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Sample records for cancer cells identified

  1. A basal stem cell signature identifies aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes

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    Smith, Bryan A.; Sokolov, Artem; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Baertsch, Robert; Newton, Yulia; Graim, Kiley; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from numerous cancers suggests that increased aggressiveness is accompanied by up-regulation of signaling pathways and acquisition of properties common to stem cells. It is unclear if different subtypes of late-stage cancer vary in stemness properties and whether or not these subtypes are transcriptionally similar to normal tissue stem cells. We report a gene signature specific for human prostate basal cells that is differentially enriched in various phenotypes of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. We FACS-purified and transcriptionally profiled basal and luminal epithelial populations from the benign and cancerous regions of primary human prostates. High-throughput RNA sequencing showed the basal population to be defined by genes associated with stem cell signaling programs and invasiveness. Application of a 91-gene basal signature to gene expression datasets from patients with organ-confined or hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer revealed that metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was molecularly more stem-like than either metastatic adenocarcinoma or organ-confined adenocarcinoma. Bioinformatic analysis of the basal cell and two human small cell gene signatures identified a set of E2F target genes common between prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and primary prostate basal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that aggressive prostate cancer shares a conserved transcriptional program with normal adult prostate basal stem cells. PMID:26460041

  2. Cell Membrane Proteomic Analysis Identifies Proteins Differentially Expressed in Osteotropic Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Philippe Kischel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer cells are characterized by their high propensity to colonize the skeleton and form bone metastases, causing major morbidity and mortality. Identifying key proteins involved in the osteotropic phenotype would represent a major step toward the development of both new prognostic markers and new effective therapies. Cell surface proteins differentially expressed in cancer cells are preferred potential targets for antibody-based targeted therapies. In this study, using cell surface biotinylation and a mass spectrometric approach, we have compared the profile of accessible cell surface proteins between the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and its highly osteotropic B02 subclone. This strategy allowed the identification of several proteins either up- or downregulated in the osteotropic cell line, and differential protein expressions were validated using antibody-based techniques. Class I HLAs were down-regulated in the bone metastatic variant, whereas αvβ3 integrins, among others, were consistently up-regulated in this latter cell line. These results show that comprehensive profiling of the cell surface proteome of mother cancerous cell lines and derived organ-specific metastatic cell lines provides an effective approach for the identification of potential accessible marker proteins for both prognosis and antibodybased targeted therapies.

  3. Enhancer profiling identifies critical cancer genes and characterizes cell identity in adult T-cell leukemia.

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    Wong, Regina Wan Ju; Ngoc, Phuong Cao Thi; Leong, Wei Zhong; Yam, Alice Wei Yee; Zhang, Tinghu; Asamitsu, Kaori; Iida, Shinsuke; Okamoto, Takashi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Gray, Nathanael S; Ishida, Takashi; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-11-23

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated that super-enhancers, which are large cluster of enhancers typically marked by a high level of acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 and mediator bindings, are frequently associated with genes that control and define cell identity during normal development. Super-enhancers are also often enriched at cancer genes in various malignancies. The identification of such enhancers would pinpoint critical factors that directly contribute to pathogenesis. In this study, we performed enhancer profiling using primary leukemia samples from adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), which is a genetically heterogeneous intractable cancer. Super-enhancers were enriched at genes involved in the T-cell activation pathway, including IL2RA/CD25, CD30, and FYN, in both ATL and normal mature T cells, which reflected the origin of the leukemic cells. Super-enhancers were found at several known cancer gene loci, including CCR4, PIK3R1, and TP73, in multiple ATL samples, but not in normal mature T cells, which implicated those genes in ATL pathogenesis. A small-molecule CDK7 inhibitor, THZ1, efficiently inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis, and downregulated the expression of super-enhancer-associated genes in ATL cells. Furthermore, enhancer profiling combined with gene expression analysis identified a previously uncharacterized gene, TIAM2, that was associated with super-enhancers in all ATL samples, but not in normal T cells. Knockdown of TIAM2 induced apoptosis in ATL cell lines, whereas overexpression of this gene promoted cell growth. Our study provides a novel strategy for identifying critical cancer genes. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 identifies cells with cancer stem cell-like properties in a human renal cell carcinoma cell line.

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    Kosuke Ueda

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC or cancer stem cell-like cells (CSC-LCs have been identified in many malignant tumors. CSCs are proposed to be related with drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis and are considered as a new target for cancer treatment; however, there are only a few reports on CSCs or CSC-LCs in renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Different approaches have been reported for CSC identification, but there are no universal markers for CSC. We used two different approaches, the traditional side population (SP approach, and the enzymatic (aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 approach to identify CSC-LC population in two RCC cell lines, ACHN and KRC/Y. We found that ACHN and KRC/Y contain 1.4% and 1.7% SP cells, respectively. ACHN SP cells showed a higher sphere forming ability, drug resistance, and a slightly higher tumorigenic ability in NOD/SCID mice than Non-SP (NSP cells, suggesting that cells with CSC-LC properties are included in ACHN SP cells. KRC/Y SP and NSP cells showed no difference in such properties. ALDH1 activity analysis revealed that ACHN SP cells expressed a higher level of activity than NSP cells (SP vs. NSP: 32.7% vs 14.6%. Analysis of ALDH1-positive ACHN cells revealed that they have a higher sphere forming ability, self-renewal ability, tumorigenicity and express higher mRNA levels of CSC-LC property-related genes (e.g., ABC transporter genes, self-replication genes, anti-apoptosis genes, and so forth than ALDH1-negative cells. Drug treatment or exposure to hypoxic condition induced a 2- to 3-fold increase in number of ALDH1-positive cells. In conclusion, the results suggest that the ALDH1-positive cell population rather than SP cells show CSC-LC properties in a RCC cell line, ACHN.

  5. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

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    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-05

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identifying and targeting cancer stem cells in the treatment of gastric cancer.

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    Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; El-Rayes, Bassel

    2017-04-15

    Current treatment regimens for gastric cancer are not adequate. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be a key driving factor for growth and metastasis of this tumor type. In contrast to the conventional clonal evolution hypothesis, CSCs can initiate tumor formation, self-renew, and differentiate into tumor-propagating cells. Because gastric cancer can originate from CSCs, it is necessary to review current targets of signaling pathways for CSCs in gastric cancer that are being studied in clinical trials. These pathways are known to regulate the self-renewal and differentiation process in gastric CSCs. A better understanding of the clinical results of trials that target gastric CSCs will lead to better outcomes for patients with gastric cancer. Cancer 2017;123:1303-1312. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  7. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant.

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    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A C 't; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin β3-binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis.

  8. Differential Aspartate Usage Identifies a Subset of Cancer Cells Particularly Dependent on OGDH

    OpenAIRE

    Eric L. Allen; Danielle B. Ulanet; David Pirman; Christopher E. Mahoney; John Coco; Yaguang Si; Ying Chen; Lingling Huang; Jinmin Ren; Sung Choe; Michelle F. Clasquin; Erin Artin; Zi Peng Fan; Giovanni Cianchetta; Joshua Murtie

    2016-01-01

    Although aberrant metabolism in tumors has been well described, the identification of cancer subsets with particular metabolic vulnerabilities has remained challenging. Here, we conducted an siRNA screen focusing on enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and uncovered a striking range of cancer cell dependencies on OGDH, the E1 subunit of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Using an integrative metabolomics approach, we identified differential aspartate utilization,...

  9. Repositioning "old" drugs for new causes: identifying new inhibitors of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion.

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    Shah, Esha T; Upadhyaya, Akanksha; Philp, Lisa K; Tang, Tiffany; Skalamera, Dubravka; Gunter, Jennifer; Nelson, Colleen C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Hollier, Brett G

    2016-04-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) deaths occur due to the metastatic spread of tumor cells to distant organs. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies once tumor cells have spread outside the prostate. It is therefore imperative to rapidly develop therapeutics to inhibit the metastatic spread of tumor cells. Gain of cell motility and invasive properties is the first step of metastasis and by inhibiting motility one can potentially inhibit metastasis. Using the drug repositioning strategy, we developed a cell-based multi-parameter primary screening assay to identify drugs that inhibit the migratory and invasive properties of metastatic PC-3 PCa cells. Following the completion of the primary screening assay, 33 drugs were identified from an FDA approved drug library that either inhibited migration or were cytotoxic to the PC-3 cells. Based on the data obtained from the subsequent validation studies, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, simvastatin, fluvastatin and vandetanib were identified as strong candidates that can inhibit both the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells without significantly affecting cell viability. By employing the drug repositioning strategy instead of a de novo drug discovery and development strategy, the identified drug candidates have the potential to be rapidly translated into the clinic for the management of men with aggressive forms of PCa.

  10. Differential Aspartate Usage Identifies a Subset of Cancer Cells Particularly Dependent on OGDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Eric L; Ulanet, Danielle B; Pirman, David; Mahoney, Christopher E; Coco, John; Si, Yaguang; Chen, Ying; Huang, Lingling; Ren, Jinmin; Choe, Sung; Clasquin, Michelle F; Artin, Erin; Fan, Zi Peng; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Murtie, Joshua; Dorsch, Marion; Jin, Shengfang; Smolen, Gromoslaw A

    2016-10-11

    Although aberrant metabolism in tumors has been well described, the identification of cancer subsets with particular metabolic vulnerabilities has remained challenging. Here, we conducted an siRNA screen focusing on enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and uncovered a striking range of cancer cell dependencies on OGDH, the E1 subunit of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Using an integrative metabolomics approach, we identified differential aspartate utilization, via the malate-aspartate shuttle, as a predictor of whether OGDH is required for proliferation in 3D culture assays and for the growth of xenograft tumors. These findings highlight an anaplerotic role of aspartate and, more broadly, suggest that differential nutrient utilization patterns can identify subsets of cancers with distinct metabolic dependencies for potential pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential Aspartate Usage Identifies a Subset of Cancer Cells Particularly Dependent on OGDH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Allen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although aberrant metabolism in tumors has been well described, the identification of cancer subsets with particular metabolic vulnerabilities has remained challenging. Here, we conducted an siRNA screen focusing on enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and uncovered a striking range of cancer cell dependencies on OGDH, the E1 subunit of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Using an integrative metabolomics approach, we identified differential aspartate utilization, via the malate-aspartate shuttle, as a predictor of whether OGDH is required for proliferation in 3D culture assays and for the growth of xenograft tumors. These findings highlight an anaplerotic role of aspartate and, more broadly, suggest that differential nutrient utilization patterns can identify subsets of cancers with distinct metabolic dependencies for potential pharmacological intervention.

  12. Yang-Dan-Tang, Identified from 15 Chinese Herbal Formulae, Inhibits Human Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation via Cell Cycle Arrest

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    Tien-Chun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has long been one of the most deadly forms of cancer. The majority of lung cancers are of the non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC type. Here we used the non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line A549 to screen 15 different traditional Chinese herbal medicine (CHM formulae to explore the possible mechanisms of alternative medicine in lung cancer therapy. We identified three formulae (Formulae 3, 5, and 14 that substantially decreased the survival of A549 cells but did not affect MRC5 normal lung tissue cells. Formula 14, Yang-Dan-Tang, a modified decoction of Ramulus Cinnamomi Cassiae, was chosen for further characterization. Flow cytometry analysis showed that treatment of Formula 14 induced cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2 phase without causing significant cell death. These results were also confirmed by Western blot analysis, with decreased expression of G1/S and G2/M promoting cell cycle machinery including cyclin D3, cyclin B1, CDK4, and CDK6. This study provides further insight into the possible working mechanism of Yang-Dan-Tang in patients.

  13. Common fusion transcripts identified in colorectal cancer cell lines by high-throughput RNA sequencing.

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    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard Os; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%-28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated.

  14. Common Fusion Transcripts Identified in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines by High-Throughput RNA Sequencing12

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    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard OS; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%–28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated. PMID:24151535

  15. A crucial step in cell division identified | Center for Cancer Research

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    When cell division doesn’t go according to plan, the resulting daughter cells can become unstable or even cancerous. A team of CCR investigators has now discovered a crucial step required for normal cell division to occur. Read more...

  16. T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire.

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    Beausang, John F; Wheeler, Amanda J; Chan, Natalie H; Hanft, Violet R; Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-11-28

    Tumor-infiltrating T cells play an important role in many cancers, and can improve prognosis and yield therapeutic targets. We characterized T cells infiltrating both breast cancer tumors and the surrounding normal breast tissue to identify T cells specific to each, as well as their abundance in peripheral blood. Using immune profiling of the T cell beta-chain repertoire in 16 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we show that the clonal structure of the tumor is significantly different from adjacent breast tissue, with the tumor containing ∼2.5-fold greater density of T cells and higher clonality compared with normal breast. The clonal structure of T cells in blood and normal breast is more similar than between blood and tumor, and could be used to distinguish tumor from normal breast tissue in 14 of 16 patients. Many T cell sequences overlap between tissue and blood from the same patient, including ∼50% of T cells between tumor and normal breast. Both tumor and normal breast contain high-abundance "enriched" sequences that are absent or of low abundance in the other tissue. Many of these T cells are either not detected or detected with very low frequency in the blood, suggesting the existence of separate compartments of T cells in both tumor and normal breast. Enriched T cell sequences are typically unique to each patient, but a subset is shared between many different patients. We show that many of these are commonly generated sequences, and thus unlikely to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  17. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell line...

  18. ALDH/CD44 identifies uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells in salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas.

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    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Pearson, Alexander T; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Kim, Hong Sun; Mochizuki, Daiki; Basura, Gregory; Helman, Joseph; Mantesso, Andrea; Castilho, Rogério M; Wicha, Max S; Nör, Jacques E

    2015-09-29

    A small sub-population of cells characterized by increased tumorigenic potential, ability to self-renew and to differentiate into cells that make up the tumor bulk, has been characterized in some (but not all) tumor types. These unique cells, namedcancer stem cells, are considered drivers of tumor progression in these tumors. The purpose of this work is to understand if cancer stem cells play a functional role in the tumorigenesis of salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Here, we investigated the expression of putative cancer stem cell markers (ALDH, CD10, CD24, CD44) in primary human mucoepidermoid carcinomas by immunofluorescence, in vitro salisphere assays, and in vivo tumorigenicity assays in immunodeficient mice. Human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (UM-HMC-1, UM-HMC-3A, UM-HMC-3B) sorted for high levels of ALDH activity and CD44 expression (ALDHhighCD44high) consistently formed primary and secondary salispheres in vitro, and showed enhanced tumorigenic potential in vivo (defined as time to tumor palpability, tumor growth after palpability), when compared to ALDHlowCD44low cells. Cells sorted for CD10/CD24, and CD10/CD44 showed varying trends of salisphere formation, but consistently low in vivo tumorigenic potential. And finally, cells sorted for CD44/CD24 showed inconsistent results in salisphere formation and tumorigenic potential assays when different cell lines were evaluated. Collectively, these data demonstrate that salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas contain a small population of cancer stem cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and that are characterized by high ALDH activity and CD44 expression. These results suggest that patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma might benefit from therapies that ablate these highly tumorigenic cells.

  19. A synthetic interaction screen identifies factors selectively required for proliferation and TERT transcription in p53-deficient human cancer cells.

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    Li Xie

    Full Text Available Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi-based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53- human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+ human cancer cell lines, diverse p53- human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53- cells, RNAi-mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53- but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53- cancer cells.

  20. Immunogenetic Profiling for Gastric Cancers Identifies Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans as Major and Functional B Cell Antigens in Human Malignancies.

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    Katoh, Hiroto; Komura, Daisuke; Konishi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Asami; Kakiuchi, Miwako; Sato, Reiko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Shogo; Tatsuno, Kenji; Oshima, Takashi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Shumpei

    2017-08-01

    Recent successes in tumor immunotherapies have highlighted the importance of tumor immunity. However, most of the work conducted to date has been on T cell immunity, while the role of B cell immunity in cancer remains more elusive. In this study, immunogenetic repertoire profiling for tumor-infiltrating B and T cells in gastric cancers was carried out to help reveal the architecture of B cell immunity in cancer. Humoral immunity in cancer was shown to involve oligoclonal expansions of tumor-specific and private B cell repertoires. We find that B cell repertoires in cancer are shaped by somatic hypermutation (SHM) either with or without positive selection biases, the latter of which tended to be auto-reactive. Importantly, we identified sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) as major functional B cell antigens among gastric tumors. Furthermore, natural anti-sulfated GAG antibodies discovered in gastric cancer tissues showed robust growth-suppressive functions against a wide variety of human malignancies of various organs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metastasis-related plasma membrane proteins of human breast cancer cells identified by comparative quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Hansen, Helle V

    2009-01-01

    clinical samples or in vitro assays is not feasible. We have used a unique model system consisting of two isogenic human breast cancer cell lines that are equally tumorigenic in mice, but while one gives rise to metastasis, the other disseminates single cells that remain dormant at distant organs. Membrane......'-nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT, CD73), Ndrg1, integrin beta1, CD44, CD74 and MHC class II proteins. The altered expression levels of proteins identified by LC-MS/MS were validated using flow cytometry, Western blotting, immunocyto- and immunohisto-chemistry. Analysis of clinical breast cancer biopsies demonstrated...... by the two cell lines. The study demonstrates a quantitative and comparative proteomic strategy to identify clinically-relevant key molecules in the early events of metastasis, some of which may prove to be potential targets for cancer therapy....

  2. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

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    Anantha Koteswararao Kanugula

    Full Text Available Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  3. Distinct genes related to drug response identified in ER positive and ER negative breast cancer cell lines.

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    Kui Shen

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients have different responses to chemotherapeutic treatments. Genes associated with drug response can provide insight to understand the mechanisms of drug resistance, identify promising therapeutic opportunities, and facilitate personalized treatment. Estrogen receptor (ER positive and ER negative breast cancer have distinct clinical behavior and molecular properties. However, to date, few studies have rigorously assessed drug response genes in them. In this study, our goal was to systematically identify genes associated with multidrug response in ER positive and ER negative breast cancer cell lines. We tested 27 human breast cell lines for response to seven chemotherapeutic agents (cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, doxorubicin, epirubicin, fluorouracil, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel. We integrated publicly available gene expression profiles of these cell lines with their in vitro drug response patterns, then applied meta-analysis to identify genes related to multidrug response in ER positive and ER negative cells separately. One hundred eighty-eight genes were identified as related to multidrug response in ER positive and 32 genes in ER negative breast cell lines. Of these, only three genes (DBI, TOP2A, and PMVK were common to both cell types. TOP2A was positively associated with drug response, and DBI was negatively associated with drug response. Interestingly, PMVK was positively associated with drug response in ER positive cells and negatively in ER negative cells. Functional analysis showed that while cell cycle affects drug response in both ER positive and negative cells, most biological processes that are involved in drug response are distinct. A number of signaling pathways that are uniquely enriched in ER positive cells have complex cross talk with ER signaling, while in ER negative cells, enriched pathways are related to metabolic functions. Taken together, our analysis indicates that distinct mechanisms are involved in

  4. Multiplex flow cytometry barcoding and antibody arrays identify surface antigen profiles of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sukhdeo

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a deadly disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Current treatment challenges include management of disease burden as well as improvements in detection and targeting of tumor cells. To identify disease state-specific surface antigen signatures, we combined fluorescent cell barcoding with high-throughput flow cytometric profiling of primary and metastatic colon cancer lines (SW480, SW620, and HCT116. Our multiplexed technique offers improvements over conventional methods by permitting the simultaneous and rapid screening of cancer cells with reduced effort and cost. The method uses a protein-level analysis with commercially available antibodies on live cells with intact epitopes to detect potential tumor-specific targets that can be further investigated for their clinical utility. Multiplexed antibody arrays can easily be applied to other tumor types or pathologies for discovery-based approaches to target identification.

  5. HER2 expression identifies dynamic functional states within circulating breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nicole Vincent; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S.; Benes, Cyril; Ligorio, Matteo; Zheng, Yu; Yu, Min; Sundaresan, Tilak K.; Licausi, Joseph A.; Desai, Rushil; O’Keefe, Ryan M.; Ebright, Richard Y.; Boukhali, Myriam; Sil, Srinjoy; Onozato, Maristela L.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Kapur, Ravi; Sgroi, Dennis; Ting, David T.; Toner, Mehmet; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Haas, Wilhelm; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer acquire a HER2-positive subpopulation following multiple courses of therapy1,2. In contrast to HER2-amplified primary breast cancer, which is highly sensitive to HER2-targeted therapy, the clinical significance of acquired HER2 heterogeneity during the evolution of metastatic breast cancer is unknown. Here, we analyzed CTCs from 19 ER+/HER2− patients, 84% of whom had acquired CTCs expressing HER2. Cultured CTCs maintain discrete HER2+ and HER2− subpopulations: HER2+ CTCs are more proliferative but not addicted to HER2, consistent with activation of multiple signaling pathways. HER2− CTCs show activation of Notch and DNA damage pathways, exhibiting resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy, but sensitivity to Notch inhibition. HER2+ and HER2− CTCs interconvert spontaneously, with cells of one phenotype producing daughters of the opposite within four cell doublings. While HER2+ and HER2− CTCs have comparable tumor initiating potential, differential proliferation favors the HER2+ state, while oxidative stress or cytotoxic chemotherapy enhances transition to the HER2− phenotype. Simultaneous treatment with paclitaxel and Notch inhibitors achieves sustained suppression of tumorigenesis in orthotopic CTC-derived tumor models. Together, these results point to distinct yet interconverting phenotypes within patient-derived CTCs, contributing to progression of breast cancer and acquisition of drug resistance. PMID:27556950

  6. Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a clinical entity to be identified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Ramos, Roberta Pulcheri; Franceschini, Juliana; Jamnik, Sergio; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It has been recognized that patients with non-small cell lung cancer who are lifelong never-smokers constitute a distinct clinical entity. The aim of this study was to assess clinical risk factors for survival among never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: All consecutive non-small cell lung cancer patients diagnosed (n = 285) between May 2005 and May 2009 were included. The clinical characteristics of never-smokers and ever-smokers (former and current) were compared using chi-squared or Student's t tests. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used for survival comparisons. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was evaluated by adjusting for age (continuous variable), gender (female vs. male), smoking status (never- vs. ever-smoker), the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (continuous variable), histological type (adenocarcinoma vs. non-adenocarcinoma), AJCC staging (early vs. advanced staging), and treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy vs. the best treatment support). RESULTS: Of the 285 non-small cell lung cancer patients, 56 patients were never-smokers. Univariate analyses indicated that the never-smoker patients were more likely to be female (68% vs. 32%) and have adenocarcinoma (70% vs. 51%). Overall median survival was 15.7 months (95% CI: 13.2 to 18.2). The never-smoker patients had a better survival rate than their counterpart, the ever-smokers. Never-smoker status, higher Karnofsky Performance Status, early staging, and treatment were independent and favorable prognostic factors for survival after adjusting for age, gender, and adenocarcinoma in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological differences exist between never- and ever-smokers with lung cancer. Overall survival among never-smokers was found to be higher and independent of gender and histological type. PMID:22086516

  7. Mutations in the DDR2 Kinase Gene identify a Novel therapeutic target in squamous cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerman, Peter S.; Sos, Martin L.; Ramos, Alex H.; Xu, Chunxiao; Dutt, Amit; Zhou, Wenjun; Brace, Lear E.; Woods, Brittany A.; Lin, Wenchu; Zhang, Jianming; Deng, Xianming; Lim, Sang Min; Heynck, Stefanie; Peifer, Martin; Simard, Jeffrey R.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Onofrio, Robert C.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Seidel, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Koker, Mirjam; Leenders, Frauke; Gabler, Franziska; Querings, Silvia; Ansen, Sascha; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lorimier, Philippe; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Aslaug; Petersen, Iver; Clement, Joachim H.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Juergen; Beer, David G.; Tsao, Ming Sound; Hanna, Megan; Hatton, Charles; Eck, Michael J.; Janne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Winckler, Wendy; Greulich, Heidi; Bass, Adam J.; Cho, Jeonghee; Rauh, Daniel; Gray, Nathanael S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Haura, Eric B.; Thomas, Roman K.; Meyerson, Matthew

    Although genomically targeted therapies have improved outcomes for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, little is known about the genomic alterations that drive squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the lung. Sanger sequencing of the tyrosine kinome identified mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene in 3.8% of lung

  8. Plasma membrane proteomics of human breast cancer cell lines identifies potential targets for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne S Ziegler

    Full Text Available The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease.

  9. Combining phenotypic and proteomic approaches to identify membrane targets in a 'triple negative' breast cancer cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Steven; Guillard, Sandrine; Sachsenmeier, Kris; Hay, Carl; Davidson, Max; Karlsson, Anders; Karlsson, Roger; Brand, Erin; Lowne, David; Elvin, John; Flynn, Matt; Kurosawa, Gene; Hollingsworth, Robert; Jermutus, Lutz; Minter, Ralph

    2013-02-13

    The continued discovery of therapeutic antibodies, which address unmet medical needs, requires the continued discovery of tractable antibody targets. Multiple protein-level target discovery approaches are available and these can be used in combination to extensively survey relevant cell membranomes. In this study, the MDA-MB-231 cell line was selected for membranome survey as it is a 'triple negative' breast cancer cell line, which represents a cancer subtype that is aggressive and has few treatment options. The MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line was used to explore three membranome target discovery approaches, which were used in parallel to cross-validate the significance of identified antigens. A proteomic approach, which used membrane protein enrichment followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, was used alongside two phenotypic antibody screening approaches. The first phenotypic screening approach was based on hybridoma technology and the second was based on phage display technology. Antibodies isolated by the phenotypic approaches were tested for cell specificity as well as internalisation and the targets identified were compared to each other as well as those identified by the proteomic approach. An anti-CD73 antibody derived from the phage display-based phenotypic approach was tested for binding to other 'triple negative' breast cancer cell lines and tested for tumour growth inhibitory activity in a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. All of the approaches identified multiple cell surface markers, including integrins, CD44, EGFR, CD71, galectin-3, CD73 and BCAM, some of which had been previously confirmed as being tractable to antibody therapy. In total, 40 cell surface markers were identified for further study. In addition to cell surface marker identification, the phenotypic antibody screening approaches provided reagent antibodies for target validation studies. This is illustrated using the anti-CD73 antibody, which bound other 'triple negative

  10. Combining phenotypic and proteomic approaches to identify membrane targets in a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rust Steven

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continued discovery of therapeutic antibodies, which address unmet medical needs, requires the continued discovery of tractable antibody targets. Multiple protein-level target discovery approaches are available and these can be used in combination to extensively survey relevant cell membranomes. In this study, the MDA-MB-231 cell line was selected for membranome survey as it is a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell line, which represents a cancer subtype that is aggressive and has few treatment options. Methods The MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line was used to explore three membranome target discovery approaches, which were used in parallel to cross-validate the significance of identified antigens. A proteomic approach, which used membrane protein enrichment followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, was used alongside two phenotypic antibody screening approaches. The first phenotypic screening approach was based on hybridoma technology and the second was based on phage display technology. Antibodies isolated by the phenotypic approaches were tested for cell specificity as well as internalisation and the targets identified were compared to each other as well as those identified by the proteomic approach. An anti-CD73 antibody derived from the phage display-based phenotypic approach was tested for binding to other ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell lines and tested for tumour growth inhibitory activity in a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. Results All of the approaches identified multiple cell surface markers, including integrins, CD44, EGFR, CD71, galectin-3, CD73 and BCAM, some of which had been previously confirmed as being tractable to antibody therapy. In total, 40 cell surface markers were identified for further study. In addition to cell surface marker identification, the phenotypic antibody screening approaches provided reagent antibodies for target validation studies. This is illustrated

  11. Integrated analysis of dysregulated lncRNA expression in breast cancer cell identified by RNA-seq study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Tripathi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Among all the sequencing techniques, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq has galloped with pace adopting the profiling of transcriptomic data in almost every biological analytics area like gene regulation study, development biology and clinical research. Recently the discovery of differentially expressed genes across different conditions has outshone the barrier of genetic & epigenetic regulations. The present work identified and analyzed differentially expressed novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs for breast cancer. A complex computational pipeline was adopted for the study which includes analysis of 18498 differentially expressed genes with 4114 up-regulated and 3475 down-regulated transcripts. The overexpression of lnc-MTAP (CDKN2B-AS1, lnc-PCP4 (DSCAM-S1, and lnc-FAM (H19 in breast cells suggests that these lncRNAs may have significant role to play in breast cancer. These results validated the relevance of the dysregulation pattern in cancer cells due to the presence of lncRNAs. The study further opens a new scope for experimental analysis to confirm the aberrant expression pattern of these lncRNAs which may act as potential bio-markers for the diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer. Keywords: RNA sequencing, Transcriptomics, Differentially expressed genes, Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, Breast cancer, Dysregulation

  12. Quantitative proteomics identifies central players in erlotinib resistance of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Lund, Rikke Raaen; Beck, Hans Christian

    Background: Erlotinib (Tarceva®, Roche) has significantly changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as 70% of patients show significant tumor regression when treated. However, all patients relapse due to development of acquired resistance, which in 43-50% of cases are caused......, but surprisingly not of AKT and FOXO1/3a, indicating that AKT is the main signaling hub for survival. Also Erk1/2 phsphorylation is pertained although at decreased levels. Conclusions: In conclusion, cancer-related networks such as proliferation and apoptosis were found to be regulated, supporting the validity...

  13. CXCR6, a newly defined biomarker of tissue-specific stem cell asymmetric self-renewal, identifies more aggressive human melanoma cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzbeh Taghizadeh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in cancer research is identifying the cell type that is capable of sustaining neoplastic growth and its origin from normal tissue cells. Recent investigations of a variety of tumor types have shown that phenotypically identifiable and isolable subfractions of cells possess the tumor-forming ability. In the present paper, using two lineage-related human melanoma cell lines, primary melanoma line IGR39 and its metastatic derivative line IGR37, two main observations are reported. The first one is the first phenotypic evidence to support the origin of melanoma cancer stem cells (CSCs from mutated tissue-specific stem cells; and the second one is the identification of a more aggressive subpopulation of CSCs in melanoma that are CXCR6+.We defined CXCR6 as a new biomarker for tissue-specific stem cell asymmetric self-renewal. Thus, the relationship between melanoma formation and ABCG2 and CXCR6 expression was investigated. Consistent with their non-metastatic character, unsorted IGR39 cells formed significantly smaller tumors than unsorted IGR37 cells. In addition, ABCG2+ cells produced tumors that had a 2-fold greater mass than tumors produced by unsorted cells or ABCG2- cells. CXCR6+ cells produced more aggressive tumors. CXCR6 identifies a more discrete subpopulation of cultured human melanoma cells with a more aggressive MCSC phenotype than cells selected on the basis of the ABCG2+ phenotype alone.The association of a more aggressive tumor phenotype with asymmetric self-renewal phenotype reveals a previously unrecognized aspect of tumor cell physiology. Namely, the retention of some tissue-specific stem cell attributes, like the ability to asymmetrically self-renew, impacts the natural history of human tumor development. Knowledge of this new aspect of tumor development and progression may provide new targets for cancer prevention and treatment.

  14. Identifying resistance mechanisms against five tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the ERBB/RAS pathway in 45 cancer cell lines.

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    Zsófia Pénzváltó

    Full Text Available Because of the low overall response rates of 10-47% to targeted cancer therapeutics, there is an increasing need for predictive biomarkers. We aimed to identify genes predicting response to five already approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We tested 45 cancer cell lines for sensitivity to sunitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib and gefitinib at the clinically administered doses. A resistance matrix was determined, and gene expression profiles of the subsets of resistant vs. sensitive cell lines were compared. Triplicate gene expression signatures were obtained from the caArray project. Significance analysis of microarrays and rank products were applied for feature selection. Ninety-five genes were also measured by RT-PCR. In case of four sunitinib resistance associated genes, the results were validated in clinical samples by immunohistochemistry. A list of 63 top genes associated with resistance against the five tyrosine kinase inhibitors was identified. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed 45 of 63 genes identified by microarray analysis. Only two genes (ANXA3 and RAB25 were related to sensitivity against more than three inhibitors. The immunohistochemical analysis of sunitinib-treated metastatic renal cell carcinomas confirmed the correlation between RAB17, LGALS8, and EPCAM and overall survival. In summary, we determined predictive biomarkers for five tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and validated sunitinib resistance biomarkers by immunohistochemistry in an independent patient cohort.

  15. Genomic Landscape Survey Identifies SRSF1 as a Key Oncodriver in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

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    Liyan Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is an aggressive disease with poor survival. A few sequencing studies performed on limited number of samples have revealed potential disease-driving genes in SCLC, however, much still remains unknown, particularly in the Asian patient population. Here we conducted whole exome sequencing (WES and transcriptomic sequencing of primary tumors from 99 Chinese SCLC patients. Dysregulation of tumor suppressor genes TP53 and RB1 was observed in 82% and 62% of SCLC patients, respectively, and more than half of the SCLC patients (62% harbored TP53 and RB1 mutation and/or copy number loss. Additionally, Serine/Arginine Splicing Factor 1 (SRSF1 DNA copy number gain and mRNA over-expression was strongly associated with poor survival using both discovery and validation patient cohorts. Functional studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that SRSF1 is important for tumorigenicity of SCLC and may play a key role in DNA repair and chemo-sensitivity. These results strongly support SRSF1 as a prognostic biomarker in SCLC and provide a rationale for personalized therapy in SCLC.

  16. The SOX2-interactome in brain cancer cells identifies the requirement of MSI2 and USP9X for the growth of brain tumor cells.

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    Jesse L Cox

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas and glioblastomas, the most common primary brain tumors in children and adults, respectively, are extremely difficult to treat. Efforts to identify novel proteins essential for the growth of these tumors may help to further our understanding of the biology of these tumors, as well as, identify targets for future therapies. The recent identification of multiple transcription factor-centric protein interaction landscapes in embryonic stem cells has identified numerous understudied proteins that are essential for the self-renewal of these stem cells. To identify novel proteins essential for the fate of brain tumor cells, we examined the protein interaction network of the transcription factor, SOX2, in medulloblastoma cells. For this purpose, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT identified >280 SOX2-associated proteins in the medulloblastoma cell line DAOY. To begin to understand the roles of SOX2-associated proteins in brain cancer, we focused on two SOX2-associated proteins, Musashi 2 (MSI2 and Ubiquitin Specific Protease 9x (USP9X. Recent studies have implicated MSI2, a putative RNA binding protein, and USP9X, a deubiquitinating enzyme, in several cancers, but not brain tumors. We demonstrate that knockdown of MSI2 significantly reduces the growth of DAOY cells as well as U87 and U118 glioblastoma cells. We also demonstrate that the knockdown of USP9X in DAOY, U87 and U118 brain tumor cells strongly reduces their growth. Together, our studies identify a large set of SOX2-associated proteins in DAOY medulloblastoma cells and identify two proteins, MSI2 and USP9X, that warrant further investigation to determine whether they are potential therapeutic targets for brain cancer.

  17. Structural analysis of the genome of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-30 identifies twelve expressed fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ina; Batty, Elizabeth M; Pole, Jessica C M; Blood, Katherine A; Mo, Steven; Cooke, Susanna L; Ng, Charlotte; Howe, Kevin L; Chin, Suet-Feung; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos; Howarth, Karen D; Edwards, Paul A W

    2012-12-22

    It has recently emerged that common epithelial cancers such as breast cancers have fusion genes like those in leukaemias. In a representative breast cancer cell line, ZR-75-30, we searched for fusion genes, by analysing genome rearrangements. We first analysed rearrangements of the ZR-75-30 genome, to around 10kb resolution, by molecular cytogenetic approaches, combining array painting and array CGH. We then compared this map with genomic junctions determined by paired-end sequencing. Most of the breakpoints found by array painting and array CGH were identified in the paired end sequencing-55% of the unamplified breakpoints and 97% of the amplified breakpoints (as these are represented by more sequence reads). From this analysis we identified 9 expressed fusion genes: APPBP2-PHF20L1, BCAS3-HOXB9, COL14A1-SKAP1, TAOK1-PCGF2, TIAM1-NRIP1, TIMM23-ARHGAP32, TRPS1-LASP1, USP32-CCDC49 and ZMYM4-OPRD1. We also determined the genomic junctions of a further three expressed fusion genes that had been described by others, BCAS3-ERBB2, DDX5-DEPDC6/DEPTOR and PLEC1-ENPP2. Of this total of 12 expressed fusion genes, 9 were in the coamplification. Due to the sensitivity of the technologies used, we estimate these 12 fusion genes to be around two-thirds of the true total. Many of the fusions seem likely to be driver mutations. For example, PHF20L1, BCAS3, TAOK1, PCGF2, and TRPS1 are fused in other breast cancers. HOXB9 and PHF20L1 are members of gene families that are fused in other neoplasms. Several of the other genes are relevant to cancer-in addition to ERBB2, SKAP1 is an adaptor for Src, DEPTOR regulates the mTOR pathway and NRIP1 is an estrogen-receptor coregulator. This is the first structural analysis of a breast cancer genome that combines classical molecular cytogenetic approaches with sequencing. Paired-end sequencing was able to detect almost all breakpoints, where there was adequate read depth. It supports the view that gene breakage and gene fusion are important

  18. Functional Genomics to Identify Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Stem Cells Using a Novel Murine CRPC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    skin , intestine, and pancreas, the role for the Hippo–YAP pathway in prostate cancer biology is emerging [9-11]. Consistent with the in silico analysis...pathway plays an important role in development and cancer in organs such as the liver, skin , intestine, and pan- creas ( 25–27 ), the role for the Hippo...neutrophils of patients with laryngeal carcinoma and antioxidative enzyme activity in their blood . Acta Oncol 2004 ; 43 : 252 – 8 . 16. Schmielau J

  19. Optical quantification of cellular mass, volume and density of circulating tumor cells identified in an ovarian cancer patient

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    Kevin Gregory Phillips

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have demonstrated that circulating tumor cells (CTCs are present in the blood of cancer patients with known metastatic disease across the major types of epithelial malignancies. Recent studies have shown that the concentration of CTCs in the blood is prognostic of overall survival in breast, prostate, colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer. This study characterizes CTCs identified using the high-definition (HD-CTC assay in an ovarian cancer patient with stage IIIC disease. We characterized the physical properties of 31 HD-CTCs and 50 normal leukocytes from a single blood draw taken just prior to the initial debulking surgery. We utilized a non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy technique using brightfield imagery to measure cellular dry mass. Next we used a quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy technique to measure cellular volume. These techniques were combined to determine cellular dry mass density. We found that HD-CTCs were more massive than leukocytes: 33.6 ± 3.2 pg (HD-CTC compared to 18.7 ± 0.6 pg (leukocytes, p < 0.001; had greater volumes: 518.3 ± 24.5 fL (HD-CTC compared to 230.9 ± 78.5 fL (leukocyte, p<0.001; and possessed a decreased dry mass density with respect to leukocytes: 0.065 ± 0.006 pg/fL (HD-CTC compared to 0.085 ± 0.004 pg/fL (leukocyte, p < 0.006. Quantification of HD-CTC dry mass content and volume provide key insights into the fluid dynamics of cancer, and may provide the rationale for strategies to isolate, monitor or target CTCs based on their physical properties. The parameters reported here can also be incorporated into blood cell flow models to better understand metastasis.

  20. Using ABCG2-molecule-expressing side population cells to identify cancer stem-like cells in a human ovarian cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jun; Jiang, Cuilian; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Fengshu; Hu, Weihua; He, Xiangfeng; Li, Xiaoli; Zou, Dandan; Gu, Ning

    2011-03-01

    CSCs (cancer stem cells) are a small subset of cells within a tumour that possesses the characteristics of stem cells and are considered to be responsible for resistance to chemoradiation. Identification of CSCs through stem cell characteristics might have relevant clinical implications. In this study, SP (side population ) cells were sorted from a human ovarian cancer cell line by FACS to determine whether cancer stem cell-like SP cells were present. A very small fraction of SP cells (2.6%) was detected in A2780 cells. SP cells possessed the following characteristics: highly proliferative activity, marked ability for self-renewal in soft agar and culture medium, high expression of ABCG2, drug resistance to vinblastine in vitro, and strong tumourigenic potential in Balb/c nude mice. It is concluded that there exists in the A2780 cell line a small number of SP cells with high expression of ABCG2. The cells have the characteristics of cancer stem-like cells, and identification and cloning of such human SP cells can help in improving therapeutic approaches to ovarian cancer in patients.

  1. Systematic screening of isogenic cancer cells identifies DUSP6 as context-specific synthetic lethal target in melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie; Wittig, Rainer; Schmidt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has dramatically increased genome-wide profiling options and conceptually initiates the possibility for personalized cancer therapy. State-of-the-art sequencing studies yield large candidate gene sets comprising dozens or hundreds of mutated genes. However, few technolo......Next-generation sequencing has dramatically increased genome-wide profiling options and conceptually initiates the possibility for personalized cancer therapy. State-of-the-art sequencing studies yield large candidate gene sets comprising dozens or hundreds of mutated genes. However, few...... technologies are available for the systematic downstream evaluation of these results to identify novel starting points of future cancer therapies. We improved and extended a site-specific recombination-based system for systematic analysis of the individual functions of a large number of candidate genes....... This was facilitated by a novel system for the construction of isogenic constitutive and inducible gain- and loss-of-function cell lines. Additionally, we demonstrate the construction of isogenic cell lines with combinations of the traits for advanced functional in vitro analyses. In a proof-of-concept experiment...

  2. Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor RHAMM in tumor budding cells identifies aggressive colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Huber, Bettina; Mele, Valentina; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Trippel, Mafalda; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (RHAMM, CD168) predicts adverse clinicopathological features and decreased survival for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Using full tissue sections, we investigated the expression of RHAMM in tumor budding cells of 103 primary CRCs to characterize the biological processes driving single-cell invasion and early metastatic dissemination. RHAMM expression in tumor buds was analyzed with clinicopathological data, molecular features and survival. Tumor budding cells at the invasive front of CRC expressed RHAMM in 68% of cases. Detection of RHAMM-positive tumor budding cells was significantly associated with poor survival outcome (P = .0312), independent of TNM stage and adjuvant therapy in multivariate analysis (P = .0201). RHAMM-positive tumor buds were associated with frequent lymphatic invasion (P = .0007), higher tumor grade (P = .0296), and nodal metastasis (P = .0364). Importantly, the prognostic impact of RHAMM expression in tumor buds was maintained independently of the number of tumor buds found in an individual case (P = .0246). No impact of KRAS/BRAF mutation, mismatch repair deficiency and CpG island methylation was observed. RHAMM expression identifies an aggressive subpopulation of tumor budding cells and is an independent adverse prognostic factor for CRC patients. These data support ongoing efforts to develop RHAMM as a target for precision therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  4. Circulating tumor DNA identified by targeted sequencing in advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Lou, Feng; Wu, Yi; Sun, Da-Qiang; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Chen, Wei; Ye, Hua; Liu, Jing-Hao; Wei, Sen; Zhao, Ming-Yu; Wu, Wen-Jun; Su, Xue-Xia; Shi, Rong; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-28

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have unique mutation patterns, and some of these mutations may be used to predict prognosis or guide patient treatment. Mutation profiling before and during treatment often requires repeated tumor biopsies, which is not always possible. Recently, cell-free, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) isolated from blood plasma has been shown to contain genetic mutations representative of those found in the primary tumor tissue DNA (tDNA), and these samples can readily be obtained using non-invasive techniques. However, there are still no standardized methods to identify mutations in ctDNA. In the current study, we used a targeted sequencing approach with a semi-conductor based next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to identify gene mutations in matched tDNA and ctDNA samples from 42 advanced-stage NSCLC patients from China. We identified driver mutations in matched tDNA and ctDNA in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and TP53, with an overall concordance of 76%. In conclusion, targeted sequencing of plasma ctDNA may be a feasible option for clinical monitoring of NSCLC in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in pancreatic cancer patients identifies novel genes with potential diagnostic utility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Baine

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that many malignancies, including pancreatic cancer (PC, possess the ability to evade the immune system by indirectly downregulating the mononuclear cell machinery necessary to launch an effective immune response. This knowledge, in conjunction with the fact that the trancriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells has been shown to be altered in the context of many diseases, including renal cell carcinoma, lead us to study if any such alteration in gene expression exists in PC as it may have diagnostic utility.PBMC samples from 26 PC patients and 33 matched healthy controls were analyzed by whole genome cDNA microarray. Three hundred eighty-three genes were found to be significantly different between PC and healthy controls, with 65 having at least a 1.5 fold change in expression. Pathway analysis revealed that many of these genes fell into pathways responsible for hematopoietic differentiation, cytokine signaling, and natural killer (NK cell and CD8+ T-cell cytotoxic response. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis identified an eight-gene predictor set, consisting of SSBP2, Ube2b-rs1, CA5B, F5, TBC1D8, ANXA3, ARG1, and ADAMTS20, that could distinguish PC patients from healthy controls with an accuracy of 79% in a blinded subset of samples from treatment naïve patients, giving a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 75%.In summary, we report the first in-depth comparison of global gene expression profiles of PBMCs between PC patients and healthy controls. We have also identified a gene predictor set that can potentially be developed further for use in diagnostic algorithms in PC. Future directions of this research should include analysis of PBMC expression profiles in patients with chronic pancreatitis as well as increasing the number of early-stage patients to assess the utility of PBMCs in the early diagnosis of PC.

  6. Random Cell Identifiers Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite integration of advanced functions that enable Femto Access Points (FAPs to be deployed in a plug-and-play manner, the femtocell concept still cause several opened issues to be resolved. One of them represents an assignment of Physical Cell Identifiers (PCIs to FAPs. This paper analyses a random based assignment algorithm in LTE systems operating in diverse femtocell scenarios. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparing the number of confusions for various femtocell densities, PCI ranges and knowledge of vicinity. Simulation results show that better knowledge of vicinity can significantly reduce the number of confusions events.

