a part of the 10 year general strategy against cancer. This is only one facility of this kind in the world. The features of heavy particle beam as radiation therapy are the excellent concentration of dose distribution, biological effect and so on. The nuclides to be used are those having the atomic number from helium to argon. The acceleration energy of ions was set at 800 MeV per nucleon so as to reach 30 cm in human bodies. The beam intensity is 5 Gy/min to finish irradiation within 1 min. The maximum irradiation field is 22 cm in diameter. The specification of the HIMAC accelerator is summarized. The Penning Ionization Gauge and the electron cyclotron resonance ion sources were installed for the reliability. The radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator is suitable to accelerate low velocity, high intensity beam. Two synchrotrons of 41 m mean diameter are installed. High energy beam transport system, irradiation equipment, and the clinical trial are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Clinical research on cancer treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Koyama, Kazuyuki; Morita, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    There are two purposes of using combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancers. One is to suppress distant metastasis, especially micrometastasis; the other is to improve localized control. As a trial of the utility of the former, systemic chemotherapy with CDDP and 5 FU was given successively with radiotherapy to treat nasopharyngeal cancer. The survival rate was significantly improved compared with historical control cases. The main reason for this effectiveness was the improvement of localized control. The suppression of distant metastasis is the subject of future research. As a trial of the utility of the latter, a super-selective intraarterial chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with radiotherapy was used to head and neck localized progressive cancers. The control of localized cancer was remarkably effective. This treatment is considered to be especially suitable for locally advanced tongue cancer and cancer of the root of the tongue. (author)

  10. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  11. Phase II cancer clinical trials for biomarker-guided treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2018-01-01

    The design and analysis of cancer clinical trials with biomarker depend on various factors, such as the phase of trials, the type of biomarker, whether the used biomarker is validated or not, and the study objectives. In this article, we demonstrate the design and analysis of two Phase II cancer clinical trials, one with a predictive biomarker and the other with an imaging prognostic biomarker. Statistical testing methods and their sample size calculation methods are presented for each trial. We assume that the primary endpoint of these trials is a time to event variable, but this concept can be used for any type of endpoint.

  12. Tailored treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: clinical and pre-clinical developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, A.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in males and females in developed countries. Metastases in distant organs, which develop in 50% of colorectal cancer patients, are responsible for the majority of colorectal cancer deaths. Treatment of metastatic disease should

  13. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Rishindra M., E-mail: reddyrm@med.umich.edu [Medical Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 2120 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  14. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Rishindra M.; Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples

  15. [Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    Hereditary colorectal cancer can be divded into two categories based on the presence or absence of polyps. The first category is characterized by the development of polyposis, which includes familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP); The second category is nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, which is represented by Lynch syndrome. "Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China" developed by the Genetics Group of the Committee of Colorectal Cancer, Chinese Anti-cancer Association, is composed of three sections, including hereditary nonpolyposis syndrome, polyposis syndrome as well as genetic evaluation of hereditary colorectal cancer. The consensus aims to provide recommendations on management of the respective hereditary syndromes in terms of definition, clinical and pathological features, diagnostic standards, treatment, and follow-ups. In addition to describing diagnostic and treatment strategies, prophylactic treatment as well as genetic screening and pedigree monitoring is highly recommended. Through the establishment of this expert consensus, we hope to promote better understanding of hereditary colorectal cancer for clinicians and encourage standardized treatment through multidisciplinery approaches, eventually improving clinical treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China.

  16. Clinical aspects and perspectives of erlotinib in the treatment of patients with biliary tract cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with non-resectable biliary tract cancer have a poor prognosis even if treated with systemic chemotherapy. One hope for improving treatment is through molecular biology and the characterization of specific cancer driving alterations followed by the design of targeted drugs...... of patients benefitting from erlotinib. Until this subgroup has been defined, erlotinib has no value to biliary tract cancer patients in the daily clinic....

  17. Clinical evaluation of developed product for recovery of immune system in the treatment of cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul-Ku; Choi, Soo Yong; Rhyu, Sung Ryeol; Kim, Ki Wha; Kim, Ji Yun; Yun, Na Ra [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    We evaluate the clinical efficacy of pilot product (HemoHIM) on recovery from hematopoiesis damage in cancer patients who received radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The cancer patients studied were as follows : cancer of the breast(47 intakers and 136 non-intakers), uterine cervix(38 intakers and 73 non-intakers), and head and neck(7 intakers and 15 non-intakers). The clinical efficacy of pilot product(HemoHIM) in cancer patients who received radiotherapy and chemotherapy was analyzed. In breast cancer patients, the number of leukocytes decreased according to duration of treatment in both groups. However, intakers showed a less decreasing trend compared with non-intakers. Especially, under limiting value in range of leukocyte number of intakers was significantly higher than that of non-intakers. This result incicates that HemoHIM reduce the severe leukopenia. Values of lymphocyte in both groups decreased similarly after treatment, and it was similar to that of leukocyte. Values of erythrocyte in both groups decreased similarly after treatment, but the values were within normal range. In cervix cancer patients, the results were similar to that of breast cancer patients. In cancer of head and neck, values of leukocyte slightly decreased according to duration of treatment in both group. However, it needs to collect more subjects continuously because of small number of cancer patients. No toxicological side effects of HemoHIM were observed in serological analysis, and possibility to alleviate fatigue and inflammation was investigated in some cases.

  18. Clinical evaluation of developed product for recovery of immune system in the treatment of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chul-Ku; Choi, Soo Yong; Rhyu, Sung Ryeol; Kim, Ki Wha; Kim, Ji Yun; Yun, Na Ra

    2006-01-01

    We evaluate the clinical efficacy of pilot product (HemoHIM) on recovery from hematopoiesis damage in cancer patients who received radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The cancer patients studied were as follows : cancer of the breast(47 intakers and 136 non-intakers), uterine cervix(38 intakers and 73 non-intakers), and head and neck(7 intakers and 15 non-intakers). The clinical efficacy of pilot product(HemoHIM) in cancer patients who received radiotherapy and chemotherapy was analyzed. In breast cancer patients, the number of leukocytes decreased according to duration of treatment in both groups. However, intakers showed a less decreasing trend compared with non-intakers. Especially, under limiting value in range of leukocyte number of intakers was significantly higher than that of non-intakers. This result incicates that HemoHIM reduce the severe leukopenia. Values of lymphocyte in both groups decreased similarly after treatment, and it was similar to that of leukocyte. Values of erythrocyte in both groups decreased similarly after treatment, but the values were within normal range. In cervix cancer patients, the results were similar to that of breast cancer patients. In cancer of head and neck, values of leukocyte slightly decreased according to duration of treatment in both group. However, it needs to collect more subjects continuously because of small number of cancer patients. No toxicological side effects of HemoHIM were observed in serological analysis, and possibility to alleviate fatigue and inflammation was investigated in some cases

  19. Clinical issues in the surgical treatment of colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amri, R.

    2015-01-01

    More than half of colon cancer patients will eventually die of their disease. Early detection is crucial to maximize chances of cure, as five-year survival can range from 97% to as low as 8% depending on disease stage at diagnosis. Since colon cancer is associated with both old age and obesity,

  20. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body's ability to fight ...

  1. Daily clinical practice and patterns of care in upper gastrointestinal cancer treatment : Toxicity, quality of life and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haj Mohammad, N.

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancers - esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancer - have a dismal prognosis. Despite treatment with curative intent, randomized clinical trials report 5-year survival rates of only 47% in esophageal cancer, 36 % in gastric cancer and 21% in pancreatic cancer. In

  2. Effects of Clinical Pilates Exercises on Patients Developing Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şener, Hülya Özlem; Malkoç, Mehtap; Ergin, Gülbin; Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzşen, Tuğba

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of clinical Pilates exercises with those of the standard lymphedema exercises on lymphedema developing after breast cancer treatment. The study comprised 60 female patients with a mean age of 53.2±7.7 years who developed lymphedema after having breast cancer treatment. The patients were randomized into two groups: the clinical Pilates exercise group (n=30), and the control group (n=30). Before, and at the 8th week of treatment, the following parameters were measured: the severity of lymphedema, limb circumferences, body image using the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale, quality of life with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-BR23), and upper extremity function using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) outcome measure. Both groups performed one-hour exercises three days a week for 8 weeks. After treatment, the symptoms recovered significantly in both groups. Reductions in the severity of lymphedema, improvements in the social appearance anxiety scale scores, quality of life scores, and upper extremity functions scores in the clinical Pilates exercise group were greater than those in the control group. Clinical Pilates exercises were determined to be more effective on the symptoms of patients with lymphedema than were standard lymphedema exercises. Clinical Pilates exercises could be considered a safe model and would contribute to treatment programs.

  3. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucchini G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Giorgia Zucchini,1 Elena Geuna,1 Andrea Milani,1 Caterina Aversa,2 Rossella Martinello,2 Filippo Montemurro1 1Investigative Clinical Oncology, Fondazione del Piemonte per l’Oncologia-Candiolo Cancer Institute (IRCCs, Candiolo, 2University of Turin Medical School, Turin, Italy Abstract: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs, such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2–3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal

  4. SHORT OVERVIEW OF CLINICAL TRIALS WITH CURRENT IMMUNOTHERAPEUTIC TOOLS FOR CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Nepomnyashchikh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over last decade, a substantial progress has been made, with respect to understanding of cancer biology and its interplay with the host immune system. Different immunotherapeutic drugs based on recombinant cytokines and monoclonal antibodies are widely used in cancer therapy, and a large number of experimental cancer treatments have been developed, many of which are currently undergoing various stages of clinical trials. Recent endorsement of a recombinant oncolytic herpesvirus T-VEC for the treatment of melanoma was an important step towards a more safe and efficient anticancer therapeutics. In this review, we shall mention only some of the most promising cancer immunotherapy strategies, namely, immune checkpoint inhibitors, cellular therapy and oncolytic viruses. 

  5. Clinical aspects of forecasting results of treatments of patients with rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kas'yanova, T.S.; Rusinovich, V.M.; Mirilenko, L.V.; Kizina, L.I.

    1990-01-01

    To predict the outcome of surgical treatment of patients with rectum cancer and the efficiency of the radiation component of multimodality treatment, some clinical aspects, having the prognostic meaning, are proposed. It is established that the prognostically significant signs for rectum cancer are: the disease stage, the status of the regional lymphatic system, the invasion degree and tumor growth form, tumor differentiation degree, its propagation over the circle, the availability or absence of ileus symptoms, the anamnesis period and some hemogram characters. 8 refs.; 1 tab

  6. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. Problems of diagnostics and treatment of uterine tube cancer (clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Levchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of seldom found pathology – primary cancer of the uterine tube including at the same time both epithelial and sarcomatous component of a tumor is described. Data on a cancer of a uterine tube which, being a rare tumor are submitted, is morphologically similar to an ovary carcinoma. Predictively significant factors for this tumor are the disease stage, volume of residual tumoral masses, SA-125 indicators, and also as those the vascular invasion, degree of a differentiation of a tumor and age of patients are considered. On the basis of our supervision and clinical experience we came to a conclusion that this clinical case emphasizes not specificity of a current and complexity of timely diagnosis of a disease. Thus, an actual task is research of this problem for the purpose of improvement of quality of early diagnosis of primary cancer of uterine tube and use of new modern methods of treatment.

  8. Quality of Life Outcomes after Primary Treatment for Clinically Localised Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardas, Michael; Liew, Matthew; van den Bergh, Roderick C; De Santis, Maria; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Cornford, Philip; Cumberbatch, Marcus G; Fossati, Nicola; Gross, Tobias; Henry, Ann M; Bolla, Michel; Briers, Erik; Joniau, Steven; Lam, Thomas B; Mason, Malcolm D; Mottet, Nicolas; van der Poel, Henk G; Rouvière, Olivier; Schoots, Ivo G; Wiegel, Thomas; Willemse, Peter-Paul M; Yuan, Cathy Yuhong; Bourke, Liam

    2017-12-01

    Current evidence-based management for clinically localised prostate cancer includes active surveillance, surgery, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy. The impact of these treatment modalities on quality of life (QoL) is uncertain. To systematically review comparative studies investigating disease-specific QoL outcomes as assessed by validated cancer-specific patient-reported outcome measures with at least 1 yr of follow-up after primary treatment for clinically localised prostate cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library were searched to identify relevant studies. Studies were critically appraised for the risk of bias. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Of 11486 articles identified, 18 studies were eligible for inclusion, including three randomised controlled trials (RCTs; follow-up range: 60-72 mo) and 15 nonrandomised comparative studies (follow-up range: 12-180 mo) recruiting a total of 13604 patients. Two RCTs recruited small cohorts and only one was judged to have a low risk of bias. The quality of evidence from observational studies was low to moderate. For a follow-up of up to 6 yr, active surveillance was found to have the lowest impact on cancer-specific QoL, surgery had a negative impact on urinary and sexual function when compared with active surveillance and EBRT, and EBRT had a negative impact on bowel function when compared with active surveillance and surgery. Data from one small RCT reported that brachytherapy has a negative impact on urinary function 1 yr post-treatment, but no significant urinary toxicity was reported at 5 yr. This is the first systematic review comparing the impact of different primary treatments on cancer-specific QoL for men with clinically localised prostate cancer, using validated cancer-specific patient-reported outcome measures only. There is robust evidence that choice of primary treatment for localised prostate cancer has distinct impacts on patients' QoL. This should be discussed in

  9. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chan, L; Hausen, H [Xoft Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  10. Cancer clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurlen, A.; Kay, R.; Baum, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on Cancer clinical trials: A critical appraisal. Topics covered include: Scientific fundamentals; Heterogeneous treatment effects; On combining information: Historical controls, overviews, and comprehensive cohort studies; and assessment of quality of life

  11. Biology and potential clinical implications of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in colorectal cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nanna Møller; Sørensen, irene Vejgaard; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the industrialized world. About half of "curatively" resected patients develop recurrent disease within the next 3-5 years despite the lack of clinical, histological and biochemical evidence of remaining overt disease...... after resection of the primary tumour. Availability of validated biological markers for early detection, selection for adjuvant therapy, prediction of treatment efficacy and monitoring of treatment efficacy would most probably increase survival. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) may...... patients, suggesting that TIMP-1 could have a tumour-promoting function. Furthermore, measurement of plasma TIMP-1 has been shown to be useful for disease detection, with a high sensitivity and high specificity for early-stage colon cancer. This review describes some basic information on the current...

  12. Clinical evidence of the efficacy of everolimus and its potential in the treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saksena R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rujuta Saksena, Serena T WongThe Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USAAbstract: The PI3K/Akt/mTOR (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway regulates several key cellular functions and its dysregulation creates an environment that promotes tumorigenesis as well as resistance to therapy. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has emerged as a promising agent in the treatment of breast cancer and was recently approved in combination with exemestane for advanced hormone receptor–positive disease after progression on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. Everolimus may also be effective in combination with cytotoxic and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-directed therapies for the treatment of other subtypes of breast cancer. This paper highlights preclinical and clinical data that have emerged on the role of mTOR inhibition in breast cancer. Although generally well tolerated, everolimus carries a unique side effect profile of which both patients and providers should be made aware. Recommendations related to the administration of everolimus in the clinical setting are also discussed.Keywords: everolimus, breast cancer, mTOR inhibition

  13. Proton and neutron radiation in cancer treatment: clinical and economic outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleurette, F.; Charvet-Protat, S.

    1996-01-01

    The French National Agency for Medical Evaluation (ANDEM) was requested to assess the effectiveness of proton and neutron beam therapy in cancer treatment compared to conventional radiotherapy. This task was accomplished by a critical appraisal of the clinical and economic literature. According to the published economic literature and the capital and staffing cost analysis, it appears that the costs of proton therapy are likely to be two or three times greater than those conformal therapy. According to the published clinical literature, proton beam therapy should be proposed as a routine treatment only for uveal melanoma and skull base cancers. Neutron beam therapy should be proposed as a routine treatment for inoperable salivary gland tumors; its use may be also discussed in cases of stage C-D1 prostate cancers and soft tissue sarcomas. Based on the current scientific evidence and given the incidence rate of these tumors, the time and material requirements, the current French proton/neutron beam facilities are able to meet the current demand. FOr other cancers the medical and economic potential of proton therapy is still an open question. (author)

  14. Observational study to analyze patterns of treatment of breakthrough dyspnea in cancer patients in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Luis; Delgado-Mingorance, Ignacio; Nabal-Vicuña, María; Jiménez-López, Antonio Javier; Cabezón-Álvarez, Ana; Soler-López, Begoña

    2018-06-12

    Although breakthrough dyspnea is very frequent in cancer patients, there are no precise recommendations for treating it. The main objective of this study was to analyze what treatments are used in clinical practice for the management of breakthrough dyspnea in cancer patients in Spain and the secondary objectives were to describe the characteristics of cancer patients with breakthrough dyspnea and the attributes of the disorder. Cancer patients over 18 years of age, with breakthrough dyspnea and a Karnofsky performance score of ≥30, who were treated at departments of oncology in institutes across Spain were included in this cross-sectional observational study. The characteristics of breakthrough dyspnea, history of treatment, anthropometric variables, Mahler dyspnea index, Borg scale, Edmonton Symptoms Assessment Scale, and patient satisfaction with current breakthrough dyspnea treatment were assessed. The mean age of the 149 included patients was 66 years (95% confidence interval: 64.3 to 67.9), and 53 were females (35.6%). The mean breakthrough dyspnea intensity was 5.85 (95% confidence interval 5.48 to 6.22, Borg scale). A total of 55.1% of the first-choice treatments consisted of opioids, followed by oxygen (17.3%). A total of 119 patients (79.9%) received monotherapy for breakthrough dyspnea. Patients presenting with basal dyspnea received oxygen in a greater proportion of cases (21.1% vs 7.4%; p = 0.07). Patients with predictable dyspnea received a greater proportion of opioids (70.9% vs 44.4%; p = 0.01). Opioids constitute first-line therapy for breakthrough dyspnea in routine clinical practice, though the scientific evidence supporting their use is scarce. Further information derived from controlled clinical trials is needed regarding the comparative efficacy of the different treatments in order to justify their use.

  15. Clinical roundtable monograph: new and emerging treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel J; Kantoff, Philip W; Lin, Daniel W

    2011-06-01

    Historically, the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been limited to chemotherapeutic regimens that did not improve patient survival. In 2004, clinical studies began to demonstrate significant improvements in patient outcomes, including overall survival, with docetaxel versus mitoxantrone chemotherapy. Since these pivotal trials, the combination of docetaxel plus prednisone has become a standard of care for patients with metastatic CRPC. However, the limited survival benefit achieved with this regimen prompted several investigations into the development of alternative therapeutic options. Recent advances have now led to an unprecedented number of new drug approvals within the past year, providing many new treatment options for patients with metastatic CRPC. Sipuleucel-T, considered a new paradigm in cancer treatment, is the first such immunotherapeutic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other successes include abiraterone acetate, the first androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, and cabazitaxel, a novel microtubule inhibitor, both of which have demonstrated improved survival following docetaxel failure. The bone-targeting agent denosumab, also recently approved in this setting, offers these patients significant improvement in the prevention of skeletal-related events. The data supporting the approval of each of these agents are described in this monograph, as are current approaches in the treatment of metastatic CRPC and ongoing clinical trials of novel treatments and strategies. The experts also discuss several of the issues regarding the introduction of these novel agents into clinical practice for metastatic CRPC patients.

  16. Choosing relevant endpoints for older breast cancer patients in clinical trials: an overview of all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Glas, N. A.; Hamaker, M. E.; Kiderlen, M.; de Craen, A. J. M.; Mooijaart, S. P.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; van Munster, B. C.; Portielje, J. E. A.; Liefers, G. J.; Bastiaannet, E.

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing ageing of western societies, the proportion of older breast cancer patients will increase. For several years, clinicians and researchers in geriatric oncology have urged for new clinical trials that address patient-related endpoints such as functional decline after treatment of

  17. Clinical features, anti-cancer treatments and outcomes of lung cancer patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minegishi, Yuji; Kokuho, Nariaki; Miura, Yukiko; Matsumoto, Masaru; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Noro, Rintaro; Saito, Yoshinobu; Seike, Masahiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Azuma, Arata; Kida, Kouzui; Gemma, Akihiko

    2014-08-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) patients may be at significantly increased risk of lung cancer compared with either isolated emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis patients. Acute exacerbation (AE) of interstitial lung disease caused by anticancer treatment is the most common lethal complication in Japanese lung cancer patients. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of CPFE compared with isolated idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in patients with lung cancer is not well understood. A total of 1536 patients with lung cancer at Nippon Medical School Hospital between March 1998 and October 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with IIPs were categorized into two groups: (i) CPFE; IIP patients with definite emphysema and (ii) non-CPFE; isolated IIP patients without definite emphysema. The clinical features, anti-cancer treatments and outcomes of the CPFE group were compared with those of the non-CPFE group. CPFE and isolated IIPs were identified in 88 (5.7%) and 63 (4.1%) patients respectively, with lung cancer. AE associated with initial treatment occurred in 22 (25.0%) patients in the CPFE group and in 8 (12.7%) patients in the non-CPFE group, irrespective of treatment modality. Median overall survival (OS) of the CPFE group was 23.7 months and that of the non-CPFE group was 20.3 months (P=0.627). Chemotherapy was performed in a total of 83 patients. AE associated with chemotherapy for advanced lung cancer occurred in 6 (13.6%) patients in the CPFE group and 5 (12.8%) patients in the non-CPFE group. Median OS of the CPFE group was 14.9 months and that of the non-CPFE group was 21.6 months (P=0.679). CPFE was not an independent risk factor for AE and was not an independent prognosis factor in lung cancer patients with IIPs. Therefore, great care must be exercised with CPFE as well as IIP patients when performing anticancer treatment for patients with lung cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation of microarray-based breast cancer molecular subtypes and clinical outcomes: implications for treatment optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Hui-Chi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimizing treatment through microarray-based molecular subtyping is a promising method to address the problem of heterogeneity in breast cancer; however, current application is restricted to prediction of distant recurrence risk. This study investigated whether breast cancer molecular subtyping according to its global intrinsic biology could be used for treatment customization. Methods Gene expression profiling was conducted on fresh frozen breast cancer tissue collected from 327 patients in conjunction with thoroughly documented clinical data. A method of molecular subtyping based on 783 probe-sets was established and validated. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate molecular subtypes with survival outcome and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Heterogeneity of molecular subtypes within groups sharing the same distant recurrence risk predicted by genes of the Oncotype and MammaPrint predictors was studied. Results We identified six molecular subtypes of breast cancer demonstrating distinctive molecular and clinical characteristics. These six subtypes showed similarities and significant differences from the Perou-Sørlie intrinsic types. Subtype I breast cancer was in concordance with chemosensitive basal-like intrinsic type. Adjuvant chemotherapy of lower intensity with CMF yielded survival outcome similar to those of CAF in this subtype. Subtype IV breast cancer was positive for ER with a full-range expression of HER2, responding poorly to CMF; however, this subtype showed excellent survival when treated with CAF. Reduced expression of a gene associated with methotrexate sensitivity in subtype IV was the likely reason for poor response to methotrexate. All subtype V breast cancer was positive for ER and had excellent long-term survival with hormonal therapy alone following surgery and/or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not provide any survival benefit in early stages of subtype V patients. Subtype V was

  19. Correlation of microarray-based breast cancer molecular subtypes and clinical outcomes: implications for treatment optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Kuo-Jang; Chang, Kai-Ming; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Huang, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing treatment through microarray-based molecular subtyping is a promising method to address the problem of heterogeneity in breast cancer; however, current application is restricted to prediction of distant recurrence risk. This study investigated whether breast cancer molecular subtyping according to its global intrinsic biology could be used for treatment customization. Gene expression profiling was conducted on fresh frozen breast cancer tissue collected from 327 patients in conjunction with thoroughly documented clinical data. A method of molecular subtyping based on 783 probe-sets was established and validated. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate molecular subtypes with survival outcome and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Heterogeneity of molecular subtypes within groups sharing the same distant recurrence risk predicted by genes of the Oncotype and MammaPrint predictors was studied. We identified six molecular subtypes of breast cancer demonstrating distinctive molecular and clinical characteristics. These six subtypes showed similarities and significant differences from the Perou-Sørlie intrinsic types. Subtype I breast cancer was in concordance with chemosensitive basal-like intrinsic type. Adjuvant chemotherapy of lower intensity with CMF yielded survival outcome similar to those of CAF in this subtype. Subtype IV breast cancer was positive for ER with a full-range expression of HER2, responding poorly to CMF; however, this subtype showed excellent survival when treated with CAF. Reduced expression of a gene associated with methotrexate sensitivity in subtype IV was the likely reason for poor response to methotrexate. All subtype V breast cancer was positive for ER and had excellent long-term survival with hormonal therapy alone following surgery and/or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not provide any survival benefit in early stages of subtype V patients. Subtype V was consistent with a unique subset of luminal A intrinsic

  20. Emerging treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer: clinical potential of albumin-bound paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontana E

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Fontana, Francesco Sclafani, David Cunningham Department of Medicine, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Surrey, UK Abstract: The management of pancreatic cancer has historically represented a major challenge for oncologists. The inherent aggressiveness of this tumor and the fibrotic features of the surrounding stromal tissue have significantly limited the impact of standard chemotherapy. Moreover, the paucity of available tumor tissue has hampered a better understanding of the biology of this disease as well as the development of new treatment strategies. Recently, the therapeutic landscape of metastatic pancreatic cancer has been enriched by two new combination regimens (FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel which have been demonstrated to improve the outcome in patients with good performance status. Moreover, the peritumoral stroma has been increasingly recognized as a potential therapeutic target for this disease, and several new agents targeting stromal components are currently under investigation. In this paper, we review the current treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer, highlight the role of the peritumoral stroma, and discuss the clinical potential of nab-paclitaxel and antistromal treatment strategies. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, nab-paclitaxel, stroma, SPARC

  1. Design and rational for the precision medicine guided treatment for cancer pain pragmatic clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Scott A; Hicks, J Kevin; Portman, Diane G; Donovan, Kristine A; Gopalan, Priya; Schmit, Jessica; Starr, Jason; Silver, Natalie; Gong, Yan; Langaee, Taimour; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Starostik, Petr; Chang, Young D; Rajasekhara, Sahana; Smith, Joshua E; Soares, Heloisa P; George, Thomas J; McLeod, Howard L; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2018-05-01

    Pain is one of the most burdensome symptoms associated with cancer and its treatment, and opioids are the cornerstone of pain management. Opioid therapy is empirically selected, and patients often require adjustments in therapy to effectively alleviate pain or ameliorate adverse drug effects that interfere with quality of life. There are data suggesting CYP2D6 genotype may contribute to inter-patient variability in response to opioids through its effects on opioid metabolism. Therefore, we aim to determine if CYP2D6 genotype-guided opioid prescribing results in greater reductions in pain and symptom severity and interference with daily living compared to a conventional prescribing approach in patients with cancer. Patients with solid tumors with metastasis and a self-reported pain score ≥ 4/10 are eligible for enrollment and randomized to a genotype-guided or conventional pain management strategy. For patients in the genotype-guided arm, CYP2D6 genotype information is integrated into opioid prescribing decisions. Patients are asked to complete questionnaires regarding their pain, symptoms, and quality of life at baseline and 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after enrollment. The primary endpoint is differential change in pain severity by treatment strategy (genotype-guided versus conventional pain management). Secondary endpoints include change in pain and symptom interference with daily living. Pharmacogenetic-guided opioid selection for cancer pain management has potential clinical utility, but current evidence is limited to retrospective and observational studies. Precision Medicine Guided Treatment for Cancer Pain is a pragmatic clinical trial that seeks to determine the utility of CYP2D6 genotype-guided opioid prescribing in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Superselective uterine artery chemoembolization for the treatment of cervical cancer: a clinical analysis of 33 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jian; Hu Xing; Sun Yajun; Di Zhenhai; Zou Rong; Ren Zhongyang; Mao Xuequn; Wang Meirong; Zhang Aiqin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical therapeutic effect and side reaction of superselective uterine arterial chemoembolization therapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: Bilateral uterine arterial chemoembolization was performed in 33 patients with pathologically-proved cervical cancer. The infusion drugs included DDP or L-OHP, EADM, MMC and 5-Fu. The Gelfoam particle was employed as embolic agent. The therapeutic effect evaluated by observing the improvement of clinical symptoms and the volume reduction of the tumor. Results: Of the total 33 patients with pathologically-confirmed cervical cancer, squamous cell carcinoma was seen in 29 and adenocarcinoma in 4. Based on FIGO classification (established by Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics), 6, 23 and 4 patients were classified in stage Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ respectively. The angiography conducted during the procedure showed that the uterine arteries were markedly dilated, and spiral tumor-feeding arteries as well as tumor stain were also observed. Technical success together with perfect chemoembolization was achieved for 57 uterine arteries in 33 patients. Among the 33 patients, the interventional treatment was carried out three times in 2, two times in 2 and single time in 29. One week after the initial interventional procedure the remission rate of the clinical symptoms was 96% for squamous cell carcinoma and 100% for adenocarcinoma. One month after the treatment, the mean tumor volume was decreased by 30%, the tumor volume reduction for squamous cell carcinoma was 27.6% and was 50.0% for adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection after interventional therapy was carried out in 21 cases and additional radiotherapy after surgery or interventional procedure was adopted in 11 cases. The main adverse reactions after interventional procedure included fever, leucocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, etc. Conclusion: Superselective uterine arterial chemoembolization is one of effective

  3. Bladder cancer treatment response assessment with radiomic, clinical, and radiologist semantic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Marshall N.; Cha, Kenny H.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Paramagul, Chintana; Alva, Ajjai; Weizer, Alon Z.

    2018-02-01

    We are developing a decision support system for assisting clinicians in assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer. Accurate treatment response assessment is crucial for identifying responders and improving quality of life for non-responders. An objective machine learning decision support system may help reduce variability and inaccuracy in treatment response assessment. We developed a predictive model to assess the likelihood that a patient will respond based on image and clinical features. With IRB approval, we retrospectively collected a data set of pre- and post- treatment CT scans along with clinical information from surgical pathology from 98 patients. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier was used to predict the likelihood that a patient would respond to treatment based on radiomic features extracted from CT urography (CTU), a radiologist's semantic feature, and a clinical feature extracted from surgical and pathology reports. The classification accuracy was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) with a leave-one-case-out cross validation. The classification accuracy was compared for the systems based on radiomic features, clinical feature, and radiologist's semantic feature. For the system based on only radiomic features the AUC was 0.75. With the addition of clinical information from examination under anesthesia (EUA) the AUC was improved to 0.78. Our study demonstrated the potential of designing a decision support system to assist in treatment response assessment. The combination of clinical features, radiologist semantic features and CTU radiomic features improved the performance of the classifier and the accuracy of treatment response assessment.

  4. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... can be addressed as quickly as possible. Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  5. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: Alexandra.Jensen@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Clinical Co-Operation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  6. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E.; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006–2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  7. A clinical concept for interfractional adaptive radiation therapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2012-02-01

    To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online correction methods, this approach allows significant

  8. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Mustian, Karen M.; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J.; Kamen, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-sc...

  9. Clinical usage of hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, Lev M

    2005-06-28

    Factors predisposing hormone-dependent tissues to the development of tumors coincide, at least partly, with hormonal-metabolic promoters (like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, visceral obesity, etc.) of other main non-communicable diseases. This important knowledge poses the question of whether the same approach which is applied for prevention/treatment of a metabolic syndrome and the associated endocrine disorders might also be used in preventive and therapeutic oncology. Whereas an answer to this question remains controversial and is based mainly on experimental evidence, there is accumulating clinical data suggesting a practical significance of such a strategy, even though it is not to be considered as directly cytostatic. Among the many drugs under discussion, three groups of medicines (statins, antidiabetic biguanides, and thiazolidinediones) are the most attractive. The concept of metabolic rehabilitation is proposed and used practically in an adjuvant setting for the correction of the above-mentioned endocrine-metabolic disorders commonly found in cancer patients. The current use and aim of this approach is to improve the survival of patients and limit cancer progression. Nonetheless, it also appears potentially useful as a neoadjuvant therapy as well as a prophylactic treatment earlier in life for specific groups of people with hormone-associated enhanced oncological risk. It seems possible that certain hypolipidemic and antidiabetic medicines with pleiotropic effects might be combined with traditional antisteroid prevention/therapeutic approaches in routine clinical situations as well as for overcoming resistance to standard cancer hormonal therapies including receptor-negative cases. Characteristic at the end of the 20th and at the beginning of the 21st century is an epidemic of diabetes and obesity, which might further increase the incidence of certain cancers. This makes it timely to apply hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs (in combination

  10. Differences in Funding Sources of Phase III Oncology Clinical Trials by Treatment Modality and Cancer Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Vikram; Yu, James B; Aneja, Sanjay; Wilson, Lynn D; Lloyd, Shane

    2017-06-01

    Given the limited resources available to conduct clinical trials, it is important to understand how trial sponsorship differs among different therapeutic modalities and cancer types and to consider the ramifications of these differences. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for a cross-sectional register of active, phase III, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying treatment-related endpoints such as survival and recurrence for the 24 most prevalent malignancies. We classified the RCTs into 7 categories of therapeutic modality: (1) chemotherapy/other cancer-directed drugs, (2) targeted therapy, (3) surgery, (4) radiation therapy (RT), (5) RT with other modalities, (6) multimodality therapy without RT, and (7) other. RCTs were categorized as being funded by one or more of the following groups: (1) government, (2) hospital/university, (3) industry, and (4) other. χ analysis was performed to detect differences in funding source distribution between modalities and cancer types. The percentage of multimodality trials (5%) and radiation RCTs (4%) funded by industry was less than that for chemotherapy (32%, Pfunding than any of the other modalities (Pfunded by industry if they also studied targeted therapy (Pfunded by industry than trials studying multimodality therapy or radiation. The impact of industry funding versus institutional or governmental sources of funding for cancer research is unclear and requires further study.

  11. Clinical Experiences of Korean Medicine Treatment against Urinary Bladder Cancer in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeyeol Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder cancer (UBC is one of the most common cancers, with 1 out of every 26 men and 1 out of every 80 women worldwide developing the disease during their lifetime. Moreover, it is a disease that predominantly affects the elderly and is becoming a major health problem as the elderly population continues to rapidly increase. In spite of the rapid development of medical science, the 5-year survival rate has remained around 75% since the 1990s, and the FDA has approved no new drugs for UBC over the last 10 years. In addition, most patients experience frequent recurrence and poor quality of life after diagnosis. Therefore, in order to solve unmet needs by alternative methods, we present our clinical cases of UBC where we observed outstanding results including regression and recurrence prevention exclusively through Traditional Korean Medicine such as (1 herbal therapy, (2 acupuncture, (3 pharmacopuncture and needle-embedding therapy, (4 moxibustion, and (5 cupping therapy. From our experience, it appears that multimodal strategies for synergistic efficiency are more effective than single Korean Medicine treatment. We hope this will encourage investigation of the efficacy of Korean Medicine treatment in clinical trials for UBC patients.

  12. Clinical characteristics and treatment results of large cell lung cancer-62 case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongfu; Ou Guangfei; Cheng Guiyu; Zhou Zongmei; Zhao Lujun; Wang Lvhua

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Objective To evaluate the clinical characteristics and treatment results of 60 patients with large cell lung cancer (LCLC). Methods: All sixty-two patients were diagnosed histopathologically with 5 in stage I, 13 in stage II, 30 in stage III and 14 in stage IV. Forty-five patients received primary surgical resection with 38 radical resection and 7 palliative resection. Non-surgical treatment was given to 17 patients. Mediastinum and ipsilateral hilum were treated to the total dose of 40-60 Gy in 4-6 weeks in 16 patients as postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. For patients treated by radiation alone, the primary tumor bed, bilateral mediastinum and ipsilateral hilum were treated to the total dose of 36-70 Gy in 4-7 weeks. Results: The overall 1-, 3- and 5- year survival rates were 25.7%, 15.4% and 11.6%, respectively with the median survival time of 11.6 months. In the radically resected patients, the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates and the median survival time were 51.3%, 24.7%, 24.7% and 13 months, compared to those of 0%, 0%, 0% and 2 months in the palliatively resected group. In non-surgical treatment group, the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates and the median survival time were 41.2%, 21.2%, 7.0% and 11 months, respectively. Conclusions: The prognosis of large cell lung cancer is poor due to high distant metastasis rate. The long-term survival rate after radical resection is worse than the other lung cancers, but similar to the non-surgical treatment. (authors)

  13. Anal cancer: ESMO–ESSO–ESTRO clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glynne-Jones, Robert; Nilsson, Per J.; Aschele, Carlo; Goh, Vicky; Peiffert, Didier; Cervantes, Andrés; Arnold, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) is a rare cancer but its incidence is increasing throughout the world, and is particularly high in the human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV+) population. A multidisciplinary approach is mandatory (involving radiation therapists, medical oncologists, surgeons, radiologists and pathologists). SCCA usually spreads in a loco-regional manner within and outside the anal canal. Lymph node involvement at diagnosis is observed in 30–40% of cases while systemic spread is uncommon with distant extrapelvic metastases recorded in 5–8% at onset, and rates of metastatic progression after primary treatment between 10% and 20%. SCCA is strongly associated with human papilloma virus (HPV, types 16–18) infection. The primary aim of treatment is to achieve cure with loco-regional control and preservation of anal function, with the best possible quality of life. Treatment dramatically differs from adenocarcinomas of the lower rectum. Combinations of 5FU-based chemoradiation and other cytotoxic agents (mitomycin C) have been established as the standard of care, leading to complete tumour regression in 80–90% of patients with locoregional failures in the region of 15%. There is an accepted role for surgical salvage. Assessment and treatment should be carried out in specialised centres treating a high number of patients as early as possible in the clinical diagnosis. To date, the limited evidence from only 6 randomised trials [1,2,3,4,5,6,7], the rarity of the cancer, and the different behaviour/natural history depending on the predominant site of origin, (the anal margin, anal canal or above the dentate line) provide scanty direction for any individual oncologist. Here we aim to provide guidelines which can assist medical, radiation and surgical oncologists in the practical management of this unusual cancer

  14. Improving Breast Cancer Surgical Treatment Decision Making: The iCanDecide Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Sarah T; Li, Yun; An, Lawrence C; Resnicow, Kenneth; Janz, Nancy K; Sabel, Michael S; Ward, Kevin C; Fagerlin, Angela; Morrow, Monica; Jagsi, Reshma; Hofer, Timothy P; Katz, Steven J

    2018-03-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to determine the effect of iCanDecide, an interactive and tailored breast cancer treatment decision tool, on the rate of high-quality patient decisions-both informed and values concordant-regarding locoregional breast cancer treatment and on patient appraisal of decision making. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial of newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer making locoregional treatment decisions. From 22 surgical practices, 537 patients were recruited and randomly assigned online to the iCanDecide interactive and tailored Web site (intervention) or the iCanDecide static Web site (control). Participants completed a baseline survey and were mailed a follow-up survey 4 to 5 weeks after enrollment to assess the primary outcome of a high-quality decision, which consisted of two components, high knowledge and values-concordant treatment, and secondary outcomes (decision preparation, deliberation, and subjective decision quality). Results Patients in the intervention arm had higher odds of making a high-quality decision than did those in the control arm (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.92; P = .0004), which was driven primarily by differences in the rates of high knowledge between groups. The majority of patients in both arms made values-concordant treatment decisions (78.6% in the intervention arm and 81.4% in the control arm). More patients in the intervention arm had high decision preparation (estimate, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.34; P = .027), but there were no significant differences in the other decision appraisal outcomes. The effect of the intervention was similar for women who were leaning strongly toward a treatment option at enrollment compared with those who were not. Conclusion The tailored and interactive iCanDecide Web site, which focused on knowledge building and values clarification, positively affected high-quality decisions largely by improving knowledge compared with static online

  15. National Cancer Patient Registry--a patient registry/clinical database to evaluate the health outcomes of patients undergoing treatment for cancers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, G C C; Azura, D

    2008-09-01

    Cancer burden in Malaysia is increasing. Although there have been improvements in cancer treatment, these new therapies may potentially cause an exponential increase in the cost of cancer treatment. Therefore, justification for the use of these treatments is mandated. Availability of local data will enable us to evaluate and compare the outcome of our patients. This will help to support our clinical decision making and local policy, improve access to treatment and improve the provision and delivery of oncology services in Malaysia. The National Cancer Patient Registry was proposed as a database for cancer patients who seek treatment in Malaysia. It will be a valuable tool to provide timely and robust data on the actual setting in oncology practice, safety and cost effectiveness of treatment and most importantly the outcome of these patients.

  16. Distinct work-related, clinical and psychological factors predict return to work following treatment in four different cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alethea F; Hankins, Matthew; Rixon, Lorna; Eaton, Emma; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A

    2013-03-01

    Many factors influence return to work (RTW) following cancer treatment. However specific factors affecting RTW across different cancer types are unclear. This study examined the role of clinical, sociodemographic, work and psychological factors in RTW following treatment for breast, gynaecological, head and neck, and urological cancer. A 12-month prospective questionnaire study was conducted with 290 patients. Cox regression analyses were conducted to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for time to RTW. Between 89-94% of cancer survivors returned to work. Breast cancer survivors took the longest to return (median 30 weeks), and urology cancer survivors returned the soonest (median 5 weeks). Earlier return among breast cancer survivors was predicted by a greater sense of control over their cancer at work (HR 1.2; 95% CI: 1.09-1.37) and by full-time work (HR 2.1; CI: 1.24-3.4). Predictive of a longer return among gynaecological cancer survivors was a belief that cancer treatment may impair ability to work (HR 0.75; CI: 0.62-0.91). Among urological cancer survivors constipation was predictive of longer RTW (HR 0.99; CI: 0.97-1.00), whereas undertaking flexible working was predictive of returning sooner (HR 1.70; CI: 1.07-2.7). Head and neck cancer survivors who perceived greater negative consequences of their cancer took longer to return (HR 0.27; CI: 0.11-0.68). Those reporting better physical functioning returned sooner (HR1.04; CI: 1.01-1.08). A different profile of predictive factors emerged for the four cancer types. In addition to optimal symptom management and workplace adaptations, the findings suggest that eliciting and challenging specific cancer and treatment-related perceptions may facilitate RTW. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Analysis of the clinical benefit of 5-fluorouracil and radiation treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Perera, Francisco E.; Kocha, Walter; Tomiak, Anna; Taylor, Marianne; Vincent, Mark; Bauman, Glenn S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the palliative benefit of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy in patients with surgically unresectable localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced surgically unresectable symptomatic pancreatic cancer received 5-FU chemotherapy and local radiation therapy. They were retrospectively reviewed in regard to their clinical benefit response (a composite of measurement of pain assessment, weight, and Karnofsky performance status [KPS]), as well as radiological response, time to progression, and overall survival. Results: Median survival for the 25 patients was 9 months and median progression-free survival was 6 months. Thirty-two percent of patients survived in excess of 1 year. Analgesic requirements increased >50% in 2 patients and KPS deteriorated in 10 patients. Of the 13 remaining patients, 2 sustained a >7% weight loss and 2 gained weight post-treatment. Six patients improved in one parameter of analgesic consumption, weight loss or KPS without deteriorating in any others. Thus, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 6/25 (24%). In terms of tumor response, 8 patients (44%) demonstrated a reduction in tumor volume post-treatment, 4 of whom (22%) experienced a >50% reduction. Four additional patients had radiologically stable disease. Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 24%, a value similar to the 23.8% reported for single agent gemcitabine. The median survival of 7 months was also similar to the 5.65 months reported for gemcitabine. The radiological partial response rate of 22% and the 1-year survival of 32% were higher for 5-FU-radiation than the reported values for gemcitabine. A randomized trial would be necessary to compare 5-FU-radiation to gemcitabine directly; however, from this review it did not appear that the overall palliative benefit of 5-FU-radiation was inferior to gemcitabine

  18. Cryosurgery in Cancer Treatment: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  19. Clinical observation of 89Sr treatment efficacy of multiple bone metastases in breast and prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chao; Li Weipeng; Hu Yongquan; Tao Jian

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of 89 Sr in treatment of multiple bone metastases of breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Seventy multiple bone metastases patients (30 females with breast cancer and 40 males with prostate cancer) were treated with 89 Sr. The clinical effectiveness was assessed by Karnofsky performance score and whole body bone scanning data. Results: The total pain relief rate was 79% in bone metastases of breast cancer and 85% in bone metastases of prostate cancer, respectively. There was no significant differences between the two groups (χ 2 =0.78, P>0.05). The Karnofsky score was significantly improved in both groups (t=2.46, P 89 Sr treatment was good, and the quality of life was improved in patients with multiple bone metastases breast or prostate cancer. (authors)

  20. Cetuximab in the treatment of head and neck cancer: preliminary results outside clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dequanter, Didier; Shahla, Mohammad; Paulus, Pascal; Lothaire, Phillippe

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy in our daily practice, outside clinical trials, of cetuximab plus radiotherapy in a majority of treatment-naive patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to evaluate outcomes in patients who were treated definitively with cetuximab and radiotherapy (ExRT). Patients with stage III or IV, nonmetastatic, measurable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were eligible. Results: There were 18 males and two females. The median age was 61 years (range from 49 to 87 years old). Concurrent radiotherapy and cetuximab was used, in first line, in 17 patients with locally advanced disease; two patients with recurrent SCCHN, who were intolerant of Cisplatin-based regimens, were treated with radiotherapy combined with weekly cetuximab; and 1 patient received cetuximab and radiotherapy postoperatively. The median time of response was 10 months (range from 2 to 24 months). A partial response was observed in 11 cases; a complete response in nine cases. The occurrence of grade 2–3 skin toxicity was observed in 11 cases. Skin toxicity was clearly correlated with a better response and the duration of the response to the treatment. The use of cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy does not increase the side effects of radiotherapy. At the end of the follow-up, 17 patients died. Conclusion: Cetuximab, with its highly targeted mechanism of action and synergistic activity with current treatment modalities, is a valuable treatment option in head and neck patients. The effect of the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist occurs without any change in the pattern and the severity of toxicity usually associated with head and neck radiation. Cetuximab seems not to provide the most benefit for patients with oropharyngeal cancers but will in patients with T4 tumors. However, the median duration of local control was

  1. Cetuximab in the treatment of head and neck cancer: preliminary results outside clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dequanter, Didier; Shahla, Mohammad; Paulus, Pascal; Lothaire, Phillippe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy in our daily practice, outside clinical trials, of cetuximab plus radiotherapy in a majority of treatment-naive patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate outcomes in patients who were treated definitively with cetuximab and radiotherapy (ExRT). Patients with stage III or IV, nonmetastatic, measurable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were eligible. There were 18 males and two females. The median age was 61 years (range from 49 to 87 years old). Concurrent radiotherapy and cetuximab was used, in first line, in 17 patients with locally advanced disease; two patients with recurrent SCCHN, who were intolerant of Cisplatin-based regimens, were treated with radiotherapy combined with weekly cetuximab; and 1 patient received cetuximab and radiotherapy postoperatively. The median time of response was 10 months (range from 2 to 24 months). A partial response was observed in 11 cases; a complete response in nine cases. The occurrence of grade 2–3 skin toxicity was observed in 11 cases. Skin toxicity was clearly correlated with a better response and the duration of the response to the treatment. The use of cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy does not increase the side effects of radiotherapy. At the end of the follow-up, 17 patients died. Cetuximab, with its highly targeted mechanism of action and synergistic activity with current treatment modalities, is a valuable treatment option in head and neck patients. The effect of the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist occurs without any change in the pattern and the severity of toxicity usually associated with head and neck radiation. Cetuximab seems not to provide the most benefit for patients with oropharyngeal cancers but will in patients with T4 tumors. However, the median duration of local control was less as described in the clinical trials

  2. [Clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients with non-invasive breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnijć, Zoran; Brkljacić, Boris; Drinković, Ivan; Jakić-Razumović, Jasminka; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Krajina, Zdenko; Margaritoni, Marko; Strnad, Marija; Sarcević, Bozena; Tomić, Snjezana; Zic, Rado

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Early diagnosis and more effective treatment of invasive breast cancer resulted in significant mortality reduction, improvement of survival and the quality of life of the patients. The management od non-invasive breast cancer, on the contrary, is still controversial and the problem of overdiagnosis and overtreatment of patients come to evidence. In the following text a multidisciplinary team of experts brings the first consensus guidelines aimed to standardize and optimize the criteria and management in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of non-invasive breast cancer patients in the Republic of Croatia.

