WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer care assessment

  1. Assessing breast cancer risk in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Deirdre; Schwartz, Shira

    2014-10-15

    Individuals who are given a preventive exam by a primary care provider are more likely to agree to cancer screening. The provider recommendation has been identified as the strongest factor associated with screening utilization. This article provides a framework for breast cancer risk assessment for an advanced practice registered nurse working in primary care practice.

  2. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire......-based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes...... the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self...

  3. Psychosocial Assessment as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazak, Anne E.; Abrams, Annah N.; Banks, Jaime; Christofferson, Jennifer; DiDonato, Stephen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Kabour, Marianne; Madan-Swain, Avi; Patel, Sunita K.; Zadeh, Sima; Kupst, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for psychosocial assessment in pediatric cancer. An interdisciplinary group of investigators utilized EBSCO, PubMed, PsycINFO, Ovid, and Google Scholar search databases, focusing on five areas: youth/family psychosocial adjustment, family

  4. Symptom assessment in elderly cancer patients receiving palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautex, Sophie; Berger, André; Chatelain, Catherine; Herrmann, François; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the concordance of symptom assessment among the multiple raters in French-speaking elderly patients with an advanced cancer benefiting from palliative care. This study was conducted in a geriatric hospital with palliative care specificity. During 6 months, patient, nurse and physician completed the Edmonton symptom assessment system on two consecutive days. 42 patients with an advanced oncological disease were included. Mean age was 72+/-9.04 (range 52-88) and 23 were females. Mean mini mental status examination (MMSE) was 27.5+/-1.6. First assessment was completed at a median of day 8 after admission. Nurses, physicians and patients assessments were reproducible between days 1 and 2 (P>0.05). Pearson correlation coefficient significantly associated nurse assessment with patient assessment for pain, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite and wellbeing (Ppatient assessment for pain, depression, drowsiness, appetite, wellbeing and shortness of breath (Ppatient score from both physicians and nurses scores weakly correlated all these factors (R2patients without cognitive failure and in stable general condition are consistent in their symptom assessment, and they have to be considered as the gold standard. Nevertheless, interdisciplinary assessment is probably a valid surrogate to self-assessment by the patient but only when the latter is truly impossible.

  5. Lack of Needs Assessment in Cancer Survivorship Care and Rehabilitation in Hospitals and Primary Care Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte Maria; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    the aim of this study was to describe specific survivorship care and rehabilitation needs and plans as stated by patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed and when primary care survivorship care and rehabilitation begins. Methods: Needs assessment forms from cancer patients at two hospitals and two...... primary care settings were analyzed. The forms included stated needs and survivorship care and rehabilitation plans. All data were categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results: Eighty-nine patients at hospitals and 99 in primary care, stated...... their needs. Around 50% of the patients completed a survivorship care and rehabilitation plan. In total, 666 (mean 7.5) needs were stated by hospital patients and 836 (mean 8.0) by those in primary care. The needs stated were primarily within the ICF component “body functions and structure”, and the most...

  6. Assessing the Development of Multidisciplinary Care: Experience of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot L; Chawla, Neetu; Morris, Paul T; Castro, Kathleen M; Carrigan, Angela C; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007 with a goal of expanding cancer research and delivering quality care in communities. The NCCCP Quality of Care (QoC) Subcommittee was charged with developing and improving the quality of multidisciplinary care. An assessment tool with nine key elements relevant to MDC structure and operations was developed. Fourteen NCCCP sites reported multidisciplinary care assessments for lung, breast, and colorectal cancer in June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012 using an online reporting tool. Each site evaluated their level of maturity (level 1 = no multidisciplinary care, level 5 = highly integrated multidisciplinary care) in nine elements integral to multidisciplinary care. Thematic analysis of open-ended qualitative responses was also conducted. The proportion of sites that reported level 3 or greater on the assessment tool was tabulated at each time point. For all tumor types, sites that reached this level increased in six elements: case planning, clinical trials, integration of care coordination, physician engagement, quality improvement, and treatment team integration. Factors that enabled improvement included increasing organizational support, ensuring appropriate physician participation, increasing patient navigation, increasing participation in national quality initiatives, targeting genetics referrals, engaging primary care providers, and integrating clinical trial staff. Maturation of multidisciplinary care reflected focused work of the NCCCP QoC Subcommittee. Working group efforts in patient navigation, genetics, and physician conditions of participation were evident in improved multidisciplinary care performance for three common malignancies. This work provides a blueprint for health systems that wish to incorporate prospective multidisciplinary care into their cancer programs. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  8. Assessment of quality of operable breast cancer care in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer and its treatment constitute a great challenge in resource limited countries as found in Africa. A retrospective analysis of all breast cancer patients seen in our institution was conducted to assess the quality of operable breast cancer care in our setting and compare with the international standards.

  9. A Work Sampling Assessment of the Nursing Delivery of Palliative Care in Ambulatory Cancer Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Jennifer; Schenker, Yael; Donovan, Heidi; Rosenzweig, Margaret

    2016-08-01

    Most cancer care occurs within infusion rooms at ambulatory cancer centers, which are staffed by RNs administering chemotherapies and other cancer care medications. Many patients receiving these therapies have basic palliative care needs that could be addressed by the RNs. However, the extent to which these RNs spend their time on basic, or "primary," palliative care is unknown. The aim of this project was to conduct a work sampling assessment of infusion room RNs' work activities and provision of primary palliative care. A single observer conducted direct observation work sampling at three academic cancer center infusion rooms. Nursing tasks were recorded via freehand text and later assigned an appropriate task code. Observed infusion room RNs spent about 1% of their time on direct care palliative care tasks, primarily symptom assessment. The remainder of their time was divided among direct (28%) and indirect (56%) nonpalliative care activities, unit-related activities (7%), and personal time (9%). Infusion room RNs spent less than a third of their time on administering direct patient care and very minimal time on performing palliative care activities.

  10. Assessment of Palliative Care in Lung Cancer in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Y.; Ozlu, T.; Arinc, S.; Ozyurek, B.A.; Gunbatar, H.; Senturk, A.; Bahadir, A.; Ozcelik, M.; Yilmaz, U.; Akbay, M.O.; Saglam, L.; Kilic, T.; Kirkil, G.; Ozcelik, N.; Tatar, D.; Baris, S.A.; Yavsan, D.M.; Sen, H.S.; Berk, S.; Acat, M.; Cakmak, G.; Yumuk, P.F.; Intepe, Y.S.; Toru, U.; Ayik, S.O.; Basyigit, I.; Ozkurt, S.; Mutlu, L.C.; Yasar, Z.A.; Esme, H.; Erol, M.M.; Oruc, O.; Erdoğan, Y.; Asker, S.; Ulas, A.; Erol, S.; Kerget, B.; Erbaycu, A.E.; Teke, T.; Beşiroğlu, M.; Can, H.; Dalli, A.; Talay, F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the symptoms of lung cancer in Turkey and to evaluate approaches to alleviate these symptoms. Subjects and Methods This study included 1,245 lung cancer patients from 26 centers in Turkey. Demographic characteristics as well as information regarding the disease and treatments were obtained from medical records and patient interviews. Symptoms were evaluated using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and were graded on a scale between 0 and 10 points. Data were compared using the χ2, Student t, and Mann-Whitney U tests. Potential predictors of symptoms were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Results The most common symptom was tiredness (n = 1,002; 82.1%), followed by dyspnea (n = 845; 69.3%), appetite loss (n = 801; 65.7%), pain (n = 798; 65.4%), drowsiness (n = 742; 60.8%), anxiety (n = 704; 57.7%), depression (n = 623; 51.1%), and nausea (n = 557; 45.5%). Of the 1,245 patients, 590 (48.4%) had difficulty in initiating or maintaining sleep. The symptoms were more severe in stages III and IV. Logistic regression analysis indicated a clear association between demographic characteristics and symptom distress, as well as between symptom distress (except nausea) and well-being. Overall, 804 (65.4%) patients used analgesics, 630 (51.5%) received treatment for dyspnea, 242 (19.8%) used enteral/parenteral nutrition, 132 (10.8%) used appetite stimulants, and 129 (10.6%) used anxiolytics/antidepressants. Of the 799 patients who received analgesics, 173 (21.7%) reported that their symptoms were under control, and also those on other various treatment modalities (dyspnea: 78/627 [12.4%], appetite stimulant: 25/132 [18.9%], and anxiolytics/antidepressants: 25/129 [19.4%]) reported that their symptoms were controlled. Conclusion In this study, the symptoms progressed and became more severe in the advanced stages of lung cancer, and palliative treatment was insufficient in most of the patients in Turkey. PMID:27780164

  11. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  12. The development of a supportive care needs assessment tool for Indigenous people with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Gail; Beesley, Vanessa L; Janda, Monika; Jacka, Catherine; Green, Adèle C; O'Rourke, Peter; Valery, Patricia C

    2012-07-20

    Little is known about the supportive care needs of Indigenous people with cancer and to date, existing needs assessment tools have not considered cultural issues for this population. We aimed to adapt an existing supportive care needs assessment tool for use with Indigenous Australians with cancer. Face-to-face interviews with Indigenous cancer patients (n = 29) and five focus groups with Indigenous key-informants (n = 23) were conducted to assess the face and content validity, cultural acceptability, utility and relevance of the Supportive Care Needs Survey - Short Form 34 (SCNS-SF34) for use with Indigenous patients with cancer. All items from the SCNS-SF34 were shortened and changed to use more appropriate language (e.g. the word 'anxiety' was substituted with 'worry'). Seven questions were omitted (e.g. items on death and future considerations) as they were deemed culturally inappropriate or irrelevant and 12 items were added (e.g. accessible transport). Optional instructions were added before the sexual items. The design and response format of the SCNS-SF34 was modified to make it easier to use for Indigenous cancer patients. Given the extensive modifications to the SCNS-SF34 and the liklihood of a different factor structure we consider this tool to be a new tool rather than a modification. The Supportive care needs assessment tool for Indigenous people (SCNAT-IP) shows promising face and content validity and will be useful in informing services where they need to direct their attention for these patients. Indigenous people with cancer have language, customs and specific needs that are not accommodated within the standard SCNS-SF34. Our SCNAT-IP improves acceptability, relevance and face validity for Indigenous-specific concerns. Our SCNAT-IP will allow screening for supportive care needs that are specific to Indigenous cancer patients' and greatly inform targeted policy development and practice.