  7. CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+ phenotypes fail to reliably identify cell populations with cancer stem cell functional features in established human colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Mele, Valentina; Däster, Silvio; Han, Junyi; Heberer, Michael; Cesare Spagnoli, Giulio; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2012-08-01

    Increasing evidence that cancers originate from small populations of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies and regenerating the original tumor, urges the development of novel CSC-targeted treatments. Screening of new anticancer compounds is conventionally conducted on established tumor cell lines, providing sufficient material for high-throughput studies. Whether tumor cell lines might comprise CSC populations resembling those of primary tumors, however, remains highly debated. We have analyzed the expression of defined phenotypic profiles, including CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+, reported as CSC-specific in human primary colorectal cancer (CRC), on a panel of 10 established CRC cell lines and evaluated their correlation with CSC properties. None of the putative CSC phenotypes consistently correlated with stem cell-like features, including spheroid formation ability, clonogenicity, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, and side population phenotype. Importantly, CRC cells expressing putative CSC markers did not exhibit increased survival when treated with chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro or display higher tumorigenicity in vivo. Thus, the expression of CD133 or the coexpression of CD166/CD44 or CD24/CD44 did not appear to reliably identify CSC populations in established CRC cell lines. Our findings question the suitability of cell lines for the screening of CSC-specific therapies and underline the urgency of developing novel platforms for anticancer drug discovery.

  8. Bioinformatic analyses identifies novel protein-coding pharmacogenomic markers associated with paclitaxel sensitivity in NCI60 cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Lawson; Ibrahim-zada, Irada; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Savas, Sevtap; Meschian, Mehran; Pritchard, Kathleen I; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2011-02-11

    Paclitaxel is a microtubule-stabilizing drug that has been commonly used in treating cancer. Due to genetic heterogeneity within patient populations, therapeutic response rates often vary. Here we used the NCI60 panel to identify SNPs associated with paclitaxel sensitivity. Using the panel's GI50 response data available from Developmental Therapeutics Program, cell lines were categorized as either sensitive or resistant. PLINK software was used to perform a genome-wide association analysis of the cellular response to paclitaxel with the panel's SNP-genotype data on the Affymetrix 125 k SNP array. FastSNP software helped predict each SNP's potential impact on their gene product. mRNA expression differences between sensitive and resistant cell lines was examined using data from BioGPS. Using Haploview software, we investigated for haplotypes that were more strongly associated with the cellular response to paclitaxel. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software helped us understand how our identified genes may alter the cellular response to paclitaxel. 43 SNPs were found significantly associated (FDRlines. Haplotypes found in GRIK1, SGCD, ROBO1, LPHN2, and PTPRD were more strongly associated with response than their individual SNPs. Our study has taken advantage of available genotypic data and its integration with drug response data obtained from the NCI60 panel. We identified 10 SNPs located within protein-coding genes that were not previously shown to be associated with paclitaxel response. As only five genes showed differential mRNA expression, the remainder would not have been detected solely based on expression data. The identified haplotypes highlight the role of utilizing SNP combinations within genomic loci of interest to improve the risk determination associated with drug response. These genetic variants represent promising biomarkers for predicting paclitaxel response and may play a significant role in the cellular response to paclitaxel.

  9. Genetic Recombination Between Stromal and Cancer Cells Results in Highly Malignant Cells Identified by Color-Coded Imaging in a Mouse Lymphoma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Miki; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Kousuke; Matsumoto, Takuro; Aoki, Hitomi; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masahito; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) promotes tumor growth and metastasis. We previously established the color-coded EL4 lymphoma TME model with red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressing EL4 implanted in transgenic C57BL/6 green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice. Color-coded imaging of the lymphoma TME suggested an important role of stromal cells in lymphoma progression and metastasis. In the present study, we used color-coded imaging of RFP-lymphoma cells and GFP stromal cells to identify yellow-fluorescent genetically recombinant cells appearing only during metastasis. The EL4-RFP lymphoma cells were injected subcutaneously in C57BL/6-GFP transgenic mice and formed subcutaneous tumors 14 days after cell transplantation. The subcutaneous tumors were harvested and transplanted to the abdominal cavity of nude mice. Metastases to the liver, perigastric lymph node, ascites, bone marrow, and primary tumor were imaged. In addition to EL4-RFP cells and GFP-host cells, genetically recombinant yellow-fluorescent cells, were observed only in the ascites and bone marrow. These results indicate genetic exchange between the stromal and cancer cells. Possible mechanisms of genetic exchange are discussed as well as its ramifications for metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4216-4221, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Quantitative proteomics as a tool to identify resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine

    Background: Erlotinib (Tarceva®, Roche) has significantly changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as approximately 70% of patients show significant tumor regression when treated (Santarpia et. al., 2013). However, all patients relapse due to development of acquired resistance......, which in 43-50% of cases are caused by a secondary mutation (T790M) in EGFR. Importantly, a majority of resistance cases are still unexplained (Lin & Bivona, 2012). Our aim is to identify novel resistance mechanisms – and potentially new drug targets - in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell...... was downregulated, indicating a bypass signaling mechanism to achieve resistance. More specifically, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) and synovial apoptosis inhibitor 1 (SYNV1) were upregulated. Conclusions: In conclusion, cancer-related networks such as proliferation and apoptosis were found...

  11. Dissemination in athymic nude mice of lacZ transfected small cell lung cancer cells identified by X-gal staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, M U; Christiansen, J; Brünner, N

    1995-01-01

    The small cell lung cancer cell lines GLC-2 and DMS 456 were genetically labeled with the lacZ gene and examined for invasive and metastatic potential in META/Bom nude mice. The lacZ gene encodes the enzyme beta-D- galactosidase, and cells expressing this enzyme were identified by staining...... with the chromogenic substrate X-gal. lacZ expressing cells were investigated after subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation and intravenous (i.v.) injection. The X-gal detection of beta-D-galactosidase activity proved to be a rapid and easy means for specific and highly sensitive identification of metastases. All primary s.......c. tumors stained by X-gal. The primary tumors of GLC-2 regularly demonstrated local invasive growth and produced multiple metastases in several organs. In contrast, primary DMS 456 tumors only occasionally demonstrated local invasion and very rarely generated secondary foci. No experimental metastases were...

  12. Identifying anti-cancer drug response related genes using an integrative analysis of transcriptomic and genomic variations with cell line-based drug perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Yunqin; Ma, Qin; Wei, Jia; Liu, Qi

    2016-02-23

    Clinical responses to anti-cancer therapies often only benefit a defined subset of patients. Predicting the best treatment strategy hinges on our ability to effectively translate genomic data into actionable information on drug responses. To achieve this goal, we compiled a comprehensive collection of baseline cancer genome data and drug response information derived from a large panel of cancer cell lines. This data set was applied to identify the signature genes relevant to drug sensitivity and their resistance by integrating CNVs and the gene expression of cell lines with in vitro drug responses. We presented an efficient in-silico pipeline for integrating heterogeneous cell line data sources with the simultaneous modeling of drug response values across all the drugs and cell lines. Potential signature genes correlated with drug response (sensitive or resistant) in different cancer types were identified. Using signature genes, our collaborative filtering-based drug response prediction model outperformed the 44 algorithms submitted to the DREAM competition on breast cancer cells. The functions of the identified drug response related signature genes were carefully analyzed at the pathway level and the synthetic lethality level. Furthermore, we validated these signature genes by applying them to the classification of the different subtypes of the TCGA tumor samples, and further uncovered their in vivo implications using clinical patient data. Our work may have promise in translating genomic data into customized marker genes relevant to the response of specific drugs for a specific cancer type of individual patients.

  13. Integrated genomic analyses identify KDM1A's role in cell proliferation via modulating E2F signaling activity and associate with poor clinical outcome in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sathiya Pandi; Singh, Smriti; Gupta, Amit; Yadav, Sandhya; Singh, Shree Ram; Shukla, Sanjeev

    2015-10-28

    The histone demethylase KDM1A specifically demethylates lysine residues and its deregulation has been implicated in the initiation and progression of various cancers. However, KDM1A's molecular role and its pathological consequences, and prognostic significance in oral cancer remain less understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate the expression of KDM1A and its downstream role in oral cancer pathogenesis. By comparing mRNA expression profiles, we identified an elevated KDM1A expression in oral tumors when compared to normal oral tissues. In silico pathway prediction identified the association between KDM1A and E2F1 signaling in oral cancer. Pathway scanning, functional annotation analysis and In vitro assays showed the KDM1A's involvement in oral cancer cell proliferation and the cell cycle. Moreover, real time PCR and luciferase assays confirmed KDM1A's role in regulation of E2F1 signaling activity in oral cancer. Elevated KDM1A expression is associated with poor clinical outcome in oral cancer. Our data indicate that deregulated KDM1A expression is positively associated with proliferative phenotype of oral cancer and confers poor clinical outcome. These cumulative data suggest that KDM1A might be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for oral cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM (DIRPP) identifies drug resistant cancer cell lines and pathway mechanisms of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Douglas; Difeo, Analisa; Chen, Yanwen; Pearl, Taylor; Zhai, Kaide; Bebek, Gurkan; Chance, Mark; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    The revolution in sequencing techniques in the past decade has provided an extensive picture of the molecular mechanisms behind complex diseases such as cancer. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and The Cancer Genome Project (CGP) have provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine copy number, gene expression, and mutational information for over 1000 cell lines of multiple tumor types alongside IC50 values for over 150 different drugs and drug related compounds. We present a novel pipeline called DIRPP, Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM7, which predicts a cell line's response to a drug intervention from molecular data. PARADIGM (Pathway Recognition Algorithm using Data Integration on Genomic Models) is a probabilistic graphical model used to infer patient specific genetic activity by integrating copy number and gene expression data into a factor graph model of a cellular network. We evaluated the performance of DIRPP on endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer related cell lines from the CCLE and CGP for nine drugs. The pipeline is sensitive enough to predict the response of a cell line with accuracy and precision across datasets as high as 80 and 88% respectively. We then classify drugs by the specific pathway mechanisms governing drug response. This classification allows us to compare drugs by cellular response mechanisms rather than simply by their specific gene targets. This pipeline represents a novel approach for predicting clinical drug response and generating novel candidates for drug repurposing and repositioning.

  15. Multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy identifies enriched foci of cancer stem-like cells in high-grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tao He,1–3,* Tianming Qiu,4,* Xiaodong Wang,5 Hongxing Gui,6 Xilong Wang,2 Qikuan Hu,3,7 Hechun Xia,2 Gaoyang Qi,1,2 Jinsong Wu,4 Hui Ma2 1Clinical Medicine College, Ningxia Medical University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, 3Ningxia Key Laboratory of Cerebrocranial Diseases, The National Key Laboratory Incubation Base, Yinchuan, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 5Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, People’s Republic of China; 6Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School of Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, USA; 7Department of Physiology, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: This study investigated the correlation between choline/creatine (Cho/Cr ratios determined by multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS and the distribution of cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs in high-grade gliomas. Patients and methods: Sixteen patients with high-grade gliomas were recruited and underwent 1H-MRS examination before surgery to identify distinct tumor regions with variable Cho/Cr ratios. Using intraoperative neuronavigation, tumor tissues were accurately sampled from regions with high and low Cho/Cr ratios within each tumor. The distribution of CSLCs in samples from glioma tissue regions with different Cho/Cr ratios was quantified by neurosphere culture, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. Results: The mean neurosphere formation rate in tissues with high Cho/Cr ratios was significantly increased compared with that in low Cho/Cr ratio tissues (13.94±5.94 per 100 cells vs 8.04±3.99 per 100 cells, P<0.001. Immunohistochemistry indicated that tissues with high Cho/Cr ratios had elevated expression of CD133, nestin, and CD15, relative to low Cho/Cr ratio tissue

  16. Bioinformatic analyses identifies novel protein-coding pharmacogenomic markers associated with paclitaxel sensitivity in NCI60 cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarjanazi Hamdi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paclitaxel is a microtubule-stabilizing drug that has been commonly used in treating cancer. Due to genetic heterogeneity within patient populations, therapeutic response rates often vary. Here we used the NCI60 panel to identify SNPs associated with paclitaxel sensitivity. Using the panel's GI50 response data available from Developmental Therapeutics Program, cell lines were categorized as either sensitive or resistant. PLINK software was used to perform a genome-wide association analysis of the cellular response to paclitaxel with the panel's SNP-genotype data on the Affymetrix 125 k SNP array. FastSNP software helped predict each SNP's potential impact on their gene product. mRNA expression differences between sensitive and resistant cell lines was examined using data from BioGPS. Using Haploview software, we investigated for haplotypes that were more strongly associated with the cellular response to paclitaxel. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software helped us understand how our identified genes may alter the cellular response to paclitaxel. Results 43 SNPs were found significantly associated (FDR CFTR, ROBO1, PTPRD, BTBD12, DCT, SNTG1, SGCD, LPHN2, GRIK1, ZNF607. SNPs in GRIK1, DCT, SGCD and CFTR were predicted to be intronic enhancers, altering gene expression, while SNPs in ZNF607 and BTBD12 cause conservative missense mutations. mRNA expression analysis supported these findings as GRIK1, DCT, SNTG1, SGCD and CFTR showed significantly (p GRIK1, SGCD, ROBO1, LPHN2, and PTPRD were more strongly associated with response than their individual SNPs. Conclusions Our study has taken advantage of available genotypic data and its integration with drug response data obtained from the NCI60 panel. We identified 10 SNPs located within protein-coding genes that were not previously shown to be associated with paclitaxel response. As only five genes showed differential mRNA expression, the remainder would not have been detected solely

  17. Integrated High Throughput Analysis Identifies GSK3 as a Crucial Determinant of p53-Mediated Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Chenyang; Sun, Bangyao; Lv, Jiawei; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Shengwang; Li, Hai

    2017-01-01

    p53 dysfunction is frequently observed in lung cancer. Although restoring the tumour suppressor function of p53 is recently approved as a putative strategy for combating cancers, the lack of understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying p53-mediated lung cancer suppression has limited the application of p53-based therapies in lung cancer. Using RNA sequencing, we determined the transcriptional profile of human non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells after treatment with two p53-activating chemical compounds, nutlin and RITA, which could induce A549 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of genome-wide gene expression data showed that distinct transcription profiles were induced by nutlin and RITA and 66 pathways were differentially regulated by these two compounds. However, only two of these pathways, 'Adherens junction' and 'Axon guidance', were found to be synthetic lethal with p53 re-activation, as determined via integrated analysis of genome-wide gene expression profile and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening. Further functional protein association analysis of significantly regulated genes associated with these two synthetic lethal pathways indicated that GSK3 played a key role in p53-mediated A549 cell apoptosis, and then gene function study was performed, which revealed that GSK3 inhibition promoted p53-mediated A549 cell apoptosis in a p53 post-translational activity-dependent manner. Our findings provide us with new insights regarding the mechanism by which p53 mediates A549 apoptosis and may cast light on the development of more efficient p53-based strategies for treating lung cancer. © 201 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The Low Chamber Pancreatic Cancer Cells Had Stem-Like Characteristics in Modified Transwell System: Is It a Novel Method to Identify and Enrich Cancer Stem-Like Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs or cancer-initiating cells (CICs play an important role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence. It is important to construct an effective method to identify and isolate CSCs for biotherapy of cancer. During the past years, many researchers had paid more attention to it; however, this method was still on seeking. Therefore, compared to the former methods that were used to isolate the cancer stem cell, in the present study, we tried to use modified transwell system to isolate and enrich CSCs from human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc-1. Our results clearly showed that the lower chamber cells in modified transwell system were easily forming spheres; furthermore, these spheres expressed high levels of stem cell markers (CD133/CD44/CD24/Oct-4/ESA and exhibited chemoresistance, underwent epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and possessed the properties of self-renewal in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Therefore, we speculated that modified transwell assay system, as a rapid and effective method, can be used to isolate and enrich CSCs.

  19. Principal component analysis identifies patterns of cytokine expression in non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah G Ellsworth

    Full Text Available Radiation treatment (RT stimulates the release of many immunohumoral factors, complicating the identification of clinically significant cytokine expression patterns. This study used principal component analysis (PCA to analyze cytokines in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients undergoing RT and explore differences in changes after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT without or with chemotherapy.The dataset included 141 NSCLC patients treated on prospective clinical protocols; PCA was based on the 128 patients who had complete CK values at baseline and during treatment. Patients underwent SBRT (n = 16, CFRT (n = 18, or CFRT (n = 107 with concurrent chemotherapy (ChRT. Levels of 30 cytokines were measured from prospectively collected platelet-poor plasma samples at baseline, during RT, and after RT. PCA was used to study variations in cytokine levels in patients at each time point.Median patient age was 66, and 22.7% of patients were female. PCA showed that sCD40l, fractalkine/C3, IP10, VEGF, IL-1a, IL-10, and GMCSF were responsible for most variability in baseline cytokine levels. During treatment, sCD40l, IP10, MIP-1b, fractalkine, IFN-r, and VEGF accounted for most changes in cytokine levels. In SBRT patients, the most important players were sCD40l, IP10, and MIP-1b, whereas fractalkine exhibited greater variability in CFRT alone patients. ChRT patients exhibited variability in IFN-γ and VEGF in addition to IP10, MIP-1b, and sCD40l.PCA can identify potentially significant patterns of cytokine expression after fractionated RT. Our PCA showed that inflammatory cytokines dominate post-treatment cytokine profiles, and the changes differ after SBRT versus CFRT, with vs without chemotherapy. Further studies are planned to validate these findings and determine the clinical significance of the cytokine profiles identified by PCA.

  20. Gene signatures associated with mouse postnatal hindbrain neural stem cells and medulloblastoma cancer stem cells identify novel molecular mediators and predict human medulloblastoma molecular classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Daniela; Daniela, Corno; Pala, Mauro; Cominelli, Manuela; Cipelletti, Barbara; Leto, Ketty; Croci, Laura; Barili, Valeria; Brandalise, Federico; Melzi, Raffaella; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Bulfone, Alessandro; Rossi, Paola; Rossi, Ferdinando; Consalez, Gian Giacomo; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Galli, Rossella

    2012-06-01

    Medulloblastoma arises from mutations occurring in stem/progenitor cells located in restricted hindbrain territories. Here we report that the mouse postnatal ventricular zone lining the IV ventricle also harbors bona fide stem cells that, remarkably, share the same molecular profile with cerebellar white matter-derived neural stem cells (NSC). To identify novel molecular mediators involved in medulloblastomagenesis, we compared these distinct postnatal hindbrain-derived NSC populations, which are potentially tumor initiating, with murine compound Ptch/p53 mutant medulloblastoma cancer stem cells (CSC) that faithfully phenocopy the different variants of human medulloblastoma in vivo. Transcriptome analysis of both hindbrain NSCs and medulloblastoma CSCs resulted in the generation of well-defined gene signatures, each reminiscent of a specific human medulloblastoma molecular subclass. Most interestingly, medulloblastoma CSCs upregulated developmentally related genes, such as Ebfs, that were shown to be highly expressed in human medulloblastomas and play a pivotal role in experimental medullo-blastomagenesis. These data indicate that gene expression analysis of medulloblastoma CSCs holds great promise not only for understanding functional differences between distinct CSC populations but also for identifying meaningful signatures that might stratify medulloblastoma patients beyond histopathologic staging.

  1. Short hairpin RNA library-based functional screening identified ribosomal protein L31 that modulates prostate cancer cell growth via p53 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yojiro Maruyama

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31 was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer.

  2. Short hairpin RNA library-based functional screening identified ribosomal protein L31 that modulates prostate cancer cell growth via p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yojiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31) was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR) cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer.

  3. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  4. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Briffa

    Full Text Available Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50's were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001. TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been

  5. A large set of estrogen receptor β-interacting proteins identified by tandem affinity purification in hormone-responsive human breast cancer cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; Ambrosino, Concetta; Bamundo, Angela; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Paris, Ornella; Ravo, Maria; Guzzi, Pietro H; Cannataro, Mario; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A; Nola, Ernesto; Weisz, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen receptors α (ER-α) and β (ER-β) play distinct biological roles in onset and progression of hormone-responsive breast cancer, with ER-β exerting a modulatory activity on ER-α-mediated estrogen signaling and stimulation of cell proliferation by mechanisms still not fully understood. We stably expressed human ER-β fused to a tandem affinity purification-tag in estrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells and applied tandem affinity purification and nanoLC-MS/MS to identify the ER-β interactome of this cell type. Functional annotation by bioinformatics analyses of the 303 proteins that co-purify with ER-β from nuclear extracts identify several new molecular partners of this receptor subtype that represents nodal points of a large protein network controlling multiple processes and functions in breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Clustering of multi-parametric functional imaging to identify high-risk subvolumes in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Aniek J G; Reymen, Bart; La Fontaine, Matthew D; Das, Marco; Mottaghy, Felix M; Belderbos, José S A; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; van Elmpt, Wouter

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to identify tumour subregions with characteristic phenotypes based on pre-treatment multi-parametric functional imaging and correlate these subregions to treatment outcome. The subregions were created using imaging of metabolic activity (FDG-PET/CT), hypoxia (HX4-PET/CT) and tumour vasculature (DCE-CT). 36 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent functional imaging prior to radical radiotherapy. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans to acquire blood flow (BF) and volume (BV) maps. HX4-PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were non-rigidly co-registered to the planning FDG-PET/CT. Two clustering steps were performed on multi-parametric images: first to segment each tumour into homogeneous subregions (i.e. supervoxels) and second to group the supervoxels of all tumours into phenotypic clusters. Patients were split based on the absolute or relative volume of supervoxels in each cluster; overall survival was compared using a log-rank test. Unsupervised clustering of supervoxels yielded four independent clusters. One cluster (high hypoxia, high FDG, intermediate BF/BV) related to a high-risk tumour type: patients assigned to this cluster had significantly worse survival compared to patients not in this cluster (p = 0.035). We designed a subregional analysis for multi-parametric imaging in NSCLC, and showed the potential of subregion classification as a biomarker for prognosis. This methodology allows for a comprehensive data-driven analysis of multi-parametric functional images. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Single-cell analysis of circulating tumor cells identifies cumulative expression patterns of EMT-related genes in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Osmulski, Pawel; Jadhav, Rohit R; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Leach, Robin J; Chang, Tien-Cheng; Weitman, Steven D; Kumar, Addanki Pratap; Sun, Luzhe; Gaczynska, Maria E; Thompson, Ian M; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming

    2013-06-01

    Prostate tumors shed circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the blood stream. Increased evidence shows that CTCs are often present in metastatic prostate cancer and can be alternative sources for disease profiling and prognostication. Here we postulate that CTCs expressing genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are strong predictors of metastatic prostate cancer. A microfiltration system was used to trap CTCs from peripheral blood based on size selection of large epithelial-like cells without CD45 leukocyte marker. These cells individually retrieved with a micromanipulator device were assessed for cell membrane physical properties using atomic force microscopy. Additionally, 38 CTCs from eight prostate cancer patients were used to determine expression profiles of 84 EMT-related and reference genes using a microfluidics-based PCR system. Increased cell elasticity and membrane smoothness were found in CTCs compared to noncancerous cells, highlighting their potential invasiveness and mobility in the peripheral circulation. Despite heterogeneous expression patterns of individual CTCs, genes that promote mesenchymal transitioning into a more malignant state, including IGF1, IGF2, EGFR, FOXP3, and TGFB3, were commonly observed in these cells. An additional subset of EMT-related genes (e.g., PTPRN2, ALDH1, ESR2, and WNT5A) were expressed in CTCs of castration-resistant cancer, but less frequently in castration-sensitive cancer. The study suggests that an incremental expression of EMT-related genes in CTCs is associated with metastatic castration-resistant cancer. Although CTCs represent a group of highly heterogeneous cells, their unique EMT-related gene signatures provide a new opportunity for personalized treatments with targeted inhibitors in advanced prostate cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Transcriptomic profiling and quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) drug screening of CDH1 deficient hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) cells identify treatment leads for familial gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ina; Mathews-Greiner, Lesley; Li, Dandan; Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Ray, Satyajit; Bian, Yansong; Shukla, Vivek; Zhang, Xiaohu; Guha, Raj; Thomas, Craig; Gryder, Berkley; Zacharia, Athina; Beane, Joal D; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Ferrer, Marc; Rudloff, Udo

    2017-05-01

    Patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), a cancer predisposition syndrome associated with germline mutations of the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene, have few effective treatment options. Despite marked differences in natural history, histopathology, and genetic profile to patients afflicted by sporadic gastric cancer, patients with HDGC receive, in large, identical systemic regimens. The lack of a robust preclinical in vitro system suitable for effective drug screening has been one of the obstacles to date which has hampered therapeutic advances in this rare disease. In order to identify therapeutic leads selective for the HDGC subtype of gastric cancer, we compared gene expression profiles and drug phenotype derived from an oncology library of 1912 compounds between gastric cancer cells established from a patient with metastatic HDGC harboring a c.1380delA CDH1 germline variant and sporadic gastric cancer cells. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis shows select gene expression alterations in c.1380delA CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 cells compared to a panel of sporadic gastric cancer cell lines with enrichment of ERK1-ERK2 (extracellular signal regulated kinase) and IP3 (inositol trisphosphate)/DAG (diacylglycerol) signaling as the top networks in c.1380delA SB.mhdgc-1 cells. Intracellular phosphatidylinositol intermediaries were increased upon direct measure in c.1380delA CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 cells. Differential high-throughput drug screening of c.1380delA CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 versus sporadic gastric cancer cells identified several compound classes with enriched activity in c.1380 CDH1 SB.mhdgc-1 cells including mTOR (Mammalian Target Of Rapamycin), MEK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase), c-Src kinase, FAK (Focal Adhesion Kinase), PKC (Protein Kinase C), or TOPO2 (Topoisomerase II) inhibitors. Upon additional drug response testing, dual PI3K (Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase)/mTOR and topoisomerase 2A inhibitors displayed up to >100-fold increased activity in hereditary c.1380

  9. MicroRNA activity profile in the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3 identifies a proapoptotic effect of miR-23a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andikyan V

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vaagn Andikyan,1 Gregory Mullokandov,2 Judith Agudo,2 Ravi Sachidanandam,3,4 David Fishman,1 Alessia Baccarini,2 Brian D Brown2,3 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, 2Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, 3Tisch Cancer Institute, 4Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Introduction: Molecular profiling has revealed that many microRNAs (miRNAs are highly expressed in ovarian carcinoma. However, it is not yet known which miRNAs are biologically active (ie, they suppress expression of a target gene in ovarian cancer cells. Here we set out to determine the most active miRNAs in ovarian cancer cells. Methods: We performed miRNA molecular profiling by quantitative polymerase chain reaction array, and measured miRNA activity using a library of sensor vectors for 291 different conserved miRNAs. We inhibited miR-23a activity using a lentiviral-based decoy, and measured the percentage of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. Results: Our miRNA activity profiling identified 54 active miRNAs in OVCAR3 cells, and found that over 150 miRNAs had no detectable activity. To study the function of an active miRNA, we selected miR-23a for further analysis. We inhibited miR-23a in OVCAR3 cells using a decoy vector, and found that there was decreased cell death compared to control (7.4%±1.4% versus 11.2%±0.5%; P<0.05 when the cells were treated with cisplatin. Moreover, the percentage of apoptotic cells was significantly lower in miR-23a inhibited cells compared to control (2.3%±0.4% versus 9.4%±2.6%; P<0.05. Conclusion: This study identifies the active miRNAs in OVCAR3 cells, and suggests that miR-23a may help to regulate chemosensitivity of ovarian cancer cells. Keywords: ovarian cancer, OVCAR3, microRNA profiling, miR-23a, apoptosis

  10. Epigenome-wide ovarian cancer analysis identifies a methylation profile differentiating clear-cell histology with epigenetic silencing of the HERG K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Mine S; Koestler, Devin C; Fridley, Brooke L; Kalli, Kimberly R; Armasu, Sebastian M; Larson, Melissa C; Wang, Chen; Winham, Stacey J; Vierkant, Robert A; Rider, David N; Block, Matthew S; Klotzle, Brandy; Konecny, Gottfried; Winterhoff, Boris J; Hamidi, Habib; Shridhar, Viji; Fan, Jian-Bing; Visscher, Daniel W; Olson, Janet E; Hartmann, Lynn C; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L

    2013-08-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death in women with gynecologic malignancies, despite surgical advances and the development of more effective chemotherapeutics. As increasing evidence indicates that clear-cell ovarian cancer may have unique pathogenesis, further understanding of molecular features may enable us to begin to understand the underlying biology and histology-specific information for improved outcomes. To study epigenetics in clear-cell ovarian cancer, fresh frozen tumor DNA (n = 485) was assayed on Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. We identified a clear-cell ovarian cancer tumor methylation profile (n = 163) which we validated in two independent replication sets (set 1, n = 163; set 2, n = 159), highlighting 22 CpG loci associated with nine genes (VWA1, FOXP1, FGFRL1, LINC00340, KCNH2, ANK1, ATXN2, NDRG21 and SLC16A11). Nearly all of the differentially methylated CpGs showed a propensity toward hypermethylation among clear-cell cases. Several loci methylation inversely correlated with tumor gene expression, most notably KCNH2 (HERG, a potassium channel) (P = 9.5 × 10(-7)), indicating epigenetic silencing. In addition, a predicted methylation class mainly represented by the clear-cell cases (20 clear cell out of 23 cases) had improved survival time. Although these analyses included only 30 clear-cell carcinomas, results suggest that loss of expression of KCNH2 (HERG) by methylation could be a good prognostic marker, given that overexpression of the potassium (K(+)) channel Eag family members promotes increased proliferation and results in poor prognosis. Validation in a bigger cohort of clear-cell tumors of the ovary is warranted.

  11. PTRF/cavin-1 and MIF proteins are identified as non-small cell lung cancer biomarkers by label-free proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gámez-Pozo

    Full Text Available With the completion of the human genome sequence, biomedical sciences have entered in the "omics" era, mainly due to high-throughput genomics techniques and the recent application of mass spectrometry to proteomics analyses. However, there is still a time lag between these technological advances and their application in the clinical setting. Our work is designed to build bridges between high-performance proteomics and clinical routine. Protein extracts were obtained from fresh frozen normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer samples. We applied a phosphopeptide enrichment followed by LC-MS/MS. Subsequent label-free quantification and bioinformatics analyses were performed. We assessed protein patterns on these samples, showing dozens of differential markers between normal and tumor tissue. Gene ontology and interactome analyses identified signaling pathways altered on tumor tissue. We have identified two proteins, PTRF/cavin-1 and MIF, which are differentially expressed between normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer. These potential biomarkers were validated using western blot and immunohistochemistry. The application of discovery-based proteomics analyses in clinical samples allowed us to identify new potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. Clinical Observation of Icotinib Hydrochloride for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with EGFR Status Identified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi LI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Icotinib is the first self-developed small molecular drug in China for targeted therapy of lung cancer. Compared to the other two commercially available epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, gefitinib and erlotinib, icotinib is similar to them in chemical structure, mechanism of activity and therapeutic effects. To explore the efficacy and side effects of icotinib hydrochloride in the treatment of the advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation and wild-type. Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC who were treated with icotinib hydrochloride in Beijing Chest Hospital were retrospective analyzed from March 2009 to December 2014. Results The clinical data of 124 patients (99 with EGFR mutation and 25 with wild type with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in this study. The patients’ overall objective response rate (ORR was 51.6 % and the disease control rate (DCR was 79.8%; The patients with EGFR mutation, ORR was 63.6%, DCR was 93.9%. The ORR was 4.0% and the DCR was 24.0% in the wild-type patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS with icotinib treatment in EGFR mutation patients was 10.5 months and 1.0 month in wild-type patients. The major adverse events were mild skin rash (30.6% and diarrhea (16.1%. Conclusion Monotherapy with icotinib hydrochloride is effective and tolerable for the advanced NSCLC EGFR mutation patients.

  13. Identifying Early Diagnosis Markers of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Shuang

    2004-01-01

    .... We reasoned that the success and accuracy in early diagnosis of prostate cancer may be significantly improved if a panel of prostate cancer-specific markers can be identified and used in combination...

  14. Neuropilin-1 expression identifies a subset of regulatory T cells in human lymph nodes that is modulated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Monego, Giovanni; Peri, Laura; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Fanfani, Francesco; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We examined the phenotype and function of CD4+ T cells expressing the semaphorin III receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) in human lymph nodes and peripheral blood. In lymph nodes, Nrp1 identified a small regulatory CD4+ CD25(high) T-cell subpopulation (Nrp1+ Treg) that expressed higher levels of Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) message and protein than Nrp1- Treg, and various molecular markers of activated Treg, i.e. CD45RO, human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR). Similarly to conventional Treg, Nrp1+ Treg proliferated poorly in vitro, and exerted contact-dependent in vitro suppression of T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. However, Nrp1+ Treg were more efficient than Nrp1- Treg at inducing suppression. Nrp1 was also expressed on a small subpopulation of CD25(int) and CD25- CD4+ T cells that expressed more Foxp3, CD45RO, HLA-DR and GITR than their Nrp1- counterparts. In contrast, in peripheral blood Nrp1 identified a minor CD4+ T-cell subset that did not display the phenotypic features of Treg lacking Foxp3 expression and marginally expressing CD25. Hence, the function of Nrp1+ CD4+ T cells seemingly depends on their anatomical location. In a previous report, we proposed that Treg may curb the anti-tumour T-cell response in cervical cancer. We show here that Treg and Nrp1+ Treg levels dropped in the tumour-draining lymph nodes of patients with cervical cancer following preoperative chemoradiotherapy in a direct relationship with the reduction of tumour mass, suggesting that suppressor cell elimination facilitated the generation of T cells mediating the destruction of the neoplastic cells left behind after cytotoxic therapy.

  15. Phosphorylation of Sox2 at Threonine 116 is a Potential Marker to Identify a Subset of Breast Cancer Cells with High Tumorigenecity and Stem-Like Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Gopal, Keshav; Wu, Chengsheng; Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Chow, Alexandra; Wu, Fang; Wang, Peng; Ye, Xiaoxia; Bigras, Gilbert; Lai, Raymond

    2018-02-03

    We have previously identified a novel phenotypic dichotomy in breast cancer (BC) based on the response to a SRR2 (Sox2 regulatory region 2) reporter, with reporter responsive (RR) cells being more tumorigenic/stem-like than reporter unresponsive (RU) cells. Since the expression level of Sox2 is comparable between the two cell subsets, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Sox2 contribute to their differential reporter response and phenotypic differences. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found Sox2 to be phosphorylated in RR but not RU cells. Threonine 116 is an important phosphorylation site, since transfection of the T116A mutant into RR cells significantly decreased the SRR2 reporter luciferase activity and the RR-associated phenotype. Oxidative stress-induced conversion of RU into RR cells was accompanied by Sox2 phosphorylation at T116 and increased Sox2-DNA binding. In a cohort of BC, we found significant correlations between the proportion of tumor cells immuno-reactive with anti-phosphorylated Sox2T116 and a high tumor grade (p = 0.006), vascular invasion (p = 0.001) and estrogen receptor expression (p = 0.032). In conclusion, our data suggests that phosphorylation of Sox2T116 contributes to the tumorigenic/stem-like features in RR cells. Detection of phospho-Sox2T116 may be useful in identifying a small subset of tumor cells carrying stem-like/tumorigenic features in BC.

  16. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  17. Initial basal cell carcinomas diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention are smaller than those identified by the conventional medical referral system*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakiyama, Thweicyka Pinheiro; França, Maria Laura Marconi; Carvalho, Larissa Pierri; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante; Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Basal cell carcinoma is the malignant tumor most often diagnosed in the National Campaign for Skin Cancer Prevention (NCSCP). Little is known about the profile of these lesions compared to the profile of lesions diagnosed by conventional routes of public dermatological care. OBJECTIVE To identify if basal cell carcinomas identified in prevention campaigns and referred to surgery are smaller than those routinely removed in a same medical institution. METHODS Cross-sectional study including tumors routed from 2011-2014 campaigns and 84 anatomopathological reports of outpatients. RESULTS The campaigns identified 223 individuals with suspicious lesions among 2,531 examinations (9%), with 116 basal cell carcinomas removed. Anatomopathological examinations revealed that the primary lesions identified in the national campaigns were smaller than those referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care (28 [13-50] x 38 [20-113] mm2, p <0.01). On the other hand, after a mean follow-up of 15.6 ± 10.3 months, 31% of cases identified in campaigns showed new basal cell carcinoma lesions. STUDY LIMITATIONS Retrospective study and inaccuracies in the measurements of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS The NCSCP promotes an earlier treatment of basal cell carcinomas compared to patients referred to surgery by the conventional routes of public health care, which can result in lower morbidity rates and better prognosis. PMID:28225952

  18. Csa-19, a radiation-responsive human gene, identified by an unbiased two-gel cDNA library screening method in human cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Meltzer, S. J.; Han, L. H.; Zhang, X. F.; Shi, Z. M.; Harrison, G. H.; Abraham, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was used to identify candidate genes whose expression is altered in cancer cells by ionizing radiation. Transcriptional induction of randomly selected genes in control versus irradiated human HL60 cells was compared. Among several complementary DNA (cDNA) clones recovered by this approach, one cDNA clone (CL68-5) was downregulated in X-irradiated HL60 cells but unaffected by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, forskolin, or cyclosporin-A. DNA sequencing of the CL68-5 cDNA revealed 100% nucleotide sequence homology to the reported human Csa-19 gene. Northern blot analysis of RNA from control and irradiated cells revealed the expression of a single 0.7-kilobase (kb) messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript. This 0.7-kb Csa-19 mRNA transcript was also expressed in a variety of human adult and corresponding fetal normal tissues. Moreover, when the effect of X- or fission neutron-irradiation on Csa-19 mRNA was compared in cultured human cells differing in p53 gene status (p53-/- versus p53+/+), downregulation of Csa-19 by X-rays or fission neutrons was similar in p53-wild type and p53-null cell lines. Our results provide the first known example of a radiation-responsive gene in human cancer cells whose expression is not associated with p53, adenylate cyclase or protein kinase C.

  19. Galectin-3 and Beclin1/Atg6 genes in human cancers: using cDNA tissue panel, qRT-PCR, and logistic regression model to identify cancer cell biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halliday A Idikio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer biomarkers are sought to support cancer diagnosis, predict cancer patient response to treatment and survival. Identifying reliable biomarkers for predicting cancer treatment response needs understanding of all aspects of cancer cell death and survival. Galectin-3 and Beclin1 are involved in two coordinated pathways of programmed cell death, apoptosis and autophagy and are linked to necroptosis/necrosis. The aim of the study was to quantify galectin-3 and Beclin1 mRNA in human cancer tissue cDNA panels and determine their utility as biomarkers of cancer cell survival. METHODS AND RESULTS: A panel of 96 cDNAs from eight (8 different normal and cancer tissue types were used for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR using ABI7900HT. Miner2.0, a web-based 4- and 3-parameter logistic regression software was used to derive individual well polymerase chain reaction efficiencies (E and cycle threshold (Ct values. Miner software derived formula was used to calculate mRNA levels and then fold changes. The ratios of cancer to normal tissue levels of galectin-3 and Beclin1 were calculated (using the mean for each tissue type. Relative mRNA expressions for galectin-3 were higher than for Beclin1 in all tissue (normal and cancer types. In cancer tissues, breast, kidney, thyroid and prostate had the highest galectin-3 mRNA levels compared to normal tissues. High levels of Beclin1 mRNA levels were in liver and prostate cancers when compared to normal tissues. Breast, kidney and thyroid cancers had high galectin-3 levels and low Beclin1 levels. CONCLUSION: Galectin-3 expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues support its reported roles in human cancer. Beclin1 expression pattern supports its roles in cancer cell survival and in treatment response. qRT-PCR analysis method used may enable high throughput studies to generate molecular biomarker sets for diagnosis and predicting cancer treatment response.

  20. A gene expression signature from human breast cancer cells with acquired hormone independence identifies MYC as a mediator of antiestrogen resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd W.; Balko, Justin M.; Ghazoui, Zara; Dunbier, Anita; Anderson, Helen; Dowsett, Mitch; González-Angulo, Ana M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Miller, William R.; Wu, Huiyun; Shyr, Yu; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although most patients with estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer initially respond to endocrine therapy, many ultimately develop resistance to antiestrogens. However, mechanisms of antiestrogen resistance and biomarkers predictive of such resistance are underdeveloped. Experimental Design We adapted four ER+ human breast cancer cell lines to grow in an estrogen-depleted medium. A gene signature of estrogen independence was developed by comparing expression profiles of long-term estrogen-deprived (LTED) cells to their parental counterparts. We evaluated the ability of the LTED signature to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor, and disease outcome following adjuvant tamoxifen. We utilized Gene Set Analysis (GSA) of LTED cell gene expression profiles and a loss-of-function approach to identify pathways causally associated with resistance to endocrine therapy. Results The LTED gene expression signature was predictive of high tumor cell proliferation following neoadjuvant therapy with anastrozole and letrozole, each in different patient cohorts. This signature was also predictive of poor recurrence-free survival in two studies of patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. Bioinformatic interrogation of expression profiles in LTED cells revealed a signature of MYC activation. The MYC activation signature and high MYC protein levels were both predictive of poor outcome following tamoxifen therapy. Finally, knockdown of MYC inhibited LTED cell growth. Conclusions A gene expression signature derived from ER+ breast cancer cells with acquired hormone independence predicted tumor response to aromatase inhibitors and associated with clinical markers of resistance to tamoxifen. In some cases, activation of the MYC pathway was associated with this resistance. PMID:21346144

  1. Characterising Castrate Tolerant Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ASHLEE KATE CLARK

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent disease in aging males. This thesis explores prostate cancer cells that escape current therapy and give rise to end-stage disease. Using sophisticated experimental approaches, this important cancer cell population was identified and characterised in human prostate cancer tissues.  Our discoveries will eventually lead to improved cancer treatments for men with prostate cancer.

  2. miRConnect: identifying effector genes of miRNAs and miRNA families in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjia Hua

    Full Text Available micro(miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of most mRNAs. They are powerful regulators of various differentiation stages, and the expression of genes that either negatively or positively correlate with expressed miRNAs is expected to hold information on the biological state of the cell and, hence, of the function of the expressed miRNAs. We have compared the large amount of available gene array data on the steady state system of the NCI60 cell lines to two different data sets containing information on the expression of 583 individual miRNAs. In addition, we have generated custom data sets containing expression information of 54 miRNA families sharing the same seed match. We have developed a novel strategy for correlating miRNAs with individual genes based on a summed Pearson Correlation Coefficient (sPCC that mimics an in silico titration experiment. By focusing on the genes that correlate with the expression of miRNAs without necessarily being direct targets of miRNAs, we have clustered miRNAs into different functional groups. This has resulted in the identification of three novel miRNAs that are linked to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT in addition to the known EMT regulators of the miR-200 miRNA family. In addition, an analysis of gene signatures associated with EMT, c-MYC activity, and ribosomal protein gene expression allowed us to assign different activities to each of the functional clusters of miRNAs. All correlation data are available via a web interface that allows investigators to identify genes whose expression correlates with the expression of single miRNAs or entire miRNA families. miRConnect.org will aid in identifying pathways regulated by miRNAs without requiring specific knowledge of miRNA targets.

  3. Stem cells and solid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart A C; Graham, Trevor A; Schier, Stefanie; Wright, Nicholas A; Alison, Malcolm R

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in our knowledge of stem cells found in tissues that can develop solid tumours. In particular, novel stem cell markers have been identified for the first time identifying multipotential cells: a required characteristic of a stem cell. The scarcity of cancer stem cells has been questioned. Current dogma states that they are rare, but novel research has suggested that this may not be the case. Here, we review the latest literature on stem cells, particularly cancer stem cells within solid tumours. We discuss current thinking on how stem cells develop into cancer stem cells and how they protect themselves from doing so and do they express unique markers that can be used to detect stem cells. We attempt to put into perspective these latest advances in stem cell biology and their potential for cancer therapy.

  4. Definition of a fluorescence in-situ hybridization score identifies high- and low-level FGFR1 amplification types in squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Heukamp, Lukas C; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Riesner, Katharina; Schmitz, Katja; Binot, Elke; Paggen, Ellen; Albus, Kerstin; Schulte, Wolfgang; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Schlesinger, Andreas; Ansén, Sascha; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Brockmann, Michael; Serke, Monika; Gerigk, Ulrich; Huss, Sebastian; Göke, Friederike; Perner, Sven; Hekmat, Khosro; Frank, Konrad F; Reiser, Marcel; Schnell, Roland; Bos, Marc; Mattonet, Christian; Sos, Martin; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Zander, Thomas; Buettner, Reinhard

    2012-11-01

    We recently reported fibroblast growth factor receptor-type 1 (FGFR1) amplification to be associated with therapeutically tractable FGFR1 dependency in squamous cell lung cancer. This makes FGFR1 a novel target for directed therapy in these tumors. To reproducibly identify patients for clinical studies, we developed a standardized reading and evaluation strategy for FGFR1 fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and propose evaluation criteria, describe different patterns of low- and high-level amplifications and report on the prevalence of FGFR1 amplifications in pulmonary carcinomas. A total of 420 lung cancer patients including 307 squamous carcinomas, 100 adenocarcinomas of the lung and 13 carcinomas of other types were analyzed for FGFR1 amplification using a dual color FISH. We found heterogeneous and different patterns of gene copy numbers. FGFR1 amplifications were observed in 20% of pulmonary squamous carcinomas but not in adenocarcinomas. High-level amplification (as defined by an FGFR1/centromer 8 (CEN8) ratio ≥2.0, or average number of FGFR1 signals per tumor cell nucleus ≥6, or the percentage of tumor cells containing ≥15 FGFR1 signals or large clusters ≥10%) was detected at a frequency of 16% and low-level amplification (as defined by ≥5 FGFR1 signals in ≥50% of tumor cells) at a frequency of 4%. We conclude that FGFR1 amplification is one of the most frequent therapeutically tractable genetic lesions in pulmonary carcinomas. Standardized reporting of FGFR1 amplification in squamous carcinomas of the lung will become increasingly important to correlate therapeutic responses with FGFR1 inhibitors in clinical studies. Thus, our reading and evaluation strategy might serve as a basis for identifying patients for ongoing and upcoming clinical trials.