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Screening and Treatment of Precancerous Lesions for Cervical Cancer Prevention in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mandeel, Hazem Mahmoud; Sagr, Emad; Sait, Khalid; Latifah, Hassan Mohamed; Al-Obaid, Abdulaziz; Al-Badawi, Ismail A; Alkushi, Abdulmohsen O; Salem, Hany; Massoudi, Nada S; Schunemann, Holger; Mustafa, Reem A; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common gynecological malignancy in Saudi women with an estimated incidence rate of 1.9 cases per 100 000 women-years. More than 40% of cervical cancer cases are diagnosed at advanced stages due to lack of a routine screening program in Saudi Arabia. Thus, national guidelines for routine screening and treatment of precancerous cervical lesions are needed. The Saudi Centre for Evidence-Based Healthcare invited a panel of local experts and partnered them with a team from McMaster University in Canada for methodological support, to develop national clinical practice guidelines on the screening and treatment of precancerous lesions for cervical cancer. After the panel identified key clinical questions, the McMaster University working group updated existing systematic reviews that had been used for the 2013 WHO Guidelines for screening and treatment of precancerous lesions for cervical cancer prevention. Recommendations were based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Those recommendations took into account the available evidence, patient values and preferences, and resource use in the Saudi context. The panel provided recommendations on two major issues: screening for precancerous lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 & 3) and treatment of those lesions to prevent cervical cancer in women who tested positive after screening. The Saudi expert panel recommends using the HPV DNA test followed by colposcopy or cytology (Pap test) followed by colposcopy to screen for CIN2+ in women at risk of cervical cancer. The panel recommends cryotherapy or loop excision electrosurgery procedure (LEEP) over cold knife cone biopsy to treat women at risk of cervical cancer that tests positive for CIN2+. Universal screening for precancerous cervical dysplasia in women in Saudi Arabia is recommended using HPV testing and or cytology. Either cryotherapy or LEEP are preferred for treatment. National

  4. A multidisciplinary clinical treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer complicated with rectovesical fistula: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Tiancheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula is a rare and difficult to treat entity. Here, we describe a case of rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula successfully managed by multimodality treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Chinese man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer accompanied by rectovesical fistula. He underwent treatment with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy combined with total pelvic excision and adjuvant chemotherapy, as recommended by a multimodality treatment team. Post-operative pathology confirmed the achievement of pathological complete response. Conclusions This case suggests that a proactive multidisciplinary treatment is needed to achieve complete cure of locally advanced rectal cancer even in the presence of rectovesical fistula.

  5. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  6. The clinical database and implementation of treatment guidelines by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group in 2007-2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maj-Britt; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Offersen, Birgitte V

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 40 years, Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) has provided comprehensive guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. This population-based analysis aimed to describe the plurality of modifications introduced over the past 10 years in the national Danish...... guidelines for the management of early breast cancer. By use of the clinical DBCG database we analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of guideline revisions in Denmark. METHODS: From the DBCG guidelines we extracted modifications introduced in 2007-2016 and selected examples regarding surgery......, radiotherapy (RT) and systemic treatment. We assessed introduction of modifications from release on the DBCG webpage to change in clinical practice using the DBCG clinical database. RESULTS: Over a 10-year period data from 48,772 patients newly diagnosed with malignant breast tumors were entered into DBCG...

  7. Coupled variable selection for regression modeling of complex treatment patterns in a clinical cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, I; Elsäßer, A; Weinmann, A; Binder, H

    2014-12-30

    For determining a manageable set of covariates potentially influential with respect to a time-to-event endpoint, Cox proportional hazards models can be combined with variable selection techniques, such as stepwise forward selection or backward elimination based on p-values, or regularized regression techniques such as component-wise boosting. Cox regression models have also been adapted for dealing with more complex event patterns, for example, for competing risks settings with separate, cause-specific hazard models for each event type, or for determining the prognostic effect pattern of a variable over different landmark times, with one conditional survival model for each landmark. Motivated by a clinical cancer registry application, where complex event patterns have to be dealt with and variable selection is needed at the same time, we propose a general approach for linking variable selection between several Cox models. Specifically, we combine score statistics for each covariate across models by Fisher's method as a basis for variable selection. This principle is implemented for a stepwise forward selection approach as well as for a regularized regression technique. In an application to data from hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the coupled stepwise approach is seen to facilitate joint interpretation of the different cause-specific Cox models. In conditional survival models at landmark times, which address updates of prediction as time progresses and both treatment and other potential explanatory variables may change, the coupled regularized regression approach identifies potentially important, stably selected covariates together with their effect time pattern, despite having only a small number of events. These results highlight the promise of the proposed approach for coupling variable selection between Cox models, which is particularly relevant for modeling for clinical cancer registries with their complex event patterns. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  8. Analysis on the childhood and adolescent differentiated thyroid cancer: clinical features and radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zequan; Luo Quanyong; Chen Libo; Ding Yin; Yu Yongli; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Children with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) frequently present with more extensive disease than adults. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of child-hood and adolescent DTC and evaluate the outcome and safety of radioiodine treatment. Methods: The records of 38 childhood and adolescent DTC cases, with 28 females and 10 males (mean age: 16.4 years) were reviewed. At diagnosis, all had metastatic lesions with 38 at regional lymph nodes, 15 at lung, 2 at brain and bone. Twenty-three had a total thyroidectomy, 7 had subtotal thyroidectomy, 5 had lobectomy, and 3 had other treatment. All received post-operative radioiodine therapy. All had follow-up for at least one year. Results: At the time of follow-up, all were survive (with a median follow-up of 5.13 years). Four-teen patients had no evidence of disease, 16 had partial remission, and 8 were stable disease. Conclusions: DTC of the thyroid in childhood and adolescent has high risks of residual/recurrence and metastasis. Post-thyroidectomy oral administration of radioiodine was an effective and safety adjuvant therapy for outcomes. (authors)

  9. Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: Molecular Testing for Colorectal Cancer Treatment, Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Yoshino, Takayuki; Akagi, Kiwamu; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Nakatani, Kaname; Muro, Kei; Yatabe, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2018-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Medical Oncology (JSMO) previously published 2 editions of the clinical guidelines: "Japanese guidelines for testing of KRAS gene mutation in colorectal cancer" in 2008 and "Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutation testing in colorectal cancer patients" in 2014. These guidelines have contributed to the proper use of KRAS and RAS mutation testing, respectively. Recently, clinical utility, particularly for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with BRAF V600E mutation or DNA mismatch-repair (MMR) deficiency, has been established. Therefore, the guideline members decided these genetic alterations should also be involved. The aim of this revision is to properly carry out testing for BRAF V600E mutation and MMR deficiency in addition to RAS mutation. The revised guidelines include the basic requirements for testing for these genetic alterations based on recent scientific evidence. Furthermore, because clinical utility of comprehensive genetic testing using next-generation sequencing and somatic gene testing of analyzing circulating tumor DNA has increasingly evolved with recent advancements in testing technology, we noted the current situation and prospects for these testing technologies and their clinical implementation in the revised guidelines. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  11. Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT Study: design of a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wit G Ardine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a major problem of cancer patients. Thirty percent of cancer survivors report serious fatigue three years after finishing treatment. There is evidence that physical exercise during cancer treatment reduces fatigue. This may also lead to an improvement of quality of life. Such findings may result in a decrease of healthcare related expenditures and societal costs due to sick leave. However, no studies are known that investigated these hypotheses. Therefore, the primary aim of our study is to assess the effect of exercise during cancer treatment on reducing complaints of fatigue and on reducing health service utilisation and sick leave. Methods/Design The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment study is a multicentre randomised controlled trial in 150 breast and 150 colon cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment. Participants will be randomised to an exercise or a control group. In addition to the usual care, the exercise group will participate in an 18-week supervised group exercise programme. The control group will be asked to maintain their habitual physical activity pattern. Study endpoints will be assessed after 18 weeks (short term and after 9 months (long term. Validated questionnaires will be used. Primary outcome: fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory and Fatigue Quality List and cost-effectiveness, health service utilisation and sick leave. Secondary outcome: health related quality of life (European Organisation Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life questionnaire-C30, Short Form 36 healthy survey, impact on functioning and autonomy (Impact on functioning and autonomy questionnaire, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, physical fitness (aerobic peak capacity, muscle strength, body composition and cognitive-behavioural aspects. To register health service utilisation and sick leave, participants will keep diaries including the EuroQuol-5D. Physical activity level

  12. Working during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000834.htm Working during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Many people continue to work throughout their cancer treatment. Cancer, or the side effects of treatment, may ...

  13. After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Better Home Your Health Resources Healthcare Management After Cancer Treatment After Cancer Treatment Share Print From the day you were diagnosed ... of the questions you may have after your cancer treatment ends. Path to well being Will I need ...

  14. Endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women with and without previous estrogen replacement treatment: comparison of clinical and histopathological characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Norup, P

    1993-01-01

    Clinical and histopathological features of postmenopausal endometrial cancer were studied in 63 patients who had received exogenous estrogens previously and in 76 patients who had never been exposed to estrogens. All treatments were primarily surgical. Estrogen users were younger than nonusers (P...... metaplasia and "foam" cells were not related to tumor grade or use of estrogens. The receptor content correlated inversely with grade but was not related to estrogen use. Duration of estrogen treatment was not associated with tumor stage and grade. Our findings support the theory that endometrial cancer...

  15. Types of Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the several types of cancer clinical trials, including treatment trials, prevention trials, screening trials, supportive and palliative care trials. Each type of trial is designed to answer different research questions.

  16. Developing advanced clinical practice skills in gastrointestinal consequences of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Caroline; Andreyev, Jervoise; Muls, Ann

    2018-03-08

    This article explores the transition from a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) towards developing advanced clinical practice skills within a gastrointestinal consequences of cancer clinic. It presents data on the first 50 patients assessed by the CNS from a prospective service evaluation, demonstrating how this informed the nurse's future learning. There is high demand for advanced clinical practice skills to address unmet health needs and improve the quality, efficiency, and sustainability of healthcare services. However, a literature review found no literature on developing advanced clinical practice skills in this setting. Emerging themes from the service evaluation focused on barriers and enablers, ongoing support, organisational commitment and working in a multidisciplinary team. Blended learning provided both structured and opportunistic learning, embedding both formal and tacit knowledge, as roles require increasing flexibility. Clinical supervision and reflective practice were key in maintaining professional and peer support.

  17. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  18. Clinical use of cabozantinib in the treatment of advanced kidney cancer: efficacy, safety, and patient selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu SS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Steven S Yu, David I Quinn, Tanya B Dorff Division of Oncology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Clear cell (cc renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common type of cancer found in the kidney accounting for ~90% of all kidney cancers. In 2012, there were ~337,000 new cases of RCC diagnosed worldwide with an estimated 143,000 deaths, with the highest incidence and mortality in Western countries. Despite improvements in cancer control achieved with VEGF- and mTOR-targeted therapy for RCC, progression remains virtually universal and additional therapies are needed. The pivotal results of the METEOR trial led to cabozantinib’s designation as a breakthrough drug by the US Food and Drug Administration and its approval for treatment of advanced RCC in 2016. Subsequent data from the CABOSUN trial, where caboxantinib is compared with sunitinib, will provide information on the relative activity of cabozantinib as first-line therapy for ccRCC. We review the development of cabozantinib in advanced RCC and its role in the treatment landscape for advanced RCC. Keywords: cabozantinib, renal cell carcinoma, kidney cancer, clear cell carcinoma, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  19. Primary treatments for clinically localised prostate cancer: a comprehensive lifetime cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperberg, Matthew R; Ramakrishna, Naren R; Duff, Steven B; Hughes, Kathleen E; Sadownik, Sara; Smith, Joseph A; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2013-03-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Multiple treatment alternatives exist for localised prostate cancer, with few high-quality studies directly comparing their comparative effectiveness and costs. The present study is the most comprehensive cost-effectiveness analysis to date for localised prostate cancer, conducted with a lifetime horizon and accounting for survival, health-related quality-of-life, and cost impact of secondary treatments and other downstream events, as well as primary treatment choices. The analysis found minor differences, generally slightly favouring surgical methods, in quality-adjusted life years across treatment options. However, radiation therapy (RT) was consistently more expensive than surgery, and some alternatives, e.g. intensity-modulated RT for low-risk disease, were dominated - that is, both more expensive and less effective than competing alternatives. To characterise the costs and outcomes associated with radical prostatectomy (open, laparoscopic, or robot-assisted) and radiation therapy (RT: dose-escalated three-dimensional conformal RT, intensity-modulated RT, brachytherapy, or combination), using a comprehensive, lifetime decision analytical model. A Markov model was constructed to follow hypothetical men with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer over their lifetimes after primary treatment; probabilities of outcomes were based on an exhaustive literature search yielding 232 unique publications. In each Markov cycle, patients could have remission, recurrence, salvage treatment, metastasis, death from prostate cancer, and death from other causes. Utilities for each health state were determined, and disutilities were applied for complications and toxicities of treatment. Costs were determined from the USA payer perspective, with incorporation of patient costs in a sensitivity analysis. Differences across treatments in quality-adjusted life years across methods were modest, ranging from 10.3 to

  20. What is a “good” treatment decision?: Decisional control, knowledge, treatment decision-making, and quality of life in men with clinically localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orom, Heather; Biddle, Caitlin; Underwood, Willie; Nelson, Christian J.; Homish, D. Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Objective We explored whether active patient involvement in decision making and greater patient knowledge are associated with better treatment decision making experiences and better quality of life (QOL) among men with clinically localized prostate cancer. Localized prostate cancer treatment decision-making is an advantageous model for studying patient treatment decision-making dynamics as there are multiple treatment options and a lack of empirical evidence to recommend one over the other; consequently, it is recommended that patients be fully involved in making the decision. Methods Men with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer (N=1529) completed measures of decisional control, prostate cancer knowledge, and their decision-making experience (decisional conflict, and decision-making satisfaction and difficulty) shortly after they made their treatment decision. Prostate cancer-specific QOL was assessed 6-months after treatment. Results More active involvement in decision making and greater knowledge were associated with lower decisional conflict and higher decision-making satisfaction, but greater decision-making difficulty. An interaction between decisional control and knowledge revealed that greater knowledge was only associated with greater difficulty for men actively involved in making the decision (67% of sample). Greater knowledge, but not decisional control predicted better QOL 6-months post-treatment. Conclusion Although men who are actively involved in decision making and more knowledgeable may make more informed decisions, they could benefit from decisional support (e.g., decision-making aids, emotional support from providers, strategies for reducing emotional distress) to make the process easier. Men who were more knowledgeable about prostate cancer and treatment side effects at the time they made their treatment decision may have appraised their QOL as higher because they had realistic expectations about side effects. PMID:26957566

  1. Clinical Trials with Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Pisano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the pharmaceutical options available for treatment of ovarian cancer, increasing attention has been progressively focused on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD, whose unique formulation prolongs the persistence of the drug in the circulation and potentiates intratumor accumulation. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has become a major component in the routine management of epithelial ovarian cancer. In 1999 it was first approved for platinum-refractory ovarian cancer and then received full approval for platinum-sensitive recurrent disease in 2005. PLD remains an important therapeutic tool in the management of recurrent ovarian cancer in 2012. Recent interest in PLD/carboplatin combination therapy has been the object of phase III trials in platinum-sensitive and chemonaïve ovarian cancer patients reporting response rates, progressive-free survival, and overall survival similar to other platinum-based combinations, but with a more favorable toxicity profile and convenient dosing schedule. This paper summarizes data clarifying the role of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD in ovarian cancer, as well as researches focusing on adding novel targeted drugs to this cytotoxic agent.

  2. The clinical communication and information challenges associated with the psychosexual aspects of prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Susan A; Tucker, Samantha R; McPhillips, Rebecca; Peters, Sarah

    2017-07-01

    Prostate cancer and its treatment have significant sexual side effects that necessitate timely patient information and open communication with healthcare professionals. However, very little is known about men's experiences of talking to clinicians about the psychosexual difficulties associated with the disease. This study aims to advance understanding of men's perceptions of the communication and information challenges associated with the psychosexual aspects of prostate cancer and its treatment. Between October 2013 and April 2014, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 men from the UK who had been treated for prostate cancer. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes describe the communication challenges men face: (1) It can be too soon to talk about sex; (2) the psychology of sex is missing; (3) communication is not individually tailored. Clinicians might usefully (1) consider and discuss with patients how their psychosexual communication needs and information processing abilities may fluctuate across the cancer timeline; (2) initiate discussions about the consequences of treatment that extend beyond biological and mechanical aspects to include emotional and relational factors; (3) tailor communication to the dynamic mix of attributes that shape men's individual psychosexual needs, including their relationship status, sexual orientation, sexual motivations and values. Skills-based training in communication and psychosexual awareness may facilitate the proactive and permissive stance clinicians need to discuss sexual side effects with a heterogeneous group of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis, clinical staging, and treatment of breast cancer: a retrospective multiyear study of a large controlled population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta, Antonio P; Chernicoff, Helen O; Trinh, Jennifer B; Parker, Robert G

    2004-04-01

    This study compares diagnosis, staging, and treatment of newly diagnosed breast cancer cases over a several-year period. The study design was a retrospective, multiyear comparison between new breast cancer cases diagnosed in 1995 (n = 827) and 1997 (n = 815). Cases were identified through claims data, and medical record abstraction was used to verify each case and to identify clinical staging and type of treatment. All medical records were reviewed by one physician to maximize internal reliability. Both cohorts were predominantly 40 and older, white, married, and postmenopausal. The latter cohort (1997) had a higher proportion of women aged 70 to 79 and a lower proportion of women aged 40 to 49. In both cohorts, women age 40 and older were likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at the time of mammographic screening, while women younger than 40 were more likely to be diagnosed by clinical breast examination. In logistic regression analyses, controlling for confounding factors such as age, undergoing mammographic screening increased the likelihood of having a low cancer stage at diagnosis by more than three and a half times. Mammographic screening was statistically significantly positively associated with having eligibility for breast-conserving treatment (BCT); however, although an increase in BCT eligibility was observed, actual use of BCT did not change. Mammography leads to a lower clinical stage as well as a greater likelihood of BCT eligibility at time of breast cancer diagnosis, but may not have a substantial effect on treatment choice (lumpectomy vs. mastectomy). Between 1995 and 1997, a trend was observed toward downstaging of disease at diagnosis; further research is warranted to observe whether this trend continues over time.

  4. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  5. Clinical application of endovascular stent-graft in the treatment of portal stenosis of cancerous thrombus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zaibo; Huang Mingsheng; Wang Jing; Li Zhengran; Qian Jiesheng; Guang Shouhai; Zhu Kangshun; Shan Hong; Zhang Xiongjun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the approach and early effects of endovascular stent-graft deployment in the treatment of portal stenosis of cancerous thrombus. Methods: Six cases with portal vein stenosis of cancerous thrombus, which caused by primary hepatic carcinoma (5 cases) and cholangiocarcinoma (1 case) and the severity of stenosis showed on contrast enhanced CT were more than 75% or occluded, were performed percutaneous transhepatic or transsplenic portography. FLUENCY TM endovascular stent-graft (10 mm diameter) was placed at the position of stenosis after gastroesophageal varices embolization. Portal pressure was measured pre- and post-deployment. Results: Stents were successfully placed in all patients. The average portal pressure decreased from 50.7 em H 2 O (1 cm H 2 O0.098 kPa) to 41.3 cm H 2 O after endovascular stent-graft deployment. The restenosis were found in 2 cases after one month. Haematemesis and refractory ascites appeared in one case respectively, the other 4 cases showed no significant symptoms above caused by portal hypertension. Conclusion: It is safe and feasible for endovascular stent-graft deployment in the treatment of portal stenosis of cancerous thrombus. Selecting the suitable indications, the symptoms of portal hypertension can be controlled effectively. (authors)

  6. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, M; Li, X Allen

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher T pot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer. This set of parameters is consistent with in vitro

  7. Clinical manifestation of late sequelae and patient disability after breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radenkov, Kh.

    1976-01-01

    Based on medical records from 453 breast cancer patients undergoing complex treatment with follow-up periods of 1 to 12 years at the Shumen Area Oncologic Dispensary, evidence of late effects of therapy was studied in terms of resulting disability. Pre- and post-operative radiotherapy was found to enhance, in a dose-dependent fashion, upper extremity lymphatic stasis following mastectomy. The impact of radiotherapy was further manifested in bone changes, painfulness of shoulder-joint mitions, leukopenia, pneumosclerosis, and a number of neurologic and mental signs. The following invalidity groups were delineated: first group, any III or IV stage patient within the 5-year post-treatment period irrespective of how radical the treatment; second group, any II or I stage patient experiencing severe complication(s); and third group, any I stage patient with only slight physical defects and no concomitant conditions or other complications. (A.B.)

  8. Clinical manifestation of late sequelae and patient disability after breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radenkov, K [Okryzhen Onkologichen Djspanser, Shumen (Bulgaria)

    1976-01-01

    Based on medical records from 453 breast cancer patients undergoing complex treatment with follow-up periods of 1 to 12 years at the Shumen Area Oncologic Dispensary, evidence of late effects of therapy was studied in terms of resulting disability. Pre- and post-operative radiotherapy was found to enhance, in a dose-dependent fashion, upper extremity lymphatic stasis following mastectomy. The impact of radiotherapy was further manifested in bone changes, painfulness of shoulder-joint mitions, leukopenia, pneumosclerosis, and a number of neurologic and mental signs. The following invalidity groups were delineated: first group, any III or IV stage patient within the 5-year post-treatment period irrespective of how radical the treatment; second group, any II or I stage patient experiencing severe complication(s); and third group, any I stage patient with only slight physical defects and no concomitant conditions or other complications.

  9. Treatment outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer patients who are ineligible for a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Akira Ueda, Ayumu Hosokawa, Kohei Ogawa, Hiroki Yoshita, Takayuki Ando, Shinya Kajiura, Haruka Fujinami, Kengo Kawai, Jun Nishikawa, Kazuto Tajiri, Masami Minemura, Toshiro SugiyamaDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice, and assess whether chemotherapy provided a clinical benefit for patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria of the clinical trial.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 75 patients who received first-line chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer between April 2006 and September 2011. Patients were treated with gemcitabine (GEM alone, S-1 (tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil potassium alone, or GEM plus S-1. Patients were divided into the clinical trial eligible group (arm eligible or the ineligible group (arm ineligible. We evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the chemotherapy.Results: A total of 23 patients out of 75 (31% belonged to the ineligible group, for the following reasons: 20 patients had poor performance status, eight had massive ascites, one had synchronous malignancy, and one had icterus. The median progression-free survival (PFS was 3.5 months, and the median overall survival (OS was 6.7 months in all patients. In arm eligible, median PFS was 4.5 months, and median OS was 10.5 months. In arm ineligible, median PFS was 1.1 months, and median OS was 2.9 months.Conclusion: The outcome of the patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria was very poor. It is important to select the patients that could benefit from either chemotherapy or optimal supportive care.Keywords: gemcitabine, S-1, clinical practice

  10. A prospective cohort study of treatment decision-making for prostate cancer following participation in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Lauren M; Cullen, Jennifer; Elsamanoudi, Sally; Kim, Daniel J; Hudak, Jane; Colston, Maryellen; Travis, Judith; Kuo, Huai-Ching; Porter, Christopher R; Rosner, Inger L

    2016-05-01

    Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) are presented with several treatment options of similar efficacy but varying side effects. Understanding how and why patients make their treatment decisions, as well as the effect of treatment choice on long-term outcomes, is critical to ensuring effective, patient-centered care. This study examined treatment decision-making in a racially diverse, equal-access, contemporary cohort of patients with PCa counseled on treatment options at a multidisciplinary clinic. A prospective cohort study was initiated at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (formerly Walter Reed Army Medical Center) in 2006. Newly diagnosed patients with PCa were enrolled before attending a multidisciplinary clinic. Patients completed surveys preclinic and postclinic to assess treatment preferences, reasons for treatment choice, and decisional regret. As of January 2014, 925 patients with PCa enrolled in this study. Surgery (54%), external radiation (20%), and active surveillance (12%) were the most common primary treatments for patients with low- and intermediate-risk PCa, whereas patients with high-risk PCa chose surgery (34%) or external radiation with neoadjuvant hormones (57%). Treatment choice differed by age at diagnosis, race, comorbidity status, and calendar year in both univariable and multivariable analyses. Patients preferred to play an active role in the decision-making process and cited doctors at the clinic as the most helpful source of treatment-related information. Almost all patients reported satisfaction with their decision. This is one of the first prospective cohort studies to examine treatment decision-making in an equal-access, multidisciplinary clinic setting. Studies of this cohort would aid in understanding and improving the PCa decision-making process. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenberg, Eduardo E

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca's pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca's known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca's possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  12. Molecular profiling of advanced breast cancer tumors is beneficial in assisting clinical treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Philip; Alifrangis, Costi; Cereser, Biancastella; Chandrasinghe, Pramodh; Del Bel Belluz, Lisa; Moderau, Nina; Poyia, Fotini; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Tabassum, Neha; Wen, Jinrui; Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin

    2018-04-03

    We used data obtained by Caris Life Sciences, to evaluate the benefits of tailoring treatments for a breast carcinoma cohort by using tumor molecular profiles to inform decisions. Data for 92 breast cancer patients from the commercial Caris Molecular Intelligence database was retrospectively divided into two groups, so that the first always followed treatment recommendations, whereas in the second group all patients received at least one drug after profiling that was predicted to lack benefit. The biomarker and drug associations were based on tests including fluorescent in situ hybridization and DNA sequencing, although immunohistochemistry was the main test used. Patients whose drugs matched those recommended according to their tumor profile had an average overall survival of 667 days, compared to 510 days for patients that did not (P=0.0316). In the matched treatment group, 26% of patients were deceased by the last time of monitoring, whereas this was 41% in the unmatched group (P=0.1257). We therefore confirm the ability of tumor molecular profiling to improve survival of breast cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry biomarkers for the androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptors were found to be prognostic for survival.

  13. Identification of Atuveciclib (BAY 1143572), the First Highly Selective, Clinical PTEFb/CDK9 Inhibitor for the Treatment of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücking, Ulrich; Scholz, Arne; Lienau, Philip; Siemeister, Gerhard; Kosemund, Dirk; Bohlmann, Rolf; Briem, Hans; Terebesi, Ildiko; Meyer, Kirstin; Prelle, Katja; Denner, Karsten; Bömer, Ulf; Schäfer, Martina; Eis, Knut; Valencia, Ray; Ince, Stuart; von Nussbaum, Franz; Mumberg, Dominik; Ziegelbauer, Karl; Klebl, Bert; Choidas, Axel; Nussbaumer, Peter; Baumann, Matthias; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Rühter, Gerd; Eickhoff, Jan; Brands, Michael

    2017-11-08

    Selective inhibition of exclusively transcription-regulating PTEFb/CDK9 is a promising new approach in cancer therapy. Starting from lead compound BAY-958, lead optimization efforts strictly focusing on kinase selectivity, physicochemical and DMPK properties finally led to the identification of the orally available clinical candidate atuveciclib (BAY 1143572). Structurally characterized by an unusual benzyl sulfoximine group, BAY 1143572 exhibited the best overall profile in vitro and in vivo, including high efficacy and good tolerability in xenograft models in mice and rats. BAY 1143572 is the first potent and highly selective PTEFb/CDK9 inhibitor to enter clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  15. Cervix cancer: clinical aspects of tumoral control and radiotherapy treatment time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitto, J.V.

    1994-01-01

    The author analyzed 35 patients with recurrence or residual tumor at the end of the radiotherapy program. These patients were selected out of a group of 338 patients cervix cancer who had also undergone on the same radiotherapy program. Those patients were compared with control group of 30 patients without clinical evidence of the disease, from the same group of 338 patients. It has studied the clinical results considering the total radiotherapy time to developed the radiation program and factors that could modify the time for a longer program, and also modify the final survival results. No significant difference was shown in this study, but it should be taken in consideration the total radiotherapy time, because this is a factor that could change the final results if the time would be longer than what was shown in this work. (author). 26 refs, 10 tabs

  16. Relevance of health economics in breast cancer treatment: integration of economics in the management of breast cancer at the clinic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Volker R; Bogner, Gerhard; Schausberger, Christiane E; Reitsamer, Roland; Fischer, Thorsten

    2013-03-01

    Since the introduction of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system with cost-related and entity-specific flat-rate reimbursements for all in-patients in 2004 in Germany, economics have become an important focus in medical care, including breast centers. Since then, physicians and hospitals have had to gradually take on more and more financial responsibilities for their medical care to avoid losses for their institutions. Due to financial limitations of resources, most medical services have to be adjusted to correlating revenues, which results in the development of a variety of active measures to understand, steer, and optimize costs, resources and related processes for breast cancer treatment. In this review, the challenging task to implement microeconomic management at the clinic level for breast cancer treatment is analyzed from breast cancer-specific publications. The newly developed economic management perspective is identified for different stakeholders in the healthcare system, and successful microeconomic projects and future aspects are described.

  17. Clinical utility of vandetanib in the treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hari Deshpande1,3, Vicky Marler3, Julie Ann Sosa2,31Department of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, 3Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Vandetanib (ZD6474 became the first systemic agent to be approved for the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer. It was a proof of principle, because it is an orally bioavailable medication that targets the growth factors felt to be important in the pathogenesis of this disease, ie, the rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. It was tested initially in two Phase II studies at doses of 100 mg and 300 mg daily. Although activity was seen at both doses, the higher dose was chosen for a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase II study. This trial, which accrued more than 300 patients, showed a statistically significant benefit for the group taking vandetanib compared with those taking placebo medication. Progression-free survival for the vandetanib arm has not been reached, compared with 19 months for the placebo arm. The main toxicity appears to be diarrhea, although some patients experienced significant side effects, including torsades de pointes and sudden cardiac death. Therefore, it is now necessary for practitioners to enroll in a Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy before being allowed to prescribe this medication, to reduce the risk of serious side effects occurring.Keywords: ZD6474, medullary thyroid cancer, vandetanib

  18. Clinical outcome of radical prostatectomy for stage C prostate cancer. Comparison with other treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Osamu; Meguro, Norio; Saiki, Shigeru; Kinouchi, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Masao; Usami, Michiyuki; Kotake, Toshihiko

    1997-01-01

    Of the 69 patients with clinical stage C prostate cancer under 75 years old and with good performance status between 1986 and 1995, 29 underwent radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy, 21 underwent radiation therapy combined with endocrine therapy and remaining 19 patients were treated by endocrine therapy alone. The median follow-up was 44 months (range 4 to 122). Radical prostatectomy resulted in progression-free rates of 79% and 61% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Progression-free rates were lower in patients with lymph node metastasis or positive surgical margins. In patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor, radical prostatectomy resulted in a progression-free rate of 100% at 5 years. However, in patients with clinical stage T4a or poorly differentiated tumor, radiation therapy resulted in a better progression-free rate than radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor will benefit from radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy and that radiation therapy will be effective for advanced diseases. (author)

  19. Super-selective uterine artery chemoembolization for the treatment of cervical cancer: its clinical value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Chi; Zhang Dezhi; Cao Liyu; Xiong Zhuang; Wang Mingquan; Du Linan; Zhao Bensheng; Wang Wanqin; Sheng Qiang; Yu Yongqiang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate super-selective uterine arterial chemoembolization therapy in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: Bilateral uterine arterial infusion with DDP, EADM or THP, MMC and 5-Fu was performed in 56 patients with pathologically-proved cervical cancer, which was followed by embolization of uterine arteries with iodine emulsion and Gelfoam particles. Radical hysterectomy was performed in 6 patients after interventional treatment. Results: Embolization of bilateral uterine arteries were successfully carried out in all cases. The angiography conducted during the procedure revealed markedly dilated uterine arteries, spiral tumor-feeding arteries and obvious tumor staining. The total effective rate was up to 94.6%. Six patients received radical hysterectomy 2 weeks after arterial chemoembolization, and the blood loss during the operation was much less than usual and the surgery procedure took shorter time. Ovarian necrosis was found in 1 case. The main adverse effects included leukocytopenia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Conclusion: Super-selective uterine arterial chemoembolization is a safe and effective supplementary therapy for cervical carcinoma with fewer complications. (authors)

  20. Clinical effect of systemic chemotherapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization in treatment of breast cancer with liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Liye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical effect of systemic chemotherapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE in the treatment of breast cancer with liver metastases. MethodsA total of 86 female breast cancer patients with liver metastases who were treated in the Affiliated Hospital of Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences from December 2012 to December 2014 were selected and equally divided into experimental group and control group. The patients in the control group received systemic chemotherapy, and those in the experimental group received systemic chemotherapy combined with TACE. The clinical effect, changes in lesions, and patients′ quality of life (QOL scores after treatment were compared between two groups. The t-test was applied for comparison of continuous data between the two groups, and the chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between the two groups. ResultsThe experimental group had a significantly higher overall response rate than the control group (90.70% vs 58.14%, χ2=13.07, P=0.001. Compared with the control group, the experimental group had significantly smaller diameters of tumors and lymph nodes after treatment (t=4.26 and 4.63, both P<0.001, as well as significantly higher QOL scores at 3 and 6 months after treatment (t=6.30 and 3.89, both P<0001. ConclusionSystemic chemotherapy combined with TACE has a significant therapeutic effect in breast cancer patients with liver metastases, and can improve patients′ symptoms, reduce adverse drug reactions, and improve QOL. As a safe and reliable therapeutic method, it is worthy of clinical application.

  1. SU-G-TeP1-05: Development and Clinical Introduction of Automated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, D; Bol, GH; Asselen, B van; Hes, J; Scholten, V; Kerkmeijer, LGW; Raaymakers, BW

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow for prostate cancer in order to generate clinical treatment plans. Methods: A fully automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow was developed based on the treatment planning system Monaco (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). To evaluate our method, a retrospective planning study (n=100) was performed on patients treated for prostate cancer with 5 field intensity modulated radiotherapy, receiving a dose of 35×2Gy to the prostate and vesicles and a simultaneous integrated boost of 35×0.2Gy to the prostate only. A comparison was made between the dosimetric values of the automatically and manually generated plans. Operator time to generate a plan and plan efficiency was measured. Results: A comparison of the dosimetric values show that automatically generated plans yield more beneficial dosimetric values. In automatic plans reductions of 43% in the V72Gy of the rectum and 13% in the V72Gy of the bladder are observed when compared to the manually generated plans. Smaller variance in dosimetric values is seen, i.e. the intra- and interplanner variability is decreased. For 97% of the automatically generated plans and 86% of the clinical plans all criteria for target coverage and organs at risk constraints are met. The amount of plan segments and monitor units is reduced by 13% and 9% respectively. Automated planning requires less than one minute of operator time compared to over an hour for manual planning. Conclusion: The automatically generated plans are highly suitable for clinical use. The plans have less variance and a large gain in time efficiency has been achieved. Currently, a pilot study is performed, comparing the preference of the clinician and clinical physicist for the automatic versus manual plan. Future work will include expanding our automated treatment planning method to other tumor sites and develop other automated radiotherapy workflows.

  2. Cancer treatment - preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation - preventing infection; Bone marrow transplant - preventing infection; Cancer treatment - immunosuppression ... this is a short-lived side effect of cancer treatment. Your provider may give you medicines to help ...

  3. Endoluminal brachytherapy in the palliative treatment of advanced esophageal cancer, first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchali, A.; Dinges, S.; Ortner, M.; Schlenger, L.; Lochs, H.; Budach, V.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Dysphagia is the main problem in patients with advanced nonresectable esophageal cancer. Palliation can be achieved by several treatment ways. We want to evaluate the efficacy of endoluminal brachytherapy (BT) for improvement of dysphagia, performance status, time of local tumor progress, and survival time. Methods: 6 patients with esophageal cancer stage IV received a palliative treatment with 192 Ir HDR BT. The dose per fraction was 5 Gy, calculated 1 cm from the surface of the applicator, the total dose was 20 Gy (four weekly applications). Symptoms, performance status and life quality score were investigated before each application and each 4 weeks after treatment. The results were compared with 10 historical patients who were treated by implantation of nitinol stents (Ultraflex, Boston Scient. Inc.). Results: The tumor stages in the BT-group were T4, T3, T2 three, two and one, and in the stent group three, two and five, respectively. Dysphagia improved in median from grade 1.7 to grade 0.5 (BT group) and from grade 2.6 to grade 1.8 (stent group). Karnowski status improved in the BT group from 70 % to 85 %, but did not change in the stent group (75%). A strong correlation between improvement of dysphagia and life quality score could be found especially in patients with initial high grade dysphagia. The only side effect of BT mostly after the 3 rd application was esophagitis grade 1 in 3 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Relief of the esophagitis after conservative therapy could be achieved within 1 week. In the BT group 3 patients were alive without local progress after 20, 13 and 2 weeks. The other 3 patients died from local progress (2 patients, after 20, 20 weeks) or from metastasis (1 patient, after 11 weeks). All patients in the stent group died from local progress. The median survival time is 17 ± 5.2 weeks in BT group vs. 8.8 ± 8.6 weeks in the stent group. Conclusion: Endoluminal brachytherapy seems to be an effective and well tolerable

  4. Clinical potential of nintedanib for the second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothschild SI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sacha I Rothschild Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: The therapeutic landscape in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is changing. The description of molecular alterations leading to NSCLC carcinogenesis and progression (so-called oncogenic driver mutations and the development of targeted agents interfering with the tumor-promoting intracellular signaling pathways have improved the outcome for many patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC. However, many patients with stage IV NSCLC do not have one of the targetable predictive biomarkers, and are therefore in need of classical chemotherapy. This especially applies to squamous cell cancer. A platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with stage IV NSCLC. As second-line therapies, docetaxel, pemetrexed, and the EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib have demonstrated benefit in Phase III randomized trials. Recently, the addition of the angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib to docetaxel has proven efficacious, and is a new treatment option in the second-line setting. Preclinical and clinical data of nintedanib for the treatment of lung cancer patients are reviewed here. Keywords: nintedanib, lung cancer, angiokinase inhibitor, VEGFR, PDGF, FGFR

  5. Clinical evaluation of internal iliac artery anticancer drug infusion for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ye; Wang Jin; Nie Yong; Chen Hua; Huang Xinjie

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of bilateral internal iliac artery chemotherapy infusion for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer (ALPC). Methods: Thirty eight eases of confirmed AIPC were randomly divided into treatment group and control group. The patients in treatment group (23 cases) were treated with androgen deprivation therapy and regular internal iliac artery chemotherapy, while patients in control group (15 cases) were only received androgen deprivation therapy. The therapeutic efficacies of the two groups were compared and analyzed after completion of the treatment. Results: The clinical symptoms and maximum urine flow rates of' treatment group were improved rapidly 6 months later. After 2 years follow-up, the total efficacies of treatment group and control group were 65.2% and 26.7% respectively, showing a significant statistical difference (P<0.05). Conclusions: The treatment of AlPC with bilateral internal iliac artery chemotherapy is effective, providing melioration the quality of life and alleviation of the symptoms. (authors)

  6. Sick leave and disability pension among Swedish testicular cancer survivors according to clinical stage and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Carina; Olofsson, Sven-Erik; Glimelius, Ingrid; Cedermark, Gabriella Cohn; Ekberg, Sara; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Neovius, Martin; Jerkeman, Mats; Smedby, Karin E

    2015-11-01

    To investigate if testicular cancer survivors (TCSs) have a higher incidence of work loss compared with the population, accounting for stage, treatment and relapse. A cohort of 2146 Swedish TCSs diagnosed 1995-2007 (seminoma n = 926, non-seminoma n = 1220) was identified in the SWENOTECA (Swedish-Norwegian Testicular Cancer Group) register, and matched 1:4 to population comparators. Prospectively recorded work loss data (both before and after diagnosis) were obtained from national registers through September 2013. Adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of sick leave and/or disability pension were calculated annually and overall with Poisson- and Cox regression, censoring at relapse. The mean number of annual work days lost was also estimated. TCSs were at a modestly increased annual risk of work loss up to the third year of follow-up (RR3rd year 1.25, 95% CI 1.08, 1.43), attributed to a more pronounced risk among extensively treated patients (4 chemotherapy courses: RR3rd year 1.60, 95% CI 1.19, 2.15; > 4 courses: RR3rd year 3.70, 95% CI 2.25, 6.11). Patients on surveillance or limited treatment (radiotherapy, 1-3 chemotherapy courses) did not have an increased risk of work loss beyond the first year. TCSs receiving > 4 chemotherapy courses had higher mean number of annual days of work loss up to the 10th year post-diagnosis, and a five-fold risk of disability pension (RR 5.16, 95% CI 2.00, 10.3). Extensively treated TCSs, but not those on surveillance or limited treatment, are at increased risk of work loss long-term, not explained by relapse. These patients may benefit from early rehabilitation initiatives.

  7. UFT and leucovorin: a review of its clinical development and therapeutic potential in the oral treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, P M; Pazdur, R; Benner, S E; Canetta, R

    1998-07-01

    UFT is an oral antineoplastic drug combining uracil and tegafur in a 4:1 molar ratio. Tegafur acts as a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), being slowly metabolized by cytochrome P450 to 5-FU. Uracil competitively inhibits the metabolism of 5-FU, resulting in increased plasma and tumor 5-FU concentrations. At equimolar doses, higher peak plasma 5-FU concentrations are achieved with UFT plus oral leucovorin with similar systemic 5-FU exposure compared with low-dose continuous 5-FU infusions. The elimination half-life of 5-FU following UFT administration is approximately 7 h compared with 0.2 h with i.v. 5-FU. In phase II studies of UFT plus oral leucovorin for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, response rates ranged from 25 to 42%. UFT plus oral leucovorin is well tolerated, with manageable diarrhea being the only dose-limiting toxicity; the regimen is not associated with significant myelosuppression, mucositis, hand-foot syndrome or alopecia. UFT, with or without leucovorin, has also been evaluated alone or in combination with other cytotoxic agents for the treatment of advanced lung, breast and gastric cancers. UFT has also been evaluated as adjuvant therapy for colorectal, breast, gastric, head and neck, and superficial bladder cancers. UFT plus leucovorin offers patients an entirely oral cancer treatment, and appears to provide potential advantages over bolus 5-FU regimens with regard to toxicity and convenience of administration. These benefits should be advantageous in the adjuvant setting, as well as in advanced disease settings in which palliation is an important consideration. Ongoing clinical trials will further define the role of this promising oral treatment regimen.

  8. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer: utility and experience from the clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundranda MN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Madappa N Kundranda, Tomislav Dragovich Division of Hematology and Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ, USA Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest epithelial cancers, primarily due to late diagnosis, early metastasis and the lack of effective treatments. With recent advances in systemic therapies, the median survival for metastatic disease has essentially doubled to approximately 1 year, and a significant number of patients are receiving multiple lines of therapy. One such first-line therapy is the combination of gemcitabine with nab-paclitaxel, which was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013. This standard option is now serving as a backbone to other novel combinations. In this review, we focus on the development of this combination, its clinical utility, and real-life experiences of managing patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma receiving gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. Keywords: pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, nab-paclitaxel, MPACT trial, PRODIGE 4/ACCORD 11 trial

  9. [The clinical and pathological research of complete mesocolic excision on the treatment of right colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingchi; Wang, Jin; Jin, Lan; Zhao, Xiaomu; Wu, Guocong; Wang, Kangli; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2016-01-01

    To verify the clinical safety of complete mesocolic excision (CME) and manufacture pathological large slices. A prospective analysis clinical data of 85 right colon cancer in patients by the same group of surgeons at the Department of General Surgery, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University from January 2012 to December 2013 which were divided into two groups: CME group (n=39) and traditional radical operation group (n=46) by surgical approach. CME group and control group were compared the differences of clinic and pathologic variables, precise tissues morphometry, lymph nodes harvest, mesocolic area and so on. By comparison to operation time, blood loss, postoperative complications, flatus restoring time, drainage removal time and length of stay, the security of CME was analyzed. Statistical methods included independent sample t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and χ(2) test. In order to manufacture pathological large slices, the CME operation specimens were fixed. The large slices were stained by routine HE staining to detection of circumferential resection margin. Mean number of total lymph nodes was increased obviously in CME group (26.8±1.9 vs. 23.2±3.4, t=4.261, P=0.000). Mean number of lymph nodes of stage Ⅰ, Ⅱ were different between two groups (25.8±3.6 vs. 18.2±4.5, 26.8±7.7 vs. 24.9±6.2, t=8.776, 2.802, P=0.000). The positive lymph nodes of CME group was higher than control group (4(7) vs. 1.5(2), P=0.032), above all with statistically significant difference. Comparing CME group with the control group, there were the larger area of mesentery ((15 555±1 263) mm(2) vs. (12 493±1 002) mm(2,) t=12.456, P=0.000), the greater distance between the tumor and the high vascular tie ((116±22) mm vs. (82±11) mm, t=9.295, P=0.000), the greater distance between the normal bowel and the high vascular tie ((92±17) mm vs. (74±10) mm, t=8.132, P=0.000) of CME, with statistically significant difference. There were no statistically significant

  10. Influence of clinical, societal, and treatment variables on racial differences in ER-/PR- breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseland, M E; Schwartz, K; Ruterbusch, J J; Lamerato, L; Krajenta, R; Booza, J; Simon, Michael S

    2017-08-01

    African American (AA) women with breast cancer have persistently higher mortality compared to whites. We evaluated racial disparities in mortality among women with estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR)-negative breast cancer. The study population included 542 women (45% AA) diagnosed with ER/PR-negative Stage I through III breast cancer treated at the Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) between 1996 and 2005. Linked datasets from HFHS, Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System, and the U.S. Census Bureau were used to obtain demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical information. Economic deprivation was categorized using a previously validated deprivation index, which included 5 categories based on the quintile of census tract socioeconomic deprivation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the relationship between race and mortality. AA women were more likely to have larger tumors, have higher Charlson Comorbidity Indices (CCI), and to reside in economically deprived areas. In an unadjusted analysis, AA women demonstrated a significantly higher risk of death compared to whites [hazard ratio (HR) 1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.00]. Following adjustment for clinical factors (age, stage, CCI) and treatment (radiation and chemotherapy), AA race continued to have a significant impact on mortality (HR 1.51, CI 1.10-2.08 and HR 1.63, CI 1.20-2.21). Only after adjusting for deprivation was race no longer significant (HR 1.26, CI 0.84-1.87). Social determinants of health play a large role in explaining racial disparities in breast cancer outcomes, especially among women with aggressive subtypes.