  13. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  14. Needs assessment of primary care physicians in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ronald; Saunders, Kevin; Burke, Howard; Belanger, Andre; Chow, Edward

    2017-06-07

    Cancer patients live longer with effective anti-cancer therapy and supportive care. About 30% of cancer survivors (non-palliative cancer patients who completed treatment) suffer from chronic pain, which will be managed by their primary care physician (PCP). The aim of this study was to assess practice patterns and treatment barriers in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors among PCPs. A survey using a 16-item questionnaire was sent to PCPs across Canada. A total of 162 responses were collected. The majority of participants were in group (59%) or solo (33%) practice, with an average of 25 years of clinical experience. Seventy-one percent of PCPs were practicing in communities of 10,000 to 100,000 people. Respondents were treating approximately 10 cancer survivors with chronic pain per month. The majority of PCPs (59%) reported having "little knowledge" or "some understanding" of chronic pain management in cancer survivors. They did not usually refer these patients to other specialists. Patient comorbidities (79%), pain medication side effects (78%), previous pain treatment (76%), effect of pain on daily functioning (75%), and drug interactions (71%) were identified as factors that guided PCP treatment choices. Major barriers included medication cost (54%), concerns about opioid abuse (51%), and patient non-compliance (46%). PCPs indicated that treatment guidelines (74%) and knowledge of pharmacological (64%) and non-pharmacological (62%) treatment options would help their chronic pain management. Most PCPs report a lack of knowledge in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors but are keen to receive medical education on treatment options and clinical practice guidelines.

  15. Many quality measurements, but few quality measures assessing the quality of breast cancer care in women: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in women is increasingly frequent, and care is complex, onerous and expensive, all of which lend urgency to improvements in care. Quality measurement is essential to monitor effectiveness and to guide improvements in healthcare. Methods Ten databases, including Medline, were searched electronically to identify measures assessing the quality of breast cancer care in women (diagnosis, treatment, followup, documentation of care. Eligible studies measured adherence to standards of breast cancer care in women diagnosed with, or in treatment for, any histological type of adenocarcinoma of the breast. Reference lists of studies, review articles, web sites, and files of experts were searched manually. Evidence appraisal entailed dual independent assessments of data (e.g., indicators used in quality measurement. The extent of each quality indicator's scientific validation as a measure was assessed. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO was asked to contribute quality measures under development. Results Sixty relevant reports identified 58 studies with 143 indicators assessing adherence to quality breast cancer care. A paucity of validated indicators (n = 12, most of which assessed quality of life, only permitted a qualitative data synthesis. Most quality indicators evaluated processes of care. Conclusion While some studies revealed patterns of under-use of care, all adherence data require confirmation using validated quality measures. ASCO's current development of a set of quality measures relating to breast cancer care may hold the key to conducting definitive studies.

  16. Sexual well-being in cancer and palliative care: an assessment of healthcare professionals' current practice and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Aoife; Hazell, Emily

    2017-09-01

    : Sexual well-being is often significantly affected by cancer and its treatments. Previous research shows that a patient's sexual well-being is often overlooked in clinical practice. The aims of this study were twofold. First, to determine the current practice of healthcare professionals (HCPs) working with cancer and palliative care patients in primary and secondary care settings in relation to sexual well-being. Second, to determine the education requirements of HCPs regarding the management of sexual well-being concerns of cancer/palliative care patients. An anonymous electronic questionnaire was sent to assess current practice and education needs relating to the management of sexual well-being in cancer and palliative care. The majority of HCPs did not routinely assess sexual well-being in cancer and palliative care patients, with only 13.8% of secondary care staff, 7.9% of district nurses and 4% of general practitioners (GPs) routinely assessing it. The most frequent reason for non-assessment was that it was not the presenting symptom. The majority of respondents felt further support and training would be of benefit, including knowledge of specialist services patients could be referred to, written information for patients and access to assessment tools. This survey identified that sexual well-being in cancer and palliative care patients is not routinely assessed with the majority of respondents stating that further support and training would be beneficial. The results of this questionnaire will be used to inform and develop sexual well-being training for HCPs working with cancer and palliative care patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Assessment of a Hospital Palliative Care Unit (HPCU) for Cancer Patients; A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Saghafinia, Masoud; Zandehdel, Kazem; Motlagh, Ali Ghanbari; Kazemian, Ali; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Tahmasebi, Mamak

    2015-01-01

    The first hospital palliative care unit (HPCU) in Iran (FARS-HPCU) has been established in 2008 in the Cancer Institute, which is the largest referral cancer center in the country. We attempted to assess the performance of the HPCU based on a comprehensive conceptual framework. The main aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for assessment of the HPCU performances through designing a value chain in line with the goals and the main processes (core and support). We collected data from a variety of sources, including international guidelines, international best practices, and expert opinions in the country and compared them with national policies and priorities. We also took into consideration the trend of the HPCU development in the Cancer Institute of Iran. Through benchmarking the gap area with the performance standards, some recommendations for better outcome are proposed. The framework for performance assessment consisted of 154 process indicators (PIs), based on which the main stakeholders of the HPCU (including staff, patients, and families) offered their scoring. The outcome revealed the state of the processes as well as the gaps. Despite a significant improvement in many processes and indicators, more development in the comprehensive and integrative aspects of FARS-HPCU performance is required. Consideration of all supportive and palliative requirements of the patients through interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches is recommended.

  18. Delirium assessed by Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale in advanced cancer patients admitted to an acute palliative/supportive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Adile, Claudio; Ferrera, Patrizia; Cortegiani, Andrea; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2017-07-01

    Delirium is often unrecognized in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of delirium assessed by the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) and possible associated factors on admission to an acute palliative/supportive care unit (APSCU). The secondary outcome was to assess changes in MDAS and symptom burden at time of discharge. A consecutive sample of advanced cancer patients who were admitted to an APSCU was prospectively assessed for a period of 10 months. Patient demographics, including age, gender, primary diagnosis, Karnofsky status, stage of disease, and educational level were collected. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and the MDAS were measured at hospital admission and discharge. A total of 314 patients were surveyed. Of 292 patients with MDAS available at T0, 74 (25.3%) and 24 (8.2%) had a MDAS of 7-12 and ≥13, respectively. At discharge, there was a significant decrease in the number of patients with a MDAS ≥7/30. Higher values of MDAS were associated with age (p = .028), a lower Karnofsky status (p Delirium is highly prevalent in patients admitted to APSCU, characterized by a low mortality due to early referral. Comprehensive assessment and treatment may allow a decrease in the level of cognitive disorders and symptom burden.

  19. PS1-17: Assessing Communication During Cancer Care: Multiple Perspectives, Multiple Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglio, Bridget; Arora, Neeraj; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste; Firneno, Cassandra; Mazor, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Patient-centered communication (PCC) between clinicians and patients is necessary for quality care. Measurement of communication over the cancer care continuum is an important step in describing current practices and remediating breakdowns. As a first step in developing a system to assess PCC longitudinally across the cancer care continuum, we interviewed patients, family members, physicians, health information technology (HIT) leaders, and health plan leaders. The purpose of the present study was to expand our understanding of possible approaches to create and implement such a system by conducting a symposium with experts and stakeholders. Methods We conducted a symposium with experts in the field of HIT, academic researchers, investigators from the 14 Cancer Research Network sites, information technology (IT) advisors from each CRN site, National Cancer Institute staff, and investigators and consultants involved with the project. The purpose of the symposium was to have experts in the field of HIT present possible approaches to computerizing data collection and feedback of patients’ experiences with PCC and to engage in an active dialogue around the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches proposed. Prior to the meeting, we distributed a list of questions for the IT experts to address in their presentations, based on issues, which have been identified during the interviews. The symposium was digitally recorded, professionally transcribed, and coded using grounded theory approaches. Results Themes identified during the symposium focused on contextual factors to be considered when creating a communication feedback system; data liquidity, using one system in multiple healthcare environments that are very diverse, and hat modality to use when there are a variety of preferences for communication and the technology is constantly evolving. The symposium also confirmed themes that emerged from the interviews; the system would need to be

  20. Cancer patient assessment and reports of excellence: reliability and validity of advanced cancer patient perceptions of the quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Lima, Julie C; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle

    2009-04-01

    Consumer perceptions are important measures of the quality of cancer care. This article describes the validation of new measures of the quality of cancer care at the time of diagnosis and treatment for advanced cancer with life-limiting prognosis. Focus groups, review of guidelines, and an expert panel were used to construct two surveys of the quality of cancer care. A prospective cohort study examined the reliability and validity of three problem scores (ie, counts of the opportunities to improve the quality of care) that examine care at the time of diagnosis and initial treatment. At the first interview, 58% of 206 cancer patients (54.9% females; 27.5% with lung cancer; 5.4% with pancreatic cancer; 30.4% with colorectal cancer; 18.6% with breast cancer; mean age, 66.6 years) identified one or more concerns with communication about being diagnosed with advanced cancer. At the second interview, 57.0% of the respondents voiced one or more concerns about treatment communication, and 30.2% expressed one or more concerns about the experience of treatment. Each of the problem scores demonstrated both internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha > .75 and short-term stability of responses in a subsample that had the survey administered twice in 72 hours. Factor analysis largely confirmed the proposed scale structure. All three measures demonstrated moderate correlations suggesting evidence of construct validity. The three proposed problem scores demonstrate evidence of reliability and validity that warrants further testing to examine their responsiveness and discriminate validity in larger, more generalizable samples.

  1. Survival As a Quality Metric of Cancer Care: Use of the National Cancer Data Base to Assess Hospital Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lawrence N; Palis, Bryan E; McCabe, Ryan; Mallin, Kathy; Loomis, Ashley; Winchester, David; McKellar, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Survival is considered an important indicator of the quality of cancer care, but the validity of different methodologies to measure comparative survival rates is less well understood. We explored whether the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) could serve as a source of unadjusted and risk-adjusted cancer survival data and whether these data could be used as quality indicators for individual hospitals or in the aggregate by hospital type. The NCDB, an aggregate of > 1,500 hospital cancer registries, was queried to analyze unadjusted and risk-adjusted hazards of death for patients with stage III breast cancer (n = 116,787) and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 252,392). Data were analyzed at the individual hospital level and by hospital type. At the hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals had comparative risk-adjusted survival rates that were statistically better or worse. By hospital type, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers had risk-adjusted survival ratios that were statistically significantly better than those of academic cancer centers and community hospitals. Using the NCDB as the data source, survival rates for patients with stage III breast cancer and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer were statistically better at National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers when compared with other hospital types. Compared with academic hospitals, risk-adjusted survival was lower in community hospitals. At the individual hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals were shown to have statistically better or worse survival, suggesting that, using NCDB data, survival may not be a good metric to determine relative quality of cancer care at this level.

  2. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  3. CancerCare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physically and financially. Cancer Care ® can help. For Patients & Survivors For Caregivers & Loved Ones For Health Care Professionals We provide Counseling Support Groups Connect Education Workshops Publications Financial and Co‑Pay Assistance Community ...

  4. Cancer pain management in ambulatory care: can we link assessment and action to outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Nancy; McDowell, M Rachel; Hendricks, Patty; Dietrich, Mary S; Murphy, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    Good cancer pain control requires appropriate assessment and treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among physician, nurse practitioner, and nurse knowledge, documentation of assessment, treatment, and pain reduction in cancer patients seen in ambulatory settings. The study method included an assessment of pain knowledge of providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) who worked in cancer clinics and a retrospective review of patients' records treated for cancer-related pain in their clinics. Fifty-eight providers from eight cancer clinics completed the knowledge questionnaire; 56 patient records were reviewed for assessment, treatment, and outcome data. Pain relief, the outcome, was obtained from documentation at the next clinic visit. Of the 54 patient records that documented pain relief at the next clinic visit, 61.9% reported no relief. Chi square analysis revealed clinics with a higher level of pain knowledge documented a greater number of elements of an ideal pain assessment (p = 0.03) but was unrelated to treatment and pain relief reported. Assessment and treatment were unrelated to reported pain relief at the next clinic visit. These data suggest that providers' pain knowledge is related to pain assessment but not treatment or outcome. In addition, these data showed no relationship between assessment, treatment prescribed, and pain relief in these ambulatory settings.