  5. Discriminating isogenic cancer cells and identifying altered unsaturated fatty acid content as associated with metastasis status, using k-means clustering and partial least squares-discriminant analysis of Raman maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martin; Krafft, Christoph; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free, real-time diagnostic tool that shows great promise in identifying cell differences. We have evaluated the discriminatory power of Raman spectroscopy using a unique model system consisting of two isogenic cancer cell lines derived from the MDA-MB-435 cell line...

  6. Site-Specific Fucosylation Analysis Identifying Glycoproteins Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Using Tandem Affinity Enrichments of Intact Glycopeptides Followed by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianliang; Yang, Weiming; Hu, Yingwei; Höti, Naseruddin; Liu, Yang; Shah, Punit; Sun, Shisheng; Clark, David; Thomas, Stefani; Zhang, Hui

    2017-07-18

    Fucosylation (Fuc) of glycoproteins plays an important role in regulating protein function and has been associated with the development of several cancer types including prostate cancer (Pca). Therefore, the research of Fuc glycoproteins has attracted increasing attention recently in the analytical field. Herein, a strategy based on lectin affinity enrichments of intact glycopeptides followed by mass spectrometry has been established to evaluate the specificities of various Fuc-binding lectins for glycosite-specific Fuc analysis of nonaggressive (NAG) and aggressive (AG) Pca cell lines. The enrichment specificities of Fuc glycopeptides using lectins (LCA, PSA, AAL, LTL, UEA I, and AOL) and MAX extraction cartridges alone, or in tandem, were evaluated. Our results showed that the use of lectin enrichment significantly increased the ratio of fucosylated glycopeptides to total glycopeptides compared to MAX enrichment. Furthermore, tandem use of lectin followed by MAX increased the number of identifications of Fuc glycopeptides compared to using lectin enrichment alone. LCA, PSA, and AOL showed stronger binding capacity than AAL, LTL, and UEA I. Also, LCA and PSA bound specifically to core Fuc, whereas AOL, AAL, and UEA I showed binding to both core Fuc and branch Fuc. The optimized enrichment method with tandem enrichment of LCA followed by MAX (LCA-MAX) was then applied to examine the Fuc glycoproteomes in two NAG and two AG Pca cell lines. In total, 973 intact Fuc glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 252 Fuc proteins by using the tandem-mass-tags (TMT) labeling and nanoliquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) analysis. Further data analysis revealed that 51 Fuc glycopeptides were overexpressed more than 2-fold in AG cell lines compared to NAG cells. The analysis of protein core fucosylation has great potential for aiding our understanding of invasive activity of AG Pca and may lead to the development of diagnostic approaches for AG Pca.

  7. Proteomic profiling identified multiple short-lived members of the central proteome as the direct targets of the addicted oncogenes in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Tonggang; Zhang, Wei; Luan, Yun; Kong, Feng; Xu, Dawei; Cheng, Guanghui; Wang, Yunshan

    2014-01-01

    "Oncogene addiction" is an unexplained phenomenon in the area of cancer targeted therapy. In this study, we have tested a hypothesis that rapid apoptotic response of cancer cells following acute inhibition of the addicted oncogenes is because of loss of multiple short-lived proteins whose activity normally maintain cell survival by blocking caspase activation directly or indirectly. It was shown that rapid apoptotic response or acute apoptosis could be induced in both A431 and MiaPaCa-2 cells, and quick down-regulation of 17 proteins, which were all members of the central proteome of human cells, was found to be associated with the onset of acute apoptosis. Knockdown of PSMD11 could partially promote the occurrence of acute apoptosis in both MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. These findings indicate that maintaining the stability of central proteome may be a primary mechanism for addicted oncogenes to maintain the survival of cancer cells through various signaling pathways, and quick loss of some of the short-lived members of the central proteome may be the direct reason for the rapid apoptotic response or acute apoptosis following acute inhibition of the addicted oncogenes in cancer cells. These findings we have presented can help us better understand the phenomenon of oncogene-addiction and may have important implications for the targeted therapy of cancer.

  8. Secretomic Analysis Identifies Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (A1AT) as a Required Protein in Cancer Cell Migration, Invasion, and Pericellular Fibronectin Assembly for Facilitating Lung Colonization of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Lee, Shu-Hui; Liao, I-Chuang; Huang, Shin-Huei; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis is a major obstacle that must be overcome for the successful treatment of lung cancer. Proteins secreted by cancer cells may facilitate the progression of metastasis, particularly within the phases of migration and invasion. To discover metastasis-promoting secretory proteins within cancer cells, we used the label-free quantitative proteomics approach and compared the secretomes from the lung adenocarcinoma cell lines CL1-0 and CL1-5, which exhibit low and high metastatic properties, respectively. By employing quantitative analyses, we identified 660 proteins, 68 of which were considered to be expressed at different levels between the two cell lines. High levels of A1AT were secreted by CL1-5, and the roles of A1AT in the influence of lung adenocarcinoma metastasis were investigated. Molecular and pathological confirmation demonstrated that altered expression of A1AT correlates with the metastatic potential of lung adenocarcinoma. The migration and invasion properties of CL1-5 cells were significantly diminished by reducing the expression and secretion of their A1AT proteins. Conversely, the migration and invasion properties of CL1-0 cells were significantly increased through the overexpression and secretion of A1AT proteins. Furthermore, the assembly levels of the metastasis-promoting pericellular fibronectin (FN1), which facilitates colonization of lung capillary endothelia by adhering to the cell surface receptor dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), were higher on the surfaces of suspended CL1-5 cells than on those of the CL1-0 cells. This discovery reflects previous findings in breast cancer. In line with this finding, FN1 assembly and the lung colonization of suspended CL1-5 cells were inhibited when endogenous A1AT protein was knocked down using siRNA. The major thrust of this study is to demonstrate the effects of coupling the label-free proteomics strategy with the secretomes of cancer cells that differentially exhibit invasive and metastatic

  9. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Dyall

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis is becoming more widely accepted as a model for carcinogenesis. Tumours are heterogeneous both at the molecular and cellular level, containing a small population of cells that possess highly tumourigenic “stem-cell” properties. Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumour-initiating cells, have the ability to self-renew, generate xenografts reminiscent of the primary tumour that they were derived from, and are chemoresistant. The characterisation of the CSC population within a tumour that drives its growth could provide novel target therapeutics against these cells specifically, eradicating the cancer completely. There have been several reports describing the isolation of putative cancer stem cell populations in several cancers; however, no defined set of markers has been identified that conclusively characterises “stem-like” cancer cells. This paper highlights the current experimental approaches that have been used in the field and discusses their limitations, with specific emphasis on the identification and characterisation of the CSC population in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of recurrently deregulated genes across multiple cancers identifies new pan-cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Tanaka, Yuji; Kawaji, Hideya

    2016-01-01

    Genes that are commonly deregulated in cancer are clinically attractive as candidate pan-diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. To globally identify such targets, we compared Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) profiles from 225 different cancer cell lines and 339 corresponding primary cell...... RNAs which are upregulated in cancer, defining promoters which overlap with repetitive elements (especially SINE/Alu and LTR/ERV1 elements) that are often upregulated in cancer. Lastly, we documented for the first time upregulation of multiple copies of the REP522 interspersed repeat in cancer. Overall...

  11. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoma Small cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Secondhand smoke and lung cancer Normal lungs and alveoli Respiratory system Smoking hazards Bronchoscope References Horn L, Eisenberg R, ...

  12. A Novel High Content Imaging-Based Screen Identifies the Anti-Helminthic Niclosamide as an Inhibitor of Lysosome Anterograde Trafficking and Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena L Circu

    Full Text Available Lysosome trafficking plays a significant role in tumor invasion, a key event for the development of metastasis. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that the anterograde (outward movement of lysosomes to the cell surface in response to certain tumor microenvironment stimulus, such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF or acidic extracellular pH (pHe, increases cathepsin B secretion and tumor cell invasion. Anterograde lysosome trafficking depends on sodium-proton exchanger activity and can be reversed by blocking these ion pumps with Troglitazone or EIPA. Since these drugs cannot be advanced into the clinic due to toxicity, we have designed a high-content assay to discover drugs that block peripheral lysosome trafficking with the goal of identifying novel drugs that inhibit tumor cell invasion. An automated high-content imaging system (Cellomics was used to measure the position of lysosomes relative to the nucleus. Among a total of 2210 repurposed and natural product drugs screened, 18 "hits" were identified. One of the compounds identified as an anterograde lysosome trafficking inhibitor was niclosamide, a marketed human anti-helminthic drug. Further studies revealed that niclosamide blocked acidic pHe, HGF, and epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced anterograde lysosome redistribution, protease secretion, motility, and invasion of DU145 castrate resistant prostate cancer cells at clinically relevant concentrations. In an effort to identify the mechanism by which niclosamide prevented anterograde lysosome movement, we found that this drug exhibited no significant effect on the level of ATP, microtubules or actin filaments, and had minimal effect on the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Niclosamide collapsed intralysosomal pH without disruption of the lysosome membrane, while bafilomycin, an agent that impairs lysosome acidification, was also found to induce JLA in our model. Taken together, these data suggest that niclosamide promotes

  13. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of exposure ...

  14. Molecular cloning, genomic characterization and over-expression of a novel gene, XRRA1, identified from human colorectal cancer cell HCT116Clone2_XRR and macaque testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashimoto Katsuyuki

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of our investigation into the genetic basis of tumor cell radioresponse, we have isolated several clones with a wide range of responses to X-radiation (XR from an unirradiated human colorectal tumor cell line, HCT116. Using human cDNA microarrays, we recently identified a novel gene that was down-regulated by two-fold in an XR-resistant cell clone, HCT116Clone2_XRR. We have named this gene as X-ray radiation resistance associated 1 (XRRA1 (GenBank BK000541. Here, we present the first report on the molecular cloning, genomic characterization and over-expression of the XRRA1 gene. Results We found that XRRA1 was expressed predominantly in testis of both human and macaque. cDNA microarray analysis showed three-fold higher expression of XRRA1 in macaque testis relative to other tissues. We further cloned the macaque XRRA1 cDNA (GenBank AB072776 and a human XRRA1 splice variant from HCT116Clone2_XRR (GenBank AY163836. In silico analysis revealed the full-length human XRRA1, mouse, rat and bovine Xrra1 cDNAs. The XRRA1 gene comprises 11 exons and spans 64 kb on chromosome 11q13.3. Human and macaque cDNAs share 96% homology. Human XRRA1 cDNA is 1987 nt long and encodes a protein of 559 aa. XRRA1 protein is highly conserved in human, macaque, mouse, rat, pig, and bovine. GFP-XRRA1 fusion protein was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of HCT116 clones and COS-7 cells. Interestingly, we found evidence that COS-7 cells which over-expressed XRRA1 lacked Ku86 (Ku80, XRCC5, a non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair molecule, in the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed differential expression of XRRA1 after XR in HCT116 clones manifesting significantly different XR responses. Further, we found that XRRA1 was expressed in most tumor cell types. Surprisingly, mouse Xrra1 was detected in mouse embryonic stem cells R1. Conclusions Both XRRA1 cDNA and protein are highly conserved among mammals, suggesting that XRRA1 may have

  15. Expression patterns of DLK1 and INSL3 identify stages of Leydig cell differentiation during normal development and in testicular pathologies, including testicular cancer and Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, G; Nielsen, J E; Maroun, L L

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the differentiation stage of human testicular interstitial cells, in particular Leydig cells (LC), within micronodules found in patients with infertility, testicular cancer and Klinefelter syndrome? SUMMARY ANSWER: The Leydig- and peritubular-cell populations in testes......, and in the majority of LCs, it was mutually exclusive of DLK1. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The number of samples was relatively small and no true normal adult controls were available. True stereology was not used for LC counting, instead LCs were counted in three fields of 0.5 µm(2) surface for each sample...... in adult men with testicular pathologies including testis cancer and Klinefelter syndrome. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: This work was funded by Rigshospitalet's research funds, the Danish Cancer Society and Kirsten and Freddy Johansen's foundation. The authors have no conflicts of interest....

  16. A kinase inhibitor screen identifies Mcl-1 and Aurora kinase A as novel treatment targets in antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, S; Pedersen, A M; Thomsen, M B H

    2015-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major problem in breast cancer treatment. Therefore, the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for antiestrogen resistance is crucial. In this study, we performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive MCF-7 cells and a panel of MCF-7-derived...... and JNJ-7706621 was also found in T47D-derived tamoxifen-resistant cell lines, pointing at Mcl-1 and Aurora kinase A as potential treatment targets. In addition, tumor samples from 244 estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen showed that higher expression level...

  17. Multi-parametric profiling of renal cell, colorectal, and ovarian cancer identifies tumour-type-specific stroma phenotypes and a novel vascular biomarker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corvigno, Sara; Frödin, Magnus; Wisman, G Bea A; Nijman, Hans W; Van der Zee, Ate Gj; Jirström, Karin; Nodin, Björn; Hrynchyk, Ina; Edler, David; Ragnhammar, Peter; Johansson, Martin; Dahlstrand, Hanna; Mezheyeuski, Artur; Östman, Arne

    A novel set of integrated procedures for quantification of fibroblast-rich stroma and vascular characteristics has recently been presented allowing discovery of novel perivascular and stromal biomarkers in colorectal, renal cell, and ovarian cancer. In the present study, data obtained through these

  18. Computational Analysis of mRNA Expression Profiles Identifies the ITG Family and PIK3R3 as Crucial Genes for Regulating Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhontip Klahan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer that does not express estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (Her2/neu. TNBC has worse clinical outcomes than other breast cancer subtypes. However, the key molecules and mechanisms of TNBC migration remain unclear. In this study, we compared two normalized microarray datasets from GEO database between Asian (GSE33926 and non-Asian populations (GSE46581 to determine the molecules and common pathways in TNBC migration. We demonstrated that 16 genes in non-Asian samples and 9 genes in Asian samples are related to TNBC migration. In addition, our analytic results showed that 4 genes, PIK3R3, ITGB1, ITGAL, and ITGA6, were involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Our results indicated potential genes that link to TNBC migration. This study may help identify novel therapeutic targets for drug development in cancer therapy.

  19. Bonafide Targets of Deregulated microRNAs in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer as Tool to Identify Novel Therapeutic Targets: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Monica; Landi, Stefano; Gemignani, Federica

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an aggressive neoplasm with a poor survival and novel therapies are urgently needed. The study of deregulated micro- RNAs (dereg-miRs) could constitute a strategy helping to detect specific genes playing a relevant role in the disease. Thus, the oncoproteins encoded by these genes could be exploited as novel therapeutic targets to be inhibited by small molecules, aptamers, or monoclonal antibodies. The present review is focused on candidate genes having convincing biological evidences to be both bona fide targets for dereg-miRs and playing a role in NSCLC progression. These genes were evaluated according to the molecular pathway they belong. Moreover, in the attempt to provide an even broader list of candidate therapeutic targets for NSCLC, the full list of genes was analyzed using the online tool Interactome DB. Among the identified targets, some of them belong to p53 or MAP kinase signaling pathways, and others include caspases, MCL1, and BCL2L2 (playing a role in apoptosis), ZEB1, ZEB2, and USP25 (epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition), EZH2, SOX9, and HOXA5 (differentiation), Paxillin, LIMK1 and MTDH (cytoskeleton remodeling), and HDGF (angiogenesis). In addition, other targets, such as TIMP-2, PIM-1, and components of the IGF-signaling pathways were suggested following the interactome analysis. Studies on dereg-miRs helped to identify a set of genes whose encoded proteins could constitute candidates for future therapeutic approaches. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Drug repurposing screen identifies lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill breast cancer associated gene-1 mutant and wild type breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Chisholm, Cristine; Xu, Xiaoling; Lahusen, Tyler J; Li, Cuiling; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Thomas, Craig J; Xia, Menghang; Deng, Chuxia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a devastating disease that results in approximately 40,000 deaths each year in the USA. Current drug screening and chemopreventatitive methods are suboptimal, due in part to the poor specificity of compounds for cancer cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor (PARPi)-mediated therapy is a promising approach for familial breast cancers caused by mutations of breast cancer-associated gene-1 and -2 (BRCA1/2), yet drug resistance frequently occurs duri...

  1. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  2. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  3. Basal cell cancer (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure ... is required to watch for new sites of basal cell cancer.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells and the Ontogeny of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, Craig D.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world today and is poised to claim approximately 1 billion lives during the 21st century. A major challenge in treating this and other cancers is the intrinsic resistance to conventional therapies demonstrated by the stem/progenitor cell that is responsible for the sustained growth, survival, and invasion of the tumor. Identifying these stem cells in lung cancer and defining the biologic processes necessary for their existence is paramou...

  5. Prostate cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate gland formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative androgen receptor-negative (AR(-)) status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade therapy. The androgen-regulated gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG could be used to clarify both the cells of origin and the evolution of prostate cancer cells. In this review, we show that the hypothesis that distinct subtypes of cancer result from abnormalities within specific cell types-the stem cell theory of cancer-may instigate a major paradigm shift in cancer research and therapy. Ultimately, the stem cell theory of cancers will affect how we practice clinical oncology: our diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy of prostate and other cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies of never-smoking females on the prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Soo; Kang, Hyo-Gyoung; Choi, Jin Eun; Do, Sook Kyung; Lee, Won Kee; Choi, Sun Ha; Lee, So Yeon; Lee, Shin Yup; Lee, Jaehee; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Seok, Yangki; Lee, Eungbae; Kim, Moon Soo; Lee, Jong Mog; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Young-Chul; Cho, Sukki; Jheon, Sanghoon; Jung, Chi Young; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Min Ki; Park, Jae Yong

    2017-04-01

    A number of genome-wide association studies have reported several variants that influence the risk of lung cancer in never-smoking females. We evaluated the impact of these variants on survival outcome in never-smoking females with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In total, 510 never-smoking females with NSCLC who underwent curative surgery were enrolled. Eleven variants associated with lung cancer susceptibility in never-smoking females were genotyped and their associations with survival outcome were analyzed. Among these 11 variants, TP63 rs7631358 and CSF1R rs10079250 affected survival outcomes. TP63 rs7631358 G > A was associated with a relatively worse overall survival (under a dominant model; hazard ratio = 2.31, 95% confidence interval = 1.18-4.52, P = 0.01). CSF1R rs10079250 A > G was associated with a relatively better disease-free survival (under a codominant model; hazard ratio = 0.70, 95% confidence interval = 0.53-0.93, P = 0.01). These results suggest that TP63 rs7631358 G > A and CSF1R rs10079250 A > G may affect the prognosis of NSCLC in never-smoking females, as well as the risk of lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipid Biomarkers Identified for Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive cancer of the liver with poor prognosis and growing incidence in developed countries. Pathology and genetic profiles of HCC are heterogeneous, suggesting that it can begin growing in different cell types. Although human tumors such as HCC have been profiled in-depth by genomics-based studies, not much is known about their overall metabolite modifications and how these changes can form a network that leads to aggressive disease and poor outcome.

  8. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Beesley, Jonathan; Hui, Shirley; Kar, Siddhartha; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Glubb, Dylan; Rostamianfar, Asha; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Wang, Zhaoming; Allen, Jamie; Keeman, Renske; Eilber, Ursula; French, Juliet D; Qing Chen, Xiao; Fachal, Laura; McCue, Karen; McCart Reed, Amy E; Ghoussaini, Maya; Carroll, Jason S; Jiang, Xia; Finucane, Hilary; Adams, Marcia; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arndt, Volker; Aronson, Kristan J; Arun, Banu; Auer, Paul L; Bacot, François; Barrdahl, Myrto; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brock, Ian W; Broeks, Annegien; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brucker, Sara Y; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butterbach, Katja; Cai, Qiuyin; Cai, Hui; Caldés, Trinidad; Canzian, Federico; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, Jose E; Chan, Tsun L; David Cheng, Ting-Yuan; Seng Chia, Kee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Christiansen, Hans; Clarke, Christine L; Collée, Margriet; Conroy, Don M; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Cox, David G; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Devilee, Peter; Doheny, Kimberly F; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Eccles, Diana M; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, A Heather; Ellberg, Carolina; Elvira, Mingajeva; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fritschi, Lin; Gaborieau, Valerie; Gabrielson, Marike; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe I; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A; Håkansson, Niclas; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Hartman, Mikael; Hein, Alexander; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Ho, Dona N; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Huang, Guanmengqian; Humphreys, Keith; Ishiguro, Junko; Ito, Hidemi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Iwata, Hiroji; Jakubowska, Anna; Janni, Wolfgang; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kasuga, Yoshio; Kerin, Michael J; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Krüger, Ute; Kwong, Ava; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Neng Lee, Chuen; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lux, Michael P; Ma, Edmond S K; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolin, Sara; Mariapun, Shivaani; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; McKay, James; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menon, Usha; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Nicola; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Sune F; Noh, Dong-Young; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Norman, Aaron; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olsson, Håkan; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Pankratz, V Shane; Park, Sue K; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Lloyd, Rachel; Perez, Jose I A; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofyeva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rennert, Gadi; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Ruebner, Matthias; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Scott, Rodney J; Scott, Christopher; Seal, Sheila; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Grace; Sherman, Mark E; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Smeets, Ann; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Stegmaier, Christa; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stone, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tamimi, Rulla; Taylor, Jack A; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo H; Beth Terry, Mary; Tessier, Daniel C; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Thöne, Kathrin; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Ursin, Giske; Untch, Michael; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J; Van Den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Kolk, Lizet; van der Luijt, Rob B; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weinberg, Clarice R; Wendt, Camilla; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H; Xia, Lucy; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Xiaohong R; Har Yip, Cheng; Yoo, Keun-Young; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Lakhani, Sunil R; Antoniou, Antonis C; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Amos, Christopher I; Couch, Fergus J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hall, Per; Hunter, David J; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Bader, Gary D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F

    2017-11-02

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer risk at P < 5 × 10-8. The majority of credible risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these loci fall in distal regulatory elements, and by integrating in silico data to predict target genes in breast cells at each locus, we demonstrate a strong overlap between candidate target genes and somatic driver genes in breast tumours. We also find that heritability of breast cancer due to all single-nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory features was 2-5-fold enriched relative to the genome-wide average, with strong enrichment for particular transcription factor binding sites. These results provide further insight into genetic susceptibility to breast cancer and will improve the use of genetic risk scores for individualized screening and prevention.

  9. Heterozygous deletion at the RLN1 locus in a family with testicular germ cell cancer identified by integrating copy number variation data with phenome and interactome information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edsgärd, D; Scheel, M; Hansen, N T

    2011-01-01

    To search for disease-related copy number variations (CNVs) in families with a high frequency of germ cell tumours (GCT), we analysed 16 individuals from four families by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and applied an integrative systems biology algorithm that prioritizes risk...... GCT patients and 200 healthy controls. Observed CNV frequencies of 1.9% among cases and 1.5% amongst controls were not significantly different and this was further confirmed by CNV data extracted from a genome-wide analysis of 189 cases and 380 controls, where similar frequencies of 2.2% were observed....... Collectively, the findings show that a heterozygous loss at the RLN1 locus is not a genetic factor mediating high population-wide risk for testicular germ cell tumour, but do not exclude a contribution of this aberration in some cases of cancer. The preliminary expression data suggest a possible role...

  10. Heterozygous deletion at the RLN1 locus in a family with testicular germ cell cancer identified by integrating copy number variation data with phenome and interactome information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edsgard, Stefan Daniel; Scheel, M.; Hansen, Niclas Tue

    2011-01-01

    To search for disease‐related copy number variations (CNVs) in families with a high frequency of germ cell tumours (GCT), we analysed 16 individuals from four families by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and applied an integrative systems biology algorithm that prioritizes risk...... GCT patients and 200 healthy controls. Observed CNV frequencies of 1.9% among cases and 1.5% amongst controls were not significantly different and this was further confirmed by CNV data extracted from a genome‐wide analysis of 189 cases and 380 controls, where similar frequencies of 2.2% were observed...... and spermatids. Collectively, the findings show that a heterozygous loss at the RLN1 locus is not a genetic factor mediating high population‐wide risk for testicular germ cell tumour, but do not exclude a contribution of this aberration in some cases of cancer. The preliminary expression data suggest a possible...

  11. Hurthle Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breath Hurthle cell cancer Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  12. Basal cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell skin cancer almost never spreads. If it is left untreated, it may spread into surrounding areas and nearby tissues and bone. In these cases, treatment can injure the appearance of the skin.

  13. Combined Use of Gene Expression Modeling and siRNA Screening Identifies Genes and Pathways Which Enhance the Activity of Cisplatin When Added at No Effect Levels to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ada W Y; Hung, Stacy S; Backstrom, Ian; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Poon, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Segovia, Romulo; Rawji, Jenna; Qadir, Mohammed A; Aparicio, Samuel; Stirling, Peter C; Steidl, Christian; Bally, Marcel B

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based combination chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While cisplatin is effective, its use is not curative and resistance often emerges. As a consequence of microenvironmental heterogeneity, many tumour cells are exposed to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. Further, genomic heterogeneity and unique tumor cell sub-populations with reduced sensitivities to cisplatin play a role in its effectiveness within a site of tumor growth. Being exposed to sub-lethal doses will induce changes in gene expression that contribute to the tumour cell's ability to survive and eventually contribute to the selective pressures leading to cisplatin resistance. Such changes in gene expression, therefore, may contribute to cytoprotective mechanisms. Here, we report on studies designed to uncover how tumour cells respond to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. A microarray study revealed changes in gene expressions that occurred when A549 cells were exposed to a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of cisplatin (e.g. the IC10). These data were integrated with results from a genome-wide siRNA screen looking for novel therapeutic targets that when inhibited transformed a NOEL of cisplatin into one that induced significant increases in lethality. Pathway analyses were performed to identify pathways that could be targeted to enhance cisplatin activity. We found that over 100 genes were differentially expressed when A549 cells were exposed to a NOEL of cisplatin. Pathways associated with apoptosis and DNA repair were activated. The siRNA screen revealed the importance of the hedgehog, cell cycle regulation, and insulin action pathways in A549 cell survival and response to cisplatin treatment. Results from both datasets suggest that RRM2B, CABYR, ALDH3A1, and FHL2 could be further explored as cisplatin-enhancing gene targets. Finally, pathways involved in repairing double-strand DNA breaks and INO80 chromatin remodeling were enriched in both

  14. Analyses in human urothelial cells identify methylation of miR-152, miR-200b and miR-10a genes as candidate bladder cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Christina U; Bryk, Oleksandr; Meier, Swetlana; Lang, Kerstin; Rozynek, Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Käfferlein, Heiko U

    2013-08-16

    Urinary miRNAs are discussed as potential biomarkers for bladder cancer. The majority of miRNAs, however, are downregulated, making it difficult to utilize reduced miRNA signals as reliable diagnostic tools. Because the downregulation of miRNAs is frequently associated with hypermethylation of the respective regulative sequences, we studied whether DNA hypermethylation might serve as an improved diagnostic tool compared to measuring downregulated miRNAs. miRNA expression arrays and individual qPCR were used to identify and confirm miRNAs that were downregulated in malignant urothelial cells (RT4, 5637 and J82) when compared to primary, non-malignant urothelial cells (HUEPC). DNA methylation was determined by customized PCR-arrays subsequent to methylation-sensitive DNA-restriction and by mass spectrometry. miRNA expression and DNA methylation were determined in untreated cells and in cultures treated with the demethylating agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine. miR-200b, miR-152 and miR-10a displayed differential expression and methylation among untreated cancer cell lines. In addition, reduced miRNA expression of miR-200b, miR-152, and miR-10a was associated with increased DNA methylation in malignant cells versus HUEPC. Finally, the demethylation approach revealed a causal relationship between both parameters for miR-152 in 5637 and also suggests a causal connection of both parameters for miR-200b in J82 and miR-10a in 5637. In conclusion, our studies in multiple bladder cancer cell lines and primary non-malignant urothelial cells suggest that hypermethylation of miR-152, miR-10a and miR-200b regulative DNA sequences might serve as epigenetic bladder cancer biomarkers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  16. TCGA study identifies genomic features of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that will aid in subclassification of the disease and may help target therapies that are most appropriate for each patient.

  17. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microarray profile of circular RNAs identifies hsa_circ_0014130 as a new circular RNA biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoyan; Zeng, Xiaoli; Ding, Ting; Guo, Lin; Li, Yulong; Ou, Songlei; Yuan, Hui

    2018-02-13

    Accumulating evidence has revealed that aberrant Circular RNAs (circRNAs) expression plays important roles in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. However, their role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains unclear. In this study, we first used circRNA microarrays to screen for tumour-specific circRNA candidates in between NSCLC (n = 3) and adjacent lung (n = 3) tissue. Among the circRNA expression profile, two circRNAs (hsa_circ_0014130 and hsa_circ_0016760) were selected for validation in ten pairs of NSCLC and adjacent non-cancerous tissues by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Only hsa_circ_0014130 exhibited significantly overexpressed in NSCLC tissues (P < 0.001), which were further confirmed in another 36 matched tissue samples using qRT-PCR. Hsa_circ_0014130 expression significantly correlated with TNM stage (P = 0.001) and lymphatic metastasis (P = 0.004). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.878 (95% confidence interval = 0.804-0.951; P < 0.001), which showed good diagnostic potential. Bioinformatics platforms predicted that hsa_circ_0014130 might interact with five miRNAs and their corresponding mRNAs. Gene oncology analysis and pathway analysis revealed that hsa_circ_0014130 could participate in NSCLC development. In summary, our findings indicated that hsa_circ_0014130 could be used as a potential NSCLC biomarker and might be closely related to the carcinogenesis of NSCLC.

  19. Drosophila Cancer Models Identify Functional Differences between Ret Fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Levinson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We generated and compared Drosophila models of RET fusions CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET. Both RET fusions directed cells to migrate, delaminate, and undergo EMT, and both resulted in lethality when broadly expressed. In all phenotypes examined, NCOA4-RET was more severe than CCDC6-RET, mirroring their effects on patients. A functional screen against the Drosophila kinome and a library of cancer drugs found that CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET acted through different signaling networks and displayed distinct drug sensitivities. Combining data from the kinome and drug screens identified the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 plus the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib as a synergistic drug combination that is specific for NCOA4-RET. Our work emphasizes the importance of identifying and tailoring a patient’s treatment to their specific RET fusion isoform and identifies a multi-targeted therapy that may prove effective against tumors containing the NCOA4-RET fusion.

  20. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  1. Identifying DNA Methylation Features that Underlie Prostate Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Profiles Primary Aim #1: Determine if methylation profiles differ by race/ancestry Primary Aim #2: Identify ethnicity-specific markers of prostate...cancer Primary Aim #3: Identify methylation Quantitative Trait Loci In the U.S., there are pronounced racial disparities in prostate cancer incidence...vary by ethnicity and to identify ethnicity-specific methylation features of prostate cancer that could contribute the racial disparities that exist in

  2. Breast cancer circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Joao Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastasization of breast cancer involves various mechanisms responsible for progression from invasive lesion to dissemination in distant organs. Regional lymph node metastasization was considered an initial step in this process, but it is now recognized that hematogenous dissemination is a deviation from lymphatic circulation. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC is an aim in several oncology areas. For this purpose, several techniques have been used to detect CTC, including the use of antibodies and techniques with nucleic acids. This study reviews the published studies considering the detection of breast cancer CTC. There are focused the difficulties in identifying a CTC in a heterogeneous population, the handling of the sample, criteria of positivity, analytical techniques, and specific markers. There are systematized various specific markers of breast cancer cells also the problems with false positive results. Finally, we hypothesize clinical applications either as a prognostic marker or as a therapeutic response monitor.

  3. Identifying novel protein complexes in cancer cells using epitope-tagging of endogenous human genes and affinity-purification mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Hao, Yujun; Du, Zhanwen; Wang, Zhenghe; Ewing, Rob M

    2012-12-07

    Affinity-purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is the preeminent technique for identification of eukaryotic protein complexes in vivo. AP-MS workflows typically express epitope-tagged bait proteins, immunopurify, and then identify associated protein complexes using mass spectrometry. However, challenges of existing strategies include the construction of expression vectors for large open reading frames and the possibility that overexpression of bait proteins may result in expression of nonphysiological levels of the bait protein with concomitant perturbation of endogenous protein complexes. To address these issues, we use human cell lines with epitope-tagged endogenous genes as AP-MS substrates to develop a platform that we call "knock-in AP-MS", thereby avoiding the challenges of expression vector construction and ensuring that expression of tagged proteins is driven by endogenous regulatory mechanisms. Using three different bait genes (MRE11A, DNMT1 and APC), we show that cell lines expressing epitope-tagged endogenous genes make good substrates for sensitive and reproducible identification of protein interactions using AP-MS. In particular, we identify novel interactors of the important oncoprotein Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC), including an interaction with Flightless-1 homologue (FLII) that is enriched in nuclear fractions.

  4. ABCB5 Identifies Immunoregulatory Dermal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schatton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based strategies represent a new frontier in the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. However, the paucity of markers for isolation of molecularly defined immunomodulatory cell populations poses a barrier to this field. Here, we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5 identifies dermal immunoregulatory cells (DIRCs capable of exerting therapeutic immunoregulatory functions through engagement of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1. Purified Abcb5+ DIRCs suppressed T cell proliferation, evaded immune rejection, homed to recipient immune tissues, and induced Tregs in vivo. In fully major-histocompatibility-complex-mismatched cardiac allotransplantation models, allogeneic DIRCs significantly prolonged allograft survival. Blockade of DIRC-expressed PD-1 reversed the inhibitory effects of DIRCs on T cell activation, inhibited DIRC-dependent Treg induction, and attenuated DIRC-induced prolongation of cardiac allograft survival, indicating that DIRC immunoregulatory function is mediated, at least in part, through PD-1. Our results identify ABCB5+ DIRCs as a distinct immunoregulatory cell population and suggest promising roles of this expandable cell subset in cellular immunotherapy.

  5. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W.J. Lennard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP, have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC, combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  6. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  7. Cancer therapeutic target genes identified on chromosome 20q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    , Snijders and Mao described that and “when the selection pressure is removed, amplifications are not maintained and eventually disappear. Thus, amplifications focus on those genes that are important for tumor development,” they said. Their analysis showed that, as tumorous cells progress toward malignancy, the DNA copy number plays a major role in the mechanism of increased expression levels for the 18-gene signature on chromosome 20q. “Strong associations between the DNA copy number and gene expression were observed in the majority of tumor types,” the researchers said. “For example, the RAE1 expression was found to be significantly associated with DNA copy number in 20 tumor types,” the study reported. “Elevated DNA copy numbers of MMP9 and SULF2 were associated with increased gene expressions in only two and seven tumor types, respectively,” it added. With their integrated multi-omics analysis of genes on chromosome 20q, Snijders and Mao believed that the 18-gene signature could become new molecular targets for cancer therapy. “Gene ontology analysis revealed significant enrichment of cell cycle and mitosis-related biological processes in our 18-gene, suggesting that a cluster of functionally related genes localize to chromosome 20q,” they said. The identification of good targets such as theirs is a critical step for the development of targeted therapies for cancer treatment, according to the researchers. Microarray and next generation sequencing technologies have become invaluable tools in cataloging genomic abnormalities in human cancers and identifying new potential therapeutic targets, in addition to the availability of large cancer genomic data sets which allows for unbiased approaches to identify genes that are important in tumor progression, the research study noted. “Here, we aggregated available cancer databases to identify cancer driver genes across tumor types by combining gene transcript and DNA copy number across chromosome 20q to

  8. Proteomic analysis of cell lines to identify the irinotecan resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADHU

    [Peng X-C, Gong F-M, Wei M, Chen X, Chen Y, Cheng K, Gao F, Xu F, Bi F and Liu J-Y 2010 Proteomic analysis of cell lines to identify the irinotecan resistance proteins; J. Biosci. 35 557–564] DOI 10.1007/s12038-010-0064-9. Keywords. Colon cancer; 2-DE; drug resistance; irinotecan; proteomics. Abbreviations used: ACN ...

  9. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... squamous cell cancer include: Having light-colored skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red hair Long-term, daily sun exposure (such as in people who work outside) Many severe sunburns early in life Older age Having had many x-rays Chemical exposure A weakened immune system, especially in ...

  10. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  11. Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Maryland 21702-5012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer October...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ovarian cancer , BRCA1, RAD51, PARP inhibitors, platinum, biomarkers, drug resistance 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells: A New Target for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglei Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal disease among all gynecologic malignancies and is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Although the standard combination of surgery and chemotherapy was initially effective in patients with ovarian cancer, disease relapse commonly occurred due to the generation of chemoresistance. It has been reported that cancer stem cells (CSCs are involved in drug resistance and cancer recurrence. Over the past decades, increasing studies have been done to identify CSCs from human ovarian cancer cells. The present paper will summarize different investigations on ovarian CSCs, including isolation, mechanisms of chemoresistance, and therapeutic approaches. Although there are still numerous challenges to translate basic research to clinical applications, understanding the molecular details of CSCs is essential for developing effective strategies to prevent ovarian cancer and its recurrence.

  13. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  14. High-throughput targeted screening in triple-negative breast cancer cells identifies Wnt-inhibiting activities in Pacific brittle stars

    OpenAIRE

    Blagodatski, Artem; Cherepanov, Vsevolod; Koval, Alexey; Kharlamenko, Vladimir I.; Khotimchenko, Yuri S.; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2017-01-01

    Pro-proliferative oncogenic signaling is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Specific targeting of such signaling pathways is one of the main approaches to modern anti-cancer drug discovery, as opposed to more traditional search for general cytotoxic agents. Natural products, especially from marine sources, represent a largely untapped source of chemical diversity, which so far have mostly been screened for cytotoxicity. Here we present a pioneering pipeline of high-throughput screening of marine...

  15. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-hong; Cai, Ai-zhen; Wei, Xue-ming; Ding, Li; Li, Feng-zhi; Zheng, Ai-ming; Dai, Da-jiang; Huang, Rong-rong; Cao, Hou-jun; Zhou, Hai-yang; Wang, Jian-mei; Wang, Xue-jing; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Heng; Yuan, Xiao-ying; Chen, Lin

    2013-03-01

    Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer. Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells, including several gastric cancer cell lines. This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells. This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells. Five stemness-related gene expression profiles, including OCT-4, SOX-2, NANOG, CD44, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2, were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells. Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells. When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells. These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  16. Alcohol and Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Xu; Jia Luo

    2017-01-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption has been associated with increased risk of several cancers, including cancer of the colon, rectum, female breast, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, liver, and esophagus. It appears that alcohol exposure not only promotes carcinogenesis but also enhances the progression and aggressiveness of existing cancers. The molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol tumor promotion, however, remain unclear. Cancer stem cells (CSC), a subpopulation of cancer cells with self-renewal and ...

  17. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  18. miR-155, identified as anti-metastatic by global miRNA profiling of a metastasis model, inhibits cancer cell extravasation and colonization in vivo and causes significant signaling alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Karina Hedelund; Terp, Mikkel G; Lund, Rikke R

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into miRNA regulation in metastasis formation, we used a metastasis cell line model that allows investigation of extravasation and colonization of circulating cancer cells to lungs in mice. Using global miRNA profiling, 28 miRNAs were found to exhibit significantly altered...... in lungs when injected intravenously in immunodeficient mice. Our experiments addressing the underlying mechanism of the altered tumor burden revealed that miR-155-overexpressing CL16 cells were less invasive than CL16 control cells in vitro, while miR-155 overexpression had no effect on cancer cell...... expression between isogenic metastasizing and non-metastasizing cancer cells, with miR-155 being the most differentially expressed. Highly metastatic mesenchymal-like CL16 cancer cells showed very low miR-155 expression, and miR-155 overexpression in these cells lead to significantly decreased tumor burden...

  19. A patient tumor transplant model of squamous cell cancer identifies PI3K inhibitors as candidate therapeutics in defined molecular bins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysar, Stephen B; Astling, David P; Anderson, Ryan T; Vogler, Brian W; Bowles, Daniel W; Morton, J Jason; Paylor, Jeramiah J; Glogowska, Magdalena J; Le, Phuong N; Eagles-Soukup, Justin R; Kako, Severine L; Takimoto, Sarah M; Sehrt, Daniel B; Umpierrez, Adrian; Pittman, Morgan A; Macfadden, Sarah M; Helber, Ryan M; Peterson, Scott; Hausman, Diana F; Said, Sherif; Leem, Ted H; Goddard, Julie A; Arcaroli, John J; Messersmith, Wells A; Robinson, William A; Hirsch, Fred R; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Raben, David; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Song, John I; Tan, Aik-Choon; Jimeno, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Targeted therapy development in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is challenging given the rarity of activating mutations. Additionally, HNSCC incidence is increasing related to human papillomavirus (HPV). We sought to develop an in vivo model derived from patients reflecting the evolving HNSCC epidemiologic landscape, and use it to identify new therapies. Primary and relapsed tumors from HNSCC patients, both HPV+ and HPV-, were implanted on mice, giving rise to 25 strains. Resulting xenografts were characterized by detecting key mutations, measuring protein expression by IHC and gene expression/pathway analysis by mRNA-sequencing. Drug efficacy studies were run with representative xenografts using the approved drug cetuximab as well as the new PI3K inhibitor PX-866. Tumors maintained their original morphology, genetic profiles and drug susceptibilities through serial passaging. The genetic makeup of these tumors was consistent with known frequencies of TP53, PI3KCA, NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 mutations. Because the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab is a standard HNSCC therapy, we tested its efficacy and observed a wide spectrum of efficacy. Cetuximab-resistant strains had higher PI3K/Akt pathway gene expression and protein activation than cetuximab-sensitive strains. The PI3K inhibitor PX-866 had anti-tumor efficacy in HNSCC models with PIK3CA alterations. Finally, PI3K inhibition was effective in two cases with NOTCH1 inactivating mutations. In summary, we have developed an HNSCC model covering its clinical spectrum whose major genetic alterations and susceptibility to anticancer agents represent contemporary HNSCC. This model enables to prospectively test therapeutic-oriented hypotheses leading to personalized medicine. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An integrated analysis identifies STAT4 as a key regulator of ovarian cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L; Ji, G; Le, X; Luo, Z; Wang, C; Feng, M; Xu, L; Zhang, Y; Lau, W B; Lau, B; Yang, Y; Lei, L; Yang, H; Xuan, Y; Chen, Y; Deng, X; Yi, T; Yao, S; Zhao, X; Wei, Y; Zhou, S

    2017-06-15

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most common gynecological cancers, with diagnosis often at a late stage. Metastasis is a major cause of death in patients with EOC, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we utilized an integrated approach to find potential key transcription factors involved in ovarian cancer metastasis and identified STAT4 as a critical player in ovarian cancer metastasis. We found that activated STAT4 was overexpressed in epithelial cells of ovarian cancer and STAT4 overexpression was associated with poor outcome of ovarian cancer patients, which promoted metastasis of ovarian cancer in both in vivo and in vitro. Although STAT4 mediated EOC metastasis via inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of ovarian cancer cells in vivo, STAT4 failed to induce EMT directly in vitro, suggesting that STAT4 might mediate EMT process via cancer-stroma interactions. Further functional analysis revealed that STAT4 overexpression induced normal omental fibroblasts and adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to obtain cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF)-like features via induction of tumor-derived Wnt7a. Reciprocally, increased production of CAF-induced CXCL12, IL6 and VEGFA within tumor microenvironment could enable peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer via induction of EMT program. In summary, our study established a model that STAT4 promotes ovarian cancer metastasis via tumor-derived Wnt7a-induced activation of CAFs.

  1. Identifying and Targeting the Cause of Cancer is Needed to Cure Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Adjiri, Adouda

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells continue to challenge scientists and oncologists due to the phenomenon of resistance. Moreover, recurrence, as seen in many treated patients, shows that currently-used anti-cancer drugs are unable to prevent the development of new cancer cells harboring new mutations. The purpose of this paper is to try to answer some of the questions regarding why cancer arises and why evolution would naturally lead to the development of cancer. Providing answers to these questions may shed new ...