  11. Clinical and demographic characteristics associated with the receipt of chemotherapy treatment among 7951 elderly metastatic colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Emily S; Onukwugha, Eberechukwu; Hanna, Nader; Seal, Brian S; Mullins, C Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Among older individuals diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer (mCC) there is limited evidence available that describes the characteristics associated with advancing to second- and subsequent lines of treatment with chemotherapy/biologics. Our objective was to describe the trends and lines of treatment received among elderly mCC patients. Elderly beneficiaries diagnosed with mCC from 2003 to 2007 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare dataset. Beneficiaries were followed up until death or censoring. Treatment lines were classified in combinations of chemotherapies and biologics. Modified Poisson regression was used to predict receipt of lines of treatment. Analyses controlled for age, race/ethnicity, gender, marital status, state buy-in during diagnosis year, SEER-registry site, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), poor performance indicators, surgery of primary site, and surgery of regional/distal sites. Among 7951 Medicare beneficiaries identified with mCC, 3266 initiated therapy. Of these, 1440 advanced to second-line treatment. Of these, 274 advanced to a subsequent-line treatment. Surgeries of the primary tumor site and of the regional/distal sites and marital status were the most significant variables associated with advancing through second- and subsequent-line treatments. Greater than 80 years of age, African American race, SEER-registry area, less than 6 months state buy-in assistance in mCC diagnosis year, and having poor performance indicators were inversely associated with receipt of second- or subsequent-line treatments. Among elderly individuals diagnosed with mCC, we identified demographic, clinical, and regional factors associated with receipt of second- and subsequent-line chemotherapy/biologics. Additional research is warranted to understand the role of physician versus patient preferences as well as geographic differences explaining why patients advance through lines of chemotherapy. © 2013 The Authors

  12. Preoperative brachyradiotherapy in the treatment of uterine cervix cancer in its first stage of clinical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kietlinska, Z.; Haruppa, J.; Zielinski, J.; Kawczynska, M.

    1981-01-01

    In 58 women with diagnosed stage 1 uterine cervix cancer radium (27 women) or cesium (31 women) were applied into the vagina or in the uterine cavity, then after about 7 weeks they were submitted to surgical treatment - radical hysterectomy with adnexectomy and excision of the obturatory and iliac lymphnodes (Wertheim Meigs operation). In 16 of these women, considering the marked dimensions of the neoplasm teletherapy in a decreased dose preceded the brachytherapy. Total destruction of the neoplasmatic outgrowth as a result of preoperative radiotherapy was met in 44 women (76%). In 8 women the excised tissues revealed neoplasmatic cells persisting in the uterine cervix and in 6 - in the lymphnodes. These women underwent subsequent post-operative teletherapy. The complications of the adapted technique were analysed and found to fall close within limits of those, accepted in cases of classic primary surgical treatment. No exits and no fistulas were met in the material. The value of brachytherapy applied before surgery is evident as it permitted to evade the post-operative teletherapy in 55% of women and to reduce the external irradiation dose in further 21% of women. (author)

  13. Clinical Trial Participation and Time to Treatment Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: Does Age at Diagnosis or Insurance Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Helen M.; Harlan, Linda C.; Seibel, Nita L.; Stevens, Jennifer L.; Keegan, Theresa H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Because adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer have experienced variable improvement in survival over the past two decades, enhancing the quality and timeliness of cancer care in this population has emerged as a priority area. To identify current trends in AYA care, we examined patterns of clinical trial participation, time to treatment, and provider characteristics in a population-based sample of AYA patients with cancer. Methods Using the National Cancer Institute Patterns of Care Study, we used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate demographic and provider characteristics associated with clinical trial enrollment and time to treatment among 1,358 AYA patients with cancer (age 15 to 39 years) identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Results In our study, 14% of patients age 15 to 39 years had enrolled onto a clinical trial; participation varied by type of cancer, with the highest participation in those diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (37%) and sarcoma (32%). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that uninsured, older patients and those treated by nonpediatric oncologists were less likely to enroll onto clinical trials. Median time from pathologic confirmation to first treatment was 3 days, but this varied by race/ethnicity and cancer site. In multivariate analyses, advanced cancer stage and outpatient treatment alone were associated with longer time from pathologic confirmation to treatment. Conclusion Our study identified factors associated with low clinical trial participation in AYA patients with cancer. These findings support the continued need to improve access to clinical trials and innovative treatments for this population, which may ultimately translate into improved survival. PMID:21931022

  14. 'Mind the gap' between the development of therapeutic innovations and the clinical practice in oncology: A proposal of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) to optimise cancer clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Emmanuelle; Bogaerts, Jan; Lacombe, Denis; Liu, Lifang

    2017-11-01

    In Europe, most of the cancer clinical research dedicated to therapeutic innovations aims primarily at regulatory approval. Once an anticancer drug enters the common market, each member state determines its real-world use based on its own criteria: pricing, reimbursement and clinical indications. Such an innovation-centred clinical research landscape might neglect patient-relevant issues in real-world setting, such as comparative effectiveness of distinct treatment options or long-term safety monitoring. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) advocates reforming the current 'innovation-centred' system to a truly 'patient-centred' paradigm with systematically coordinated applied clinical research in conjunction with drug development, featuring the following strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo E Schenberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. Methods: An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. Results: At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca’s pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. Conclusion: The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca’s known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca’s possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  16. Cancer treatment - early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premature menopause; Ovarian insufficiency - cancer ... Cancer treatments that can cause early menopause include: Surgery. Having both ovaries removed causes menopause to happen right away. If you are age 50 or younger, your provider may ...

  17. Clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioid analgesics used for pain treatment in patients with cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotlinska-Lemieszek A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,1 Pål Klepstad,2,3,6 Dagny Faksvåg Haugen2,4,5 1Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, University Hospital of the Lord’s Transfiguration, Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2European Palliative Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; 4Regional Centre of Excellence for Palliative Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 5Department of Clinical Medicine K1, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 6Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Background: Opioids are the most frequently used drugs to treat pain in cancer patients. In some patients, however, opioids can cause adverse effects and drug–drug interactions. No advice concerning the combination of opioids and other drugs is given in the current European guidelines. Objective: To identify studies that report clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioids used for pain treatment in adult cancer patients. Design and data sources: Systematic review with searches in Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the start of the databases (Embase from 1980 through January 2014. In addition, reference lists of relevant full-text papers were hand-searched. Results: Of 901 retrieved papers, 112 were considered as potentially eligible. After full-text reading, 17 were included in the final analysis, together with 15 papers identified through hand-searching of reference lists. All of the 32 included publications were case reports or case series. Clinical manifestations of drug–drug interactions involving opioids were grouped as follows: 1 sedation and respiratory depression, 2 other central nervous system symptoms, 3 impairment of pain

  18. Influence of clinical and tumoral factors on the inter-fractions bones displacements during the treatment of gastric or esophagus cancers by external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quivrin, M.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Blanchard, N.; Ligey-Bartolomeu, A.; Maingon, P.; Crehange, G.; Liegard, M.; Bonnetain, F.; Petitfils, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the influence of clinical and tumoral characteristics on the inter fractions bones displacements during the irradiation of eso gastric cancers. Conclusion: the local control of irradiated esophagus and gastric cancers stay not satisfying and could be improved by the individual adjustment of peritumoral margins in function of clinical and tumoral characteristics as age, sex, average weight at the beginning of the treatment, the index of the initial average body mass. (N.C.)

  19. Clinical and anatomical guidelines in pelvic cancer contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portaluri, M.; Bambace, S.; Giuliano, G.; Pili, G.; Didonna, V.; Perez, C.; Angone, G.; Alloro, E.; Scialpi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose. Many observations on potential inadequate coverage of tumour volume at risk in advanced cervical cancer (CC) when conventional radiation fields are used, have further substantiated by investigators using MRI, CT or lymph-angiographic imaging. This work tries to obtain three dimensional margins by observing enlarged nodes in CT scans in order to improve pelvic nodal chains clinical target volumes (CTVs) drawing, and by looking for corroborative evidence in the literature for a better delineation of tumour CTV. Method. Eleven consecutive patients (seven males, four females, mean age 62 years, range 43 8) with CT diagnosis of nodal involvement caused by pathologically proved carcinoma of the cervix (n = 2), carcinoma of the rectum (n = 2), carcinoma of the prostate (n = 2), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n 2), Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1), carcinoma of the penis (n = 1) and carcinoma of the corpus uteri (n = 1) were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty CT scans with 67 enlarged pelvic nodes were reviewed in order to record the more proximal structures (muscle, bone, vessels, cutis or sub-cutis and other organs) to each enlarged node or group of nodes according to the four surfaces (anterior, lateral, posterior and medial) in a clockwise direction. Results. summary of the observations of each nodal chain and the number of occurrences of every marginal structure on axial CT slices is presented. Finally, simple guidelines are proposed. Conclusions. Tumour CTV should be based on individual tumour anatomy mainly for lateral beams as it results from sagittal T2 weighted MRI images. Boundaries of pelvic nodes CTVs can be derived from observations of enlarged lymph nodes in CT scans. (author)

  20. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  1. Clinical utility of letrozole in the treatment of breast cancer: a Chinese perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He DX

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dong-xu He,1 Xin Ma2 1National Engineering Laboratory for Cereal Fermentation Technology, 2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The incidence rate of breast cancers in People’s Republic of China has increased in the last decade, and many cases are responsive to hormone therapies. The third-generation aromatase inhibitor letrozole inhibits estrogen production, and is more efficacious than the estrogen receptor inhibitor tamoxifen. In recent years, letrozole has been widely used to treat postmenopausal breast cancers in People’s Republic of China. Also, metastatic, premenopausal, and male breast cancers have been effectively treated by a combination of letrozole with cytotoxic, radiation, or other therapies. In this review, we provide a perspective and summary of recent advances in the use of letrozole for breast cancer in Chinese patients. Keywords: breast cancer, Chinese, letrozole

  2. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    targeting bone density, cardiovascular function, lean and fat mass, physical function and falls risk as primary study endpoints. In terms of advancement of prostate cancer care, we expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce fracture risk, improve physical and functional ability, quality of life and ultimately survival rate in this population. A Phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer; ACTRN12609000200280

  3. Clinical application of determination of serum ICTP and PINP contents in cancer patients with bone metastasis for diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Haizhong; Li Bin; Zhu Yaling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical usefulness of determination of serum carboxy terminal telepeptide type I collagen (ICTP) and aminoterminal prepeptide type I procollagen (PINP) in cancer patients with bone metastasis for diagnosis and treatment. Methods: Serum ICTP and PINP contents were measured with RIA in 115 patients and 30 controls. These patients consisted of : 1) Group A, less than 6 metastatic foci, n=47 2) Group B, 6-20 foci, n=42 3) Group C, over 20 foci, n=26. A second measurement of these markers was done in 35 of the 115 patients after comprehensive treatment. Results: The Serum ICTP and PINP contents in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (p<0.01). The contents increased steadily from Group A to Group C, with significant differences between those in successive groups (p<0.01 or p<0.05). Levels of the two markers correlated well to the number of foci (r=0.68, p<0.01; r=0.52, p<0.01). In the 35 treated patients, the levels dropped significantly (p<0.01, p<0.05 respectively). Conclusion: Both ICTP and PINP level determinations could reflect the clinical status of metastatic size and treatment effect (ICTP more sensitive)

  4. Hypnosis or cognitive behavioral training for the reduction of pain and nausea during cancer treatment: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, K L; Cummings, C; Donaldson, G W

    1992-02-01

    Few controlled clinical trials have tested the efficacy of psychological techniques for reducing cancer pain or post-chemotherapy nausea and emesis. In this study, 67 bone marrow transplant patients with hematological malignancies were randomly assigned to one of four groups prior to beginning transplantation conditioning: (1) hypnosis training (HYP); (2) cognitive behavioral coping skills training (CB); (3) therapist contact control (TC); or (4) treatment as usual (TAU; no treatment control). Patients completed measures of physical functioning (Sickness Impact Profile; SIP) and psychological functioning (Brief Symptom Inventory; BSI), which were used as covariates in the analyses. Biodemographic variables included gender, age and a risk variable based on diagnosis and number of remissions or relapses. Patients in the HYP, CB and TC groups met with a clinical psychologist for two pre-transplant training sessions and ten in-hospital "booster" sessions during the course of transplantation. Forty-five patients completed the study and provided all covariate data, and 80% of the time series outcome data. Analyses of the principal study variables indicated that hypnosis was effective in reducing reported oral pain for patients undergoing marrow transplantation. Risk, SIP, and BSI pre-transplant were found to be effective predictors of inpatient physical symptoms. Nausea, emesis and opioid use did not differ significantly between the treatment groups. The cognitive behavioral intervention, as applied in this study, was not effective in reducing the symptoms measured.

  5. Targeted Nanoparticles for Image-guided Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Technological Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Kleinhenz, Jasmine M.; Bozeman, Erica N.

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) with its aggressive tumor biology, highly heterogeneous tumor cells, and poor prognosis requires an integrated therapeutic approach that addresses critical issues in cancer therapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles with the abilities of targeted drug delivery and non-invasive imaging for monitoring drug delivery and responses to therapy, such as theranostic nanoparticles, hold great promise towards the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of TNBC using a single therapeutic platform. The biological and pathological characteristics of TNBC provide insight into several potential molecular targets for current and future nanoparticle based therapeutics. Extensive tumor stroma, highly proliferative cells, and a high rate of drug-resistance are all barriers that must be appropriately addressed in order for these nanotherapeutic platforms to be effective. Utilization of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect coupled with active targeting of cell surface receptors expressed by TNBC cells, and tumor associated endothelial cells, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages is likely to overcome such barriers to facilitate more effective drug delivery. An in depth summary of current studies investigating targeted nanoparticles in preclinical TNBC mouse and human xenograft models is presented. This review aims to outline the current status of nanotherapeutic options for TNBC patients, identification of promising molecular targets, challenges associated with the development of targeted nanotherapeutics, the research done by our group as well as others and future perspectives on the nanomedicine field and ways to translate current preclinical studies into the clinic. PMID:25966677

  6. Targeted nanoparticles for image-guided treatment of triple-negative breast cancer: clinical significance and technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Kleinhenz, Jasmine M; Bozeman, Erica N; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with its aggressive tumor biology, highly heterogeneous tumor cells, and poor prognosis requires an integrated therapeutic approach that addresses critical issues in cancer therapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles with the abilities of targeted drug delivery and noninvasive imaging for monitoring drug delivery and responses to therapy, such as theranostic nanoparticles, hold great promise toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of TNBC using a single therapeutic platform. The biological and pathological characteristics of TNBC provide insight into several potential molecular targets for current and future nanoparticle-based therapeutics. Extensive tumor stroma, highly proliferative cells, and a high rate of drug resistance are all barriers that must be appropriately addressed in order for these nanotherapeutic platforms to be effective. Utilization of the enhanced permeability and retention effect coupled with active targeting of cell surface receptors expressed by TNBC cells, and tumor-associated endothelial cells, stromal fibroblasts, and macrophages is likely to overcome such barriers to facilitate more effective drug delivery. An in-depth summary of current studies investigating targeted nanoparticles in preclinical TNBC mouse and human xenograft models is presented. This review aims to outline the current status of nanotherapeutic options for TNBC patients, identification of promising molecular targets, challenges associated with the development of targeted nanotherapeutics, the research done by our group as well as by others, and future perspectives on the nanomedicine field and ways to translate current preclinical studies into the clinic. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Clinical picture and treatment of complications of lower part of large intestine resulting from radiotherapy for intra-pelvic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshihito; Sunagawa, Keishin; Matsumura, Shigejiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Masaoka, Yoshio

    1976-01-01

    The authors described clinical pictures and those treatments of 40 patients with complications of the lower part of the large intestine resulting from radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, ovarium or the penis. As the radiotherapy, 60 Co-telecobalt (6,000-16,000R) and 60 Co-needle (1,000-8,568 mch) intracavitary irradiation were used alone or in combination. Findings in the complications of the lower part of the large intestine were classified into Grade I (13 cases), II (14), III (14), and IV (4) according to Sherman. The prodromal symptoms of the complications appeared in 2-6 months following the irradiation in more than a half of the patients, and it appeared within a year in most of the patients. Most of the patients complained about melena, anemia, proctagra, tenesmus and diarrhea. In the cases of Grade III, the symptoms of ileus such as constipation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain appeared. Internal treatment was given principally, and preternal anus was made when frequent blood transfusion was required. Fourteen cases of those in Grade I and II recovered within 1-3 years. The cases which received proctostomy, including those who had bleeding, stricture and fistulation, had favorable prognosis. This result suggested that the radiotherapy for intra-pelvic cancer should be controlled to prevent further development of the complications in the rectum beyond Grade I. (Serizawa, K.)

  8. Clinical commissioning of an in vivo range verification system for prostate cancer treatment with anterior and anterior oblique proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesl, M.; Deepak, S.; Moteabbed, M.; Jassens, G.; Orban, J.; Park, Y. K.; Parodi, K.; Bentefour, E. H.; Lu, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is the clinical commissioning of a recently developed in vivo range verification system (IRVS) for treatment of prostate cancer by anterior and anterior oblique proton beams. The IRVS is designed to perform a complete workflow for pre-treatment range verification and adjustment. It contains specifically designed dosimetry and electronic hardware and a specific software for workflow control with database connection to the treatment and imaging systems. An essential part of the IRVS system is an array of Si-diode detectors, designed to be mounted to the endorectal water balloon routinely used for prostate immobilization. The diodes can measure dose rate as function of time from which the water equivalent path length (WEPL) and the dose received are extracted. The former is used for pre-treatment beam range verification and correction, if necessary, while the latter is to monitor the dose delivered to patient rectum during the treatment and serves as an additional verification. The entire IRVS workflow was tested for anterior and 30 degree inclined proton beam in both solid water and anthropomorphic pelvic phantoms, with the measured WEPL and rectal doses compared to the treatment plan. Gafchromic films were also used for measurement of the rectal dose and compared to IRVS results. The WEPL measurement accuracy was in the order of 1 mm and after beam range correction, the dose received by the rectal wall were 1.6% and 0.4% from treatment planning, respectively, for the anterior and anterior oblique field. We believe the implementation of IRVS would make the treatment of prostate with anterior proton beams more accurate and reliable.

  9. Clinical implementation of a low energy x-ray therapy device in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, A.; University of Western Australia, WA; Joseph, D.; Lanzon, P.; Caswell, N.; Ebert, M.; University of Western Asutralia, WA

    2001-01-01

    Full text: A low energy device producing x-rays of maximum operating potential of 50kV is used to treat primary breast tumours intraoperatively. In pathologically favourable cases, the treatment replaces conventional external beam irradiation. For patients at greater risk of local recurrence, the treatment replaces conventional 'boost' therapy. The dosimetry of the device will be described in a companion paper. QA tests prior to irradiation include: output calibration/verification; isotropy verification and external radiation monitor (the secondary beam termination device) functionality. The internal radiation monitor count (similar to setting monitor units on a linac) for a prescribed dose is calculated from tables of measured depth dose and applicator factors. The spherical applicator which best suits the size of the excised tumour is lightly sutured into position maintaining as much distance between the skin surface as possible to minimise skin erythema. Radiation protection is achieved with the use of portable lead shields and tungsten impregnated silicon drapes. Patients entered into a TROG randomised clinical trial comparing intraoperative with conventional postoperative radiotherapy after conservative breast surgery for women with early stage breast cancer will be studied in collaboration with the CRC/University College London, Cancer Trials Centre (UK) to record the effects of local tumour control, cosmesis, patient satisfaction and health economics. QA tests take approximately 15 minutes to perform and a treatment prescription of 5Gy at 1cm depth with a 5cm applicator would take approximately 30 minutes. A low energy x-ray device may be used intraoperatively in selected cases to replace conventional radiotherapy minimising the inconvenience for patients and reducing waiting lists on treatment machines. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  10. Treatment selection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer: the role of the patient in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, S; Nuyttens, J J M E; de Mol, M; Aerts, J G J V; Maat, A P W M; Birim, Ö; Bogers, A J J C; Takkenberg, J J M

    2018-01-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate the role and experience of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient in decision making process concerning treatment selection in the current clinical practice. Stage I-II NSCLC patients (surgery 55 patients, SBRT 29 patients, median age 68) were included in this prospective study and completed a questionnaire that explored: (1) perceived patient knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options, (2) experience with current clinical decision making, and (3) the information that the patient reported to have received from their treating physician. This was assessed by multiple-choice, 1-5 Likert Scale, and open questions. The Decisional Conflict Scale was used to assess the decisional conflict. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured with SF-36 questionnaire. In 19% of patients, there was self-reported perceived lack of knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options. Seventy-four percent of patients felt that they were sufficiently involved in decision-making by their physician, and 81% found it important to be involved in decision making. Forty percent experienced decisional conflict, and one-in-five patients to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. Subscores with regard to feeling uninformed and on uncertainty, contributed the most to decisional conflict, as 36% felt uninformed and 17% of patients were not satisfied with their decision. HRQoL was not influenced by patient experience with decision-making or patient preferences for shared decision making. Dutch early-stage NSCLC patients find it important to be involved in treatment decision making. Yet a substantial proportion experiences decisional conflict and feels uninformed. Better patient information and/or involvement in treatment-decision-making is needed in order to improve patient knowledge and hopefully reduce decisional conflict.

  11. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of thrombosis associated with central venous catheters in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debourdeau, P; Farge, D; Beckers, M; Baglin, C; Bauersachs, R M; Brenner, B; Brilhante, D; Falanga, A; Gerotzafias, G T; Haim, N; Kakkar, A K; Khorana, A A; Lecumberri, R; Mandala, M; Marty, M; Monreal, M; Mousa, S A; Noble, S; Pabinger, I; Prandoni, P; Prins, M H; Qari, M H; Streiff, M B; Syrigos, K; Büller, H R; Bounameaux, H

    2013-01-01

    Although long-term indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE) and loss of the CVC, there is lack of consensus on management of CVC-related thrombosis (CRT) in cancer patients and heterogeneity in clinical practices worldwide. To establish common international Good Clinical Practices Guidelines (GCPG) for the management of CRT in cancer patients. An international working group of experts was set up to develop GCPG according to an evidence-based medicine approach, using the GRADE system. For the treatment of established CRT in cancer patients, we found no prospective randomized studies, two non-randomized prospective studies and one retrospective study examining the efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). One retrospective study evaluated the benefit of CVC removal and two small retrospective studies were on thrombolytic drugs. For the treatment of symptomatic CRT, anticoagulant treatment (AC) is recommended for a minimum of 3 months; in this setting, LMWHs are suggested. VKAs can also be used, in the absence of direct comparisons of these two types of anticoagulants in this setting [Guidance]. The CVC can be kept in place if it is functional, well-positioned and non-infected and there is good resolution under close surveillance; whether the CVC is kept or removed, no standard approach in terms of AC duration has been established [Guidance]. For the prophylaxis of CRT in cancer patients, we found six randomized studies investigating the efficacy and safety of VKA vs. placebo or no treatment, one on the efficacy and safety of unfractionnated heparin, six on the value of LMWH, one double-blind randomized and one non randomized study on thrombolytic drugs and six meta-analyses of AC and CVC thromboprophylaxis. Type of catheter (open-ended like the Hickman(®) catheter vs. closed-ended catheter with a valve like the Groshong(®) catheter), its position (above, below or at the

  12. Development of a real-time clinical decision support system upon the web mvc-based architecture for prostate cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wen-Miin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A real-time clinical decision support system (RTCDSS with interactive diagrams enables clinicians to instantly and efficiently track patients' clinical records (PCRs and improve their quality of clinical care. We propose a RTCDSS to process online clinical informatics from multiple databases for clinical decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer based on Web Model-View-Controller (MVC architecture, by which the system can easily be adapted to different diseases and applications. Methods We designed a framework upon the Web MVC-based architecture in which the reusable and extractable models can be conveniently adapted to other hospital information systems and which allows for efficient database integration. Then, we determined the clinical variables of the prostate cancer treatment based on participating clinicians' opinions and developed a computational model to determine the pretreatment parameters. Furthermore, the components of the RTCDSS integrated PCRs and decision factors for real-time analysis to provide evidence-based diagrams upon the clinician-oriented interface for visualization of treatment guidance and health risk assessment. Results The resulting system can improve quality of clinical treatment by allowing clinicians to concurrently analyze and evaluate the clinical markers of prostate cancer patients with instantaneous clinical data and evidence-based diagrams which can automatically identify pretreatment parameters. Moreover, the proposed RTCDSS can aid interactions between patients and clinicians. Conclusions Our proposed framework supports online clinical informatics, evaluates treatment risks, offers interactive guidance, and provides real-time reference for decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer. The developed clinician-oriented interface can assist clinicians in conveniently presenting evidence-based information to patients and can be readily adapted to an existing hospital

  13. Development of a real-time clinical decision support system upon the Web MVC-based architecture for prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsueh-Chun; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Chang, Chih-Hung; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Wen-Miin; Wang, Jong-Yi Wang

    2011-03-08

    A real-time clinical decision support system (RTCDSS) with interactive diagrams enables clinicians to instantly and efficiently track patients' clinical records (PCRs) and improve their quality of clinical care. We propose a RTCDSS to process online clinical informatics from multiple databases for clinical decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer based on Web Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture, by which the system can easily be adapted to different diseases and applications. We designed a framework upon the Web MVC-based architecture in which the reusable and extractable models can be conveniently adapted to other hospital information systems and which allows for efficient database integration. Then, we determined the clinical variables of the prostate cancer treatment based on participating clinicians' opinions and developed a computational model to determine the pretreatment parameters. Furthermore, the components of the RTCDSS integrated PCRs and decision factors for real-time analysis to provide evidence-based diagrams upon the clinician-oriented interface for visualization of treatment guidance and health risk assessment. The resulting system can improve quality of clinical treatment by allowing clinicians to concurrently analyze and evaluate the clinical markers of prostate cancer patients with instantaneous clinical data and evidence-based diagrams which can automatically identify pretreatment parameters. Moreover, the proposed RTCDSS can aid interactions between patients and clinicians. Our proposed framework supports online clinical informatics, evaluates treatment risks, offers interactive guidance, and provides real-time reference for decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer. The developed clinician-oriented interface can assist clinicians in conveniently presenting evidence-based information to patients and can be readily adapted to an existing hospital information system and be easily applied in other chronic diseases.

  14. Current Challenges in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Guedes, Cristiano; Ponce, Santiago; Ferrer, Irene; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we highlight the current concepts and discuss some of the current challenges and future prospects in cancer therapy. We frequently use the example of lung cancer. We conducted a nonsystematic PubMed search, selecting the most comprehensive and relevant research articles, clinical trials, translational papers, and review articles on precision oncology and immuno-oncology. Papers were prioritized and selected based on their originality and potential clinical applicability. Two major revolutions have changed cancer treatment paradigms in the past few years: targeting actionable alterations in oncogene-driven cancers and immuno-oncology. Important challenges are still ongoing in both fields of cancer therapy. On the one hand, druggable genomic alterations are diverse and represent only small subsets of patients in certain tumor types, which limits testing their clinical impact in biomarker-driven clinical trials. Next-generation sequencing technologies are increasingly being implemented for molecular prescreening in clinical research, but issues regarding clinical interpretation of large genomic data make their wide clinical use difficult. Further, dealing with tumor heterogeneity and acquired resistance is probably the main limitation for the success of precision oncology. On the other hand, long-term survival benefits with immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-programmed death cell protein-1/programmed death cell ligand-1[PD-1/L1] and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 monoclonal antibodies) are restricted to a minority of patients, and no predictive markers are yet robustly validated that could help us recognize these subsets and optimize treatment delivery and selection. To achieve long-term survival benefits, drug combinations targeting several molecular alterations or cancer hallmarks might be needed. This will probably be one of the most challenging but promising precision cancer treatment strategies in the future. Targeting single molecular

  15. Data mining analysis of Professor Liu Shangyi’s prescription characteristics in clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer patients with stomachache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Qi Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze National Chinese Medicine Master Liu Shangyi’s prescription characteristics of clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer patients with stomachache. Methods: Data on prescriptions for cancer patients with stomachache between January 2014 and July 2016 were collected. The composing principles were analyzed by unsupervised data mining methods including Apriori algorithm in association rules and complex system entropy cluster. Results: Based on the analysis of 120 prescriptions, the frequency of each herb and association rules among the herbs were computed. Four core combinations and two new prescriptions were mined from the database. Compared to the before treatment, the clinical symptomatic grading of stomachache after treatment was lower (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Professor Liu has been successful in the treatment of cancer patients with stomachache by prescribing medication that aids in activating blood circulation, removing dampness, and alleviating pain.

  16. Impact of a robotic surgical system on treatment choice for men with clinically organ-confined prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Kanao, Kent; Araki, Motoo; Terada, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Sawada, Atsuro; Inoue, Takahiro; Ebara, Shin; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Kamba, Tomomi; Sumitomo, Makoto; Nasu, Yasutomo; Ogawa, Osamu

    2018-04-01

    Introducing a new surgical technology may affect behaviors and attitudes of patients and surgeons about clinical practice. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) was approved in 2012 in Japan. We investigated whether the introduction of this system affected the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) and the use of radical prostatectomy (RP). We conducted a retrospective multicenter study on 718 patients with clinically determined organ-confined PCa treated at one of three Japanese academic institutions in 2011 (n = 338) or 2013 (n = 380). Two patient groups formed according to the treatment year were compared regarding the clinical characteristics of PCa, whether referred or screened at our hospital, comorbidities and surgical risk, and choice of primary treatment. Distribution of PCa risk was not changed by the introduction of RALP. Use of RP increased by 70% (from 127 to 221 cases, p accounted for 70% of the total RP increase, whereas the number of low- or very low-risk PCa patients with high comorbidity scores (Charlson Index ≥ 4) increased from 8 to 25 cases, accounting for 18%. Use of expectant management (active surveillance, watchful waiting) in very low-risk PCa patients was 15% in 2011 and 12% in 2013 (p = 0.791). Introduction of a robotic surgical system had little effect on the risk distribution of PCa. Use of RP increased, apparently due to increased indications in patients who are candidates for RP but have mild perioperative risk. Although small, there was an increase in the number of RPs performed on patients with severe comorbidities but with low-risk or very low-risk PCa.

  17. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...

  18. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  19. Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Eastham, James A

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal strategies combining local and systemic therapy offer the greatest chance of cure for many with men with high-risk prostate cancer who may harbor occult metastatic disease. However, no systemic therapy combined with radical prostatectomy has proven beneficial. This was in part due to a lack of effective systemic agents; however, there have been several advancements in the metastatic and castrate-resistant prostate cancer that might prove beneficial if given earlier in the natural history of the disease. For example, novel hormonal agents have recently been approved for castration-resistant prostate cancer with some early phase II neoadjuvant showing promise. Additionally, combination therapy with docetaxel-based chemohormonal has demonstrated a profound survival benefit in metastatic hormone-naïve patients and might have a role in eliminating pre-existing ADT-resistant tumor cells in the neoadjuvant setting. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 90203 trial has finished accrual and should answer the question as to whether neoadjuvant docetaxel-based chemohormonal therapy provides an advantage over prostatectomy alone. There are also several promising targeted agents and immunotherapies under investigation in phase I/II trials with the potential to provide benefit in the neoadjuvant setting.

  20. Clinical validation of FDG-PET/CT in the radiation treatment planning for patients with oesophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, Christina T.; Beukema, Jannet C.; Woutersen, Dankert; Mul, Veronique E.; Berveling, Maaike J.; Pruim, Jan; van der Jagt, Eric J.; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Groen, Henk; Plukker, John Th.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the proportion of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) that could have been prevented if radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer was based on PET/CT instead of CT. Materials and methods: Ninety oesophageal cancer patients,

  1. Clinical evaluation of the partition model for estimating radiation doses from yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of hepatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.; Lau, W.Y.; Leung, T.W.T.; Chan, M.; Johnson, P.J.; Li, A.K.C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation doses to the tumour and non-tumorous liver compartments from yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of hepatic cancer, as estimated by a partition model, have been verified by correlation with the actual doses measured with a beta probe at open surgery. The validity of the doses to the lungs, the tumour and non-tumours liver compartment as estimated by the partition model was further evaluated in clinical settings. On the basis of the observation that one of three patients who received more than 30 Gy from a single treatment and one of two patients who received more than 50 Gy from multiple treatments developed radiation pneumonitis, it was deduced that an estimated lung dose 30 Gy as estimated by the partition model and were predicted to develop radiation pneumonitis, did so despite the use of partial hepatic embolization to reduce the degree of lung shunting. Furthermore, a higher radiological response rate and prolonged survival were found in the group of patients who received higher tumour doses, as estimated by the partition model, than in the group with lower estimated tumour doses. Thus the radiation doses estimated by the partition model can be used to predict (a) complication rate, (b) response rate and (c) duration of survival in the same manner as the actual radiation doses measured with a beta probe at open surgery. The partition model has made selective internal radiation therapy using 90 Y microspheres safe and repeatable without laparotomy. (orig.)

  2. Cancer treatment: what's ahead?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.

    2005-01-01

    Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are standard modalities for cancer treatment. Biological therapy (immunotherapy, biotherapy, or biological response modifier therapy) is a comparatively novel addition to this armamentarium. Biological therapies use the body's immune system, either directly or indirectly, to fight cancer or to lessen the side effects that may be caused by some cancer treatments. Biological therapeutic agents include interferons, interleukins, colony-simulating factors, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and nonspecific immunomodulating agents. A promising form of cancer treatment is immunotherapy. Immunotherapy for cancer is essentially the stimulation of the immune system through a variety of reagents such as vaccines, infusion of T-cells, or cytokines. These reagents act through one of several mechanisms including stimulating the anti-tumour response, decreasing suppressor mechanisms, altering tumour cells to increase their immunogenicity and making them more susceptible to immunologic defenses, and improving tolerance to cytotoxic agents or radiotherapy. This review describes some novel approaches in the immunotherapy in cancer. (author)

  3. Multicenter clinical study for evaluation of efficacy and safety of transdermal fentanyl matrix patch in treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain in 474 chinese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-Lin; Song, Guo-Hong; Liu, Duan-Qi; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Kui-Feng; Zang, Ai-Hua; Cheng, Ying; Cao, Guo-Chun; Liang, Jun; Ma, Xue-Zhen; Ding, Xin; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei-Lian; Hu, Zuo-Wei; Feng, Gang; Huang, Jiang-Jin; Zheng, Xiao; Jiao, Shun-Chang; Wu, Rong; Ren, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Although a new matrix formulation fentanyl has been used throughout the world for cancer pain management, few data about its efficacy and clinical outcomes associated with its use in Chinese patients have been obtained. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of the new system in Chinese patients with moderate to severe cancer pain. A total of 474 patients with moderate to severe cancer pain were enrolled in this study and were treated with the new transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (TDF) up to 2 weeks. All the patients were asked to record pain intensity, side effects, quality of life (QOL), adherence and global satisfaction. The initial dose of fentanyl was 25 μg/h titrated with opioid or according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Transdermal fentanyl was changed every three days. After 2 weeks. The mean pain intensity of the 459 evaluated patients decreased significantly from 5.63±1.26 to 2.03±1.46 (P<0.0001). The total remission rate was 91.29%, of which moderate remission rate 53.16%, obvious remission rate 25.49% and complete remission rate 12.64%. The rate of adverse events was 33.75%, 18.78% of which were moderate and 3.80% were severe. The most frequent adverse events were constipation and nausea. No fatal events were observed. The quality of life was remarkably improved after the treatment (P<0.0001). The new TDF is effective and safe in treating patients with moderate to severe cancer pain, and can significantly improve the quality of life.

  4. Genomic and clinical predictors for improving estimator precision in randomized trials of breast cancer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Patil

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Adjusting only for clinical variables led to substantial precision gains (at least 5% in three of the four data sets, with a 1% precision loss in the remaining data set. These gains were unchanged or increased when sample sizes were doubled in our simulations. The precision gains due to incorporating genomic information, beyond the gains from adjusting for clinical variables, were not substantial.

  5. Clinical Significance of Preoperative Albumin and Globulin Ratio in Patients with Gastric Cancer Undergoing Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-jie Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pretreatment albumin and globulin ratio (AGR was an inflammation-associated factor which was related to the overall survival in various malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of AGR in patients with gastric cancer. Method. This retrospective study included 862 cases pathologically diagnosed with gastric cancer. All patients were randomly divided into the testing group (431 cases and validation group (431 cases. The relationships of AGR with clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results. In the testing group, the median overall survival was 26.90 months and the cutoff value of AGR was 1.50 based on R language. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that lower AGR was correlated with poorer overall survival. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that AGR was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (HR: 0.584, 95% CI = 0.351–0.973, and p = 0.039. In the validation group, the median overall survival was 24.10 months. Lower AGR (≤1.50 also had a significantly poorer overall survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. According to multivariate analysis, the AGR was also confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (HR: 0.578, 95% CI = 0.373–0.897, and p = 0.015. Conclusions. Our study suggested that the pretreatment AGR could be a prognostic biomarker for overall survival in patients with gastric cancer.

  6. Clinical Use of the Utrecht Applicator for Combined Intracavitary/Interstitial Brachytherapy Treatment in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Moerland, Marinus A.; Roesink, Judith M.; Tersteeg, Robbert J.H.A.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to investigate the benefit of the Utrecht interstitial CT/MR applicator for combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) approach, using magnetic resonance imaging—guided brachytherapy, over the intracavitary approach alone in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer and to analyze the clinical use of needles. Methods and Materials: This study includes the first 20 patients treated with the new applicator. Brachytherapy consisted of two pulsed dose rate applications, and the second application was performed with the IC/IS approach. The number of needles, chosen guiding holes through the ovoids, and insertion depths were based on the dose distribution and dosimetric shortcomings of the first application (IC alone). We investigated the dosimetric gain by comparing the clinical interstitial optimized plan (IC/IS clinical ) with an additionally generated optimized plan without needle use (IC study ). Furthermore, we studied the relation of the inserted needles and their source loading patterns with the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Results: A total of 54 needles (range, 1–6 per application) were applied with an average depth of 25 mm. The chosen needle positions corresponded with the location of the HR-CTV extensions. The total and individual needle treatment times per application were on average 19% (range, 4–35%) and 7% (range, 2–14%) of the implant treatment time, respectively. The total (external-beam radiotherapy + brachytherapy) D90 HR-CTV for the IC study and the IC/IS clinical were on average 79.5 (SD 7.4) Gy α/β10 and 83.9 (SD 6.7) Gy α/β10 , respectively, with an average gain of 4.4 (SD 2.3) Gy α/β10 for the second application. Conclusions: Needle placement was feasible in all patients and resulted in a gain in dose and better coverage of HR-CTV. Defining the location of HR-CTV protrusions and analyzing the associated needles has given us deeper understanding of the possibilities in magnetic

  7. Clinical diagnosis and treatment of thyroid microcarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xuemei; Zhang Yajing; Gao Zairong

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant carcinoma in the endocrine system. With the increasing incidence of thyroid cancer, the incidence of thyroid microcarcinoma has been elevating gradually. But there is still a large ambiguity on thyroid microcarcinoma about the diagnosis and treatment. The epidemiology, clinical diagnosis, biological behavior and treatment programs of thyroid microcarcinoma were reviewed in this article. (authors)

  8. Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufunmilayo F. Olopade MD, FACP, Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and Director of the Cancer Risk Clinic Department of Medicine, BSD Section of Hematology/Oncology University of Chicago, presented "Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention".

  9. The emerging role of histology in the choice of first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: implication in the clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Bareschino, Maria Anna; Schettino, Clorinda; Sacco, Paola Claudia; Ferrara, Marianna Luciana; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Gridelli, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting for about 85% of all lung cancers, includes squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated large cell carcinoma. The majority of patients have advanced disease at diagnosis, and medical treatment is the cornerstone of management. Several randomized trials comparing third-generation platinum-based doublets concluded that all such combinations are comparable in their clinical efficacy, failing to document a difference based on histology. However, recent evidences, arising from the availability of pemetrexed, have shown that histology represents an important variable in the decision making. The major progresses in the understanding cancer biology and mechanism of oncogenesis have allowed the development of several potential molecular targets for cancer treatment such as vascular growth factor and its receptors and epidermal growth factor receptor. Targeted drugs seem to be safer or more effective in a specific histology subtype. All of these data have led to choose the optimal first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC based on histologic diagnosis. However, this scenario raises a diagnostic issue: a specific diagnosis of NSCLC histologic subtype is mandatory. This review will discuss these new evidences in the first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC and their implication in the current clinical decision-making.

  10. Incorporation of expert variability into breast cancer treatment recommendation in designing clinical protocol guided fuzzy rule system models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ying; John, Robert I; Ellis, Ian O

    2012-06-01

    It has been often demonstrated that clinicians exhibit both inter-expert and intra-expert variability when making difficult decisions. In contrast, the vast majority of computerized models that aim to provide automated support for such decisions do not explicitly recognize or replicate this variability. Furthermore, the perfect consistency of computerized models is often presented as a de facto benefit. In this paper, we describe a novel approach to incorporate variability within a fuzzy inference system using non-stationary fuzzy sets in order to replicate human variability. We apply our approach to a decision problem concerning the recommendation of post-operative breast cancer treatment; specifically, whether or not to administer chemotherapy based on assessment of five clinical variables: NPI (the Nottingham Prognostic Index), estrogen receptor status, vascular invasion, age and lymph node status. In doing so, we explore whether such explicit modeling of variability provides any performance advantage over a more conventional fuzzy approach, when tested on a set of 1310 unselected cases collected over a fourteen year period at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, UK. The experimental results show that the standard fuzzy inference system (that does not model variability) achieves overall agreement to clinical practice around 84.6% (95% CI: 84.1-84.9%), while the non-stationary fuzzy model can significantly increase performance to around 88.1% (95% CI: 88.0-88.2%), psystems in any application domain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronetskij, I.B.

    1990-01-01

    Peculiarities of thyroid cancer, producing direct influence on selection of treatment procedure are enumerated. It is shown that surgical treatment is the determining way of treatment, which is supplemented with hormonotherapy in case of differentiated forms of the tumor. In case of anaplasia cancer, sarcomas, propagation of tumor beyond the limits of the organ, inoperable processes, treatment of recurrences and functional inactivity of bone metastases the remote control gamma-therapy should be performed. Therapy by radioactive iodine is shown for the treatment of remote iodine-concentrating metastases for devitalization of residual thyroid tissue after thyroidectomy

  12. The clinical summary of 312 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer metastases with 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, R.S.; Yongli, Y.L.; Hankui, H.K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Three hundred and twelve thyroid carcinoma patients with metastasis treated by the multiple 'high dose' program were followed up for 10 years. The result of 131I adverse effect were accessed. Method 1 Treatment protocol: In case of lung and bone metastasis. 200mCi 131 I was administered each time. For patient with lymphatic metastasis, 150mCi 131 I was given each time. The interval between 2 doses was 4 month. 2 Assessment of results, 131 I scanning of negative 131 I scanning denotes cure. Lesion size decrease, reduction of number of foci or reductions of iodine uptake by the lesion, normal blood Tg indicated effective treatment. Treatment failure shows higher blood Tg, appearance of new lesions with ensuing death. 3 Adverse events - marrow inhibition pulmonary function affected ; parathyroid function affected; salivary glands affected; chromosome aberration. Result 1: of the 312 patients, 112 were cured (35.9%),effective 118 patients (60.2%). Treatment failed in 12 cases(3.8%).2 adverse events bone marrow inhibition. accumulation dose of 131I could produce temporary reversible inhibition of bone marrow, no aplastic anemia was evident. Effect of salivary gland function, reversible changes were seen. Sub maxilla glandular function was least affected. Effect of parathyroid function: PTH showed temporary change, without a single case of hypoparathyroidism. Effect of pulmonary function: no change what so ever without a single case of pulmonary fibrosis. Effect on chromosome: After treatment lymphocytes in peripheral blood showed aberration, in part of the patients radioaction tolerability increased. Conclusion: Multiple high dose therapy with treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinoma is an effective method. Indication can be extended to patients showing pathological lesion on operation. Adverse events was almost negligible percent and treatment was discussed. Good results were obtained no aplastic anemia. hypoparathyroidism, decrease of pulmonary function

  13. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer who develop brain metastasis: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountzilas, Christos; Chang, Katherine; Hernandez, Brian; Michalek, Joel; Crownover, Richard; Floyd, John; Mahalingam, Devalingam

    2017-02-01

    The development of brain metastasis (BM) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is a rare and late event. We sought to investigate the clinical characteristics, disease course and safety using biologic agents in our patients with CRC who develop brain metastases. A retrospective review of patients with CRC with brain metastases treated at our institution from 01/2005-01/2015 was performed. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Forty patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 55.5 years, 67.5% were males, and 28% had a KRAS mutation. Twenty-four percent were treatment-naive at the time of BM diagnosis. Patients had a median of two brain lesions. Sixty-five percent of the patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 22.5% had both surgical resection and brain radiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.2 months after development of BM. Overall survival was longer in patients who received combined modality local therapy compared to patients treated with surgical resection or radiotherapy alone. Patients who received systemic treatment incorporating biologics following development of BM had a median overall survival of 18.6 months. Overall, the administration of biologic agents was safe and well tolerated. In summary, BM is an uncommon and late event in the natural history of metastatic CRC. The ability to deliver combined-modality local brain therapy as well as availability of more systemic therapy options appear to lead to improved outcomes.