  5. Psychosocial cancer care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper briefly reviews some of the current interests in the international field of psychosocial oncology, focusing on adults with cancer. The articles cited describe cancer in general – not specific cancers. It is not possible to give a comprehensive literature review on such a wide and dynamic field of care, but what follows.

  6. A study to assess the feasibility of introducing early palliative care in ambulatory patients with advanced lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayita Kedar Deodhar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Early palliative care is beneficial in advanced lung cancer patients. We aimed to assess the feasibility of introducing early palliative care in ambulatory advanced lung cancer patients in an Indian tertiary cancer center. Methodology: In a longitudinal, single–arm, and single-center study, fifty patients were recruited and followed up every 3–4 weeks for 6 months, measuring the symptom burden using Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS and quality of life (QoL with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-QoL tools. The primary end point of feasibility was that at least 60% of the patients should complete 50% of the planned palliative care visits and over 50% of the patients should complete QoL questionnaires. Analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20. Results: Twenty-four of fifty patients (48% completed the planned follow-up visits. All patients completed the questionnaires at baseline and 31 (62% at their follow-up visits. The patients' main reasons for not following up in the hospital palliative care clinic were logistics and fatigue. Tiredness, pain, and appetite loss were the highest rated symptoms at baseline (ESAS scores 3, 2.2, and 2.1, respectively. Improvement in pain and anxiety scores at follow-up visits 1 and 2 was significant (P < 0.05. Scores on QoL functioning scales improved during the follow-up period. Conclusions: We did not meet the feasibility criteria for the introduction of early palliative care in our advanced lung cancer patients in a resource-limited country.

  7. Assessment of Cancer-Related Fatigue, Pain, and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients at Palliative Care Team Referral: A Multicenter Observational Study (JORTC PAL-09).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Satoru; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Tokoro, Akihiro; Yamada, Kimito; Kanai, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Kashiwaya, Yuko; Okuma, Kae; Inada, Shuji; Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Miyaji, Tempei; Azuma, Kanako; Ishiki, Hiroto; Unezaki, Sakae; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue greatly influences quality of life in cancer patients; however, no specific treatments have been established for cancer-related fatigue, and at present, no medication has been approved in Japan. Systematic research using patient-reported outcome to examine symptoms, particularly fatigue, has not been conducted in palliative care settings in Japan. The objective was to evaluate fatigue, pain, and quality of life in cancer patients at the point of intervention by palliative care teams. Patients who were referred to palliative care teams at three institutions and met the inclusion criteria were invited to complete the Brief Fatigue Inventory, Brief Pain Inventory, and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative. Of 183 patients recruited, the majority (85.8%) were diagnosed with recurrence or metastasis. The largest group (42.6%) comprised lung cancer patients, of whom 67.2% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status of 0-1. The mean value for global health status/quality of life was 41.4, and the highest mean European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative symptom item score was for pain (51.0). The mean global fatigue score was 4.1, and 9.8%, 30.6%, 38.7%, and 20.8% of patients' fatigue severity was classified as none (score 0), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6), and severe (7-10), respectively. Cancer-related fatigue, considered to occur more frequently in cancer patients, was successfully assessed using patient-reported outcomes with the Brief Fatigue Inventory for the first time in Japan. Results suggested that fatigue is potentially as problematic as pain, which is the main reason for palliative care.

  8. Delivery of meaningful cancer care: a retrospective cohort study assessing cost and benefit with the ASCO and ESMO frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Paggio, Joseph C; Sullivan, Richard; Schrag, Deborah; Hopman, Wilma M; Azariah, Biju; Pramesh, C S; Tannock, Ian F; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) have developed frameworks that quantify survival gains in light of toxicity and quality of life to assess the benefits of cancer therapies. We applied these frameworks to a cohort of contemporary randomised controlled trials to explore agreement between the two approaches and to assess the relation between treatment benefit and cost. We identified all randomised controlled trials of systemic therapies in non-small-cell lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and pancreatic cancer published between Jan 1, 2011, and Dec 31, 2015, and assessed their abstracts and methods. Trials were eligible for inclusion in our cohort if significant differences favouring the experimental group in a prespecified primary or secondary outcome were reported (secondary outcomes were assessed only if primary outcomes were not significant). We assessed trial endpoints with the ASCO and ESMO frameworks at two timepoints 3 months apart to confirm intra-rater reliability. Cohen's κ statistic was calculated to establish agreement between the two frameworks on the basis of the median ASCO score, which was used as an arbitrary threshold of benefit, and the framework-recommended ESMO threshold. Differences in monthly drug cost between the experimental and control groups of each randomised controlled trial (ie, incremental drug cost) were derived from 2016 average wholesale prices. 109 randomised controlled trials were eligible for inclusion, 42 (39%) in non-small-cell lung cancer, 36 (33%) in breast cancer, 25 (23%) in colorectal cancer, and six (6%) in pancreatic cancer. ASCO scores ranged from 2 to 77; median score was 25 (IQR 16-35). 41 (38%) trials met the benefit thresholds in the ESMO framework. Agreement between the two frameworks was fair (κ=0·326). Among the 100 randomised controlled trials for which drug costing data were available, ASCO benefit score and monthly incremental

  9. Utility of routine data sources for feedback on the quality of cancer care: an assessment based on clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baade Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Not all cancer patients receive state-of-the-art care and providing regular feedback to clinicians might reduce this problem. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of various data sources in providing feedback on the quality of cancer care. Methods Published clinical practice guidelines were used to obtain a list of processes-of-care of interest to clinicians. These were assigned to one of four data categories according to their availability and the marginal cost of using them for feedback. Results Only 8 (3% of 243 processes-of-care could be measured using population-based registry or administrative inpatient data (lowest cost. A further 119 (49% could be measured using a core clinical registry, which contains information on important prognostic factors (e.g., clinical stage, physiological reserve, hormone-receptor status. Another 88 (36% required an expanded clinical registry or medical record review; mainly because they concerned long-term management of disease progression (recurrences and metastases and 28 (11.5% required patient interview or audio-taping of consultations because they involved information sharing between clinician and patient. Conclusion The advantages of population-based cancer registries and administrative inpatient data are wide coverage and low cost. The disadvantage is that they currently contain information on only a few processes-of-care. In most jurisdictions, clinical cancer registries, which can be used to report on many more processes-of-care, do not cover smaller hospitals. If we are to provide feedback about all patients, not just those in larger academic hospitals with the most developed data systems, then we need to develop sustainable population-based data systems that capture information on prognostic factors at the time of initial diagnosis and information on management of disease progression.

  10. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  11. Integrated Care in Prostate Cancer (ICARE-P): Nonrandomized Controlled Feasibility Study of Online Holistic Needs Assessment, Linking the Patient and the Health Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanton, Veronica; Appleton, Rebecca; Dale, Jeremy; Roscoe, Julia; Hamborg, Thomas; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Badger, Douglas; James, Nicholas; Mendelsohn, Richard; Khan, Omar; Parashar, Deepak; Patel, Prashant

    2017-07-28

    The potential of technology to aid integration of care delivery systems is being explored in a range of contexts across a variety of conditions in the United Kingdom. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in UK men. With a 10-year survival rate of 84%, there is a need to explore innovative methods of care that are integrated between primary health care providers and specialist teams in order to address long-term consequences of the disease and its treatment as well as to provide continued monitoring for recurrence. Our aim was to test the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial to compare a model of prostate cancer continuing and follow-up care integration, underpinned by digital technology, with usual care in terms of clinical and cost-effectiveness, patient-reported outcomes, and experience. A first phase of the study has included development of an online adaptive prostate specific Holistic Needs Assessment system (HNA), training for primary care-based nurses, training of an IT peer supporter, and interviews with health care professionals and men with prostate cancer to explore views of their care, experience of technology, and views of the proposed intervention. In Phase 2, men in the intervention arm will complete the HNA at home to help identify and articulate concerns and share them with their health care professionals, in both primary and specialist care. Participants in the control arm will receive usual care. Outcomes including quality of life and well-being, prostate-specific concerns, and patient enablement will be measured 3 times over a 9-month period. Findings from phase 1 indicated strong support for the intervention among men, including those who had had little experience of digital technology. Men expressed a range of views on ways that the online system might be used within a clinical pathway. Health care professionals gave valuable feedback on how the output of the assessment might be presented to encourage engagement and uptake by

  12. Benchmarking comprehensive cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke

    2017-01-01

    The number of cancer patients and survivors is steadily increasing and despite or perhaps because of rapid improvements in diagnostics and therapeutics, important inequalities in cancer survival exist within and between different countries in Europe. Improving the quality of care is part of the

  13. Performance of Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) in Patients With Advanced Cancer in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Emanuelly Varea Maria; Padilha, Patricia de Carvalho; Peres, Wilza Arantes Ferreira

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) in patients receiving palliative care for advanced cancer. The PG-SGA was used to assess nutrition status of 120 patients admitted to the Palliative Care Unit at the National Cancer Institute in Brazil. According to the PG-SGA, 94.2% (n = 113) of the patients were evaluated as malnourished. The PG-SGA evaluated that xerostomia was the only symptom associated with a short survival (odds ratio [OR], 2.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-5.38; P = .014). Survival was found to be significantly higher in well-nourished (PG-SGA A) than malnourished (PG-SGA B [ P = .021] or C [ P = .013]) patients. Total PG-SGA score (hazard ratio [HR], 1.06; 95% CI, 1.001-1.09; P = .045) and Karnofsky Performance Status of 20%-30% (HR, 15.4; 95% CI, 1.63-92.9; P = .001) and 40%-50% (HR, 10.0; 95% CI, 1.22-64.9; P = .031) were found to be independent prognostic survival factors. The scored PG-SGA is an independent prognostic factor of survival and thus can be a useful tool for nutrition evaluation in palliative care.