  2. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, and that gastric tumors contain cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are believed to share a common microenvironment with normal niche, which play an important role in gastric cancer and tumor growth. This mini-review presents a brief overview of the recent developments in gastric cancer stem cell research. The knowledge gained by studying cancer stem cells in gastric mucosa will support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:23583679

  3. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  4. Lipid degradation promotes prostate cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Harri M; Brown, Michael; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Tredwell, Gregory; Lau, Chung Ho; Barfeld, Stefan; Hart, Claire; Guldvik, Ingrid J.; Takhar, Mandeep; Heemers, Hannelore V.; Erho, Nicholas; Bloch, Katarzyna; Davicioni, Elai; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Mohler, James L.; Clarke, Noel; Swinnen, Johan V.; Keun, Hector C.; Rekvig, Ole P.; Mills, Ian G.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer and androgen receptor (AR) is the major driver of the disease. Here we show that Enoyl-CoA delta isomerase 2 (ECI2) is a novel AR-target that promotes prostate cancer cell survival. Increased ECI2 expression predicts mortality in prostate cancer patients (p = 0.0086). ECI2 encodes for an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, and we use multiple metabolite profiling platforms and RNA-seq to show that inhibition of ECI2 expression leads to decreased glucose utilization, accumulation of fatty acids and down-regulation of cell cycle related genes. In normal cells, decrease in fatty acid degradation is compensated by increased consumption of glucose, and here we demonstrate that prostate cancer cells are not able to respond to decreased fatty acid degradation. Instead, prostate cancer cells activate incomplete autophagy, which is followed by activation of the cell death response. Finally, we identified a clinically approved compound, perhexiline, which inhibits fatty acid degradation, and replicates the major findings for ECI2 knockdown. This work shows that prostate cancer cells require lipid degradation for survival and identifies a small molecule inhibitor with therapeutic potential. PMID:28415728

  5. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the tumour volume, HPV status, cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures, as potential markers of radiobiological mechanisms of radioresistance, in a contemporary cohort of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell...... expression and hypoxia-associated gene signatures on outcome of primary RCTx was retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint of this study was loco-regional control (LRC). RESULTS: Univariate Cox regression revealed a significant impact of tumour volume, p16 overexpression, and SLC3A2 and CD44 protein...... signatures are potential prognostic biomarkers for patients with locally advanced HNSCC, who were treated by primary RCTx. The study also supports that the individual tumour volumes should generally be included in biomarker studies and that panels of biomarkers are superior to individual parameters....

  6. miR-155, identified as anti-metastatic by global miRNA profiling of a metastasis model, inhibits cancer cell extravasation and colonization in vivo and causes significant signaling alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Karina Hedelund; Terp, Mikkel G; Lund, Rikke R

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into miRNA regulation in metastasis formation, we used a metastasis cell line model that allows investigation of extravasation and colonization of circulating cancer cells to lungs in mice. Using global miRNA profiling, 28 miRNAs were found to exhibit significantly altered......-associated proteins ALDH1A1, PIR and PDCD4 in miR-155-overexpressing tumors was validated by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that miR-155 inhibits the ability of cancer cells to extravasate and/or colonize at distant organs and brings additional insight into the complexity of miR-155 regulation...... expression between isogenic metastasizing and non-metastasizing cancer cells, with miR-155 being the most differentially expressed. Highly metastatic mesenchymal-like CL16 cancer cells showed very low miR-155 expression, and miR-155 overexpression in these cells lead to significantly decreased tumor burden...

  7. Genomic profiling identifies GATA6 as a candidate oncogene amplified in pancreatobiliary cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Kwei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatobiliary cancers have among the highest mortality rates of any cancer type. Discovering the full spectrum of molecular genetic alterations may suggest new avenues for therapy. To catalogue genomic alterations, we carried out array-based genomic profiling of 31 exocrine pancreatic cancers and 6 distal bile duct cancers, expanded as xenografts to enrich the tumor cell fraction. We identified numerous focal DNA amplifications and deletions, including in 19% of pancreatobiliary cases gain at cytoband 18q11.2, a locus uncommonly amplified in other tumor types. The smallest shared amplification at 18q11.2 included GATA6, a transcriptional regulator previously linked to normal pancreas development. When amplified, GATA6 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels, and strong immunostaining was observed in 25 of 54 (46% primary pancreatic cancers compared to 0 of 33 normal pancreas specimens surveyed. GATA6 expression in xenografts was associated with specific microarray gene-expression patterns, enriched for GATA binding sites and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity. siRNA mediated knockdown of GATA6 in pancreatic cancer cell lines with amplification led to reduced cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and colony formation. Our findings indicate that GATA6 amplification and overexpression contribute to the oncogenic phenotypes of pancreatic cancer cells, and identify GATA6 as a candidate lineage-specific oncogene in pancreatobiliary cancer, with implications for novel treatment strategies.

  8. Cancer treatments transform residual cancer cell phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harless William W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiologic wound repair and tissue regeneration are associated with distinct cellular behaviors triggered by tissue damage. Normally quiescent stem cells proliferate to regenerate damaged tissue, while relatively immobile epithelial cells can transform into a motile, tissue invasive phenotype through a partial epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These distinct cellular behaviors may have particular relevance to how cancer cells can be predicted to behave after treatments damaging a tumor. Presentation of the hypothesis Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy trigger highly conserved wound healing pathways that: (1 facilitate the phenotypic transformation of surviving cancer cells into a highly mobile, metastatic phenotype through an EMT or epithelial-mesenchymal transition and (2 induce residual cancer stem cell proliferation. Testing the hypothesis Tissue damage caused by cancer treatments will trigger the release of distinct cytokines with established roles in physiologic wound healing, EMT induction, and stem cell activation. They will be released rapidly after treatment and detectable in the patient's blood. Careful histologic evaluation of cancerous tissue before and after treatment will reveal cellular changes suggestive of EMT induction (down regulation of cytokeratin expression and cancer stem cell enrichment (stem cell markers upregulated. Implications of the hypothesis Cancer cells surviving treatment will be more capable of metastasis and resistant to conventional therapies than the pre-treatment population of cancer cells. These changes will develop rapidly after treatment and, in distinct contrast to selection pressures fostering such changes, be triggered by highly conserved wound repair signals released after tissue damage. This pattern of tissue (tumor repair may be amenable to treatment intervention at the time it is upregulated.

  9. Identifying Therapeutics for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer by Next Generation Mechanotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    will validate the effects of the lead compounds on cisplatin- resistant ovarian cancer cells, including cellular and molecular analyses . 15. SUBJECT...air bubbles, and/or clogging due to particles of PDMS or other debris that may alter the flow properties of individual devices. We found that...cell biology to cancer. For example, a shRNA-screen could identify the origins of nuclear shape stability and mechanotranduction. o What was the

  10. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  11. Community Engagement for Identifying Cancer Education Needs in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Julio; Ramos, Axel; Ramos-Rivera, Francisco E; Gwede, Clement; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Vadaparampil, Susan; Brandon, Thomas; Simmons, Vani; Castro, Eida

    2018-02-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Puerto Rico, suggesting a need for improved strategies, programs, and resources devoted to cancer prevention. Enhanced prevention needs in Puerto Rico were initially identified in pilot studies conducted by the Ponce School of Medicine (PSM) in collaboration with the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC). In the current study, we used community engagement to identify specific needs in cancer prevention and education and strategies to create culturally attuned, effective cancer prevention education programs. A total of 37 participants attended a community forum and were assigned to one of three discussion groups: patients/survivors (n = 14); family/caregivers (n = 11); or healthcare providers (n = 12). Most participants were women (73 %), over 35 years of age, and a majority were married (58 %) and had a university education (81 %). The sessions were recorded and transcribed and analyzed for key themes. Participants wanted improved awareness of cancer prevention in Puerto Rico and believed cancer prevention education should start early, ideally in elementary school. Participants also stressed the importance of creating partnerships with private and government agencies to coordinate educational efforts. Suggested strategies included outreach to communities with limited resources, incorporating the testimony of cancer survivors, and utilizing social media to disseminate cancer prevention information.

  12. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Jesus I; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Murphy, William J; Canter, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Standard cytoreductive cancer therapy, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are frequently resisted by a small portion of cancer cells with 'stem-cell' like properties including quiescence and repopulation. Immunotherapy represents a breakthrough modality for improving oncologic outcomes in cancer patients. Since the success of immunotherapy is not contingent on target cell proliferation, it may also be uniquely suited to address the problem of resistance and repopulation exerted by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Areas covered: Natural killer (NK) cells have long been known for their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells, and there are increasing data demonstrating that NK cells can selectively identify and lyse CSCs. The authors review the current knowledge of CSCs and NK cells and highlight recent studies that support the concept that NK cells are capable of targeting CSC in solid tumors, especially in the context of combination therapy simultaneously targeting non-CSCs and CSCs. Expert opinion: Unlike cytotoxic cancer treatments, NK cells can target and eliminate quiescent/non-proliferating cells such as CSCs, and these enigmatic cells are an important source of relapse and metastasis. NK targeting of CSCs represents a novel and potentially high impact method to capitalize on the intrinsic therapeutic potential of NK cells.

  13. Cisplatin induces differentiation of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36-51% and proliferation capacity by 36-67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12-67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10-130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor.

  14. Phosphoproteomics identified Endofin, DCBLD2, and KIAA0582 as novel tyrosine phosphorylation targets of EGF signaling and Iressa in human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunhao; Low, Teck-Yew; Choong, Lee-Yee

    2007-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, analysis of enriched phosphotyrosyl proteins from epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphotyrosine proteome permits the identification of novel downstream substrates of the EGF receptor (EGFR). Using cICAT-based LC-MS/MS method, we identified ...

  15. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research. PMID:22507219

  17. Cell-of-Origin of Cancer versus Cancer Stem Cells: Assays and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Tang, Dean G

    2015-10-01

    A tumor originates from a normal cell that has undergone tumorigenic transformation as a result of genetic mutations. This transformed cell is the cell-of-origin for the tumor. In contrast, an established clinical tumor is sustained by subpopulations of self-renewing cancer cells operationally called cancer stem cells (CSC) that can generate, intraclonally, both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells. Identifying and characterizing tumor cell-of-origin and CSCs should help elucidate tumor cell heterogeneity, which, in turn, should help understand tumor cell responses to clinical treatments, drug resistance, tumor relapse, and metastatic spread. Both tumor transplantation and lineage-tracing assays have been helpful in characterizing these cancer cell populations, although each system has its strengths and caveats. In this article, we briefly review and summarize advantages and limitations of both assays in support of a combinatorial approach to accurately define the roles of both cancer-initiating and cancer-propagating cells. As an aside, we also wish to clarify the definitions of cancer cell-of-origin and CSCs, which are often interchangeably used by mistake. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Gene expression signature analysis identifies vorinostat as a candidate therapy for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future.Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer-specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern.We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment.

  19. Mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified proteomic biosignatures of breast cancer in proximal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Stephen A.; He, Jianbo; Lu, Ming; Souda, Puneet; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Chang, Helena R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We have begun an early phase of biomarker discovery in three clinically important types of breast cancer using a panel of human cell lines: HER2 positive, HER2 negative and hormone receptor positive and triple negative (HER2−, ER−, PR−). We identified and characterized the most abundant secreted, sloughed, or leaked proteins released into serum free media from these breast cancer cell lines using a combination of protein fractionation methods before LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 249 proteins were detected in the proximal fluid of 7 breast cancer cell lines. The expression of a selected group of high abundance and/or breast cancer specific potential biomarkers including thromobospondin 1, galectin-3 binding protein, cathepsin D, vimentin, zinc-α2-glycoprotein, CD44, and EGFR from the breast cancer cell lines and in their culture media were further validated by Western blot analysis. Interestingly, mass spectrometry identified a cathepsin D protein single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) by alanine to valine replacement from the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Comparison of each cell line media proteome displayed unique and consistent biosignatures regardless of the individual group classifications demonstrating the potential for stratification of breast cancer. Based on the cell line media proteome, predictive Tree software was able to categorize each cell line as HER2 positive, HER2 negative and hormone receptor positive and triple negative based on only two proteins, muscle fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase and keratin 19. In addition, the predictive Tree software clearly identified MCF-7 cell line overexpresing the HER2 receptor with the SNP cathepsin D biomarker. PMID:22934887

  20. Fatty acids and breast cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, R W; Wickramasinghe, N S; Ke, S C; Wells, A

    1997-01-01

    We and others have shown that fatty acids are important regulators of breast cancer cell proliferation. In particular individual fatty acids specifically alter EGF-induced cell proliferation in very different ways. This regulation is mediated by an EGFR/G-protein signaling pathway. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of how this signaling pathway functions and how fatty acids regulate it will provide important information on the cellular and molecular basis for the association of dietary fat and cancer. Furthermore these in vitro studies may explain data previously obtained from in vivo animal studies and identify "good" as well as "bad" fatty acids with respect to the development of cancer.

  1. Terahertz spectral unmixing based method for identifying gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuqi; Huang, Pingjie; Li, Xian; Ge, Weiting; Hou, Dibo; Zhang, Guangxin

    2018-02-01

    At present, many researchers are exploring biological tissue inspection using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) techniques. In this study, based on a modified hard modeling factor analysis method, terahertz spectral unmixing was applied to investigate the relationships between the absorption spectra in THz-TDS and certain biomarkers of gastric cancer in order to systematically identify gastric cancer. A probability distribution and box plot were used to extract the distinctive peaks that indicate carcinogenesis, and the corresponding weight distributions were used to discriminate the tissue types. The results of this work indicate that terahertz techniques have the potential to detect different levels of cancer, including benign tumors and polyps.

  2. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result of discu...... of discussions within the ICGC on how to address the challenge of identifying mutations that contribute to oncogenesis, tumor maintenance or response to therapy, and recommend computational techniques to annotate somatic variants and predict their impact on cancer phenotype....

  3. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  4. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Horn L, Eisenberg R, Gius D, et al. Cancer of the lung. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan ...

  5. Identification of cancer stem-like side population cells in ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quanli; Geng, Li; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Gaudernack, Gustav; Suo, Zhenhe

    2009-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells may enrich stem-like cells in many normal and malignant tissues. However, SP method application has drawn special attention to the field of stem cell research, and the existence of SP cells in cell culture is being debated, most probably because different cell lines require different technical modifications, especially when cell staining is considered. In this study, the authors aimed to disclose whether the hoechst33342 staining required extensive optimization for identifying SP cells in the human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3. After systematic evaluations, it was found that only 2.5 microg/mL hoechst33342 staining of the cells for 60 min could get an ideal SP population, which accounted for 0.9% of the whole cell population. The sorted SP cells showed significantly higher colony formation efficiency than the non-side population (NSP) cells, and only the SP cells could form holoclones. Real-time PCR disclosed that SP cells expressed higher levels of "stemness" gene Oct3/4 than the NSP cells did, indicating that the SP cells might harbor cancer stem cells in this cell line. The results highlight the necessity of SP method optimization in cell studies, and the SP cells in this cell line merit further studies when cancer stem cell identification and isolation are considered.

  6. Single cell sequencing reveals heterogeneity within ovarian cancer epithelium and cancer associated stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, Boris J; Maile, Makayla; Mitra, Amit Kumar; Sebe, Attila; Bazzaro, Martina; Geller, Melissa A; Abrahante, Juan E; Klein, Molly; Hellweg, Raffaele; Mullany, Sally A; Beckman, Kenneth; Daniel, Jerry; Starr, Timothy K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of heterogeneity in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) by analyzing RNA expression in single epithelial and cancer associated stromal cells. In addition, we explored the possibility of identifying subgroups based on pathway activation and pre-defined signatures from cancer stem cells and chemo-resistant cells. A fresh, HGSOC tumor specimen derived from ovary was enzymatically digested and depleted of immune infiltrating cells. RNA sequencing was performed on 92 single cells and 66 of these single cell datasets passed quality control checks. Sequences were analyzed using multiple bioinformatics tools, including clustering, principle components analysis, and geneset enrichment analysis to identify subgroups and activated pathways. Immunohistochemistry for ovarian cancer, stem cell and stromal markers was performed on adjacent tumor sections. Analysis of the gene expression patterns identified two major subsets of cells characterized by epithelial and stromal gene expression patterns. The epithelial group was characterized by proliferative genes including genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation and MYC activity, while the stromal group was characterized by increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes and genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Neither group expressed a signature correlating with published chemo-resistant gene signatures, but many cells, predominantly in the stromal subgroup, expressed markers associated with cancer stem cells. Single cell sequencing provides a means of identifying subpopulations of cancer cells within a single patient. Single cell sequence analysis may prove to be critical for understanding the etiology, progression and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristic miRNA expression signature and random forest survival analysis identify potential cancer-driving miRNAs in a broad range of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Lopez, Yury O; Victoria, Berta; Golusinski, Pawel; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the miRNA expression profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSSC) accounting for a broad range of cancer subtypes and consequently identify an optimal miRNA signature with prognostic value. HNSCC is consistently among the most common cancers worldwide. Its mortality rate is about 50% because of the characteristic aggressive behavior of these cancers and the prevalent late diagnosis. The heterogeneity of the disease has hampered the development of robust prognostic tools with broad clinical utility. The Cancer Genome Atlas HNSC dataset was used to analyze level 3 miRNA-Seq data from 497 HNSCC patients. Differential expression (DE) analysis was implemented using the limma package and multivariate linear model that adjusted for the confounding effects of age at diagnosis, gender, race, alcohol history, anatomic neoplasm subdivision, pathologic stage, T and N stages, and vital status. Random forest (RF) for survival analysis was implemented using the randomForestSRC package. A characteristic DE miRNA signature of HNSCC, comprised of 11 upregulated (i.e., miR-196b-5p, miR-1269a, miR-196a-5p, miR-4652-3p, miR-210-3p, miR-1293, miR-615-3p, miR-503-5p, miR-455-3p, miR-205-5p, and miR-21-5p) and 9 downregulated (miR-376c-3p, miR-378c, miR-29c-3p, miR-101-3p, miR-195-5p, miR-299-5p, miR-139-5p, miR-6510-3p, miR-375) miRNAs was identified. An optimal RF survival model was built from seven variables including age at diagnosis, miR-378c, miR-6510-3p, stage N, pathologic stage, gender, and race (listed in order of variable importance). The joint differential miRNA expression and survival analysis controlling for multiple confounding covariates implemented in this study allowed for the identification of a previously undetected prognostic miRNA signature characteristic of a broad range of HNSCC.

  8. Liver Cancer: Molecular Characterization, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Castelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. The major forms of primary liver cancer are hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA. Both these tumors develop against a background of cirrhotic liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic liver damage and fibrosis. HCC is a heterogeneous disease which usually develops within liver cirrhosis related to various etiologies: hepatitis B virus (HBV infection (frequent in Asia and Africa, hepatitis C virus (HCV, chronic alcohol abuse, or metabolic syndrome (frequent in Western countries. In cirrhosis, hepatocarcinogenesis is a multi-step process where pre-cancerous dysplastic macronodules transform progressively into HCC. The patterns of genomic alterations observed in these tumors were recently identified and were instrumental for the identification of potential targeted therapies that could improve patient care. Liver cancer stem cells are a small subset of undifferentiated liver tumor cells, responsible for cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance, enriched and isolated according to immunophenotypic and functional properties: cell surface proteins (CD133, CD90, CD44, EpCAM, OV-6, CD13, CD24, DLK1, α2δ1, ICAM-1 and CD47; the functional markers corresponding to side population, high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity and autofluorescence. The identification and definition of liver cancer stem cells requires both immunophenotypic and functional properties.

  9. Identifying primary concerns in patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Rebecca H

    2011-07-01

    To compare illness concerns before and after surgery in patients newly diagnosed with early-stage lung cancer, and to determine whether perceived healthcare environment factors were associated with reduced concerns and cancer-related worry. Participants completed a semistructured interview using the conceptual content cognitive map (3CM) method. Important concepts were identified in a spatial array representative of a cognitive map of the illness. A comprehensive cancer center and a Veterans Affairs medical center in the midwestern United States. 34 men (n=22) and women (n=12), aged 47-83 years (X=65, SD=10), with newly diagnosed lung cancer were interviewed at the time of diagnosis and again three to four weeks after surgery. Content and frequency analysis and descriptive statistics were used to characterize the data. Correlation studies and paired t tests were used to determine relationships among the main study variables. Illness perceptions, worry, and health environment experience. Twelve primary content domains were identified pre- and postoperatively (seven negative and five positive). Cancer-related worry was related to negative content and to fears both before and after surgery. Positive health environment perceptions were related to positive content after surgery. The findings demonstrate important areas of concern that can be targeted to reduce psychological distress and promote adaptation. The willingness of nurses to identify concerns, assist patients to participate in care, and identify strategies to manage unresolved issues early in the treatment trajectory is integral to optimize long-term adjustment.

  10. Mechanotransduction in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jin; Zhang, Yueling; Ye, Rui; Zheng, Yingcheng; Zhao, Zhihe; Li, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept, which arose about a decade ago, proposes that tumor growth is sustained by a subpopulation of highly malignant cells. These cells, termed CSCs, are capable of extensive self-renewal that contributes to metastasis and treatment resistance. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that target CSCs should be developed for improving outcomes of cancer patients. Recent progress has highlighted the importance of physical properties of the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction pathway in cancer cells during cancer development. On the other hand, the significance of CXCR1, an upstream signal of FAK/PI3K/Akt has been revealed in CSCs. FAK/PI3K/Akt is a key signal mediator in mechanotransduction pathway. Therefore, mechanotransduction could be a new target for CSCs, and would be an innovative way to treat cancer by inhibiting FAK/PI3K/Akt. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. Distinct metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer stem cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John F; Styczynski, Mark P

    2014-12-18

    Cancer metabolism is emerging as an important focus area in cancer research. However, the in vitro cell culture conditions under which much cellular metabolism research is performed differ drastically from in vivo tumor conditions, which are characterized by variations in the levels of oxygen, nutrients like glucose, and other molecules like chemotherapeutics. Moreover, it is important to know how the diverse cell types in a tumor, including cancer stem cells that are believed to be a major cause of cancer recurrence, respond to these variations. Here, in vitro environmental perturbations designed to mimic different aspects of the in vivo environment were used to characterize how an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived, isogenic cancer stem cells metabolically respond to environmental cues. Mass spectrometry was used to profile metabolite levels in response to in vitro environmental perturbations. Docetaxel, the chemotherapeutic used for this experiment, caused significant metabolic changes in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism in ovarian cancer cells, but had virtually no metabolic effect on isogenic ovarian cancer stem cells. Glucose deprivation, hypoxia, and the combination thereof altered ovarian cancer cell and cancer stem cell metabolism to varying extents for the two cell types. Hypoxia had a much larger effect on ovarian cancer cell metabolism, while glucose deprivation had a greater effect on ovarian cancer stem cell metabolism. Core metabolites and pathways affected by these perturbations were identified, along with pathways that were unique to cell types or perturbations. The metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived isogenic cancer stem cells differ greatly under most conditions, suggesting that these two cell types may behave quite differently in an in vivo tumor microenvironment. While cancer metabolism and cancer stem cells are each promising potential therapeutic targets, such varied behaviors in vivo would need to

  12. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  13. Exploratory Study to Identify Radiomics Classifiers for Lung Cancer Histology

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Weimiao; Parmar, Chintan; Grossmann, Patrick; Quackenbush, John; Lambin, Philippe; Bussink, Johan; Mak, Raymond; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiomics can quantify tumor phenotypic characteristics non-invasively by applying feature algorithms to medical imaging data. In this study of lung cancer patients, we investigated the association between radiomic features and the tumor histologic subtypes (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma). Furthermore, in order to predict histologic subtypes, we employed machine-learning methods and independently evaluated their prediction performance. Methods Two independen...

  14. Identifying Malnutrition: Nutritional Status in Newly Diagnosed Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Karthikayini; Li Yoong, Tang; Mei Chan, Chong; Peng Choong, Lau; Chinna, Karuthan

    2017-02-01

    Malnutrition is common among patients with cancer, but little attention is given to its risks and consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the nutritional status and identify the factors associated with malnutrition among newly diagnosed patients with cancer. Patients admitted with newly diagnosed cancer at a teaching hospital in Malaysia were recruited from January to April 2015. Nutritional status was assessed before treatment initiation, and patients were classified into three categories. A total of 132 pretreatment patients were recruited into the study. About half were severely malnourished. Patients with stage III cancer had the highest prevalence of severe malnourishment. Clinical parameters and disease characteristics were significantly associated with nutritional status. Demographic variables were also statistically significantly associated with severe nutritional status.

  15. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  16. Side population cells isolated from KATO III human gastric cancer cell line have cancer stem cell-like characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Peng-Ge; Wang, Xuan; Che, Xiang-Ming; Wang, Zi-Ming

    2012-09-07

    To investigate whether the side population (SP) cells possess cancer stem cell-like characteristics in vitro and the role of SP cells in tumorigenic process in gastric cancer. We analyzed the presence of SP cells in different human gastric carcinoma cell lines, and then isolated and identified the SP cells from the KATO III human gastric cancer cell line by flow cytometry. The clonogenic ability and self-renewal were evaluated by clone and sphere formation assays. The related genes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. To compare tumorigenic ability, SP and non-side population (NSP) cells from the KATO III human gastric cancer cell line were subcutaneously injected into nude mice. SP cells from the total population accounted for 0.57% in KATO III, 1.04% in Hs-746T, and 0.02% in AGS (CRL-1739). SP cells could grow clonally and have self-renewal capability in conditioned media. The expression of ABCG2, MDRI, Bmi-1 and Oct-4 was different between SP and NSP cells. However, there was no apparent difference between SP and NSP cells when they were injected into nude mice. SP cells have some cancer stem cell-like characteristics in vitro and can be used for studying the tumorigenic process in gastric cancer.

  17. Levobuipivacaine-Induced Dissemination of A549 Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shun-Ming; Lin, Bo-Feng; Wong, Chih-Shung; Chuang, Wen-Ting; Chou, Yu-Ting; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2017-08-17

    While anaesthetics are frequently used on cancer patients during surgical procedures, their consequence on cancer progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to investigate the influence of local anesthetics on lung cancer cell dissemination in vitro and in vivo. A549 human non-small lung cancer cells were treated with various local anaesthetics including ropivacaine, lidocaine, levobupivacaine and bupivacaine. Cell barrier property was assessed using an electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of treated cells was studied by immunofluorescence staining. In vitro and in vivo cancer cell dissemination were investigated.Gene expression microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR) assays were used to identify the genes responsible for levobupivacaine-mediated cancer cell dissemination.The results illustrated that only levobupivacaine induced EMT in the treated cells and also caused the dissemination of cancer cells in vitro. In addition, after intravenous injection, levobupivacaine encouraged cancer cell dissemination in vivo. Gene expression microarray, qrt-PCR and immunoblotting revealed that after levobupivacaine treatment, the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)- 2α gene was upregulated in cancer cells. Our findings suggest that levobupivacaine may induce A549 lung cancer cell dissemination both in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, HIF-2α signaling possibly contributes to levobupivacaine-mediated A549 lung cancer cell dissemination.

  18. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but...

  19. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  20. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeb, Bisrat G; Zhang, Xiaomei; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Gao, Hui; Cohen, Evan; Li, Li; Rodriguez, Angel A; Landis, Melissa D; Lucci, Anthony; Ueno, Naoto T; Robertson, Fredika; Xu, Wei; Lacerda, Lara; Buchholz, Thomas A; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Reuben, James M; Lewis, Michael T; Woodward, Wendy A

    2010-07-08

    Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced by serial xenograft passages through transplantation. Herein we fully characterize cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells. 293T cells can be readily cultured and passaged as spheres in serum-free stem cell promoting culture conditions. Cells cultured in vitro as three-dimensional spheres (3D) were shown to contain higher ALDH1 and CD44+/CD24- population compared to monolayer cells. These cells were also resistant to radiation and upregulate stem cell survival signaling including beta-catenin, Notch1 and Survivin in response to radiation. Moreover, 3D spheres generated from the 293T cells have increased expression of mesenchymal genes including vimentin, n-cadherin, zeb1, snail and slug as well as pro-metastatic genes RhoC, Tenascin C and MTA1. In addition, microRNAs implicated in self-renewal and metastases were markedly reduced in 3D spheres. 293T cells exhibit a cancer stem cell-like phenotype when cultured as 3D spheres and represent an important research tool for studying the molecular and biological mechanisms of cancer stem cells and for testing and developing novel targets for cancer therapy.

  1. Identifying molecular targets of lifestyle modifications in colon cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Marie Derry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; ~20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes that could positively influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals.

  2. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... immunology approach is applied. Via in silico screening of the protein sequences, 415 peptides were predicted as HLA-A*0201 and HLA-B*0702 binders. Subsequent in vitro binding analysis in a MHC ELISA platform confirmed binding for 147 of the 415 predicted binders. The 147 peptides were evaluated for T cell...

  3. Protecting Confidentiality in Cancer Registry Data With Geographic Identifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mandi; Reiter, Jerome Phillip; Zhu, Li; Liu, Benmei; Cronin, Kathleen A; Feuer, Eric J Rocky

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program releases research files of cancer registry data. These files include geographic information at the county level, but no finer. Access to finer geography, such as census tract identifiers, would enable richer analyses-for example, examination of health disparities across neighborhoods. To date, tract identifiers have been left off the research files because they could compromise the confidentiality of patients' identities. We present an approach to inclusion of tract identifiers based on multiply imputed, synthetic data. The idea is to build a predictive model of tract locations, given patient and tumor characteristics, and randomly simulate the tract of each patient by sampling from this model. For the predictive model, we use multivariate regression trees fitted to the latitude and longitude of the population centroid of each tract. We implement the approach in the registry data from California. The method results in synthetic data that reproduce a wide range (but not all) of analyses of census tract socioeconomic cancer disparities and have relatively low disclosure risks, which we assess by comparing individual patients' actual and synthetic tract locations. We conclude with a discussion of how synthetic data sets can be used by researchers with cancer registry data. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Oncogene-directed alterations in cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Malvi, Parmanand; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-07-01

    Oncogenes are key drivers of tumor growth. Although several cancer-driving mechanisms have been identified, the role of oncogenes in shaping metabolic patterns in cancer cells is only beginning to be appreciated. Recent studies show that oncogenes directly regulate critical metabolic enzymes and metabolic signaling pathways. Here, we present evidence for oncogene-directed cancer metabolic regulation and discuss the importance of identifying underlying mechanisms that can be targeted for developing precision cancer therapies.

  5. OGG1, MYH and MTH1 gene variants identified in gastric cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    OGG1, MYH and MTH1 gene variants identified in gastric cancer patients exhibiting both 8-hydroxy-2 -deoxyguanosine accumulation and low inflammatory cell infiltration in their gastric mucosa. MASANORI GOTO1, KAZUYA SHINMURA1, HIDETAKA YAMADA1, TOSHIHIRO TSUNEYOSHI2 and HARUHIKO SUGIMURA1∗.

  6. Identifying candidate driver genes by integrative ovarian cancer genomics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinguo; Lu, Jibo

    2017-08-01

    Integrative analysis of molecular mechanics underlying cancer can distinguish interactions that cannot be revealed based on one kind of data for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients. Tumor samples exhibit heterogeneity in omics data, such as somatic mutations, Copy Number Variations CNVs), gene expression profiles and so on. In this paper we combined gene co-expression modules and mutation modulators separately in tumor patients to obtain the candidate driver genes for resistant and sensitive tumor from the heterogeneous data. The final list of modulators identified are well known in biological processes associated with ovarian cancer, such as CCL17, CACTIN, CCL16, CCL22, APOB, KDF1, CCL11, HNF1B, LRG1, MED1 and so on, which can help to facilitate the discovery of biomarkers, molecular diagnostics, and drug discovery.

  7. Single cancer cell analysis on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yoon Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells in blood may represent “a real time liquid biopsy” through the interrogation of single cancer cells thereby determining the outspread of their heterogeneity and guiding therapy. In this thesis, we focused on single cancer cell analysis downstream of the isolation of cancer cells from

  8. An integrative framework identifies alternative splicing events in colorectal cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisognin, Andrea; Pizzini, Silvia; Perilli, Lisa; Esposito, Giovanni; Mocellin, Simone; Nitti, Donato; Zanovello, Paola; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2014-02-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a common mechanism which creates diverse RNA isoforms from a single gene, potentially increasing protein variety. Growing evidence suggests that this mechanism is closely related to cancer progression. In this study, whole transcriptome analysis was performed with GeneChip Human exon 1.0 ST Array from 80 samples comprising 23 normal colon mucosa, 30 primary colorectal cancer and 27 liver metastatic specimens from 46 patients, to identify AS events in colorectal cancer progression. Differentially expressed genes and exons were estimated and AS events were reconstructed by combining exon-level analyses with AltAnalyze algorithms and transcript-level estimations (MMBGX probabilistic method). The number of AS genes in the transition from normal colon mucosa to primary tumor was the most abundant, but fell considerably in the next transition to liver metastasis. 206 genes with probable AS events in colon cancer development and progression were identified, that are involved in processes and pathways relevant to tumor biology, as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Several AS events in VCL, CALD1, B3GNT6 and CTHRC1 genes, differentially expressed during tumor development were validated, at RNA and at protein level. Taken together, these results demonstrate that cancer-specific AS is common in early phases of colorectal cancer natural history. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel Somatic Copy Number Alteration Identified for Cervical Cancer in the Mexican American Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Torabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer affects millions of Americans, but the rate for cervical cancer in the Mexican American is approximately twice that for non-Mexican Americans. The etiologies of cervical cancer are still not fully understood. A number of somatic mutations, including several copy number alterations (CNAs, have been identified in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas in non-Mexican Americans. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate CNAs in association with cervical cancer in the Mexican American population. We conducted a pilot study of genome-wide CNA analysis using 2.5 million markers in four diagnostic groups: reference (n = 125, low grade dysplasia (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN-I, n = 4, high grade dysplasia (CIN-II and -III, n = 5 and invasive carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, n = 5 followed by data analyses using Partek. We observed a statistically-significant difference of CNA burden between case and reference groups of different sizes (>100 kb, 10–100 kb and 1–10 kb of CNAs that included deletions and amplifications, e.g., a statistically-significant difference of >100 kb deletions was observed between the reference (6.6% and pre-cancer and cancer (91.3% groups. Recurrent aberrations of 98 CNA regions were also identified in cases only. However, none of the CNAs have an impact on cancer progression. A total of 32 CNA regions identified contained tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. Moreover, the pathway analysis revealed endometrial cancer and estrogen signaling pathways associated with this cancer (p < 0.05 using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG. This is the first report of CNAs identified for cervical cancer in the U.S. Latino population using high density markers. We are aware of the small sample size in the study. Thus, additional studies with a larger sample are needed to confirm the current findings.

  10. Cancer stem cells and their implication in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, E; Alvarez, Pablo J; Prados, José; Melguizo, Consolación; Rama, Ana R; Aránega, Antonia; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis on the origin of cancer has recently gained considerable support. CSCs are tumour cells with the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation that direct the origin and progression of the disease and may be responsible for relapse, metastasis and treatment failures. This article reviews breast CSCs (BCSCs) phenotyping, clinical implications and clinical trials focused on BCSCs in breast cancer. Relevant studies were found through PubMed and Clinicaltrials.gov databases. Cancer stem cells are identified and isolated using membrane and cell activity markers; in the case of BCSCs, these are CD44(+) /CD24(low/-) and show aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, alongside their capacity to grow and form mammospheres. The presence of stem cell properties is associated with a worse outcome. Hence, these cells have important clinical implications, and elucidation of the mechanisms underlying their activity will allow the development of novel effective therapies and diagnostic instruments, improving the prognosis of these patients. Standard treatments are directed against the tumour mass and do not eliminate CSCs. There is therefore a need for specific anti-CSC therapies, and numerous authors are investigating new targets to this end, as reported in this review. It is also necessary for clinical trials to be undertaken to allow this new knowledge to be applied in the clinical setting. However, there have been few trials on anti-BCSCs therapies to date. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  11. Systematic tracking of dysregulated modules identifies novel genes in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihari, Sriganesh; Ragan, Mark A

    2013-06-15

    Deciphering the modus operandi of dysregulated cellular mechanisms in cancer is critical to implicate novel cancer genes and develop effective anti-cancer therapies. Fundamental to this is meticulous tracking of the behavior of core modules, including complexes and pathways across specific conditions in cancer. Here, we performed a straightforward yet systematic identification and comparison of modules across pancreatic normal and cancer tissue conditions by integrating PPI, gene-expression and mutation data. Our analysis revealed interesting change-patterns in gene composition and expression correlation particularly affecting modules responsible for genome stability. Although in most cases these changes indicated impairment of essential functions (e.g., of DNA damage repair), in several other cases we noticed strengthening of modules possibly abetting cancer. Some of these compensatory modules showed switches in transcription regulation and recruitment of tumor inducers (e.g., SOX2 through overexpression). In-depth analysis revealed novel genes in pancreatic cancer, which showed susceptibility to copy-number alterations (e.g., for USP15 in 17 of 67 cases), supported by literature evidence for their involvement in other tumors (e.g., USP15 in glioblastoma). Two of the identified genes, YWHAE and DISC1, further supported the nexus between neural genes and pancreatic carcinogenesis. Extension of this assessment to BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors showed specific differences even across the two sub-types and revealed novel genes involved therein (e.g., TRIM5 and NCOA6). Our software CONTOURv1 is available at: http://bioinformatics.org.au/tools-data/.

  12. Transcription profiles of non-immortalized breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland James F

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searches for differentially expressed genes in tumours have made extensive use of array technology. Most samples have been obtained from tumour biopsies or from established tumour-derived cell lines. Here we compare cultures of non-immortalized breast cancer cells, normal non-immortalized breast cells and immortalized normal and breast cancer cells to identify which elements of a defined set of well-known cancer-related genes are differentially expressed. Methods Cultures of cells from pleural effusions or ascitic fluids from breast cancer patients (MSSMs were used in addition to commercially-available normal breast epithelial cells (HMECs, established breast cancer cell lines (T-est and established normal breast cells (N-est. The Atlas Human Cancer 1.2 cDNA expression array was employed. The data obtained were analysed using widely-available statistical and clustering software and further validated through real-time PCR. Results According to Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM and AtlasImage software, 48 genes differed at least 2-fold in adjusted intensities between HMECs and MSSMs (p Conclusion The expression profiles of 1176 genes were determined in finite life-span cultures of metastatic breast cancer cells and of normal breast cells. Significant differences were detected between the finite life-span breast cancer cell cultures and the established breast cancer cell lines. These data suggest caution in extrapolating information from established lines for application to clinical cancer research.

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Turnbull, Clare; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie; Ahmed, Shahana; Driver, Kristy; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nicholas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans BL; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Alonso, M. Rosario; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm WR; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Muir, Kenneth R; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Perkins, Annie; Swann, Ruth; Velentzis, Louiza; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, Will J; Gerty, Susan M; Graham, Nikki J; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lathrop, Mark; Dunning, Alison M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Peto, Julian; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ~ 8% of the heritability of the disease. We followed up 72 promising associations from two independent Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in ~70,000 cases and ~68,000 controls from 41 case-control studies and nine breast cancer GWAS. We identified three new breast cancer risk loci on 12p11 (rs10771399; P=2.7 × 10−35), 12q24 (rs1292011; P=4.3×10−19) and 21q21 (rs2823093; P=1.1×10−12). SNP rs10771399 was associated with similar relative risks for both estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ER-positive breast cancer, whereas the other two loci were associated only with ER-positive disease. Two of the loci lie in regions that contain strong plausible candidate genes: PTHLH (12p11) plays a crucial role in mammary gland development and the establishment of bone metastasis in breast cancer, while NRIP1 (21q21) encodes an ER co-factor and has a role in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22267197

  14. Prospectively Identified Incident Testicular Cancer Risk in a Familial Testicular Cancer Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anand; Adams, Charleen D; Loud, Jennifer T; Nichols, Kathryn; Stewart, Douglas R; Greene, Mark H

    2015-10-01

    Human testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) have a strong genetic component and a high familial relative risk. However, linkage analyses have not identified a rare, highly penetrant familial TGCT (FTGCT) susceptibility locus. Currently, multiple low-penetrance genes are hypothesized to underlie the familial multiple-case phenotype. The observation that two is the most common number of affected individuals per family presents an impediment to FTGCT gene discovery. Clinically, the prospective TGCT risk in the multiple-case family context is unknown. We performed a prospective analysis of TGCT incidence in a cohort of multiple-affected-person families and sporadic-bilateral-case families; 1,260 men from 140 families (10,207 person-years of follow-up) met our inclusion criteria. Age-, gender-, and calendar time-specific standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for TGCT relative to the general population were calculated using SEER*Stat. Eight incident TGCTs occurred during prospective FTGCT cohort follow-up (versus 0.67 expected; SIR = 11.9; 95% CI, 5.1-23.4; excess absolute risk = 7.2/10,000). We demonstrate that the incidence rate of TGCT is greater among bloodline male relatives from multiple-case testicular cancer families than that expected in the general population, a pattern characteristic of adult-onset Mendelian cancer susceptibility disorders. Two of these incident TGCTs occurred in relatives of sporadic-bilateral cases (0.15 expected; SIR = 13.4; 95% CI, 1.6-48.6). Our data are the first to indicate that despite relatively low numbers of affected individuals per family, members of both multiple-affected-person FTGCT families and sporadic-bilateral TGCT families comprise high-risk groups for incident testicular cancer. Men at high TGCT risk might benefit from tailored risk stratification and surveillance strategies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luis [CNRS UMR 7598, LJLL, & INRIA MAMBA team, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, luis@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Chisholm, Rebecca [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, rebecca.chisholm@gmail.com (Australia); Clairambault, Jean [INRIA MAMBA team & LJLL, UMR 7598, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, jean.clairambault@inria.fr, Corresponding author (France); Escargueil, Alexandre [INSERM “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 938, CDR St Antoine, Hôpital St Antoine, 184 Fbg. St Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France, alexandre.escargueil@upmc.fr (France); Lorenzi, Tommaso [CMLA, ENS Cachan, 61, Av. du Président Wilson, 94230 Cachan cedex & INRIA MAMBA team, & LJLL, UMR 7598, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, tommaso.lorenzi@gmail.com (France); Lorz, Alexander [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598 & INRIA Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, alex.lorz@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Trélat, Emmanuel [Institut Universitaire de France, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598, Boîte courrier 187, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, emmanuel.trelat@upmc.fr (France)

    2016-06-08

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as “bet hedging” of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  16. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    were linked to MMR status based on immunostaining and BRAF mutation status.MMR defects were identified in 22.7% of the tumors, with 46 classified as sporadic. When the clinical parameters of age, sex, and proximal tumor location were combined with the morphologic features with the highest relative...... and excluded 61.5% of the tumors from MMR testing. This clinicopathologic index thus successfully selects MMR-defective colon cancers. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  17. Upregulation of Mrps18a in breast cancer identified by selecting phage antibody libraries on breast tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Meldgaard, Theresa; Melchjorsen, Connie Jenning

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: We identified the mitochondrial ribosomal protein s18a (Mrps18a) as a protein which is upregulated in breast cancer. However, Mrps18a was not homogeneously upregulated in all cancer cells, suggesting the existence of sub-populations within the tumor. The upregulation was not confined...... to cytokeratin 19 and cytokeratin 14 double positive cells. CONCLUSION: This study illustrates how phage display can be applied towards the discovery of proteins which exhibit changes in their expression patterns. We identified the mitochondrial protein Mrps18a as being upregulated in human breast cancer cells...

  18. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer identifies EPB41L3 as a functional suppressor of epithelial ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dafou, Dimitra; Grun, Barbara; Sinclair, John

    2010-01-01

    We used a functional complementation approach to identify tumor-suppressor genes and putative therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 18 in the ovarian cancer cell line TOV21G induced in vitro and in vivo neoplastic suppression. Gene expression microarray...... profiling in TOV21G(+18) hybrids identified 14 candidate genes on chromosome 18 that were significantly overexpressed and therefore associated with neoplastic suppression. Further analysis of messenger RNA and protein expression for these genes in additional ovarian cancer cell lines indicated that EPB41L3...... (erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1-like 3, alternative names DAL-1 and 4.1B) was a candidate ovarian cancer-suppressor gene. Immunoblot analysis showed that EPB41L3 was activated in TOV21G(+18) hybrids, expressed in normal ovarian epithelial cell lines, but was absent in 15 (78%) of 19 ovarian cancer cell...

  19. Cancer Stem Cells, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Markers, and Circulating Tumor Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind; Meijer, Coby; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Hiltermann, T. Jeroen N.

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of markers of cancer stem cells and epithelial to mesenchymal transition in small cell lung cancer is not known. We retrospectively studied these markers in the biopsy tissue of patients with small cell lung cancer and correlated them with overall survival and the strongest

  20. Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment: Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Yuen-Ting Lau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor consists of heterogeneous cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs that can terminally differentiate into tumor bulk. Normal stem cells in normal organs regulate self-renewal within a stem cell niche. Likewise, accumulating evidence has also suggested that CSCs are maintained extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment, which includes both cellular and physical factors. Here, we review the significance of stromal cells, immune cells, extracellular matrix, tumor stiffness, and hypoxia in regulation of CSC plasticity and therapeutic resistance. With a better understanding of how CSC interacts with its niche, we are able to identify potential therapeutic targets for the development of more effective treatments against cancer.

  1. An evidence-based knowledgebase of metastasis suppressors to identify key pathways relevant to cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Li, Zhe; Qu, Hong

    2015-10-21

    Metastasis suppressor genes (MS genes) are genes that play important roles in inhibiting the process of cancer metastasis without preventing growth of the primary tumor. Identification of these genes and understanding their functions are critical for investigation of cancer metastasis. Recent studies on cancer metastasis have identified many new susceptibility MS genes. However, the comprehensive illustration of diverse cellular processes regulated by metastasis suppressors during the metastasis cascade is lacking. Thus, the relationship between MS genes and cancer risk is still unclear. To unveil the cellular complexity of MS genes, we have constructed MSGene (http://MSGene.bioinfo-minzhao.org/), the first literature-based gene resource for exploring human MS genes. In total, we manually curated 194 experimentally verified MS genes and mapped to 1448 homologous genes from 17 model species. Follow-up functional analyses associated 194 human MS genes with epithelium/tissue morphogenesis and epithelia cell proliferation. In addition, pathway analysis highlights the prominent role of MS genes in activation of platelets and coagulation system in tumor metastatic cascade. Moreover, global mutation pattern of MS genes across multiple cancers may reveal common cancer metastasis mechanisms. All these results illustrate the importance of MSGene to our understanding on cell development and cancer metastasis.