  14. Communicative skills in treatmenting cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchay, Sanaullah

    2007-01-01

    Communication within oncology is a core clinical skill but one in which few oncologists or specialist cancer nurses have received much formal training. Inadequate communication may cause much distress for patients and their families, who often want considerably more information than is usually provided. Many patients leave consultations unsure about the diagnosis and prognosis, confused about the meaning of--and need for-further diagnostic tests, unclear about the management plan and uncertain about the true therapeutic intent of treatment. Additionally, communication difficulties may impede the recruitment of patients to clinical trials, delaying the introduction of efficacious new treatments into clinics

  15. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies : Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.L.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; de Giorgi, U.; De Wit, R.; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.; European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group; Genito-Urinary Cancers Group, The

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  16. Recruiting long-term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III clinical trials into quality of life studies: Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Efficace, F.; Fosså, S.D.; Bolla, M.; De Giorgi, U.; de Wit, R; Holzner, B.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; van Poppel, H.; White, J.; Collette, L.; Osanto, S.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In this pilot study we evaluated the feasibility of and methods for assessing the quality of life of long term survivors of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III clinical trials. Here we report the results pertaining to the feasibility of conducting

  17. Population based study on sentinel node biopsy before or after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in clinically node negative breast cancer patients : Identification rate and influence on axillary treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heiden-van der Loo, M.; de Munck, L.; Sonke, G. S.; van Dalen, T.; van Diest, P. J.; van den Bongard, H. J. G. D.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Rutgers, E. J. T.

    The timing of the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) is controversial in clinically node negative patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). We studied variation in the timing of axillary staging in breast cancer patients who received NAC and the subsequent axillary treatment in The

  18. A global, incremental development method for a web-based prostate cancer treatment decision aid and usability testing in a Dutch clinical setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, M.; Lamers, R.E.D.; Kil, P.J.M.; The, R.; Karssen, K.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; de Vries, M.

    2018-01-01

    Many new decision aids are developed while aspects of existing decision aids could also be useful, leading to a sub-optimal use of resources. To support treatment decision-making in prostate cancer patients, a pre-existing evidence-based Canadian decision aid was adjusted to Dutch clinical setting.

  19. Prognostic influence of clinical stage for distant failure in conservation treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjan, N.A.; Murray, K.J.; Walker, A.P.; Derus, S.B.; Komaki, R.U.; Cox, J.D.; Wilson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    One-hundred twelve patients with clinical stage I-II mammary carcinoma treated with radiation therapy following breast-conserving surgery from 1975 through 1985 were evaluated. Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-80 months). This study demonstrates the importance of evaluating patients on the basis of tumor and axillary node findings rather than by clinical stage alone. In the authors' series, all T1 patients with positive axillary lymph nodes achieved the same excellent local and distant control as node-negative T1 and T2 patients. Distant failure occurred in 70% of T2 N1 patients despite systemic chemotherapy given to the majority of patients. The significance of these data regarding future trials are discussed

  20. Clinical experiment with a methyl sup( b)12 preparation in the treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimori, Hagime; Matsuyama, Toshitake; Yo, Teruo

    1978-01-01

    To determine the effect of Methylcobol on hemograms, at the beginning of radiotherapy 20 patients with cervical cancer were given 500 mg/day intramuscular injections for 20 days and were compared with 20 patients not given the injections. Radiotherapy consisted of 200 rad/day of 60 Co externally irradiated 6 times a week (total, 5,000 - 6,000 rad). Although there was no difference in the number of patients with increases or decreases (more than 10%) in hemoglobin in the two groups, the rate of decrease was greater in the control group. Regarding increases and decreases (less than 10%) in hematocrit and erythrocyte count, an effect suppressing decrease was observed in the experimental group, the rate of decrease being about half that in the control group. No remarkable differences between the two groups were observed regarding the number of patients with changes, the rate of decrease in leukocyte count, or serum protein. Since this drug limited decrease in erythrocyte count and hemoglobin to one half that in the control group and caused no side effects, it appears to be useful in combination with radiotherapy. (Bell, E.)

  1. Towards quantifying the aesthetic outcomes of breast cancer treatment: comparison of clinical photography and colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Soon; Rodney, William N; Cooper, Tara; Kite, Chris; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K

    2009-02-01

    Scarring is a significant cause of dissatisfaction for women who undergo breast surgery. Scar tissue may be clinically distinguished from normal skin by aberrant colour, rough surface texture, increased thickness (hypertrophy) and firmness. Colorimeters or spectrophotometers can be used to quantitatively assess scar colour, but they require direct patient interaction and can cost thousands of dollars. By comparison, digital photography is already in widespread use to document clinical outcomes and requires less patient interaction. Thus, assessment of scar coloration by digital photography is an attractive alternative. The goal of this study was to compare colour measurements obtained by digital photography and colorimetry. Agreements between photographic and colorimetric measurements of colour were evaluated. Experimental conditions were controlled by performing measurements on artificial scars created by a make-up artist. The colorimetric measurements of the artificial scars were compared with those reported in the literature for real scars in order to confirm the validity of this approach. We assessed the agreement between the colorimetric and photographic measurements of colour using a hypothesis test for equivalence, the intraclass correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman method. Overall, good agreement was obtained for three parameters (L*a*b*) measured by colorimetry and photography from the results of three statistical analyses. Colour measurements obtained by digital photography were equivalent to those obtained using colorimetry. Thus, digital photography is a reliable, cost-effective measurement method of skin colour and should be further investigated for quantitative analysis of surgical outcomes.

  2. Toward Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Comparison of Clinical Photography and Colorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Soon; Rodney, William N.; Cooper, Tara; Kite, Chris; Reece, Gregory P.; Markey, Mia K.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Scarring is a significant cause of dissatisfaction for women who undergo breast surgery. Scar tissue may be clinically distinguished from normal skin by aberrant color, rough surface texture, increased thickness (hypertrophy), and firmness. Colorimeters or spectrophotometers can be used to quantitatively assess scar color, but they require direct patient interaction and can cost thousands of dollars By comparison, digital photography is already in widespread use to document clinical outcomes and requires less patient interaction. Thus, assessment of scar coloration by digital photography is an attractive alternative. The goal of this study was to compare color measurements obtained by digital photography and colorimetry. Method Agreement between photographic and colorimetric measurements of color were evaluated. Experimental conditions were controlled by performing measurements on artificial scars created by a makeup artist. The colorimetric measurements of the artificial scars were compared to those reported in the literature for real scars in order to confirm the validity of this approach. We assessed the agreement between the colorimetric and photographic measurements of color using a hypothesis test for equivalence, the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and the Bland-Altman method. Results Overall, good agreement was obtained for three parameters (L*a*b*) measured by colorimetry and photography from the results of three statistical analyses. Conclusion Color measurements obtained by digital photography were equivalent to those obtained using colorimetry. Thus, digital photography is a reliable, cost-effective measurement method of skin color and should be further investigated for quantitative analysis of surgical outcomes. PMID:19239578

  3. Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer: utility and experience from the clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dragovich, Tomislav; Kundranda,Madappa

    2016-01-01

    Madappa N Kundranda, Tomislav Dragovich Division of Hematology and Oncology, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Gilbert, AZ, USA Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest epithelial cancers, primarily due to late diagnosis, early metastasis and the lack of effective treatments. With recent advances in systemic therapies, the median survival for metastatic disease has essentially doubled to approximately 1 year, and a significant number of patients are receiving m...

  4. Encounters in cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1...... by this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization....

  5. What margins should be added to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy treatment planning of lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, L.; Wittgren, L.; Holmberg, O.

    1995-01-01

    When defining the planning target volume (PTV) in radiotherapy treatment planning, it is vital to add geometrical margins of normal tissue around the clinical target volume (CTV). This is to ensure that the whole CTV will receive the planned absorbed dose taking into account both set-up deviations and target movements as well as other geometrical variations in the treatment chain. The problem is our limited knowledge of how large these margins should be. To assess the size of needed margins around the CTV in conformal radiotherapy of lung cancer, electronic portal imaging was employed in 232 irradiation field set-ups of 14 patients. This was done in order to quantify the uncertainty in the execution of treatment considering patient movement and set-up displacements. For an estimation of the added geometrical variation from target movement during irradiation, fluoroscopy was used at the simulation of the irradiation fields. The set-up study showed an average systematic deviation for all individual fields of 3.1 mm and an average maximal systematic deviation (in either transversal or craniocaudal direction) of 4.8 mm. The random errors can be described by an average standard deviation of 2.8 mm for all fields in either direction. Major gradual displacements as a function of time was also detected in one of the patients. CTV-movements of several millimetres during respiration could be observed. It was also seen that heartbeats could add to CTV-movements during irradiation with an equal magnitude. The combined effect of these factors are considered when making an overall estimation of margins that should be added to the CTV

  6. Linking the Price of Cancer Drug Treatments to Their Clinical Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzo, Lucia; Navarria, Andrea; Drago, Valentina; Longo, Laura; Mansueto, Silvana; Pignataro, Giacomo; Cicchetti, Americo; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2016-07-01

    Appropriate pricing of medications is one of the ultimate goals for decision makers, but reliable data on the risk/benefit ratio are often lacking when a Marketing Authorization Application is submitted. Here we propose a method to consistently evaluate price adequacy, which we applied to six anticancer medications approved in Italy in recent years. We obtained ratios of cost per survival per day (cost/survival/day) by dividing the total costs of evaluated medications for the median survival gain in days. Each cost/survival/day corresponds to a crude score, with 0 assigned to a cost/survival/day ≥€586. The maximum price considered as adequate was €91 cost/survival/day (score 75) while a score of 100 corresponded to a cost/survival/day ≤€11, based on the thresholds set by the British National Health System (NHS) and the "willingness-to-pay" of the Italian NHS. Crude scores were then adjusted using correction factors for efficacy, safety, quality of life, and prevalence of disease. None of the analyzed medications (abiraterone, afatinib, aflibercept, bevacizumab, dabrafenib, and ipilimumab) achieved a final score of 75, corresponding to adequate pricing. The final score for afatinib was the highest with 55 points. Prices of all the other drugs resulted in being inadequate, with negative final scores for bevacizumab, dabrafenib, and ipilimumab. This method may be considered a tool for the evaluation of appropriateness of price proposed at negotiation and could represent a reliable resource for decision-making. Furthermore, this analysis suggests that most recently approved cancer drugs in Italy do not fulfill price adequacy.

  7. PRE-CLINICAL EVALUATION OF EXTRACTS AND ESSENTIAL OILS FROM BETEL-LIKE SCENT PIPER SPECIES IDENTIFIED POTENTIAL CANCER TREATMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanubol, Arisa; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Tanee, Tawatchai; Sudmoon, Runglawan

    2017-01-01

    Nine Piper species with betel-like scents are sources of industrial and medicinal aromatic chemicals, but there is lack of information on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for human safety, including how these plants impact human cervical cancer cell line. Plant leaves were extracted with hexane and hydro-distilled for essential oils. The extracts and oils were pre-clinically studied based on cyto - and genotoxicity using microculture tetrazolium (MTT) and comet assays. The crude extracts showed an IC 50 in leukocytes and HeLa cells of 58.59-97.31 mg/ml and 34.91-101.79 mg/ml, the LD 50 is higher than 5000 mg/kg. With lower values than the crude extracts, the essential oils showed an IC 50 in leukocytes and HeLa cells of 0.023-0.059 μg/ml and 0.025-0.043 μg/ml the LD 50 is less than 50 mg/kg. IC 50 values showed that the essential oils were highly toxic than the crude extracts. At the level of human genetic materials, the crude extracts of two species, including P. betloides and P. crocatum , showed a significant toxicity ( p Piper species showed insignificant toxicity in leukocytes. For HeLa cells, the eight-studied species showed significant toxicity in HeLa cells, whereas only P. submultinerve showed insignificant toxicity. The crude extracts and essential oils should be tested as putative cervical cancer treatments due to less toxicity in human normal cells.

  8. Efficacy and mechanism of action of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, lapatinib and neratinib in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer: preclinical and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia-Mendoza, Mariana; González-González, María E; Barrera, David; Díaz, Lorenza; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of tumors, including breast cancer, overexpress proteins of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. The interaction between family members activates signaling pathways that promote tumor progression and resistance to treatment. Human epidermal growth factor receptor type II (HER2) positive breast cancer represents a clinical challenge for current therapy. It has motivated the development of novel and more effective therapeutic EGFR family target drugs, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This review focuses on the effects of three TKIs mostly studied in HER2- positive breast cancer, lapatinib, gefitinib and neratinib. Herein, we discuss the mechanism of action, therapeutic advantages and clinical applications of these TKIs. To date, TKIs seem to be promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast tumors, either as monotherapy or combined with other pharmacological agents.

  9. Factors associated with initial treatment and survival for clinically localized prostate cancer: results from the CDC-NPCR Patterns of Care Study (PoC1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schymura, Maria J; Kahn, Amy R; German, Robert R; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Cress, Rosemary D; Finch, Jack L; Fulton, John P; Shen, Tiefu; Stuckart, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Despite the large number of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, there is as yet no consensus concerning appropriate treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial treatment patterns for localized prostate cancer in a population-based sample and to determine the clinical and patient characteristics associated with initial treatment and overall survival. The analysis included 3,300 patients from seven states, diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer in 1997. We examined the association of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with four treatment options: radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and watchful waiting. Diagnostic and treatment information was abstracted from medical records. Socioeconomic measures were derived from the 2000 Census based on the patient's residence at time of diagnosis. Vital status through December 31, 2002, was obtained from medical records and linkages to state vital statistics files and the National Death Index. Multiple logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards models identified factors associated with initial treatment and overall survival, respectively. Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received the following treatments: radical prostatectomy (39.7%), radiation therapy (31.4%), hormone therapy (10.3%), or watchful waiting (18.6%). After multivariable adjustment, the following variables were associated with conservative treatment (hormone therapy or watchful waiting): older age, black race, being unmarried, having public insurance, having non-screen detected cancer, having normal digital rectal exam results, PSA values above 20, low Gleason score (2-4), comorbidity, and state of residence. Among patients receiving definitive treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy), older age, being unmarried, PSA values above 10, unknown Gleason score, state of residence, as well as black race in patients under 60 years of age, were

  10. Factors associated with initial treatment and survival for clinically localized prostate cancer: results from the CDC-NPCR Patterns of Care Study (PoC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulton John P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the large number of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, there is as yet no consensus concerning appropriate treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial treatment patterns for localized prostate cancer in a population-based sample and to determine the clinical and patient characteristics associated with initial treatment and overall survival. Methods The analysis included 3,300 patients from seven states, diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer in 1997. We examined the association of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with four treatment options: radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and watchful waiting. Diagnostic and treatment information was abstracted from medical records. Socioeconomic measures were derived from the 2000 Census based on the patient's residence at time of diagnosis. Vital status through December 31, 2002, was obtained from medical records and linkages to state vital statistics files and the National Death Index. Multiple logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards models identified factors associated with initial treatment and overall survival, respectively. Results Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received the following treatments: radical prostatectomy (39.7%, radiation therapy (31.4%, hormone therapy (10.3%, or watchful waiting (18.6%. After multivariable adjustment, the following variables were associated with conservative treatment (hormone therapy or watchful waiting: older age, black race, being unmarried, having public insurance, having non-screen detected cancer, having normal digital rectal exam results, PSA values above 20, low Gleason score (2-4, comorbidity, and state of residence. Among patients receiving definitive treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, older age, being unmarried, PSA values above 10, unknown Gleason score, state of residence, as well as black

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: shaista.hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, Karen [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  12. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Shaista; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly; Harris, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent; Thomas, Karen; Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  13. Integrative medicine for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000932.htm Integrative medicine for cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... help relieve common side effects of cancer or cancer treatment, such as fatigue, anxiety, pain, and nausea. Some ...

  14. Design and implementation of a decision support system for breast cancer treatment based on clinical practice guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skevofilakas, M.T.; Nikita, K.S.; Templaleksis, P.H.; Birbas, K.N.; Kaklamanos, I.G.; Bonatsos, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is the clinical practice that uses medical data and proof in order to make efficient clinical decisions. Information technology (IT) can play a crucial role in exploiting the huge size of raw medical data involved. In an attempt to improve clinical efficacy, health care society nowadays also utilizes a new assistant, clinical guidelines. Our research concerns the medical domain of the breast cancer disease. Our research's focus is twofold; our primary goal is to ensure consistency in clinical practice by importing clinical guidelines in an IT driven decision support system (DSS). Furthermore, we seek to improve visualization of disease specific, clinical data, providing for it's faster and more efficient use. (orig.)

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade ≥3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  16. Eribulin in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Swami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Halichondrin B is a complex, natural, polyether macrolide derived from marine sponges. Eribulin is a structurally-simplified, synthetic, macrocyclic ketone analogue of Halichondrin B. Eribulin was approved by United States Food and Drug Administration in 2010 as a third-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients who have previously been treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. It has a unique microtubule dynamics inhibitory action. Phase III studies have either been completed or are currently ongoing in breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Phase I and II studies in multiple cancers and various combinations are currently ongoing. This article reviews the available information on eribulin with respect to its clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, metabolism, preclinical studies, and with special focus on clinical trials.

  17. Mammary neoplasm inflammatory: clinic presentation: combined treatment value; Cancer inflamatorio de mama: presentacion clinica: valor de los tratamientos combinados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola Alles, A; Sabini Gaye, G; Barrios Herrera, E; Muse Sevrini, I

    1995-06-01

    On a total of 1152 patients bearing of cancer of she suckles tried in the period 1978-1988, 41 of she(3.5% )corresponding to the variety inflamatory. Her ages was understood between 26 and 73 years , was been 15(63,5% )postmenopause. Clinically they presented commitment mammary exclusive 34,1%, invasion ganglionar lorregional 48,7% and 17% was disseminated remaining. The initial treatment bases on 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy type FCA, safe in patient with more years that they received the association CMF. All then were irradiated with dose of 5000-6000 cGy on she suckles and territories ganglionares. Finish the treatment with 6 to 8 additional cycles of the patients' chemotherapy. Nobody it was subjected to surgical. The middle survive of the population's total it was of 22 meses, has been of 26 for the premenopause and 15 for the posmenopause. The percentage of relapses arrive to 30% and 45% in the located ways they were disseminated during its evolution. It highlights that the therapeutic strategy you bases on the association open chemotherapy, radiotherapy remaining the possibility of the handling of high citostatics dose with or without transplants of osseous medulla osea (Author) [Spanish] Sobre un total de 1152 pacientes portadoras de cancer de mama tratadas en el periodo 1978-1988, 41 de ellas(3.5%)correspondieron a la variedad inflamatoria. Sus edades estaban comprendidas entre 26 y 73 an os,siendo 15(63,5%) posmenopausicas. Clinicamente presentaron compromiso mamario exclusivo 34,1%, invasion ganglionar lorregional 48,7% y estaban diseminadas 17% resptantes. El tratamiento inicial se baso en 3-4 ciclos de quimioterapia tipo FCA, salvo en pacientes anosas que recibieron la asociacion CMF. Todas ellas luego se irradiaron con dosis de 5000-6000 cGy sobre mama y territorios ganglionares. Se culmino el tratamiento con 6 a 8 ciclos adicionales de quimioterapia. Ninguna de las pacientes fue sometida a cirugia. La sobrevida media del total de la poblacion fue de 22

  18. Clinical Usefulness of Tools to Support Decision-making for Palliative Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Révész, Dóra; Tamminga, Hans J.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Koopman, Mirjam; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jansma, Ilse P.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Coupé, Veerle M. H.

    2018-01-01

    Decision-making regarding palliative treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is complex and comprises numerous decisions. Decision-making should be guided by the premise of maintaining and/or improving patients' quality of life, by patient preference, and by the trade-off

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer, part II of II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G. Zaorsky, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: External beam radiation is a key component of the curative management of T1 and T2 prostate cancer. By combining the most recent medical literature, these Appropriateness Criteria can aid clinicians in determining the appropriate treatment delivery and personalized approaches for individual patients.

  20. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  1. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000827.htm Cancer treatment - dealing with pain To use the sharing features ... test, can cause pain. Treatment. Many types of cancer treatments can cause pain, including chemotherapy , radiation , and surgery. ...

  2. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    Indications and contraindications for radiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The role of chemoradiation among esophagus cancer treatment methods is determined.Thechnical, dosimetric and clinical data are sequently delivered. Preparation of a patient for chemoradiation is described. Recommendations on their most efficient use are given

  3. Cost identification of Nordic FLIRI, Nordic FLOX, XELIRI and XELOX in first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer in Sweden -- a clinical practice model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Karin; Carlsson, Göran; Holmberg, Christoffer; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2012-09-01

    The role of health-related economy is crucial due to the finite healthcare resources. Intravenous (i.v.) regimes Nordic FLOX and Nordic FLIRI, and the partly oral alternatives XELIRI and XELOX are four commonly used chemotherapies in the first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) in the Scandinavian countries, all with different costs. To describe and compare costs associated with four commonly used treatments for advanced CRC in clinical routine practice. An additional aim was to evaluate the theoretical cost impact of adverse effects associated with the therapies. The retrospective study was carried out using observations and a clinical quality database of CRC patients treated with Nordic FLOX, Nordic FLIRI, XELIRI and XELOX as first line at an oncology clinic in Gothenburg, Sweden. The treatments are used in parallel in clinical practice. All patients treated from 2003 to 2009 were included. The clinical outcome of the therapies was equivalent; mean treatment time was 5.9-7.7 months. A clinical economic evaluation model was designed. All direct costs associated with the baseline treatment, administration of chemotherapy and drug costs were collected and evaluated. The maximum cost for the four treatments was estimated to be 72 000-75 000 SEK per patient for six months, of this approximately 8000 SEK was linked to treatment of toxicity. During six months the i.v. treatments could include 17 more outpatient visits per patient compared to the oral alternatives. During treatment at the clinic around 20% of the patients were hospitalised (XELOX excluded, because of few included patients). The results indicate that the four regimens are similar in terms of treatment costs. Different costs affect the total cost. The oral alternative makes it possible to treat additional patients with the same labour force resources. Treatment of adverse effects contributes to extensive resource use at the hospital.

  4. Breast cancer: Diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariel, I.M.; Clearly, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This is a publication about the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer with an appeal for unified reporting of end results. Nine chapters cover historical reviews, risk factors, pathology-receptors-immunology, detection and diagnosis, treatment of the potentially curable patient, and treatment of the patient with advanced disease. The three concluding chapters discuss reconstruction, special clinical situations, and support for the patient. The role of radiation therapy is presented well. The current status of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and combined therapies is also addressed by authoritative authors

  5. [Treatment of testicular cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Boyle, Helen; Culine, Stéphane; Fizazi, Karim; Fléchon, Aude; Massard, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Germ-cell tumours (GCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young men. Since the late 1970s, disseminated GCT have been a paradigm for curable metastatic cancer and metastatic GCTs are highly curable with cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of residual masses. Patients' prognosis is currently assessed using the International Germ-Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC) and used to adapt the burden of chemotherapy. Approximately 20% of patients still do not achieve cure after first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and need salvage chemotherapy (high dose or standard dose chemotherapy). Clinical stage I testicular cancer is the most common presentation and different strategies are proposed: adjuvant therapies, surgery or surveillance. During the last three decades, clinical trials and strong international collaborations lead to the development of a consensus in the management of GCTs.

  6. Outcome of cervix uteri cancer patients: Clinical treatment results and toxicity profile in a retrospective study from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mohamed E; Bahadur, Yasir A; Hassouna, Ashraf H; Fawzy, Ehab E; Nasr, Azza M; Sadiq, Bakr B; Dada, Reyad; Sait, Khalid H; Anfinan, Nisrin M

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the survival outcome, pattern of failure and prognostic factors in cervix uteri cancer patients. We reviewed the data of 60 patients with stages IB-IVA cancer who were treated between January 2004 and December 2010. Most patients (n = 50; 83%) had squamous cell carcinoma. Stage IIB was the most common presentation (n = 41; 68%). Forty-seven patients (78%) received Cisplatin concurrent with radiotherapy (CRT). The 2- and 4-year overall survival (OS) was 82% and 79%, respectively. Prolongation of the overall treatment time (OAT) for greater than 56 days, advanced stage and pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) levels (cervix uteri cancer patients and the prognostic factors are comparable to those of previous reports. Orthogonal brachytherapy planning and vaginal infiltration negatively predicted relapse. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  8. Clinical presentation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of thyroid cancer (TC) as seen at the Nuclear Medicine Department, where the patients investigated prior to diagnosis of disease are clinically suspected to harbor malignancy and mostly referred for scintigraphic investigations are presented

  9. Clinical-morphological characteristic of papillary thyroid cancer in children and adolescents and surgical tactic of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarenko, I.V.; Rybakov, S.I.; Bogdanova, T.I.; Kovalenko, A.Ye.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of surgical treatment of 300 patients of children and adolescent ages with papillary thyroid carcinoma has shown in the paper. It has been noticed that at the time after the Chernobyl accident the majority of thyroid carcinomas in children and adolescents has been characterized with the combined solid-follicular variants of structure with the expressed aggressive properties: early lymphogenic metastasis and local invasiveness of primary tumor. The method of radical treatment for patients of children and adolescent ages with papillary thyroid cancer was thyroidectomy with the following radioiodine therapy and suppressive therapy with the thyroid hormones

  10. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose–Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45–50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy for tumor; α/β = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV (± 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 (±30) cm 3 , and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 (±14) cm 3 . The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 (±13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 (±20) Gy, 76 (±16) Gy, 70 (±9) Gy, and 60 (±9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19–87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable

  11. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  12. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  14. Radiochemotherapy in Anal Cancer: cCR, clinical outcomes and quality of life using two different treatment schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Sara; Trignani, Marianna; Neri, Matteo; Milano, Angelo; Innocenti, Paolo; Taraborrelli, Maria; Augurio, Antonietta; Vinciguerra, Annamaria; Di Tommaso, Monica; Ursini, Lucia Anna; Di Pilla, Angelo; Di Nicola, Marta; Genovesi, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Main endpoint was a response rate to therapy; secondary endpoints were disease-free survival, overall survival, acute and late toxicities, specially in terms of anorectal and urinary continence. Radiochemotherapy for anal cancer achieves a good clinical response, locoregional control, anal function preservation. However, oncologic outcomes can differ using radiotherapy plus fluorouracil and mytomicin vs. cisplatin and fluorouracil. Between 2000 and 2012, 27 anal cancer patients receiving radiotherapy combined with two different radiochemotherapy schedules, fluorouracil and mytomicin (group A) and cisplatin plus fluorouracil (group B). The Kaplan-Meier method was also used to estimate local control, overall survival and disease free survival. Statistical significance between curves was evaluated using the Log-rank test. Complete pathological response was found in 85.2% of patients, with higher rates of response in the group A (100% vs. 63.6%, p = 0.039). No significantly difference was found between the two groups for the other endpoints. Low rates of both acute and late toxicities were recorded. Radiotherapy plus fluorouracil and mytomicin provide a better complete pathological response than radiotherapy plus cisplatin and fluorouracil and a greater rate of anal sphincter function preservation. Globally, radiochemotherapy of the anal cancer provides excellent clinical outcomes with a good profile of acute and late toxicity, without difference between the two groups studied.

  15. Cetuximab: clinical results in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiello, E; Giuliani, F; Gebbia, V; Piano, A; Agueli, R; Colucci, G

    2007-06-01

    In recent years, the introduction of targeted therapies into clinical practice seems to offer incremental benefits in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), mainly when they are employed in combination with optimal chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. In this paper, we focus on Cetuximab and its role in the treatment of mCRC.

  16. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000032.htm Dry mouth during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you ...

  17. Safe drinking during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000060.htm Drinking water safely during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. During and right after your cancer treatment, your body may not be able to protect ...

  18. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  19. Clinical practice guidelines of the French Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and the French Society for Psycho-oncology: refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, J C; Adam, V; Block, V; Metzger, M; Salleron, J; Dauchy, S

    2017-11-01

    The study's purpose was to develop practical guidelines for assessment and management of refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer. The French Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and the French Society for Psycho-oncology gathered a task force that applied a consensus methodology to draft guidelines studied predisposing situations, the diagnosis, regulatory aspects, and the management of refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer. We propose five guidelines: (1) be aware of the conditions/profiles of patients most often associated with refusal of treatment so as to adequately underpin the care and support measures; (2) understand the complexity of the process of refusal and knowing how to accurately identify the type and the modalities of the refused treatments; (3) apply a way to systematically analyze refusal, thereby promoting progression from a situation of disaccord toward a consensual decision; (4) devise procedures, according to the legal context, to address refusal of treatment that safeguards the stakeholders in situations of sustained disaccord; and (5) know the indications for ethical collective decision-making. The quality of the relationship between patients and health professionals, and the communication between them are essential components involved in reaching a point of consent or refusal of treatment. A process of systematic analysis of refusal is recommended as the only way to ensure that all of the physiological, psychological, and contextual elements that are potentially involved are taken into account.

  20. Alternative Cancer Treatments: 10 Options to Consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative cancer treatments: 10 options to consider Alternative cancer treatments can't cure your cancer, but they may provide some ... that may help them, including complementary and alternative cancer treatments. If cancer makes you feel as if you ...

  1. A potent and orally active antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in clinical development for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Sun, Haiying; Peng, Yuefeng; Lu, Jianfeng; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; McEachern, Donna; Liu, Liu; Qiu, Su; Yang, Chao-Yie; Miller, Rebecca; Yi, Han; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Duxin; Kang, Sanmao; Guo, Ming; Leopold, Lance; Yang, Dajun; Wang, Shaomeng

    2011-04-28

    We report the discovery and characterization of SM-406 (compound 2), a potent and orally bioavailable Smac mimetic and an antagonist of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). This compound binds to XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2 proteins with K(i) of 66.4, 1.9, and 5.1 nM, respectively. Compound 2 effectively antagonizes XIAP BIR3 protein in a cell-free functional assay, induces rapid degradation of cellular cIAP1 protein, and inhibits cancer cell growth in various human cancer cell lines. It has good oral bioavailability in mice, rats, non-human primates, and dogs, is highly effective in induction of apoptosis in xenograft tumors, and is capable of complete inhibition of tumor growth. Compound 2 is currently in phase I clinical trials for the treatment of human cancer.

  2. Clinical and radiological characteristics of central pulmonary adenocarcinoma: a comparison with central squamous cell carcinoma and small cell lung cancer and the impact on treatment response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhe Wang,1,2 Minghuan Li,2 Yong Huang,3 Li Ma,3 Hui Zhu,2 Li Kong,2 Jinming Yu2 1School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; 3Department of Radiology, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China Purpose: The proportion of central pulmonary adenocarcinoma (ADC in central-type lung cancer has been gradually increasing due to the overall increasing incidence of pulmonary ADC. But the clinical and radiological characteristics of central ADCs remain unclear. In this study, we compared the clinical and radiological characteristics of central ADCs with those of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs and squamous cell carcinomas (SQCCs and investigated the impact of these characteristics on patients’ treatment response. Patients and methods: The medical records of 302 consecutive patients with central lung cancer from July 2014 to September 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 99 patients with ADC, 95 with SQCC and 108 with SCLC. Computed tomography images were interpreted by two radiologists. Treatment response was determined by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Univariate analyses found that younger age, female sex, no history of smoking, higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, contralateral hilum lymphadenopathy, contralateral lung metastasis, pleural nodules and pleural metastasis to the interlobular fissure were significantly correlated with central ADC. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that compared with central SQCC, female sex, younger age, no history of smoking, higher levels of CEA and contralateral hilum lymphadenopathy were the significantly independent indicators of central pulmonary ADC. Furthermore, compared with central SCLC, younger age, higher levels of CEA and cytokeratin 19 fragment (Cyfra21-1, lower

  3. Clinical use of S-HER2 in breast cancer for detecting metastatic recurrence and monitoring effect of trastuzumab treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Ina Mathilde; Brandslund, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    % and the positive predictive value was 47% using a cutoff value of 15 μg/L. Further, we have shown that the S-HER2 value reflects the effect of targeted treatment with trastuzumab. An increase in S-HER2 was correlated with progression of disease in 40 out of 44 clinical courses, whereas a decrease in S-HER2...

  4. Rate of Clinical Complete Response for 1 Year or More in Bone-Metastatic Breast Cancer after Comprehensive Treatments including Autologous Formalin-Fixed Tumor Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Fumito; Imaoka, Yuki; Sumi, Yuusuke; Uemae, Yoji; Yasuda-Kurihara, Hiroko; Ishihara, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Tsubasa; Ohno, Tadao

    2018-01-01

    No effective treatment has been developed for bone-metastatic breast cancer. We found 3 cases with clinical complete response (cCR) of the bone metastasis and longer overall survival of the retrospectively examined cohort treated comprehensively including autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV). AFTV was prepared individually for each patient from their own formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. Three patients maintained cCR status of the bone metastasis for 17 months or more. Rate of cCR for 1 year or more appeared to be 15% (3/20) after comprehensive treatments including AFTV. The median overall survival time (60.0 months) and the 3- to 8-year survival rates after diagnosis of bone metastasis were greater than those of historical control cohorts in Japan (1988-2002) and in the nationwide population-based cohort study of Denmark (1999-2007). Bone-metastatic breast cancer may be curable after comprehensive treatments including AFTV, although larger scale clinical trial is required.

  5. Rate of Clinical Complete Response for 1 Year or More in Bone-Metastatic Breast Cancer after Comprehensive Treatments including Autologous Formalin-Fixed Tumor Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumito Kuranishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. No effective treatment has been developed for bone-metastatic breast cancer. We found 3 cases with clinical complete response (cCR of the bone metastasis and longer overall survival of the retrospectively examined cohort treated comprehensively including autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV. Patients and Methods. AFTV was prepared individually for each patient from their own formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. Results. Three patients maintained cCR status of the bone metastasis for 17 months or more. Rate of cCR for 1 year or more appeared to be 15% (3/20 after comprehensive treatments including AFTV. The median overall survival time (60.0 months and the 3- to 8-year survival rates after diagnosis of bone metastasis were greater than those of historical control cohorts in Japan (1988–2002 and in the nationwide population-based cohort study of Denmark (1999–2007. Conclusion. Bone-metastatic breast cancer may be curable after comprehensive treatments including AFTV, although larger scale clinical trial is required.

  6. Gallbladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Types of treatment for gallbladder cancer include surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Treatment of gallbladder cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, cannot be removed by surgery, or has come back after treatment is often within a clinical trial. Find out about treatment options for gallbladder cancer.

  7. Scalpel or SABR for Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Clinical Considerations for the Multidisciplinary Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Treatment options for early-stage (T1-2 N0) non-small cell lung cancer are often limited by the patient's advanced age, poor performance status, and comorbidities. Despite these challenges, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) provides a highly effective and safe therapy for intrathoracic tumors and has become the standard of care for delivering definitive treatment in medically inoperable patients. High-quality treatment, which includes reliable immobilization, accurate tumor targeting, and precise verification of dose delivery, is essential both to achieve successful cure and to avoid debilitating toxicities. Generally, SABR is well tolerated in patients with peripherally located tumors, but even centrally or superiorly located lesions can be treated if there is adequate conformal avoidance of normal structures and/or modified fractionation to meet dose constraints. While several preliminary studies suggest that SABR is as efficacious as surgery in operable patients, results of randomized data will illuminate whether the indications for SABR can be expanded to include patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Herein, we review the rationale for using SABR and its application in treating different patient populations with early-stage lung cancer.

  8. Scalpel or SABR for Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Clinical Considerations for the Multidisciplinary Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Y. Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for early-stage (T1-2 N0 non-small cell lung cancer are often limited by the patient’s advanced age, poor performance status, and comorbidities. Despite these challenges, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR provides a highly effective and safe therapy for intrathoracic tumors and has become the standard of care for delivering definitive treatment in medically inoperable patients. High-quality treatment, which includes reliable immobilization, accurate tumor targeting, and precise verification of dose delivery, is essential both to achieve successful cure and to avoid debilitating toxicities. Generally, SABR is well tolerated in patients with peripherally located tumors, but even centrally or superiorly located lesions can be treated if there is adequate conformal avoidance of normal structures and/or modified fractionation to meet dose constraints. While several preliminary studies suggest that SABR is as efficacious as surgery in operable patients, results of randomized data will illuminate whether the indications for SABR can be expanded to include patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Herein, we review the rationale for using SABR and its application in treating different patient populations with early-stage lung cancer.

  9. Continuous DC-CIK infusions restore CD8+ cellular immunity, physical activity and improve clinical efficacy in advanced cancer patients unresponsive to conventional treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Jie; Jiang, Ni; Song, Qing-Kun; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Song, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Xin-Na; Yang, Hua-Bing; Ren, Jun; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2015-01-01

    There are few choices for treatment of advanced cancer patients who do not respond to or tolerate conventional anti-cancer treatments. Therefore this study aimed to deploy the benefits and clinical efficacy of continuous dendritic cell-cytokine induced killer cell infusions in such patients. A total of 381 infusions (from 67 advanced cases recruited) were included in this study. All patients underwent peripheral blood mononuclear cell apheresis for the following cellular therapy and dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer cells were expanded in vitro. Peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets were quantified through flow cytometry to address the cellular immunity status. Clinical efficacy and physical activities were evaluated by RECIST criteria and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scores respectively. Logistic regression model was used to estimate the association between cellular infusions and clinical benefits. An average of 5.7±2.94x10(9) induced cells were infused each time and patients were exposed to 6 infusions. Cellular immunity was improved in that cytotoxic CD8+CD28+T lymphocytes were increased by 74% and suppressive CD8+CD28-T lymphocytes were elevated by 16% (p<0.05). Continuous infusion of dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer cells was associated with improvement of both patient status and cellular immunity. A median of six infusions were capable of reducing risk of progression by 70% (95%CI 0.10-0.91). Every elevation of one ECOG score corresponded to a 3.90-fold higher progression risk (p<0.05) and 1% increase of CD8+CD28- T cell proportion reflecting a 5% higher risk of progression (p<0.05). In advanced cancer patients, continuous dendritic cell-cytokine induced killer cell infusions are capable of recovering cellular immunity, improving patient status and quality of life in those who are unresponsive to conventional cancer treatment.

  10. A phase I study of combination vaccine treatment of five therapeutic epitope-peptides for metastatic colorectal cancer; safety, immunological response, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazama, Shoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Takenouchi, Hiroko; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Tsunedomi, Ryouichi; Inoue, Yuka; Tokuhisa, Yoshihiro; Iizuka, Norio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Shinozaki, Hirokazu; Kamiya, Akira; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Oka, Masaaki

    2014-03-10

    To evaluate the safety of combination vaccine treatment of multiple peptides, phase I clinical trial was conducted for patients with advanced colorectal cancer using five novel HLA-A*2402-restricted peptides, three peptides derived from oncoantigens, ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), 34 kDa-translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOMM34), and insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA binding protein 3 (KOC1), and the remaining two from angiogenesis factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGFR2. Eighteen HLA- A*2402-positive colorectal cancer patients who had failed to standard therapy were enrolled in this study. 0.5 mg, 1.0 mg or 3.0 mg each of the peptides was mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant and then subcutaneously injected at five separated sites once a week. We also examined possible effect of a single site injection of "the cocktail of 5 peptides" on the immunological responses. ELISPOT assay was performed before and after vaccinations in the schedule of every 4 weeks. The vaccine treatment using multiple peptides was well tolerated without any severe treatment-associated systemic adverse events. Dose-dependent induction of peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was observed. The single injection of "peptides cocktail" did not diminish the immunological responses. Regarding the clinical outcome, one patient achieved complete response and 6 patients revealed stable disease for 4 to 7 months. The median overall survival time (MST) was 13.5 months. Patients, in which we detected induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific to 3 or more peptides, revealed significantly better prognosis (MST; 27.8 months) than those with poorer immune responses (MST; 3.7 months) (p = 0.032). Our cancer vaccine treatment using multiple peptides is a promising approach for advanced colorectal cancer with the minimum risk of systemic adverse reactions. UMIN-CTR number UMIN000004948.

  11. Treatment results and complications in clinical combinations of radiation and chemotherapy in the treatment of localized cancer in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie; Shigematsu, Yasushi

    1981-01-01

    By using chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy, significant improvements were achieved in treatment results of localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, intraoral cancer, and carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. Administering chemotherapy with radiation was given sumultaneously in the patients with intraoral cancer (BLM iv) and with carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (5-FU ia). In the patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chemotherapy (1 or 2 cycles of COPP) was administered and followed by radiotherapy. If radiation dose were reduced by about 50% in the intraoral cancer, 20% in carcinoma of the maxillary sinus, and 10% in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute and/or chronic complications were within tolerable limits in this series of observations, although toxicity was dose-related for both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Single High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Session as a Whole Gland Primary Treatment for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Limani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the treatment outcomes of a single session of whole gland high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa. Methods. Response rates were defined using the Stuttgart and Phoenix criteria. Complications were graded according to the Clavien score. Results. At a median follow-up of 94months, 48 (44.4% and 50 (46.3% patients experienced biochemical recurrence for Phoenix and Stuttgart definition, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial biochemical recurrence free survival rates were 57% and 40%, respectively. The 10-year overall survival rate, cancer specific survival rate, and metastasis free survival rate were 72%, 90%, and 70%, respectively. Preoperative high risk category, Gleason score, preoperative PSA, and postoperative nadir PSA were independent predictors of oncological failure. 24.5% of patients had self-resolving LUTS, 18.2% had urinary tract infection, and 18.2% had acute urinary retention. A grade 3b complication occurred in 27 patients. Pad-free continence rate was 87.9% and the erectile dysfunction rate was 30.8%. Conclusion. Single session HIFU can be alternative therapy for patients with low risk PCa. Patients with intermediate risk should be informed about the need of multiple sessions of HIFU and/or adjuvant treatments and HIFU performed very poorly in high risk patients.

  13. Clinical survey of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tsuyoshi; Hatano, Koji; Satoh, Mototaka; Tsujimoto, Yuichi; Honda, Masahito; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Fujioka, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    Treatment trends and outcomes for prostate cancer in our hospital were reported. A total of 482 patients with prostate cancer treated in our hospital between January, 1990 and December, 2004. The age distribution was from 51 to 99 years-old, with the mean age of 72.9 years-old at onset. The number of prostate cancer patients, especially asymptomatic patients with prostatic specific antigen (PSA) elevation, have increased recently. As for the clinical stage, 92 cases (19.1%), 238 cases (49.4%), 48 cases (10.0%) and 104 cases (21.6%) were stage A, B, C and D, respectively. 425 cases (88.2%) received some form of endocrine therapy. Retropubic prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy was performed in 77 and 57 cases, respectively all cases. The cause-specific 5-year survival rate of the 482 cases was 79.7%, comprising 100% for stage A1, 96.8% for stage A2, 89.4% for stage B, 79.9% for stage C and 42.9% for stage D. The cause-specific 5-year survival was significantly better in the latter patients (1997-2004) than the former patients (1990-1996) in stage C (p=0.0226), D (p=0.0448). In stage C patients, the retropubic prostatectomy (with endocrine therapy) group, increased in the latter period and showed longer cause-specific 5-year survival than the endocrine therapy group (p=0.0027). In stage D2 patients, chemo-endocrine therapy with etoposide (VP-16), adriamycin (ADM) and cisplatin (CDDP) refractory and cause-specific 5-year survival was longer than endocrine therapy alone (p=0.0467, P=0.0381). Our results suggest that retropubic prostatectomy with endocrine therapy and chemo-endocrine therapy are useful for stage C and D prostate cancer patients, respectively. (author)

  14. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  15. Brain cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszow, S.

    1998-01-01

    As soon as 1936 an American physicist proposed to treat certain forms of cancer by using the nuclear reaction: n + 10 B → 7 Li + 4 He where the alpha particles produced could destroy the DNA of surrounding cells. From 1951 to 1961 62 patients underwent this treatment for brain cancer. The results were unsatisfactory: the neutrons were not energetic enough to enter brain tissues deeply and were accompanied by strongly damaging gamma radiation. In Netherlands an installation using the high flux reactor of Petten has been set up. A highly focused neutron beam of about 10 keV with reduced gamma radiation is produced. The first step is to determine the limit exposure and the maximal permissible concentration of boron. (A.C.)

  16. Clinical effectiveness of decongestive treatments on excess arm volume and patient-centered outcomes in women with early breast cancer-related arm lymphedema: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Eunice; Ream, Emma; Taylor, Cath; Bick, Debra

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the effect of decongestive lymphedema treatment on excess arm volume or patient-centered outcomes in women presenting within either 12 months or a mean nine months of developing arm lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Introduction: Lymphedema is a common consequence of breast cancer treatment requiring life-long treatment to reduce symptoms and prevent complications. Currently, evidence to inform the optimal decongestive lymphedema treatment package is lacking. Inclusion criteria: The review included studies on women who received lymphedema treatment within either 12 months or a mean of nine months of developing unilateral breast cancer-related arm lymphedema. The intervention was any decongestive lymphedema treatment delivered with the purpose of reducing arm lymphedema, compared to another form of lymphedema treatment (whether self or practitioner-administered), placebo or no treatment. The clinical outcome was excess arm volume; patient-centered outcomes were health-related quality of life, arm heaviness, arm function, patient-perceived benefit and satisfaction with treatment. Experimental study designs were eligible, including randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental, prospective and retrospective before and after studies were considered. Methods: A three-step search strategy was utilized to find published and unpublished studies. The search identified studies published from the inception of each database to July 6, 2016. Reference lists were scanned to identify further eligible studies. Studies were critically appraised using appropriate standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Details describing each study and treatment results regarding outcomes of interest were extracted from papers included in the review using appropriate standardized data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Due to heterogeneity in included studies, results for similar

  17. Clinical variability of target volume description and treatment plans in conformal radiotherapy in muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logue, John P; Sharrock, Carole L; Cowan, Richard A.; Read, Graham; Marrs, Julie; Mott, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The delineation of tumor and the production of a treatment plan to encompass this is the prime step in radiotherapy planning. Conformal radiotherapy is developing rapidly and although plentiful research has addressed the implementation of the radiotherapy prescription, scant attention has been made to the fundamental step of production, by the clinician, of an appropriate target volume. As part of an ongoing randomized trial of conformal radiotherapy, in bladder cancer, we have therefore assessed the interphysician variability of radiologists and radiation oncologists (RO) in assessing Gross Tumor Volume(GTV) (ICRU 50) and the adherence of the radiation oncologists to the study protocol of producing a Planning Target Volume (PTV). Materials and Methods: Four patients with T3 carcinoma of bladder who had been entered into the trial were identified. The clinical details, MR scans and CT scans were made available. Eight RO and 3 dedicated diagnostic oncology radiologists were invited to directly outline the GTV onto CT images on a planning computer consul. The RO in addition created a PTV following the trial protocol of 15mm margin around the GTV. Three RO sub-specialized in Urological radiotherapy; all RO had completed training. Volumes were produced, for each clinician, and comparison of these volumes and their isocenters were analyzed. In addition the margins allowed were measured and compared. Results: There was a maximum variation ratio (largest to smallest volume outlined) of the GTV in the four cases of 1.74 among radiologists and 3.74 among oncologists. There was a significant difference (p=0.01) in mean GTV between RO and the radiologists. The mean GTV of the RO exceeded the radiologists by a factor of 1.29 with a mean difference of 13.4 cm 3 The between observer variance within speciality comprised only 9.9% of the total variance in the data having accounted for case and observers speciality. The variation ratio in PTV among oncologists

  18. Combined endoscopic treatment in the patient with inoperable middle third esophageal cancer (4-year clinical follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of 4-year clinical follow-up in the patient with obstructive inoperable retropericardial esophageal cancer are represented. According to cardiac co-morbidity (myocardial infarction, postinfarction cardiosclerosis the palliative care for patient was managed. To preserve patency of esophagus multiple courses of endoscopic photodynamic therapy by means of the approach developed in P.A. Herzen MCRI were performed. From 2011 to 2014 thirteen courses of photodynamic therapy with photosens were conducted. The patient was under follow-up for 4 years and 3 months to his death in 2015. For follow-up period the patient had oral feeding with no signs of dysphagia, not significant weight loss and with good quality of life. 