  14. Sequential Assessments of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Scale Enhance Prognostic Value in Patients With Terminally Ill Cancer Receiving Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Meng-Ting; Liu, Chien-Ting; Hung, Yu-Shin; Kao, Chen-Yi; Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the utility of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance scale assessments on days 1 and 8 of palliative care, as well as scale change between these assessments, as prognostic tools for patients with terminally ill cancer. A total of 2392 patients with terminally ill cancer who received palliative care between January 2006 and December 2011 at a single medical center were analyzed. Our study showed that the ECOG scale is a useful prognostic tool to predict life expectancy in patients with terminally ill cancer. The ECOG scale assessments at different time points under palliative care were independent predictors for overall survival. The combined ECOG scale assessments on days 1 and 8 predicted survival more precisely than using day 1 ECOG scale assessment alone. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. A pan-Canadian practice guideline and algorithm: screening, assessment, and supportive care of adults with cancer-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, D; Keller-Olaman, S; Oliver, T K; Hack, T F; Broadfield, L; Biggs, K; Chung, J; Gravelle, D; Green, E; Hamel, M; Harth, T; Johnston, P; McLeod, D; Swinton, N; Syme, A; Olson, K

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review was to develop a practice guideline to inform health care providers about screening, assessment, and effective management of cancer-related fatigue (crf) in adults. The internationally endorsed adapte methodology was used to develop a practice guideline for pan-Canadian use. A systematic search of the literature identified a broad range of evidence: clinical practice guidelines, systematic reviews, and other guidance documents on the screening, assessment, and management of crf. The search included medline, embase, cinahl, the Cochrane Library, and other guideline and data sources to December 2009. Two clinical practice guidelines were identified for adaptation. Seven guidance documents and four systematic reviews also provided supplementary evidence to inform guideline recommendations. Health professionals across Canada provided expert feedback on the adapted recommendations in the practice guideline and algorithm through a participatory external review process. Practice guidelines can facilitate the adoption of evidence-based assessment and interventions for adult cancer patients experiencing fatigue. Development of an algorithm to guide decision-making in practice may also foster the uptake of a guideline into routine care.

  16. Patients' and Health Care Providers' Evaluation of Quality of Life Issues in Advanced Cancer Using Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Palliative Care Module (FACIT-Pal) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Luluel; Zeng, Liang; Cella, David; Thavarajah, Nemica; Chen, Emily; Zhang, Liying; Bennett, Margaret; Peckham, Kenneth; De Costa, Sandra; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Barnes, Elizabeth; Sahgal, Arjun; Chow, Edward

    2012-10-01

    To examine the agreement of Health Care Providers (HCPs) and patients' evaluation of quality of life on the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness therapy - Palliative care module (FACIT-Pal) scale. Sixty advanced cancer patients and fifty-six health care providers involved in their care at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre completed a modified version of the FACIT- Pal. In the survey, patients and HCPs indicated the 10 top issues affecting the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer most profoundly. The percentage of participants selecting each item as one of their 10 most relevant items was calculated in HCPs and patients. There were differences in relative rankings of QOL issues among patients and HCPs. Among the top 10 items which were identified from both patients and HCPs, there were differences in the rankings. Patients ranked emotional support from family (40.9%) as most important followed by pain (38.6%), lack of energy (31.8%) and able to enjoy life (29.6%). HCPs ranked in the following order: pain (73.2%), lack of energy (63.4%), nausea (51.2%) and dyspnea (51.2%) whereas patients rated nausea at 18.2 % and dyspnea at 9.09%. There is a discrepancy between scores of patients and HCPs as they may prioritize differently. HCPs tended to put more emphasis on physical symptoms, whereas patients had emotional and global issues as priorities.

  17. Early catheter removal following laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer: assessment of a new bladder care protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patrick; Casement, Maire; Addley, Susan; Dobbs, Stephen; Harley, Ian; Nagar, Hans

    2017-10-01

    Evidence to support prolonged catheterisation after radical hysterectomy is lacking. We sought to assess feasibility of a new protocol of early post-operative catheter removal following laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer. A retrospective review of post-operative bladder care in patients who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer was carried out. The post-operative bladder care protocol recommended catheter removal after 24-72 hours. Three consecutive post-void residual scans of less than 150 millilitres (ml) were considered evidence of normal voiding function. First line management of voiding dysfunction was clean intermittent self-catheterisation (CISC). Ninety-eight patients underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer of whom 78 patients had catheter removal 24-72 hours post-operatively. The incidence of post-operative voiding dysfunction in this group was 44%, of whom 88% were managed with CISC and 82% regained normal voiding function. Average hospital stay was 4.2 days. The overall rate of long-term voiding dysfunction was 6%. Early catheter removal after laparoscopic radical hysterectomy appears to be both feasible and effective and compliments the ethos of enhanced patient recovery.

  18. Do GPs know their patients with cancer? Assessing the quality of cancer registration in Dutch primary care: a cross-sectional validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollie, Annet; Roskam, Jessika; Sijmons, Rolf H; Numans, Mattijs E; Helsper, Charles W

    2016-09-15

    To assess the quality of cancer registry in primary care. A cross-sectional validation study using linked data from primary care electronic health records (EHRs) and the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). 290 000 patients, registered with 120 general practitioners (GPs), from 50 practice centres in the Utrecht area, the Netherlands, in January 2013. Linking the EHRs of all patients in the Julius General Practitioners' Network database at an individual patient level to the full NCR (∼1.7 million tumours between 1989 and 2011), to determine the proportion of matching cancer diagnoses. Full-text EHR extraction and manual analysis for non-matching diagnoses. Proportions of matching and non-matching breast, lung, colorectal and prostate cancer diagnoses between 2007 and 2011, stratified by age category, cancer type and EHR system. Differences in year of diagnosis between the EHR and the NCR. Reasons for non-matching diagnoses. In the Primary Care EHR, 60.6% of cancer cases were registered and coded in accordance with the NCR. Of the EHR diagnoses, 48.9% were potentially false positive (not registered in the NCR). Results differed between EHR systems but not between age categories or cancer types. The year of diagnosis corresponded in 80.6% of matching coded diagnoses. Adding full-text EHR analysis improved results substantially. A national disease registry (the NCR) proved incomplete. Even though GPs do know their patients with cancer, only 60.6% are coded in concordance with the NCR. Reusers of coded EHR data should be aware that 40% of cases can be missed, and almost half can be false positive. The type of EHR system influences registration quality. If full-text manual EHR analysis is used, only 10% of cases will be missed and 20% of cases found will be wrong. EHR data should only be reused with care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finished Treatment Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go ... fewer procedures and better quality of life. Good communication between patients, family caregivers, and the health care ...

  20. Utilization of psychosocial care and oncological follow-up assessments among German long-term survivors of cancer with onset during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieluweit, U; Seitz, D C M; Besier, T; Debatin, K-M; Grabow, D; Kaatsch, P; Goldbeck, L

    2011-05-01

    Survivors of pediatric cancer are at increased risk for medical and psychosocial late effects. This study retrospectively investigated the utilization of oncological and psychosocial care by former adolescent cancer patients (≥ 5 years since cancer diagnosis) in Germany. Based on data of the German Childhood Cancer Registry (N=1 876 survivors of cancer with an age at diagnosis between 15 and 18 years), the study cohort comprised 820 survivors of adolescent cancer (time since diagnosis: M=13.7, SD=6.0, age at follow-up: M=30.4, SD=6.0 years). Survivors of adolescent cancer completed standardized questionnaires measuring symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression and anxiety as well as items on their utilization of medical and psychosocial care. More than a quarter (26.2%) of the survivors was no longer attending regular oncological follow-up assessments. Less than half of the survivors (44.4%) had received psychosocial care, mostly during their in-patient cancer treatment and their post-acute rehabilitation phase. Out of 184 survivors showing clinically relevant symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety and/or depression at time of the study, 12.0% received psychosocial care and 13.6% took psychotropic medication. It should be studied further why only a small proportion of the survivors showing clinically relevant symptoms received psychosocial or psychopharmacological treatment. Systematic oncological follow-up assessments should take psychological late effects into greater account. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Sleep-wake difficulties in community-dwelling cancer patients receiving palliative care: subjective and objective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatchez, Marie Solange; Savard, Josée; Savard, Marie-Hélène; Aubin, Michèle; Ivers, Hans

    2017-09-21

    Prevalence rates of sleep difficulties in advanced cancer patients have varied widely across studies (12 to 96%), and none of these employed a diagnostic interview to distinguish different types of sleep-wake disorders. Moreover, very limited information is available on subjective and objective sleep parameters in this population. Our study was conducted in palliative cancer patients and aimed to assess rates of sleep-wake disorders and subsyndromal symptoms and to document subjective and objective sleep-wake parameters across various types of sleep-wake difficulties. The sample was composed of 51 community-dwelling cancer patients receiving palliative care and having an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score of 2 or 3. Relevant sections of the Duke Interview for Sleep Disorders were administered over the phone. An actigraphic recording and a daily sleep diary were completed for 7 consecutive days. Overall, 68.6% of the sample had at least one type of sleep-wake difficulty (disorder or symptoms): 31.4% had insomnia and 29.4% had hypersomnolence as their main sleep-wake problem. Participants with insomnia as their main sleep difficulty had greater disruptions of subjective sleep parameters, while objectively-assessed sleep was more disrupted in patients with hypersomnolence comorbid with another sleep-wake difficulty. Significance of the Results: The high rates of sleep-wake difficulties found in this study indicate a need to screen more systematically for sleep-wake disorders, including insomnia and hypersomnolence, in both palliative care research and clinical practice, and to develop effective nonpharmacological interventions specifically adapted to this population.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of non-invasive assessment in the Dutch breast cancer screening program versus usual care: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.M.H.; Damen, J.A.A.G.; Pijnappel, R.M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Heeten, GJ. den; Adang, E.M.M.; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Increased recall rates in the Dutch breast cancer screening program call for a new assessment strategy aiming to reduce unnecessary costs and anxiety. Diagnostic work-up (usual care) includes multidisciplinary hospital assessment and is similar for all recalled women, regardless of the

  3. Integration of genomics in cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Erika Maria Monteiro; Edwards, Quannetta T; Floria-Santos, Milena

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The article aims to introduce nurses to how genetics-genomics is currently integrated into cancer care from prevention to treatment and influencing oncology nursing practice. ORGANIZING CONSTRUCT: An overview of genetics-genomics is described as it relates to cancer etiology, hereditary...... cancer syndromes, epigenetics factors, and management of care considerations. METHODS: Peer-reviewed literature and expert professional guidelines were reviewed to address concepts of genetics-genomics in cancer care. FINDINGS: Cancer is now known to be heterogeneous at the molecular level, with genetic...... and genomic factors underlying the etiology of all cancers. Understanding how these factors contribute to the development and treatment of both sporadic and hereditary cancers is important in cancer risk assessment, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management and surveillance. CONCLUSIONS...