  2. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  3. Emory University: MEDICI (Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions) for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has developed a computational methodology to combine high-throughput knockdown data with known protein network topologies to infer the importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) for the survival of cancer cells.  Applying these data to the Achilles shRNA results, the CCLE cell line characterizations, and known and newly identified PPIs provides novel insights for potential new drug targets for cancer therapies and identifies important PPI hubs.

  4. Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    deficient in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair, such as those lacking functional BRCA1 are highly sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP...Identify genetic alterations essential for PARP inhibitor resistance; 3: Determine the ability of identified genetic aberrations to serve as predictive...INTRODUCTION: Cells that are deficient in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair, such as those lacking functional BRCA1 are highly sensitive to poly

  5. Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare pathogenic variants in new predisposition genes for familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Garre, Pilar; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltran, Sergi; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Piqué, Josep M; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2015-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Hereditary forms are due to germ-line mutations in APC, MUTYH, and the mismatch repair genes, but many cases present familial aggregation but an unknown inherited cause. The hypothesis of rare high-penetrance mutations in new genes is a likely explanation for the underlying predisposition in some of these familial cases. Exome sequencing was performed in 43 patients with colorectal cancer from 29 families with strong disease aggregation without mutations in known hereditary colorectal cancer genes. Data analysis selected only very rare variants (0-0.1%), producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. Variants in genes previously involved in hereditary colorectal cancer or nearby previous colorectal cancer genome-wide association study hits were also chosen. Twenty-eight final candidate variants were selected and validated by Sanger sequencing. Correct family segregation and somatic studies were used to categorize the most interesting variants in CDKN1B, XRCC4, EPHX1, NFKBIZ, SMARCA4, and BARD1. We identified new potential colorectal cancer predisposition variants in genes that have a role in cancer predisposition and are involved in DNA repair and the cell cycle, which supports their putative involvement in germ-line predisposition to this neoplasm.

  6. Comparative evaluation of genetic assays to identify oral pre-cancerous fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Jantine F; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Brink, Arjen; Broeckaert, Mark A M; Beliën, Jeroen A M; Meijer, Gerrit A; Kuik, Dirk J; Leemans, C René; Bloemena, Elisabeth; van der Waal, Isaäc; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2008-11-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas often develop in a pre-cancerous field, defined as mucosal epithelium with cancer-related genetic alterations, and which may appear as a clinically visible lesion. The test characteristics of three genetic assays that were developed to detect pre-cancerous fields were investigated and compared to histology. In total, 10 pre-cancerous fields that were not visible at clinical inspection and gave rise to malignant transformation based on an identical TP53 mutation in tumor and mucosal epithelium in the surgical margin, as well as 10 normal oral mucosa specimens were analyzed for numerical chromosomal changes with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), for loss of heterozygosity (LOH), with microsatellite PCR and for DNA index alterations with DNA image analysis. No alterations were detected in normal tissue by either of the assays. Both MLPA and LOH assays detected all pre-cancerous fields. DNA cytometry identified aneuploidy in four of 10 pre-cancerous fields, while the corresponding tumors that developed in these fields were shown to be aneuploid. Both the MLPA and LOH assay seem suitable for screening pre-cancerous fields in subjects at high risk for oral cancer even in the absence of clinically abnormal appearing oral mucosa. Measurements of DNA index might be valuable to determine the time to progression.

  7. Cell Surface and Secreted Protein Profiles of Human Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines Reveal Distinct Glycoprotein Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcinas, Arthur; Yen, Ten-Yang; Kebebew, Electron; Macher, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface proteins have been shown to be effective therapeutic targets. In addition, shed forms of these proteins and secreted proteins can serve as biomarkers for diseases, including cancer. Thus, identification of cell surface and secreted proteins has been a prime area of interest in the proteomics field. Most cell surface and secreted proteins are known to be glycosylated and therefore, a proteomics strategy targeting these proteins was applied to obtain proteomic profiles from various thyroid cancer cell lines that represent the range of thyroid cancers of follicular cell origin. In this study, we oxidized the carbohydrates of secreted proteins and those on the cell surface with periodate and isolated them via covalent coupling to hydrazide resin. The glycoproteins obtained were identified from tryptic peptides and N-linked glycopeptides released from the hydrazide resin using 2-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in combination with the gas phase fractionation. Thyroid cancer cell lines derived from papillary thyroid cancer (TPC-1), follicular thyroid cancer (FTC-133), Hürthle cell carcinoma (XTC-1), and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ARO and DRO-1) were evaluated. An average of 150 glycoproteins were identified per cell line, of which more than 57 percent are known cell surface or secreted glycoproteins. The usefulness of the approach for identifying thyroid cancer associated biomarkers was validated by the identification of glycoproteins (e.g. CD44, galectin 3 and metalloproteinase inhibitor 1) that have been found to be useful markers for thyroid cancer. In addition to glycoproteins that are commonly expressed by all of the cell lines, we identified others that are only expressed in the more well-differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (follicular, Hürthle cell and papillary), or by cell lines derived from undifferentiated tumors that are uniformly fatal forms of thyroid cancer (i.e. anaplastic). Based on the results obtained, a

  8. The proteome signature of the inflammatory breast cancer plasma membrane identifies novel molecular markers of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Arroyo, Ivette J; Feliz-Mosquea, Yismeilin R; Pérez-Laspiur, Juliana; Arju, Rezina; Giashuddin, Shah; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Cubano, Luis A; Schneider, Robert J; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of breast cancer with a 35% 5-year survival rate. The accurate and early diagnosis of IBC and the development of targeted therapy against this deadly disease remain a great medical challenge. Plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) such as E-cadherin and EGFR, play an important role in the progression of IBC. Because the critical role of PMPs in the oncogenic processes they are the perfect candidates as molecular markers and targets for cancer therapies. In the present study, Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) followed by mass spectrometry analysis was used to compare the relative expression levels of membrane proteins (MP) between non-cancerous mammary epithelial and IBC cells, MCF-10A and SUM-149, respectively. Six of the identified PMPs were validated by immunoblotting using the membrane fractions of non-IBC and IBC cell lines, compared with MCF-10A cells. Immunohistochemical analysis using IBC, invasive ductal carcinoma or normal mammary tissue samples was carried out to complete the validation method in nine of the PMPs. We identified and quantified 278 MPs, 76% of which classified as PMPs with 1.3-fold or higher change. We identified for the first time the overexpression of the novel plasminogen receptor, PLGRKT in IBC and of the carrier protein, SCAMP3. Furthermore, we describe the positive relationship between L1CAM expression and metastasis in IBC patients and the role of SCAMP3 as a tumor-related protein. Overall, the membrane proteomic signature of IBC reflects a global change in cellular organization and suggests additional strategies for cancer progression. Together, this study provides insight into the specialized IBC plasma membrane proteome with the potential to identify a number of novel therapeutic targets for IBC.

  9. IDENTIFY CANCER DRIVER GENES THROUGH SHARED MENDELIAN DISEASE PATHOGENIC VARIANTS AND CANCER SOMATIC MUTATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Wang, Changchang; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Schadt, Eric E; Li, Shuyu D; Chen, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Genomic sequencing studies in the past several years have yielded a large number of cancer somatic mutations. There remains a major challenge in delineating a small fraction of somatic mutations that are oncogenic drivers from a background of predominantly passenger mutations. Although computational tools have been developed to predict the functional impact of mutations, their utility is limited. In this study, we applied an alternative approach to identify potentially novel cancer drivers as those somatic mutations that overlap with known pathogenic mutations in Mendelian diseases. We hypothesize that those shared mutations are more likely to be cancer drivers because they have the established molecular mechanisms to impact protein functions. We first show that the overlap between somatic mutations in COSMIC and pathogenic genetic variants in HGMD is associated with high mutation frequency in cancers and is enriched for known cancer genes. We then attempted to identify putative tumor suppressors based on the number of distinct HGMD/COSMIC overlapping mutations in a given gene, and our results suggest that ion channels, collagens and Marfan syndrome associated genes may represent new classes of tumor suppressors. To elucidate potentially novel oncogenes, we identified those HGMD/COSMIC overlapping mutations that are not only highly recurrent but also mutually exclusive from previously characterized oncogenic mutations in each specific cancer type. Taken together, our study represents a novel approach to discover new cancer genes from the vast amount of cancer genome sequencing data.

  10. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Berbamine inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells and cancer initiating cells by targeting Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Zhipeng; Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Van Ness, Carl; Gan, Yichao; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jinfen; Lou, Guiyu; Wang, Yafan; Wu, Jun; Yen, Yun; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2013-01-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but no effective treatment toward liver cancer is available so far. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need to identify novel therapies to efficiently treat liver cancer and improve the prognosis of this disease. Here we report that berbamine (BBM) and one of its derivatives, bbd24, potently suppressed liver cancer cell proliferation and induced cancer cell death by targeting Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK...

  12. Identifying novel hypoxia-associated markers of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, Lynda M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with poor long-term survival due to late diagnosis and development of chemoresistance. Tumour hypoxia is associated with many features of tumour aggressiveness including increased cellular proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, increased invasion and metastasis, and chemoresistance, mostly mediated through hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. While HIF-1α has been associated with platinum resistance in a variety of cancers, including ovarian, relatively little is known about the importance of the duration of hypoxia. Similarly, the gene pathways activated in ovarian cancer which cause chemoresistance as a result of hypoxia are poorly understood. This study aimed to firstly investigate the effect of hypoxia duration on resistance to cisplatin in an ovarian cancer chemoresistance cell line model and to identify genes whose expression was associated with hypoxia-induced chemoresistance.

  13. Identifying Novel Cancer Therapies Using Chemical Genetics and Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Michelle; Fogley, Rachel; Zon, Leonard I

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genetics is the use of small molecules to perturb biological pathways. This technique is a powerful tool for implicating genes and pathways in developmental programs and disease, and simultaneously provides a platform for the discovery of novel therapeutics. The zebrafish is an advantageous model for in vivo high-throughput small molecule screening due to translational appeal, high fecundity, and a unique set of developmental characteristics that support genetic manipulation, chemical treatment, and phenotype detection. Chemical genetic screens in zebrafish can identify hit compounds that target oncogenic processes-including cancer initiation and maintenance, metastasis, and angiogenesis-and may serve as cancer therapies. Notably, by combining drug discovery and animal testing, in vivo screening of small molecules in zebrafish has enabled rapid translation of hit anti-cancer compounds to the clinic, especially through the repurposing of FDA-approved drugs. Future technological advancements in automation and high-powered imaging, as well as the development and characterization of new mutant and transgenic lines, will expand the scope of chemical genetics in zebrafish.

  14. Administrative data algorithms to identify second breast cancer events following early-stage invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubak, Jessica; Yu, Onchee; Pocobelli, Gaia; Lamerato, Lois; Webster, Joe; Prout, Marianne N; Ulcickas Yood, Marianne; Barlow, William E; Buist, Diana S M

    2012-06-20

    Studies of breast cancer outcomes rely on the identification of second breast cancer events (recurrences and second breast primary tumors). Cancer registries often do not capture recurrences, and chart abstraction can be infeasible or expensive. An alternative is using administrative health-care data to identify second breast cancer events; however, these algorithms must be validated against a gold standard. We developed algorithms using data from 3152 women in an integrated health-care system who were diagnosed with stage I or II breast cancer in 1993-2006. Medical record review served as the gold standard for second breast cancer events. Administrative data used in algorithm development included procedures, diagnoses, prescription fills, and cancer registry records. We randomly divided the cohort into training and testing samples and used a classification and regression tree analysis to build algorithms for classifying women as having or not having a second breast cancer event. We created several algorithms for researchers to use based on the relative importance of sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) in future studies. The algorithm with high specificity and PPV had 89% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 84% to 92%), 99% specificity (95% CI = 98% to 99%), and 90% PPV (95% CI = 86% to 94%); the high-sensitivity algorithm had 96% sensitivity (95% CI = 93% to 98%), 95% specificity (95% CI = 94% to 96%), and 74% PPV (95% CI = 68% to 78%). Algorithms based on administrative data can identify second breast cancer events with high sensitivity, specificity, and PPV. The algorithms presented here promote efficient outcomes research, allowing researchers to prioritize sensitivity, specificity, or PPV in identifying second breast cancer events.

  15. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  16. Single Cell “Glucose Nanosensor” Verifies Elevated Glucose Levels in Individual Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Raphael A. S.; Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Mak, Wai Han; Mulato, Marcelo; Singaram, Bakthan; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Because the transition from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolytic metabolism is a hallmark of cancer progression, approaches to identify single living cancer cells by their unique glucose metabolic signature would be useful. Here, we present nanopipettes specifically developed to measure glucose levels in single cells with temporal and spatial resolution, and we use this technology to verify the hypothesis that individual cancer cells can indeed display higher intracellular glucos...

  17. Transcriptional Network Analysis Identifies BACH1 as a Master Regulator of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yajun; Wu, Heng; Lei, Rong; Chong, Robert A.; Wei, Yong; Lu, Xin; Tagkopoulos, Ilias; Kung, Sun-Yuan; Yang, Qifeng; Hu, Guohong; Kang, Yibin

    2012-01-01

    The application of functional genomic analysis of breast cancer metastasis has led to the identification of a growing number of organ-specific metastasis genes, which often function in concert to facilitate different steps of the metastatic cascade. However, the gene regulatory network that controls the expression of these metastasis genes remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate a computational approach for the deconvolution of transcriptional networks to discover master regulators of breast cancer bone metastasis. Several known regulators of breast cancer bone metastasis such as Smad4 and HIF1 were identified in our analysis. Experimental validation of the networks revealed BACH1, a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, as the common regulator of several functional metastasis genes, including MMP1 and CXCR4. Ectopic expression of BACH1 enhanced the malignance of breast cancer cells, and conversely, BACH1 knockdown significantly reduced bone metastasis. The expression of BACH1 and its target genes was linked to the higher risk of breast cancer recurrence in patients. This study established BACH1 as the master regulator of breast cancer bone metastasis and provided a paradigm to identify molecular determinants in complex pathological processes. PMID:22875853

  18. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  19. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates

    OpenAIRE

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J.; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X.; Lowry, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in f...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Characterization, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death and is the most lethal of common malignancies with a five-year survival rate of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. The genetic landscape of PDAC is characterized by the presence of four frequently-mutated genes: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53 and SMAD4. The development of mouse models of PDAC has greatly contributed to the understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which driver genes contribute to pancreatic cancer development. Particularly, oncogenic KRAS-driven genetically-engineered mouse models that phenotypically and genetically recapitulate human pancreatic cancer have clarified the mechanisms through which various mutated genes act in neoplasia induction and progression and have led to identifying the possible cellular origin of these neoplasias. Patient-derived xenografts are increasingly used for preclinical studies and for the development of personalized medicine strategies. The studies of the purification and characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells have suggested that a minority cell population is responsible for initiation and maintenance of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The study of these cells could contribute to the identification and clinical development of more efficacious drug treatments. PMID:29156578

  1. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Pten in breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roberto; Lee, Song-Choon; Hon-Kim Ban, Kenneth; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Mann, Michael B.; Newberg, Justin Y.; McNoe, Leslie A.; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Ward, Jerrold M.; Rust, Alistair G.; Chin, Kuan-Yew; Black, Michael A.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. To better understand the genetic forces driving TNBC, we performed a transposon mutagenesis screen in a phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) mutant mice and identified 12 candidate trunk drivers and a much larger number of progression genes. Validation studies identified eight TNBC tumor suppressor genes, including the GATA-like transcriptional repressor TRPS1. Down-regulation of TRPS1 in TNBC cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by deregulating multiple EMT pathway genes, in addition to increasing the expression of SERPINE1 and SERPINB2 and the subsequent migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Transposon mutagenesis has thus provided a better understanding of the genetic forces driving TNBC and discovered genes with potential clinical importance in TNBC. PMID:27849608

  2. The ratio of cancer cells to stroma after induction therapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masaki; Naito, Masahito; Saruwatari, Koichi; Hisakane, Kakeru; Kojima, Motohiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Nomura, Shogo; Aokage, Keiju; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Yokoi, Kohei; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-02-01

    Induction therapy induces degenerative changes of various degrees in both cancerous and non-cancerous cells of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The effect of induction therapy on histological characteristics, in particular the ratio of residual cancer cells to non-cancerous components, is unknown. Seventy-four NSCLC patients treated with induction therapy followed by surgery were enrolled. Residual cancer cells were identified using anti-pan-cytokeratin antibody (AE1/AE3). We analyzed and quantified the following three factors via digital image analysis; (1) the tumor area containing cancer cells and non-cancerous components (TA), (2) the total area of AE1/AE3 positive cancer cells (TACC), (3) the percentage of TACC to TA (%TACC). These factors were also analyzed in a matched control group (surgery alone, n = 80). The median TACC of the induction therapy group was significantly lower than that of the control group (p induction therapy group (5.9 %) was significantly lower than that of the control group (58.6 %) (p induction therapy group. Conversely, TACC had a strong positive correlation with %TACC in the induction therapy group (r = 0.95), but not in the control group. Unlike the control group, the smaller the total area of residual cancer cells, the higher residual tumor contained non-cancerous components in the induction group, which may be the characteristic histological feature of NSCLC after induction therapy.

  3. PAF-Wnt signaling-induced cell plasticity is required for maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Wang, Wenqi; Schneider, Andrea; Sun Oh, Young; Lin, Steven H; Park, Bum-Joon; Chen, Junjie; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Park, Jae-Il

    2016-02-04

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to tumour heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of cancer cell stemness remain elusive. Here we identify PCNA-associated factor (PAF) as a key molecule that controls cancer cell stemness. PAF is highly expressed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells (MECs). In MECs, ectopic expression of PAF induces anchorage-independent cell growth and breast CSC marker expression. In mouse models, conditional PAF expression induces mammary ductal hyperplasia. Moreover, PAF expression endows MECs with a self-renewing capacity and cell heterogeneity generation via Wnt signalling. Conversely, ablation of endogenous PAF induces the loss of breast cancer cell stemness. Further cancer drug repurposing approaches reveal that NVP-AUY922 downregulates PAF and decreases breast cancer cell stemness. Our results unveil an unsuspected role of the PAF-Wnt signalling axis in modulating cell plasticity, which is required for the maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

  4. Transposon Mutagenesis Screen Identifies Potential Lung Cancer Drivers and CUL3 as a Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Casey; Janik, Callie; Weg, Madison; Been, Raha A.; Bader, Justin; Kang, Ryan; Ng, Brandon; Foran, Lindsey; Landman, Sean R.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Steinbach, Michael; Sarver, Aaron L.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Largaespada, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harbor thousands of passenger events that hide genetic drivers. Even highly recurrent events in NSCLC, such as mutations in PTEN, EGFR, KRAS, and ALK, are only detected in, at most, 30% of patients. Thus, many unidentified low-penetrant events are causing a significant portion of lung cancers. To detect low-penetrance drivers of NSCLC a forward genetic screen was performed in mice using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon as a random mutagen to generate lung tumors in a Pten deficient background. SB mutations coupled with Pten deficiency were sufficient to produce lung tumors in 29% of mice. Pten deficiency alone, without SB mutations, resulted in lung tumors in 11% of mice, while the rate in control mice was ~3%. In addition, thyroid cancer and other carcinomas as well as the presence of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelialization in mice deficient for Pten were also identified. Analysis of common transposon insertion sites identified 76 candidate cancer driver genes. These genes are frequently dysregulated in human lung cancers and implicate several signaling pathways. Cullin3 (Cul3), a member of an ubiquitin ligase complex that plays a role in the oxidative stress response pathway, was identified in the screen and evidence demonstrates that Cul3 functions as a tumor suppressor. PMID:25995385

  5. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  6. Cancer stem cell: fundamental experimental pathological concepts and updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Qiao, Bin; Smith, Robert A; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subset of cancer cells which play a key role in predicting the biological aggressiveness of cancer due to its ability of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation (stemness). The CSC model is a dynamic one with a functional subpopulation of cancer cells rather than a stable cell population responsible for tumour regeneration. Hypotheses regarding the origins of CSCs include (1) malignant transformation of normal stem cells; (2) mature cancer cell de-differentiation with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and (3) induced pluripotent cancer cells. Surprisingly, the cancer stem cell hypothesis originated in the late nineteenth century and the existence of haematopoietic stem cells was demonstrated a century later, demonstrating that the concept was possible. In the last decade, CSCs have been identified and isolated in different cancers. The hallmark traits of CSCs include their heterogeneity, interaction with microenvironments and plasticity. Understanding these basic concepts of CSCs is important for translational applications using CSCs in the management of patients with cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Think Tank: Identifying and Creating the Next Generation of Community-Based Cancer Prevention Studies | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    In late 2015, the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention convened cancer prevention research experts and stakeholders to discuss the current state of cancer prevention research, identify key prevention research priorities for the NCI, and identify studies that could be conducted within the NCI Community Oncology Research Program. Read the Cancer Prevention Research journal article (PDF, 532KB). |

  8. Lectin microarray technology identifies specific lectins related to lymph node metastasis of advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Keishi; Kuno, Atsushi; Matsuda, Atsushi; Ikehata, Yuzuru; Katada, Natsuya; Hirabayashi, Jun; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Although various molecular profiling technologies have the potential to predict specific tumor phenotypes, the comprehensive profiling of lectin-bound glycans in human cancer tissues has not yet been achieved. We examined 242 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients without or with lymph node metastasis-N0 (n = 62) or N+ (n = 180)-by lectin microarray, and identified the specific lectins highly associated with AGC phenotypes. In seven gastric cancer cell lines, in contrast to expressed-in-cancer lectins, not-expressed-in-cancer (NEC) lectins were tentatively designated by lectin microarray. Binding signals of the specific lectins were robustly reduced in AGC patients with N+ status as compared with those with N0 status. The receiver operating characteristic curve determined the optimal cutoff value to differentiate N0 status from N+ status, and subsequent profiling of NEC lectins identified Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) association with the significant other lectins involved in lymph node metastasis. VVA reaction was clearly found on cancer cells, suggesting that it may result from carcinoma-stroma interaction in primary AGC, because VVA is an NEC lectin. Most intriguingly, VVA reaction was remarkably attenuated in the tumor cells of the metastatic lymph nodes, even if it was recognized in primary AGC. In AGC, histological type was strongly associated with soybean agglutinin and Bauhinia purpurea lectin, whereas p53 mutation was the best correlated with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II. Lectin microarrays can be used to very accurately quantify the reaction of glycans with tumor tissues, and such profiles may represent the specific phenotypes, including N+ status, histological type, or p53 mutation of AGC.

  9. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  10. Effect of lycopene on cell viability and cell cycle progression in human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lycopene, a major carotenoid component of tomato, has a potential anticancer activity in many types of cancer. Epidemiological and clinical trials rarely provide evidence for mechanisms of the compound’s action, and studies on its effect on cancer of different cell origins are now being done. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of lycopene on cell cycle and cell viability in eight human cancer cell lines. Methods Human cell lines were treated with lycopene (1–5 μM for 48 and 96 h. Cell viability was monitored using the method of MTT. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and apoptotic cells were identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick labeling (TUNEL and by DAPI. Results Our data showed a significant decrease in the number of viable cells in three cancer cells lines (HT-29, T84 and MCF-7 after 48 h treatment with lycopene, and changes in the fraction of cells retained in different cell cycle phases. Lycopene promoted also cell cycle arrest followed by decreased cell viability in majority of cell lines after 96 h, as compared to controls. Furthermore, an increase in apoptosis was observed in four cell lines (T-84, HT-29, MCF-7 and DU145 when cells were treated with lycopene. Conclusions Our findings show the capacity of lycopene to inhibit cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle in different phases and increase apoptosis, mainly in breast, colon and prostate lines after 96 h. These observations suggest that lycopene may alter cell cycle regulatory proteins depending on the type of cancer and the dose of lycopene administration. Taken together, these data indicated that the antiproliferative effect of lycopene was cellular type, time and dose-dependent.

  11. Improved prediction of breast cancer outcome by identifying heterogeneous biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghwan; Park, Sanghyun; Yoon, Youngmi; Ahn, Jaegyoon

    2017-11-15

    Identification of genes that can be used to predict prognosis in patients with cancer is important in that it can lead to improved therapy, and can also promote our understanding of tumor progression on the molecular level. One of the common but fundamental problems that render identification of prognostic genes and prediction of cancer outcomes difficult is the heterogeneity of patient samples. To reduce the effect of sample heterogeneity, we clustered data samples using K-means algorithm and applied modified PageRank to functional interaction (FI) networks weighted using gene expression values of samples in each cluster. Hub genes among resulting prioritized genes were selected as biomarkers to predict the prognosis of samples. This process outperformed traditional feature selection methods as well as several network-based prognostic gene selection methods when applied to Random Forest. We were able to find many cluster-specific prognostic genes for each dataset. Functional study showed that distinct biological processes were enriched in each cluster, which seems to reflect different aspect of tumor progression or oncogenesis among distinct patient groups. Taken together, these results provide support for the hypothesis that our approach can effectively identify heterogeneous prognostic genes, and these are complementary to each other, improving prediction accuracy. https://github.com/mathcom/CPR. jgahn@inu.ac.kr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  13. In silico mining identifies IGFBP3 as a novel target of methylation in prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Perry, A S

    2007-05-21

    Promoter hypermethylation is central in deregulating gene expression in cancer. Identification of novel methylation targets in specific cancers provides a basis for their use as biomarkers of disease occurrence and progression. We developed an in silico strategy to globally identify potential targets of promoter hypermethylation in prostate cancer by screening for 5\\' CpG islands in 631 genes that were reported as downregulated in prostate cancer. A virtual archive of 338 potential targets of methylation was produced. One candidate, IGFBP3, was selected for investigation, along with glutathione-S-transferase pi (GSTP1), a well-known methylation target in prostate cancer. Methylation of IGFBP3 was detected by quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 49\\/79 primary prostate adenocarcinoma and 7\\/14 adjacent preinvasive high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, but in only 5\\/37 benign prostatic hyperplasia (P < 0.0001) and in 0\\/39 histologically normal adjacent prostate tissue, which implies that methylation of IGFBP3 may be involved in the early stages of prostate cancer development. Hypermethylation of IGFBP3 was only detected in samples that also demonstrated methylation of GSTP1 and was also correlated with Gleason score > or =7 (P=0.01), indicating that it has potential as a prognostic marker. In addition, pharmacological demethylation induced strong expression of IGFBP3 in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our concept of a methylation candidate gene bank was successful in identifying a novel target of frequent hypermethylation in early-stage prostate cancer. Evaluation of further relevant genes could contribute towards a methylation signature of this disease.

  14. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stem cells in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Francesca; Fernandez, Pedro L; Thomson, Timothy M

    2013-06-01

    Tumors constitute complex ecosystems with multiple interactions among neoplastic cells displaying various phenotypes and functions and where the tumoral niche is built with an active participation of the host environment that also impacts the malignant progression of the tumor cells. Irrespective of the cell of origin of prostate adenocarcinoma, mounting evidences support the existence of a hierarchy within neoplastic prostate cells that contributes to the heterogeneity of these tumors. At the origin of this hierarchy are small populations of tumor cells with high self-renewal potential and also capable of generating progeny tumor cells that lose self-renewal properties as they acquire more differentiated phenotypes. These cancer stem cells (CSC) depend on active gene networks that confer them with their self-renewal capacity through symmetrical divisions whereas they can also undergo asymmetrical division and differentiation either as stochastic events or in response to environmental cues. Although new experimental evidences indicate that this is can be a reversible process, thus blurring the distinction between CSCs and non-CSCs, the former are considered as the drivers of tumor growth and evolution, and thus a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Of particular importance in prostate cancer, CSCs may constitute the repository population of androgen-insensitive and chemotherapy-resistant tumor cells responsible for castration-resistant and chemotherapy-insensitive tumors, thus their identification and quantification in primary and metastatic neoplasms could play important roles in the management of this disease.

  16. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gene...... expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  17. Cancer stem cell-like side population cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Huang, Yi Jun; Yao, Zhi Jun; Chen, Xu; Guo, Sheng Jie; Mao, Xiao Peng; Wang, Dao Hu; Chen, Jun Xing; Qiu, Shao Peng

    2013-01-01

    Although cancers are widely considered to be maintained by stem cells, the existence of stem cells in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has seldom been reported, in part due to the lack of unique surface markers. We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that 769P, a human clear cell RCC cell line, contained the largest amount of SP cells as compared with other four cell lines. These 769P SP cells possessed characteristics of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as strong resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy that were possibly related to the ABCB1 transporter. In vivo experiments with serial tumor transplantation in mice also showed that 769P SP cells formed tumors in NOD/SCID mice. Taken together, these results indicate that 769P SP cells have the properties of cancer stem cells, which may play important roles in tumorigenesis and therapy-resistance of RCC.

  18. Cancer Stem Cells, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Markers, and Circulating Tumor Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, M.M.; Meijer, C.; de Bock, G.H.; Boersma-van Ek, W.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Groen, H.J.M.; Timens, W.; Kruyt, F.A.E.; Hiltermann, T.N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis, and even with localized (limited) disease, the 5-year survival has only been around 20%. Elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been associated with a worse prognosis, and markers of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and

  19. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G.; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ˜16. Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15, and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

  20. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  1. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-06

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors.

  2. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X; Lowry, W E

    2016-05-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in fact define cell fate. Lastly, we introduce a web-based database to disseminate the results. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  4. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  5. Spheroid body-forming cells in the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 possess cancer stem cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Ma, Lilin; Xu, Junfei; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Jie; Chen, Ruixin; Zhou, Youlang

    2013-02-01

    The cancer stem cell theory hypothesizes that cancer stem cells (CSCs), which possess self-renewal and other stem cell properties, are regarded as the cause of tumor formation, recurrence and metastasis. The isolation and identification of CSCs could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies specifically targeting CSCs. In this study, we enriched gastric cancer stem cells through spheroid body formation by cultivating the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 in defined serum-free medium. The stemness characteristics of spheroid body-forming cells, including self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance, tumorigenicity of the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were evaluated, and the expression levels of stemness genes and related proteins in the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were assessed. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining for the stem cell markers on spheroid body-forming cells was examined to evaluate the association between stemness factors (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog) and the proposed CSC marker CD44. Our data demonstrated that non-adherent spheroid body-forming cells from the gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 cultured in stem cell-conditioned medium possessed gastric CSC properties, such as persistent self-renewal, extensive proliferation, drug resistance, high tumorigenic capacity and overexpression of CSC-related genes and proteins (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44), compared with the parental cells. More importantly, CD44-positive cells co-expressing the pluripotency genes Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog may represent gastric CSCs. Further experiments using more refined selection criteria such as a combination of two or multiple markers would be useful to specifically identify and purify CSCs.

  6. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated...... the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1...... summarized mutation load in these regions by a combined mutation score that is statistical significantly associated to survival by analysis in the data sets used for identification of the regions. Furthermore, the prognostic value of the combined mutation score was validated in an independent large data set...

  7. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  8. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  9. The expression of TRMT2A, a novel cell cycle regulated protein, identifies a subset of breast cancer patients with HER2 over-expression that are at an increased risk of recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubbs Raymond

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over-expression of HER2 in a subset of breast cancers (HER2+ is associated with high histological grade and aggressive clinical course. Despite these distinctive features, the differences in response of HER2+ patients to both adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy (e.g. trastuzumab suggests that unrecognized biologic and clinical diversity is confounding treatment strategies. Furthermore, the small but established risk of cardiac morbidity with trastuzumab therapy compels efforts towards the identification of biomarkers that might help stratify patients. Methods A single institution tissue array cohort assembled at the Clearview Cancer Institute of Huntsville (CCIH was screened by immunohistochemistry staining using a large number of novel and commercially available antibodies to identify those with a univariate association with clinical outcome in HER2+ patients. Staining with antibody directed at TRMT2A was found to be strongly associated with outcome in HER2+ patients. This association with outcome was tested in two independent validation cohorts; an existing staining dataset derived from tissue assembled at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF, and in a new retrospective study performed by staining archived paraffin blocks available at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI. Results TRMT2A staining showed a strong correlation with likelihood of recurrence at five years in 67 HER2+ patients from the CCIH discovery cohort (HR 7.0; 95% CI 2.4 to 20.1, p HER2+ patients from the CCF cohort (HR 3.6; 95% CI 1.3 to 10.2, p Conclusions Studies from three independent single institution cohorts support TRMT2A protein expression as a biomarker of increased risk of recurrence in HER2+ breast cancer patients. These results suggest that TRMT2A expression should be further studied in the clinical trial setting to explore its predictive power for response to adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy in combination with HER2 targeted

  10. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  11. Exploratory Study to Identify Radiomics Classifiers for Lung Cancer Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weimiao; Parmar, Chintan; Grossmann, Patrick; Quackenbush, John; Lambin, Philippe; Bussink, Johan; Mak, Raymond; Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2016-01-01

    Radiomics can quantify tumor phenotypic characteristics non-invasively by applying feature algorithms to medical imaging data. In this study of lung cancer patients, we investigated the association between radiomic features and the tumor histologic subtypes (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma). Furthermore, in order to predict histologic subtypes, we employed machine-learning methods and independently evaluated their prediction performance. Two independent radiomic cohorts with a combined size of 350 patients were included in our analysis. A total of 440 radiomic features were extracted from the segmented tumor volumes of pretreatment CT images. These radiomic features quantify tumor phenotypic characteristics on medical images using tumor shape and size, intensity statistics, and texture. Univariate analysis was performed to assess each feature's association with the histological subtypes. In our multivariate analysis, we investigated 24 feature selection methods and 3 classification methods for histology prediction. Multivariate models were trained on the training cohort and their performance was evaluated on the independent validation cohort using the area under ROC curve (AUC). Histology was determined from surgical specimen. In our univariate analysis, we observed that fifty-three radiomic features were significantly associated with tumor histology. In multivariate analysis, feature selection methods ReliefF and its variants showed higher prediction accuracy as compared to other methods. We found that Naive Baye's classifier outperforms other classifiers and achieved the highest AUC (0.72; p-value = 2.3 × 10(-7)) with five features: Stats_min, Wavelet_HLL_rlgl_lowGrayLevelRunEmphasis, Wavelet_HHL_stats_median, Wavelet_HLL_stats_skewness, and Wavelet_HLH_glcm_clusShade. Histological subtypes can influence the choice of a treatment/therapy for lung cancer patients. We observed that radiomic features show significant association with the lung

  12. Reprogramming cancer cells: overview & current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian Lam; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is a disease with genetic and epigenetic origins, and the possible effects of reprogramming cancer cells using the defined sets of transcription factors remain largely uninvestigated. In the handful of publications available so far, findings have shown that reprogramming cancer cells changed the characteristics of the cells to differ from the parental cancer cells. These findings indicated the possibility of utilizing reprogramming technology to create a disease model in the laboratory to be used in studying the molecular pathogenesis or for drug screening of a particular cancer model. Despite numerous methods employed in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from cancer cells only a few studies have successfully reprogrammed malignant human cells. In this review we will provide an overview on i) methods to reprogram cancer cells, ii) characterization of the reprogrammed cancer cells, and iii) the differential effects of reprogramming on malignancy, epigenetics and response of the cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Continued technical progress in cancer cell reprogramming technology will be instrumental for more refined in vitro disease models and ultimately for the development of directed and personalized therapy for cancer patients in the future.

  13. Lentiviral vector-based insertional mutagenesis identifies genes associated with liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzani, Marco; Cesana, Daniela; Bartholomae, Cynthia C.; Sanvito, Francesca; Pala, Mauro; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Gallina, Pierangela; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Merella, Stefania; Bulfone, Alessandro; Doglioni, Claudio; von Kalle, Christof; Kim, Yoon Jun; Schmidt, Manfred; Tonon, Giovanni; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Transposons and γ-retroviruses have been efficiently used as insertional mutagens in different tissues to identify molecular culprits of cancer. However, these systems are characterized by recurring integrations that accumulate in tumor cells, hampering the identification of early cancer-driving events amongst bystander and progression-related events. We developed an insertional mutagenesis platform based on lentiviral vectors (LVV) by which we could efficiently induce hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 3 different mouse models. By virtue of LVV’s replication-deficient nature and broad genome-wide integration pattern, LVV-based insertional mutagenesis allowed identification of 4 new liver cancer genes from a limited number of integrations. We validated the oncogenic potential of all the identified genes in vivo, with different levels of penetrance. Our newly identified cancer genes are likely to play a role in human disease, since they are upregulated and/or amplified/deleted in human HCCs and can predict clinical outcome of patients. PMID:23314173

  14. Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Pedro M; Caicedo, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Stemness combines the ability of a cell to perpetuate its lineage, to give rise to differentiated cells, and to interact with its environment to maintain a balance between quiescence, proliferation, and regeneration. While adult Stem Cells display these properties when participating in tissue homeostasis, Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) behave as their malignant equivalents. CSCs display stemness in various circumstances, including the sustaining of cancer progression, and the interaction with their environment in search for key survival factors. As a result, CSCs can recurrently persist after therapy. In order to understand how the concept of stemness applies to cancer, this review will explore properties shared between normal and malignant Stem Cells. First, we provide an overview of properties of normal adult Stem Cells. We thereafter elaborate on how these features operate in CSCs. We then review the organization of microenvironment components, which enables CSCs hosting. We subsequently discuss Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs), which, although their stemness properties are limited, represent essential components of the Stem Cell niche and tumor microenvironment. We next provide insights of the therapeutic strategies targeting Stem Cell properties in tumors and the use of state-of-the-art techniques in future research. Increasing our knowledge of the CSCs microenvironment is key to identifying new therapeutic solutions.

  15. Clinicopathologic factors identify sporadic mismatch repair-defective colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvarsson, Britta; Anderson, Harald; Domanska, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Identification of sporadic mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colon cancers is increasingly demanded for decisions on adjuvant therapies. We evaluated clinicopathologic factors for the identification of these prognostically favorable tumors. Histopathologic features in 238 consecutive colon cancers...... and excluded 61.5% of the tumors from MMR testing. This clinicopathologic index thus successfully selects MMR-defective colon cancers. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  16. Long-term survival in small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Osterlind, K; Hansen, M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) the characteristics of those who survive for > or = 5 years, to identify long-term prognostic factors, to analyze survival data of 5-year survivors, and to study 10-year survival in patients entered before 1981. PATIENTS......, especially tobacco-related cancers and other tobacco-related diseases....

  17. A genome-wide screen for promoter methylation in lung cancer identifies novel methylation markers for multiple malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Shames

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Promoter hypermethylation coupled with loss of heterozygosity at the same locus results in loss of gene function in many tumor cells. The "rules" governing which genes are methylated during the pathogenesis of individual cancers, how specific methylation profiles are initially established, or what determines tumor type-specific methylation are unknown. However, DNA methylation markers that are highly specific and sensitive for common tumors would be useful for the early detection of cancer, and those required for the malignant phenotype would identify pathways important as therapeutic targets.In an effort to identify new cancer-specific methylation markers, we employed a high-throughput global expression profiling approach in lung cancer cells. We identified 132 genes that have 5' CpG islands, are induced from undetectable levels by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in multiple non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and are expressed in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. As expected, these genes were also expressed in normal lung, but often not in companion primary lung cancers. Methylation analysis of a subset (45/132 of these promoter regions in primary lung cancer (n = 20 and adjacent nonmalignant tissue (n = 20 showed that 31 genes had acquired methylation in the tumors, but did not show methylation in normal lung or peripheral blood cells. We studied the eight most frequently and specifically methylated genes from our lung cancer dataset in breast cancer (n = 37, colon cancer (n = 24, and prostate cancer (n = 24 along with counterpart nonmalignant tissues. We found that seven loci were frequently methylated in both breast and lung cancers, with four showing extensive methylation in all four epithelial tumors.By using a systematic biological screen we identified multiple genes that are methylated with high penetrance in primary lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers. The cross-tumor methylation pattern we observed for these novel markers

  18. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer stem cells: the theory and perspectives in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Justyna; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Pesz, Karolina A; Sasiadek, Maria M

    2008-01-01

    The cancer stem cell theory elucidates not only the issue of tumour initiation and development, tumour's ability to metastasise and reoccur, but also the ineffectiveness of conventional cancer therapy. This review examines stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, heterogeneity, and resistance to apoptosis. The 'niche' hypothesis is presented, and mechanisms of division, differentiation, self-renewal and signalling pathway regulation are explained. Epigenetic alterations and mutations of genes responsible for signal transmission may promote the formation of cancer stem cells. We also present the history of development of the cancer stem cell theory and discuss the experiments that led to the discovery and confirmation of the existence of cancer stem cells. Potential clinical applications are also considered, including therapeutic models aimed at selective elimination of cancer stem cells or induction of their proper differentiation.

  20. Novel snail1 target proteins in human colon cancer identified by proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Larriba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Snail1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process responsible for the acquisition of invasiveness during tumorigenesis. Several transcriptomic studies have reported Snail1-regulated genes in different cell types, many of them involved in cell adhesion. However, only a few studies have used proteomics as a tool for the characterization of proteins mediating EMT.We identified by proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF and ESI-linear ion trap mass spectrometry a number of proteins with variable functions whose expression is modulated by Snail1 in SW480-ADH human colon cancer cells. Validation was performed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Snail1 repressed several members of the 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/phosphothreonine binding proteins and also the expression of the Proliferation-associated protein 2G4 (PA2G4 that was mainly localized at the nuclear Cajal bodies. In contrast, the expression of two proteins involved in RNA processing, the Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6 and the Splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ, was higher in Snail1-expressing cells than in controls. The regulation of 14-3-3epsilon, 14-3-3tau, 14-3-3zeta and PA2G4 by Snail1 was reproduced in HT29 colon cancer cells. In addition, we found an inverse correlation between 14-3-3sigma and Snail1 expression in human colorectal tumors.We have identified a set of novel Snail1 target proteins in colon cancer that expand the cellular processes affected by Snail1 and thus its relevance for cell function and phenotype.

  1. Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing YIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs, including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2. Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  2. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Devon A.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D.; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality1. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours2–5. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown2. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are

  3. A POX on Renal Cancer Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proline oxidase, or POX, is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing the amino acid proline. POX contributes to the regulation of cell death that occurs when cellular systems malfunction, a process called apoptosis. Previous studies have determined that levels of POX are reduced in several types of human cancer. Likewise, many cancer cells become resistant to apoptosis, suggesting a link between POX and cancer cell survival.

  4. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  5. Stromal cells in tumor microenvironment and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T; Garfield, David H; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression but also induce therapeutic resistance. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistance. This review summarizes the current understandings of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. In addition, the effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages, and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to categorize patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment.

  6. Stroma Cells in Tumor Microenvironment and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T.; Garfield, David H.; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease, encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression, but also induce therapeutic resistances. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistances. This review summarizes the current understanding of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. The effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to sort patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment. PMID:23114846

  7. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  8. Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by at Least Two Cancer Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Beesley, Jonathan; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Lawrenson, Kate; Lindstrom, Sara; Ramus, Susan J; Thompson, Deborah J; Kibel, Adam S; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Michael, Agnieszka; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Whittemore, Alice S; Wolk, Alicja; Monteiro, Alvaro; Peixoto, Ana; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cox, Angela; Rudolph, Anja; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Wu, Anna H; Lindblom, Annika; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B; Burwinkel, Barbara; Karlan, Beth Y; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Blomqvist, Carl; Phelan, Catherine; McLean, Catriona; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Vachon, Celine; Cybulski, Cezary; Slavov, Chavdar; Stegmaier, Christa; Maier, Christiane; Ambrosone, Christine B; Høgdall, Claus K; Teerlink, Craig C; Kang, Daehee; Tessier, Daniel C; Schaid, Daniel J; Stram, Daniel O; Cramer, Daniel W; Neal, David E; Eccles, Diana; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Wokozorczyk, Dominika; Levine, Douglas A; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sawyer, Elinor J; Bandera, Elisa V; Poole, Elizabeth M; Goode, Ellen L; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Høgdall, Estrid; Song, Fengju; Bruinsma, Fiona; Heitz, Florian; Modugno, Francesmary; Hamdy, Freddie C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Giles, Graham G; Olsson, Håkan; Wildiers, Hans; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Pandha, Hardev; Risch, Harvey A; Darabi, Hatef; Salvesen, Helga B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Gronberg, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Song, Honglin; Lim, Hui-Yi; McNeish, Iain; Campbell, Ian; Vergote, Ignace; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Stanford, Janet L; Benítez, Javier; Doherty, Jennifer A; Permuth, Jennifer B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Donovan, Jenny L; Dennis, Joe; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schleutker, Johanna; Hopper, John L; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Park, Jong Y; Figueroa, Jonine; Clements, Judith A; Knight, Julia A; Peto, Julian; Cunningham, Julie M; Pow-Sang, Julio; Batra, Jyotsna; Czene, Kamila; Lu, Karen H; Herkommer, Kathleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Muir, Kenneth; Offitt, Kenneth; Chen, Kexin; Moysich, Kirsten B; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Odunsi, Kunle; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Cook, Linda S; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Hooning, Maartje J; Pike, Malcolm C; Bolla, Manjeet K; Luedeke, Manuel; Teixeira, Manuel R; Goodman, Marc T; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Riggan, Marjorie; Aly, Markus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W; Moisse, Matthieu; Sanderson, Maureen; Southey, Melissa C; Jones, Michael; Lush, Michael; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hou, Ming-Feng; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Bogdanova, Natalia; Rahman, Nazneen; Le, Nhu D; Orr, Nick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pashayan, Nora; Peterlongo, Paolo; Guénel, Pascal; Brennan, Paul; Paulo, Paula; Webb, Penelope M; Broberg, Per; Fasching, Peter A; Devilee, Peter; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Qiyuan; Kaneva, Radka; Butzow, Ralf; Kopperud, Reidun Kristin; Schmutzler, Rita K; Stephenson, Robert A; MacInnis, Robert J; Hoover, Robert N; Winqvist, Robert; Ness, Roberta; Milne, Roger L; Travis, Ruth C; Benlloch, Sara; Olson, Sara H; McDonnell, Shannon K; Tworoger, Shelley S; Maia, Sofia; Berndt, Sonja; Lee, Soo Chin; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Bojesen, Stig E; Gapstur, Susan M; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Pejovic, Tanja; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Dörk, Thilo; Brüning, Thomas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Key, Tim J; Edwards, Todd L; Menon, Usha; Hamann, Ute; Mitev, Vanio; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Kristensen, Vessela; Arndt, Volker; Vogel, Walther; Zheng, Wei; Sieh, Weiva; Blot, William J; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Schumacher, Fredrick; Freedman, Matthew L; Berchuck, Andrew; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Haiman, Christopher A; Spurdle, Amanda; Sellers, Thomas A; Hunter, David J; Henderson, Brian E; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Gayther, Simon A; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D P; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-09-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis, but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type-specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P cancer meta-analysis. We demonstrate that combining large-scale GWA meta-analysis findings across cancer types can identify completely new risk loci common to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. We show that the identification of such cross-cancer risk loci has the potential to shed new light on the shared biology underlying these hormone-related cancers. Cancer Discov; 6(9); 1052-67. ©2016 AACR.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 932. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  10. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Rachel D; Emmett, Kevin J; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-04-30

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here, we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbour cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than 5,000 patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate 'pan-cancer' comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers.