  19. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orio, Peter F III; Merrick, Gregory S; Allen, Zachariah A; Butler, Wayne M; Wallner, Kent E; Kurko, Brian S; Galbreath, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT) on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR) urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66) or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59). All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively). Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc) had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR (<40 cc) had no demonstrable change throughout treatment. Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes

  20. Clinical complete response (cCR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and conservative treatment in rectal cancer. Findings from the ACCORD 12/PRODIGE 2 randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Benezery, Karène; Laroche, Guy de; Mahé, Marc-André; Boige, Valérie; Juzyna, Béata

    2015-01-01

    Background: During the ACCORD 12 randomized trial, an evaluation of the clinical tumor response was prospectively performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The correlations between clinical complete response and patient characteristics and treatment outcomes are reported. Material and methods: Between 2005 and 2008 the Accord 12 trial accrued 598 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and compared two different neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapies (Capox 50: capecitabine + oxaliplatin + 50 Gy vs Cap 45: capecitabine + 45 Gy). An evaluation of the clinical tumor response with rectoscopy and digital rectal examination was planned before surgery. A score to classify tumor response was used adapted from the RECIST definition: complete response: no visible or palpable tumor; partial response, stable and progressive disease. Results: The clinical tumor response was evaluable in 201 patients. Score was: complete response: 8% (16 patients); partial response: 68% (137 patients); stable: 21%; progression: 3%. There was a trend toward more complete response in the Capox 50 group (9.3% vs 6.7% with Cap 45). In the whole cohort of 201 pts complete response was significantly more frequent in T2 tumors (28%; p = 0.025); tumors <4 cm in diameter (14%; p = 0.017), less than half rectal circumference and with a normal CEA level. Clinical complete response observed in 16 patients was associated with more conservative treatment (p = 0.008): 2 patients required an abdomino-perineal resection, 11 an anterior resection and 3 patients benefited from organ preservation (2 local excision, 1 “watch and wait”. A complete response was associated with more ypT0 (73%; p < 0.001); ypNO (92%); R0 circumferential margin (100%). Conclusion: These data support the hypothesis that a clinical complete response assessed using rectoscopy and digital rectal examination after neoadjuvant therapy may increase the chance of a sphincter or organ preservation in selected rectal cancers

  1. Clinical complete response (cCR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and conservative treatment in rectal cancer. Findings from the ACCORD 12/PRODIGE 2 randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Benezery, Karène; de Laroche, Guy; Mahé, Marc-André; Boige, Valérie; Juzyna, Béata

    2015-05-01

    During the ACCORD 12 randomized trial, an evaluation of the clinical tumor response was prospectively performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The correlations between clinical complete response and patient characteristics and treatment outcomes are reported. Between 2005 and 2008 the Accord 12 trial accrued 598 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and compared two different neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapies (Capox 50: capecitabine+oxaliplatin+50Gy vs Cap 45: capecitabine+45Gy). An evaluation of the clinical tumor response with rectoscopy and digital rectal examination was planned before surgery. A score to classify tumor response was used adapted from the RECIST definition: complete response: no visible or palpable tumor; partial response, stable and progressive disease. The clinical tumor response was evaluable in 201 patients. Score was: complete response: 8% (16 patients); partial response: 68% (137 patients); stable: 21%; progression: 3%. There was a trend toward more complete response in the Capox 50 group (9.3% vs 6.7% with Cap 45). In the whole cohort of 201 pts complete response was significantly more frequent in T2 tumors (28%; p=0.025); tumors <4cm in diameter (14%; p=0.017), less than half rectal circumference and with a normal CEA level. Clinical complete response observed in 16 patients was associated with more conservative treatment (p=0.008): 2 patients required an abdomino-perineal resection, 11 an anterior resection and 3 patients benefited from organ preservation (2 local excision, 1 "watch and wait". A complete response was associated with more ypT0 (73%; p<0.001); ypNO (92%); R0 circumferential margin (100%). These data support the hypothesis that a clinical complete response assessed using rectoscopy and digital rectal examination after neoadjuvant therapy may increase the chance of a sphincter or organ preservation in selected rectal cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stomatitis associated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition: A review of pathogenesis, prevention, treatment, and clinical implications for oral practice in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark S; Rugo, Hope S; Litton, Jennifer K; Meiller, Timothy F

    2018-04-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer may develop oral morbidities that result from therapeutic interventions. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS) is a common adverse event (AE), secondary to mTOR inhibitor therapy, that can have a negative impact on treatment adherence, quality of life, and health care costs. A multidisciplinary team approach is important to minimize mIAS and to maximize treatment benefits to patients with breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and natural history of mIAS. Current and new management strategies for the prevention and treatment of mIAS are described in the context of fostering a coordinated team care approach to optimizing patient care. The authors conducted a PubMed search from 2007 through 2017 using the terms "stomatitis," "mIAS," "everolimus," "mTOR," "metastatic breast cancer," and "oral care." They selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals that reported controlled trials and evidence-based guidelines. mIAS can be distinguished from mucositis caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy on the basis of cause, clinical presentation, and treatment paradigms. Specific preventive and therapeutic management strategies can be implemented across the continuum of patient oral health care. Oral health care providers are on the frontline of oral health care for patients with metastatic breast cancer and are uniquely positioned to provide patient education, advocate accurate reporting of mIAS, and support early identification, monitoring, and prompt intervention to mitigate the severity and duration of this manageable, potentially dose-limiting AE. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A prospective development study of software-guided radio-frequency ablation of primary and secondary liver tumors: Clinical intervention modelling, planning and proof for ablation cancer treatment (ClinicIMPPACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Martin; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Kolesnik, Marina; Jenniskens, Sjoerd; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Eibisberger, Martin; Voglreiter, Philip; Flanagan, Ronan; Mariappan, Panchatcharam; Busse, Harald; Moche, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA) is a promising minimal-invasive treatment option for early liver cancer, however monitoring or predicting the size of the resulting tissue necrosis during the RFA-procedure is a challenging task, potentially resulting in a significant rate of under- or over treatments. Currently there is no reliable lesion size prediction method commercially available. ClinicIMPPACT is designed as multicenter-, prospective-, non-randomized clinical trial to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of innovative planning and simulation software. 60 patients with early liver cancer will be included at four European clinical institutions and treated with the same RFA system. The preinterventional imaging datasets will be used for computational planning of the RFA treatment. All ablations will be simulated simultaneously to the actual RFA procedure, using the software environment developed in this project. The primary outcome measure is the comparison of the simulated ablation zones with the true lesions shown in follow-up imaging after one month, to assess accuracy of the lesion prediction. This unique multicenter clinical trial aims at the clinical integration of a dedicated software solution to accurately predict lesion size and shape after radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors. Accelerated and optimized workflow integration, and real-time intraoperative image processing, as well as inclusion of patient specific information, e.g. organ perfusion and registration of the real RFA needle position might make the introduced software a powerful tool for interventional radiologists to optimize patient outcomes.

  4. Treatment of clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Jerry R

    2012-07-01

    In summary, culture-based therapy and severity levels are key to management of clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy should be strongly considered for gram-positive clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy is not necessary for mild-to-moderate gram-negative clinical mastitis. Antibiotic therapy is warranted for practically all severe clinical mastitis as well as fluids and anti-inflammatory drugs. Clinical mastitis cases due to yeast and fungal pathogens or no growth isolates do not warrant antibiotic therapy.

  5. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Karen; Small, William; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  6. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Orešković, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established

  7. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallner Kent E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. Methods 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66 or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59. All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. Results The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively. Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR ( Conclusion Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes.

  8. Long-term clinical outcome in patients with stage-i nonseminomatous germ cell cancer: a critical review of own treatment modalities in a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Seseke

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The optimal management of patients with clinical stage I non-seminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT I was considered controversial until the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group determined unambiguous treatment strategies. In order to assess the long-term outcome we evaluated the data of patients with NSGCT I. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective evaluation, we included 52 patients with a mean age of 26 years (range 15-58 who were treated with different modalities at our department between 1989 and 2003. Mean follow-up was 5.9 years (range 2-14 years. After orchiectomy, 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, 7 patients underwent retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and 6 men were managed using a surveillance strategy. Survival, recurrence rate and time of recurrence were evaluated. The histological staging and treatment modality was related to the relapse. RESULTS: Tumor specific overall mortality was 3.8%. The mortality and relapse rate of the surveillance strategy, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and chemotherapy was 16.7% / 50%, 14.3% / 14.3% and 0% / 2.5% respectively. All relapsed patients in the surveillance group as well as in the RPLND group had at least one risk factor for developing metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Following the European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer in patients with NSGCT Stage I any treatment decision must be individually related to the patient according to prognostic factors and care capacity of the treating centre. In case of doubt, adjuvant chemotherapy should be the treatment of choice, as it provides the lowest risk of relapse or tumor related death.

  9. Early prostate cancer: particularities of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, F.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction of prostate cancer screening using PSA leads to a disproportional increase of cancer incidence. Most of those tumors are small and indolent in behavior. When diagnosed, they are usually managed by radical treatment modalities despite the growth of serious adverse events of such therapy. Active surveillance appears to be an alternative treatment approach for the majority of those patients. Author stresses on the particularities of the prostate cancer diagnosed in the PSA era. Show the importance of patient stratification and the utility of the use of nomograms in clinical praxis. The clinical importance of treatment choices based on life expectancy of patient, concomitant diseases on one side and cancer biological behavior in the other side is discussed. Critically discuss the new approach of radiation with proton beams advertising that it remains an experimental therapeutic choice. (author)

  10. Follow-up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Follow-Up Medical Care Once you’re done with cancer treatment, ...

  11. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer treatment commonly includes various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. Prognosis and selection of therapy is influenced by clinical and pathology features. Get detailed information about breast cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  12. Clinical experience of Phelloberin A in diarrhea during the treatment of cancer of the cervix uteri with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagabu, Teruo; Takano, Toshiaki; Sano, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Osamu; Saito, Masataka

    1978-01-01

    This drug containing chlorinated berberine and Gennoshoko extract was administered to cases which suffered from diarrhea during external irradiation, and its effect on them were observed. Out of 35 cases of cancer of the cervix uteri from stage I to III, 20 cases in which watery diarrhea was induced over three times a day by external irradiation were given 12 tablets per a day in four divided doses for 7 days. In external irradiation a total of 3000 rads was irradiated in 200 rads per a day (1000 rads per a week) by the whole pelvic irradiation, and after that, irradiation was performed up to 6000 rads by shielding the center. Diarrhea was observed in 20 of 35 cases during external irradiation (57.1%). Diarrhea was recognized in 4 cases in the range from 1000 to 2000 rads (20%), in 13 cases in the range from 2000 to 3000 rads (65%), and 3 cases irradiated by shielding the center (15%). Response to this drug was effective within 3 days after the administration in 9 cases (45%), a little effective in 7 cases (35%), and ineffective in 4 cases (20%). There was a past history of hypertension in cases whose response was ineffective. In the clinical examination after the administration of this drug, abnormalities in kidney and liver functions were not recognized. From the above-mentioned results, it was suggested that this drug was effective on diarrhea which occurred during external irradiation. (Kanao, N.)

  13. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  14. Tailoring exercise interventions to comorbidities and treatment-induced adverse effects in patients with early stage breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy: a framework to support clinical decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeden, Marike; Huijsmans, Rosalie J.; Geleijn, Edwin; de Rooij, Mariëtte; Konings, Inge R.; Buffart, Laurien M.; Dekker, Joost; Stuiver, Martijn M.

    2018-01-01

    Delivery of exercise interventions to patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy requires complex clinical decisions. The purpose of this study was to develop a framework to support clinical decisions for tailoring exercise interventions to common comorbidities and cancer

  15. Testicular Cancer Treatments: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... isn't quite normal). When we talk about tumor markers, we are referring to alphafetoprotein (AFP), beta-hCG ( ... on clinical data (pathology, markers, xrays) Year 1: Tumor Markers and Chest X-ray done every month Abdominal ...

  16. Status and prospects of new clinical methods of cancer diagnostics and treatment based on particle and ion beams available at JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, O.V.

    1996-01-01

    Brief history of radiation therapy is given. New radiation sources providing better distribution of the radiation doses in a patient's body are shown to increase the efficiency of the radiation therapy. Grounds for using heavy nuclear particles to treat malignant tumours and the first clinical tests of these particles at some physics research centres in different countries of the world are considered. A many-room complex of radiation treatment with JINR phasotron beams at the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems is described. The first results of treating cancer patients with proton beams in this complex are given. The prospects for radiation therapy and diagnosis with heavy nuclear beams from other basic facilities of JINR are presented. The necessity of building a radiological hospital and a regional treatment and diagnosis centre in Dubna is discussed, which will allow the fastest and most efficient application of new nuclear physics techniques and designs to medicine. 68 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Clinical features and treatment outcome of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with uncommon or complex epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassan, Matteo; Indraccolo, Stefano; Calabrese, Fiorella; Favaretto, Adolfo; Bonanno, Laura; Polo, Valentina; Zago, Giulia; Lunardi, Francesca; Attili, Ilaria; Pavan, Alberto; Rugge, Massimo; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, PierFranco; Pasello, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) represent the best treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with common exon 19 deletion or exon 21 epidermal growth factor receptor mutation (EGFRm). This is an observational study investigating epidemiology, clinical features and treatment outcome of NSCLC cases harbouring rare/complex EGFRm. Results Among 764 non-squamous NSCLC cases with known EGFRm status, 26(3.4%) harboured rare/complex EGFRm. Patients receiving first-line TKIs (N = 17) achieved median Progression Free Survival (PFS) and Overall Survival (OS) of 53 (IC 95%, 2–105) and 84 (CI 95%, 27–141) weeks respectively, without significant covariate impact. Response Rate and Disease Control Rate (DCR) were 47% and 65%, respectively. Uncommon exon 19 mutations achieved longer OS and PFS and higher DCR compared with exon 18 and 20 mutations. No additional gene mutation was discovered by MassARRAY analysis. TKIs were globally well tolerated. Materials and methods A retrospective review of advanced non-squamous NSCLC harbouring rare/complex EGFRm referred to our Center between 2010 and 2015 was performed. Additional molecular pathways disregulation was explored in selected cases, through MassARRAY analysis. Conclusions Peculiar clinical features and lower TKIs sensitivity of uncommon/complex compared with common EGFRm were shown. Exon 19 EGFRm achieved the best TKIs treatment outcome, while the optimal treatment of exon 18 and 20 mutations should be further clarified. PMID:28427238

  18. A Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Distress After Prostate Cancer Treatment: Development and Feasibility of the Getting Down to Coping Program in Two Different Clinical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockle-Hearne, Jane; Barnett, Deborah; Hicks, James; Simpson, Mhairi; White, Isabel; Faithfull, Sara

    2018-04-30

    Distress after prostate cancer treatment is a substantial burden for up to one-third of men diagnosed. Physical and emotional symptoms and health service use can intensify, yet men are reticent to accept support. To provide accessible support that can be cost effectively integrated into care pathways, we developed a unique, Web-based, self-guided, cognitive-behavior program incorporating filmed and interactive peer support. To assess feasibility of the intervention among men experiencing distress after prostate cancer treatment. Demand, acceptability, change in distress and self-efficacy, and challenges for implementation in clinical practice were measured. A pre-post, within-participant comparison, mixed-methods research design was followed. Phase I and II were conducted in primary care psychological service and secondary care cancer service, respectively. Men received clinician-generated postal invitations: phase I, 432 men diagnosed Web-based. Men with mild and moderate distress were enrolled. Web-based assessment included demographic, disease, treatment characteristics; distress (General Health Questionnaire-28); depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9); anxiety (General Anxiety Disorder Scale-7); self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Symptom Control Inventory); satisfaction (author-generated, Likert-type questionnaire). Uptake and adherence were assessed with reference to the persuasive systems design model. Telephone interviews explored participant experience (phase II, n=10); interviews with health care professionals (n=3) explored implementation issues. A total of 135 men consented (phase I, 61/432, 14.1%; phase II, 74/606, 12.2%); from 96 eligible men screened for distress, 32% (30/96) entered the intervention (phase I, n=10; phase II, n=20). Twenty-four completed the Web-based program and assessments (phase I, n=8; phase II, n=16). Adherence for phase I and II was module completion rate 63% (mean 2.5, SD 1.9) versus 92% (mean 3.7, SD 1.0); rate of

  19. Hyperdosed radiotherapy in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machidon, Vasile; Jovmir, Vasile; Stanislav, Anastasia; Scurtu, Elena; Gazibar, Valeria; Lungu, Viorica

    2010-01-01

    The results of 328 patients with metastasizing breast cancer (BCM) are presented in the article. The distant metastases development in 4,5 % from the lot, which received the neoadjuvant treatment, is a high assurance in argumentation of preoperative hyperdosed X-ray therapy in breast cancer treatment. 15,8% from 100% - that is the significance of hyper dosed X-ray therapy versus classic X-ray therapy used preoperative in case of metastasizing breast cancer. The obtained data can not deny the efficacy of hyperdosed X-ray therapy in preoperative treatment of breast cancer. The hyperdosed X-ray therapy in the present moment remains current in the treatment of breast cancer and different localized cancers. (authors)

  20. CATCH: a randomised clinical trial comparing long-term tinzaparin versus warfarin for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Agnes YY; Bauersachs, Rupert; Janas, Mette S; Jarner, Mikala F; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Meyer, Guy; Khorana, Alok A

    2013-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is recommended and commonly used for extended treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), but its superiority over warfarin has been demonstrated in only one randomised study. We report here the rationale, design and a priori analysis plans of Comparison of Acute Treatments in Cancer Haemostasis (CATCH; NCT01130025), a multinational, Phase III, open-label, randomised controlled trial comparing tinzaparin with warfarin for extended treatment of CAT. The primary objective is to assess the efficacy of tinzaparin in preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with active cancer and acute, symptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism. The secondary objectives are to determine: safety of tinzaparin given over 6 months; clinical and laboratory markers for recurrent VTE and/or major bleeding; 6-month overall mortality; incidence and severity of post-thrombotic syndrome; patient-reported quality of life; and healthcare resource utilisation. Nine hundred patients are randomised to receive tinzaparin 175 IU/kg once daily for 6 months or initial tinzaparin 175 IU/kg once daily for 5–10 days and dose-adjusted warfarin (target INR 2.0–3.0) for 6 months. The primary composite outcome is time to recurrent VTE, including incidental VTE and fatal pulmonary embolism. All patients are followed up to 6 months or death, whichever comes sooner. Blinded adjudication will be performed for all reported VTE, bleeding events and causes of death. Efficacy will be analysed using centrally adjudicated results of all patients according to intention-to-treat analysis. An independent Data Safety Monitoring Board is reviewing data at regular intervals and an interim analysis is planned after 450 patients have completed the study. The results will add significantly to the knowledge of the efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness of tinzaparin in the prevention of recurrent VTE in patients with cancer and thrombosis

  1. The role of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: a controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Kowalska, T.; Glinski, C.

    2000-01-01

    Radiotherapy remains the basic form of treatment in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but there still exist controversies concerning optimal radiotherapy regimen and in particular, the total dose and fractionation schedules. To prove whether the question: if using an unconventional dose fractionation regimen (accelerated hyperfractionation) could improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy patients with NSCLC. Between 1997 and 2000 in the Cancer Centre in Cracow (COOK) a controlled clinical trial was conducted in a group of 150 patients with locally advanced (III Deg) inoperable and unsuitable for radical radiotherapy NSCLC, with no major symptoms of the disease. In 76 patients conventionally fractionated radiotherapy was performed - 50 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks (CF). 74 patients were irradiated twice a day (AHF); the dose per fraction was 1.25 Gy and the minimum interval between fractions - 6 hours. The total dose was 50 Gy in 40 fractions during 26 days. The probability of 12 months survival was 47.4% in the CF arm and 45.9% in the AHF arm; the probability of 24 months survival was 16.2% and 15.8%, respectively. In all 76 patients in CF arm the treatment was carried out in prescribed time without breaks. Out of 74 patients in the A HF group 8 (10,8%) did not complete the treatment and 2 of then died in 3rd and 4th week of treatment. The use of accelerated hyperfractionation does not improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC without severe symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The treatment of choice in this group of patients os conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in 5 week of treatment. (author)

  2. The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Jon D; Eskicioglu, Cagla; Weiser, Martin R; Feingold, Daniel L; Steele, Scott R

    2017-10-01

    The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons is dedicated to ensuring high-quality patient care by advancing the science, prevention, and management of disorders and diseases of the colon, rectum, and anus. The Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee is composed of society members who are chosen because they have demonstrated expertise in the specialty of colon and rectal surgery. This committee was created to lead international efforts in defining quality care for conditions related to the colon, rectum, and anus. This is accompanied by developing Clinical Practice Guidelines based on the best available evidence. These guidelines are inclusive and not prescriptive. Their purpose is to provide information on which decisions can be made, rather than to dictate a specific form of treatment. These guidelines are intended for the use of all practitioners, health care workers, and patients who desire information about the management of the conditions addressed by the topics covered in these guidelines. It should be recognized that these guidelines should not be deemed inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of methods of care reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. The ultimate judgment regarding the propriety of any specific procedure must be made by the physician in light of all the circumstances presented by the individual patient.

  3. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta-Zaragoza O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza,1 Víctor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales,1 Carlos Pérez-Plasencia,2,3 Jonathan Salazar-León,1 Claudia Gómez-Cerón,1 Vicente Madrid-Marina11Direction of Chronic Infections and Cancer, Research Center in Infection Diseases, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; 2Oncogenomics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Tlalpan, México; 3Biomedicine Unit, FES-Iztacala UNAM, México City, MéxicoAbstract: Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%–95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development.Keywords: Cervical cancer, clinical trials, gene therapy, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, siRNAs

  4. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  5. Cancer cachexia, mechanism and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that half of all patients with cancer eventually develop a syndrome of cachexia, with anorexia and a progressive loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle mass. Cancer cachexia is characterized by systemic inflammation, negative protein and energy balance, and an involuntary loss of lean body mass. It is an insidious syndrome that not only has a dramatic impact on patient quality of life, but also is associated with poor responses to chemotherapy and decreased survival. Cachexia is still largely an underestimated and untreated condition, despite the fact that multiple mechanisms are reported to be involved in its development, with a number of cytokines postulated to play a role in the etiology of the persistent catabolic state. Existing therapies for cachexia, including orexigenic appetite stimulants, focus on palliation of symptoms and reduction of the distress of patients and families rather than prolongation of life. Recent therapies for the cachectic syndrome involve a multidisciplinary approach. Combination therapy with diet modification and/or exercise has been added to novel pharmaceutical agents, such as Megestrol acetate, medroxyprogesterone, ghrelin, omega-3-fatty acid among others. These agents are reported to have improved survival rates as well as quality of life. In this review, we will discuss the emerging understanding of the mechanisms of cancer cachexia, the current treatment options including multidisciplinary combination therapies, as well an update on new and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25897346

  6. Fertility effects of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Donald E; Hacker, Neville

    2003-01-01

    Cancer sufferers are a subfertile group, and most treatments have the potential to adversely affect gonadal function. As cancer treatment becomes more effective and survival rates improve there are more cancer survivors in the reproductive age group for whom parenting is an important consideration. This article outlines the effects on fertility of cancer treatments and techniques to minimise the risk of infertility. The overall prospects for younger cancer sufferers to either retain their fertility or have genetic offspring is now better than ever before, due to advances in assisted reproductive technology, the appropriate use of fertility sparing surgery and other techniques to reduce the toxicity of therapy on the reproductive organs. These advances raise new moral and ethical concerns that must be considered before advising cancer sufferers of the options for preserving reproductive capacity.

  7. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  8. [Multiple primary colorectal cancer: Clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatkina, N V; Kit, O I; Gevorkyan, Yu A; Milakin, A G

    to define some clinical characteristics of synchronous and metachronous colorectal cancer (CRC). The investigation was concerned with the data of 150 patients with T1-4N0-2M0-1 multiple primary CRC. The clinical, biological, and morphological characteristics of synchronous and metachronous tumors were analyzed. Multiple primary tumors were 6.01% of all the cases of CRC. There was a preponderance of synchronous CRC (63.75%) with the tumor localized in the sigmoid colon and rectum. In women, synchronous colorectal tumors were more often concurrent with breast tumors; metachronous ones were detected after treatment for genital tumors. In men, synchronous colorectal tumors were more frequently concurrent with kidney cancer; metachronous ones were identified after treatment for gastric cancer. The found characteristics of multiple primary colorectal tumors may be taken in account in programs for both primary diagnosis and follow-up after treatment for malignant tumors, which will be able to improve the early detection of cancer patients and their treatment results.

  9. Intensity-modulated arc therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in the treatment of primary irresectable cervical cancer. Treatment planning, quality control, and clinical implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecasteele, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; De Gersem, Werner; Paelinck, Leen; Fonteyne, Valerie; De Wagter, Carlos; De Meerleer, Gert [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Delrue, Louke; Villeirs, Geert [Dept. of Radiology, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Makar, Amin [Dept. of Gynecology, Ghent Univ. Hospital (Belgium)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to report on the planning procedure, quality control, and clinical implementation of intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) delivering a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in patients with primary irresectable cervix carcinoma. Patients and methods: six patients underwent PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) before treatment planning. Prescription (25 fractions) was (1) a median dose (D{sub 50}) of 62, 58 and 56 Gy to the primary tumor (GTVcervix), primary clinical target volume (CTVcervix) and its planning target volume (PTVcervix), respectively; (2) a D{sub 50} of 60 Gy to the PET-positive lymph nodes (GTVnodes); (3) a minimal dose (D{sub 98}) of 45 Gy to the planning target volume of the elective lymph nodes (PTVnodes). IMAT plans were generated using an anatomy-based exclusion tool with the aid of weight and leaf position optimization. The dosimetric delivery of IMAT was validated preclinically using radiochromic film dosimetry. Results: five to nine arcs were needed to create valid IMAT plans. Dose constraints on D{sub 50} were not met in two patients (both GTVcervix: 1 Gy and 3 Gy less). D{sub 98} for PTVnodes was not met in three patients (1 Gy each). Film dosimetry showed excellent gamma evaluation. There were no treatment interruptions. Conclusion: IMAT allows delivering an SIB to the macroscopic tumor without compromising the dose to the elective lymph nodes or the organs at risk. The clinical implementation is feasible. (orig.)

  10. Development and evaluation of a holistic surgical head and neck cancer post-treatment follow-up clinic using touchscreen technology-Feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, C J; Lannon, D; Qudairat, E; McCaughan, E; McCormac, R

    2018-03-01

    The efficacy of traditional follow-up care is being challenged, as cancer survivors' supportive and psychological needs are often neither identified, nor addressed. This study's aim was to develop a holistic surgical follow-up clinic for oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients were participants completed a disease-specific health-related quality of life tool (UWQOLv4) and item prompt list (Patient Concern Inventory) on a touchscreen computer. Information generated was used to focus the consultation on patient's identified needs and concerns. By means of a prospective non-randomised, pre-test post-test design, this follow-up clinic was evaluated using the patient enablement instrument (PEI) and patient content checklist (PCC). Feasibility was explored from the patient perspective (satisfaction survey) and clinician perspective (qualitative interview). Forty-four consecutive patients were recruited. Findings demonstrating five of the eight topics (overall QOL, emotions, head and neck symptoms, side-effects of treatment, chronic non-specific) on PCC were discussed more frequently, but changes were not statistically significant. The PEI highlighted a trend towards perceived improvement in four of the six items. Using touchscreen computers to aid communication during routine follow-up was reported as both feasible and beneficial by patients and clinicians. Providing a patient-focused follow-up consultation can facilitate the identification of unmet needs, permitting timely and appropriate intervention being initiated. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Serum tumor markers in chronic kidney disease: as clinical tool in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is singled out as the biggest cause of death in the world, predicted to reach 13.1 million cancer-related deaths by the year 2030. Although there are no specific tumor markers used in cancer screening, some markers can be used to assist in making a diagnosis and determining a prognosis. They can be used to follow in cases where the diagnosis is cancer through monitoring of the disease recurrence and/or evaluating the response to therapy. These markers are not specific as the number increases in multiple cases of cancer. Some markers are positive in a single type of cancer; others are detectable in more than one type. An ideal tumor marker should be highly sensitive, specific, and reliable with high prognostic value. Other characteristics of an ideal tumor marker are organ specificity and correlation of it with tumor stages. However, none of the tumor markers reported to date has all these characteristics. Influence of different stages of chronic kidney function on serum tumor markers is variable. Furthermore, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation affect on tumor markers differently. Sometimes, no study has been found in the literature review. Combined serum tumor markers may also be valuable. This literature review points the role of serum tumor markers in screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of cancer patients in chronic kidney disease patients and renal allograft recipients. In addition, impact of chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation on different serum tumor markers is briefly explored.

  12. Clinical application of PET in abdominal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon

    2002-01-01

    Clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly increasing for the detection and staging of cancer at whole-body studies performed with the glucose analogue tracer 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FG). Although FDG PET cannot match the anatomic resolution of conventional imaging techniques in the liver and the other abdominal organs, it is particularly useful for identification and characterization of the entire body simultaneously. FDG PET can show foci of metastatic disease that may not be apparent at conventional anatomic imaging and can aid in the characterizing of indeterminate soft-tissue masses. Most abdominal cancer requires surgical management. FGD PET can improve the selection of patients for surgical treatment and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate surgery. FDG PET is also useful for the early detection of recurrence and the monitoring of therapeutic effect. The abdominal cancers, such as gastroesophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer and pancreatic cancer, are common malignancies in Korea, and PET is one of the most promising and useful methodologies for the management of abdominal cancers

  13. Clinical photoacoustic imaging of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Willmann, Juergen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid technique that shines laser light on tissue and measures optically induced ultrasound signal. There is growing interest in the clinical community over this new technique and its possible clinical applications. One of the most prominent features of photoacoustic imaging is its ability to characterize tissue, leveraging differences in the optical absorption of underlying tissue components such as hemoglobin, lipids, melanin, collagen and water among many others. In this review, the state-of-the-art photoacoustic imaging techniques and some of the key outcomes pertaining to different cancer applications in the clinic are presented.

  14. Treatment patterns and real world clinical outcomes in ER+/HER2- post-menopausal metastatic breast cancer patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, Giovanni; Hunger, Matthias; Perkins, Julia J; Horblyuk, Ruslan; Martin, Monique

    2017-06-02

    With several new therapies becoming available, treatment of metastatic breast cancer (mBC) is evolving. The objective of this study is to describe patient characteristics, treatment patterns and real-world clinical outcomes in post-menopausal women with ER+, HER2- mBC and to obtain insight into patient outcomes and potential unmet needs with current therapies. The current study is a physician survey followed by a retrospective chart review of patient medical records by physicians in the US between March and April 2015. One hundred three physicians were asked to complete an online survey aiming to understand their satisfaction and expectations with current available treatments and potential areas of unmet need for mBC patients. Medical records from 178 females were extracted for the chart review. Using these data from medical records, patient characteristics and treatment patterns were analyzed descriptively. Time to progression (TTP) on first line, and progression-free survival (PFS) on second and third line of therapy were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Sixty-seven percent (n = 119) of patients had metastatic disease at initial diagnosis of breast cancer. Mean age at chart data extraction was 65.8 (SD: 9.4) years. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) were prescribed for 58% and around 13% of patients in first line and second line, respectively. Chemotherapy was prescribed to 14% in first line and 31% in second line. Median TTP on first line therapy was 12 months for patients receiving AIs as compared to 7.9 months for patients receiving chemotherapy. Across all treatment lines, bone pain and fatigue were reported as the main symptoms associated with disease progression which had an impact on patient quality of life. Physicians expressed that prolonging life was deemed the most important treatment goal, followed by preservation or improvement of quality of life. In this study the majority of patients received endocrine therapy as first line treatment and current

  15. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted-Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Binbin, E-mail: binbin.wu@gunet.georgetown.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zahurak, Marianna [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Simari, Patricio [Autodesk Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pang, Dalong [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); Taylor, Russell [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)-driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  16. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Binbin; McNutt, Todd; Zahurak, Marianna; Simari, Patricio; Pang, Dalong; Taylor, Russell; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)–driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  17. Vitamin D and cancer: Clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial preclinical and epidemiologic data that suggest that vitamin D plays a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Numerous observational studies have shown that low blood levels of 25(OH) vitamin D (cholecalciferol), estimated by geographical location, diet and activity assessment or measured serum levels are associated with a higher risk of cancer and worse cancer-specific survival as well as numerous morbidities to e.g. cardiovascular disease, stroke, infection, autoimmune disease, and neuromuscular dysfunction among large populations. A considerable number of in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the most active metabolite of vitamin D – 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or calcitriol – has anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, pro-differentiating, and anti-angiogenic properties. Combined treatment of calcitriol and many types of cytotoxic agents has synergistic or at least additive effects. However, clinical trials testing these hypotheses have been less encouraging, though a number of methodological, pharmacological, and pharmaceutical issues confound all trials ever conducted. In order to properly assess the clinical value of vitamin D, its metabolites and analogs in cancer prevention and treatment, more studies are needed. PMID:21872802

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials Global ... Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancers Clinical Trials ... Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials ...

  20. Erlotinib usage after prior treatment with gefitinib in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A clinical perspective and review of published literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navneet; Jindal, Aditya; Behera, Digambar

    2014-12-10

    Erlotinib and gefitinib are among the most widely researched, used and available molecularly targeted therapies for treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). They are both tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In the past decade, there have been reports on clinical benefit from use of erlotinib after gefitinib failure in NSCLC patients. A review of published literature on this focussed topic is provided herein. Pooled analysis of published literature shows that majority of patients were female (60.6%), non-smokers (64.5%), had adenocarcinoma histology (88.3%) and were of East Asian ethnicity (92.3%). Presence of sensitizing EGFR mutation was detected in 48.4% of subjects. Disease control rates with prior gefitinib therapy and with subsequent erlotinib treatment were 79.4% and 45.4% respectively. Based upon our review, the most important predictive factor for clinical benefit from erlotinib identified was previous response to gefitinib. The exact explanations for the potential benefit from erlotinib use in this patient population is still not known and further studies are required to determine the role of molecular mechanisms especially those related to resistance to initial EGFR TKI therapy.

  1. Treatment and Prognosis of Isolated Local Relapse after Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Clinical Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Importance of Salvage Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Chen, Fengshi; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts have been made to detect local relapse (LR) in the follow-up after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) although limited data are available on its treatment and prognosis. We aimed to characterize treatment options and clarify long-term outcomes of isolated LR after SBRT for patients with clinical stage I NSCLC. We reviewed our institutional database in search of patients with isolated LR after SBRT for clinical stage I NSCLC at our institution between 1999 and 2013. Patient characteristics were compared with Mann-Whitney U test, χ2 test, or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. Survival outcomes were estimated with Kaplan-Meier method. Potential prognostic factors were investigated using Cox proportional hazard model. Of 308 patients undergoing SBRT for clinical stage I NSCLC, 49 patients were identified to have isolated LR. Twelve patients underwent salvage surgery, none underwent radiotherapy, and eight patients received chemotherapy, whereas 29 patients received best supportive care. No patient characteristic except operability was significantly related with patient selection for LR treatments. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate of the whole cohort was 47.9% from SBRT and 25.7% from LR. Salvage surgery was associated with improved OS after LR (p = 0.014), and 5-year OS for patients undergoing salvage surgery was 79.5% from LR. It was confirmed that our patient selection for salvage surgery for isolated LR was associated with favorable survival outcomes. Operability based on multidisciplinary conferences, rather than measurable patient characteristics, is essential for appropriate patient selection for salvage surgery.

  2. Treatment of Hormone Resistance with Docetaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients: Results of a Clinical Experience at Omid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Tajvidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the most important cancers among men worldwide. Androgen ablation therapy can be used in treatment of these patients; however, most will progress to metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. In this regard, docetaxel has been approved to treat metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer in the United States. In this study, we aimed to investigate the results of this treatment modality in metastatic prostate cancer patients from Iran. Methods:We evaluated PSA response and bone pain relief in 18 metastatic prostate cancer patients who underwent treatment with docetaxel at a dose of 75 mg/m2 intravenously on the first day of treatment. The treatment was repeated every three weeks (6 cycles along with 10 mg of prednisolone. Results: Of 18 patients, 39% had >50% decline in PSA levels.There were 16% of the patients with a PSA decline of approximately 30% to 50% of the pre-treatment levels. In addition, 29% of the patients had progressive PSA levels during chemotherapy. Among them, 55% had significant pain relief. Conclusion: This research showed the effectiveness of docetaxel to decrease PSA levels in metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients from Iran. Docetaxel was also valuable in alleviation of pain in these patients. However, prospective studies should validate this approach.

  3. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Sporadic Colorectal Cancer and Primary Cancers of Other Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients often neglect the possibility of secondary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. It is important to be aware of the clinical characteristics of double cancer in CRC patients for early diagnosis and treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 1,031 CRC patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Department of Surgery of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2004. Among these patients, CRC was accompanied by cancer of other organs in 17 patients (1.65%, either synchronously or metachronously. Therefore, we describe our experience regarding the location of CRC, the clinical symptoms and signs of these patients, the TNM stage, histology, phase, association with other malignancies, interval between cancers and clinical outcomes. Of the 17 patients in whom CRC was accompanied by primary cancer of other organs, there were four synchronous and 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients. Our patient group comprised six men and 11 women with ages ranging from 47 to 88 years (median age, 66 years. The most common location of CRC was the sigmoid colon. Six gastric cancers (35.2% and six breast cancers (35.2% were associated with primary CRC. The remaining six second primary cancers were one lung cancer, one thyroid cancer, one cervical cancer, one ovarian cancer, one skin cancer, and one urinary bladder cancer. Of the 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients, eight patients developed subsequent CRC after primary cancers of other organs, whereas two patients developed a subsequent second primary cancer after CRC. The intervals between the development of metachronous multiple cancers ranged from 2 to 19 years. In this retrospective analysis, breast and gastric cancer patients were at increased risk of developing subsequent secondary CRC. Careful attention should always be paid to the possibility of secondary CRC in treating these cancer patients. Cancer

  5. Curcumin nanoformulations : A review of pharmaceutical properties and preclinical studies and clinical data related to cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; Okonogi, Siriporn; Schiffelers, Raymond M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/212909509; Hennink, Wim E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070880409

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural yellow phenolic compound, is present in many kinds of herbs, particularly in Curcuma longa Linn. (turmeric). It is a natural antioxidant and has shown many pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-Alzheimer in both preclinical

  6. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above the waist. Tiny tubules in the kidneys filter and clean the blood . They take out waste ... to bladder cancer. Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals, or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment ...

  8. Efficiency of clinical and combined diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, I.E.

    1986-01-01

    Problems on clinical, instrumental, laboratory diagnosis of mammary glands cancer are described. Efficiency of clinical examination, mammography, cytological examination, ultrasonic, radioisotopic diagnosis, some biochemical tests are estimated. The conclusion concerning advisability of complex diagnosis of mammary glands cancer especially its early forms is made. Perspectivity of application of polyamine test in diagnosis of primary cancer of the mammary gland is mark to estimate efficiency of its treatment

  9. Radiotherapy for asymptomatic brain metastasis in epidermal growth factor receptor mutant non-small cell lung cancer without prior tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment: a retrospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, SongRan; Qiu, Bo; Chen, LiKun; Wang, Fang; Liang, Ying; Cai, PeiQiang; Zhang, Li; Chen, ZhaoLin; Liu, ShiLiang; Liu, MengZhong; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastasis (BM) harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation shows good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This study is to assess the appropriate timing of brain radiotherapy (RT) for asymptomatic BM in EGFR mutant NSCLC patients. There were 628 patients diagnosed with EGFR mutant NSCLC between October 2005 and December 2011. Treatment outcomes had been retrospectively evaluated in 96 patients with asymptomatic BM without prior TKI treatment. 39 patients received first-line brain RT, 23 patients received delayed brain RT, and 34 patients did not receive brain RT. With a median follow-up of 26 months, the 2-year OS was 40.6 %. Univariate analyses revealed that ECOG performance status (p = 0.006), other distant metastases (p = 0.002) and first line systemic treatment (p = 0.032) were significantly associated with overall survival (OS). Multivariate analyses revealed that other sites of distant metastases (p = 0.030) were prognostic factor. The timing of brain RT was not significantly related to OS (p = 0.246). The 2-year BM progression-free survival (PFS) was 26.9 %. Brain RT as first-line therapy failed to demonstrate a significant association with BM PFS (p = 0.643). First-line brain RT failed to improve long-term survival in TKI-naïve EGFR mutant NSCLC patients with asymptomatic BM. Prospective studies are needed to validate these clinical findings

  10. Development and evaluation of a clinical model for lung cancer patients using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) within a knowledge-based algorithm for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Snyder, Karen; Kim, Jinkoo; Reding, Anne; Fraser, Corey; Gordon, James; Ajlouni, Munther; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of a clinical model for lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) within a knowledge-based algorithm for treatment planning, and to evaluate the model performance and applicability to different planning techniques, tumor locations, and beam arrangements. 105 SBRT plans for lung cancer patients previously treated at our institution were included in the development of the knowledge-based model (KBM). The KBM was trained with a combination of IMRT, VMAT, and 3D CRT techniques. Model performance was validated with 25 cases, for both IMRT and VMAT. The full KBM encompassed lesions located centrally vs. peripherally (43:62), upper vs. lower (62:43), and anterior vs. posterior (60:45). Four separate sub-KBMs were created based on tumor location. Results were compared with the full KBM to evaluate its robustness. Beam templates were used in conjunction with the optimizer to evaluate the model's ability to handle suboptimal beam placements. Dose differences to organs-at-risk (OAR) were evaluated between the plans gener-ated by each KBM. Knowledge-based plans (KBPs) were comparable to clinical plans with respect to target conformity and OAR doses. The KBPs resulted in a lower maximum spinal cord dose by 1.0 ± 1.6 Gy compared to clinical plans, p = 0.007. Sub-KBMs split according to tumor location did not produce significantly better DVH estimates compared to the full KBM. For central lesions, compared to the full KBM, the peripheral sub-KBM resulted in lower dose to 0.035 cc and 5 cc of the esophagus, both by 0.4Gy ± 0.8Gy, p = 0.025. For all lesions, compared to the full KBM, the posterior sub-KBM resulted in higher dose to 0.035 cc, 0.35 cc, and 1.2 cc of the spinal cord by 0.2 ± 0.4Gy, p = 0.01. Plans using template beam arrangements met target and OAR criteria, with an increase noted in maximum heart dose (1.2 ± 2.2Gy, p = 0.01) and GI (0.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.01) for the nine

  11. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  12. A global, incremental development method for a web-based prostate cancer treatment decision aid and usability testing in a Dutch clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Maarten; Lamers, Romy Ed; Kil, Paul Jm; The, Regina; Karssen, Klemens; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; de Vries, Marieke

    2017-07-01

    Many new decision aids are developed while aspects of existing decision aids could also be useful, leading to a sub-optimal use of resources. To support treatment decision-making in prostate cancer patients, a pre-existing evidence-based Canadian decision aid was adjusted to Dutch clinical setting. After analyses of the original decision aid and routines in Dutch prostate cancer care, adjustments to the decision aid structure and content were made. Subsequent usability testing (N = 11) resulted in 212 comments. Care providers mainly provided feedback on medical content, and patients commented most on usability and summary layout. All participants reported that the decision aid was comprehensible and well-structured and would recommend decision aid use. After usability testing, final adjustments to the decision aid were made. The presented methods could be useful for cultural adaptation of pre-existing tools into other languages and settings, ensuring optimal usage of previous scientific and practical efforts and allowing for a global, incremental decision aid development process.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Oncology overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiological diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Biopsy and cytology in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Pathology and morphology of pancreatic cancer; Staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancer; Biological and immunological markers in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer; Drug therapy of pancreatic cancer; Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer; Selected studies on the epidemiology of pancreatic cancer; Clinical correlates and syndromes associated with pancreatic neoplasia

  14. Clinical applications of 153Sm-EDTMP in treatment of multiple bone metastases in 78 patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Guoyou; Li Dangsheng; Liang Yihua; Yao Xinjuan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of 153 Sm-EDTMP in treating patients with lung cancer and multiple bone metastases. Methods: A dose of 18.5-25.9 MBq/Kg 153 Sm-EDTMP was administered once a month to each patient through vein injection according to disease severity and body weight. 3 injections made up one therapy cycle. Results: Pain relieves were obtained in 65 patients, with an effective rate of 83.3%. Pain relief of grade I was observed in 19 patients (24.3%), grade II in 46 patients (59%) and grade III in 13 patients (16.7%), respectively. Lesions of bone metastases disappeared or shrunk in 9 patients, with a positive rate of 11.5%, which included 3 cases of grade I and 6 cases of grade II, respectively. Better effects were obtained in adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma than in small cell lung cancer. Conclusion: 153 Sm-EDTMP is safe and effective in treating patients with lung cancer and multiple bone metastases

  15. [Let Us to Know the Post-Marketing Clinical Studies and Critical Situation of Study Groups -- Now We Should Talk about How to Achieve the Safe and Most Effective Treatment for Cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Maki

    2016-04-01

    Not to leave something to be regretted in the life of patients and their family, it is important to find the best way during and after treatment for cancer. We, cancer survivors association, propose a corporated actions among patients, administration, medical stuffs, and enterprises to solve the problems of clinical studies. And we express our opinion on the present problems and to do for patients and citizens.