  4. Evaluating wait times from screening to breast cancer diagnosis among women undergoing organised assessment vs usual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Muradali, Derek; Blackmore, Kristina M; Smith, Courtney R; Mirea, Lucia; Majpruz, Vicky; O'Malley, Frances P; Quan, May Lynn; Holloway, Claire Mb

    2017-05-09

    Timely coordinated diagnostic assessment following an abnormal screening mammogram reduces patient anxiety and may optimise breast cancer prognosis. Since 1998, the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) has offered organised assessment through Breast Assessment Centres (BACs). For OBSP women seen at a BAC, an abnormal mammogram is followed by coordinated referrals through the use of navigators for further imaging, biopsy, and surgical consultation as indicated. For OBSP women seen through usual care (UC), further diagnostic imaging is arranged directly from the screening centre and/or through their physician; results must be communicated to the physician who is then responsible for arranging any necessary biopsy and/or surgical consultation. This study aims to evaluate factors associated with diagnostic wait times for women undergoing assessment through BAC and UC. Of the 2 147 257 women aged 50-69 years screened in the OBSP between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2009, 155 866 (7.3%) had an abnormal mammogram. A retrospective design identified two concurrent cohorts of women diagnosed with screen-detected breast cancer at a BAC (n=4217; 47%) and UC (n=4827; 53%). Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined associations between wait times and assessment and prognostic characteristics by pathway. A two-sided 5% significance level was used. Screened women with breast cancer were two times more likely to be diagnosed within 7 weeks when assessed through a BAC vs UC (OR=1.91, 95% CI=1.73-2.10). In addition, compared with UC, women assessed through a BAC were significantly more likely to have their first assessment procedure within 3 weeks of their abnormal mammogram (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.12-1.39), ⩽3 assessment procedures (OR=1.54, 95% CI=1.41-1.69), ⩽2 assessment visits (OR=1.86, 95% CI=1.70-2.05), and ⩾2 procedures per visit (OR=1.41, 95% CI=1.28-1.55). Women diagnosed through a BAC were also more likely than those in UC to have imaging (OR=1.99, 95

  5. The current and future role of general practitioners in skin cancer care: an assessment of 268 general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsingen, M.C.J. van; Bon, B.W. van; Wilt, G.J. van der; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given the increase in skin cancer (SC) it seems inevitable that general practitioners (GPs) will play a larger role in SC care in the near future. OBJECTIVES: To obtain insights into the opinion of GPs with respect to their role in SC care, and their SC knowledge and skills. METHODS: A

  6. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima NN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nádia Nara Rolim Lima,1 Vânia Barbosa do Nascimento,1 Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho,1 Modesto Leite Rolim Neto,2 Marcial Moreno Moreira,2 Aline Quental Brasil,2 Francisco Telésforo Celestino Junior,2 Gislene Farias de Oliveira,2 Alberto Olavo Advíncula Reis3 1Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, ABC Region Medical School, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil; 3Public Health Postgraduate Program, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS] was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people's welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers

  7. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  8. Assessment of quality of life in breast cancer patients at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Damodar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: These findings have shown that there exists a strong correlation between the length of treatment and the QoL among breast cancer patients. Future interventions should target each specific aspect of QoL.

  9. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use to create one: American Society of Clinical Oncology -- www.cancer.net/survivorship/follow-care-after-cancer-treatment/asco- ... your doctor visits. References American Society of Clinical Oncology. Survivorship. Cancer.net. Updated July 2016. www.cancer.net/survivorship . ...

  10. Palliative Care in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCI support palliative care research? What is palliative care? Palliative care is care given to improve the quality ... the direction of a physician. Who gives palliative care ? Palliative care is usually provided by palliative care specialists, ...

  11. Assessment of family history of colorectal cancer in primary care: perceptions of first degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Emilie; Rose, Shiho; Carey, Mariko

    2014-03-01

    First degree relatives (FDRs) of someone with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at increased risk of the disease. In this study we examine the factors associated with discussing family history of CRC with a health professional. People with CRC, recruited through the population-based Victorian Cancer Registry in Australia, were asked to refer FDRs to the study. Eight hundred and nineteen FDRs completed a telephone interview. Thirty-six percent of FDRs recalled ever being asked about their family history of bowel cancer by a health professional. Factors associated with having this discussion were being aged 50-60 years, having a university education, being in the potentially high risk category, being very worried about getting bowel cancer and knowing that family history increases risk through discussions with family, friends or their own education. Despite evidence that doctor endorsement is a key factor in the uptake of CRC screening, our study shows that the majority of FDRs do not recall being asked by a health professional about their family history. There is a need to identify the most appropriate method to improve rates of health professional discussion of family history with relatives of CRC patients in order to improve screening rates. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Severe Obesity in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streu, Erin

    2016-05-01

    Increasing weight and body fat composition has an impact on cancer detection and staging. Obese women are less likely to engage in breast and cervical screening practices. Excessive adipose tissue makes physical assessment more difficult, and patients with a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2 may have deeper and wider pelvic structures, which make internal examinations problematic. A retrospective review of 324 primary surgical patients found that patients with a BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 are seven times less likely to undergo complete surgical staging for endometrial cancer compared with individuals with a BMI less than 40 kg/m2. In addition, healthcare provider bias against the need for screening, feelings of discomfort and embarrassment, as well as patient's fears of guilt, humiliation, and shame pose significant barriers to addressing the issue of obesity in clinical care with patients and family members. 
.

  14. Scenarios cancer in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, L.F.J. van der; Schellevis, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies predicted an increase in both the incidence and prevalence of cancer in the Netherlands. Other studies showed that cancer patients use primary care more frequently than non-cancer patients. Finally, during the “chronic phase” of the disease, task substitution from

  15. Access to Cancer Care and General Medical Care Services Among Cancer Survivors in the United States: An Analysis of 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Janet S; Virgo, Katherine S; Li, Chunyu; Chawla, Neetu; Han, Xuesong; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Ekwueme, Donatus U; McNeel, Timothy S; Rodriguez, Juan L; Yabroff, K Robin

    2016-11-01

    Cancer survivors require appropriate health care to manage their unique health needs. This study describes access to cancer care among cancer survivors in the United States and compares access to general medical care between cancer survivors and people who have no history of cancer. We assessed access to general medical care using the core 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). We assessed access to cancer care using the MEPS Experiences With Cancer Survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to compare access to general medical care among 2 groups of cancer survivors (those who reported having access to all necessary cancer care [n = 1088] and those who did not [n = 70]) with self-reported access to general medical care among people who had no history of cancer (n = 22 434). Of the 1158 cancer survivors, 70 (6.0%) reported that they did not receive all necessary cancer care. Adjusted analyses found that cancer survivors who reported not receiving all necessary cancer care were also less likely to report receiving general medical care (78.0%) than cancer survivors who reported having access to necessary cancer care (87.1%) and people who had no history of cancer (87.8%). This study provides nationally representative data on the proportion of cancer survivors who have access to necessary cancer care and yields insight into factors that impede survivors' access to both cancer care and general medical care. This study is a reference for future work on access to care.

  16. Oncology Nurses' Attitudes Toward the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System: Results From a Large Cancer Care Ontario Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Esther; Yuen, Dora; Chasen, Martin; Amernic, Heidi; Shabestari, Omid; Brundage, Michael; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Klinger, Christopher; Ismail, Zahra; Pereira, José

    2017-01-01

    To examine oncology nurses' attitudes toward and reported use of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and to determine whether the length of work experience and presence of oncology certification are associated with their attitudes and reported usage.
. Exploratory, mixed-methods study employing a questionnaire approach.
. 14 regional cancer centers (RCCs) in Ontario, Canada.
. Oncology nurses who took part in a larger province-wide study that surveyed 960 interdisciplinary providers in oncology care settings at all of Ontario's 14 RCCs.
. Oncology nurses' attitudes and use of ESAS were measured using a 21-item investigator-developed questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and Kendall's tau-b or tau-c test were used for data analyses. Qualitative responses were analyzed using content analysis.
. Attitudes toward and self-reported use of standardized symptom screening and ESAS.
. More than half of the participants agreed that ESAS improves symptom screening, most said they would encourage their patients to complete ESAS, and most felt that managing symptoms is within their scope of practice and clinical responsibilities. Qualitative comments provided additional information elucidating the quantitative responses. Statistical analyses revealed that oncology nurses who have 10 years or less of work experience were more likely to agree that the use of standardized, valid instruments to screen for and assess symptoms should be considered best practice, ESAS improves symptom screening, and ESAS enables them to better manage patients' symptoms. No statistically significant difference was found between oncology-certified RNs and noncertified RNs on attitudes or reported use of ESAS.
. Implementing a population-based symptom screening approach is a major undertaking. The current study found that oncology nurses recognize the value of standardized screening, as demonstrated by their attitudes toward ESAS.
. Oncology nurses are integral to providing high

  17. Patients' experiences with care for lung cancer and colorectal cancer: findings from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Arora, Neeraj K; Kahn, Katherine L; Malin, Jennifer L; Ganz, Patricia A; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kiefe, Catarina I; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M; Weeks, Jane C; Harrington, David P

    2010-09-20

    To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health.

  18. Patients' Experiences With Care for Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Findings From the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Ganz, Patricia A.; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Harrington, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. Patients and Methods For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). Results English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health. PMID:20713876

  19. The evaluation of the relationship between the level of disclosure of cancer in terminally ill patients with cancer and the quality of terminal care in these patients and their families using the Support Team Assessment Schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nobuhisa; Hata, Yoshinobu; Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi

    2013-06-01

    To examine the relationship between informing patients of cancer and the quality of terminal care. This was a study of 87 consecutive terminally ill cancer patients who died during the last 27-month period. Notification of cancer was classified into 4 groups (A, B, C, and D, respectively): "nondisclosure," "disclosure of cancer diagnosis," "disclosure of life threatening," and "disclosure of poor prognosis." We evaluated the quality of palliative care using Support Team Assessment Schedule-Japanese (STAS-J). A, B, C, and D groups included 8, 22, 37, and 20 cases, respectively. Regarding physical symptoms, no marked difference was noted. Anxiety was significantly reduced, and the recognition of disease conditions and the level of communication were significantly higher in the groups that received specific information (P terminal care.

  20. Robotics in Endometrial Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in women in most of the developed world. The majority of these women with endometrial cancer will be unaffected by their disease. The challenge therefore is for surgical treatment not to be worse than the disease. Robotics has changed the way that we care for women living with endometrial cancer by making low-impact surgical treatment available to more women than was previously possible.

  1. Health care technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  2. Danish cancer patients’ perspective on health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandager, Mette; Sperling, Cecilie; Jensen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    and better involvement of patient and relatives. The study indicates that women, younger and higher educated patients tend to be less satisfied with the health care they received. This study shows that even though the majority of patients are satisfied with the quality of health care, there is room......Patient’s experiences and patient surveys are increasingly being used for the evaluation of the quality of health care. Patient information is valuable input when we aim to improve healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess Danish cancer patients’ experiences and assessment...... of the health care they have received, in regard to access to diagnostics, coordination and continuity of care, information and communication and involvement of patients and relatives. Questions and the opportunity to comment in free text were distributed to 6,720 newly diagnosed cancer patients in the summer...