  11. Hyaluronan Tumor Cell Interactions in Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    hyaluronidase pretreatment or by using RNAi for the hyaluronan synthase enzymes expressed by these cells. The prediction, again, is that limiting HA...vertebrates and is not found in lower organisms or in insects (Fig. 9.2). Given its roles in such important cellular processes as motility and cell division in...cancer. Gut Zlobec, I., et al. (2008b). Node-negative colorectal cancer at high risk of distant metastasis identified by combined analysis of lymph

  12. Side population cells separated from A549 lung cancer cell line possess cancer stem cell-like properties and inhibition of autophagy potentiates the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Fan, Yuxia; Qi, Yu; Liu, Donglei; Wu, Kai; Wen, Fengbiao; Zhao, Song

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be responsible for tumorigenesis and contribute to resistance to chemotherapy. Side population (SP) cells are thought to be enriched for CSCs in most types of human tumors. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to sort SP cells using an A549 lung cancer cell line, identify the cancer stem cell-like properties of SP and determine the role of autophagy in the survival of SP cells of lung cancer. SP cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) from A549 lung cancer cells, and the CSC-like properties were verified through confocal fluorescence imaging, sphere formation assays, cell proliferation and colony formation assay, gene expression in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. The role of autophagy in the survival of SP cells was assessed by western blotting and flow cytometric analysis. A549 lung cancer cells contained 1.10% SP cells. SP cells showed higher abilities of sphere and colony formation, cell proliferation and self-renewal. Moreover, compared to non-SP, SP cells demonstrated a higher mRNA expression of stem cell markers (MDR1, ABCG2 and OCT-4). The clone formation efficiency of SP cells was significantly higher than that non-SP cells under the same conditions. Expression of autophagosomes in SP cells was markedly lower than that in non-SP cells. However, the level of autophagy in SP cells was found to be markedly increased in the presence of cisplatin. In addition, inhibition of autophagy enhanced the effects of apoptosis induced by cisplatin. SP cells from the A549 lung cancer cell line possessed the properties of CSCs and were used to investigate the further characteristics of lung CSCs. SP cells were more resistant to chemotherapy and inhibition of autophagy enhanced the effects of apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin. These results may provide insight into novel therapeutic targets.

  13. EZH2 depletion blocks the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Fussbroich

    Full Text Available The Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2 protein has been reported to stimulate cell growth in some cancers and is therefore considered to represent an interesting new target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated a possible role of EZH2 for the growth control of colon cancer cells. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated intracellular EZH2 depletion led to cell cycle arrest of colon carcinoma cells at the G1/S transition. This was associated with a reduction of cell numbers upon transient transfection of synthetic EZH2-targeting siRNAs and with inhibition of their colony formation capacity upon stable expression of vector-borne siRNAs. We furthermore tested whether EZH2 may repress the growth-inhibitory p27 gene, as reported for pancreatic cancer. However, expression analyses of colon cancer cell lines and colon cancer biopsies did not reveal a consistent correlation between EZH2 and p27 levels. Moreover, EZH2 depletion did not re-induce p27 expression in colon cancer cells, indicating that p27 repression by EZH2 may be cell- or tissue-specific. Whole genome transcriptome analyses identified cellular genes affected by EZH2 depletion in colon cancer cell lines. They included several cancer-associated genes linked to cellular proliferation or invasion, such as Dag1, MageD1, SDC1, Timp2, and Tob1. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EZH2 depletion blocks the growth of colon cancer cells. These findings might provide benefits for the treatment of colon cancer.

  14. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast ca...

  15. NIH scientists identify molecular link between metabolism and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A protein associated with conditions of metabolic imbalance, such as diabetes and obesity, may play a role in the development of aggressive forms of breast cancer, according to new findings by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of th

  16. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Beesley, Jonathan; Hui, Shirley; Kar, Siddhartha; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Glubb, Dylan; Rostamianfar, Asha; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Wang, Zhaoming; Allen, Jamie; Keeman, Renske; Eilber, Ursula; French, Juliet D.; Qing Chen, Xiao; Fachal, Laura; McCue, Karen; McCart Reed, Amy E.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Carroll, Jason S.; Jiang, Xia; Finucane, Hilary; Adams, Marcia; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Arndt, Volker; Aronson, Kristan J.; Arun, Banu; Auer, Paul L.; Bacot, François; Barrdahl, Myrto; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brock, Ian W.; Broeks, Annegien; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brucker, Sara Y.; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butterbach, Katja; Cai, Qiuyin; Cai, Hui; Caldés, Trinidad; Canzian, Federico; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D.; Castelao, Jose E.; Chan, Tsun L.; David Cheng, Ting-Yuan; Seng Chia, Kee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Christiansen, Hans; Clarke, Christine L.; Collée, Margriet; Conroy, Don M.; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Cox, David G.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Devilee, Peter; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Eccles, Diana M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Ellberg, Carolina; Elvira, Mingajeva; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fritschi, Lin; Gaborieau, Valerie; Gabrielson, Marike; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; García-Sáenz, José A.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe I.; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A.; Håkansson, Niclas; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hartman, Mikael; Hein, Alexander; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Ho, Dona N.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Huang, Guanmengqian; Humphreys, Keith; Ishiguro, Junko; Ito, Hidemi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Iwata, Hiroji; Jakubowska, Anna; Janni, Wolfgang; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kasuga, Yoshio; Kerin, Michael J.; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Krüger, Ute; Kwong, Ava; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Neng Lee, Chuen; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lux, Michael P.; Ma, Edmond S. K.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolin, Sara; Mariapun, Shivaani; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; McKay, James; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menon, Usha; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Nicola; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Sune F.; Noh, Dong-Young; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Norman, Aaron; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olsson, Håkan; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Pankratz, V. Shane; Park, Sue K.; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Lloyd, Rachel; Perez, Jose I. A.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofyeva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rennert, Gadi; Rennert, Hedy S.; Rhenius, Valerie; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Ruebner, Matthias; Rutgers, Emiel J. T.; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sandler, Dale P.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Scott, Rodney J.; Scott, Christopher; Seal, Sheila; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Grace; Sherman, Mark E.; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Smeets, Ann; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stone, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O.; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tamimi, Rulla; Taylor, Jack A.; Tengström, Maria; teo, Soo H.; Beth Terry, Mary; Tessier, Daniel C.; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Thöne, Kathrin; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Ursin, Giske; Untch, Michael; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Kolk, Lizet; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Wendt, Camilla; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wildiers, Hans; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H.; Xia, Lucy; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Har Yip, Cheng; Yoo, Keun-Young; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L.; Amos, Christopher I.; Couch, Fergus J.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hall, Per; Hunter, David J.; Milne, Roger L.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Bader, Gary D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast

  17. Identifying Genes Responsible for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Meijer (Daniëlle)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the leading causes of death of women in western countries. It affects one out of eight females in the USA (1) and one out of nine females in The Netherlands (www.kankerregistratie.nl) during their lifetime. Many risk factors for breast cancer have been

  18. The Use of Chemical-Chemical Interaction and Chemical Structure to Identify New Candidate Chemicals Related to Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Lung cancer causes over one million deaths every year worldwide. However, prevention and treatment methods for this serious disease are limited. The identification of new chemicals related to lung cancer may aid in disease prevention and the design of more effective treatments. This study employed a weighted network, constructed using chemical-chemical interaction information, to identify new chemicals related to two types of lung cancer: non-small lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. Then, a randomization test as well as chemical-chemical interaction and chemical structure information were utilized to make further selections. A final analysis of these new chemicals in the context of the current literature indicates that several chemicals are strongly linked to lung cancer.

  19. The Use of Chemical-Chemical Interaction and Chemical Structure to Identify New Candidate Chemicals Related to Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingyue; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer causes over one million deaths every year worldwide. However, prevention and treatment methods for this serious disease are limited. The identification of new chemicals related to lung cancer may aid in disease prevention and the design of more effective treatments. This study employed a weighted network, constructed using chemical-chemical interaction information, to identify new chemicals related to two types of lung cancer: non-small lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. Then, a randomization test as well as chemical-chemical interaction and chemical structure information were utilized to make further selections. A final analysis of these new chemicals in the context of the current literature indicates that several chemicals are strongly linked to lung cancer. PMID:26047514

  20. Characterization of side population cells isolated from the colon cancer cell line SW480.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Binghong; Ma, Li; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Caiquan; Cheng, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer. Many types of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells, including colon cancer cell lines. This study aimed to identify cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the SP of the colon cancer cell line SW480. SP cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), followed by serum-free medium (SFM) culture. The self-renewal, differentiated progeny, clone formation, proliferation, invasion ability, cell cycle, chemosensitivity and tumorigenic properties in SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were investigated through in vitro culture and in vivo serial transplantation. The expression profiles of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein transporters and stem cell-related genes were examined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The human colon cancer cell lines SW480, Lovo and HCT116 contain 1.1 ± 0.10, 0.93 ± 0.11 and 1.33 ± 0.05% SP cells, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that SP cells could differentiate into SP and NSP cells. SP cells had a higher proliferation potency and CFE than NSP cells. Compared to NSP cells, SP cells were also more resistant to CDDP and 5-FU, and were more invasive and displayed increased tumorigenic ability. Moreover, SP cells showed higher mRNA and protein expression of ABCG2, MDR1, OCT-4, NANOG, SOX-2, CD44 and CD133. SP cells isolated from human colon cancer cell lines harbor CSC properties that may be related to the invasive potential and therapeutic resistance of colon cancer.

  1. Cancer Cell Fusion: Mechanisms Slowly Unravel

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    Felicite K. Noubissi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways driving invasion and metastasis have been studied for many years, the origin of the population of metastatic cells within the primary tumor is still not well understood. About a century ago, Aichel proposed that cancer cell fusion was a mechanism of cancer metastasis. This hypothesis gained some support over the years, and recently became the focus of many studies that revealed increasing evidence pointing to the possibility that cancer cell fusion probably gives rise to the metastatic phenotype by generating widespread genetic and epigenetic diversity, leading to the emergence of critical populations needed to evolve resistance to the treatment and development of metastasis. In this review, we will discuss the clinical relevance of cancer cell fusion, describe emerging mechanisms of cancer cell fusion, address why inhibiting cancer cell fusion could represent a critical line of attack to limit drug resistance and to prevent metastasis, and suggest one new modality for doing so.

  2. Current approaches in identification and isolation of human renal cell carcinoma cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    KHAN, MOHAMMED I.; Czarnecka, Anna M.; Helbrecht, Igor; Bartnik, Ewa; Lian, Fei; Szczylik, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cancer stem cells (CSCs)/tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified inside different tumors. However, currently used anti-cancer therapies are mostly directed against somatic tumor cells without targeting CSCs/TICs. CSCs/TICs also gain resistance to chemotherapies/radiotherapies. For the development of efficient treatment strategies, choosing the best method for isolation and characterization of CSCs/TICs is still debated among the scientific community. In this review...

  3. shRNA kinome screen identifies TBK1 as a therapeutic target for HER2+ breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tao; Liu, Jeff C; Chung, Philip E D; Uehling, David; Aman, Ahmed; Joseph, Babu; Ketela, Troy; Jiang, Zhe; Schachter, Nathan F; Rottapel, Robert; Egan, Sean E; Al-Awar, Rima; Moffat, Jason; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2014-04-01

    HER2(+) breast cancer is currently treated with chemotherapy plus anti-HER2 inhibitors. Many patients do not respond or relapse with aggressive metastatic disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new therapeutics that can target HER2(+) breast cancer and potentiate the effect of anti-HER2 inhibitors, in particular those that can target tumor-initiating cells (TIC). Here, we show that MMTV-Her2/Neu mammary tumor cells cultured as nonadherent spheres or as adherent monolayer cells select for stabilizing mutations in p53 that "immortalize" the cultures and that, after serial passages, sphere conditions maintain TICs, whereas monolayer cells gradually lose these tumorigenic cells. Using tumorsphere formation as surrogate for TICs, we screened p53-mutant Her2/Neu(+) tumorsphere versus monolayer cells with a lentivirus short hairpin RNA kinome library. We identified kinases such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase and the TGFβR protein family, previously implicated in HER2(+) breast cancer, as well as autophagy factor ATG1/ULK1 and the noncanonical IκB kinase (IKK), TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which have not been previously linked to HER2(+) breast cancer. Knockdown of TBK1 or pharmacologic inhibition of TBK1 and the related protein, IKKε, suppressed growth of both mouse and human HER2(+) breast cancer cells. TBK1/IKKε inhibition promoted cellular senescence by suppressing p65-NF-κB and inducing p16(Ink4a). In addition, TBK1/IKKε inhibition cooperated with lapatinib, a HER2/EGFR1-targeted drug, to accelerate apoptosis and kill HER2(+) breast cancer cells both in culture and in xenografts. Our results suggest that patients with HER2(+) breast cancer may benefit from anti-TBK1/IKKε plus anti-HER2 combination therapies and establish conditions that can be used to screen for additional TIC-specific inhibitors of HER2(+) breast cancer. ©2014 AACR.

  4. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Facchino, Sabrina; Abdouh, Mohamed [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Bernier, Gilbert, E-mail: gbernier.hmr@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2011-03-30

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  5. Cell surface marker profiling of human tracheal basal cells reveals distinct subpopulations, identifies MST1/MSP as a mitogenic signal, and identifies new biomarkers for lung squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Laar, Emily; Clifford, Monica; Hasenoeder, Stefan; Kim, Bo Ram; Wang, Dennis; Lee, Sharon; Paterson, Josh; Vu, Nancy M; Waddell, Thomas K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Ailles, Laurie; Moghal, Nadeem

    2014-12-31

    The large airways of the lungs (trachea and bronchi) are lined with a pseudostratified mucociliary epithelium, which is maintained by stem cells/progenitors within the basal cell compartment. Alterations in basal cell behavior can contribute to large airway diseases including squamous cell carcinomas (SQCCs). Basal cells have traditionally been thought of as a uniform population defined by basolateral position, cuboidal cell shape, and expression of pan-basal cell lineage markers like KRT5 and TP63. While some evidence suggests that basal cells are not all functionally equivalent, few heterogeneously expressed markers have been identified to purify and study subpopulations. In addition, few signaling pathways have been identified that regulate their cell behavior. The goals of this work were to investigate tracheal basal cell diversity and to identify new signaling pathways that regulate basal cell behavior. We used flow cytometry (FACS) to profile cell surface marker expression at a single cell level in primary human tracheal basal cell cultures that maintain stem cell/progenitor activity. FACS results were validated with tissue staining, in silico comparisons with normal basal cell and lung cancer datasets, and an in vitro proliferation assay. We identified 105 surface markers, with 47 markers identifying potential subpopulations. These subpopulations generally fell into more (~ > 13%) or less abundant (~ markers in the total population, and immunostaining of large airway tissue suggested that some of these markers are relevant in vivo. 24 markers were enriched in lung SQCCs relative to adenocarcinomas, with four markers having prognostic significance in SQCCs. We also identified 33 signaling receptors, including the MST1R/RON growth factor receptor, whose ligand MST1/MSP was mitogenic for basal cells. This work provides the largest description to date of molecular diversity among human large airway basal cells. Furthermore, these markers can be used to further

  6. Systemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Miyamoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05. Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.

  7. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Wei ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  8. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  9. A preliminary study of side population cells in human gastric cancer cell line HGC-27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ganglong; Sun, Zhenliang; Wenyong, Liu; Dongxia, Ye; Zhao, Runjia; Zhang, Xueli

    2015-03-16

    Cancer stem cell-like side population (SP) cells, which may be responsible for recurrence, tumor metastasis, and resistance to cancer therapy, have been identified and characterized in several types of cell lines from gastric cancer. However, there is no report on isolation of SP cells from human gastric cancer cell line HGC-27. This study aims to analyze the proportion of SP cells in HGC-27 cell line, differentiate SP from non-side population (NSP) cells, and determine whether the SP cells have certain biological properties of stem cells. (1) HGC-27 suspension was prepared and stained with Hoechst33342 and PI for flow cytometric isolation of SP (2). Differences in proliferation and stemness-related gene expression profiles (CD133, CD44, OCT-4, MDR1, EpCAM, and ABCG2) between SP and NSP cells were detected by gastric formation assay and quantitative real-time PCR (3). Oncogenicity of SP and NSP cells was determined in nude mice in vivo. (1) SP cells accounted for 0.1-1.0% of HGC-27 cells, and decreased to 0% after verapamil inhibition. Using flow cytometry, we sorted 7.5×10⁵ SP cells and most HGC-27 cells were NSP cells (2). Gastric formation assay and MTT demonstrated that there was a significant difference in proliferation between SP and NSP cells. Gene expression analysis showed that the expression of genes was significantly higher in SP cells (3). The oncogenicity experiment in nude mice revealed that 105 SP cells were able to form tumors, which demonstrated higher tumorigenicity than non-SP cells. These results collectively suggested that SP cells from HGC-27 cell line have some cancer stem cell properties and could be used for studying the pathogenesis of gastric cancer, which may contribute to discovery of novel therapeutic targets.

  10. Transcriptome sequencing in prostate cancer identifies inter-tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Mendonca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the dearth of gene mutations in prostate cancer, [1] ,[2] it is likely that genomic rearrangements play a significant role in the evolution of prostate cancer. However, in the search for recurrent genomic alterations, "private alterations" have received less attention. Such alterations may provide insights into the evolution, behavior, and clinical outcome of an individual tumor. In a recent report in "Genome Biology" Wyatt et al. [3] defines unique alterations in a cohort of high-risk prostate cancer patient with a lethal phenotype. Utilizing a transcriptome sequencing approach they observe high inter-tumor heterogeneity; however, the genes altered distill into three distinct cancer-relevant pathways. Their analysis reveals the presence of several non-ETS fusions, which may contribute to the phenotype of individual tumors, and have significance for disease progression.

  11. Tumor-Initiating and -Propagating Cells: Cells That We Would to Identify and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Bølge Tysnes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the cell types capable of initiating and sustaining growth of the neoplastic clone in vivo is a fundamental problem in cancer research. It is likely that tumor growth can be sustained both by rare cancer stem-like cells and selected aggressive clones and that the nature of the mutations, the cell of origin, and its environment will contribute to tumor propagation. Genomic instability, suggested as a driving force in tumorigenesis, may be induced by genetic and epigenetic changes. The feature of self-renewal in stem cells is shared with tumor cells, and deviant function of the stem cell regulatory networks may, in complex ways, contribute to malignant transformation and the establishment of a cancer stem cell-like phenotype. Understanding the nature of the more quiescent cancer stem-like cells and their niches has the potential to develop novel cancer therapeutic protocols including pharmacological targeting of self-renewal pathways. Drugs that target cancer-related inflammation may have the potential to reeducate a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Because most epigenetic modifications may be reversible, DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors can be used to induce reexpression of genes that have been silenced epigenetically. Design of therapies that eliminate cancer stem-like cells without eliminating normal stem cells will be important. Further insight into the mechanisms by which pluripotency transcription factors (e.g., OCT4, SOX2, and Nanog, polycomb repressive complexes and microRNA balance selfrenewal and differentiation will be essential for our understanding of both embryonic differentiation and human carcinogenesis and for the development of new treatment strategies.

  12. NCR1 Expression Identifies Canine Natural Killer Cell Subsets with Phenotypic Similarity to Human Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ann Foltz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Canines spontaneously develop many cancers similar to humans - including osteosarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma - offering the opportunity to study immune therapies in a genetically heterogeneous and immunocompetent environment. However, a lack of antibodies recognizing canine NK cell markers has resulted in suboptimal characterization and unknown purity of NK cell products, hindering the development of canine models of NK cell adoptive immunotherapy. To this end, we generated a novel antibody to canine NCR1 (NKp46, the putative species-wide marker of NK cells, enabling purification of NK cells for further characterization. We demonstrate that CD3-/NKp46+ cells in healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing canines have phenotypic similarity to human CD3-/NKp46+ NK cells, expressing mRNA for CD16 and the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30, NKp44, and NKp80. Functionally, we demonstrate with the calcein release assay that canine CD3-/NKp46+ cells kill canine tumor cell lines without prior sensitization and secrete IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and GM-CSF as measured by Luminex. Like human NK cells, CD3-/NKp46+ cells expand rapidly on feeder cells expressing 4-1BBL and membrane-bound IL-21 (median= 20,283-fold in 21 days. Further, we identify a minor Null population (CD3-/CD21-/CD14-/NKp46- with reduced cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma cells, but similar cytokine secretion as CD3-/NKp46+ cells. Null cells in canines and humans have reduced expression of NKG2D, NKp44, and CD16 compared to NKp46+ NK cells, and can be induced to express NKp46 with further expansion on feeder cells. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized canine NK cells, including an NKp46- subset of canine and human NK cells, using a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody, and report robust ex vivo expansion of canine NK cells sufficient for adoptive immunotherapy.

  13. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  14. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-06-29

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  16. Reprogramming to developmental plasticity in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien-Ball, Caitlin; Biddle, Adrian

    2017-10-15

    During development and throughout adult life, sub-populations of cells exist that exhibit phenotypic plasticity - the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. This behaviour is important in embryogenesis, is exhibited in a more limited context by adult stem cells, and can be re-activated in cancer cells to drive important processes underlying tumour progression. A well-studied mechanism of phenotypic plasticity is the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process which has been observed in both normal and cancerous cells. The epigenetic and metabolic modifications necessary to facilitate phenotypic plasticity are first seen in development and can be re-activated both in normal regeneration and in cancer. In cancer, the re-activation of these mechanisms enables tumour cells to acquire a cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype with enhanced ability to survive in hostile environments, resist therapeutic interventions, and undergo metastasis. However, recent research has suggested that plasticity may also expose weaknesses in cancer cells that could be exploited for future therapeutic development. More research is needed to identify developmental mechanisms that are active in cancer, so that these may be targeted to reduce tumour growth and metastasis and overcome therapeutic resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. PATE, a gene expressed in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis, identified by a functional genomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Tapan K.; Maitra, Rangan; Iavarone, Carlo; Salvatore, Giuliana; Kumar, Vasantha; Vincent, James J.; Sathyanarayana, B. K.; Duray, Paul; Lee, B. K.; Pastan, Ira

    2002-03-01

    To identify target antigens for prostate cancer therapy, we have combined computer-based screening of the human expressed sequence tag database and experimental expression analysis to identify genes that are expressed in normal prostate and prostate cancer but not in essential human tissues. Using this approach, we identified a gene that is expressed specifically in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis. The gene has a 1.5-kb transcript that encodes a protein of 14 kDa. We named this gene PATE (expressed in prostate and testis). In situ hybridization shows that PATE mRNA is expressed in the epithelial cells of prostate cancers and in normal prostate. Transfection of the PATE cDNA with a Myc epitope tag into NIH 3T3 cells and subsequent cell fractionation analysis shows that the PATE protein is localized in the membrane fraction of the cell. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of PATE shows that it has structural similarities to a group of proteins known as three-finger toxins, which includes the extracellular domain of the type transforming growth factor receptor. Restricted expression of PATE makes it a potential candidate for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  18. NSC23925, identified in a high-throughput cell-based screen, reverses multidrug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Duan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major factor which contributes to the failure of cancer chemotherapy, and numerous efforts have been attempted to overcome MDR. To date, none of these attempts have yielded a tolerable and effective therapy to reverse MDR; thus, identification of new agents would be useful both clinically and scientifically.To identify small molecule compounds that can reverse chemoresistance, we developed a 96-well plate high-throughput cell-based screening assay in a paclitaxel resistant ovarian cancer cell line. Coincubating cells with a sublethal concentration of paclitaxel in combination with each of 2,000 small molecule compounds from the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set Library, we identified a previously uncharacterized molecule, NSC23925, that inhibits Pgp1 and reverses MDR1 (Pgp1 but does not inhibit MRP or BCRP-mediated MDR. The cytotoxic activity of NSC23925 was further evaluated using a panel of cancer cell lines expressing Pgp1, MRP, and BCRP. We found that at a concentration of >10 microM NSC23925 moderately inhibits the proliferation of both sensitive and resistant cell lines with almost equal activity, but its inhibitory effect was not altered by co-incubation with the Pgp1 inhibitor, verapamil, suggesting that NSC23925 itself is not a substrate of Pgp1. Additionally, NSC23925 increases the intracellular accumulation of Pgp1 substrates: calcein AM, Rhodamine-123, paclitaxel, mitoxantrone, and doxorubicin. Interestingly, we further observed that, although NSC23925 directly inhibits the function of Pgp1 in a dose-dependent manner without altering the total expression level of Pgp1, NSC23925 actually stimulates ATPase activity of Pgp, a phenomenon seen in other Pgp inhibitors.The ability of NSC23925 to restore sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy or to prevent resistance could significantly benefit cancer patients.

  19. Genomic profiling identifies TITF1 as a lineage-specific oncogene amplified in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwei, KA; Kim, YH; Girard, L; Kao, J; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; Salari, K; Lee, J; Choi, Y-L; Sato, M; Wang, P; Hernandez-Boussard, T; Gazdar, AF; Petersen, I; Minna, JD; Pollack, JR

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death, where the amplification of oncogenes contributes to tumorigenesis. Genomic profiling of 128 lung cancer cell lines and tumors revealed frequent focal DNA amplification at cytoband 14q13.3, a locus not amplified in other tumor types. The smallest region of recurrent amplification spanned the homeobox transcription factor TITF1 (thyroid transcription factor 1; also called NKX2-1), previously linked to normal lung development and function. When amplified, TITF1 exhibited increased expression at both the RNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)- mediated knockdown of TITF1 in lung cancer cell lines with amplification led to reduced cell proliferation, manifested by both decreased cell-cycle progression and increased apoptosis. Our findings indicate that TITF1 amplification and overexpression contribute to lung cancer cell proliferation rates and survival and implicate TITF1 as a lineage-specific oncogene in lung cancer. PMID:18212743

  20. Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 2 Identifies High-Risk Patients within Both Major Phenotypes of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Jarle; Kolberg, Matthias; Ahlquist, Terje C; Røyrvik, Ellen C; Nome, Torfinn; Leithe, Edward; Lind, Guro E; Merok, Marianne A; Rognum, Torleiv O; Bjørkøy, Geir; Johansen, Terje; Lindblom, Annika; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svindland, Aud; Liestøl, Knut; Nesbakken, Arild; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2015-08-15

    Colorectal cancer has high incidence and mortality worldwide. Patients with microsatellite instable (MSI) tumors have significantly better prognosis than patients with microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. Considerable variation in disease outcome remains a challenge within each subgroup, and our purpose was to identify biomarkers that improve prediction of colorectal cancer prognosis. Mutation analyses of 42 MSI target genes were performed in two independent MSI tumor series (n = 209). Markers that were significantly associated with prognosis in the test series were assessed in the validation series, followed by functional and genetic explorations. The clinical potential was further investigated by immunohistochemistry in a population-based colorectal cancer series (n = 903). We identified the cell-cycle gene regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2) as a cancer biomarker. We found a mutation in the 5' UTR region of RCC2 that in univariate and multivariate analyses was significantly associated with improved outcome in the MSI group. This mutation caused reduction of protein expression in dual luciferase gene reporter assays. siRNA knockdown in MSI colon cancer cells (HCT15) caused reduced cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, and increased apoptosis. Massive parallel sequencing revealed few RCC2 mutations in MSS tumors. However, weak RCC2 protein expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis, independent of clinical high-risk parameters, and stratifies clinically important patient subgroups with MSS tumors, including elderly patients (>75 years), stage II patients, and those with rectal cancer. Impaired RCC2 affects functional and clinical endpoints of colorectal cancer. High-risk patients with either MSI or MSS tumors can be identified with cost-effective routine RCC2 assays. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. DDB2 Suppresses Tumorigenicity by Limiting the Cancer Stem Cell Population in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunhua; Zhao, Ran; Liu, Xingluo; Srivastava, Amit; Gong, Li; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Qu, Meihua; Zhao, Weiqiang; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Qi-En

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is an extremely aggressive disease associated with a high percentage of tumor recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. Understanding the underlying mechanism of tumor relapse is crucial for effective therapy of ovarian cancer. DNA damage-binding protein 2 (DDB2) is a DNA repair factor mainly involved in nucleotide excision repair. Here, a novel role was identified for DDB2 in the tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer cells and the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer. Overexpressing DDB2 in human ovarian cancer cells suppressed its capability to recapitulate tumors in athymic nude mice. Mechanistic investigation demonstrated that DDB2 is able to reduce the cancer stem cell (CSC) population characterized with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in ovarian cancer cells, probably through disrupting the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Low DDB2 expression correlates with poor outcomes among patients with ovarian cancer, as revealed from the analysis of publicly available gene expression array datasets. Given the finding that DDB2 protein expression is low in ovarian tumor cells, enhancement of DDB2 expression is a promising strategy to eradicate CSCs and would help to halt ovarian cancer relapse. PMID:24574518

  2. Engineering and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes Identifies Novel Oncogenic Drivers of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hengyu; Villafane, Nicole; Dogruluk, Turgut; Grzeskowiak, Caitlin L; Kong, Kathleen; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Zagorodna, Oksana; Pantazi, Angeliki; Yang, Lixing; Neill, Nicholas J; Kim, Young Won; Creighton, Chad J; Verhaak, Roel G; Mills, Gordon B; Park, Peter J; Kucherlapati, Raju; Scott, Kenneth L

    2017-07-01

    Oncogenic gene fusions drive many human cancers, but tools to more quickly unravel their functional contributions are needed. Here we describe methodology permitting fusion gene construction for functional evaluation. Using this strategy, we engineered the known fusion oncogenes, BCR-ABL1, EML4-ALK , and ETV6-NTRK3, as well as 20 previously uncharacterized fusion genes identified in The Cancer Genome Atlas datasets. In addition to confirming oncogenic activity of the known fusion oncogenes engineered by our construction strategy, we validated five novel fusion genes involving MET, NTRK2 , and BRAF kinases that exhibited potent transforming activity and conferred sensitivity to FDA-approved kinase inhibitors. Our fusion construction strategy also enabled domain-function studies of BRAF fusion genes. Our results confirmed other reports that the transforming activity of BRAF fusions results from truncation-mediated loss of inhibitory domains within the N-terminus of the BRAF protein. BRAF mutations residing within this inhibitory region may provide a means for BRAF activation in cancer, therefore we leveraged the modular design of our fusion gene construction methodology to screen N-terminal domain mutations discovered in tumors that are wild-type at the BRAF mutation hotspot, V600. We identified an oncogenic mutation, F247L, whose expression robustly activated the MAPK pathway and sensitized cells to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. When applied broadly, these tools will facilitate rapid fusion gene construction for subsequent functional characterization and translation into personalized treatment strategies. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3502-12. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Network-Based Integration of Disparate Omic Data To Identify "Silent Players" in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Ruffalo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of high-throughput monitoring technologies enables interrogation of cancer samples at various levels of cellular activity. Capitalizing on these developments, various public efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA generate disparate omic data for large patient cohorts. As demonstrated by recent studies, these heterogeneous data sources provide the opportunity to gain insights into the molecular changes that drive cancer pathogenesis and progression. However, these insights are limited by the vast search space and as a result low statistical power to make new discoveries. In this paper, we propose methods for integrating disparate omic data using molecular interaction networks, with a view to gaining mechanistic insights into the relationship between molecular changes at different levels of cellular activity. Namely, we hypothesize that genes that play a role in cancer development and progression may be implicated by neither frequent mutation nor differential expression, and that network-based integration of mutation and differential expression data can reveal these "silent players". For this purpose, we utilize network-propagation algorithms to simulate the information flow in the cell at a sample-specific resolution. We then use the propagated mutation and expression signals to identify genes that are not necessarily mutated or differentially expressed genes, but have an essential role in tumor development and patient outcome. We test the proposed method on breast cancer and glioblastoma multiforme data obtained from TCGA. Our results show that the proposed method can identify important proteins that are not readily revealed by molecular data, providing insights beyond what can be gleaned by analyzing different types of molecular data in isolation.

  4. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs......We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further...... of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including...

  5. T Cells that Recognize HPV Protein Can Target Virus-Infected Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types. An approach that may be applied to a wider array of cancers involves modifying peripheral blood T cells with chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors (TCR) that target specific tumor antigens. Unfortunately, epithelial cancers, which are the vast majority of cancers diagnosed, have proven difficult to treat this way because most identified antigens are shared with healthy tissues and targeting them leads to toxic side effects. However, cancers caused by persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, including cervical, head and neck, anal, vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers, may be particularly amenable to the latter form of ACT since the E6 and E7 viral proteins are essential for cancer formation but are not produced in normal tissues. To test this idea, Christian Hinrichs, M.D., and his colleagues examined tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from a patient who experienced a prolonged disease-free period after her second surgical removal of metastatic anal cancer in the hopes of identifying a TCR against one of the HPV oncoproteins.

  6. MicroRNA-21 identified as predictor of cancer outcome: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growing evidence from recent studies has revealed the association of microRNA-21 (mir-21 with outcomes in multiple cancers, but inconsistent findings have been reported, which rationalized a summary and analysis of available data to investigate the prognostic role of mir-21. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eligible studies were identified through several search strategies and assessed for quality. Data was extracted from studies in terms of baseline characteristics and key statistics such as hazard ratio (HR, 95% confidence interval (CI and P value, which were utilized to calculate pooled effect size. RESULTS: 25 studies were included in the meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic role of mir-21 in malignant tumors. Elevated mir-21 level was demonstrated to moderately predict poor overall survival (OS (HR = 1.903, 95% CI: 1.713-2.113, P = 0.000 and disease-free survival (DFS (HR = 1.574, 95% CI: 1.139-2.175, P = 0.006 by the fixed and random effect model respectively. Importantly, subgroup analysis disclosed significant association between increased mir-21 level in cancerous tissue and worse survival status. Furthermore, over-expression of mir-21 was an independent prognostic factor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and pancreatic cancer patients, with the pooled HR being 2.153 (95% CI: 1.693-2.739, P = 0.000 and 1.976 (95% CI: 1.639-2.384, P = 0.000. CONCLUSIONS: Over-expression of mir-21, especially in cancerous tissue, was effectively predictive of worse prognosis in various carcinomas. Non-invasive circulating mir-21, however, exhibited modest ability to discriminate outcomes. Major concerns about mir-21 assay standardization and selection of specimen need to be fully addressed before its practical implementation in management of cancer.

  7. Androgen receptors and serum testosterone levels identify different subsets of postmenopausal breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secreto Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen receptors (AR are frequently expressed in breast cancers, but their implication in cancer growth is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the role of the androgen/AR pathway in breast cancer development. Methods AR expression was evaluated by immunochemistry in a cohort of 528 postmenopausal breast cancer patients previously examined for the association of serum testosterone levels with patient and tumor characteristics. AR expression was classified according to the percentage of stained cells: AR-absent (0% and AR-poorly (1%-30%, AR-moderately (>30%-60%, and AR-highly (>60% positive. Results Statistical analysis was performed in 451 patients who experienced natural menopause. AR-high expression was significantly related with low histologic grade and estrogen receptor (ER- and progesterone receptor (PR-positive status (P trendP=0.022, although a trend across the AR expression categories was not present. When women defined by ER status were analyzed separately, regression analysis in the ER-positive group showed a significant association of high testosterone levels with AR-highly-positive expression (OR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.10-3.16, but the association was essentially due to patients greater than or equal to 65 years (OR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.22-4.82. In ER-positive group, elevated testosterone levels appeared also associated with AR-absent expression, although the small number of patients in this category limited the appearance of significant effects (OR 1.92; 95% CI, 0.73–5.02: the association was present in both age groups ( Conclusions The findings in the present study confirm that testosterone levels are a marker of hormone-dependent breast cancer and suggest that the contemporary evaluation of ER status, AR expression, and circulating testosterone levels may identify different subsets of cancers whose growth may be influenced by androgens.

  8. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  9. Primary Patient-Derived Cancer Cells and Their Potential for Personalized Cancer Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Kodack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalized cancer therapy is based on a patient’s tumor lineage, histopathology, expression analyses, and/or tumor DNA or RNA analysis. Here, we aim to develop an in vitro functional assay of a patient’s living cancer cells that could complement these approaches. We present methods for developing cell cultures from tumor biopsies and identify the types of samples and culture conditions associated with higher efficiency of model establishment. Toward the application of patient-derived cell cultures for personalized care, we established an immunofluorescence-based functional assay that quantifies cancer cell responses to targeted therapy in mixed cell cultures. Assaying patient-derived lung cancer cultures with this method showed promise in modeling patient response for diagnostic use. This platform should allow for the development of co-clinical trial studies to prospectively test the value of drug profiling on tumor-biopsy-derived cultures to direct patient care.

  10. Methods To Identify Aptamers against Cell Surface Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Ducongé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid-based ligands identified through a process of molecular evolution named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment. During the last 10-15 years, numerous aptamers have been developed specifically against targets present on or associated with the surface of human cells or infectious pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites. Several of the aptamers have been described as potent probes, rivalling antibodies, for use in flow cytometry or microscopy. Some have also been used as drugs by inhibiting or activating functions of their targets in a manner similar to neutralizing or agonistic antibodies. Additionally, it is straightforward to conjugate aptamers to other agents without losing their affinity and they have successfully been used in vitro and in vivo to deliver drugs, siRNA, nanoparticles or contrast agents to target cells. Hence, aptamers identified against cell surface biomarkers represent a promising class of ligands. This review presents the different strategies of SELEX that have been developed to identify aptamers for cell surface-associated proteins as well as some of the methods that are used to study their binding on living cells.

  11. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  12. Comparative evaluation of genetic assays to identify oral pre-cancerous fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, J.F.; Braakhuis, B.J.; Brink, A.; Broeckaert, M.A.; Beliën, J.A.M.; Meijer, G.A.; Kuik, D.J.; Leemans, C.R.; Bloemena, E.; van der Waal, I.; Brakenhoff, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinomas often develop in a pre-cancerous field, defined as mucosal epithelium with cancer-related genetic alterations, and which may appear as a clinically visible lesion. The test characteristics of three genetic assays that were developed to detect pre-cancerous

  13. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the lungs. Enlarge Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their ... Cell Lung Cancer Tobacco (includes help with quitting) Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to Quit Secondhand Smoke and Cancer For general cancer information and other ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the lungs. Enlarge Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their ... Cell Lung Cancer Tobacco (includes help with quitting) Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to Quit Secondhand Smoke and Cancer For general cancer information and other ...

  15. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the lungs. Enlarge Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their ... Cell Lung Cancer Tobacco (includes help with quitting) Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to Quit Secondhand Smoke and Cancer For general cancer information and other ...

  16. N-cadherin identifies human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells by in vitro stem cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong P T; Xiao, L; Deane, James A; Tan, Ker-Sin; Cousins, Fiona L; Masuda, Hirotaka; Sprung, Carl N; Rosamilia, Anna; Gargett, Caroline E

    2017-11-01

    Pre-M endometrial epithelial cells. N-cadherin+ cells comprise a median 16.7% (n = 8) and 20.2% (n = 5) of Pre-M endometrial epithelial cells by flow cytometry and magnetic bead sorting, respectively. N-cadherin+ epithelial cells from Pre-M endometrium were more clonogenic than N-cadherin- cells (n = 12, P = 0.003), underwent more population doublings (n = 7), showed greater capacity for serial cloning (n = 7) and differentiated into cytokeratin+ gland-like organoids. N-cadherin immunolocalised to the lateral and apical membrane of epithelial cells in the bases of glands in the basalis of Pre-M endometrium and Post-M gland profiles, co-expressing cytokeratin, ERα but not SSEA-1 or SOX9, which localized on gland profiles proximal to N-cadherin+ cells. N-cadherin+ cells were quiescent (Ki-67-) in the basalis and in Post-M endometrial glands and co-localized with EMT markers vimentin and E-cadherin. The raw and processed data files from the gene microarray have been deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus data set with accession number GSE35221. This is a descriptive study in human endometrium only using in vitro stem cell assays. The differential ability of N-cadherin+ and N-cadherin-cells to generate endometrial glands in vivo was not determined. A small number of uterine tissues analysed contained adenomyosis for which N-cadherin has been implicated in epithelial-EMT. A new marker enriching for human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells identifies a different and potentially more primitive cell population than SSEA-1, suggesting a potential hierarchy of epithelial differentiation in the basalis. Using N-cadherin as a marker, the molecular and cellular characteristics of epithelial progenitor cells and their role in endometrial proliferative disorders including endometriosis, adenomyosis and thin dysfunctional endometrium can be investigated. This research was supported by Cancer Council Victoria grant 491079 (C

  17. Berbamine inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells and cancer-initiating cells by targeting Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhipeng; Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Van Ness, Carl; Gan, Yichao; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jinfen; Lou, Guiyu; Wang, Yafan; Wu, Jun; Yen, Yun; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2013-10-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but no effective treatment toward liver cancer is available so far. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need to identify novel therapies to efficiently treat liver cancer and improve the prognosis of this disease. Here, we report that berbamine and one of its derivatives, bbd24, potently suppressed liver cancer cell proliferation and induced cancer cell death by targeting Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). Furthermore, berbamine inhibited the in vivo tumorigenicity of liver cancer cells in NOD/SCID mice and downregulated the self-renewal abilities of liver cancer-initiating cells. Chemical inhibition or short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of CAMKII recapitulated the effects of berbamine, whereas overexpression of CAMKII promoted cancer cell proliferation and increased the resistance of liver cancer cells to berbamine treatments. Western blot analyses of human liver cancer specimens showed that CAMKII was hyperphosphorylated in liver tumors compared with the paired peritumor tissues, which supports a role of CAMKII in promoting human liver cancer progression and the potential clinical use of berbamine for liver cancer therapies. Our data suggest that berbamine and its derivatives are promising agents to suppress liver cancer growth by targeting CAMKII. Mol Cancer Ther; 12(10); 2067-77. ©2013 AACR.

  18. Cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh S; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells of the digestive system are ideal in many ways for research, given they are abundant, highly proliferative and have a uniform structural arrangement. This in turn has enormously aided the research of cancer stem cells of the digestive system, which is now shaping our understanding of cancer stem cells. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of cancer stem cells of the digestive system have been summarized, including aspects such as their identification, origin, cell-cycle dormancy, relationship with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular metabolism and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newly acquired knowledge concerning cancer stem cells have led to the development of novel cancer therapeutics with provisional yet encouraging results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Molecular Biology of Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oishi, Naoki; Yamashita, Taro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    .... The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased...

  20. Cancer Stem Cells: Repair Gone Awry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Rangwala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because cell turnover occurs in all adult organs, stem/progenitor cells within the stem-cell niche of each tissue must be appropriately mobilized and differentiated to maintain normal organ structure and function. Tissue injury increases the demands on this process, and thus may unmask defective regulation of pathways, such as Hedgehog (Hh, that modulate progenitor cell fate. Hh pathway dysregulation has been demonstrated in many types of cancer, including pancreatic and liver cancers, in which defective Hh signaling has been linked to outgrowth of Hh-responsive cancer stem-initiating cells and stromal elements. Hence, the Hh pathway might be a therapeutic target in such tumors.