  16. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  18. Clinical usefulness of random biopsies in diagnosis and treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, J D; Palou, J; Esquinas, C; Fernández Gómez, J M; Rodríguez Faba, O

    2017-11-20

    This systematic review of the literature has been focused on determining the clinical usefulness of random bladder biopsies (RB) in the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis was performed to establish the clinic and pathological factors associated to positive biopsies. A systematic review was performed using Pubmed/Medline database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Thirty-seven articles were included, recruiting a total of 12,657 patients, 10,975 were submitted to RB. The overall incidence of positive RB was 21.91%. Significant differences were found in the incidence of positive RB when patients were stratified according to urine cytology result, tumor multiplicity, tumor appearance, stage and grade. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that the presence of positive cytology, tumor multiplicity, non-papillary appearance tumors, stage T1 and histological grades G2 and G3 represent the risk factors to predict abnormalities in RB. The incidence of positive RB in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer was 21.91%. The maximum usefulness of RB was observed when these are performed in a standardized way. The results of the meta-analysis showed that besides positive cytology and non-papillary appearance tumors, tumor multiplicity and histological grades G2 and G3 represent risk factors associated to positive RB, suggesting that the use of RB might be extensive to the intermediate risk group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. [Randomized clinical trial of IEP and EP regimens in the treatment of patients with small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wang, Anlan; Huang, Zhihua; Zhou, Wenwei

    2004-06-20

    To observe and compare the efficacy and safety of IEP and EP regimens for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Sixty-four patients with SCLC pathologically proved were randomly divided into IEP group ( n =32) and EP group ( n =32). All the 64 patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. In IEP group, the total responsive rate, responsive rates of limited-stage patients and extensive-stage patients were 84.4%(27/32), 100.0%(15/15) and 70.6%(12/17) respectively; while in EP group, those were 75.0%(24/32), 85.7%(12/14) and 66.7% (12/18) respectively. The median duration of remission was 6 months and 1-year survival rate was 62.5% in IEP group, and 5 months and 56.2% in EP group. There was no significant difference in response rate, median duration of remission and 1-year survival between the two groups ( P > 0.05). The main toxicity was myelosuppression. Incidences of leukopenia at grade III-IV, nausea, vomiting and alopecia were significantly higher in the IEP arm than those in the EP arm ( P IEP and EP. IEP regimen shows a similar response rate compared with EP regimen. They might be considered as relevant regimens in initial patients with small cell lung cancer.

  20. Findings from NSABP Protocol No. B-04: comparison of radical mastectomy with alternative treatments. II. The clinical and biologic significance of medial-central breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, B.; Wolmark, N.; Redmond, C.; Deutsch, M.; Fisher, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Findings from 1665 women with primary breast cancer, treated at 34 NSABP institutions in Canada and the United States, have failed to demonstrate that patients with medial-central tumors had a greater probability of developing distant metastases or dying than did those with lateral tumors despite the greater incidence of internal mammary (IM) node involvement when tumors are medial-central in location. A comparison of patients with similar clinical nodal status and tumor location who were treated either by radical mastectomy (RM) or by total mastectomy plus radiation therapy (TM + RT) failed to indicate that radiation of IM nodes reduced the probability of distant treatment failure (TF) or mortality. When findings from patients having equivalent clinical nodal status and tumor location treated by TM alone or TM + RT were compared, it was found that the addition of RT failed to alter the probability of the occurrence of a distant TF or of death. This was despite the fact that in the nonradiated group two putative sources of further tumor spread, i.e., positive axillary and IM nodes, were left unremoved and untreated. The findings provide further insight into the biologic significance of the positive lymph node and confirm our prior contention that positive regional lymph nodes are indicators of a host-tumor relationship which permits the development of metastases and that they are not important investigators of distant disease

  1. Weekly Cisplatin and Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Radical Treatment of Advanced Cervical Cancer in Elderly Patients: Feasibility and Clinical Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Fiorentino, Alba; Levra, Niccolò Giaj; Fersino, Sergio; Di Paola, Gioacchino; Ruggieri, Ruggero

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical preliminary results of weekly cisplatin and volumetric-modulated arc therapy to the pelvis with simultaneous integrated boost to macroscopic disease in a cohort of elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Inclusion criteria of this prospective study were age ≥70 years, Karnofsky performance status 70 to 100, locally advanced histologically proven squamous cervical carcinoma, and patients unable to undergo brachytherapy. Radiation doses prescribed were 66 Gy to the macroscopic disease and 54 Gy to the pelvic nodes in 30 fractions. Weekly cisplatin dose was 40 mg/mq. Results: A total of 30 patients were recruited. Median follow-up was 32 months (range: 8-48 months). Median age was 72 years (range: 70-84 years). The 3-year overall survival and local control were 93% and 80%, respectively. The median time to progression was 24 months (range: 6-30 months). Analyzing clinical outcome grouping based on the stage of disease, II versus III, the 3-year overall survival was 100% and 85%, respectively. The 3-year local control was 91% for stage II and 67% for stage III. Acute and late toxicities were acceptable without severe events. Conclusion: Weekly cisplatin and volumetric-modulated arc therapy–simultaneous integrated boost for radical treatment of advanced cervical cancer in the current cohort of elderly patients were feasible. Long-term results and prospective randomized trials are advocated. PMID:27402633

  2. Antimatter cancer treatment

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Noorden, Richard

    2006-01-01

    "The idea that antimatter beams could treat cancer might seem ridiculous. But researchers working at Cerns particle accelerator laboratory in Geneva don't think so. They have just reported a successful first experiment into the biological effects of antiprotons radiation on living cells."

  3. Drug Repositioning for Effective Prostate Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanli, Beste; Grøtli, Morten; Boren, Jan; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias; Arga, Kazim Y; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2018-01-01

    Drug repositioning has gained attention from both academia and pharmaceutical companies as an auxiliary process to conventional drug discovery. Chemotherapeutic agents have notorious adverse effects that drastically reduce the life quality of cancer patients so drug repositioning is a promising strategy to identify non-cancer drugs which have anti-cancer activity as well as tolerable adverse effects for human health. There are various strategies for discovery and validation of repurposed drugs. In this review, 25 repurposed drug candidates are presented as result of different strategies, 15 of which are already under clinical investigation for treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). To date, zoledronic acid is the only repurposed, clinically used, and approved non-cancer drug for PCa. Anti-cancer activities of existing drugs presented in this review cover diverse and also known mechanisms such as inhibition of mTOR and VEGFR2 signaling, inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling, COX and selective COX-2 inhibition, NF-κB inhibition, Wnt/β-Catenin pathway inhibition, DNMT1 inhibition, and GSK-3β inhibition. In addition to monotherapy option, combination therapy with current anti-cancer drugs may also increase drug efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Thus, drug repositioning may become a key approach for drug discovery in terms of time- and cost-efficiency comparing to conventional drug discovery and development process.

  4. Medical cannabis in the treatment of cancer pain and spastic conditions and options of drug delivery in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Leos; Jurica, Jan; Sliva, Jiri; Pechackova, Monika; Demlova, Regina

    2018-03-01

    The use of cannabis for medical purposes has been recently legalised in many countries including the Czech Republic. As a result, there is increased interest on the part of physicians and patients in many aspects of its application. This mini review briefly covers the main active substances of the cannabis plant and mechanisms of action. It focuses on two conditions, cancer pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis, where its effects are well-documented. A comprehensive overview of a few cannabis-based products and the basic pharmacokinetics of marijuana's constituents follows. The review concludes with an outline for preparing cannabis (dried inflorescence) containing drug dosage forms that can be produced in a hospital pharmacy.

  5. Women with breast cancer report substantially more disease- and treatment-related side or late effects than registered by clinical oncologists: a cross-sectional study of a standard follow-up program in an oncological department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Mai-Britt Bjørklund; Grau, Cai; Zachariae, Robert; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-08-01

    Follow-up after breast cancer treatment is standard due to the risk of development of new primary cancers and recurrent disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a standard follow-up program in an oncological department by assessing: (1) Symptoms or signs of new primary cancer or recurrent disease, (2) Disease- and treatment-related physical and psychosocial side or late effects, and (3) relevant actions by oncology staff. In a cross-sectional study, 194 women who came for follow-up visit after treatment for primary surgery were included. The clinical oncologists registered symptoms and signs of recurrent disease or new primary cancer. Side or late effects were both assessed by patient and the clinical oncologists. Loco-regional or distant signs of recurrent disease were suspected in eight (5%) patients. Further examinations revealed no disease recurrence. Most patients (93%) reported some degree of side or late effects. Statistically significant more side or late effects were reported by the women (average: 6.9) than registered by the clinical oncologists (average: 2.4), p effects were hot flushes (35%), fatigue (32%), and sleep disturbance (31%). None of the scheduled or additional visits resulted in detection of recurrent disease. Furthermore, the majority of patients reported side or late effects. Statistically significant more women reported side or late effects than registered by the clinical oncologists. This suggests the need for rethinking of the follow-up programs with more emphasis upon side or late effects of the treatment.

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  7. Prevalence and clinical significance of cancer cachexia based on time from treatment in advanced-stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Minsu; Kim, Rock Bum; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sung-Bae; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of cancer cachexia and its prognostic impact in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The prevalence of cancer cachexia was analyzed according to the follow-up periods during the first year after curative initial treatment. Recurrences, noncancer health events (NCHEs), and cause-specific survival outcomes were also analyzed according to the incidence of cancer cachexia during follow-up. Cancer cachexia was identified in 22 (6.1%), 148 (41%), 66 (18.4%), and 65 (18.7%) of 361 enrolled patients at pretreatment, immediately after treatment, 6-months after treatment, and 12-months after treatment, respectively. Sustained or newly developed cachexia at 6 and 12 months showed a significant association with recurrence and NCHE occurrence (p cachexia had a higher probability of cancer-specific death, noncancerous death, and overall death (p Cachexia prevalence at 6 and 12 months after treatment for HNSCC indicates a higher chance of recurrence, NCHE, and death. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 716-723, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  9. Unproven methods in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, S P

    1993-07-01

    The nature-based and nontoxic image makes application of unproven methods in oncology attractive in contrast to application of a mechanized scientific medicine. The application frequency of these treatments ranges from 10% to greater than 60%. Increasingly, the promoters try to create a scientific impression through a pseudologic cancer theory, a harmless diagnostic test, and a holistic treatment of every cancer. Of the big variety of unproven methods, which are summarized in 11 groups in this review, the following are discussed: anthroposophic and other mistletoe preparations; homeopathy; Maharishi Ayur-Veda; unproven anticancer diets; orthomolecular medicine, including ascorbic acid; and methods supposedly stimulating unspecific and specific defense mechanisms. In conclusion, physicians should beware of and have knowledge of currently used unproven cancer treatments for epidemiologic, social, economic, and scientific reasons.

  10. Microwaves for breast cancer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Abdelhamid Elkayal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is potentially an effective method for the treatment of cancer, especially breast cancer tumors. One of the most attractive attributes of hyperthermia is the possibility of providing therapeutic benefit noninvasively, minimizing side effects. To be effective, a hyperthermia treatment must selectively heat the cancerous tissue, elevating the temperature in the tumor without exposing healthy tissue to excessive temperature elevations. In this paper, a suggested simple model of Annular Phased Array (APA using eight half wavelength linear dipoles is presented. New software (COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS is used to calculate the temperature distribution inside a model of a three layered breast (skin, breast tissue, and tumor. In addition, the effect of changing the amplitude and phases of the array elements on the temperature distributions and the conditions on the values of the phases are demonstrated in order to achieve the objective of hyperthermia for breast tumor treatment.

  11. Preoperative distress predicts persistent pain after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Mathias Kvist; Mertz, Birgitte Goldschmidt; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold Hansen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Persistent pain after breast cancer treatment (PPBCT) affects 25% to 60% of breast cancer survivors and is recognized as a clinical problem, with 10% to 15% reporting moderate to severe pain several years after treatment. Psychological comorbidity is known to influence pain perception...

  12. Classification of treatment-related mortality in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Sarah; Pole, Jason D; Gibson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Treatment-related mortality is an important outcome in paediatric cancer clinical trials. An international group of experts in supportive care in paediatric cancer developed a consensus-based definition of treatment-related mortality and a cause-of-death attribution system. The reliability and va...

  13. A Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Clinical Trial Comparing Pemetrexed/Cisplatin and Gemcitabine/Cisplatin as First-line Treatment for Advanced Nonsquamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HUANG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is still the standard first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Previous studies have demonstrated that pemetrexed combined with platinum had promising efficacy and safety profile in NSCLC, especially in patients with nonsquamous NSCLC. This trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed made in China as first-line treatment. Methods The present study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1 to receive cisplatin plus pemetrexed chemotherapy (PC group or gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC group every 3 weeks. The primary end point was progression free survival (PFS and the secondary end points included 1 year survival rate, objective response rate (ORR, survival without grade 3/4 toxicity (SWT3/4 and safety profile. Results A total of 288 patients from 20 institutions across China were enrolled into the study. Based on the Full Analyses Set (FAS, the PFS was 168 days (5.6 months vs 140 days (4.7 months (P=0.16, one year survival rate was 50.0% vs 54.9% (P=0.47, ORR was 24.4% vs 14.2% (P=0.06 in the PC group and the GC group, respectively; Survival without grade 3/4 toxicity was 11.3 months in GC group vs 8.1 months in PC group (P=0.23. In terms of the safety, side effects were less observed on the PC group (81.95% vs 93.75%, P=0.003. The main side effects included leukopenia, neutropenia, emesis, anemia, thrombopenia. Conclusion The both regimens have similar efficacy as the treatment for advanced nonsquamous NSCLC, but pemetrexed plus cisplatin regimen has better safety profile and seems to have longer PFS, which makes it a new option as the first line setting.

  14. The newly proposed clinical and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging classifications for gastric adenocarcinoma for the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Haejin; Ravetch, Ethan; Langdon-Embry, Marisa; Palis, Bryan; Ajani, Jaffer A; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Kelsen, David P; Sano, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    New stage grouping classifications for clinical (cStage) and post-neoadjuvant treatment (ypStage) stage for gastric adenocarcinoma have been proposed for the eighth edition of the AJCC manual. This article summarizes the analysis for these stages. Gastric adenocarcinoma patients diagnosed in 2004-2009 were identified from the National Cancer Database (NCDB). The cStage cohort included both surgical and nonsurgical cases, and the ypStage cohort included only patients who had chemotherapy or radiation therapy before surgery. Survival differences between the stage groups were determined by the log-rank test and prognostic accuracy was assessed by concordance index. Analysis was performed using SAS 9.4 (SAS, Cary, NC, USA). Five strata for cStage and four strata for ypStage were developed. The 5-year survival rates for cStages were 56.77%, 47.39%, 33.1%, 25.9%, and 5.0% for stages I, IIa, IIb, III, and IV, respectively, and the rates for ypStage were 74.2%, 46.3%, 19.2%, and 11.6% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The log-rank test showed that survival differences were well stratified and stage groupings were ordered and distinct (p < 0.0001). The proposed cStage and ypStage classification was sensitive and specific and had high prognostic accuracy (cStage: c index = 0.81, 95% CI, 0.79-0.83; ypStage: c index = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.73-0.87). The proposed eighth edition establishes two new staging schemata that provide essential prognostic data for patients before treatment and for patients who have undergone surgery following neoadjuvant therapy. These additions are a significant advance to the AJCC staging manual and will provide critical guidance to clinicians in making informed decisions throughout the treatment course.

  15. Early clinical outcome of coverage probability based treatment planning for simultaneous integrated boost of nodes in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Chr; Assenholt, Marianne; Ramlov, Anne

    2017-01-01

    ) using volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided brachytherapy. PAN RT (13 pts) was given if >2 nodes or if node(s) were present at the common iliac vessels or PAN. Nodal gross tumour volumes (GTV-N) were contoured on both PET-CT and MRI. Clinical target volume......% and CTV-N D50 ≥ 101.5%. RESULTS: Seventy-four nodes were boosted. A consistent 5.0 ± 0.7 Gy dose reduction from CTV-N D98 to PTV-N D98 was obtained. In total, 73/74 nodes were in complete remission at 3 months PET-CT and MRI. Pelvic control was obtained in 21/23 patients. One patient (IB2, clear cell) had...

  16. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following rare disorders that are inherited (passed down from parent to child): Familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome . Treatment with radiation therapy may increase the risk of ...

  17. Effect of preoperative treatment strategies on the outcome of patients with clinical T3, non-metastasized rectal cancer: A comparison between Dutch and Canadian expert centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; Vermeer, T A; van den Broek, C B M; Vuong, T; Bastiaannet, E; Azoulay, L; Dekkers, O M; Niazi, T; van den Berg, H A; Rutten, H J T; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-08-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) appears to be associated with less treatment-related toxicity compared with external beam radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. The present study compared the effect of preoperative treatment strategies on overall survival, cancer-specific deaths, and local recurrences between a Dutch and Canadian expert center with different preoperative treatment strategies. We included 145 Dutch and 141 Canadian patients with cT3, non-metastasized rectal cancer. All patients from Canada were preoperatively treated with HDRBT. The preoperative treatment strategy for Dutch patients consisted of either no preoperative treatment, short-course radiotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing overall survival. We adjusted for age, cN stage, (y)pT stage, comorbidity, and type of surgery. Primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were cancer-specific deaths and local recurrences. Five-year overall survival was 70.9% (95% CI 62.6%-77.7%) in Dutch patients compared with 86.9% (80.1%-91.6%) in Canadian patients, resulting in an adjusted HR of 0.70 (95% CI 0.39-1.26; p = 0.233). Of 145 Dutch patients, 6.9% (95% CI 2.8%-11.0%) had a local recurrence and 17.9% (95% CI 11.7%-24.2%) patients died of rectal cancer, compared with 4.3% (95% CI 0.9%-7.5%) local recurrences and 10.6% (95% CI 5.5%-15.7%) rectal cancer deaths out of 141 Canadian patients. We did not detect statistically significant differences in overall survival between a Dutch and Canadian expert center with different treatment strategies. This finding needs to be further investigated in a randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... only hormone therapy after a hysterectomy . Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Aromatase inhibitors . Less exposure of breast ...

  1. The biology and treatment of oligometastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Diane K; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2015-04-20

    Clinical reports of limited and treatable cancer metastases, a disease state that exists in a transitional zone between localized and widespread systemic disease, were noted on occasion historically and are now termed oligometastasis. The ramification of a diagnosis of oligometastasis is a change in treatment paradigm, i.e. if the primary cancer site (if still present) is controlled, or resected, and the metastatic sites are ablated (surgically or with radiation), a prolonged disease-free interval, and perhaps even cure, may be achieved. Contemporary molecular diagnostics are edging closer to being able to determine where an individual metastatic deposit is within the continuum of malignancy. Preclinical models are on the outset of laying the groundwork for understanding the oligometastatic state. Meanwhile, in the clinic, patients are increasingly being designated as having oligometastatic disease and being treated owing to improved diagnostic imaging, novel treatment options with the potential to provide either direct or bridging therapy, and progressively broad definitions of oligometastasis.

  2. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and

  3. Palbociclib as a first-line treatment in oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, advanced breast cancer not cost-effective with current pricing: a health economic analysis of the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter-Walstra, K; Ruhstaller, T; Klingbiel, D; Schwenkglenks, M; Dedes, K J

    2016-07-01

    Endocrine therapy continues to be the optimal systemic treatment for metastatic ER(+)HER2(-) breast cancer. The CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib combined with letrozole has recently been shown to significantly improve progression-free survival. Here we examined the cost-effectiveness of this regimen for the Swiss healthcare system. A Markov cohort simulation based on the PALOMA-1 trial (Finn et al. in Lancet Oncol 16:25-35, 2015) was used as the clinical course. Input parameters were based on summary trial data. Costs were assessed from the Swiss healthcare system perspective. Adding palbociclib to letrozole (PALLET) compared to letrozole monotherapy was estimated to cost an additional CHF342,440 and gain 1.14 quality-adjusted life years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of CHF301,227/QALY gained. In univariate sensitivity analyses, no tested variation in key parameters resulted in an ICER below a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/QALY. PALLET had a 0 % probability of being cost-effective in probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Lowering PALLET's price by 75 % resulted in an ICER of CHF73,995/QALY and a 73 % probability of being cost-effective. At current prices, PALLET would cost the Swiss healthcare system an additional CHF155 million/year. Palbociclib plus letrozole cannot be considered cost-effective for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer in the Swiss healthcare system.

  4. Clinical Pharmacology of Chemotherapy Agents in Older People with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoye He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Populations around the world are aging, and the associated increase in cancer incidence has led to the recognition of the importance of geriatric oncology. Chronological age is a poor determinant of pharmacological response to cancer chemotherapy agents. Age-associated changes in physiology and organ function have a significant impact on the clinical pharmacology of cancer chemotherapy agents used in cancer treatment. Altered response to medicines in older people is a consequence of changes in body composition, organ function, concomitant pathophysiology, multiple medications, genetic determinants of drug response, and patient's clinical status. These issues highlight the need to individualize the management of cancer in the older people with consideration of age-related changes in the clinical pharmacology of cancer drugs, analgesics, and adjunctive therapies.

  5. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  6. Expression of class III beta tubulin in cervical cancer patients administered preoperative radiochemotherapy: correlation with response to treatment and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Martinelli, Enrica; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Distefano, Mariagrazia; Paglia, Amelia; Ferlini, Cristiano; Scambia, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    Alterations of the beta subunit of tubulin have been reported to be predictive of resistance to radiation and antitubulin agents in several solid tumors. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical role of beta III tubulin expression as prognostic factor for survival and as a predictive parameter of response to preoperative radiochemotherapy in a single institutional series of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients. The study included 98 LACC patients admitted to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University of Rome and Campobasso between January 1998 and January 2005. Immunohistochemistry was performed by using the polyclonal rabbit anti-beta III tubulin antibody (Covance, Princeton, NJ, USA). The value of 10% immunostained tumor cells was arbitrarily chosen as cut-off value to distinguish cases with high versus low beta III tubulin content. In the whole series, beta III tubulin immunoreaction was detectable in 66/98 cases (67.3%), and the percentage of positively stained cells ranged from 0 to 100% (median=10%). The percentages of cases with high beta III tubulin expression were shown not to be differently distributed according to clinico-pathological characteristics. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of cases with high beta III tubulin expression according to clinical and pathological response to treatment. During the follow-up period, recurrence and death of disease occurred in 15 and 13 cases, respectively. There was no difference in disease-free and overall survival in cases with high versus low beta III tubulin expression. The assessment of class III beta tubulin status seems of little usefulness in order to identify LACC patients with poor chance of response to concomitant radiochemotherapy and unfavorable prognosis.

  7. The prospects for the research on chemical modifiers of cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yizun

    2002-01-01

    The current clinical statue of chemical modifiers of cancer treatment is described. It should enable greater enhancement ratios to be attained clinically. To search for less toxic and more potent sensitizers for radiotherapy and chemotherapy will be improved the cancer treatment. Phase I, II and III clinical trials with TPZ, one of the bioreductive drugs, has shown the benefit to patients with cancer

  8. Molecular Biomarkers in the Clinical Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; Tomlins, Scott A

    2018-01-08

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common noncutaneous malignancies in men, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome. Although the majority of patients harbor indolent tumors that are essentially cured by local therapy, subsets of patients present with aggressive disease or recur/progress after primary treatment. With this in mind, modern clinical approaches to prostate cancer emphasize the need to reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment via personalized medicine. Advances in our understanding of prostate cancer pathogenesis, coupled with recent technologic innovations, have facilitated the development and validation of numerous molecular biomarkers, representing a range of macromolecules assayed from a variety of patient sample types, to help guide the clinical management of prostate cancer, including early detection, diagnosis, prognostication, and targeted therapeutic selection. Herein, we review the current state of the art regarding prostate cancer molecular biomarkers, emphasizing those with demonstrated utility in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  9. Breast cancer and depression: issues in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thingbaijam B. Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Many of breast-cancer patients experience distress and most of them experience depression which may lead to amplification of physical symptoms, increased functional impairment, and poor treatment adherence. We did a review on available literature from PubMed about prevalence, distress magnitudes, coping styles, and treatment methods of major depression in women with breast cancer from 1978 to 2010. Diagnosis and treatment of depressive episodes in women with breast cancer is challenging because of overlapping symptoms and co-morbid conditions. Major depression is often under-recognized and undertreated among breast cancer patients. This review highlighted the issues on identifying and managing depression in breast cancer patients in clinical settings. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:240-6Keywords: Breast cancer, coping, depression, distress

  10. Value of radiotherapy in the treatment ovarium cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.R.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    Thirty-one cases ovarium cancer are studied in different clinical stages and different histological kinds, which were submited to a radiotherapic treatment by the 'moving trip' and 'open field' techniques [pt

  11. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  12. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Radical prostatectomy and adjuvant radioactive gold seed placement: Results of treatment at 5 and 10 years for clinical stages A2, B1 and B2 cancer of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, E.D.; Loening, S.A.; Hawtrey, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1988, 131 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate underwent combined radical prostatectomy and intraoperative radioactive gold seed placement. Of these 131 patients 80 were clinically assessed as having stage A2 (12), B1 (43) or B2 (25) cancer and they are the subject of this review. The average dose of radioactivity administered to each patient was 96.6 mCi, and mean followup was 65 months (median 64 months). No patient in this series received any other form of adjuvant therapy until disease recurrence was demonstrated. Local recurrences were observed in 2 patients (2.5%) in this series while distant recurrences were observed in 10 (12.5%). Cancer specific survival free of disease at 5 years was 100% for clinical stage A2, 91% for B1 and 75% for B2 cancers. The 10-year survival free of disease was 100% for clinical stage A2, 82% for B1 and 68% for B2 cancers. Covariants of clinical stage and seminal vesicle involvement influenced survival free of disease in a statistically significant manner (p less than 0.05) while pathological stage and degree of tumor differentiation did not. Mild to severe complications were observed in 12 patients (15%). Intraoperative placement of radioactive gold seeds into unresected pelvic tissues surrounding the site of prostatectomy offers a theoretical advantage in treatment by delivering tumoricidal levels of irradiation to residual foci of cancer not appreciated at the time of surgery. Our results suggest that increases in cancer specific survival free of disease over that previously reported for prostatectomy alone may be achieved through this combined treatment regimen. Furthermore, it is our opinion that therapeutic gains can be achieved without the attendant increases in morbidity and treatment delay often associated with adjuvant external beam radiotherapy

  14. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S J; Pozzi, E C C; Monti Hughes, A; Provenzano, L; Koivunoro, H; Carando, D G; Thorp, S I; Casal, M R; Bortolussi, S; Trivillin, V A; Garabalino, M A; Curotto, P; Heber, E M; Santa Cruz, G A; Kankaanranta, L; Joensuu, H; Schwint, A E

    2017-10-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  15. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S. J.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Monti Hughes, A.; Provenzano, L.; Koivunoro, H.; Carando, D. G.; Thorp, S. I.; Casal, M. R.; Bortolussi, S.; Trivillin, V. A.; Garabalino, M. A.; Curotto, P.; Heber, E. M.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Kankaanranta, L.; Joensuu, H.; Schwint, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  16. Clinical activity and tolerability of enzalutamide (MDV3100) in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer who progress after docetaxel and abiraterone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badrising, S.; Noort, V van; Oort, I.M. van; Berg, H.P. van den; Los, M.; Hamberg, P.; Coenen, J.L.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Jong, I.J. de; Kerver, E.D.; Tinteren, H. van; Bergman, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide (Enz) and abiraterone acetate (AA) are hormone treatments that have a proven survival advantage in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer who previously received docetaxel (Doc). Recently, limited activity of AA after Enz and of Enz after AA was

  17. Treatment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, Mark A; Evans, Tracey; Gettinger, Scott; Hensing, Thomas A; VanDam Sequist, Lecia; Ireland, Belinda; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-05-01

    Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a treatable, but not curable, clinical entity in patients given the diagnosis at a time when their performance status (PS) remains good. A systematic literature review was performed to update the previous edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. The use of pemetrexed should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology. Similarly, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy (and as continuation maintenance) should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 1; however, the data now suggest it is safe to use in those patients with treated and controlled brain metastases. Data at this time are insufficient regarding the safety of bevacizumab in patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation who have an ECOG PS of 2. The role of cetuximab added to chemotherapy remains uncertain and its routine use cannot be recommended. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy are the recommended treatment of those patients identified as having an EGFR mutation. The use of maintenance therapy with either pemetrexed or erlotinib should be considered after four cycles of first-line therapy in those patients without evidence of disease progression. The use of second- and third-line therapy in stage IV NSCLC is recommended in those patients retaining a good PS; however, the benefit of therapy beyond the third-line setting has not been demonstrated. In the elderly and in patients with a poor PS, the use of two-drug, platinum-based regimens is preferred. Palliative care should be initiated early in the course of therapy for stage IV NSCLC. Significant advances continue to be made, and the treatment of stage IV NSCLC has become nuanced and specific for particular histologic subtypes and clinical patient characteristics and according to the presence of specific genetic mutations.

  18. Identification, validation, and clinical implementation of tumor-associated biomarkers to improve therapy concepts, survival, and quality of life of cancer patients: tasks of the Receptor and Biomarker Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Harbeck, N.; Daidone, M.G.; Brynner, N.; Duffy, M.J.; Foekens, J.A.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Guiding principles are provided and discussed on how to inform the physician scientist and cancer researcher about quality control systems to enable a consistent assessment of the clinical value of tumor-associated biomarkers. Next to cancer research itself, the Receptor and Biomarker Group of the

  19. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  20. Breast cancer treatment: historical review and current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakowski, A.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution and development of opinions on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer since Galen to present time is presented. The concept of breast cancer as a local disease has been replaced by the understanding of its systemic character. On this background described are the methods of surgical treatment beginning from early - supraradical, to present -conservative approaches. The ''milestones'' in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer of the last 40 years are presented. Current methods of breast cancer management include correct diagnosis (clinical examination, mammography, ultrasound, fine needle aspiration biopsy), TNM staging, adequate loco-regional therapy, systemic therapy, rehabilitation, reconstruction and careful follow-up. (author)

  1. Coping with Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment KidsHealth / For Parents / Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment What's in this article? Hair Loss Skin Problems ...

  2. Outcome of Breast Cancer in Moroccan Young Women Correlated to Clinic-Pathological Features, Risk Factors and Treatment: A Comparative Study of 716 Cases in a Single Institution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem Slaoui

    Full Text Available Breast cancer in young women is quite uncommon and shows more aggressive characteristics with major disparities between worldwide populations. Prognosis and outcome of breast cancer in young patients are widely studied, but still no consensus is available.We retrospectively included 716 cases of breast cancer women diagnosed in 2009 at the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat. Patients were divided into two groups according to their age: women aged ≤40 years (Group 1 and women aged >40 years (Group 2. Data were recorded from patients' medical files and analyzed using SPSS 13.0 software (IBM.Young patients represent 24.9% of all patients with breast cancer. The comparison between the two groups displayed significant differences regarding nulliparity (p = 0.001 and progesterone receptor negativity (p = 0.01. Moreover, more progression (Metastases/Relapse was registered in young women as compared to older women with breast cancer (p = 0.03. The estimated median follow-up period was 31 months. The 5-years Event-Free Survival (EFS of patients with local disease was 64.6% in young women and 71.5% in older women with breast cancer (p = 0.04. Multivariate analysis in young women showed that nulliparity (HR: 7.2; 95%CI: 1.16-44.54; p = 0.03, T3 tumors (HR: 17.39; 95%CI: 1.74-173.34; p = 0.01 and negative PgR status (HR: 19.85; 95%CI: 1.07-366.54; p = 0.04 can be considered as risk factors for poorer event free survival while hormone therapy was associated with better EFS (HR: 0.11; 95%CI: 0.00-0.75; p = 0.03. In Group 2, multivariate analysis showed that patients with inflammatory breast cancer, N+ status, absence of radiotherapy, absence of chemotherapy, and absence of hormone therapy are at increased risk of recurrence.In Morocco, breast cancer is more frequent in young women as compared to western countries. Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive and is diagnosed late, leading to an intensive treatment. Moreover, the main factors

  3. Fast neutron therapy with high intensity Cf-252 sources by remotely controlled afterloading and clinical experiences in the treatment of gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Wada, M.; Dokiya, T.

    1986-01-01

    Cf-252 fast neutron therapy with high intensity Cf-252 sources was tested for the treatment of advanced gynaecological cancers using a remotely controlled afterloading machine designed by the author and manufactured by Toshiba. Using high intensity sources and short treatment times in a special treatment room, personnel or environment exposure to radiation was at a safe level, i.e. almost nil. During 1978-1983 18 stage III cases of cancer of the uterine cervix were treated with complete response in 78% and 44% 5 year survivals. The types of acute and delayed effects of Cf-252 were the same as Co-60 or Cs-137 but the rectum was found sensitive in this system of brachytherapy. A dose of 1,000-1,500 cGy/6-10 F in 10-22 days of Cf-252 radiation was tolerated and produced tumor cure

  4. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  5. Clinical study of combined use of tomudex (raltitrexed) and xeloda (capecitabine) as first-line treatment for patients with metastasizing colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhabova, J V; Semenov, N N; Dobrova, N V; Lichinitser, M R

    2008-02-01

    We studied the efficiency of combined chemotherapy with tomudex and xeloda preparations in patients with metastasizing colorectal cancer. The treatment (240 courses) was effective in 75% patients. Time median before progression was 6.3 months, mean durations of partial remission and stabilization were 7.8 months, total survival 15.5 months, total survival after effective treatment was 18.2 months. The most prevalent manifestations of III-IV degree toxicity were neutropenia, diarrhea, and asthenia. Other symptoms of toxicity (increased transaminase level, bilirubin, nausea, vomiting) were observed in less than 3% courses. Thus, treatment with tomudex and xeloda are effective and safe for outpatient chemotherapy.

  6. Plague: Clinics, Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Vladimir V; Gao, He; Zhou, Lei; Anisimov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Plague still poses a significant threat to human health and as a reemerging infection is unfamiliar to the majority of the modern medical doctors. In this chapter, the plague is described according to Dr. Nikiforov's experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of patients, and also a review of the relevant literature on this subject is provided. The main modern methods and criteria for laboratory diagnosis of plague are briefly described. The clinical presentations include the bubonic and pneumonic form, septicemia, rarely pharyngitis, and meningitis. Early diagnosis and the prompt initiation of treatment reduce the mortality rate associated with bubonic plague and septicemic plague to 5-50 %; although a delay of more than 24 h in the administration of antibiotics and antishock treatment can be fatal for plague patients. Most human cases can successfully be treated with antibiotics.

  7. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-01-01

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  8. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded

  9. Comparison of therapeutic efficacy and clinical parameters between recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone withdrawal in high-dose radioiodine treatment with differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Hun; Na, Chang Ju; Kim, Jeong Hun; Han, Yeon Hee; KIm, Hee Kwon; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    High-dose radioiodine treatment (HD-RIT) after injection of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh-TSH) has become widely used. This study compared the therapeutic efficacy of HD-RIT and clinical parameters between rh-TSH supplement and thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patients (47 male and 219 female; age, 49.0 ± 10.9 years) with differentiated thyroid cancer detected from September 2011 to September 2012. Patients comprised THW (217, 81.6 %) and rh-TSH (49, 18.4 %). Inclusion criteria were: first HD-RIT; any TN stage; absence of distant metastasis. To evaluate the complete ablation of the remnant thyroid tissue or metastasis, we reviewed stimulated serum thyroglobulin (sTg), I-123 whole-body scan (RxWBS) on T4 off-state, and thyroid ultrasonography (US) or [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) 6–8 months after HD-RIT. We defined a complete ablation state when all three of the follow-up conditions were satisfied; <2.0 ng/ml of the sTg, I-123 RxWBS (−), and thyroid US or F-18 FDG PET/CT (−). If one of the three was positive, ablation was considered incomplete. We also compared various clinical biomarkers (body weight, body mass index, liver and kidney function) between THW and rh-TSH groups. The rates of complete ablation were 73.7 % (160/217) for the THW group and 73.5 % (36/49) for the rh-TSH group. There was no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.970). The follow-up aspartate transaminase (p = 0.001) and alanine transaminase (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in the THW group. The renal function parameters of blood urea nitrogen (p = 0.001) and creatinine (p = 0.005) tended to increase in the THW group. The change of body weight was + Δ0.96 (±1.9) kg for the THW group and was decreased by -Δ1.39 (±1.5) kg for the rh-TSH group. The change

  10. Paradigm shift in cancer treatment: Cancer treatment as a metabolic disease – fusion of Eastern and Western medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reo Hamaguchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current standard therapies for cancer, including surgery, anti-cancer drugs, and radiotherapy, are thought to contribute to the improvement in the survival rates of cancer patients. However, such standard therapies have 3 major problems: in advanced cancers, it is unlikely that standard cancer treatments will cure the disease; adverse side effects that accompany standard cancer treatments put many patients in distress; and a large amount of medical expenditure is required for new and expensive anti-cancer drugs. These problems may be viewed as a result of establishing treatments without any consideration regarding the root cause of the cancer. Otto Warburg suggested that particular changes in the energy metabolism of cells, which are associated with a shortage of oxygen, are the root cause of cancer. Cancer cells have unique metabolic characteristics, and thus we believe that it is important to treat cancer as a metabolic disease. More specifically, not only is it important to suppress cancer cell metabolism, but it is also important to improve the chronic inflammation that is associated with the development and progression of cancer, and to support the functions of immune cells. This type of view of cancer treatment coincides with the principles of Chinese medicine, which has a history of 4000 years, such as “fuzheng quxie” and “zhibing qiuben”, which can assist in the establishment of cancer treatments for patients. In this article, we discuss cancer treatments from the view of cancer as a metabolic disease and their association with Chinese medicine, and introduce some clinical cases along with a review of the literature.

  11. Pancreatic cancer clinical trials and accrual in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, William A; James, Porsha M; Rahib, Lola; Talley, Anitra W; Fleshman, Julie M; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2013-09-20

    Pancreatic cancer clinical trials open in the United States and their accrual were examined to identify opportunities to accelerate progress in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer-specific clinical trials open in the United States in the years 2011 and 2012 were obtained from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network database. Accrual information was obtained from trial sponsors. The portfolio of pancreatic cancer clinical trials identified by type (adenocarcinoma or neuroendocrine), phase, disease stage, and treatment approach is reported. More than half of trials for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma applied biologic insights to new therapeutic approaches, and 38% focused on optimization of radiation or chemotherapy delivery or regimens. In 2011, pancreatic cancer trials required total enrollment of 11,786 patients. Actual accrual to 93.2% of trials was 1,804 patients, an estimated 4.57% of the patients with pancreatic cancer alive in that year. The greatest need was for patients with resectable cancer. Trials open in 2011 enrolled an average of 15% of their total target accrual. Physician recommendations greatly influenced patients' decision to enroll or not enroll onto a clinical trial. Matching to a clinical trial within a 50-mile radius and identifying trials for recurrent/refractory disease were documented as challenges for patient accrual. Overall trial enrollment indicates that pancreatic cancer trials open in 2011 would require 6.7 years on average to complete accrual. These results suggest that harmonizing patient supply and demand for clinical trials is required to accelerate progress toward improving survival in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Clinical management of gastric cancer: results of a multicentre survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Wen, Feng; Jiang, Yu; Xu, Feng; Feng, Hong; Bi, Feng; Li, Qiu; Li, Nanjing; Wei, Wen; Yao, Wenxiu; Xie, Ke; Hu, Jiankun; Shen, Lida; Ji, Weizheng; Lu, You

    2011-01-01

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines in oncology-gastric cancer guidelines have been widely used to provide appropriate recommendations for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists' to the recommended guidelines. A questionnaire asking the treatment options for gastric cancer cases was sent to 394 Chinese oncology specialists, including surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists working in hospitals joined in The Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of China. The questionnaire involved a series of clinical scenarios regarding the interpretation of surgery, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and advanced treatment planning of gastric cancer. Analysis of 358 respondents (91%) showed variations between each specialization and from the recommended guidelines in the management approaches to specific clinical scenarios. The majority of specialists admitted that less than 50% of patients received multidisciplinary evaluation before treatment. The participants gave different responses to questions involving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and advanced settings, compared to the recommended guidelines. These results highlight the heterogeneity of the treatment of gastric cancer. Surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists are not adhering to the recommended guidelines

  13. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  14. Clinical evaluation of high dose rate intra-cavitary irradiation for treatment of uterine cervical cancer, combined with pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Shunji; Abe, Tatsuyuki; Mochizuki, Sachio; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Iida, Nobuhisa.

    1990-01-01

    By means of re-irradiation using pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity, we attained local control for one patient who had local recurrence in uterine cavity and suffered from uterine fluor in which viable cancer cells were confirmed. We were enlightened by this therapeutic experience, so we attempted combination therapy using pepleomycin suppositories to supplement intra-cavitary irradiation, for the 11 selected patients who were suffering from uterine fluor. We investigated the treatment results in 7 patients of stage III out of 11 patients (of all stages), in comparison with 13 patients of stage III who were treated by irradiation alone. Consequently, these treatment results were approximately equivalent, and the incidence of sigmoid complications could be decreased. Side effects which were followed by the combination therapy were not serious, and so we believe that pepleomycin suppository is a simple method and valuable to supplement radiation therapy of uterine cervical cancer. (author)

  15. Clinical evaluation of high dose rate intra-cavitary irradiation for treatment of uterine cervical cancer, combined with pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanashi, Shunji; Abe, Tatsuyuki; Mochizuki, Sachio (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Murakami, Yoshitaka; Iida, Nobuhisa

    1990-02-01

    By means of re-irradiation using pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity, we attained local control for one patient who had local recurrence in uterine cavity and suffered from uterine fluor in which viable cancer cells were confirmed. We were enlightened by this therapeutic experience, so we attempted combination therapy using pepleomycin suppositories to supplement intra-cavitary irradiation, for the 11 selected patients who were suffering from uterine fluor. We investigated the treatment results in 7 patients of stage III out of 11 patients (of all stages), in comparison with 13 patients of stage III who were treated by irradiation alone. Consequently, these treatment results were approximately equivalent, and the incidence of sigmoid complications could be decreased. Side effects which were followed by the combination therapy were not serious, and so we believe that pepleomycin suppository is a simple method and valuable to supplement radiation therapy of uterine cervical cancer. (author).

  16. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bütof, Rebecca; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  17. [Kleptomania: clinical characteristics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L

    2008-05-01

    Kleptomania, a disabling impulse control disorder, is characterized by the repetitive and uncontrollable theft of items that are of little use to the afflicted person. Despite its relatively long history, kleptomania remains poorly understood to the general public, clinicians, and sufferers. This article reviews the literature for what is known about the clinical characteristics, family history, neurobiology, and treatment options for individuals with kleptomania. Kleptomania generally has its onset in late adolescence or early adulthood and appears to be more common among women. Lifetime psychiatric comorbidity is frequent, mainly with other impulse control (20-46%), substance use (23-50%) and mood disorders (45-100%). Individuals with kleptomania suffer significant impairment in their ability to function socially and occupationally. Kleptomania may respond to cognitive behavioral therapy and various pharmacotherapies (lithium, anti-epileptics, and opioid antagonists). Kleptomania is a disabling disorder that results in intense shame, as well as legal, social, family, and occupational problems. Large scale treatment studies are needed.

  18. New treatment modalities and pharmacologic refinements for metatstatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Smorenburg (Carolien)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis the results of clinical studies with new chemotherapeutic agents and pharmacokinetic studies on taxanes in breast cancer patients are reported. In metastatic breast cancer, endocrine and cytotoxic treatment often result in objective tumor responses, associated with

  19. Adherence to cancer treatment guidelines: influence of general and cancer-specific guideline characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Jong, J.D. de; Spronk, I.; Ho, V.K.; Brink, M.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Guideline adherence remains a challenge in clinical practice, despite guidelines’ ascribed potential to improve patient outcomes. We studied the level of adherence to recommendations from Dutch national cancer treatment guidelines, and the influence of general and

  20. Active home-based cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordonaro S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sebastiano Bordonaro Fabio Raiti, Annamaria Di Mari, Calogera Lopiano, Fabrizio Romano, Vitalinda Pumo, Sebastiano Rametta Giuliano, Margherita Iacono, Eleonora Lanteri, Elena Puzzo, Sebastiano Spada, Paolo TralongoUOC Medical Oncology, RAO, ASP 8 Siracusa, ItalyBackground: Active home-based treatment represents a new model of health care. Chronic treatment requires continuous access to facilities that provide cancer care, with considerable effort, particularly economic, on the part of patients and caregivers. Oral chemotherapy could be limited as a consequence of poor compliance and adherence, especially by elderly patients.Methods: We selected 30 cancer patients referred to our department and treated with oral therapy (capecitabine, vinorelbine, imatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib, temozolomide, ibandronate. This pilot study of oral therapy in the patient’s home was undertaken by a doctor and two nurses with experience in clinical oncology. The instruments used were clinical diaries recording home visits, hospital visits, need for caregiver support, and a questionnaire specially developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC, known as the QLQ-C30 version 2.0, concerning the acceptability of oral treatment from the patient’s perspective.Results: This program decreased the need to access cancer facilities by 98.1%, promoted better quality of life for patients, as reflected in increased EORTC QLQ-C30 scores over time, allowing for greater adherence to oral treatment as a result of control of drug administration outside the hospital. This model has allowed treatment of patients with difficult access to care (elderly, disabled or otherwise needed caregivers that in the project represent the majority (78% of these.Conclusions: This model of active home care improves quality of life and adherence with oral therapy, reduces the need to visit the hospital, and consequently decreases the number of lost hours of work on

  1. Combined androgen blockade in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer--an overview. The Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1997-01-01

    The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed....

  2. Cancer Survivors: Managing Your Emotions After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devise your own plan for coping with your emotions. Have an open mind and try different strategies to find out what works best for you. Coping with fear of recurrence. Cancer.Net. ... side effects of cancer treatment. Cancer.Net. http://www.cancer. ...