  3. The Value of a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment for Patient Care in Acutely Hospitalized Older Patients with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buurman, Bianca M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Kuper, Ingeborg M.J.A.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. A comprehensive geriatric assessment systematically collects information on geriatric conditions and is propagated in oncology as a useful tool when assessing older cancer patients. Objectives. The objectives were: (a) to study the prevalence of geriatric conditions in cancer patients aged ≥65 years, acutely admitted to a general medicine ward; (b) to determine functional decline and mortality within 12 months after admission; and (c) to assess which geriatric conditions and cancer-related variables are associated with 12-month mortality. Methods. This was an observational cohort study of 292 cancer patients aged ≥65 years, acutely admitted to the general medicine and oncology wards of two university hospitals and one secondary teaching hospital. Baseline assessments included patient characteristics, reason for admission, comorbidity, and geriatric conditions. Follow-up at 3 and 12 months was aimed at functional decline (loss of one or more activities of daily living [ADL]) and mortality. Results. The median patient age was 74.9 years, and 95% lived independently; 126 patients (43%) had metastatic disease. A high prevalence of geriatric conditions was found for instrumental ADL impairment (78%), depressive symptoms (65%), pain (65%), impaired mobility (48%), malnutrition (46%), and ADL impairment (38%). Functional decline was observed in 8% and 33% of patients at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Mortality rates were 38% at 3 months and 64% at 12 months. Mortality was associated with cancer-related factors only. Conclusion. In these acutely hospitalized older cancer patients, mortality was only associated with cancer-related factors. The prevalence of geriatric conditions in this population was high. Future research is needed to elucidate if addressing these conditions can improve quality of life. PMID:21914699

  4. Spiritual Care for Cancer Patients in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memaryan, Nadereh; Jolfaei, Atefeh Ghanbari; Ghaempanah, Zeinab; Shirvani, Armin; Vand, Hoda Doos Ali; Ghahari, Shahrbanoo; Bolhari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a return to spirituality is a major coping response in cancer patients so that therapists can adopt a holistic approach by addressing spirituality in their patient care. The present study was conducted to develop a guideline in the spiritual field for healthcare providers who serve cancer patients in Iran. Relevant statements were extracted from scientific documents that through study questions were reviewed and modified by a consensus panel. The statements were arranged in six areas, including spiritual needs assessment, spiritual care candidates, the main components of spiritual care, spiritual care providers, the settings of spiritual care and the resources and facilities for spiritual care. In addition to the development and preparation of these guidelines, health policy-makers should also seek to motivate and train health service providers to offer these services and facilitate their provision and help with widespread implementation.

  5. Your cancer care team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer (cancer passed down through your genes). A genetic counselor can help you or your family members decide if you want to get tested for these types of cancer. A counselor can also help you make decisions based on test results. Nurse practitioners. A nurse with a graduate degree in ...

  6. Integrating Acupuncture into Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Ju Chien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oncology acupuncture has become a new and promising field of research because more and more cancer patients have sought non-pharmacological alternatives for symptom management. While different mechanisms have been proposed to explain its efficacy, including theories of the neural system, endocrine cytokine or immunological regulation, its eventual role has become that of alleviating the side effects induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In this paper, we have reviewed the related articles focusing on acupuncture mechanisms and applications in cancer care to provide a quick sketch of acupuncture in cancer care. A detailed search was performed to identify the randomized controlled trials (RCTs and systematic reviews on acupuncture in oncology, using PUBMED and Cochrane. The search terms included: Acupuncture, acupressure, and cancer. Additional terms were used to target specific symptoms (i.e., breast cancer, hot flash, xerostomia, nausea, vomiting, cancer pain, insomnia, fatigue. Two authors independently extracted data for analysis and review. Ultimately, 25 articles underwent full-text review. Recent trials made efforts in studying (a hot flashes in breast cancer, (b xerostomia induced by radiotherapy in head and neck cancer, (c nausea and vomiting post-chemotherapy, (d cancer pain, and (e fatigue and insomnia in cancer patients. Controversial results for acupuncture application in cancer care appeared in different categories, but a trend emerged that acupuncture can palliate cancer-related symptoms. The research to date certainly offers us a valid complementary therapy in treating cancer-related symptoms. Meanwhile, practical strategies with safe measures for enhancing the efficacy are needed in further interventions, as well as continuing research with a validated methodology.

  7. VA-INPC: Linking Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC) data to assess surveillance testing among veterans with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggstrom, David A; Rosenman, Marc; Myers, Laura J; Teal, Evgenia; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2010-11-13

    The goal of this project was to provide empiric evidence about the benefit to US veterans and the VA of capturing data from a citywide clinical informatics network (INPC) to assess care received outside the VA. We identified 468 veterans diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 2000-2007 in the Indianapolis VA cancer registry. Electronic VA healthcare data were linked with electronic health records from the regional health information organization (RHIO) INPC; 341 matches were found. Both the VA and INPC systems were queried regarding receipt of surveillance tests. The proportion with additional data from INPC varied by test: colonoscopy (3%), CT scan/abdomen (13%), CT scan/chest (79%), carcinoembryonic antigen test (8%), and other laboratory tests (25%-53%). An incremental benefit of linking VA and INPC data was present and may increase when expanded beyond patients with a single condition. New, important information about care outside the VA is obtained through RHIO data linkage.

  8. An evaluation of educational preparation for cancer and palliative care nursing for children and adolescents: issues in the assessment of practice arising from this study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Claire; Long, Tony; Sanderson, Linda; Carr, Kristine; Tomlinson, Peter

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports on findings from an externally funded research study designed to map and analyse the educational preparation for cancer and palliative care nursing for children and adolescents. The courses reviewed in the whole study, were the English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (ENB) courses ENB240 (care of children with cancer) and the ENB R62 (paediatric oncology for nurses). The specific findings reported here are those relating to the investigation into the assessment of the clinical practice of students on the ENB 240 course in the eight universities, which offered that course. Twenty-six nurses, comprising both students and assessors were interviewed in this part of the study. Key issues arising from the study were the variety in what was assessed, in particular the lack of emphasis on the of assessment of clinical skills, the problem of student selected content of assessment, the different starting points of students and the lack of reliability and validity of the assessment process. Low priority was given to the assessment of clinical skills in these programmes, particularly using direct observation. The study was funded by the ENB and was carried out between 2001 and 2003.

  9. Palliative care for the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reville, Barbara; Axelrod, David; Maury, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Palliation of symptoms to optimize QOL is the foundation of cancer care regardless of stage of disease or level of anticancer treatment. Patients commonly experience pain, constipation, nausea, vomiting, dyspnea, fatigue, and delirium. Many valid clinical tools are available to the primary care clinician to screen for symptoms, assess severity, measure treatment response, and elicit the patient's subjective symptom experience. Although there is limited evidence regarding the relative efficacy of symptom interventions from randomized controlled trials, clinical practice guidelines are available.

  10. [Cancer and elderly people, what palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyahia, Stéphanie; N'Fissi, Karima; Sahut-D'Izarn, Marine; Cudennec, Tristan

    Epidemiological data relating to cancer and the ageing of the population highlight the need for oncology, geriatrics and palliative care to work more closely together. Geriatric and palliative care assessments in oncology are complex procedures and result in the modification of the oncological therapeutic choices. They have a significant impact on the methods of treatment of the patients concerned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Sexual minority cancer survivors' satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Kamen, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors' health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors, and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority cancer survivors and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation, and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than did heterosexual cancer survivors (B = -0.12, SE = 0.04, Wald χ(2) = 9.25, pSexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors.

  12. The current and future role of general practitioners in skin cancer care: an assessment of 268 general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijsingen, M C J; van Bon, B; van der Wilt, G J; Lagro-Janssen, A L M; Gerritsen, M J P

    2014-06-01

    Given the increase in skin cancer (SC) it seems inevitable that general practitioners (GPs) will play a larger role in SC care in the near future. To obtain insights into the opinion of GPs with respect to their role in SC care, and their SC knowledge and skills. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to GPs in the region of Nijmegen, the Netherlands. In total 268 GPs (49%) responded. An overwhelming majority were willing to extend their role in SC care. Furthermore, we noted the following results: (i) > 50% of GPs requested additional SC knowledge; (ii) GPs often treat actinic keratosis (AK) themselves, primarily with cryotherapy; (iii) > 50% would treat (low-risk) basal cell carcinoma (BCC) after additional training; (iv) only a few GPs are familiar with BCC guidelines; (v) the majority of patients with high-risk SC are referred to dermatologists; (vi) only a few GPs perform total body inspection and palpation of lymph nodes; and (vii) a large number of GPs inform their patients on risk factors in SC development. Most GPs are willing to extend their role in SC care; however, more training is requested and the usage of guidelines should be encouraged. Those willing to extend their role should focus on improving their clinical diagnosis of skin tumours, treatment of low-risk skin (pre)malignancies, including field-directed treatment of AK and noninvasive treatment of BCC, and on prevention. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Assessment of the impact of comorbidity on the survival of cancer patients treated by palliative care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Espinos, Claudio; De Gaona-Lana, Estefania Ruiz; Gonzalez-Anguren, Cristina; Lama-Gay, Marcos

    2015-08-01

    The usefulness of the age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (ACCI) as a gauge of the impact of comorbidity on survival is known in the geriatric population. In palliative care, there is little research studying the correlation between comorbidity and survival in the advanced stages of oncological disease. The aim of our study was to explore the impact of comorbidity, measured with the ACCI, on survival in our patients. Our hypothesis was that higher ACCI scores would be associated with lower survival rates after the first visit. We conducted a prospective observational study over one year. Patients were attended by palliative home care teams. The main variables were: survival from metastatic disease after the first visit and ACCI score on the first visit. We also employed a descriptive analysis and a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, including different ranges of ACCI scores. The final sample included 66 subjects. The standard patient was a 76-year-old man with lung cancer who had received chemotherapy. The overall average ACCI score was 10.45. Significant differences were found between the different locations of metastatic disease (greater survivals in breast, ovary, and prostate; p = 0.005) and some treatments (hormone and radiotherapy; p = 0.001 for each), but not from the first visit. We found lower survival rates among lung cancer patients with higher comorbidity (ACCI ≥ 11, p = 0.047), with no differences on other primary locations or overall values. The data show that comorbidity measured by the ACCI may be an interesting prognostic factor during the late stages of disease, as we have found in lung cancer. More research is certainly needed.

  14. Spiritual care for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, D; Schneider, D

    1997-11-01

    To review literature pertinent to spirituality of children with cancer and to identify practical strategies for providing care for this dimension in children. Nursing research and literature about pediatric nursing care and spirituality; theoretical formulations of Piaget, Fowler, and Erikson. Children diagnosed with cancer have unique spiritual needs that place them at risk for developing spiritual distress. With the diagnosis may come experiences of loss of normalcy, physical stamina, relationships, body image, and future goals. Spiritual care includes interventions that assist children to find meaning and purpose in life, to continue relationships, and to transcend beyond the self. Spiritual care includes caregiver and child assessment and interventions appropriate to the developmental stages of infancy through adolescents. Tables outlining how this can be done by oncology nurses are included.