  1. Stem Cells Antigen-1 Enriches for a Cancer Stem Cell-Like Subpopulation in Mouse Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Won; Park, Jung Min; Park, Dong Min; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong need to identify markers to enrich gastric cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, CSC enrichment markers for mouse gastric cancers have not yet been determined. In our previous study, we generated primary mouse gastric cancer cell line NCC-S1 (S1) established from a Villin-cre;Smad4(F/F) ;Trp53(F/F) ;Cdh1(F/wt) mouse and its metastatic variant cell line NCC-S1M (S1M). Interestingly, S1M cells exhibited CSC-like features, such as increased tumorigenic potential and chemoresistance. By comparing gene expression profiles between S1 and S1M cells, we identified Stem Cells Antigen-1 (Sca-1) as a cell surface marker, which was mostly upregulated in S1M. Sca-1 was upregulated in tumorspheres from S1 cells or after cisplatin treatment in S1 cells. Immunofluorescence (IF) analysis showed that approximately 7% of cancer cells exhibited positivity for Sca-1 in primary mouse gastric cancer tissues. An in vivo-limiting dilution assay showed that Sca-1(high) mouse gastric cancer cells demonstrated increased tumorigenicity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. The Sca-1 expression was downregulated by TGF-β pathway activation and Wnt pathway inhibition in mouse gastric cancer cells. Sca-1(high) cells showed relatively low TGF-β reporter activity and high TCF/LEF1 reporter activity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. A chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Sca-1 was a β-catenin/LEF1 target gene. Sca-1(high) allografts were more resistant to cisplatin/fluorouracil chemotherapy than Sca-1(negative) allografts, and overexpressed Bcl-xL. Eighty-five mouse genes overexpressed in Sca-1(high) S1 cells compared with Sca-1(negative) cells clustered 123 pretreatment gastric cancer patient samples according to survival following chemotherapy. Taken together, Sca-1 is a novel CSC enrichment marker that mediates TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mouse gastric cancer. Stem Cells 2016;34:1177-1187. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Novel Oncogene Induced Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Define Human Prostate Cancer Progression Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaoming; Ertel, Adam; Casimiro, Mathew; Yu, Zuoren; Meng, Hui; McCue, Peter A.; Walters, Rhonda; Fortina, Paolo; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, murine prostate cancer cell lines, generated via selective transduction with a single oncogene (c-Myc, Ha-Ras, and v-Src), demonstrated oncogene-specific prostate cancer molecular signatures that were recapitulated in human prostate cancer, and developed lung metastasis in immune competent mice. Interrogation of two independent retrospective cohorts of patient samples using the oncogene signature demonstrated an ability to distinguish tumor from normal prostate with a predictive value for prostate cancer of 98 – 99%. In a blinded study, the signature algorithm demonstrated independent substratification of reduced recurrence free survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The generation of new oncogene-specific prostate cancer cell lines that recapitulate human prostate cancer gene expression, that metastasize in immune-competent mice, are a valuable new resource for testing targeted therapy while the molecular signatures identified herein provides further value over current gene signature markers of prediction and outcome. PMID:23204233

  3. NK Cells and Virus-Related Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells become activated during viral infections and can play roles in such infections by attacking virus-infected cells or by regulating adaptive immune responses. Experimental models suggest that NK cells may also have the capacity to restrain virus-induced cancers. Here, we discuss the seven viruses linked to human cancers and the evidence of NK cell involvement in these systems.

  4. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics ......, help us both in the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells and in the further development of therapeutic strategies including tissue engineering...

  5. Identifying EGFR-Expressed Cells and Detecting EGFR Multi-Mutations at Single-Cell Level by Microfluidic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ren; Zhou, Mingxing; Li, Jine; Wang, Zihua; Zhang, Weikai; Yue, Chunyan; Ma, Yan; Peng, Hailin; Wei, Zewen; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2018-03-01

    EGFR mutations companion diagnostics have been proved to be crucial for the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeted cancer therapies. To uncover multiple mutations occurred in minority of EGFR-mutated cells, which may be covered by the noises from majority of un-mutated cells, is currently becoming an urgent clinical requirement. Here we present the validation of a microfluidic-chip-based method for detecting EGFR multi-mutations at single-cell level. By trapping and immunofluorescently imaging single cells in specifically designed silicon microwells, the EGFR-expressed cells were easily identified. By in situ lysing single cells, the cell lysates of EGFR-expressed cells were retrieved without cross-contamination. Benefited from excluding the noise from cells without EGFR expression, the simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing, but not the expensive deep sequencing of the whole cell population, was used to discover multi-mutations. We verified the new method with precisely discovering three most important EGFR drug-related mutations from a sample in which EGFR-mutated cells only account for a small percentage of whole cell population. The microfluidic chip is capable of discovering not only the existence of specific EGFR multi-mutations, but also other valuable single-cell-level information: on which specific cells the mutations occurred, or whether different mutations coexist on the same cells. This microfluidic chip constitutes a promising method to promote simple and cost-effective Sanger's sequencing to be a routine test before performing targeted cancer therapy.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  7. The evolving concepts of cancer stem cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit; Patel, Shilpa; Pathak, Jigna; Swain, Niharika; Kumar, Shwetha

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the growth and spread of cancers is driven by a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs)--the only cells that are capable of long-term self-renewal and generation of the phenotypically diverse tumor cell population. CSCs have been identified and isolated in a variety of human cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The concept of cancer stem cells may have profound implications for our understanding of tumor biology and for the design of novel treatments targeted toward these cells. The present review is an attempt to conceptualize the role of CSCs in HNSCC--its implication in tumorigenesis and the possible additional approach in current treatment strategies.

  8. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Turnbull, Clare; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie; Ahmed, Shahana; Driver, Kristy; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nicholas; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Alonso, M. Rosario; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Alnaes, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Perkins, Annie; Swann, Ruth; Velentzis, Louiza; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, Will J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Graham, Nikki J.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Lathrop, Mark; Dunning, Alison M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Peto, Julian; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for similar to 8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies

  9. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C.; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N.; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; van 't Veer, Laura J.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M. Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M.; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; van den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K.; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ∼8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS...

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghoussaini, M.; Fletcher, O.; Michailidou, K.; Turnbull, C.; Schmidt, M.K.; Dicks, E.; Dennis, J.; Wang, Q.; Humphreys, M.K.; Luccarini, C.; Baynes, C.; Conroy, D.; Maranian, M.; Ahmed, S.; Driver, K.; Johnson, N.; Orr, N.; dos Santos Silva, I.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hall, P.; Czene, K.; Irwanto, A.; Liu, J.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Meindl, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Lichtner, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Hein, R.; Nickels, S.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Tsimiklis, H.; Makalic, E.; Schmidt, D.; Bui, M.; Hopper, J.L.; Apicella, C.; Park, D.J.; Southey, M.; Hunter, D.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Broeks, A.; Verhoef, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Lux, M.P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Sawyer, E.; Tomlinson, I.; Kerin, M.; Marme, F.; Schneeweiss, A.; Sohn, C.; Burwinkel, B.; Guenel, P.; Truong, T.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Menegaux, F.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Nielsen, S.F.; Flyger, H.; Milne, R.L.; Alonso, M.R.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Benitez, J.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Bernstein, L.; Dur, C.C.; Brenner, H.; Muller, H.; Arndt, V.; Stegmaier, C.; Justenhoven, C.; Brauch, H.; Bruning, T.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Eilber, U.; Dork, T.; Schurmann, P.; Bremer, M.; Hillemanns, P.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Antonenkova, N.N.; Rogov, Y.I.; Karstens, J.H.; Bermisheva, M.; Prokofieva, D.; Ligtenberg, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for approximately 8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies

  12. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    dominant role over some oncogene function.In addition, we recently reported that cancer stem cells (CSCs)- stem cell like cells in tumors that have stem ... cell properties and tumor initiating ability- retain epigenetic memories of their cells of origin (Chow et al., 2014). We showed that CSCs derived from

  13. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer. Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination.

  14. Betulinic Acid Kills Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, Lisette; Di Franco, Simone; Kessler, Jan H.; Stassi, Giorgio; Medema, Jan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be the origin of cancer and it is suggested that they are resistant to chemotherapy. Current therapies fail to eradicate CSCs and therefore selecting a resistant cell subset that is able to facilitate tumor recurrences. Betulinic acid (BetA) is a broad

  15. Identifying Educational Needs of the Multidisciplinary Cancer Team in the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchoo, Priya; Larrison, Chris; Rosenberg, Carol; Ko, Naomi; Cantril, Cynthia; Moeller, Naomi; Parikh, Ruchit; Djordjevic, Ana-Marija

    2017-02-01

    Background: Rapid advancements in the field of metastatic breast cancer (mBC) add to the complexity of managing patients with this disease. An educational needs assessment of multidisciplinary mBC clinicians was executed to identify practice performance gaps and recommend educational strategies aimed at closing these gaps. Methods: To ensure a collection of reliable data for assessment, a systematic process was used to design, develop, and validate the tools that were used. This grounded theory approach included assessment and confirmation by clinical experts and validation testing within the target audiences. A mixed-methods approach was used to identify practice performance gaps in care, using both qualitative in-depth interviews and quantitative surveying. The quantitative survey assessment consisted of 2 main sections: the Clinician Change Readiness Inventory tool and a Clinical Knowledge and Practice Assessment. Results: The study included 42 clinicians in the interview phase and 186 clinicians in the survey phase from 36 different states. Five key practice performance gaps were identified: (1) selecting optimal treatment, (2) personalizing therapy, (3) monitoring mBC, (4) engaging in effective communication, and (5) balancing patient access and time. Most of the gaps overlap and are related to the integral role communication plays in management decision-making in mBC. Conclusions: Awareness of the key practice performance gaps is critical to inform improvements in quality care. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  16. Genome-wide Meta-analyses of Breast, Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by At Least Two Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha P.; Beesley, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Lawrenson, Kate; Lindstrom, Sara; Ramus, Susan J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Kibel, Adam S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Michael, Agnieszka; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wolk, Alicja; Monteiro, Alvaro; Peixoto, Ana; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cox, Angela; Rudolph, Anja; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Wu, Anna H.; Lindblom, Annika; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Blomqvist, Carl; Phelan, Catherine; McLean, Catriona; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Vachon, Celine; Cybulski, Cezary; Slavov, Chavdar; Stegmaier, Christa; Maier, Christiane; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Kang, Daehee; Tessier, Daniel C.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Neal, David E.; Eccles, Diana; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wokozorczyk, Dominika; Levine, Douglas A.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Høgdall, Estrid; Song, Fengju; Bruinsma, Fiona; Heitz, Florian; Modugno, Francesmary; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Giles, Graham G.; Olsson, Håkan; Wildiers, Hans; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Pandha, Hardev; Risch, Harvey A.; Darabi, Hatef; Salvesen, Helga B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Gronberg, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Song, Honglin; Lim, Hui-Yi; McNeish, Iain; Campbell, Ian; Vergote, Ignace; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Stanford, Janet L.; Benítez, Javier; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Donovan, Jenny L.; Dennis, Joe; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hopper, John L.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Park, Jong Y.; Figueroa, Jonine; Clements, Judith A.; Knight, Julia A.; Peto, Julian; Cunningham, Julie M.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Batra, Jyotsna; Czene, Kamila; Lu, Karen H.; Herkommer, Kathleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Muir, Kenneth; Offitt, Kenneth; Chen, Kexin; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Odunsi, Kunle; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Cook, Linda S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Hooning, Maartje J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Luedeke, Manuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Goodman, Marc T.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Riggan, Marjorie; Aly, Markus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Moisse, Matthieu; Sanderson, Maureen; Southey, Melissa C.; Jones, Michael; Lush, Michael; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Bogdanova, Natalia; Rahman, Nazneen; Le, Nhu D.; Orr, Nick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pashayan, Nora; Peterlongo, Paolo; Guénel, Pascal; Brennan, Paul; Paulo, Paula; Webb, Penelope M.; Broberg, Per; Fasching, Peter A.; Devilee, Peter; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Qiyuan; Kaneva, Radka; Butzow, Ralf; Kopperud, Reidun Kristin; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Stephenson, Robert A.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Winqvist, Robert; Ness, Roberta; Milne, Roger L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Benlloch, Sara; Olson, Sara H.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Maia, Sofia; Berndt, Sonja; Lee, Soo Chin; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Pejovic, Tanja; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Dörk, Thilo; Brüning, Thomas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Key, Tim J.; Edwards, Todd L.; Menon, Usha; Hamann, Ute; Mitev, Vanio; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Kristensen, Vessela; Arndt, Volker; Vogel, Walther; Zheng, Wei; Sieh, Weiva; Blot, William J.; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Schumacher, Fredrick; Freedman, Matthew L.; Berchuck, Andrew; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Haiman, Christopher A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Sellers, Thomas A.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Gayther, Simon A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P < 10−8 seven new cross-cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P < 10−5 in the three-cancer meta-analysis. PMID:27432226

  17. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Jessica; Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Sickmann, Albert; Weber, Gerhard; Grosse, Jirka; Infanger, Manfred; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains. PMID:23303277

  18. Knockdown by shRNA identifies S249C mutant FGFR3 as a potential therapeutic target in bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson, Darren C.; Hurst, Carolyn D; Knowles, Margaret A.

    2007-01-01

    More than 60% of low-grade non-invasive papillary urothelial cell carcinomas contain activating point mutations of FGFR3. The phenotypic consequences of constitutive activation of FGFR3 in bladder cancer have not been elucidated and further studies are required to confirm the consequences of inhibiting receptor activity in urothelial cells. We measured FGFR3 transcript levels and demonstrated that transcript levels were significantly more abundant in low-stage and grade tumours. We identified...

  19. Heparan sulfate mediates trastuzumab effect in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Trastuzumab is an antibody widely used in the treatment of breast cancer cases that test positive for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Many patients, however, become resistant to this antibody, whose resistance has become a major focus in breast cancer research. But despite this interest, there are still no reliable markers that can be used to identify resistant patients. A possible role of several extracellular matrix (ECM) components—heparan sulfate (HS), Syn-1(Syndecan-1) and heparanase (HPSE1)—in light of the influence of ECM alterations on the action of several compounds on the cells and cancer development, was therefore investigated in breast cancer cell resistance to trastuzumab. Methods The cDNA of the enzyme responsible for cleaving HS chains from proteoglycans, HPSE1, was cloned in the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and transfected into a breast cancer cell lineage. We evaluated cell viability after trastuzumab treatment using different breast cancer cell lines. Trastuzumab and HS interaction was investigated by confocal microscopy and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The profile of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also investigated by [35S]-sulfate incorporation. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate HPSE1, HER2 and Syn-1 mRNA expression. HPSE1 enzymatic activity was performed using biotinylated heparan sulfate. Results Breast cancer cell lines responsive to trastuzumab present higher amounts of HER2, Syn-1 and HS on the cell surface, but lower levels of secreted HS. Trastuzumab and HS interaction was proven by FRET analysis. The addition of anti-HS to the cells or heparin to the culture medium induced resistance to trastuzumab in breast cancer cells previously sensitive to this monoclonal antibody. Breast cancer cells transfected with HPSE1 became resistant to trastuzumab, showing lower levels of HER2, Syn-1 and HS on the cell surface. In addition, HS shedding was increased significantly in

  20. Transposon mutagenesis identifies chromatin modifiers cooperating with Ras in thyroid tumorigenesis and detects ATXN7 as a cancer gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Conde, Cristina; Leandro-Garcia, Luis J; Chen, Xu; Oler, Gisele; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Ryder, Mabel; Landa, Iñigo; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; La, Konnor; Ghossein, Ronald A; Bajorin, Dean F; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Riordan, Jesse D; Dupuy, Adam J; Fagin, James A

    2017-06-20

    Oncogenic RAS mutations are present in 15-30% of thyroid carcinomas. Endogenous expression of mutant Ras is insufficient to initiate thyroid tumorigenesis in murine models, indicating that additional genetic alterations are required. We used Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to identify events that cooperate with Hras(G12V) in thyroid tumor development. Random genomic integration of SB transposons primarily generated loss-of-function events that significantly increased thyroid tumor penetrance in Tpo-Cre/homozygous FR-Hras(G12V) mice. The thyroid tumors closely phenocopied the histological features of human RAS-driven, poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. Characterization of transposon insertion sites in the SB-induced tumors identified 45 recurrently mutated candidate cancer genes. These mutation profiles were remarkably concordant with mutated cancer genes identified in a large series of human poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers screened by next-generation sequencing using the MSK-IMPACT panel of cancer genes, which we modified to include all SB candidates. The disrupted genes primarily clustered in chromatin remodeling functional nodes and in the PI3K pathway. ATXN7, a component of a multiprotein complex with histone acetylase activity, scored as a significant SB hit. It was recurrently mutated in advanced human cancers and significantly co-occurred with RAS or NF1 mutations. Expression of ATXN7 mutants cooperated with oncogenic RAS to induce thyroid cell proliferation, pointing to ATXN7 as a previously unrecognized cancer gene.

  1. A cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for imaging Cu2 + in living cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Dong, Baoli; Kong, Xiuqi; Song, Xuezhen; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Weiying

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring copper level in cancer cells is important for the further understanding of its roles in the cell proliferation, and also could afford novel copper-based strategy for the cancer therapy. Herein, we have developed a novel cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for the detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. The probe employed biotin as the cancer cell-specific group. Before the treatment of Cu2 +, the probe showed nearly no fluorescence. However, the probe can display strong fluorescence at 581 nm in response to Cu2 +. The probe exhibited excellent sensitivity and high selectivity for Cu2 + over the other relative species. Under the guidance of biotin group, could be successfully used for detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. We expect that this design strategy could be further applied for detection of the other important biomolecules in living cancer cells.

  2. Are cancer cells really softer than normal cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Charlotte; Goud, Bruno; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-05-01

    Solid tumours are often first diagnosed by palpation, suggesting that the tumour is more rigid than its surrounding environment. Paradoxically, individual cancer cells appear to be softer than their healthy counterparts. In this review, we first list the physiological reasons indicating that cancer cells may be more deformable than normal cells. Next, we describe the biophysical tools that have been developed in recent years to characterise and model cancer cell mechanics. By reviewing the experimental studies that compared the mechanics of individual normal and cancer cells, we argue that cancer cells can indeed be considered as softer than normal cells. We then focus on the intracellular elements that could be responsible for the softening of cancer cells. Finally, we ask whether the mechanical differences between normal and cancer cells can be used as diagnostic or prognostic markers of cancer progression. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic differentiation via semaphorin 3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuzhou; Shen, Weiwei; Qiu, Hao; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis to bone is the second most commonly diagnosed malignant disease among men worldwide. Such metastatic disease is characterized by the presence of osteoblastic bone lesions, and is associated with high rates of mortality. However, the various mechanisms involved in prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation have not been fully explored. Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A) is a newly identified regulator of bone metabolism which stimulates differentiation of pre-osteoblastic cells under physiological conditions. We investigated in this study whether prostate cancer cells can mediate osteoblastic activity through Sema 3A. We cultured osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells in prostate cancer-conditioned medium, and analyzed levels of Sema 3A protein in diverse prostate cancer cell lines to identify cell lines in which Sema 3A production showed a positive correlation with osteo-stimulation. C4-2 cells were stably transfected with Sema 3A short hairpin RNA to further determine whether Sema 3A contributes to the ability of C4-2 cells to induce osteoblastic differentiation. Down-regulation of Sema 3A expression decreased indicators of C4-2 CM-induced osteoblastic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase production and mineralization. Additionally, silencing or neutralizing Sema 3A in C4-2 cells resulted in diminished β-catenin expression in osteogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells. Our results suggest that prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation is at least partially mediated by Sema 3A, and may be regulated by the β-catenin signalling pathway. Sema 3A may represent a novel target for treatment of prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Of germ cells, trophoblasts, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Angela R

    2008-12-01

    The trophoblastic theory of cancer, proposed in the early 1900s by Dr John Beard, may not initially seem relevant to current cancer models and treatments. However, the underpinnings of this theory are remarkably similar to those of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Beard noticed that a significant fraction of germ cells never reach their final destination as they migrate during embryonic development from the hindgut to the germinal ridge. In certain situations, upon aberrant stimulation, these vagrant germ cells are able to generate tumors. Simplistically, the CSC theory surmises that a small population of tumorigenic cells exists, which initiate and maintain tumors, and these cells have a likely origin in normal stem cells. Both these theories are based on the potential of a single primitive cell to form a tumor. This has a major implication for cancer therapy, in that only a small percentage of cells need to be targeted to ablate a tumor.

  5. Single Cell Characterization of Prostate Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    CTCs from patient blood, a single T24 bladder and LNCaP prostate cancer cells, a pool of 8 prostate CTCs, and one leukocyte isolated from the blood...amplify 66% of mRNA pool from a single cell. Clustering analysis does differentiate CTCs from LNCaP and T24 bladder cell lines (Figure 4). At present we...profiles could distinguish a CTC from prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and T24 bladder cancer cell line.  There was intra and inter patient heterogeneity

  6. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  7. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Lee

    Full Text Available Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high/CD24(low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high/CD24(high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  8. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapasso S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia Allegra, Serena TrapassoOtolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal, giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division. A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on

  9. Transcriptome analysis of mammary epithelial subpopulations identifies novel determinants of lineage commitment and cell fate

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    Zvelebil Marketa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the molecular control of cell lineages and fate determination in complex tissues is key to not only understanding the developmental biology and cellular homeostasis of such tissues but also for our understanding and interpretation of the molecular pathology of diseases such as cancer. The prerequisite for such an understanding is detailed knowledge of the cell types that make up such tissues, including their comprehensive molecular characterisation. In the mammary epithelium, the bulk of the tissue is composed of three cell lineages, namely the basal/myoepithelial, luminal epithelial estrogen receptor positive and luminal epithelial estrogen receptor negative cells. However, a detailed molecular characterisation of the transcriptomic differences between these three populations has not been carried out. Results A whole transcriptome analysis of basal/myoepithelial cells, luminal estrogen receptor negative cells and luminal estrogen receptor positive cells isolated from the virgin mouse mammary epithelium identified 861, 326 and 488 genes as highly differentially expressed in the three cell types, respectively. Network analysis of the transcriptomic data identified a subpopulation of luminal estrogen receptor negative cells with a novel potential role as non-professional immune cells. Analysis of the data for potential paracrine interacting factors showed that the basal/myoepithelial cells, remarkably, expressed over twice as many ligands and cell surface receptors as the other two populations combined. A number of transcriptional regulators were also identified that were differentially expressed between the cell lineages. One of these, Sox6, was specifically expressed in luminal estrogen receptor negative cells and functional assays confirmed that it maintained mammary epithelial cells in a differentiated luminal cell lineage. Conclusion The mouse mammary epithelium is composed of three main cell types with

  10. New high-speed cell sorting methods for stem cell sorting and breast cancer cell purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.; Hokanson, James A.; Rosenblatt, Judah I.

    1998-04-01

    An important problem in clinical medicine is that of positively selecting hematopoietic stem cells or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation while purging it of contaminating tumor cells. Since both the stem cells to be positively selected and the tumor cells to be purged are relatively rare cells, this poses special problems for their isolation in terms of purity and yield of stem cells, with a high penalty of misclassification for contaminating tumor cells. A model system of tumor cells spiked into bone marrow or blood cells was used to validate the system. Multiparameter data mixtures of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human peripheral blood or bone marrow cells were first analyzed by discriminant function analysis. Mathematical methods were developed to assess the relative probabilities of misclassification. Cell identification tags, implemented as additional correlated listmode parameters not used for these analyses, were used to uniquely identify each cell type and to compare classifier results. The performance of classifier systems was also assessed using ROC (`receiver operating characteristics') analysis. Then the classification system was implemented using lookup tables allowing for real-time (in this system approximately 625 microseconds) rapid separation of these cell types. Isolated cell types, purities and yields were assessed by single-cell PCR molecular characterizations.

  11. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

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    Amber eFrick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01x10-8. Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05.In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Thus, further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies.

  12. Isolation of Stem-Like Cancer Cells in Primary Endometrial Cancer Using Cell Surface Markers CD133 and CXCR4

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    Yi Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer (EC is the most common familiar gynecologic malignant tumor identified in the female reproductive system and has been increasing yearly. In this study, we will identify the surface markers and stem cell markers related with cancer stem cells (CSCs of EC. Tissue samples were obtained from endometrial cancer patients during surgical procedures. Single cells were isolated from the tissues for culturing, transfection into nude mice, and histopathology analysis. RT-PCR demonstrated that the cultured cells strongly expressed stemness-related genes, such as c-Myc, Sox-2, Nanog, Oct 4A, ABCG2, BMI-1, CK-18, Nestin and β-actin. The expression of surface markers CD24, CD133, CD47, CD29, CD44, CXCR4, SSEA3 and SSEA4, CD24, and CD133 and chemokine markers such as CXCR4 were measured by flow cytometry. Then the double percentage of CD133+CXCR4+ cells constituted 7.2% and 9.3% in EC cells originated from two different patients, respectively. The CD133+CXCR4+ primary endometrial cancer cells grew faster, exhibited high expression of mRNA of stemness-related genes, produced more spheres, and had higher clonogenic ability than other subpopulations. They are also more resistant to anti-cancer drugs than other subpopulations. These findings indicate that CD133+CXCR4+ cells may possess some characteristics of CSCs in primary endometrial cancer. These cell surface markers may be useful for the development of drugs against CSC molecular targets or as a predictive marker for poor prognosis in primary endometrial cancer.

  13. Genomic Determinants of Protein Abundance Variation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

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    Theodoros I. Roumeliotis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impact of genomic alterations on protein networks is fundamental in identifying the mechanisms that shape cancer heterogeneity. We have used isobaric labeling to characterize the proteomic landscapes of 50 colorectal cancer cell lines and to decipher the functional consequences of somatic genomic variants. The robust quantification of over 9,000 proteins and 11,000 phosphopeptides on average enabled the de novo construction of a functional protein correlation network, which ultimately exposed the collateral effects of mutations on protein complexes. CRISPR-cas9 deletion of key chromatin modifiers confirmed that the consequences of genomic alterations can propagate through protein interactions in a transcript-independent manner. Lastly, we leveraged the quantified proteome to perform unsupervised classification of the cell lines and to build predictive models of drug response in colorectal cancer. Overall, we provide a deep integrative view of the functional network and the molecular structure underlying the heterogeneity of colorectal cancer cells.

  14. Exclusive destruction of mitotic spindles in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visochek, Leonid; Castiel, Asher; Mittelman, Leonid; Elkin, Michael; Atias, Dikla; Golan, Talia; Izraeli, Shai; Peretz, Tamar; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2017-03-28

    We identified target proteins modified by phenanthrenes that cause exclusive eradication of human cancer cells. The cytotoxic activity of the phenanthrenes in a variety of human cancer cells is attributed by these findings to post translational modifications of NuMA and kinesins HSET/kifC1 and kif18A. Their activity prevented the binding of NuMA to α-tubulin and kinesins in human cancer cells, and caused aberrant spindles. The most efficient cytotoxic activity of the phenanthridine PJ34, caused significantly smaller aberrant spindles with disrupted spindle poles and scattered extra-centrosomes and chromosomes. Concomitantly, PJ34 induced tumor growth arrest of human malignant tumors developed in athymic nude mice, indicating the relevance of its activity for cancer therapy.

  15. Embryogenic cells in Dactylis glomerata L. (Poaceae) explants identified by cell tracking and by SERK expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somleva, M.N.; Schmidt, E.D.L.; Vries, de S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Single mesophyll cells in leaf explants of Dactylis glomerata L. (Dactylis) that were competent to form somatic embryos directly or through callus were identified by semi-automatic cell tracking. These competent cells were a subpopulation of small, isodiametric, cytoplasm-rich cells located close to

  16. Cancer-associated fibroblasts promote proliferation of endometrial cancer cells.

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    Kavita S Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic malignancy worldwide; yet the tumor microenvironment, especially the fibroblast cells surrounding the cancer cells, is poorly understood. We established four primary cultures of fibroblasts from human endometrial cancer tissues (cancer-associated fibroblasts, CAFs using antibody-conjugated magnetic bead isolation. These relatively homogenous fibroblast cultures expressed fibroblast markers (CD90, vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin and hormonal (estrogen and progesterone receptors. Conditioned media collected from CAFs induced a dose-dependent proliferation of both primary cultures and cell lines of endometrial cancer in vitro (175% when compared to non-treated cells, in contrast to those from normal endometrial fibroblast cell line (51% (P<0.0001. These effects were not observed in fibroblast culture derived from benign endometrial hyperplasia tissues, indicating the specificity of CAFs in affecting endometrial cancer cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism underlying the differential fibroblast effects, we compared the activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathways in endometrial cancer cells following treatment with normal fibroblasts- and CAFs-conditioned media. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of both phosphorylated forms of Akt and Erk were significantly down-regulated in normal fibroblasts-treated cells, but were up-regulated/maintained in CAFs-treated cells. Treatment with specific inhibitors LY294002 and U0126 reversed the CAFs-mediated cell proliferation (P<0.0001, suggesting for a role of these pathways in modulating endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Rapamycin, which targets a downstream molecule in PI3K pathway (mTOR, also suppressed CAFs-induced cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Cytokine profiling analysis revealed that CAFs secrete higher levels of macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, RANTES and vascular

  17. Serpins Promote Cancer Cell Survival and Vascular Cooption in Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Manuel; Obenauf, Anna C.; Jin, Xin; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Lee, Derek J.; Chaft, Jamie E.; Kris, Mark G.; Huse, Jason T.; Brogi, Edi; Massagué, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis is an ominous complication of cancer, yet most cancer cells that infiltrate the brain die of unknown causes. Here we identify plasmin from the reactive brain stroma as a defense against metastatic invasion, and plasminogen activator (PA) inhibitory serpins in cancer cells as a shield against this defense. Plasmin suppresses brain metastasis in two ways: by converting membrane-bound astrocytic FasL into a paracrine death signal for cancer cells, and by inactivating the axon pathfinding molecule L1CAM that metastatic cells express for spreading along brain capillaries and for metastatic outgrowth. Brain metastatic cells from lung cancer and breast cancer express high levels of anti-PA serpins, including neuroserpin and serpin B2, to prevent plasmin generation and its deleterious consequences. By protecting cancer cells from death signals and fostering vascular cooption, anti-PA serpins provide a unifying mechanism for the initiation of brain metastasis in lung and breast cancers. PMID:24581498

  18. IL-32 promotes breast cancer cell growth and invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouman; Chen, Feiyu; Tang, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32 is a newly identified cytokine in humans and primates. It has been established that IL-32 may antagonize cancer growth. However, to the best of our knowledge, the direct effect of IL-32 on breast cancer cell growth has not yet been investigated. In addition, rodents lack the expression of IL-32; hence, the effects of IL-32 on breast cancer xenografts in nude mice have not been studied. The present study aimed to examine the potential regulatory effects of IL-32 on breast cancer cells in nude mice. The effects of IL-32 on tumor cell growth in cell cuture and a tumor xenograft model were investigated, as well as the effects of IL-32 on apoptosis. The effects of IL-32 on cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated by MTT assay and TUNEL staining, respectively. The results revealed that IL-32 increases the proliferation rate of cancer cells and decreases the rate of apoptosis, In addition, IL-32 was found to enhance the growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. In summary, IL-32 may represent a useful therapeutic target for human breast cancer.

  19. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  20. Tumor Budding Cells, Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-type Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

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    Eva eKaramitopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4 and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with WNT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implicated in the promotion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs, small populations of which have been identified in PDAC, and EMT-type cells play critical roles in drug resistance, invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. EMT may be histologically represented by the presence of tumor budding which is described as the occurrence of single tumor cells or small clusters (<5 of dedifferentiated cells at the invasive front of gastrointestinal (including colorectal, oesophageal, gastric and ampullary carcinomas and is linked to poor prognosis. Tumor budding has recently been shown to occur frequently in PDAC and to be associated with adverse clinicopathological features and decreased disease-free and overall survival. The aim of this review is to present a short overview on the morphological and molecular aspects that underline the relationship between tumor budding cells, CSCs and EMT-type cells in PDAC.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Urine to Identify Breast Cancer Biomarker Candidates Using a Label-Free LC-MS/MS Approach.

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    Julia Beretov

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease and is a leading cause of death in women. Early diagnosis and monitoring progression of breast cancer are important for improving prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify protein biomarkers in urine for early screening detection and monitoring invasive breast cancer progression.We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using ion count relative quantification label free LC-MS/MS analysis of urine from breast cancer patients (n = 20 and healthy control women (n = 20.Unbiased label free LC-MS/MS-based proteomics was used to provide a profile of abundant proteins in the biological system of breast cancer patients. Data analysis revealed 59 urinary proteins that were significantly different in breast cancer patients compared to the normal control subjects (p3. Thirty-six urinary proteins were exclusively found in specific breast cancer stages, with 24 increasing and 12 decreasing in their abundance. Amongst the 59 significant urinary proteins identified, a list of 13 novel up-regulated proteins were revealed that may be used to detect breast cancer. These include stage specific markers associated with pre-invasive breast cancer in the ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS samples (Leucine LRC36, MAST4 and Uncharacterized protein CI131, early invasive breast cancer (DYH8, HBA, PEPA, uncharacterized protein C4orf14 (CD014, filaggrin and MMRN2 and metastatic breast cancer (AGRIN, NEGR1, FIBA and Keratin KIC10. Preliminary validation of 3 potential markers (ECM1, MAST4 and filaggrin identified was performed in breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting. One potential marker MAST4 was further validated in human breast cancer tissues as well as individual human breast cancer urine samples with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively.Our results indicate that urine is a useful non-invasive source of biomarkers and the profile patterns (biomarkers identified, have potential for clinical

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Urine to Identify Breast Cancer Biomarker Candidates Using a Label-Free LC-MS/MS Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretov, Julia; Wasinger, Valerie C; Millar, Ewan K A; Schwartz, Peter; Graham, Peter H; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease and is a leading cause of death in women. Early diagnosis and monitoring progression of breast cancer are important for improving prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify protein biomarkers in urine for early screening detection and monitoring invasive breast cancer progression. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using ion count relative quantification label free LC-MS/MS analysis of urine from breast cancer patients (n = 20) and healthy control women (n = 20). Unbiased label free LC-MS/MS-based proteomics was used to provide a profile of abundant proteins in the biological system of breast cancer patients. Data analysis revealed 59 urinary proteins that were significantly different in breast cancer patients compared to the normal control subjects (p3). Thirty-six urinary proteins were exclusively found in specific breast cancer stages, with 24 increasing and 12 decreasing in their abundance. Amongst the 59 significant urinary proteins identified, a list of 13 novel up-regulated proteins were revealed that may be used to detect breast cancer. These include stage specific markers associated with pre-invasive breast cancer in the ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) samples (Leucine LRC36, MAST4 and Uncharacterized protein CI131), early invasive breast cancer (DYH8, HBA, PEPA, uncharacterized protein C4orf14 (CD014), filaggrin and MMRN2) and metastatic breast cancer (AGRIN, NEGR1, FIBA and Keratin KIC10). Preliminary validation of 3 potential markers (ECM1, MAST4 and filaggrin) identified was performed in breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting. One potential marker MAST4 was further validated in human breast cancer tissues as well as individual human breast cancer urine samples with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. Our results indicate that urine is a useful non-invasive source of biomarkers and the profile patterns (biomarkers) identified, have potential for clinical use in

  3. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, B; Holck, Susanne; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  4. Signalome-wide RNAi screen identifies GBA1 as a positive mediator of autophagic cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Santosh K; Bialik, Shani; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Levin-Salomon, Vered; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H; Kimchi, Adi

    2017-01-01

    Activating alternative cell death pathways, including autophagic cell death, is a promising direction to overcome the apoptosis resistance observed in various cancers. Yet, whether autophagy acts as a death mechanism by over consumption of intracellular components is still controversial and remains undefined at the ultrastructural and the mechanistic levels. Here we identified conditions under which resveratrol-treated A549 lung cancer cells die by a mechanism that fulfills the previous definition of autophagic cell death. The cells displayed a strong and sustained induction of autophagic flux, cell death was prevented by knocking down autophagic genes and death occurred in the absence of apoptotic or necroptotic pathway activation. Detailed ultrastructural characterization revealed additional critical events, including a continuous increase over time in the number of autophagic vacuoles, in particular autolysosomes, occupying most of the cytoplasm at terminal stages. This was followed by loss of organelles, disruption of intracellular membranes including the swelling of perinuclear space and, occasionally, a unique type of nuclear shedding. A signalome-wide shRNA-based viability screen was applied to identify positive mediators of this type of autophagic cell death. One top hit was GBA1, the Gaucher disease-associated gene, which encodes glucocerebrosidase, an enzyme that metabolizes glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Interestingly, glucocerebrosidase expression levels and activity were elevated, concomitantly with increased intracellular ceramide levels, both of which correlated in time with the appearance of the unique death characteristics. Transfection with siGBA1 attenuated the increase in glucocerebrosidase activity and the intracellular ceramide levels. Most importantly, GBA1 knockdown prevented the strong increase in LC3 lipidation, and many of the ultrastructural changes characteristic of this type of autophagic cell death, including a significant

  5. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... transfer (ACT) using expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or genetically modified cytotoxic T cells. However, despite clear clinical responses, only a fraction of patients respond to treatment and there is an urgent call for characterization of predictive biomarkers. CD8 positive T cells can...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However...

  6. Urothelial cancer stem cells and epithelial plasticity: current concepts and therapeutic implications in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Minal

    2015-12-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is a highly heterogeneous disease that develops along two distinct biological tracks as evident by candidate gene analysis and genome-wide screening and therefore, offers different challenges for clinical management. Tumors representing the truly distinct molecular entities express molecular markers characteristic of a developmental process and a major mechanism of cancer metastasis, known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Recently identified subset of cells known as urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs) in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) have self-renewal properties, ability to generate cellular tumor heterogeneity via differentiation and are ultimately responsible for tumor growth and viability. In this review paper, PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases were searched for original research papers and review articles to extract relevant information on the molecular mechanisms delineating the relationship between EMT and cancer stemness and their clinical implications for different subsets of urothelial cell carcinomas. Experimental and clinical studies over the past few years in bladder cancer cell lines and tumor tissues of different cancer subtypes provide evidences and new insights for mechanistic complexity for induction of EMT, tumorigenicity, and cancer stemness in malignant transformation of urothelial cell carcinomas. Differentiation and elimination therapies targeting EMT-cancer stemness pathway have been proposed as cynosure in the molecular biology of urothelial cell carcinomas and could prove to be clinically beneficial in an ability to reverse the EMT phenotype of tumor cells, suppress the properties of UroCSCs, inhibit bladder cancer progression and tumor relapse, and provide rationale in the treatment and clinical management of urothelial cancer.

  7. Breast cancer resistance protein identifies clonogenic keratinocytes in human interfollicular epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongrui; Chua, Alvin Wen Choong; Yang, Ennan; Teo, Peiyun; Ting, Yixin; Song, Colin; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Lee, Seng Teik

    2015-03-24

    There is a practical need for the identification of robust cell-surface markers that can be used to enrich for living keratinocyte progenitor cells. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, is known to be a marker for stem/progenitor cells in many tissues and organs. We investigated the expression of ABCG2 protein in normal human epidermis to evaluate its potential as a cell surface marker for identifying and enriching for clonogenic epidermal keratinocytes outside the pilosebaceous tract. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting studies of human skin showed that ABCG2 is expressed in a subset of basal layer cells in the epidermis. Flow cytometry analysis showed approximately 2-3% of keratinocytes in non-hair-bearing epidermis expressing ABCG2; this population also expresses p63, β1 and α6 integrins and keratin 14, but not CD34, CD71, C-kit or involucrin. The ABCG2-positive keratinocytes showed significantly higher colony forming efficiency when co-cultured with mouse 3T3 feeder cells, and more extensive long-term proliferation capacity in vitro, than did ABCG2-negative keratinocytes. Upon clonal analysis, most of the freshly isolated ABCG2-positive keratinocytes formed holoclones and were capable of generating a stratified differentiating epidermis in organotypic culture models. These data indicate that in skin, expression of the ABCG2 transporter is a characteristic of interfollicular keratinocyte progentior cells and suggest that ABCG2 may be useful for enriching keratinocyte stem cells in human interfollicular epidermis.

  8. An embryonic stem cell-like signature identifies poorly differentiated lung adenocarcinoma but not squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Khaled A; Chen, Guoan; Kalemkerian, Gregory P; Wicha, Max S; Beer, David G

    2009-10-15

    An embryonic stem cell (ESC) profile correlates with poorly differentiated breast, bladder, and glioma cancers. In this article, we assess the correlation between the ESC profile and clinical variables in lung cancer. Microarray gene expression analysis was done using Affymetrix Human Genome U133A on 443 samples of human lung adenocarcinoma and 130 samples of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To identify gene set enrichment patterns, we used the Genomica software. Our analysis showed that an increased expression of the ESC gene set and a decreased expression of the Polycomb target gene set identified poorly differentiated lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, this gene expression signature was associated with markers of poor prognosis and worse overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma. However, there was no correlation between this ESC gene signature and any histologic or clinical variable assessed in lung SCC. This work suggests that not all poorly differentiated non-small cell lung cancers exhibit a gene expression profile similar to that of ESC, and that other characteristics may play a more important role in the determination of differentiation and survival in SCC of the lung.

  9. Cancer in silico drug discovery: a systems biology tool for identifying candidate drugs to target specific molecular tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Lucas, F Anthony; Fowler, Jerry; Chang, Kyle; Kopetz, Scott; Vilar, Eduardo; Scheet, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale cancer datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) allow researchers to profile tumors based on a wide range of clinical and molecular characteristics. Subsequently, TCGA-derived gene expression profiles can be analyzed with the Connectivity Map (CMap) to find candidate drugs to target tumors with specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics. This represents a powerful computational approach for candidate drug identification, but due to the complexity of TCGA and technology differences between CMap and TCGA experiments, such analyses are challenging to conduct and reproduce. We present Cancer in silico Drug Discovery (CiDD; scheet.org/software), a computational drug discovery platform that addresses these challenges. CiDD integrates data from TCGA, CMap, and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) to perform computational drug discovery experiments, generating hypotheses for the following three general problems: (i) determining whether specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics are associated with unique gene expression signatures; (ii) finding candidate drugs to repress these expression signatures; and (iii) identifying cell lines that resemble the tumors being studied for subsequent in vitro experiments. The primary input to CiDD is a clinical or molecular characteristic. The output is a biologically annotated list of candidate drugs and a list of cell lines for in vitro experimentation. We applied CiDD to identify candidate drugs to treat colorectal cancers harboring mutations in BRAF. CiDD identified EGFR and proteasome inhibitors, while proposing five cell lines for in vitro testing. CiDD facilitates phenotype-driven, systematic drug discovery based on clinical and molecular data from TCGA. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. RNA sequencing identifies specific PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNA expression patterns in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Adnan; Rizzo, Francesca; Marchese, Giovanna; Ravo, Maria; Tarallo, Roberta; Nassa, Giovanni; Giurato, Giorgio; Santamaria, Gianluca; Cordella, Angela; Cantarella, Concita; Weisz, Alessandro

    2014-10-30

    PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs) are genetic and epigenetic regulatory factors in germline cells, where they maintain genome stability, are involved in RNA silencing and regulate gene expression. We found that the piRNA biogenesis and effector pathway are present in human breast cancer (BC) cells and, analyzing smallRNA-Seq data generated from BC cell lines and tumor biopsies, we identified >100 BC piRNAs, including some very abundant and/or differentially expressed in mammary epithelial compared to BC cells, where this was influenced by estrogen or estrogen receptor β, and in cancer respect to normal breast tissues. A search for mRNAs targeted by the BC piRNome revealed that eight piRNAs showing a specific expression pattern in breast tumors target key cancer cell pathways. Evidence of an active piRNA pathway in BC suggests that these small non-coding RNAs do exert transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulatory actions also in cancer cells.

  11. Abortive autophagy induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available Autophagic cell death or abortive autophagy has been proposed to eliminate damaged as well as cancer cells, but there remains a critical gap in our knowledge in how this process is regulated. The goal of this study was to identify modulators of the autophagic cell death pathway and elucidate their effects on cellular signaling and function. The result of our siRNA library screenings show that an intact coatomer complex I (COPI is obligatory for productive autophagy. Depletion of COPI complex members decreased cell survival and impaired productive autophagy which preceded endoplasmic reticulum stress. Further, abortive autophagy provoked by COPI depletion significantly altered growth factor signaling in multiple cancer cell lines. Finally, we show that COPI complex members are overexpressed in an array of cancer cell lines and several types of cancer tissues as compared to normal cell lines or tissues. In cancer tissues, overexpression of COPI members is associated with poor prognosis. Our results demonstrate that the coatomer complex is essential for productive autophagy and cellular survival, and thus inhibition of COPI members may promote cell death of cancer cells when apoptosis is compromised.

  12. NanoString expression profiling identifies candidate biomarkers of RAD001 response in metastatic gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kakoli; Chan, Xiu Bin; Epstein, David; Teh, Bin Tean; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Se Hoon; Kang, Won Ki; Rozen, Steve; Lee, Jeeyun; Tan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has contributed greatly to cancer research. However, expression-driven biomarker discovery in metastatic gastric cancer (mGC) remains unclear. A gene expression profile predicting RAD001 response in refractory GC was explored in this study. Total RNA isolated from 54 tumour specimens from patients with mGC, prior to RAD001 treatment, was analysed via the NanoString nCounter gene expression assay. This assay targeted 477 genes representing 10 different GC-related oncogenic signalling and molecular subtype-specific expression signatures. Gene expression profiles were correlated with patient clinicopathological variables. NanoString data confirmed similar gene expression profiles previously identified by microarray analysis. Signature I with 3 GC subtypes (mesenchymal, metabolic and proliferative) showed approximately 90% concordance where the mesenchymal and proliferative subtypes were significantly associated with signet ring cell carcinoma and the WHO classified tubular adenocarcinoma GC, respectively (p=0.042). Single-gene-level correlations with patient clinicopathological variables showed strong associations between FHL1 expression (mesenchymal subtype) and signet ring cell carcinoma, and NEK2 , OIP5 , PRC1 , TPX2 expression (proliferative subtype) with tubular adenocarcinoma (adjusted pNanoString nCounter gene expression profiling. Additionally, BRCA2 and MMP9 expression are potential predictive biomarkers for good response in RAD001-treated mGC.

  13. Global phosphotyrosine proteomics identifies PKCδ as a marker of responsiveness to Src inhibition in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot T McKinley

    Full Text Available Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC. We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ, CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1, Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2, and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα. The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers.