  3. Bilateral breast cancer : mammographic and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Jun, Hwang Yoon; Lee, Byung Chan; Lee, Kyong Sik; Lee, Yong Hee

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the mammographic and clinical features of bilateral breast cancer. We retrospectively reviewed clinical records(n=23) and mammograms (n=15) of 23 patients with bilateral breast cancer. Patients' age, location of the tumor and pathologic staging were determined from clinical records. Mammographic features were classified as spiculated mass, nonspiculated mass, mass with microcalcification, microcalcification only, asymmetric density, and normal. Of the 23 cases of bilateral breast cancer, 8(34.8%) were synchronous and 15(65.2%) were metachronous. Age at diagnosis of cancer in the first breast was between 27 and 59(mean 43) years ; there was no statistically significant difference in mean age between patients with synchronous and metachronous cancer. The mean interval between the diagnosis of each lesion of the metachronous pairs was 9.1 years. In 11 of 23 cases(48%), tumors were locaated in the same quadrant, and in the other 12 cases(52%), they were in different quadrant. At mammography, five of 15 metachronous cancers(33%) were similar in appearance and 10 pairs(67%) were different. In 4 of 23 cases(17%), cancer in the first breast was at stage 0 and stage 1, and in 13 of 23(57%), cancer in the second breast was at this same stage. In bilateral breast cancer, the two breasts frequently show different mammographic features. Cancer of the second breast was at an early stage; this suggest that regular examination and mammography are important and can allow early detection of contralateral breast cancer

  4. Multimodal treatment for resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection has been traditionally the mainstay of treatment for localized esophageal cancers. However, survival after surgery alone for advanced esophageal cancer is not satisfactory. In Japan, the development of multimodal therapy for esophageal cancers has centered mainly on systemic chemotherapy plus surgery to control distant metastasis. Based on the results of the recent Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 9907 study, preoperative chemotherapy (consisting of 5-fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin) followed by surgery has emerged as the standard treatment. In Western countries, where chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been mainly explored for patients with resectable esophageal cancers, two large controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness of preoperative chemotherapy reported conflicting results. However, a recent meta-analysis reported significant survival benefits for preoperative chemotherapy in patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. We need to find new effective preoperative chemotherapeutic regimens, including molecular target agents, with response rates higher than that of the conventional chemotherapy of 5-FU and cisplatin. However, we also must compare the survival benefits of preoperative chemotherapy with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  5. Engineered T cells for pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katari, Usha L; Keirnan, Jacqueline M; Worth, Anna C; Hodges, Sally E; Leen, Ann M; Fisher, William E; Vera, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    Objective Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy produce marginal survival benefits in pancreatic cancer, underscoring the need for novel therapies. The aim of this study is to develop an adoptive T cell transfer approach to target tumours expressing prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a tumour-associated antigen that is frequently expressed by pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Expression of PSCA on cell lines and primary tumour samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Healthy donor- and patient-derived T cells were isolated, activated in vitro using CD3/CD28, and transduced with a retroviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting PSCA. The ability of these cells to kill tumour cells was analysed by chromium-51 (Cr51) release. Results Prostate stem cell antigen was expressed on >70% of the primary tumour samples screened. Activated, CAR-modified T cells could be readily generated in clinically relevant numbers and were specifically able to kill PSCA-expressing pancreatic cancer cell lines with no non-specific killing of PSCA-negative target cells, thus indicating the potential efficacy and safety of this approach. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen is frequently expressed on pancreatic cancer cells and can be targeted for immune-mediated destruction using CAR-modified, adoptively transferred T cells. The safety and efficacy of this approach indicate that it deserves further study and may represent a promising novel treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:21843265

  6. Clinical Cancer Advances 2018: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymach, John; Krilov, Lada; Alberg, Anthony; Baxter, Nancy; Chang, Susan Marina; Corcoran, Ryan; Dale, William; DeMichele, Angela; Magid Diefenbach, Catherine S; Dreicer, Robert; Epstein, Andrew S; Gillison, Maura L; Graham, David L; Jones, Joshua; Ko, Andrew H; Lopez, Ana Maria; Maki, Robert G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Schilsky, Richard L; Sznol, Mario; Westin, Shannon Neville; Burstein, Harold

    2018-04-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I remember when ASCO first conceived of publishing an annual report on the most transformative research occurring in cancer care. Thirteen reports later, the progress we have chronicled is remarkable, and this year is no different. The research featured in ASCO's Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 report underscores the impressive gains in our understanding of cancer and in our ability to tailor treatments to tumors' genetic makeup. The ASCO 2018 Advance of the Year, adoptive cell immunotherapy, allows clinicians to genetically reprogram patients' own immune cells to find and attack cancer cells throughout the body. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy-a type of adoptive cell immunotherapy-has led to remarkable results in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in adults with lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Researchers are also exploring this approach in other types of cancer. This advance would not be possible without robust federal investment in cancer research. The first clinical trial of CAR T-cell therapy in children with ALL was funded, in part, by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and researchers at the NCI Center for Cancer Research were the first to report on possible CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma. These discoveries follow decades of prior research on immunology and cancer biology, much of which was supported by federal dollars. In fact, many advances that are highlighted in the 2018 Clinical Cancer Advances report were made possible thanks to our nation's support for biomedical research. Funding from the US National Institutes of Health and the NCI helps researchers pursue critical patient care questions and addresses vital, unmet needs that private industry has little incentive to take on. Federally supported cancer research generates the biomedical innovations that fuel the development and availability of new and improved treatments for patients. We need sustained federal

  7. A combined analysis of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Medical Research Council randomized clinical trials for the prophylactic treatment of stage TaT1 bladder cancer. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Genitourinary Tract Cancer Cooperative Group and the Medical Research Council Working Party on Superficial Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawinski, A.; Sylvester, R.; Kurth, K. H.; Bouffioux, C.; van der Meijden, A.; Parmar, M. K.; Bijnens, L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prophylactic agents after primary resection can decrease the incidence of tumor recurrence in patients with stage TaT1 bladder cancer. However, the long-term impact on progression to muscle invasive disease as well as on duration of survival is unknown. A combined analysis of individual

  8. Adjuvant Treatment for Older Women with Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Trevor A; Williams, Grant R; Bushan, Sita; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Jones, Ellen L; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-01-01

    Older women experience a large share of breast cancer incidence and death. With the projected rise in the number of older cancer patients, adjuvant chemo-, radiation and endocrine therapy management will become a key component of breast cancer treatment in older women. Many factors influence adjuvant treatment decisions including patient preferences, life expectancy and tumor biology. Geriatric assessment predicts important outcomes, identifies key deficits, and can aid in the decision making process. This review utilizes clinical vignettes to illustrate core principles in adjuvant management of breast cancer in older women and suggests an approach incorporating life expectancy and geriatric assessment. PMID:26767315

  9. Treatment of intractable cancer by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1981-07-01

    Intraoperative irradiation, thermotherapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and neutron brachytherapy were used for locally advanced cancer and value and limitations of these therapies were discussed. Intraoperative irradiation was mainly used for cancers of the gastro-intestinal tract. In stage I gastric cancers, no difference in the five-year survival rates was found between the groups with and without intraoperative irradiation. In gastric cancers of stage II or more, intraoperative irradiation had a favourable effect. Thermotherapy was applied to superficial radio-resistant cancer by the use of a thermal system of microwave- and radio-frequency heating. This treatment induced disappearance of approximately 50% of tumor. For the treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizer, studies of phase I and II with Misonidazole were conducted; from these results, the protocol was made for phase III study of esophagus cancer, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, uterus cancer, and brain cancer. Brachytherapy using /sup 252/Cf was also developed for locally advanced cancer.

  10. Immunotherapy Expands Lung Cancer Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a large clinical trial show combining the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) with chemotherapy helped some patients with advanced cancer live longer. As this Cancer Currents post explains, the results will immediately affect patient care.

  11. Clinical advances of nanocarrier-based cancer therapy and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Michel, Edurne; Imbuluzqueta, Edurne; Sebastián, Víctor; Blanco-Prieto, María J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and efficient new strategies are urgently needed to combat its high mortality and morbidity statistics. Fortunately, over the years, nanotechnology has evolved as a frontrunner in the areas of imaging, diagnostics and therapy, giving the possibility of monitoring, evaluating and individualizing cancer treatments in real-time. Areas covered: Polymer-based nanocarriers have been extensively studied to maximize cancer treatment efficacy and minimize the adverse effects of standard therapeutics. Regarding diagnosis, nanomaterials like quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles or gold nanoparticles have been developed to provide rapid, sensitive detection of cancer and, therefore, facilitate early treatment and monitoring of the disease. Therefore, multifunctional nanosystems with both imaging and therapy functionalities bring us a step closer to delivering precision/personalized medicine in the cancer setting. Expert opinion: There are multiple barriers for these new nanosystems to enter the clinic, but it is expected that in the near future, nanocarriers, together with new 'targeted drugs', could replace our current treatments and cancer could become a nonfatal disease with good recovery rates. Joint efforts between scientists, clinicians, the pharmaceutical industry and legislative bodies are needed to bring to fruition the application of nanosystems in the clinical management of cancer.

  12. Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Alemany

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic use of viruses against cancer has been revived during the last two decades. Oncolytic viruses replicate and spread inside tumors, amplifying their cytotoxicity and simultaneously reversing the tumor immune suppression. Among different viruses, recombinant adenoviruses designed to replicate selectively in tumor cells have been clinically tested by intratumoral or systemic administration. Limited efficacy has been associated to poor tumor targeting, intratumoral spread, and virocentric immune responses. A deeper understanding of these three barriers will be required to design more effective oncolytic adenoviruses that, alone or combined with chemotherapy or immunotherapy, may become tools for oncologists.

  13. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  17. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  18. Under-treatment of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Alysa

    2010-03-01

    Cancer pain remains inadequately treated, despite internationally accepted management guidelines and a myriad of treatment options. Risk factors for undertreatment are reviewed, along with possible explanations. Recent studies documenting the scope of the problem as well as investigating solutions are discussed with clinical-practice recommendations outlined. Women over 65 years of age representative of a cultural minority, with earlier stage disease, cared for at home, and with high-school education or less are at highest risk of having uncontrolled cancer pain. Optimal treatment is impeded by patients' maladaptive beliefs, nonadherence, underreporting or miscommunication with caregivers; from a healthcare provider perspective, it may be due to inadequate assessment, documentation, knowledge, and communication. Emerging data support the vital influence of lay caregivers on appropriate pain management. Although home-education programs may decrease pain and improve quality of life, there are also less intensive approaches deliverable by individuals to holistically address pain. Prospective study of barriers to both delivery and receipt of adequate pain management is needed, as the majority of published literature is based on survey studies. Treatment must be individualized based on clinical circumstances and patient wishes, with the goal of maximizing function and quality of life.

  19. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  20. How sociodemographics, presence of oncology specialists, and hospital cancer programs affect accrual to cancer treatment trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateren, Warren B; Trimble, Edward L; Abrams, Jeffrey; Brawley, Otis; Breen, Nancy; Ford, Leslie; McCabe, Mary; Kaplan, Richard; Smith, Malcolm; Ungerleider, Richard; Christian, Michaele C

    2002-04-15

    We chose to examine the impact of socioeconomic factors on accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment trials. We estimated the geographic and demographic cancer burden in the United States and then identified 24,332 patients accrued to NCI-sponsored cancer treatment trials during a 12-month period. Next, we examined accrual by age, sex, geographic residence, health insurance status, health maintenance organization market penetration, several proxy measures of socioeconomic status, the availability of an oncologist, and the presence of a hospital with an approved multidisciplinary cancer program. Pediatric patients were accrued to clinical trials at high levels, whereas after adolescence, only a small percentage of cancer patients were enrolled onto clinical trials. There were few differences by sex. Black males as well as Asian-American and Hispanic adults were accrued to clinical trials at lower rates than white cancer patients of the same age. Overall, the highest observed accrual was in suburban counties. Compared with the United States population, patients enrolled onto clinical trials were significantly less likely to be uninsured and more like to have Medicare health insurance. Geographic areas with higher socioeconomic levels had higher levels of clinical trial accruals. The number of oncologists and the presence of approved cancer programs both were significantly associated with increased accrual to clinical trials. We must work to increase the number of adults who enroll onto trials, especially among the elderly. Ongoing partnership with professional societies may be an effective approach to strengthen accrual to clinical trials.

  1. Using of thermoradiotherapy on treatment of cancerous growths of anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, Yu.M.; Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter of book authors investigated using of thermoradiotherapy on treatment of cancerous growths of anal canal, methods of using of thermoradiotherapy at morbid with anal cancer, methods of irradiation, the characteristic of clinical observations, using of thermoradiotherapy at treatment of epidermoid cancer of anal zone, using of thermoradiotherapy at treatment of non epithelial cancer of anal zone and using thermoradiotherapy at others types of cancerous growths

  2. [Oligometastasized colorectal cancer-modern treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnebösel, M; Lambertz, A; Dejong, K; Neumann, U P

    2018-06-05

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer in UICC stage IV has been improved in the last decades by improvements in interdisciplinary treatment. Treatment strategies for oligometastasized colorectal cancer are developing more and more into an individualized treatment. An overview of the current literature of modern treatment concepts in oligometastasized colorectal cancer UICC stage IV is given. Surgery still has the supreme mandate in resectable colorectal liver metastases, as neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment strategies to not provide any benefits for these patients. In marginal or non-resectable stages systemic treatment is superior in these patients depending on the prognostic parameters. Also in curative settings local treatment options should be considered as a reasonable additive tool. An interesting treatment approach for isolated liver metastases and non-resectable colorectal cancer is liver transplantation. Irrespective of new developments in treatment strategies for metastasized colorectal cancer, resection of colorectal liver metastases remains the gold standard whenever possible.

  3. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  4. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Liu, Helen H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Rodhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade ≥3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in increments of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p 42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  5. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered.

  6. International Partnerships for Clinical Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH co-sponsors the 2015 International Symposium on Cancer Clinical Trials and related meetings held in partnership with the Japanese National Cancer Center (JNCC) and Embassies of France, Korea, United Kingdom (UK), and United States (US) in Tokyo on May 14 - 15, 2015.

  7. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Suresh Ghadyalpatil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC, colorectal cancer (CRC, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, esophageal cancer (EC, and pancreatic cancer (PC. Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist , these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes.The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs need focussed

  8. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil Suresh; Supriya, Chopra; Prachi, Patil; Ashwin, Dsouza; Avanish, Saklani

    2016-01-01

    GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), esophageal cancer (EC), and pancreatic cancer (PC). Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist, these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes. The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach) to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs) need focussed attention

  9. Using pre-treatment PSA and Gleason score to predict for extra capsular extension among patients with clinically staged organ confined prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Anita; Roach, Mack; Diaz, Aidnag; Marquez, Carol; Chinn, Dan; Coleman, Lori; Presti, Joseph; Carroll, Peter

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The patients most suitable for a radical prostatectomy (RP) are those with organ confined disease. At least(1(3)) of patients with clinically staged organ confined disease will be found to have extra capsular extension (ECE) following RP. The purpose of this study is to assess the predictive value of an equation for predicting the risk of ECE based on the pre-treatment prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score (GS) in patients with clinical stage T1/T2 prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-two patients who underwent RP at either the San Francisco VAMC or UCSF between 1988 and 1994 were eligible for this analysis. Patients were considered eligible if the pathological stage, pre-operative PSA and GS were available. Among these patients the median pre-operative PSA was 9 ng/ml (range 0 - 195 ng/ml), and the median pre-operative GS was 6 (range 2-10). The empirically derived equations tested were [1.5 x PSA + (GS - 3) x 10] (Roach, J. Urol., 150: 1923-1924, 1993) as well as a recent modification of this equation of [PSA + (GS - 3.5) x 10]. For these equations, the range of calculated risk was limited to 0 - 100%. Results: The results of using these two equations are shown graphically. Using the modified equation, with a calculated risk (CR) of {<=}25% and an average calculated risk (ACR) of 15.4%, the observed incidence (OI) of ECE was 17.2%. Among the patients with a CR of 26 to 50% and an ACR of 36.1%, the OI of ECE was 38.4%. Among the patients with a CR of 51 to 75% and an ACR of 60.4%, the OI of ECE was 62.7%. Finally, among the patients with a CR of 76 to 100% and an ACR of 77.3%, the OI of ECE was 85.7%. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports were available in 72 patients. Correlation with TRUS demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 52.4% and 56.1% respectively. Correlation with MRI showed a sensitivity of 57.9% and a specificity of 45.5%. The use of either MRI or

  10. Re-analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziaja, Ellen L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Hollander, Jay; Matter, Richard C.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate specific antigen (PSA) has been established as the most important prognostic factor for prostate cancer. We reviewed our experience treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to evaluate if previously defined clinical and treatment related prognostic factors remain valid when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Methods and Materials: Between 1/87 and 12/91, 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58 - 70.4 Gy) using a 4 field or arc technique. Pre- and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤ 1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment completion. After achieving nadir, if 2 consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Patients (pts) were divided into 3 groups according to total number of days on treatment: ≤ 49 days (≤ 7 weeks)- 21 pts; 50-63 days (8-9 weeks)- 429 pts; and ≥ 64 days (≥ 9 weeks)- 15 pts. Patients were also divided into groups with respect to the method of diagnosis: TURP (81 pts), or other means (399 pts). Patients were further divided into 2 groups: 1) if they had ever had a pre-treatment TURP (170 pts) or 2) if they had not (310 pts). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to boost technique: bilateral arcs (459 pts) or 4 field box (21 pts). Patients were also divided into groups according to total RT dose: ≤ 70 Gy (421 pts) or > 70 Gy (59 pts). Patients were further subdivided into 3 dose groups: 70 Gy (59 pts). Results: Median follow-up is 48 months (range 3 - 112 months). No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), or treatment time divided into

  11. Clinical statistics of gynecologic cancers in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers, have both high morbidity and mortality among the gynecologic malignant tumors in Japan. The present study was conducted using both the population-based cancer registry and the gynecologic cancer registry to elucidate the characteristics of gynecologic malignant tumors in Japan. Based on nationwide estimates from the population-based cancer registry in Japan, the morbidities and mortality of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were obtained and used for analysis. Clinicopathologic factors for cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, including age, clinical stage, postsurgical stage, histological type, therapeutic strategy, and prognosis were retrieved from the gynecologic cancer registry published by the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and used for analysis. The morbidities of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were 10,908, 13,606, and 9,384 women in 2012, respectively. The prevalence of endometrial cancer has significantly and consistently been increasing and represents the most common gynecologic malignant tumor in Japan. The mortalities of cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers were 2.1, 1.3, and 3.2 per 100,000 in 2012, respectively. In 2014, 52.2% of cervical cancer patients were classified as stage I, 22.5% as stage II, 10.2% as stage III, and 11.2% as stage IV. In addition, 71.9% of endometrial cancer patients were classified as stage I, 6.0% as stage II, 13.3% as stage III, and 7.5% as stage IV. Finally, 43.2% of ovarian cancer patients were classified as stage I, 9.1% as stage II, 27.6% as stage III, and 7.2% as stage IV. Twelve-point six percent of ovarian cancer patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:28198168

  12. Risk of skin cancer following tamoxifen treatment in more than 16,000 breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstegaard, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Andersson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women with breast cancer are at increased risk of developing skin cancer. Little is known about how tamoxifen affects this risk. We aimed to investigate whether tamoxifen treatment following breast cancer is associated with skin cancer. Methods: A cohort consisting of 44,589 women...... diagnosed with breast cancer during 1977–2007 from the nationwide clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, was followed for a primary skin cancer [basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or melanoma] in the Danish Cancer Registry supplemented by data on BCC and SCC...... from the Danish Pathology Register. We investigated incidence of skin cancer among 16,214 women treated with tamoxifen compared to 28,375 women not treated with tamoxifen by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRRs) in Cox regression models. Results: Tamoxifen users were followed for a median of 2...

  13. Nanotechnology Strategies To Advance Outcomes in Clinical Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Christopher M; Bradbury, Michelle S; Lanza, Gregory M; Nel, Andre E; Rao, Jianghong; Wang, Andrew Z; Wiesner, Ulrich B; Yang, Lily; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2018-01-23

    Ongoing research into the application of nanotechnology for cancer treatment and diagnosis has demonstrated its advantages within contemporary oncology as well as its intrinsic limitations. The National Cancer Institute publishes the Cancer Nanotechnology Plan every 5 years since 2005. The most recent iteration helped codify the ongoing basic and translational efforts of the field and displayed its breadth with several evolving areas. From merely a technological perspective, this field has seen tremendous growth and success. However, an incomplete understanding of human cancer biology persists relative to the application of nanoscale materials within contemporary oncology. As such, this review presents several evolving areas in cancer nanotechnology in order to identify key clinical and biological challenges that need to be addressed to improve patient outcomes. From this clinical perspective, a sampling of the nano-enabled solutions attempting to overcome barriers faced by traditional therapeutics and diagnostics in the clinical setting are discussed. Finally, a strategic outlook of the future is discussed to highlight the need for next-generation cancer nanotechnology tools designed to address critical gaps in clinical cancer care.

  14. Clinical analysis of lung cancer complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Keishi; Homma, Sakae; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Takaya, Hisashi; Sakamoto, Susumu; Kawabata, Masateru; Kishi, Kazuma; Tsuboi, Eiyasu; Yoshimura, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristic clinical features of lung cancer associated with pulmonary tuberculosis. Among 1,028 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis admitted in our hospital between 1985 and 2005, 17 (15 men, 2 women; mean age 73±8) were diagnosed as having lung cancer. Patient characteristics, clinical features, radiographic images, treatment and prognosis were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were classified into 2 groups: group A (n=5), lung cancer complicated by active tuberculosis, and group B (n=12), lung cancer with tuberculosis sequelae. All patients in group A and 8 patients (33%) in group B had either stage III or IV lung cancer, whereas 4 patients in group B had stage I lung cancer. Coexistence of lung cancer and pulmonary tuberculosis in the same segment or lobe was seen in 80% (n=4) or 60% (n=3) of group A cases, respectively, and in 67% (n=8) or 8% (n=1) respectively, in group B. Mean survival in group A and group B was 9.2 months and 26.8 months, respectively. More attention should be paid to the possibility of development of lung cancer in individuals with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis or who have had tuberculosis sequelae revealed by chest radiography. Also, the possible coexistence of lung cancer must be carefully examined in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. (author)

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment and follow up were included. Patient ... and recurrence and the associated patient and disease ... The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the devel- ... therapy, disease stage and curative intent (table 3). ... through genetic and family analyses (4,6). ... Polite BN, Dignam JJ: A colorectal cancer model of health.

  16. [Available resources for the treatment of breast cancer in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohar, Alejandro; Bargalló, Enrique; Ramírez, Ma Teresa; Lara, Fernando; Beltrán-Ortega, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Describe the resources for the treatment of breast cancer in Mexico. Information was obtained from 23 Centros Estatales de Cáncer (State Cancer Centers, CEC), two federal hospitals and Cancerología. This study was performed in Mexico City in August/September of 2008. These 23 centers provide medical care for breast cancer including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy; all of them validated by the Seguro Popular. The costs were defined according to clinical stage and ranged from $27,500.00 pesos for clinical stage 0 to $480,00.00 in the advanced stage. A total of 2 689 women with breast cancer have been treated; only 1% was reported with in situ carcinoma. An adequate medical infrastructure is in place to treat breast cancer in Mexico. The costs are high due to late diagnosis of the disease. Early detection of breast cancer is a high priority for optimal control of this disease in Mexico.

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is found early. Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer include vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by cervical cancer or by other conditions . Check with your ...

  18. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.kr [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eui-Don [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3-4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154-0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m{sup 2} chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m{sup 2} regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  19. [Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. In 2012 one million thirty six thousand cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed all over the world, two hundred fifty three thousand cases were diagnosed in China (accounted for 18.6%). China has the largest number of new cases of colorectal cancer in the world. Colorectal cancer has becoming a serious threat of Chinese residents' health. In 2010, the National Ministry of Health organized colorectal cancer expertise of the Chinese Medical Association to write the "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2010edition), and publish it publicly. In recent years, the National Health and Family Planning Commission has organized experts to revised the protocol 2 times: the first time in 2015, the second time in 2017. The revised part of "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2017 edition) involves new progress in the field of imaging examination, pathological evaluation, surgery, chemotherpy and radiotherapy. The 2017 edition of the protocol not only referred to the contents of the international guidelines, but also combined with the specific national conditions and clinical practice in China, and also included many evidence-based clinical data in China recently. The 2017 edition of the protocol would further promote the standardization of diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer in China, improve the survival and prognosis of patients, and benefit millions of patients with colorectal cancer and their families.

  20. Cancer of unknown primitive metastatic. About two clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawen, L; Cordoba, A.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the two clinical cases about the unknown primitive metastatic cancer. The main techniques used for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of different s carcinomas are: Electronic microscope, molecular biology and genetics, especially histopathological study, topographic survey, ultrasound, radiography, chemotherapy, radiotherapy

  1. Palbociclib: A new hope in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, R Priyadharsini

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer being one of the common cancers has high morbidity and mortality. Despite the conventional treatment, the burden of the disease increases year after year. There is a need for newer drugs that target the different mechanisms in the pathogenesis. The interaction of cyclins with cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) plays a major role in the abnormal cell cycle in cancer and it is considered to be an important target. Palbociclib is a CDK inhibitor currently approved for the treatment of breast cancer. The preclinical studies with breast cancer lines were sensitive to palbociclib and the clinical trials phase I, phase II (PALOMA 1), and phase III (PALOMA 2, 3, PENTELOPE, PEARL) showed that the drug was efficacious when combined other conventional drugs for breast cancer. Palbociclib was also been tested in various other germ cell tumors, melanoma, multiple myeloma, glioblastoma multiforme etc., The major adverse effect of the drug includes hematological toxicity mainly neutropenia, gastrointestinal adverse effects.

  2. Some Aspects Of Adjuvant Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlavata, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe and in North America. Cornerstone of the treatment of localized colorectal cancer is surgical resection followed by chemotherapy or radio-chemotherapy in indicated cases. For patients with Stage III colon cancer recent data have shown efficacy through the combining fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with oxaliplatin into adjuvant treatment program. For patients with Stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at high risk for disease recurrence. Current randomized clinical trials in the adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer are examining the value of adding agents known to be active in metastatic disease, including those that modify specific molecular targets. (author)

  3. Prostate cancer - epidemiology, etiology, diagnostics, clinical symptoms, screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrus, D.

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer presents a real important medical and social problem at present. It is one of the most common malignancy in males. In global point of view it means permanent incidence increase of this disease. Despite improvement of prostate cancer diagnosis and complex treatment mortality does not decreased significantly. Knowledge of etiological factors are relatively limited. Important factors are: genetic disposition, age, life style, race, positive familial history, circulated androgens. Diagnostics is well known, based on routine clinical methods: digital rectal examination, measurement of PSA a transrectal ultrasound. Benefit of prostate cancer screening is until now unclear, controversial. (author)

  4. Cancer and treatment effects on job task performance for gynecological cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachreiner, Nancy M; Shanley, Ryan; Ghebre, Rahel G

    2013-01-01

    Over 91,000 new cases of gynecological cancers are expected to be diagnosed in 2013 in the US alone. As cancer detection technology and treatment options improve, the number of working-age cancer survivors continues to grow. To describe US gynecological cancer survivors' perceptions of the effects of cancer and treatment on their job tasks. 104 adult gynecological cancer survivors who were working at the time of their cancer diagnosis, treated at a University-based women's health clinic, diagnosed in the previous 24 months, and spoke English. Women completed written surveys to describe their work experiences following diagnosis. Clinical characteristics were obtained through medical record review. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations were performed to describe characteristics and associations. Fifteen percent of women had chemotherapy and radiation treatment; 48% had only chemotherapy, 9% only radiation therapy, and 28% had neither. Survivors described the frequency of performing seven job tasks, such as 'intense concentration', 'analyzing data', and 'lifting heavy loads.' Women who had undergone radiation treatment were more likely to indicate limitations for physical tasks; women undergoing chemotherapy were more likely to report limitations in more analytic tasks. Only 29% of women noted an employer-based policy facilitated their return-to-work process. Cancer and treatment have important effects on job performance and may vary by type of treatment. Employer-based policies focusing on improved communication and work accommodations may improve the return to work process.

  5. Clinico pathological presentation of tongue cancers and early cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najeeb, T.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinico pathological presentation of tongue cancers and to calculate survival rates (SR) with disease free survival rates (DFSR) and recurrence rates (RR) in different treatment modalities and to compare the results of surgery alone and radiotherapy alone in stage I and stage II disease and to calculate better option of treatment in early tongue cancers. Design: A longitudinal study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad (PIMS) from January 1987 to June 1998. Patients and Methods: Case histories of 67 patients were collected from departmental record. Clinical data included age at diagnosis, gender of patient, location of tumor, presenting symptoms and their duration, biopsy report, predominant histological pattern of tumor, nodal status, stage of tumor, treatment modality employed, tumor recurrence, metastasis and survival rates with disease-free survival rates after 2 years' follow-up. Results: Among 67 patients there were 31 males and 36 females. Mean age was 50 years (range 20 - 80 years). Sixty seven patients with primary cancer of tongue constituted 38.8% of oral cavity cancers during period of 1987 - 1998 in PIMS. Smoking, poor oro dental hygiene (POOH) and betel nuts chewing were the main risk factors. Odynophagia and painful ulcers on lateral border of tongue were the main clinical symptoms with average duration of 7 months. Regional lymph nodes were palpable in 32.8%, 5.5% was in stage I, 35.8% in stage II, 29.8% in stage III, and 28.3% was in stage IV. No patient was found to have distant metastasis. Histopathology in 94% of cases was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recurrence and survival rates were determined in 49 patients. Average time of recurrence was 12.5 months. Recurrence was 100% loco regional (LR). It was 85.7% in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone, 42.1% in patients treated with surgery alone and 31.2% in patients

  6. Neratinib (HKI-272) in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Tarruella, Sara; Jerez, Yolanda; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Martín, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Neratinib is an orally available, small, irreversible, pan-HER kinase inhibitor. HER-2-positive breast cancer is a breast cancer subtype with an increasing body of knowledge regarding potential targeted drug combinations that are significantly improving outcomes through a biologically tailored therapy approach; neratinib emerges as a promising tool in this context. This article reviews the molecular and clinical development of neratinib, an example of a covalent drug, from preclinical models to Phase III clinical trials, focusing on breast cancer treatment. The potential combinations of neratinib with chemotherapy in the metastatic, adjuvant and even neoadjuvant settings are appraised. These results and future perspectives will be discussed.

  7. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... oncology nurse and a registered dietitian. Read More "Screening For Breast Cancer" Articles #BeBrave: A life-saving test / Breast Cancer ...

  8. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...... population). RAS was mutated in 46% and BRAF in 12% of the tumours. RAS and BRAF, if mutated, were negative prognostic factors. The updated analyses confirmed the finding of the primary report that cetuximab did not provide any additional benefit when added to FLOX in patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type tumours......, neither on progression-free nor overall survival. However, the outcomes in a subset of patients, which, after the first eight treatment cycles, received cetuximab alone, suggested a beneficial effect of cetuximab monotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Adding cetuximab to Nordic FLOX did not provide any clinical...

  9. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  10. Clinical study of early laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Gunji; Mori, Takanori; Udaka, Tsuyoshi; Shiomori, Teruo; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 71 consecutive cases of early laryngeal cancer (stage I or II) that had undergone primary treatment in our department between 1999 and 2004. There were 68 males and 3 females, and their ages ranged from 40 to 85 years of age (average; 67.7 years). Eight patients had the supraglottic type, 61 had the glottic type, and 2 had the subglottic type. Chemoradiotherapy was performed as the primary treatment except in the patients with glottic T1a cancer, who received radiotherapy alone. The 5-year survival rates was 91.1% for glottic cancer (T1a: 100%, T1b: 92.3%, T2: 85.8%) and 75.0% for supraglottic cancer. The local control rate of glottic cancer was 79.6% (T1a: 80.0%, T1b: 74.0%, T2: 85.2%), and significantly higher than that of supraglottic cancer (56.2%, p<0.05). The laryngeal preservation rate was 84.4% in glottic cancer (T1a: 100%, T1b: 76.9%, T2: 77.5%) and 58.3% in supraglottic cancer, and the difference between T1a and T2 glottic cancer was significant (p<0.05). Local recurrence and cervical lymph node metastasis were seen in 9 patients and 6 patients, respectively. Distant metastasis occurred in 4 patients, all of whom had the glottic type. Four patients died of their disease, and distant metastasis was the major cause of death in 3 of them. These results indicate that additional treatment should be performed in cases in which radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy is ineffective and that both in the early stages glottic and supraglottic cancers can be successfully treated by radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy. The results also suggested that the survival of patients with early laryngeal cancer depends on whether they develop distant metastasis. Introduction of adjuvant chemotherapy to improve their prognosis remains to be assessed. (author)

  11. Clinical experience of integrative cancer immunotherapy with GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Mette, Martin; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Norihiro

    2013-07-01

    Immunotherapy has become an attractive new strategy in the treatment of cancer. The laboratory and clinical study of cancer immunotherapy is rapidly advancing. However, in the clinical setting, the results of cancer immunotherapy are mixed. We therefore contend that cancer immunotherapy should be customized to each patient individually based on their immune status and propose an integrative immunotherapy approach with second-generation group-specific component macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)-containing human serum. The standard protocol of our integrative cancer immunotherapy is as follows: i) 0.5 ml GcMAF-containing human serum is administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously once or twice per week for the duration of cancer therapy until all cancer cells are eradicated; ii) hyper T/natural killer (NK) cell therapy is given once per week for six weeks; iii) high-dose vitamin C is administered intravenously twice per week; iv) alpha lipoic acid (600 mg) is administered orally daily; v) vitamin D3 (5,000-10,000 IU) is administered orally daily. By March 2013, Saisei Mirai have treated over 345 patients with GcMAF. Among them we here present the cases of three patients for whom our integrative immunotherapy was remarkably effective. The results of our integrative immunotherapy seem hopeful. We also plan to conduct a comparative clinical study.>

  12. Acute onset of ovarian dysfunction in young females after start of cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mörse, Helena; Elfving, Maria; Lindgren, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Female childhood cancer survivors are at risk of ovarian failure and premature ovarian insufficiency. We hereby present an interim analysis of a prospective observational study of ovarian function during cancer treatment of young females in relation to clinical factors.......Female childhood cancer survivors are at risk of ovarian failure and premature ovarian insufficiency. We hereby present an interim analysis of a prospective observational study of ovarian function during cancer treatment of young females in relation to clinical factors....

  13. Radiological and clinical evaluation of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, O. J.; Chin, S. Y.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred thirty two cases of the pathologically proven colorectal cancer at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Hospital in the period from January 1973 to June 1980 were analyzed radiologically and clinically. The results were as follows: 1. The colorectal cancer was prevalent in rectosigmoid area and in the fourth to seventh decade of life. 2. The clinical pictures were classified into two groups. The one was rectosigmoid cancer with bowel habit changes. The other was one with no specific symptoms or signs. The clinical pictures of the right colon cancer were rather indirected, chronic and systemic than those of the left one. 3. The roentgenological findings were classified into two groups. The one was rectum and left colon cancer with symmetrical annular narrowing and the other showed trumpet-like proximal dilatation. 4. The most frequent complication was intestinal obstruction. 5. The majority of colorectal cancer was adenocarcinoma. The squamous cell carcinoma and atypical cell carcinoma were most prevalent in rectum, but malignantly lymphoma often occurred in right colon. The rarest colorectal cancer was atypical cell carcinoma in rectum

  14. [Treatments for Pancreatic Cancer with Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Junji

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer, adenocarcinoma, generally rapidly progresses, and if a metastatic lesion is detected, chemotherapy is applied even in solitary metastasis. However, surgical resection for solitary metastasis have been reported to achieve long survival in some pancreatic cancer patients. In a prospective study of surgery for hepatic and lymph node oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer, long survival of 5 years or more was reported around 10%. Furthermore, longer survival and fewer rerecurrence were achieved with surgery in lung metastasis than in liver metastasis and loco-regional recurrence. Although there has been no establishment of concept or no consensus of treatment strategy for oligometastasis in pancreatic cancer, some patients with pancreatic cancer have long disease-free survival by surgery for oligometastasis. A population of pancreatic cancer patients who have benefits of surgery for oligometastasis should be identified, and it is necessary to establish treatments for oligometastasis as standard treatments in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Facing Forward Series: Life After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment Coping with your feelings Going back to work and relating with friends and coworkers Show this booklet to the people who are close to you so they understand what life is like after cancer treatment. Take it with ...

  16. Cancer Drug Development: New Targets for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt

    1996-01-01

    There is often a considerable lapse of time between the definition of what causes a disease in the laboratory and the development of successful therapy. However, the history of medicine teaches us that the need to understand the scientific basis of disease before the discovery of new treatments is both essential and inevitable. During the middle of the 19th century, the work of the great German pathologist, Rudolf Virchow, defined disease as having an anatomic or histologic basis. In the clinic, this scientific perspective would lead to increasingly effective and, often, increasingly aggressive surgical approaches to disease. Later in the 19th century, Koch's discovery of the tubercle bacillus (a discovery Virchow disbelieved and publication of which he thwarted, since he hypothesized that cancer, not microbes, caused consumption!), would define a microbiological basis for disease. With bacteria defined as a major cause of human suffering, the stage was set for the development of the discovery of effective antibiotics. In the early 20th century, the pioneering work of Banting, Best and others would show that disease can also have an endocrine or metabolic basis. This new body of scientific knowledge would lead not only to the specific discovery of insulin as an effective treatment for diabetes but also to a more general understanding of the role of hormones, vitamins and co-factors in human health and disease. Basic medical research and its successful translation into effective treatments has fundamentally altered the cause of human death. In the developed world, where access to the benefit of this work is available, infectious disease is not the problem it was in the days of Pasteur, Metchnikoff and Ehrlich. As we approach the millennium, science is now teaching us that diseases, particularly cancer, can have a molecular or genetic basis. Can successful application of this new knowledge be far behind? We are already seeing the application of this new knowledge in

  17. Targeting cancer cells using 3-bromopyruvate for selective cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam H Baghdadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment deserves more research efforts despite intensive conventional treatment modalities for many types of malignancies. Metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy receive a lot of global research efforts. The current advances in cancer biology may improve targeting the critical metabolic differences that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Cancer cells are highly glycolytic for energy production, exhibit the Warburg effect, establish aggressive acidic microenvironment, maintain cancer stem cells, exhibit resistance to chemotherapy, have low antioxidant systems but different ΔΨm (delta psi, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, express P-glycoprotein for multidrug resistance, upregulate glucose transporters and monocarboxylate transporters and are under high steady-state reactive oxygen species conditions. Normal cells differ in all these aspects. Lactate produced through the Warburg effect helps cancer metastasis. Targeting glycolysis reactions for energy production in cancer cells seems promising in decreasing the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. 3-bromopyruvate makes use of cancer biology in treating cancer cells, cancer stem cells and preventing metastasis in human cancer as discussed in this review. Updated advances are analyzed here, which include research analysis of background, experience, readings in the field of cancer biology, oncology and biochemistry.

  18. Gastric Cancer: Current Status of Diagnosis and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of death from malignant disease worldwide and most frequently discovered in advanced stages. Because curative surgery is regarded as the only option for cure, early detection of resectable gastric cancer is extremely important for good patient outcomes. Therefore, noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as evolutionary endoscopy and positron emission tomography are utilized as screening tools for gastric cancer. To date, early gastric cancer is being treated using minimally invasive methods such as endoscopic treatment and laparoscopic surgery, while in advanced cancer it is necessary to consider multimodality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Because of the results of large clinical trials, surgery with extended lymphadenectomy could not be recommended as a standard therapy for advanced gastric cancer. Recent clinical trials had shown survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection compared with surgery alone. In addition, recent advances of molecular targeted agents would play an important role as one of the modalities for advanced gastric cancer. In this review, we summarize the current status of diagnostic technology and treatment for gastric cancer

  19. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical and practical substantiation of dose fractionation regimes in radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The indications and contraindications to radiotherapy, radiation reactions and complications resulting from the treatment process are considered. The preparation of patients to the application of chemoradiation treatment methods is described. The recommentations for the improvement of immediate and delayed results of treatment of esophagus cancer patients are given. 99 refs.; 15 figs

  20. The conservative treatment of the breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami, L.

    1982-01-01

    Despite major achievements in the medical field, the survival rate of patients with breast cancer has not changed over the last 50 years. Certain treatments once taken as definitive are now being reviewed. The therapeutic evolution of breast cancer is studied and emphasis is given to new treatment modalities, particularly the conservative ones. (Author) [pt

  1. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy.

  2. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy.

  3. A novel representation of inter-site tumour heterogeneity from pre-treatment computed tomography textures classifies ovarian cancers by clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Micco, Maura; Lakhman, Yulia; Meier, Andreas A.; Sosa, Ramon; Hricak, Hedvig; Sala, Evis [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Veeraraghavan, Harini; Deasy, Joseph [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Nougaret, Stephanie [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Service de Radiologie, Institut Regional du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); INSERM, U1194, Institut de Recherche en Cancerologie de Montpellier (IRCM), Montpellier (France); Soslow, Robert A.; Weigelt, Britta [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Levine, Douglas A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Aghajanian, Carol; Snyder, Alexandra [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the associations between clinical outcomes and radiomics-derived inter-site spatial heterogeneity metrics across multiple metastatic lesions on CT in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). IRB-approved retrospective study of 38 HGSOC patients. All sites of suspected HGSOC involvement on preoperative CT were manually segmented. Gray-level correlation matrix-based textures were computed from each tumour site, and grouped into five clusters using a Gaussian Mixture Model. Pairwise inter-site similarities were computed, generating an inter-site similarity matrix (ISM). Inter-site texture heterogeneity metrics were computed from the ISM and compared to clinical outcomes. Of the 12 inter-site texture heterogeneity metrics evaluated, those capturing the differences in texture similarities across sites were associated with shorter overall survival (inter-site similarity entropy, similarity level cluster shade, and inter-site similarity level cluster prominence; p ≤ 0.05) and incomplete surgical resection (similarity level cluster shade, inter-site similarity level cluster prominence and inter-site cluster variance; p ≤ 0.05). Neither the total number of disease sites per patient nor the overall tumour volume per patient was associated with overall survival. Amplification of 19q12 involving cyclin E1 gene (CCNE1) predominantly occurred in patients with more heterogeneous inter-site textures. Quantitative metrics non-invasively capturing spatial inter-site heterogeneity may predict outcomes in patients with HGSOC. (orig.)

  4. Atezolizumab for the treatment of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Debora; Pelizzari, Giacomo; Vitale, Maria Grazia; Lisanti, Camilla; Cinausero, Marika; Iacono, Donatella; Puglisi, Fabio

    2018-04-24

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer diagnosed among women. The development of new personalized therapeutic strategies has reshaped the landscape in this field. However, BC is still the first cause of death among women. Interestingly, several preclinical studies and some clinical evidences are focused their attention on the role of immune system and immunotherapy on cancer control, also in BC. Areas covered: Usually, BC has been considered a not immunogenic tumor for its low mutational load. However, recent studies have evidenced that some subtypes, triple negative and HER-2 positive BC, are "hot" tumors, thus more immunogenic. Moreover, the presence of immune infiltrate is positively associated with favorable prognosis. Therefore, the use of immune-checkpoint inhibitors seems to be an encouraging treatment option also in BC. Among these drugs, atezolizumab is an anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody with a particular structure that reduce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against T cells, increasing quantitatively and qualitatively the effective response. Expert opinion: The use of immunotherapy is a promising option for BC. However, at the same time it still raises many doubts. Surely, the research and the validation of immune biomarkers can permit to identify patients who more benefit from these drugs. Moreover, additional studies should evaluate as to induce immunogenicity in cold tumors. Then again, the understanding of mechanism of primary and acquired resistance can help the development of novel strategies to enhance effector response, overcoming these resistances.

  5. Mutational analysis and clinical correlation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Andrea L; Borger, Darrell R; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P; Wo, Jennifer Y; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Wadlow, Raymond C; Zhu, Andrew X; Murphy, Janet E; Faris, Jason E; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, Anthony J; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-05-15

    Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.27; P = .029). The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  6. CLINICAL CASE OF A MASSIVE ISOLA TED METASTATIC ADRENAL LESION IN COLORECT AL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Moshurov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe liver, lungs, parietal and visceral peritoneum have traditionally been considered to be the main target organs of metastatic colorectal cancer. The isolated adrenal metastasis in colorectal cancer is rare, in the literature there are single observations of clinical cases of successful surgical treatment of such patients. This article presents the clinical observation of successful surgical treatment of patients with colorectal cancer with massive isolated adrenal metastases.

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Low-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy as a Boost to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Distal Rectal Cancer: A Phase-II Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Shapour; Zohourinia, Shadi; Ansari, Mansour; Ghahramani, Leila; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Pourahmad, Saeedeh; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Hamedi, Sayed Hasan; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Despite advances in rectal cancer treatment over the last decade, local control and risk of late side effects due to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) remain as concerns. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy and the safety of low-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (LDRBT) as a boost to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for use in treating locally advanced distal rectal adenocarcinomas. This phase-II clinical trial included 34 patients (as the study arm) with newly diagnosed, locally advanced (clinical T3-T4 and/or N1/N2, M0) lower rectal cancer. For comparative analysis, 102 matched patients (as the historical control arm) with rectal cancer were also selected. All the patients were treated with LDRBT (15 Gy in 3 fractions) and concurrent chemoradiation (45-50.4 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 plus oral capecitabine 825 mg/m(2) twice daily during LDRBT and EBRT. The study results revealed a significant differences between the study arm and the control arm in terms in the pathologic tumor size (2.1 cm vs. 3.6 cm, P = 0.001), the pathologic tumor stage (35% T3-4 vs. 65% T3-4, P = 0.003), and the pathologic complete response (29.4% vs. 11.7%, P < 0.028). Moreover, a significantly higher dose of EBRT (P = 0.041) was found in the control arm, and a longer time to surgery was observed in the study arm (P < 0.001). The higher rate of treatment-related toxicities, such as mild proctitis and anemia, in the study arm was tolerable and easily manageable. A boost of LDRBT can optimize the pathologic complete response, with acceptable toxicities, in patients with distal rectal cancer.

  8. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  9. New Developments in Breast Cancer Screening and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstra, Sarah; McNeil, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The clinical update serves as a brief review of recently published, high-impact, and potentially practice-changing journal articles summarized for our readers. In this clinical update, we selected top recent articles regarding breast health that may change the clinical practice of women's health providers. We identified articles by reviewing high-impact medical and women's health journals as well as national practice guidelines. Three of our articles are dedicated to the rapid changes in breast cancer screening. With regard to breast cancer treatment, we focused on two articles that impact who we treat with traditional aggressive regimens.

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb. The cancer may occur as soon as 5 years ... thyroid cancer, drugs may be given to prevent the body from making thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone that can ...

  11. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  12. Brachytherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Yul

    1999-01-01

    Brachytherapy has been proved to be an effective method for the purpose of increasing radiation dose to the tumor and reducing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, the rationale of brachytherapy is as follows; Firstly, early small lesion is radiocurative and the major cause of failure is local recurrence. Secondly, it can diminish evidently the dose to the normal tissue especially masseteric muscle and salivary gland. Thirdly, the anatomy of head and neck is suitable to various technique of brachytherapy. On background of accumulated experience of LDR iridium brachytherapy of head and neck cancer for the last 15 years, the author reviewed the history of radioisotope therapy, the characteristics of radionuclides, and some important things in the method, clinical technique and treatment planning. The author analyzed the clinical result of 185 cases of head and neck cancer treated in the Korea Cancer Center Hospital. Finally the future prospect of brachytherapy of head and neck cancer is discussed

  13. Clinical roundtable monograph: Recent advances in taxanes for the first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, Mark A; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Spigel, David

    2012-10-01

    Treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are based on the broad categories of squamous or non-squamous histology. Frontline treatment options include pemetrexed and cisplatin, pemetrexed and a taxane, gemcitabine with cisplatin, and the addition of bevacizumab to a taxane and carboplatin. Pemetrexed is used for maintenance therapy for non-squamous NSCLC, whereas patients with squamous NSCLC lack easy options for maintenance therapy. nab-Paclitaxel overcomes the solubility and toxicity issues of solvent-based paclitaxel, and the albumin in nab-paclitaxel improves the concentration of the drug in the tumor. A recent phase III trial in NSCLC compared nab-paclitaxel with carboplatin versus solvent-based paclitaxel with carboplatin, and found improved overall response rates (ORRs) in the nab-paclitaxel arm (33% vs 25%; P=.005). In a subset analysis, NSCLC patients with squamous histology had a higher ORR (41%) with nab-paclitaxel than with solvent-based paclitaxel (24%; P<.001). Another subset analysis found that patients ages 70 years and older had improved overall survival (median 19.9 months) with nab-paclitaxel compared with solvent-based paclitaxel (median 10.4 months; P=.009). Patients in the nab-paclitaxel arm had less neuropathy, less hearing loss, and fewer interruptions in daily living than patients in the solvent-based paclitaxel arm.