  15. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  16. Assessing School Emergency Care Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Charles; Varnes, Jill

    A study assessed the emergency health care preparedness of a north central Florida public school district in light of seven criteria: (1) school policies regarding delivery of emergency health care; (2) identification of school personnel responsible for rendering emergency care; (3) training levels of emergency health care providers (first aid and…

  17. Examining racial disparities in colorectal cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jamillah; Bumpers, Kevin; Ogunlade, Vickie; Glover, Roni; Davis, Sharon; Counts-Spriggs, Margaret; Kauh, John; Flowers, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately burdened with colorectal cancer. Although incidence and mortality rates have declined in the past two decades, the disparity in health outcomes has progressively increased. This comprehensive review examines the existing literature regarding racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage at diagnosis, and treatment to determine if differences exist in the quality of care delivered to African Americans. A comprehensive review of relevant literature was performed. Two databases (EBSCOHOST Academic Search Premier and Scopus) were searched from 2000 to 2007. Articles that assessed racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage of disease at diagnosis, and treatment were selected. The majority of studies identified examined colorectal cancer screening outcomes. Although racial disparities in screening have diminished in recent years, African American men and women continue to have higher colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and are diagnosed at more advanced stages. Several studies regarding stage of disease at diagnosis identified socioeconomic status (SES) and health insurance status as major determinants of disparity. However, some studies found significant racial disparities even after controlling for these factors. Racial disparities in treatment were also found at various diagnostic stages. Many factors affecting disparities between African Americans and Whites in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality remain unexplained. Although the importance of tumor biology, genetics, and lifestyle risk factors have been established, prime sociodemographic factors need further examination to understand variances in the care of African Americans diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

  18. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  19. Cannabis in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. LGBT Populations' Barriers to Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike

    2018-02-01

    To describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals' barriers to accessing and receiving quality cancer care. Published data on cancer care and studies of LGBT individuals. There is a clustering of barriers among LGBT individuals, which suggests multiple inequities exist in LGBT individuals' cancer care, although data on disparities along the cancer control continuum are not consistently available. Nurses can make a difference in LGBT individuals' cancer care by obtaining training on LGBT health and their cancer-related needs and by providing a welcoming and respectful relationship with LGBT patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made...

  2. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made dur...

  3. Characterising cancer burden and quality of care at two palliative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also assesses the extent of differences in service delivery and the impact these might have on outcomes. Methods: Data on all cancer ... to services available. Quality of care was assessed as superior at Tiyanjane, demonstrating the importance of multiple stakeholder involvement in the delivery of palliative care services.

  4. Public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jȩdrzejewski, Mariusz; Thallinger, Christiane; Mrozik, Magda; Kornek, Gabriela; Zielinski, Christoph; Jassem, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    We compared the public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria. Both countries are members of the European Union (EU) but reflect two extremes in health-related per capita spending. Recently, the EUROCARE-5 study reported on very discrepant cancer outcomes between the two countries. A one-time survey was conducted to compare the public perception of cancer treatment in Poland and Austria. In total, 3,649 subjects, representing the general population, cancer patients, and cancer patients' family members, were surveyed. In both countries, cancer was considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care was indicated as the most important issue influencing political election decisions. Polish compared with Austrian cancer patients gave a significantly lower positive assessment of overall cancer treatment efficacy and detection methods. Cancer cure rates estimated by Polish and Austrian citizens were 29% and 44%, respectively. The majority of all citizens interviewed thought that cancer patients should have access to all available registered cancer drugs. However, only 18% of Poles versus 62% of Austrians agreed with the notion that the available cancer treatment in their countries is of a standard comparable to that of other EU countries. Consequently, 24% of Poles and 7% of Austrians identified financial status, age, gender, and residence as factors influencing the availability of cancer treatments. In both countries, cancer is considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care issues may strongly influence decisions for political elections. Vast differences in the two populations' perceptions of cancer care reflect actual cancer outcomes and the national per capita spending on health-related issues. ©AlphaMed Press.

  5. End-of-Life Care for People Who Have Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care (PDQ®) Coping with Advanced Cancer Coping with Cancer Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®) Hospice Care Last Days of Life (PDQ®) Palliative Care in Cancer When Someone You Love Has Advanced Cancer: Support ...

  6. Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment for Breast Cancer in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; Blazer, Kathleen Reilly; Weitzel, Jeffrey Nelson

    2017-01-01

    In Latin America, breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women, and limited available data suggest that up to 15% of all breast cancer cases in the region are hereditary. Genetic cancer risk assessment and counseling is a critical component of the appropriate clinical care of patients with hereditary breast cancer and their families. Unfortunately, genetic services are underdeveloped across Latin America, and access to genetic testing and counseling is very scarce in the region. Barriers contributing to the access to genetic care are high cost and lack of insurance coverage for genetic tests, insufficient oncogenetics training or expertise, nonexistence of genetic counseling as a clinical discipline and lack of supportive healthcare policies. In this review, we highlight relevant initiatives undertaken in several Latin American countries aimed at creating genetic cancer risk assessment programs. Additionally, we present a review of the scientific literature on the current status of breast cancer genomics in Latin America, with specific emphasis on demographic indicators, access to cancer genetic care, training and strategies to improve outcomes and international collaborations. PMID:28453507

  7. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S A; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions.

  8. The development and evaluation of a holistic needs assessment and care planning learning package targeted at cancer nurses in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R; Hartley, B; Simpson, M; Doyle, N

    2014-01-01

    A project team from the United Kingdom Oncology Nursing Society developed a blended e-learning website to facilitate nurses to further develop their confidence and competencies in a range of skills related to assessing the holistic needs of people with cancer. The project team identified three areas which were integral to an holistic needs assessment (HNA) implementation project. These were project support information, project management skills, and practical competencies delivered in a blended e-learning package containing a series of accessible video presentations, supporting documents, and practical activities. The team worked with internal and external partners to ensure that a robust and inspiring programme was created. www.hnaforcancer.com was launched in October 2012 as a blended learning programme that incorporates e-learning on core subjects. These subjects are packaged as videoed presentations with supporting learning material and can be accessed via the UKONS website. By the end of the programme participants were equipped to identify and explore the essential requirements for HNA and care planning, more able to recognise potential need, and initiate care to prevent or minimise the risk of complications. Participants had also developed confidence and competency in new skills, including basic project management.

  9. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  10. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  11. Consensus on quality indicators to assess the organisation of palliative cancer and dementia care applicable across national healthcare systems and selected by international experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, J.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Droes, R.M.; Radbruch, L.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large numbers of vulnerable patients are in need of palliative cancer and dementia care. However, a wide gap exists between the knowledge of best practices in palliative care and their use in everyday clinical practice. As part of a European policy improvement program, quality indicators

  12. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...... was prevalent. It is uncertain whether development of a single 'all-inclusive' model for assessing integrated care is desirable. We emphasise the continuing need for validated instruments embedded in theoretical contexts....

  13. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry...... was opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  14. Music therapy in supportive cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy i...

  15. Cancer Risk Prediction and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer prediction models provide an important approach to assessing risk and prognosis by identifying individuals at high risk, facilitating the design and planning of clinical cancer trials, fostering the development of benefit-risk indices, and enabling estimates of the population burden and cost of cancer.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know before using this tool: The Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool was designed for use by doctors and other health providers with their patients. If you are not a health ... your personal risk of colorectal cancer. (Colorectal cancer is another way ...

  17. Consensus on quality indicators to assess the organisation of palliative cancer and dementia care applicable across national healthcare systems and selected by international experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riet Paap, Jasper; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Radbruch, Lukas; Vissers, Kris; Engels, Yvonne

    2014-09-17

    Large numbers of vulnerable patients are in need of palliative cancer and dementia care. However, a wide gap exists between the knowledge of best practices in palliative care and their use in everyday clinical practice. As part of a European policy improvement program, quality indicators (QIs) have been developed to monitor and improve the organisation of palliative care for patients with cancer and those with dementia in various settings in different European countries. A multidisciplinary, international panel of professionals participated in a modified RAND Delphi procedure to compose a set of palliative care QIs based on existing sets of QIs on the organisation of palliative care. Panellists participated in three written rounds, one feedback round and one meeting. The panel's median votes were used to identify the final set of QIs. The Delphi procedure resulted in 23 useful QIs. These QIs represent key elements of the organisation of good clinical practice, such as the availability of palliative care teams, the availability of special facilities to provide palliative care for patients and their relatives, and the presence of educational interventions for professionals. The final set also includes QIs that are related to the process of palliative care, such as documentation of pain and other symptoms, communication with patients in need of palliative care and their relatives, and end-of-life decisions. International experts selected a set of 23 QIs for the organisation of palliative care. Although we particularly focused on the organisation of cancer and dementia palliative care, most QIs are generic and are applicable for other types of diseases as well.

  18. A prospective, non-interventional study of assessment and treatment adequacy of pain in the emergency department of a tertiary care cancer hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain is the most common reason for emergency department (ED visits by the cancer patients. Treatment inconsistency and inadequacy are reported worldwide in the management of ED pain. We conducted a non-interventional observational study of 100 patients visiting ED with moderate to severe pain in a tertiary care cancer center. Aims: The goal of this study was to describe the characteristics of pain and its treatment by oncologists in ED. Materials and Methods: Management of 100 adult patients with complaints of moderate to severe pain was observed by the investigator in ED. Treatment was provided by the doctors of respective oncological services. Later, patients were interviewed by the investigator to collect data about the details of their pain and treatment adequacy. Results: On arrival to ED, about 65% patients reported severe pain, however no formal pain assessment was performed and no patient received strong opioids. Poor compliance for prescribed analgesic medications was noted in a large number of patients (31%, primarily due to suboptimal pain relief and lack of awareness. Protocol based analgesic treatment was non-existent in ED. Majority of patients remained in significant pain after 30 min of analgesic administration and 24% patients could never achieve more than 50% pain relief at the time of discharge. Conclusion: Due to lack of formal pain assessment and laid down protocols, suboptimal pain management is commonly prevalent in ED. Use of strong opioids continues to be scarce in management of severe pain. There is a need to formulate pain management protocols for ED pain.

  19. Health care access and smoking cessation among cancer survivors: implications for the Affordable Care Act and survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcu, Mehmet; Steinberger, Eileen K; Sorkin, John D

    2016-02-01

    The study objectives are to examine prevalence of current smoking, and to assess the association of both health insurance (HI) and access to care with smoking cessation among cancer survivors. We performed an analysis from a cross-sectional study of cancer survivors aged 18-64 years using nationally representative data from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. We assessed the prevalence of current smoking among cancer survivors. Also, in a subset excluding never smokers, we assessed cessation status of cancer survivors operationalized as comparing current to former smokers. The study population (N = 18,896) was predominantly 45-64 years of age, female, and white. The prevalence of current smoking was substantially greater among cancer survivors without HI (40.9 %) than for those with HI (19.5 %). Cancer survivors with no HI had 2-fold greater adjusted odds of not quitting cigarette smoking compared to those with HI. Among those with insurance, cancer survivors who did not have regular health care provider or could not see doctor due to cost or had their last routine checkup ≥1 year ago had 60-80 % fold greater adjusted odds of not quitting cigarette smoking compared to cancer survivors who had better access to health care. Cancer survivors without HI have substantially greater current smoking rates compared with those with HI. Among cancer survivors with HI, those who experienced health care access-related problems had lower cessation rates than their counterparts. Smoking cessation needs to be recognized as a crucial component of preventive care for cancer survivors. Continuous patient engagement and cancer-patient-centered strategies are urgently needed to achieve optimal results for quit rates particularly for young cancer survivors who are most susceptible to current smoking.