  14. Hedgehog signaling regulates telomerase reverse transcriptase in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapati Mazumdar

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is critical for normal embryonic development, tissue patterning and cell differentiation. Aberrant HH signaling is involved in multiple human cancers. HH signaling involves a multi-protein cascade activating the GLI proteins that transcriptionally regulate HH target genes. We have previously reported that HH signaling is essential for human colon cancer cell survival and inhibition of this signal induces DNA damage and extensive cell death. Here we report that the HH/GLI axis regulates human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, which determines the replication potential of cancer cells. Suppression of GLI1/GLI2 functions by a C-terminus truncated GLI3 repressor mutant (GLI3R, or by GANT61, a pharmacological inhibitor of GLI1/GLI2, reduced hTERT protein expression in human colon cancer, prostate cancer and Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines. Expression of an N-terminus deleted constitutively active mutant of GLI2 (GLI2ΔN increased hTERT mRNA and protein expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity in human colon cancer cells while GANT61 inhibited hTERT mRNA expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with GLI1 or GLI2 antibodies precipitated fragments of the hTERT promoter in human colon cancer cells, which was reduced upon exposure to GANT61. In contrast, expression of GLI1 or GLI2ΔN in non-malignant 293T cells failed to alter the levels of hTERT mRNA and protein, or hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Further, expression of GLI2ΔN increased the telomerase enzyme activity, which was reduced by GANT61 administration in human colon cancer, prostate cancer, and GBM cells. These results identify hTERT as a direct target of the HH signaling pathway, and reveal a previously unknown role of the HH/GLI axis in regulating the replication potential of cancer cells. These findings are of significance in understanding the important regulatory

  15. CSGene: a literature-based database for cell senescence genes and its application to identify critical cell aging pathways and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M; Chen, L; Qu, H

    2016-01-14

    Cell senescence is a cellular process in which normal diploid cells cease to replicate and is a major driving force for human cancers and aging-associated diseases. Recent studies on cell senescence have identified many new genetic components and pathways that control cell aging. However, there is no comprehensive resource for cell senescence that integrates various genetic studies and relationships with cell senescence, and the risk associated with complex diseases such as cancer is still unexplored. We have developed the first literature-based gene resource for exploring cell senescence genes, CSGene. We complied 504 experimentally verified genes from public data resources and published literature. Pathway analyses highlighted the prominent roles of cell senescence genes in the control of rRNA gene transcription and unusual rDNA repeat that constitute a center for the stability of the whole genome. We also found a strong association of cell senescence with HIV-1 infection and viral carcinogenesis that are mainly related to promoter/enhancer binding and chromatin modification processes. Moreover, pan-cancer mutation and network analysis also identified common cell aging mechanisms in cancers and uncovered a highly modular network structure. These results highlight the utility of CSGene for elucidating the complex cellular events of cell senescence.

  16. Molecular biology of breast cancer stem cells: potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Almeida, Fabio S; Chi, Alex; Nguyen, Ly M; Cohen, Deirdre; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated recently as responsible for failure of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to review breast CSCs molecular biology with respect to their mechanism of resistance to conventional therapy, and to develop treatment strategies that may improve survival of breast cancer patients. A literature search has identified in vitro and in vivo studies of breast CSCs. Breast CSCs overexpress breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) which allows cancer cells to transport actively chemotherapy agents out of the cells. Radioresistance is modulated through activation of Wnt signaling pathway and overexpression of genes coding for glutathione. Lapatinib can selectively target HER-2 positive breast CSCs and improves disease-free survival in these patients. Metformin may target basal type breast CSCs. Parthenolide and oncolytic viruses are promising targeting agents for breast CSCs. Future clinical trials for breast cancer should include anti-cancer stem cells targeting agents in addition to conventional chemotherapy. Hypofractionation radiotherapy may be indicated for residual disease post chemotherapy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identifying Cell Populations in Flow Cytometry Data Using Phenotypic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell flow cytometry is a technology that measures the expression of several cellular markers simultaneously for a large number of cells. Identification of homogeneous cell populations, currently done by manual biaxial gating, is highly subjective and time consuming. To overcome the shortcomings of manual gating, automatic algorithms have been proposed. However, the performance of these methods highly depends on the shape of populations and the dimension of the data. In this paper, we have developed a time-efficient method that accurately identifies cellular populations. This is done based on a novel technique that estimates the initial number of clusters in high dimension and identifies the final clusters by merging clusters using their phenotypic signatures in low dimension. The proposed method is called SigClust. We have applied SigClust to four public datasets and compared it with five well known methods in the field. The results are promising and indicate higher performance and accuracy compared to similar approaches reported in literature.

  18. Establishment of a DNA methylation marker to evaluate cancer cell fraction in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Liang; Hattori, Naoko; Yoda, Yukie; Yamashita, Satoshi; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Takamasa; Maeda, Masahiro; Katai, Hitoshi; Nanjo, Sohachi; Ando, Takayuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2016-04-01

    Tumor samples are unavoidably contaminated with coexisting normal cells. Here, we aimed to establish a DNA methylation marker to estimate the fraction of gastric cancer (GC) cells in any DNA sample by isolating genomic regions specifically methylated in GC cells. Genome-wide and gene-specific methylation analyses were conducted with an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array and by quantitative methylation-specific PCR, respectively. Purified cancer and noncancer cells were prepared by laser-capture microdissection. TP53 mutation data were obtained from our previous study using next-generation target sequencing. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of 12 GC cell lines, 30 GCs, six normal gastric mucosae, one sample of peripheral leukocytes, and four noncancerous gastric mucosae identified OSR2, PPFIA3, and VAV3 as barely methylated in normal cells and highly methylated in cancer cells. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR using 26 independent GCs validated that one or more of them was highly methylated in all of the GCs. Using four pairs of purified cells, we confirmed the three genes were highly methylated (85 % or more) in cancer cells and barely methylated (5 % or less) in noncancer cells. The cancer cell fraction assessed by the panel of the three genes showed good correlation with that assessed by the TP53 mutant allele frequency in 13 GCs (r = 0.77). After correction of the GC cell fraction, unsupervised clustering analysis of the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles yielded clearer clustering. A DNA methylation marker-namely, the panel of the three genes-is useful to estimate the cancer cell fraction in GCs.

  19. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10......,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part...

  20. Integrated analysis of recurrent properties of cancer genes to identify novel drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneity of cancer genomes in terms of acquired mutations complicates the identification of genes whose modification may exert a driver role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we present a novel method that integrates expression profiles, mutation effects, and systemic properties of mutated genes to identify novel cancer drivers. We applied our method to ovarian cancer samples and were able to identify putative drivers in the majority of carcinomas without mutations in known cancer genes, thus suggesting that it can be used as a complementary approach to find rare driver mutations that cannot be detected using frequency-based approaches. PMID:23718799

  1. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors.

  2. Identifying key radiogenomic associations between DCE-MRI and micro-RNA expressions for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Kim, Renaid

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the key radiogenomic associations for breast cancer between DCE-MRI and micro-RNA expressions is the foundation for the discovery of radiomic features as biomarkers for assessing tumor progression and prognosis. We conducted a study to analyze the radiogenomic associations for breast cancer using the TCGA-TCIA data set. The core idea that tumor etiology is a function of the behavior of miRNAs is used to build the regression models. The associations based on regression are analyzed for three study outcomes: diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. The diagnosis group consists of miRNAs associated with clinicopathologic features of breast cancer and significant aberration of expression in breast cancer patients. The prognosis group consists of miRNAs which are closely associated with tumor suppression and regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. The treatment group consists of miRNAs that contribute significantly to the regulation of metastasis thereby having the potential to be part of therapeutic mechanisms. As a first step, important miRNA expressions were identified and their ability to classify the clinical phenotypes based on the study outcomes was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as a figure-of-merit. The key mapping between the selected miRNAs and radiomic features were determined using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression analysis within a two-loop leave-one-out cross-validation strategy. These key associations indicated a number of radiomic features from DCE-MRI to be potential biomarkers for the three study outcomes.

  3. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genomic heterogeneity at a nucleotide and chromosomal level in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Pengyuan; Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Zhang, Jianmin; Luo, Wei; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Sabatini, Linda; Vedell, Peter; Xiong, Donghai; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin; Shen, He; Li, Yinwei; Omilian, Angela R.; Hill, Annette; Head, Karen; Guru, Khurshid; Kunnev, Dimiter; Leach, Robert; Eng, Kevin H.; Darlak, Christopher; Hoeflich, Christopher; Veeranki, Srividya; Glenn, Sean; You, Ming; Pruitt, Steven C.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Using complete genome analysis, we sequenced five bladder tumors accrued from patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB) and identified a spectrum of genomic aberrations. In three tumors, complex genotype changes were noted. All three had tumor protein p53 mutations and a relatively large number of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs; average of 11.2 per megabase), structural variants (SVs; average of 46), or both. This group was best characterized by chromothripsis and the presence of subclonal populations of neoplastic cells or intratumoral mutational heterogeneity. Here, we provide evidence that the process of chromothripsis in TCC-UB is mediated by nonhomologous end-joining using kilobase, rather than megabase, fragments of DNA, which we refer to as “stitchers,” to repair this process. We postulate that a potential unifying theme among tumors with the more complex genotype group is a defective replication–licensing complex. A second group (two bladder tumors) had no chromothripsis, and a simpler genotype, WT tumor protein p53, had relatively few SNVs (average of 5.9 per megabase) and only a single SV. There was no evidence of a subclonal population of neoplastic cells. In this group, we used a preclinical model of bladder carcinoma cell lines to study a unique SV (translocation and amplification) of the gene glutamate receptor ionotropic N-methyl D-aspertate as a potential new therapeutic target in bladder cancer. PMID:24469795

  4. Metabolic cooperation between cancer and non-cancerous stromal cells is pivotal in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Coelho, Filipa; Gouveia-Fernandes, Sofia; Serpa, Jacinta

    2018-02-01

    The way cancer cells adapt to microenvironment is crucial for the success of carcinogenesis, and metabolic fitness is essential for a cancer cell to survive and proliferate in a certain organ/tissue. The metabolic remodeling in a tumor niche is endured not only by cancer cells but also by non-cancerous cells that share the same microenvironment. For this reason, tumor cells and stromal cells constitute a complex network of signal and organic compound transfer that supports cellular viability and proliferation. The intensive dual-address cooperation of all components of a tumor sustains disease progression and metastasis. Herein, we will detail the role of cancer-associated fibroblasts, cancer-associated adipocytes, and inflammatory cells, mainly monocytes/macrophages (tumor-associated macrophages), in the remodeling and metabolic adaptation of tumors.

  5. Novel Genome-Wide Screening Method Identifies Genes Important to Breast Cancer Metastasis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    For patients with solid tumors, the primary cause of illness and death is metastasis, a complex process involving multiple steps and cooperation between cancerous and normal cells. Many genes must be involved, but few have been found and characterized.

  6. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Integrative analyses identify modulators of response to neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitors in patients with early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Knowles, Elena; Wilkerson, Paul M; Ribas, Ricardo; Anderson, Helen; Mackay, Alan; Ghazoui, Zara; Rani, Aradhana; Osin, Peter; Nerurkar, Ash; Renshaw, Lorna; Larionov, Alexey; Miller, William R; Dixon, J Michael; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Dunbier, Anita K; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Dowsett, Mitch

    2015-03-11

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are a vital component of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer treatment. De novo and acquired resistance, however, is common. The aims of this study were to relate patterns of copy number aberrations to molecular and proliferative response to AIs, to study differences in the patterns of copy number aberrations between breast cancer samples pre- and post-AI neoadjuvant therapy, and to identify putative biomarkers for resistance to neoadjuvant AI therapy using an integrative analysis approach. Samples from 84 patients derived from two neoadjuvant AI therapy trials were subjected to copy number profiling by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH, n=84), gene expression profiling (n=47), matched pre- and post-AI aCGH (n=19 pairs) and Ki67-based AI-response analysis (n=39). Integrative analysis of these datasets identified a set of nine genes that, when amplified, were associated with a poor response to AIs, and were significantly overexpressed when amplified, including CHKA, LRP5 and SAPS3. Functional validation in vitro, using cell lines with and without amplification of these genes (SUM44, MDA-MB134-VI, T47D and MCF7) and a model of acquired AI-resistance (MCF7-LTED) identified CHKA as a gene that when amplified modulates estrogen receptor (ER)-driven proliferation, ER/estrogen response element (ERE) transactivation, expression of ER-regulated genes and phosphorylation of V-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1). These data provide a rationale for investigation of the role of CHKA in further models of de novo and acquired resistance to AIs, and provide proof of concept that integrative genomic analyses can identify biologically relevant modulators of AI response.

  8. Human breast cancer biopsies induce eosinophil recruitment and enhance adjacent cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalayova, Gabriela; Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Spencer, Brianna; Wade, Jacqueline; Bunn, Janice; Ambaye, Abiy; James, Ted; Rincon, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is known to facilitate cancer progression and metastasis. Less is known about the effect of acute inflammation within the tumor microenvironment, resulting from standard invasive procedures. Recent studies in mouse models have shown that the acute inflammatory response triggered by a biopsy in mammary cancer increases the frequency of distal metastases. Although tumor biopsies are part of the standard clinical practice in breast cancer diagnosis, no studies have reported their effect on inflammatory response. The objective of this study is to 1) determine whether core needle biopsies in breast cancer patients trigger an inflammatory response, 2) characterize the type of inflammatory response present, and 3) evaluate the potential effect of any acute inflammatory response on residual tumor cells. Methods The biopsy wound site was identified in the primary tumor resection tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The inflammatory response in areas adjacent (i.e. immediately around previous biopsy site) and distant to the wound biopsy was investigated by histology and immunohistochemistry analysis. Proliferation of tumor cells was also assayed. Results We demonstrate that diagnostic core needle biopsies trigger a selective recruitment of inflammatory cells at the site of the biopsy and they persist for extended periods of time. While macrophages were part of the inflammatory response, an unexpected accumulation of eosinophils at the edge of the biopsy wound was also identified. Importantly, we show that biopsy causes an increase in the proliferation rate of tumor cells located in the area adjacent to the biopsy wound. Conclusions Diagnostic core needle biopsies in breast cancer patients do induce a unique acute inflammatory response within the tumor microenvironment and have an effect on the surrounding tumor cells. Therefore biopsy-induced inflammation could have an impact on residual tumor cell progression and/or metastasis in human

  9. Ubc9 promotes invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Niu, Huiyan; Peng, Yang; Wang, Jiahe; He, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The mortality is high mainly due to the lack of known effective screening procedures; there is a high tendency for early spread and systemic therapies do not cure metastatic disease. Thus, it is important to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer development and, specifically, to identify an effective method by which to inhibit the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9), the sole conjugating enzyme for sumoylation, regulates protein function and plays a key role in tumorigenesis. Whether Ubc9 is involved in the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer remains unknown. Herein, we report that Ubc9 exhibits an important role in lung cancer invasion and metastasis. We first investigated the biological effect of Ubc9 on lung cancer by cloning the Ubc9 gene into a eukaryotic expression plasmid and stably expressing it in the human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446 in order to observe any biological changes. We further analyzed the effect of Ubc9 in an in vivo experiment, injecting NCI-H446 cells stably overexpressing Ubc9 into nude mice and analyzing their metastatic ability. Our results demonstrated that Ubc9 is expressed at higher levels in primary lung cancer tissue and metastatic nodules as compared to premalignant and/or normal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrated that upregulation of Ubc9 expression promotes migration and invasion. Ubc9 likely plays an important role in cancer progression by promoting invasion and metastasis in lung cancer.

  10. Differential ectonucleotidase expression in human bladder cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Joséli; Bavaresco, Luci; Braganhol, Elizandra; Rockenbach, Liliana; Farias, Patrícia Fernandes; Wink, Márcia R; Azambuja, Alan A; Barrios, Carlos Henrique; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Oliveira Battastini, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most prevalent tumor in the genitourinary tract. Nucleotides are important molecules that regulate many pathophysiological functions in the extracellular space. Studies have revealed evidence of a relationship between purinergic signaling and urothelial malignancies. Nucleotide-mediated signaling is controlled by a highly efficient enzymatic cascade, which includes the members of the ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDases), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (E-NPPs), ecto-alkaline phosphatases, and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73. In an attempt to identify possible differential expression of ectonucleotidases during bladder cancer progression, a comparative analysis between RT4 (grade 1) and T24 (grade 3) bladder cancer cell lines was performed. In RT4 cells, the hydrolysis of tri- and diphosphate nucleosides was higher than monophosphonucleosides. T24 cells, however, presented the opposite profile, a low level of hydrolysis of tri- and diphosphate nucleosides and a high level of hydrolysis of monophosphates. Phosphodiesterase activity was negligible in both cell lines at physiological pH, indicating that these enzymes are not active under our assay conditions, although they are expressed in both cell lines. The T24 cells expressed NTPDase5 mRNA, while the RT4 cells expressed NTPDase3 and NTPDase5 mRNA. Both cell lines expressed ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 mRNA. The present work describes, for the first time, the differential pattern of ectonucleotidases in the more malignant bladder cancer cells compared with cells derived from an early stage of bladder cancer. Our results open new avenues for research into the physiological roles of this family of enzymes and their possible therapeutic potential in bladder cancer. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  12. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Niehage

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2% or high (10% serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention.

  13. Big screens with small RNAs : loss of function genetic screens to identify novel cancer genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullenders, J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis described the construction and screening of one of the first large scale RNAi libraries for use in human cells. Functional genetic screens with this library have led to the identification of novel cancer genes. These cancer genes function in several pathways including the p53 tumor

  14. Spindle Cell Metaplastic Breast Cancer: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dursun Ozgur Karakas

    2013-08-01

    Conclusion: Spindle cell metaplastic breast cancer must be considered in differential diagnosis of breast cancers, and preoperative immunohistochemical examination, including cytokeratin and vimentin, must be added to pathological examination in intervening cases. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 259-262

  15. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Daidone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC. BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+, have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  16. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelsomino, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.gelsomino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Medical Oncology Unit 1, Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via G. Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rossi, Giulio [Operative Unit of Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, Via del Pozzo 71, 41124 Modena (Italy); Tiseo, Marcello [Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Viale A. Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-10-13

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  17. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gelsomino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  18. Peptide screen identifies a new NADPH oxidase inhibitor: impact on cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousslim, Mohamed; Pagano, Alessandra; Andreotti, Nicolas; Garrouste, Françoise; Thuault, Sylvie; Peyrot, Vincent; Parat, Fabrice; Luis, José; Culcasi, Marcel; Thétiot-Laurent, Sophie; Pietri, Sylvia; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Kovacic, Hervé

    2017-01-05

    The NADPH oxidase proteins catalyse the formation of superoxide anion which act as signalling molecules in physiological and pathological processes. Nox1-dependent NADPH oxidase is expressed in heart, lung, colon, blood vessels and brain. Different strategies involving Nox1 inhibition based on diphenylene iodonium derivatives are currently tested for colorectal cancer therapy. Here, after peptides screening on Nox1-dependent NADPH oxidase assay in HT-29 cells, we identify a peptide (referred to as NF02), cell-active, that potently block Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. Study of DEPMPO adduct formation by electron paramagnetic resonance showed that NF02 has no superoxide scavenging activity and no impact on cellular reactive oxygen species-producing enzymes such xanthine oxidase. NF02 was not cytotoxic, inhibited reactive oxygen species production of reconstituted Nox1/Noxo1/Noxa1 complex in HEK293 and did not decrease Nox2 dependent cellular NADPH oxidase reactive oxygen species production. Finally, NF02 inhibited cell migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells which is consistent with the described impact of Nox1 inhibitors on cell migration. NF02 peptide is a new NADPH oxidase inhibitor specific for Nox1 over Nox2 and xanthine oxidase which might represent a useful Nox1 tool with potential therapeutic insights. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stem Cells and Cancer; Celulas madre y cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segrelles, C.; Paraminio, J. M.; Lorz, C.

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  20. Phenotypic characterization of drug resistance and tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human bone tumor osteosarcoma cell line OS-77

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell theory suggest that presence of small subpopulation of cancer stem cells are the major implication in the cancer treatment and also responsible for tumor recurrence. Based on Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique, we have identified about 3.3% of cancer stem like side population (SP cells from human osteosarcoma OS-77 cell line whose prevalence is significantly reduced to 0.3% after treatment with verapamil. The sphere formation assay revealed that osteosarcoma SP cells are highly capable to form tumor spheres (sarcospheres. Further by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR, we show that OS-77 SP cells have enhanced expression of stem cell surface markers such as CD44, Nanog and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene (ABCG2 which contributes to self-renewal and drug resistance, respectively. Our findings help to designing a novel therapeutic drug which could effectively target the cancer stem cells and prevent the tumor relapse.

  1. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nancy L., E-mail: nlcho@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lin, Chi-Iou [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Du, Jinyan [Broad Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ito, Hiromichi [Department of Surgery, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48912 (United States); Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation

  2. The usefulness of three-dimensional cell culture in induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Daisuke [Department of Esophageal and Gastroenterological Surgery, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kato, Kazunori, E-mail: kzkatou@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Department of Atopy Research Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nohara, Shigeo; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki [Department of Esophageal and Gastroenterological Surgery, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Spheroids were created from esophageal carcinoma cells using NanoCulture® Plates. •The proportion of strongly ALDH-positive cells increased in 3-D culture. •Expression of cancer stem cell-related genes was enhanced in 3-D culture. •CA-9 expression was enhanced, suggesting hypoxia had been induced in 3-D culture. •Drug resistance was increased. 3-D culture is useful for inducing cancer stem cells. -- Abstract: In recent years, research on resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in cancer treatment has come under the spotlight, and researchers have also begun investigating the relationship between resistance and cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are assumed to be present in esophageal cancer, but experimental methods for identification and culture of these cells have not yet been established. To solve this problem, we created spheroids using a NanoCulture® Plate (NCP) for 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture, which was designed as a means for experimentally reproducing the 3-D structures found in the body. We investigated the potential for induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal cancer cells. Using flow cytometry we analyzed the expression of surface antigen markers CD44, CD133, CD338 (ABCG2), CD318 (CDCP1), and CD326 (EpCAM), which are known cancer stem cell markers. None of these surface antigen markers showed enhanced expression in 3-D cultured cells. We then analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activity using the ALDEFLUOR reagent, which can identify immature cells such as stem cells and precursor cells. 3-D-cultured cells were strongly positive for ALDH enzyme activity. We also analyzed the expression of the stem cell-related genes Sox-2, Nanog, Oct3/4, and Lin28 using RT-PCR. Expression of Sox-2, Nanog, and Lin28 was enhanced. Analysis of expression of the hypoxic surface antigen marker carbonic anhydrase-9 (CA-9), which is an indicator of cancer stem cell induction and maintenance, revealed that CA-9 expression

  3. Ensemble clustering of phosphoproteomic data identifies differences in protein interactions and cell-cell junction integrity of HER2-overexpressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberg, Katherine E; Shirure, Venktesh S; Worley, Elizabeth A; George, Steven C; Naegle, Kristen M

    2017-06-19

    Overexpression of HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase of the ERBB family, in breast cancer is related to increased cancer progression and aggressiveness. A breast epithelial cell model with the single perturbation of HER2 overexpression is capable of replicating the increased aggressiveness of HER2 overexpressing cancers. In previous work, Wolf-Yadlin and colleagues (Wolf-Yadlin et al., Mol. Syst. Biol., 2006, 2) measured the proximal tyrosine phosphorylation dynamics of the parental and HER2 overexpressing cells (24H) in response to EGF. Here, we apply an ensemble clustering approach to dynamic phosphorylation measurements of the two cell models in order to identify signaling events that explain the increased migratory potential of HER2 overexpressing cells. The use of an ensemble approach for identifying relationships within a dataset and how these relationships change across datasets uncovers relationships that cannot be found by the direct comparison of dynamic responses in the two conditions. Of particular note is a drastic change in the clustering of SHC1 phosphorylation (on site Y349) from an EGFR-MAPK module in parental cells to a module consisting of an E-cadherin junction protein phosphorylation site, catenin delta-1 Y228, in HER2 overexpressing (24H) cells. Given the importance of E-cadherin junctions in healthy epithelial wound healing and migration, we chose to test the computationally-derived identification of altered cell junctions and CTNND1:SHC1 relationships. Our cell and molecular biology experiments demonstrate that SHC and CTNND1 interact in an EGF- and HER2-dependent manner and that the cell junctions are phenotypically affected by HER2, breaking down in response to EGF and yet avoiding apoptosis as a result of cell junction loss. The results suggest a mechanism by which HER2 alters the localization of the SHC-MAPK signaling axis and a phenotypic effect on cell junction integrity.

  4. Transcriptomic architecture of the adjacent airway field cancerization in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadara, Humam; Fujimoto, Junya; Yoo, Suk-Young; Maki, Yuho; Gower, Adam C; Kabbout, Mohamed; Garcia, Melinda M; Chow, Chi-Wan; Chu, Zuoming; Mendoza, Gabriella; Shen, Li; Kalhor, Neda; Hong, Waun Ki; Moran, Cesar; Wang, Jing; Spira, Avrum; Coombes, Kevin R; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2014-03-01

    Earlier work identified specific tumor-promoting abnormalities that are shared between lung cancers and adjacent normal bronchial epithelia. We sought to characterize the yet unknown global molecular and adjacent airway field cancerization (FC) in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Whole-transcriptome expression profiling of resected early-stage (I-IIIA) NSCLC specimens (n = 20) with matched tumors, multiple cytologically controlled normal airways with varying distances from tumors, and uninvolved normal lung tissues (n = 194 samples) was performed using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST platform. Mixed-effects models were used to identify differentially expressed genes among groups. Ordinal regression analysis was performed to characterize site-dependent airway expression profiles. All statistical tests were two-sided, except where noted. We identified differentially expressed gene features (n = 1661) between NSCLCs and airways compared with normal lung tissues, a subset of which (n = 299), after gene set enrichment analysis, statistically significantly (P cancer patients from airways in cancer-free smokers. In addition, we identified genes (n = 422) statistically significantly and progressively differentially expressed in airways by distance from tumors that were found to be congruently modulated between NSCLCs and normal lung tissues. Furthermore, LAPTM4B, with statistically significantly increased expression (P cancer cell growth. The adjacent airway FC comprises both site-independent profiles as well as gradient and localized airway expression patterns. Profiling of the airway FC may provide new insights into NSCLC oncogenesis and molecular tools for detection of the disease.

  5. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Van Asperen, Christi J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-05-15

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Effects of Recombinant Erythropoietin on Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Phillips

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer anemia causes fatigue and correlates with poor treatment outcome. Erythropoietin has been introduced in an attempt to correct these defects. However, five recent clinical trials reported a negative impact of erythropoietin on survival and/or tumor control, indicating that experimental evaluation of a possible direct effect of erythropoietin on cancer cells is required. Cancer recurrence is thought to rely on the proliferation of cancer initiating cells (CICs. In breast cancer, CICs can be identified by phenotypic markers and their fate is controlled by the Notch pathway. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the effect of erythropoietin on CICs in breast cancer cell lines. Levels of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR, CD24, CD44, Jagged-1 expression, activation of Notch-1 were assessed by flow cytometry. Self-renewing capacity of CICs was investigated in sphere formation assays. RESULTS: EpoR expression was found on the surface of CICs. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo increased the numbers of CICs and self-renewing capacity in a Notch-dependent fashion by induction of Jagged-1. Inhibitors of the Notch pathway and P13-kinase blocked both effects. CONCLUSIONS: Erythropoietin functionally affects CICs directly. Our observation may explain the negative impact of recombinant Epo on local control and survival of cancer patients with EpoR-positive tumors.

  7. Alterations of calcium homeostasis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Saverio; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Typical hallmarks of cancer include programmed cell death evasion, uncontrolled cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels can modulate signaling pathways that control a broad range of cellular events, including those important to tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Here we discuss how known molecular mediators of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis impact tumor dynamics and how deregulation of major oncogenes and tumor suppressors is tightly associated with Ca(2+) signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lgr5-Positive Cells are Cancer-Stem-Cell-Like Cells in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongli Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Effective treatment of gastric cancer (GC requires better understanding of the molecular regulation of its carcinogenesis. Identification of cancer stem cells (CSCs in GC appears to be a critical question. Methods: We analyzed Lgr5 expression in GC specimen. We used an adeno-associated virus (AAV that carries diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA under the control of Lgr5 promoter (AAV-pLgr5-DTA to transduce human GC cells. The growth of GC cells with/without depletion of Lgr5-positive cells was studied in vitro in an MTT assay, and in vivo by analyzing bioluminescence levels. Results: A portion of GC cells in the resected specimen expressed Lgr5. GC cells that formed tumor spheres expressed high Lgr5. Selective depletion of Lgr5-positive GC cells resulted in significant growth inhibition of GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Lgr5-positive cells may be CSCs-like cells in GC and may play a pivotal role in the tumorigenesis of GC. Treating Lgr5-positive GC cells may substantially improve the therapeutic outcome.

  9. Study characterizes how DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs kill cancer cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients whose cancer cells express the SLFN11 protein are more likely to respond to DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs than those whose cancer cells don’t express SLFN11. In a new study, Center for Cancer Research investigators show how these drugs recruit SLFN11 to block replication and kill cancer cells. Read more…

  10. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    leading to their activation. The effectiveness of PAM against SCaBER cells is the highest when it is used immediately after preparation. It is found that the killing effect of PAM decreases gradually over time, depending on the dose of plasma exposure. Hydrogen peroxide is known as one of the most stable and impactful ROS in biological systems. Measurements show that the plasma pencil generates a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide in PAM. Interestingly, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in PAM decreases gradually over time, which correlates well with the decrease of PAM effectiveness with storage time. While the effects of PAM treatment on cancerous epithelial cell lines have been studied, much less is known about the interaction of PAM with normal epithelial cells. Effects of PAM on non-cancerous Madin-Darby Canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells indicates that MDCK cells are much more robust than SCaBER cells against PAM treatment. The dose of PAM, which causes a widespread death in SCaBER cells, does not significantly impact viability and morphology of MDCK cells. Time-lapse imaging of normal cells shows that PAM treatment inhibits cell proliferation and random migration. In addition, immunofluorescence staining shows that PAM treatment causes a significant reduction in the nuclear localization of proliferation marker, Ki-67, without any damage to the morphological properties of cells including adhesions and cytoskeleton function. This dissertation clearly demonstrates the capability of PAM treatment in inducing death in cancerous cells that can be important for cancer therapy. Hydrogen peroxide is identified as an important ROS responsible for the anti-tumor properties of PAM, although much additional work remains to comprehensively understand all the involved ROS/RNS and their role in PAM treatment.

  11. Rapid selection and proliferation of CD133+ cells from cancer cell lines: chemotherapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Kelly

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133+] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB (Celdyne, Houston, TX. For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133+ cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a +15-fold proliferation of the CD133+ cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (-4.8-fold decrease in the CD133+cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133+ cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates.

  12. Using heterogeneity of the patient-derived xenograft model to identify the chemoresistant population in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Zachary C; Katre, Ashwini A; Steg, Adam D; Erickson, Britt K; Shah, Monjri M; Alvarez, Ronald D; Conner, Michael G; Schneider, David; Chen, Dongquan; Landen, Charles N

    2014-09-30

    A cornerstone of preclinical cancer research has been the use of clonal cell lines. However, this resource has underperformed in its ability to effectively identify novel therapeutics and evaluate the heterogeneity in a patient's tumor. The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model retains the heterogeneity of patient tumors, allowing a means to not only examine efficacy of a therapy, but also basic tenets of cancer biology in response to treatment. Herein we describe the development and characterization of an ovarian-PDX model in order to study the development of chemoresistance. We demonstrate that PDX tumors are not simply composed of tumor-initiating cells, but recapitulate the original tumor's heterogeneity, oncogene expression profiles, and clinical response to chemotherapy. Combined carboplatin/paclitaxel treatment of PDX tumors enriches the cancer stem cell populations, but persistent tumors are not entirely composed of these populations. RNA-Seq analysis of six pair of treated PDX tumors compared to untreated tumors demonstrates a consistently contrasting genetic profile after therapy, suggesting similar, but few, pathways are mediating chemoresistance. Pathways and genes identified by this methodology represent novel approaches to targeting the chemoresistant population in ovarian cancer.

  13. In vivo CRISPR screening identifies Ptpn2 as a cancer immunotherapy target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manguso, Robert T; Pope, Hans W; Zimmer, Margaret D; Brown, Flavian D; Yates, Kathleen B; Miller, Brian C; Collins, Natalie B; Bi, Kevin; LaFleur, Martin W; Juneja, Vikram R; Weiss, Sarah A; Lo, Jennifer; Fisher, David E; Miao, Diana; Van Allen, Eliezer; Root, David E; Sharpe, Arlene H; Doench, John G; Haining, W Nicholas

    2017-07-27

    Immunotherapy with PD-1 checkpoint blockade is effective in only a minority of patients with cancer, suggesting that additional treatment strategies are needed. Here we use a pooled in vivo genetic screening approach using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in transplantable tumours in mice treated with immunotherapy to discover previously undescribed immunotherapy targets. We tested 2,368 genes expressed by melanoma cells to identify those that synergize with or cause resistance to checkpoint blockade. We recovered the known immune evasion molecules PD-L1 and CD47, and confirmed that defects in interferon-γ signalling caused resistance to immunotherapy. Tumours were sensitized to immunotherapy by deletion of genes involved in several diverse pathways, including NF-κB signalling, antigen presentation and the unfolded protein response. In addition, deletion of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN2 in tumour cells increased the efficacy of immunotherapy by enhancing interferon-γ-mediated effects on antigen presentation and growth suppression. In vivo genetic screens in tumour models can identify new immunotherapy targets in unanticipated pathways.

  14. Epigenetics of solid cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok; Verma, Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is an emerging science that can help to explain carcinogenesis. The possibility that carcinogenesis may originate in a stem cell process was proposed recently. Stem cells are generated and contribute to tumor formation during the process of tumor development. This chapter focuses on the role of epigenetics and genetics in stem cell formation, different theories about the origin of cancer stem cells (CSCs), and epigenetic mechanisms that occur in solid CSCs. Potential applications of knowledge gained through this field and future prospects for cancer treatment also are discussed.

  15. eFORGE: A Tool for Identifying Cell Type-Specific Signal in Epigenomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, Charles E; Paul, Dirk S; van Dongen, Jenny; Butcher, Lee M; Ambrose, John C; Barrett, James E; Lowe, Robert; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Iotchkova, Valentina; Frontini, Mattia; Downes, Kate; Ouwehand, Willem H; Laperle, Jonathan; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Bourque, Guillaume; Bergmann, Anke K; Siebert, Reiner; Vellenga, Edo; Saeed, Sadia; Matarese, Filomena; Martens, Joost H A; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Herrero, Javier; Birney, Ewan; Dunham, Ian; Beck, Stephan

    2016-11-15

    Epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) provide an alternative approach for studying human disease through consideration of non-genetic variants such as altered DNA methylation. To advance the complex interpretation of EWAS, we developed eFORGE (http://eforge.cs.ucl.ac.uk/), a new standalone and web-based tool for the analysis and interpretation of EWAS data. eFORGE determines the cell type-specific regulatory component of a set of EWAS-identified differentially methylated positions. This is achieved by detecting enrichment of overlap with DNase I hypersensitive sites across 454 samples (tissues, primary cell types, and cell lines) from the ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics, and BLUEPRINT projects. Application of eFORGE to 20 publicly available EWAS datasets identified disease-relevant cell types for several common diseases, a stem cell-like signature in cancer, and demonstrated the ability to detect cell-composition effects for EWAS performed on heterogeneous tissues. Our approach bridges the gap between large-scale epigenomics data and EWAS-derived target selection to yield insight into disease etiology. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Human Cancer Classification: A Systems Biology- Based Model Integrating Morphology, Cancer Stem Cells, Proteomics, and Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halliday A Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture the known attributes of cancer stem cells and their potential contribution to treatment response, and metastases. The integrated model of cancer classification presented here incorporates all morphology, cancer stem cell contributions, genetic, and functional attributes of cancer. Integrated cancer classification models could eliminate the unclassifiable cancers as used in current classifications. Future cancer treatment may be advanced by using an integrated model of cancer classification.

  17. In-depth Investigation of Genetic Region Identifies Mechanism that Contributes to Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators in the Laboratory of Translational Genomics have identified a genetic variant in a multi-cancer risk locus at chromosome 5p15.33 that explains, at least in part, the molecular mechanism through which this variant influences cancer risk.

  18. Seven prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study for PrCa and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 PrCa susceptibility loci. We report here the results of st...

  19. A novel yeast cell-based screen identifies flavone as a tankyrase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashiroda, Yoko, E-mail: ytyy@riken.jp [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okamoto, Reika [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Japan Biological Informatics Consortium (JBIC), Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8073 (Japan); Hatsugai, Kaori [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Division of Chemotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Keio University, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Takemoto, Yasushi [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Goshima, Naoki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Saito, Tamio [Chemical Biology Core Facility/Antibiotics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hamamoto, Makiko [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Sugimoto, Yoshikazu [Division of Chemotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Keio University, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Osada, Hiroyuki [Chemical Biology Core Facility/Antibiotics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Seimiya, Hiroyuki [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Chemical Genomics Research Group/Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2010-04-09

    The telomere-associated protein tankyrase 1 is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and is considered to be a promising target for cancer therapy, especially for BRCA-associated cancers. However, an efficient assay system for inhibitor screening has not been established, mainly due to the difficulty of efficient preparation of the enzyme and its substrate. Here, we report a cell-based assay system for detecting inhibitory activity against tankyrase 1. We found that overexpression of the human tankyrase 1 gene causes a growth defect in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemicals that restore the growth defect phenotype can be identified as potential tankyrase 1 inhibitors. We performed a high-throughput screen using this system, and identified flavone as a compound that restores the growth of yeast cells overexpressing tankyrase 1. Indeed, flavone inhibited poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of proteins caused by overexpression of tankyrase 1 in yeast cells. This system allows rapid identification of inhibitory activity against tankyrase 1 and is amenable to high-throughput screening using robotics.

  20. Therapeutic Potential, Challenges and Future Perspective of Cancer Stem Cells in Translational Oncology: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Gaurav; Khera, Harvinder Kour; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Khare, Piush; Patidar, Rahul; Saxena, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell research is a rapidly developing field that offers effective treatment for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases. Stem cell is a regenerative medicine associated with the replacement, repair, and restoration of injured tissue. Stem cell research is a promising field having maximum therapeutic potential. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cells within the tumor that posses capacity of selfrenewal and have a root cause for the failure of traditional therapies leading to re-occurrence of cancer. CSCs have been identified in blood, breast, brain, and colon cancer. Traditional therapies target only fast growing tumor mass, but not slow-dividing cancer stem cells. It has been shown that embryonic pathways such as Wnt, Hedgehog and Notch, control self-renewal capacity and involved in cancer stem cell maintenance. Targeting of these pathways may be effective in eradicating cancer stem cells and preventing chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Targeting CSCs has become one of the most effective approaches to improve the cancer survival by eradicating the main root cause of cancer. The present review will address, in brief, the importance of cancer stem cells in targeting cancer as better and effective treatment along with a concluding outlook on the scope and challenges in the implication of cancer stem cells in translational oncology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. High ratio of programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1)(+)/CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes identifies a poor prognostic subset of extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing surgery plus adjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yu Jin; Koh, Jaemoon; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, BoKyong; Lee, Kyoung Bun; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Oh, Do-Youn; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the prognostic role of PD-L1 expression, PD-1(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), and the ratio of PD-1(+)/CD8(+) TILs in extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. We analyzed 83 patients with EHBD cancer who underwent curative surgery plus fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Expressions of PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8 were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Fifty-six (68%) patients were PD-L1-positive, and its lower expression level was associated with hilar tumor location (P=0.044). A higher ratio of PD-1(+)/CD8(+) TILs was associated with poorer overall survival (OS) (P=0.032), relapse-free survival (RFS) (P=0.024), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (P=0.039) in Kaplan-Meier analyses, but survival differences were not observed according to the PD-L1 expression level. With Cox proportional hazards models, the ratio of PD-1(+)/CD8(+) TILs was the independent prognostic factor in OS (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.04-5.86), RFS (HR 2.41, 95% CI 1.08-5.41), and DMFS (HR 2.67, 95% CI 1.00-7.11) after adjusting for other significant clinicopathologic variables. A strong survival impact of the ratio of PD-1(+)/CD8(+) TILs was observed in EHBD cancer. In the poor prognostic subgroup, the blockade of the immune checkpoint in combination with conventional multimodality treatment needs to be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of periostin in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak-Wielgomas, Katarzyna; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Matkowski, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    Periostin (POSTN) is a protein involved in multiple processes important for cancer development, both at the stage of cancer initiation and progression, as well as metastasis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of POSTN in the cells of non-invasive ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and to correlate it with clinicopathological data. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were conducted on 21 cases of fibrocystic breast change (FC), 44 cases of DCIS and 92 cases of IDC. POSTN expression at mRNA (real-time PCR) and protein level (western blot analysis) was also confirmed in selected breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231 and BO2). Statistically significant higher level of POSTN expression in IDC and DCIS cancer cells compared to FC was noted. Also, the level of POSTN expression in the cytoplasm of IDC cells was shown to increase with the increasing degree of tumour malignancy (G) and significantly higher expression of POSTN was observed in each degree of tumour malignancy (G) relative to FC. Statistically significant higher POSTN expression was observed in tumours with estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor-negative (PR-) phenotypes in comparison to estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and progesterone receptor-positive (PR+) cases, as well as significant negative correlation between POSTN expression in cancer cells and expression of ER and PR (p<0.05). Additionally, statistically significant differences in POSTN expression were shown between particular breast cancer cell lines, both at mRNA and protein level. Observed POSTN expression was the lowest in the case of MCF-7, and the highest in MDA-MB-231 and BO2 of the most aggressive potential clinically corresponding to G3 tumours. POSTN expression in the cytoplasm of IDC cancer cells may play an important role in cancer transformation mechanism.

  3. Members of the heat-shock protein 70 family promote cancer cell growth by distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Mikkel; Daugaard, Mads; Jensen, Mette Hartvig

    2005-01-01

    the survival of tumorigenic as well as nontumorigenic cells depended on Hsc70. Cancer cells depleted for Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 displayed strikingly different morphologies (detached and round vs. flat senescent-like), cell cycle distributions (G2/M vs. G1 arrest) and gene expression profiles. Only Hsp70-2 depletion...... induced the expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 that was identified as a target of P53 tumor-suppressor protein and a mediator of the G1 arrest and the senescent phenotype. Importantly, concomitant depletion of Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 had a synergistic antiproliferative effect on cancer cells. Thus...... proteins in human cancer cells and identify Hsp70-2, a protein essential for spermatogenesis, as an important regulator of cancer cell growth. Targeted knock-down of the individual family members by RNA interference revealed that both Hsp70 and Hsp70-2 were required for cancer cell growth, whereas...

  4. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  5. C-C motif ligand 5 promotes migration of prostate cancer cells in the prostate cancer bone metastasis microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Satoko; Izumi, Kouji; Hiratsuka, Kaoru; Maolake, Aerken; Natsagdorj, Ariunbold; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Iwamoto, Hiroaki; Kadomoto, Suguru; Makino, Tomoyuki; Naito, Renato; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Lin, Wen-Jye; Wufuer, Guzailinuer; Narimoto, Kazutaka; Mizokami, Atsushi

    2017-12-30

    Chemokines and their receptors have key roles in cancer progression. The present study investigated chemokine activity in the prostate cancer bone metastasis microenvironment. Growth and migration of human prostate cancer cells were assayed in cocultures with bone stromal cells. The migration of LNCaP cells significantly increased when co-cultured with bone stromal cells isolated from prostate cancer bone metastases. Cytokine array analysis of conditioned medium from bone stromal cell cultures identified CCL5 as a concentration-dependent promoter of LNCaP cell migration. The migration of LNCaP cells was suppressed when C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5) neutralizing antibody was added to cocultures with bone stromal cells. Knockdown of androgen receptor with small interfering RNA increased the migration of LNCaP cells compared with control cells, and CCL5 did not promote the migration of androgen receptor knockdown LNCaP. Elevated CCL5 secretion in bone stromal cells from metastatic lesions induced prostate cancer cell migration by a mechanism consistent with CCL5 activity upstream of androgen receptor signaling. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  7. Cancer stem cells, the ultimate targets in cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Shabbir A; Esfandyari T; Farassati F

    2018-01-01

    Ahmed Shabbir,1 Tuba Esfandyari,2 Faris Farassati1,3,4 1Midwest Biomedical Research Foundation, Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 2Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of Kansas, 3Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute, 4Saint Luke’s Marion Bloch Neuroscience Institute, Saint Luke’s Health System, Kansas City, MO, USAThe concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is currently of significant interest due to its important implications in our under...

  8. Cancer stem cells, the ultimate targets in cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Shabbir A; Esfandyari T; Farassati F

    2018-01-01

    Ahmed Shabbir,1 Tuba Esfandyari,2 Faris Farassati1,3,4 1Midwest Biomedical Research Foundation, Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 2Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of Kansas, 3Saint Luke’s Cancer Institute, 4Saint Luke’s Marion Bloch Neuroscience Institute, Saint Luke’s Health System, Kansas City, MO, USAThe concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is currently of significant interest due to its important implications in our understanding of ...

  9. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  10. Expression profiling identifies genes involved in neoplastic transformation of serous ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Adèle C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The malignant potential of serous ovarian tumors, the most common ovarian tumor subtype, varies from benign to low malignant potential (LMP tumors to frankly invasive cancers. Given the uncertainty about the relationship between these different forms, we compared their patterns of gene expression. Methods Expression profiling was carried out on samples of 7 benign, 7 LMP and 28 invasive (moderate and poorly differentiated serous tumors and four whole