  14. A Web application for the management of clinical workflow in image-guided and adaptive proton therapy for prostate cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Daniel; Boes, Peter; Ho, Meng Wei; Li, Zuofeng

    2015-05-08

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), based on radiopaque markers placed in the prostate gland, was used for proton therapy of prostate patients. Orthogonal X-rays and the IBA Digital Image Positioning System (DIPS) were used for setup correction prior to treatment and were repeated after treatment delivery. Following a rationale for margin estimates similar to that of van Herk,(1) the daily post-treatment DIPS data were analyzed to determine if an adaptive radiotherapy plan was necessary. A Web application using ASP.NET MVC5, Entity Framework, and an SQL database was designed to automate this process. The designed features included state-of-the-art Web technologies, a domain model closely matching the workflow, a database-supporting concurrency and data mining, access to the DIPS database, secured user access and roles management, and graphing and analysis tools. The Model-View-Controller (MVC) paradigm allowed clean domain logic, unit testing, and extensibility. Client-side technologies, such as jQuery, jQuery Plug-ins, and Ajax, were adopted to achieve a rich user environment and fast response. Data models included patients, staff, treatment fields and records, correction vectors, DIPS images, and association logics. Data entry, analysis, workflow logics, and notifications were implemented. The system effectively modeled the clinical workflow and IGRT process.

  15. Tramadol plus metamizole combined or not with anti-inflammatory drugs is clinically effective for moderate to severe chronic pain treatment in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flôr, Patrícia B; Yazbek, Karina V B; Ida, Keila K; Fantoni, Denise T

    2013-05-01

    To test the effectiveness and safety of tramadol plus metamizole combined or not with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for treating moderate to severe chronic neoplastic pain in dogs, and its impact on quality of life (QL). Prospective, uncontrolled, open-label, clinical study. Sixty nine client-owned dogs with multiple forms of cancer and visual analog scale (VAS) pain score ≥ 40 after receiving NSAIDs for at least 7 days. The MN group received metamizole + NSAID, MNT group received metamizole + NSAID + tramadol and MT group received metamizole + tramadol. Pain was scored by the 0 to 100 mm VAS (0 = no pain, 100 = worst pain) and analgesic therapy was considered effective if 25 mm differences in VAS scores were observed between day 0 and the follow ups. The QL was evaluated according to a 0 to 36 scoring method for dogs (0 = worst, 36 = best) and side effects were recorded. Data were registered at day 0 (baseline) and at the first and second follow ups (7 and 14 days after day 0, respectively). The MN group had less analgesia at day 7 (25%) and day 14 (42%) than MNT (59%, p = 0.0274; 76%, p = 0.0251, respectively) and MT groups (69%, p = 0.0151; 81%, p = 0.0341, respectively). The QL scores were lower in the MN group at the first (score 23) and second follow up (score 26) than in MNT (27, p = 0.0847; 30, p = 0.0002) and MT (28, p = 0.0384; 31, p = 0.0001) groups. Side effects were more commonly observed in the MN group (87%) than in MNT (24%, p pain in dogs with cancer and improved QL. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  16. The guidelines for diagnostics and treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inciura, A.; Juozaityte, E.

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. The purpose of this article is to analyze the main diagnostic and treatment strategies for all stages and recurrences of cervical cancer. The article reviews the epidemiological situation, clinical features, diagnostic procedures for detection of this tumor and for evaluation of the dissemination of the disease, staging criteria, TNM (Tumor, Nodes, Metastases) and FIGO (Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) classification, as well as treatment and prognosis. Surgical treatment (radical type II or III hysterectomy and Iymphadenectomy) for early stage I and IIA cervical cancer is the main treatment method. Delivery of adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy or concomitant chemoradiation depends on the prognostic factors (tumor penetration to cervical tissues, Iymphovascular invasion, tumor invasion to paracervical tissues, and surgical margins). For treatment of more advanced stages of cervical cancer (IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVA) concomitant chemoradiation: external beam radiotherapy with chemotherapy and brachytherapy is used. Description of the treatment guidelines for each stage of cervical cancer is given in this article. These guidelines are useful for good treatment practice. (author)

  17. [Novelties in diagnostics and treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesz, Péter; Nyírádi, Péter

    2016-03-13

    Similarly to earlier years, a vast majority of novel findings were published on prostate cancer, which is the most common urological cancer. Clinical trials with long-term follow-up and promising observational studies were published. In this paper the author reviews the relevant novelties including the diagnostic use of magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography as well as active surveillance, cytoreductive prostatectomy and medical treatment.

  18. Integration of Translational Research in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Research (EORTC) Clinical Trial Cooperative Group Mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Lehmann (Frederick); D. Lacombe (Denis); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe landscape for cancer research is profoundly different today from that only one decade ago. Basic science is moving rapidly and biotechnological revolutions in molecular targeting and immunology have completely modified the opportunities and concepts for cancer

  19. Micelles As Delivery System for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Aysen

    2017-01-01

    Micelles are nanoparticles formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in certain solvents above concentrations called critical micelle concentration (CMC). Micelles are used in different fields like food, cosmetics, medicine, etc. These nanosized delivery systems are under spotlight in the recent years with new achievements in terms of their in vivo stability, ability to protect entrapped drug, release kinetics, ease of cellular penetration and thereby increased therapeutic efficacy. Drug loaded micelles can be prepared by dialysis, oil-in-water method, solid dispersion, freezing, spray drying, etc. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the research on micelles (in vitro, in vivo and clinical) as delivery system for cancer treatment. Passive targeting is one route for accumulation of nanosized micellar drug formulations. Many research groups from both academia and industry focus on developing new strategies for improving the therapeutic efficacy of micellar systems (active targeting to the tumor site, designing multidrug delivery systems for overcoming multidrug resistance or micelles formed by prodrug conjugates, etc). There is only one micellar drug formulation in South Korea that has reached clinical practice. However, there are many untargeted anticancer drug loaded micellar formulations in clinical trials, which have potential for use in clinics. Many more products are expected to be on the market in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Clinical effectiveness and safety of OROS® hydromorphone in break-through cancer pain treatment: a multicenter, prospective, open-label study in Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Min Kyoung; Hyun, Myung Soo; Kim, Jin Young; Park, Keon Uk; Song, Hong Suk; Lee, Sun Ah; Lee, Won Sik; Bae, Sung Hwa; Ryoo, Hun Mo; Cho, Yoon Young

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of OROS® hydromorphone in reducing breakthrough pain (BTP) medication frequency in Korean patients with chronic cancer pain. Multicenter, prospective, open-label, phase IV study. Patients with chronic malignant pain using immediate-release oxycodone more than two times per day for BTP. Patients were stabilized on their ongoing drug for 3 days immediately before baseline measurements (day 0). Medication was changed to OROS® hydromorphone at a dose equianalgesic to oxycodone using a 2.5:1 controlled-release oxycodone to hydromorphone hydrochloride conversion ratio; the patients were observed for 7 days. Dose was titrated, if required, and the patients were observed for another 7 days. Effectiveness and safety parameters were measured at baseline, day 7, and day 14. BTP medication frequency on days 7 and 14, compared to baseline. Of the 141 patients screened, 114 received study drug and 98 completed the study. Compared to day 0, daily BTP medication frequency on day 14 decreased from 2.93 to 2.00 (p > 0.0001), daily BTP frequency decreased from 3.67 to 2.44 (p > 0.0001), and end-of-dose pain frequency decreased by 44 percent. Pain was controlled adequately during daytime and night-time. Pain intensity decreased by 11 percent as assessed using the Korean Brief Pain Inventory and by 17 percent as assessed using the numerical rating scale. About 61.2 percent patients and 60.2 percent physicians were satisfied with the treatment. Common adverse events, which occurred in 91.2 percent patients, were constipation, somnolence, and dizziness. Once-daily OROS® hydromorphone is efficient in the reduction of cancer pain-related BTP episodes, including end-of-dose pain.

  1. Preclinical and Clinical Effects of Mistletoe against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Marvibaigi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is among the most frequent types of cancer in women worldwide. Current conventional treatment options are accompanied by side effects. Mistletoe is amongst the important herbal medicines traditionally used as complementary remedies. An increasing number of studies have reported anticancer activity of mistletoe extracts on breast cancer cells and animal models. Some recent evidence suggests that cytotoxic activity of mistletoe may be mediated through different mechanisms. These findings provide a good base for clinical trials. Various studies on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients revealed similar findings concerning possible benefits on survival time, health-related quality of life (HRQoL, remission rate, and alleviating adverse reactions to conventional therapy. This review provides an overview of the recent findings on preclinical experiments and clinical trials of mistletoe for its cytotoxic and antitumor activity and its effect on HRQoL in breast cancer patients. Moreover, studies investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of mistletoe are discussed in this paper. The analyzed trials provided evidence that there might be a combination of pharmacological and motivational aspects mediated by the mistletoe extract application which may contribute to the clinical benefit and positive outcome such as improved HRQoL and self-regulation in breast cancer patients.

  2. Clinical utility of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan MMK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew MK Chan,1,2 Katrin M Sjoquist,1,3 John R Zalcberg4 1NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, NSW, Australia; 3Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Gastric cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Prognosis remains poor with most patients presenting with advanced or metastatic disease. A better understanding of angiogenesis has led to the investigation of drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway including anti-VEGF antibody therapy (eg, bevacizumab, inhibitors of angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, sunitinib, sorafenib, apatinib, regorafenib, and inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs (eg, ramucirumab. Ramucirumab, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, is the first anti-angiogenic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of advanced gastric cancers. This review will focus on the clinical utility and potential use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer. Keywords: ramucirumab, IMC-1121B, gastric cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, angiogenesis, targeted therapy

  3. Study Design and Rationale for the Phase 3 Clinical Development Program of Enobosarm, a Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, for the Prevention and Treatment of Muscle Wasting in Cancer Patients (POWER Trials).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jeffrey; Prado, Carla M M; Johnston, Mary Ann; Gralla, Richard J; Taylor, Ryan P; Hancock, Michael L; Dalton, James T

    2016-06-01

    Muscle wasting in cancer is a common and often occult condition that can occur prior to overt signs of weight loss and before a clinical diagnosis of cachexia can be made. Muscle wasting in cancer is an important and independent predictor of progressive functional impairment, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality. Although several therapeutic agents are currently in development for the treatment of muscle wasting or cachexia in cancer, the majority of these agents do not directly inhibit muscle loss. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have the potential to increase lean body mass (LBM) and hence muscle mass, without the untoward side effects seen with traditional anabolic agents. Enobosarm, a nonsteroidal SARM, is an agent in clinical development for prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in patients with cancer (POWER 1 and 2 trials). The POWER trials are two identically designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, and multinational phase 3 trials to assess the efficacy of enobosarm for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in subjects initiating first-line chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To assess enobosarm's effect on both prevention and treatment of muscle wasting, no minimum weight loss is required. These pivotal trials have pioneered the methodological and regulatory fields exploring a therapeutic agent for cancer-associated muscle wasting, a process hereby described. In each POWER trial, subjects will receive placebo (n = 150) or enobosarm 3 mg (n = 150) orally once daily for 147 days. Physical function, assessed as stair climb power (SCP), and LBM, assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), are the co-primary efficacy endpoints in both trials assessed at day 84. Based on extensive feedback from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the co-primary endpoints will be analyzed as a responder analysis. To be considered a physical function responder, a

  4. The unpaved journey of vitamin C in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Ping; Dong, Ruochen

    2015-12-01

    Effectiveness and low-toxicity to normal tissues are ideal properties for a cancer treatment, and one that numerous research programs are aiming for. Vitamin C has long been used in the field of Complementary and Alternative Medicine as a cancer treatment, with profound safety and anecdotal efficacy. Recent studies revealed the scientific basis for this use, and indicated that vitamin C, at supra-nutritional doses, holds considerable promise as an effective and low-toxic therapeutic strategy to treat cancer. Reviewed here are the early controversies surrounding vitamin C and cancer treatment, the breakthrough discoveries that led to the current advancement, and recent clinical studies, as well as research into its mechanisms of action.

  5. Treatment of the pain caused by cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao

    1979-01-01

    Relief of pain caused by cancerous invasion is one of the most important role of radiotherapy. Telecobalt has improved the palliative effects for cancer pain, because of its sufficient depth dose. Supervoltage x-ray generated from Linac has expanded indications of treatment for cancer pain by the shortening of treatment time due to high dose rate. Intraoperative electron beam therapy is useful in the case of carcinoma of the pancreas suffering severe pain. Fast neutron therapy is clearly more effective than supervoltage x-ray for pain caused by the invasion of radioresistant cancer. Pelvic angiography is useful for diagnosis of pain focus caused by illiac lymph node metastasis. (author)

  6. Molecular biology of breast cancer stem cells: potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Almeida, Fabio S; Chi, Alex; Nguyen, Ly M; Cohen, Deirdre; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated recently as responsible for failure of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to review breast CSCs molecular biology with respect to their mechanism of resistance to conventional therapy, and to develop treatment strategies that may improve survival of breast cancer patients. A literature search has identified in vitro and in vivo studies of breast CSCs. Breast CSCs overexpress breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) which allows cancer cells to transport actively chemotherapy agents out of the cells. Radioresistance is modulated through activation of Wnt signaling pathway and overexpression of genes coding for glutathione. Lapatinib can selectively target HER-2 positive breast CSCs and improves disease-free survival in these patients. Metformin may target basal type breast CSCs. Parthenolide and oncolytic viruses are promising targeting agents for breast CSCs. Future clinical trials for breast cancer should include anti-cancer stem cells targeting agents in addition to conventional chemotherapy. Hypofractionation radiotherapy may be indicated for residual disease post chemotherapy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Types of Treatment: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease type and stage; your age, gender and race; and other treatments you've used. Your doctor ... Drug Listings Radiation Therapy Immunotherapy Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Therapy Vaccine Therapy Stem Cell Transplantation ...

  8. Active surveillance for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Klotz, Laurence H

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection for the AS stra......Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection...

  9. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rütten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Rooijakkers, Antoinette F.; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  10. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  11. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent for the Palliative Treatment of Obstructing Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer under Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Comparison of the Clinical Results according to Stent Diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Pyeong Guk; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Min Hee; Park, Hae Won; Chung, Eun Chul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of self-expandable metallic stent for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer under fluoroscopic guidance, and to compare results according to the stent diameter. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 31 self-expandable metallic stents were placed into 25 patients for palliative purposes. The rates of technical success, clinical success, complications associated with stent insertion, patient survival, and primary stent patency were evaluated. The results were also compared between two groups: 13 patients using stents with a diameter of 22 mm and 12 patients using stents with a diameter of 26 mm. The technical and clinical success rates were 93.5 and 90.3%, respectively. The complications included severe abdominal pain (6.5%), minor rectal bleeding (9.7%), stent migration (9.7%), and tumor ingrowth or overgrowth (9.7%). No statistical differences in technical were detected between the two groups for the clinical success rate and complication rates. The mean survival time was 5.5 +- 1.4 months. The primary stent patency rates were 91.3% at 5 months, 85.2% at 10 months, and 77.4% at 15 months. The mean period of stent patency was 12.4 +- 2.6 months. The mean period of primary stent patency was 16.4 +- 2.6 months in the 26 mm stent group, and significantly higher than 5.4 +- 1.4 months in the 22 mm stent group (p=0.031). A self-expandable metallic stent under fluoroscopic guidance, for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer, was feasible and effective, and yielded good clinical results. The period of primary stent patency of the 26 mm stent group was longer than the 22 mm stent group, and the complication rate was not significantly different between the two stent groups

  12. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent for the Palliative Treatment of Obstructing Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer under Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Comparison of the Clinical Results according to Stent Diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Pyeong Guk; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Min Hee; Park, Hae Won; Chung, Eun Chul; Kim, Sam Soo

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of self-expandable metallic stent for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer under fluoroscopic guidance, and to compare results according to the stent diameter. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 31 self-expandable metallic stents were placed into 25 patients for palliative purposes. The rates of technical success, clinical success, complications associated with stent insertion, patient survival, and primary stent patency were evaluated. The results were also compared between two groups: 13 patients using stents with a diameter of 22 mm and 12 patients using stents with a diameter of 26 mm. The technical and clinical success rates were 93.5 and 90.3%, respectively. The complications included severe abdominal pain (6.5%), minor rectal bleeding (9.7%), stent migration (9.7%), and tumor ingrowth or overgrowth (9.7%). No statistical differences in technical were detected between the two groups for the clinical success rate and complication rates. The mean survival time was 5.5 ± 1.4 months. The primary stent patency rates were 91.3% at 5 months, 85.2% at 10 months, and 77.4% at 15 months. The mean period of stent patency was 12.4 ± 2.6 months. The mean period of primary stent patency was 16.4 ± 2.6 months in the 26 mm stent group, and significantly higher than 5.4 ± 1.4 months in the 22 mm stent group (p=0.031). A self-expandable metallic stent under fluoroscopic guidance, for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer, was feasible and effective, and yielded good clinical results. The period of primary stent patency of the 26 mm stent group was longer than the 22 mm stent group, and the complication rate was not significantly different between the two stent groups

  13. Differentiated thyroid cancer (papillary). Brain tumor metastasis as clinical onset. surgical treatment and "1"3"1I. 8 years disease-free

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, D.; Pena, M.; Alvarez, L.; García del Rio, H.; Bruno, O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine neoplasia. The major manifestation belongs to the papillary variant (65-90%). The prognosis tends to be very favorable, with a mortality rate of 1.8 % and a disease-free rate up to 10 years of around 90-95 %. The distant metastasis in brain accounts for 0.1-5 %. There are no established protocols for the management of brain metastasis. Therapeutic options are: surgery, stereotactic radiotherapy / radiosurgery, and "1"3"1I. The successful management of this case is an option for brain metastasis from thyroid papillary carcinoma. Case report: A 77 year-old female begins with double vision (diplopia). She underwent twice a surgery for brain tumor with a histopathological report on thyroid papillary tissue. The endocrine evaluation determines euthyroid state except thyroglobulin (TG) 2300 ng/ml. Total thyroidectomy with classic thyroid papillary carcinoma. A diagnostic "1"3"1I scan after surgery shows for first time brain metastasis uptake. The patient receives 25 mCi of "1"3"1I as initial therapeutic dose, and subsequent therapeutic doses (50, 50, 75, 75, 50 mCi) in 2 years, in accordance with the evolution of magnetic resonance, clinic, endocrine lab, hematological analysis, and "1"3"1I scintigraphy, that shows the possible remission of the disease. The follow-up was carried out by means of a clinical control, thyroglobulin values, U.S., "1"3"1I scans, and magnetic resonance. The patient is at the present time over 11 years survival and 8 years disease-free. Discussion: Even though the distant metastasis is not very common in brain and is generally associated with aggressive variants of tumor, our case started with a metastatic brain tumor in an euthyroid patient with no thyroid pathology background and with low-risk post-thyroidectomy criterion. The "1"3"1I scan turned positive in brain metastasis when the patient was thyroidectomized. This detail must be considered important, since it

  14. Clinical introduction of Monte Carlo treatment planning: A different prescription dose for non-small cell lung cancer according to tumor location and size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Water, Steven van de; Levendag, Peter C.; Holt, Bronno van der; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a prescription dose for Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer according to tumor size and location. Methods: Fifty-three stereotactic radiotherapy plans designed using the equivalent path-length (EPL) algorithm were re-calculated using MC. Plans were compared by the minimum dose to 95% of the PTV (D95), the heterogeneity index (HI) and the mean dose to organs at risk (OARs). Based on changes in D95, the prescription dose was converted from EPL to MC. Based on changes in HI, we examined the feasibility of MC prescription to plans re-calculated but not re-optimized with MC. Results: The MC fraction dose for peripheral tumors is 16-18 Gy depending on tumor size. For central tumors the MC dose was reduced less than for peripheral tumors. The HI decreased on average by 4-9% in peripheral tumors and 3-5% in central tumors. The mean dose to OARs was lower for MC than EPL, and correlated strongly (R 2 = 0.98-0.99). Conclusion: For the conversion from EPL to MC we recommend a separate prescription dose according to tumor size. MC optimization is not required if a HI ≥ 70% is accepted. Dose constraints to OARs can be easily converted due to the high EPL-MC correlation.

  15. Cardiac risks in multimodal breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Almost all breast cancer patients receive one or more adjuvant treatments consisting of tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, LHRH-antogonists, chemotherapy, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy. These treatments have been shown to considerably improve overall survival. As a result, long term survival for 15 and more years is achieved in more than two thirds of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Therefore, more interest in short and long term risks of adjuvant treatments has been arisen. The focus of this article is the long term cardiac risks of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients and possible interactions with chemotherapy and trastuzumab. (orig.)

  16. Late somatic sequelae after treatment of childhood cancer in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erman Nuša

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This is a long-term follow-up clinical study of adolescents and adults, survivors of childhood cancer. We evaluate and analyze the late somatic sequelae of childhood cancer treatment. Many such studies are susceptible to a strong selection bias, i.e., they employ a limited non-systematic sample of patients, based on a clinical hospital that provided the cancer treatment or performed the follow-up. To address the issue of selection bias, we perform here an analysis of late sequelae on a systematic database of the entire population of the children treated for cancer in Slovenia. Due to the specifics of cancer treatment procedures in Slovenia, they have all been treated and followed-up in the same clinic. Methods The data are based on the centralized registry of cancer patients in Slovenia and present a controlled and homogeneous collection. Late sequelae are evaluated following a modified CTCAE, i.e., the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. We use survival analysis method to estimate the incidence of and risk for late sequelae, where the time variable is measured in years from the diagnosis date, while we follow the event of incidence of late sequelae scored other than none. Survival analysis is performed using KaplanMeier estimator and Cox regression model. Results The incidence of mild, moderate, or severe late sequelae of childhood cancer treatment significantly decreased from 75% in the group of patients diagnosed before 1975 to 55% for those diagnosed after 1995. The Cox regression analysis of the risk factors for the incidence of late sequelae identifies three significant factors: treatment modalities, age at diagnosis, and primary diagnosis. Conclusions The change of treatment modalities in terms of replacement of surgery and radiotherapy with chemotherapy is the main reason for the decrease of the incidence and the risk for late sequelae of childhood cancer treatment

  17. Subclinical hyperthyroidism: clinical features and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Palmieri, Emiliano Antonio; Klain, Michele; Schlumberger, Martin; Filetti, Sebastiano; Lombardi, Gaetano

    2005-01-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism appears to be a common disorder. It may be caused by exogenous or endogenous factors: excessive TSH suppressive therapy with L-thyroxine (L-T4) for benign thyroid nodular disease, differentiated thyroid cancer, or hormone over-replacement in patients with hypothyroidism are the most frequent causes. Consistent evidence indicates that 'subclinical' hyperthyroidism reduces the quality of life, affecting both the psycho and somatic components of well-being, and produces relevant signs and symptoms of excessive thyroid hormone action, often mimicking adrenergic overactivity. Subclinical hyperthyroidism exerts many significant effects on the cardiovascular system; it is usually associated with a higher heart rate and a higher risk of supraventricular arrhythmias, and with an increased left ventricular mass, often accompanied by an impaired diastolic function and sometimes by a reduced systolic performance on effort and decreased exercise tolerance. It is well known that these abnormalities usually precede the onset of a more severe cardiovascular disease, thus potentially contributing to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality observed in these patients. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that subclinical hyperthyroidism may accelerate the development of osteoporosis and hence increased bone vulnerability to trauma, particularly in postmenopausal women with a pre-existing predisposition. Subclinical hyperthyroidism and its related clinical manifestations are reversible and may be prevented by timely treatment.

  18. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what to expect after treatment ends. Emotional effects of treatment The last day of treatment It is normal to have different feelings, emotions and fears after treatment ends. Not everyone feels ...

  19. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liechtenstein, Therese, E-mail: t.liechtenstein.12@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Navarrabiomed Fundacion Miguel Servet, 3 Irunlarrea St., Hospital Complex of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2013-07-02

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  20. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David

    2013-01-01

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells

  1. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Escors

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(g-retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and b-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  2. Early breast cancer: diagnosis, treatment and survivorship.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meade, Elizabeth

    2013-01-11

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and globally remains a major public health concern. The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer continues to develop. Diagnosis is now more precise, surgery is less mutilating and women now have the option of breast conserving therapy with better cosmesis, and without sacrificing survival. Radiotherapy is more targeted and the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy is based not only on prognostic and predictive factors, but also on newer molecular profiling that will ensure that chemotherapy is given to the patients who need and respond to it. These developments all provide a more tailored approach to the treatment of breast cancer. Management now involves a multidisciplinary team approach in order to provide the highest standard of care for patients throughout their cancer journey from diagnosis through treatment and into follow-up care.

  3. NTCP models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva after treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: The role of dosimetric and clinical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetz, Ivo; Schilstra, Cornelis; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Heuvel, Edwin R. van den; Doornaert, Patricia; Luijk, Peter van; Vissink, Arjan; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Leemans, Charles R.; Bijl, Henk P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this multicentre prospective study was to develop multivariable logistic regression models to make valid predictions about the risk of moderate-to-severe patient-rated xerostomia (XER M6 ) and sticky saliva 6 months (STIC M6 ) after primary treatment with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and materials: The study population was composed of 178 consecutive HNC patients treated with IMRT. All patients were included in a standard follow up programme in which acute and late side effects and quality of life were prospectively assessed, prior to, during and after treatment. The primary endpoints were XER M6 and STIC M6 as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 after completing IMRT. Organs at risk (OARs) potentially involved in salivary function were delineated on planning-CT, including the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands and the minor glands in the soft palate, cheeks and lips. Patients with moderate-to-severe xerostomia or sticky saliva, respectively, at baseline were excluded. The optimal number of variables for a multivariate logistic regression model was determined using a bootstrapping method. Results: Eventually, 51.6% of the cases suffered from XER M6 . The multivariate analysis showed that the mean contralateral parotid gland dose and baseline xerostomia (none vs. a bit) were the most important predictors for XER M6 . For the multivariate NTCP model, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was 0.68 (95% CI 0.60–0.76) and the discrimination slope was 0.10, respectively. Calibration was good with a calibration slope of 1.0. At 6 months after IMRT, 35.6% of the cases reported STIC M6 . The mean contralateral submandibular gland dose, the mean sublingual dose and the mean dose to the minor salivary glands located in the soft palate were most predictive for STIC M6 . For this model, the AUC was 0.70 (95% CI 0.61–0.78) and the discrimination slope

  4. Development of cancer treatment guidelines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Krystyna Kiel

    2011-05-26

    May 26, 2011 ... KEYWORDS. Cancer;. Therapy;. Guidelines. Contents. 1. Why develop guidelines? ... Widely available guideline resources in cancer care. ... The use of guidelines in medicine has a long history. Many .... She has a negative family history. ... The patient has 1 cm grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma.

  5. Maximizing outcomes in genitourinary cancers across the treatment continuum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, John M

    2011-04-01

    Key controversies concerning the management of genitourinary cancers across the treatment continua were discussed at the second annual Interactive Genitourinary Cancer Conference (IGUCC) held in February 2010 in Athens, Greece. Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer among western men and prevention strategies are needed. Trials evaluating 5α-reductase inhibitors have reported beneficial and clinically meaningful results, but uptake remains low for primary prostate cancer prevention. Prostate cancer detection programmes are also important as curative treatments for advanced disease are unavailable. Two large landmark randomized controlled trials reported conflicting results concerning screening efficacy and uncovered high levels of over-diagnosis and potential over-treatment. Tailored management strategies after diagnosis are important and predictive markers that distinguish between aggressive and indolent tumours are needed. The majority of newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer are clinically localized. Active surveillance of favourable risk patients may be beneficial in the intermediate term, while an integrated approach of multi-modality therapy in patients with adverse features is recommended. The benefits of new technologies such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and robotic prostatectomy have not been established in prospective randomized trials vs current standards of care. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to evolving the management of advanced prostate cancer into a chronic disease paradigm. Docetaxel plus prednisone is the standard first-line chemotherapy for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but the optimal timing of chemotherapy initiation has not been addressed in randomized clinical trials. Retrospective analyses suggest that asymptomatic patients with adverse prognostic factors for survival may also benefit from receiving chemotherapy. Bladder cancer is a common malignancy and the

  6. Treatment-associated leukemia following testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travis, LB; Andersson, M; Gospodarowicz, M; van Leeuwen, FE; Bergfeldt, K; Lynch, CF; Curtis, RE; Kohler, BA; Wiklund, T; Storm, H; Holowaty, E; Hall, P; Pukkala, E; Sleijfer, DT; Clarke, EA; Boice, JD; Stovall, M; Gilbert, E

    2000-01-01

    Background: Men with testicular cancer are at an increased risk of leukemia, but the relationship to prior treatments is not well characterized. The purpose of our study was to describe the risk of leukemia following radiotherapy and chemotherapy for testicular cancer. Methods: Within a

  7. Diagnostic and treatment manual of urological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz y Mino, Milton; Tafur, Fausto; Cornejo, Francisco; Gaibor, Jose; Bueno, Cesar; Basantes, Amparito

    2004-01-01

    This book compiles different opinions about researches, diagnosis, methods, procedures and treatment of urological cancer, which will be useful for physicians and specialists of this illness. This manual is well structured in eight chapters with references, illustrations, figures and tables about neoplasms of kidney, urinary tract, urogenital system. This document is a bibliographic revision about ecuadorian experience in urological cancer

  8. [Practice guideline 'Prostate cancer: diagnosis and treatment'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijke, T.M. de; Battermann, J.J.; Moorselaar, R.J.A. van; Jong, I.J. de; Visser, A.P.; Burgers, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    --A national, multidisciplinary practice guideline was developed concerning diagnosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Because of the lack of sufficient scientific evidence at this moment no practice guideline on screening is included. --The diagnosis of prostate cancer is made by

  9. STATIN CONTAINING COMPOSITIONS FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Metselaar, J.M.; Storm, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising statin, and especially to the use of such compositions in the treatment of cancer or in the inhibition of cancer growth. More specifically, the invention relates to a method for targeting a statin to tumor tissue.

  10. TRAILs towards improved cervical cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a life threatening disease occurring world-wide, but affecting especially women in developing countries. Standard treatment for cevical cancer varies per FIGO stage and patient related factors. In general patients with non bulky (<4 cm) FIGO stage IB and IIA are treated with a

  11. Hepatic toxicity resulting from cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Theodore S.; Robertson, John M.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Jirtle, Randy L.; Ensminger, William D.; Fajardo, Luis F.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), often called radiation hepatitis, is a syndrome characterized by the development of anicteric ascites approximately 2 weeks to 4 months after hepatic irradiation. There has been a renewed interest in hepatic irradiation because of two significant advances in cancer treatment: three dimensional radiation therapy treatment planning and bone marrow transplantation using total body irradiation. RILD resulting from liver radiation can usually be distinguished clinically from that resulting from the preparative regime associated with bone marrow transplantation. However, both syndromes demonstrate the same pathological lesion: veno-occlusive disease. Recent evidence suggests that elevated transforming growth factor β levels may play a role in the development of veno-occlusive disease. Three dimensional treatment planning offers the potential to determine the radiation dose and volume dependence of RILD, permitting the safe delivery of high doses of radiation to parts of the liver. The chief therapy for RILD is diuretics, although some advocate steroids for severe cases. The characteristics of RILD permit the development of a grading system modeled after the NCI Acute Common Toxicity Criteria, which incorporates standard criteria of hepatic dysfunction

  12. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  13. Resveratrol and cancer: Challenges for clinical translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandra K.; Ndiaye, Mary A.; Ahmad, Nihal

    2014-01-01

    Significant work has been done towards identifying the health-beneficial effects of the grape antioxidant resveratrol in a variety of bioassay- and disease- models, with much research being focused on its possible application to cancer management. Despite the large number of preclinical studies dealing with different aspects of the biological effects of resveratrol, it’s translation to clinics is far from reality due to a variety of challenges. In this review, we discuss the issues and questions associated with resveratrol becoming an effective in vivo anticancer drug, from basic metabolic issues to the problems faced by incomplete understanding of the mechanism(s) of action in the body. We also explore efforts taken by researchers, both public and private, to contend with some of these issues. By examining the published data and previous clinical trials, we have attempted to identify the problems and issues that hinder the clinical translation of resveratrol for cancer management. PMID:25446990

  14. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  15. Ionizing radiation-induced cancers. Experimental and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joveniaux, Alain.

    1978-03-01

    This work attempts to give an idea of radiocarcinogenesis, both experimental and clinical. Experimentally the possibility of radio-induced cancer formation has considerable doctrinal importance since it proves without question the carcinogenetic effect of radiations, and also yields basis information on the essential constants implicated in its occurrence: need for a latency time varying with the animal species and technique used, but quite long in relation to the specific lifetime of each species; importance of a massive irradiation, more conducive to cancerisation as long as it produces no necroses liable to stop the formation of any subsequent neoplasia; finally, rarity of is occurrence. Clinically although the cause and effect relationship between treatment and cancer is sometimes difficult to establish categorically, the fact is that hundreds of particularly disturbing observations remain and from their number often emerges under well-defined circumstances, an undeniable clinical certainty. Most importantly these observation fix the criteria necessary for the possibility of a radioinduced cancer to arise, i.e: the notion of a prior irradiation; the appearance of a cancer in the irradiation area; serious tissue damage in relation with an excessive radiation dose; a long latency period between irradition and appearance of the cancer [fr

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above the waist. Tiny tubules in the kidneys filter and clean the blood . They take out waste ... to bladder cancer. Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals, or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment ...

  17. Systemic treatment of breast cancer in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szegheoova, O.

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is increasing due to trend of postponing child-bearing to later age. Breast cancer diagnosed during lactation has different biologic behaviour and worse prognosis than when diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not constitute a negative prognostic factor per se for outcomes of breast cancer in pregnancy, therefore breast cancer should be treated while containing pregnancy. Pregnancy should not delay treatment. Therapy should follow standard procedures as closely as possible, though with different timing of treatment modalities. Experienced multidisciplinary team is crucial for achieving good treatment results and involvement of an informed patient in decision-making is a must. Properly managed treatment during pregnancy does not carry detrimental effect on development and well-being of children. (author)

  18. Cabozantinib for Initial Treatment of Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA has approved cabozantinib (Cabometyx®) as an initial treatment for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. The approval adds another tyrosine kinase inhibitor to the available options for patients with advanced kidney cancer.

  19. Treatment of advanced breast cancer. An experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnoni, G; Corcione, S; Api, P

    1984-01-01

    The Authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotherapy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  20. Clinical effects of prior trastuzumab on combination eribulin mesylate plus trastuzumab as first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from a Phase II, single-arm, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhalla S

    2016-12-01

    treatment with eribulin plus trastuzumab for metastatic disease (median time between neo/adjuvant and study treatment: 23 months. In trastuzumab-naïve patients (n=31 compared with those who had received prior trastuzumab, objective response rate was 77.4% versus 61.9%, respectively; duration of response was 11.8 versus 9.5 months, respectively; clinical benefit rate was 87.1% versus 81.0%, respectively; and median progression-free survival was 12.2 versus 11.5 months, respectively. The most common grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (occuring in ≥5% of patients in patients who received prior trastuzumab versus trastuzumab naïve patients, respectively, were neutropenia (47.6% vs 32.3%, peripheral neuropathy (14.3% vs 25.8%, febrile neutropenia (14.3% vs 3.2%, fatigue (9.5% vs 6.5%, nausea (9.5% vs 0%, vomiting (9.5% vs 3.2%, and leukopenia (9.5% vs 3.2%. In patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive metastatic breast cancer, first-line eribulin/trastuzumab treatment demonstrated substantial antitumor activity and was well tolerated, regardless of prior neo/adjuvant trastuzumab treatment. Keywords: oncology, breast neoplasms, advanced breast cancer, chemotherapy, eribulin mesylate, trastuzumab, HER2

  1. Recent Advances in Prostate Cancer Treatment and Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Nevedomskaya

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel drugs, drug sequences and combinations have improved the outcome of prostate cancer in recent years. The latest approvals include abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and apalutamide which target androgen receptor (AR signaling, radium-223 dichloride for reduction of bone metastases, sipuleucel-T immunotherapy and taxane-based chemotherapy. Adding abiraterone acetate to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT in order to achieve complete androgen blockade has proven highly beneficial for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer and metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC. Also, ADT together with docetaxel treatment showed significant benefit in mHSPC. Ongoing clinical trials for different subgroups of prostate cancer patients include the evaluation of the second-generation AR antagonists enzalutamide, apalutamide and darolutamide, of inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K pathway, of inhibitors of DNA damage response, of targeted alpha therapy and of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA targeting approaches. Advanced clinical studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown limited benefits in prostate cancer and more trials are needed to demonstrate efficacy. The identification of improved, personalized treatments will be much supported by the major progress recently made in the molecular characterization of early- and late-stage prostate cancer using “omics” technologies. This has already led to novel classifications of prostate tumors based on gene expression profiles and mutation status, and should greatly help in the choice of novel targeted therapies best tailored to the needs of patients.

  2. Radiation Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    63 patients who were irradiated with a goal of long term control among 101 patients with esophageal cancer seen during an 11 years period between Jan, 1970 and Dec, 1980 at Yonsei Cancer Center in Seoul, Korea have retrospectively analysed. 52(82.5%) among the 63 patients were confirmed to have epidermoid carcinoma in the histology. The actuarial 3 and 5 years survival rates of 17 cased of T1, esophageal cancer were 24.7% and 20.8%. Statistically, there was no significant difference in survival rate according to tumor location (p>0.05)

  3. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Physics of Cancer Metabolism This application seeks to put together a multidiscipline team of experts in various institutions in USA to assemble and...of this project is to build a research cohort of engaged volunteers that reflects the racial , ethnic, and socioeconomic diversity of New York City...assessed in a randomized, phase III clinical trial. Conflict of interest: Advisory Board: Joe O’Sullivan holds consulting/ advisory roles with Bayer

  4. Clinical Outcomes from Androgen Signaling-directed Therapy after Treatment with Abiraterone Acetate and Prednisone in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Post Hoc Analysis of COU-AA-302.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew R; Saad, Fred; Rathkopf, Dana E; Mulders, Peter F A; de Bono, Johann S; Small, Eric J; Shore, Neal D; Fizazi, Karim; Kheoh, Thian; Li, Jinhui; De Porre, Peter; Todd, Mary B; Yu, Margaret K; Ryan, Charles J

    2017-07-01

    In the COU-AA-302 trial, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly increased overall survival for patients with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Limited information exists regarding response to subsequent androgen signaling-directed therapies following abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in patients with mCRPC. We investigated clinical outcomes associated with subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (55 patients) and enzalutamide (33 patients) in a post hoc analysis of COU-AA-302. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was assessed. Median time to PSA progression was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The PSA response rate (≥50% PSA decline, unconfirmed) was 44% and 67%, respectively. The median time to PSA progression was 3.9 mo (range 2.6-not estimable) for subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone and 2.8 mo (range 1.8-not estimable) for subsequent enzalutamide. The majority of patients (68%) received intervening chemotherapy before subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide. While acknowledging the limitations of post hoc analyses and high censoring (>75%) in both treatment groups, these results suggest that subsequent therapy with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide for patients who progressed on abiraterone acetate is associated with limited clinical benefit. This analysis showed limited clinical benefit for subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer following initial treatment with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone. This analysis does not support prioritization of subsequent abiraterone acetate plus prednisone or enzalutamide following initial therapy with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Treatment of Breast Cancer Using Liposome Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposome-based chemotherapeutics used in the treatment of breast cancer can in principle enhance the therapeutic index of otherwise unencapsulated anticancer drugs. This is partially attributed to the fact that encapsulation of cytotoxic agents within liposomes allows for increased concentrations of the drug to be delivered to the tumor site. In addition, the presence of the phospholipid bilayer prevents the encapsulated active form of the drug from being broken down in the body prior to reaching tumor tissue and also serves to minimize exposure of the drug to healthy sensitive tissue. While clinically approved liposome-based chemotherapeutics such as Doxil have proven to be quite effective in the treatment of breast cancer, significant challenges remain involving poor drug transfer between the liposome and cancerous cells. In this review, we discuss the recent advancements made in the development of liposome-based chemotherapeutics with respect to improved drug transfer for use in breast cancer therapy.

  6. Understanding the benefit of metformin use in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodwin Pamela J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biguanides have been developed for the treatment of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. Recently, metformin, the most widely prescribed biguanide, has emerged as a potential anticancer agent. Epidemiological, preclinical and clinical evidence supports the use of metformin as a cancer therapeutic. The ability of metformin to lower circulating insulin may be particularly important for the treatment of cancers known to be associated with hyperinsulinemia, such as those of the breast and colon. Moreover, metformin may exhibit direct inhibitory effects on cancer cells by inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling and protein synthesis. The evidence supporting a role for metformin in cancer therapy and its potential molecular mechanisms of action are discussed.

  7. Gender Differences in Bladder Cancer Treatment Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzar, Rachel A; Berry, Donna L

    2017-03-01

    To explore gender differences in bladder cancer treatment decision making.
. Secondary qualitative analysis of interview transcripts.
. One multidisciplinary genitourinary oncology clinic (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) and two urology clinics (Brigham and Women's Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) in Boston, MA.
. As part of the original study, 45 men and 15 women with bladder cancer participated in individual interviews. Participants were primarily Caucasian, and most had at least some college education.
. Word frequency reports were used to identify thematic differences between the men's and women's statements. Line-by-line coding of constructs prevalent among women was then performed on all participants in NVivo 9. Coding results were compared between genders using matrix coding queries.
. The role of family in the decision-making process was found to be a dominant theme for women but not for men. Women primarily described family members as facilitators of bladder cancer treatment-related decisions, but men were more likely to describe family in a nonsupportive role.
. The results suggest that influences on the decision-making process are different for men and women with bladder cancer. Family may play a particularly important role for women faced with bladder cancer treatment-related decisions.
. Clinical nurses who care for individuals with bladder cancer should routinely assess patients' support systems and desired level of family participation in decision making. For some people with bladder cancer, family may serve as a stressor. Nurses should support the decision-making processes of all patients and be familiar with resources that can provide support to patients who do not receive it from family.

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Penile Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Vulvar Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  13. HIV-protease inhibitors for the treatment of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Fagone, Paolo; McCubrey, James

    2017-01-01

    The possible use of HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PI) as new therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer primarily originated from their success in treating HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). While these findings were initially attributed to immune reconstitution and better control of oncogenic...... and nitric oxide (NO) derivatives of HIV-PIs. In this article, we discuss the current preclinical and clinical evidences for the potential use of HIV-PIs, and of novel derivatives, such as saquinavir-NO in the treatment of cancer....

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping ...

  16. Starvation Based Differential Chemotherapy: A Novel Approach for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Naveed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment are advised to increase food intake to overcome the therapy-induced side effects, and weight loss. Dietary restriction is known to slow down the aging process and hence reduce age-related diseases such as cancer. Fasting or short-term starvation is more effective than dietary restriction to prevent cancer growth since starved cells switch off signals for growth and reproduction and enter a protective mode, while cancer cells, being mutated, are not sensitized by any external growth signals and are not protected against any stress. This phenomenon is known as differential stress resistance (DSR. Nutrient signaling pathways involving growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis and its downstream effectors, play a key role in DSR in response to starvation controlling the other cell maintenance systems, such as autophagy and apoptosis, that are related to the tumorigenesis. Yeast cells lacking these effectors are better protected against oxidative stress compared to normal cells. In the same way, starvation protects many cell lines and mice against high-dose chemotherapeutic drugs. According to a series of studies, fasting results in overall reduction in chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients. Data shows that starvation-dependent differential chemotherapy is safe, feasible and effective in cancer treatment, but the possible side effects of starvation limit its efficacy. However, further studies and clinical trials may result in its implementation in cancer treatment.

  17. Chemotherapy Treatment of Elderly Patients (≥70 Years) with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Seven-Year Retrospective Study of Real-Life Clinical Practice at Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyi, Hirsh; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Andersson, Olov; Kölbeck, Karl-Gustav; Liv, Per; Brandén, Eva

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of cancer patients are aged >65 years and many are aged >70 years. Treatment of the elderly with lung cancer has, therefore, become an important issue; so we performed a retrospective study of our patients to demonstrate how elderly patients with NSCLC are treated in real-life, clinical practice. All patients aged ≥70 years with NSCLC at our department were reviewed retrospectively. In total, 1059 patients (50.8% of all NSCLC patients). Of these patients, 243 (22.9%) received chemotherapy, 164 (70.4%) of whom were treated with a platinum doublet using carboplatin. Second- and third-line chemotherapy were given to 31.4% and 13.9% of patients, respectively. Median overall survival was 289 and 320 days for male and female patients, respectively. Patients with performance status (PS) 0 experienced significantly better survival than patients with PS1 or PS 2: 410, 314, and 204 days, respectively. Age was of less importance, with patients aged 70-79 years versus those aged ≥80 years. Treatment of elderly NSCLC patients with chemotherapy is feasible if they have a good PS and appears to prolong survival. In this study, we found no significant differences in survival either between age groups or genders.

  18. [Molecular Biology for Surgical Treatment of Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Progress in lung cancer research achieved during the last 10 years was summarized. These include identification of novel driver mutations and application of targeted therapies, resistance mechanisms to targeted therapies, and immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Molecular biology also affects the field of surgical treatment. Several molecular markers have been reported to predict benign/ malignant or stable/growing tumors, although far from clinical application. In perioperative period, there is a possibility of atrial natriuretic peptide to prevent cancer metastasis. As adjuvant settings, although biomarker-based cytotoxic therapies failed to show clinical efficacy, several trials are ongoing employing molecular targeted agents (EGFR-TKI or ALK-TKI) or immune checkpoint inhibitors. In clinical practice, mutational information is sometimes used to distinguish 2nd primary tumors from pulmonary metastases of previous cancers. Surgery also has important role for oligo-progressive disease during molecular targeted therapies.

  19. An analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience in treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if previously analyzed clinical and treatment related prognostic factors affected outcome when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Materials and methods: Between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991, 470 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with external beam RT using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment. After achieving nadir, if two consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Prognostic factors, including the total number of days in treatment, the method of diagnosis, a history of any pretreatment transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the type of boost were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months. No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), history of any pretreatment TURP, history of diagnosis by TURP, or boost techniques. Patients diagnosed by TURP had a significant improvement in the overall rate of biochemical control (P < 0.03) compared to transrectal/transperineal biopsy. The 5-year actuarial rates were 58 versus 39%, respectively. This improvement was not evident when pretreatment PSA, T stage, or Gleason score were controlled for. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with outcome. When analysis was limited to a more favorable group of patients (T1/T2 tumors, pretreatment PSA ≤20 ng/ml and Gleason score <7), none of these variables were significantly predictive of biochemical control when controlling for pretreatment PSA, T stage and Gleason score. Conclusions: No significant effect of treatment time, overall time, pretreatment

  20. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mas