  20. Assessing the assessment in emergency care training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E W Dankbaar

    Full Text Available Each year over 1.5 million health care professionals attend emergency care courses. Despite high stakes for patients and extensive resources involved, little evidence exists on the quality of assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of commonly used formats in assessing emergency care skills.Residents were assessed at the end of a 2-week emergency course; a subgroup was videotaped. Psychometric analyses were conducted to assess the validity and inter-rater reliability of the assessment instrument, which included a checklist, a 9-item competency scale and a global performance scale.A group of 144 residents and 12 raters participated in the study; 22 residents were videotaped and re-assessed by 8 raters. The checklists showed limited validity and poor inter-rater reliability for the dimensions "correct" and "timely" (ICC = .30 and.39 resp.. The competency scale had good construct validity, consisting of a clinical and a communication subscale. The internal consistency of the (subscales was high (α = .93/.91/.86. The inter-rater reliability was moderate for the clinical competency subscale (.49 and the global performance scale (.50, but poor for the communication subscale (.27. A generalizability study showed that for a reliable assessment 5-13 raters are needed when using checklists, and four when using the clinical competency scale or the global performance scale.This study shows poor validity and reliability for assessing emergency skills with checklists but good validity and moderate reliability with clinical competency or global performance scales. Involving more raters can improve the reliability substantially. Recommendations are made to improve this high stakes skill assessment.

  1. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2011-06-01

    Although the effectiveness of prostate cancer screening is controversial, screening rates have risen dramatically among primary care providers in the United States. The authors' findings suggest more collaboration among primary care and specialty organizations, especially with respect to decision aid endorsement, is needed to achieve more discriminatory and patient-centered prostate cancer screening.

  2. Using a supportive care framework to understand and improve palliative care among cancer patients in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busolo, David S; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2016-06-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality are increasing in Africa, which is leading to greater demands for palliative care. There has been little progress in terms of research, pain management, and policies related to palliative care. Palliative care in Africa is scarce and scattered, with most African nations lacking the basic services. To address these needs, a guiding framework that identifies care needs and directs palliative care services could be utilized. Therefore, using the supportive care framework developed by Fitch (Fitch, 2009), we here review the literature on palliative care for patients diagnosed with cancer in Africa and make recommendations for improvement. The PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Embase, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Medline databases were searched. Some 25 English articles on research from African countries published between 2004 and 2014 were selected and reviewed. The reviewed literature was analyzed and presented using the domains of the supportive care framework. Palliative care patients with cancer in Africa, their families, and caregivers experience increasing psychological, physical, social, spiritual, emotional, informational, and practical needs. Care needs are often inadequately addressed because of a lack of awareness as well as deficient and scattered palliative care services and resources. In addition, there is sparse research, education, and policies that address the dire situation in palliative care. Our review findings add to the existing body of knowledge demonstrating that palliative care patients with cancer in Africa experience disturbing care needs in all domains of the supportive care framework. To better assess and address these needs, holistic palliative care that is multidomain and multi-professional could be utilized. This approach needs to be individualized and to offer better access to services and information. In addition, research, education, and policies around palliative care for cancer

  3. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B Neuman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

  4. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety...... children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  5. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  6. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Matthew Y; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M

    2015-06-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science.

  7. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  8. Role of Kindness in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Leonard L; Danaher, Tracey S; Chapman, Robert A; Awdish, Rana L A

    2017-11-01

    The wonders of high-tech cancer care are best complemented by the humanity of high-touch care. Simple kindnesses can help to diffuse negative emotions that are associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment-and may even help to improve patients' outcomes. On the basis of our experience in cancer care and research, we propose six types of kindness in cancer care: deep listening , whereby clinicians take the time to truly understand the needs and concerns of patients and their families; empathy for the patient with cancer, expressed by both individual clinicians and the care culture, that seeks to prevent avoidable suffering; generous acts of discretionary effort that go beyond what patients and families expect from a care team; timely care that is delivered by using a variety of tools and systems that reduce stress and anxiety; gentle honesty, whereby the truth is conveyed directly in well-chosen, guiding words; and support for family caregivers, whose physical and mental well-being are vital components of the care their loved ones receive. These mutually reinforcing manifestations of kindness-exhibited by self-aware clinicians who understand that how care is delivered matters-constitute a powerful and practical way to temper the emotional turmoil of cancer for patients, their families, and clinicians themselves.

  9. Relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustussen, Mikaela; Hounsgaard, Lise; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2017-01-01

    Palliative cancer care in Greenland is provided by health professionals at local level, the national Queen Ingrid's Hospital and at Rigshospitalet in Denmark. To improve and develop care for relatives of patients with advanced cancer, we conducted a mixed method study examining relatives' level...... from health professionals. They experienced a lack of security, worries about the future and a lack of support at home. The study showed a substantial level of dissatisfaction among relatives of patients with advanced cancer. We strongly recommend a focus on psychosocial care, more access...... to information and to include relatives in decision making and in the future planning of palliative care services. An assessment of relatives' needs is essential to develop an adequate palliative care in a range of settings....

  10. Caring for survivors of breast cancer: perspective of the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S L; Wai, E S; Alexander, C; Singh-Carlson, S

    2011-10-01

    Increasing numbers of women are surviving breast cancer, and survivorship care is becoming more complex. Primary care physicians provide care for most survivors of breast cancer in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The present study offers insight into the confidence of primary care physicians in their abilities to provide such care. It also explores potential ways to assist those providers in enhancing this aspect of their practice. A questionnaire was mailed to 1000 primary care physicians caring for survivors of breast cancer. The questionnaire explored the perspectives of the responding physicians on their ability to manage various aspects of survivorship care for breast cancer patients, identified preferences for the content and format of communication from oncologists at the time of transition from active oncology treatment to survivorship, and determined the means most commonly used to obtain knowledge about breast cancer. This 1-page, 31-item checkbox and open-answer questionnaire assessed the perceptions of primary care physicians about the care of breast cancer survivors after completion of active treatment and their personal preferences for resources providing information about breast cancer. The questionnaire response rate was 59%. Primary care physicians reported being most confident in screening for recurrence and managing patient anxiety; they were least confident in managing lymphedema and providing psychosocial counselling. Compared with physicians following fewer survivors of breast cancer, those who followed more breast cancer survivors had higher confidence in managing the biomedical aspects of follow-up and in providing counselling about nutrition and exercise. Most physicians found discharge letters from oncologists to be useful. Point-form discharge information was preferred by 43%; detailed description, by 19%; and both formats, by 38%. The most useful information items identified for inclusion in a discharge letter were a diagnosis

  11. Issues in adult blood cancer survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugos, Kelly G

    2015-02-01

    To describe the current literature and future directions of survivorship care for the adult blood cancer population including unique features, identification of needs, practice guidelines, care models and the implications for nursing. Peer reviewed literature, government and national advocacy organization reports, professional organization guidelines. Adult blood cancer survivors are a heterogeneous population that often receives complicated treatments to live a longer life. Survivorship needs among this population are often unmet throughout the cancer care continuum. The limited research literature and guidelines point to survivorship care strategies from the day of diagnosis to enhance long-term outcomes and improve quality of life. Nurses are experts in symptom management and central to preventing, detecting, measuring, educating, and treating the effects of cancer and its treatment. Moreover, nurses are key to implementing strategies to support blood cancer survivors, families, and caregivers from the day of diagnosis to the last day of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Global health from a cancer care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesec, Madeline; Sherertz, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is now recognized as one of the four leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and incidence is expected to rise significantly in the next two decades. Unfortunately, low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) suffer disproportionately from the world's cancer cases. The growing burden of cancer and maldistribution of cancer care resources in LMIC warrant a massive re-evaluation of the structural inequalities that produce global oncological disparities and a worldwide commitment to improve both prevention and treatment strategies. Efforts to improve cancer care capacity should focus on horizontal strengthening of healthcare systems that provide safe, affordable, effective and sustainable care. In response to current deficiencies, many international organizations have started to partner with LMIC to create solutions. Telemedicine and international collaboration are also promising ways to effect change and improve global oncological care.

  13. Committee opinion no. 634: Hereditary cancer syndromes and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A hereditary cancer syndrome is a genetic predisposition to certain types of cancer, often with onset at an early age, caused by inherited mutations in one or more genes. Cases of cancer commonly encountered by obstetrician-gynecologists or other obstetric-gynecologic providers--such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and endometrial cancer--are features of specific hereditary cancer syndromes. The most common hereditary cancer syndromes related to gynecologic cancer include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. A hereditary cancer risk assessment is the key to identifying patients and families who may be at increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Screening should include, at minimum, a personal cancer history and a first- and second-degree relative cancer history that includes a description of the type of primary cancer, the age of onset, and the lineage (paternal versus maternal) of the family member. In addition, a patient's ethnic background can influence her genetic risk. If a hereditary cancer risk assessment suggests an increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome, referral to a specialist in cancer genetics or a health care provider with expertise in genetics is recommended for expanded gathering of family history information, risk assessment, education, and counseling, which may lead to genetic testing.

  14. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although several measurement instruments have been developed to measure the level of integrated health care delivery, no standardised, validated instrument exists covering all aspects of integrated care. The purpose of this review is to identify the instruments concerning how...... to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...... abstracts were independently reviewed by two investigators. RESULTS: We identified 23 measurement instruments and, within these, eight organisational elements were found. No measurement instrument covered all organisational elements, but almost all studies include well-defined structural and process aspects...

  15. Colorectal cancer: Quality of surgical care in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanters, Arielle; Mullard, Andrew J; Arambula, Jennifer; Fasbinder, Laurie; Krapohl, Greta; Wong, Sandra L; Campbell, Darrell A; Hendren, Samantha

    2017-03-01

    Surgery remains the cornerstone therapy for colorectal cancer (CRC). This study assesses CRC quality measures for surgical cases in Michigan. In this retrospective cohort study, processes of care and outcomes for CRC resection cases were abstracted in 30 hospitals in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (2014-2015). Measures were case-mix and reliability adjusted, using logistic regression models. For 871 cases (640 colon cancer, 231 rectal cancer), adjusted morbidity (27.4%) and mortality rates (1.5%) were low. Adjusted process measures showed gaps in quality of care. Mesorectal excision was documented in 59.4% of rectal cancer (RC) cases, 65% of RC cases had sphincter preserving surgery, 18.7% of cases had quality of care measures for CRC, suggesting opportunity for regional quality improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Shared care involving cancer specialists and primary care providers - What do cancer survivors want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Koczwara, Bogda

    2017-10-01

    Cancer survivors are living longer, prompting greater focus on managing cancer as a chronic condition. Shared care between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists, involving explicit partnership in how care is communicated, could ensure effective transitions between services. However, little is known about cancer patients' and survivors' preferences regarding shared care. To explore Australian cancer survivors' views on shared care: what cancer survivors need from shared care; enablers and barriers to advancing shared care; and what successful shared care looks like. Community forum held in Adelaide, Australia, in 2015 with 21 participants: 11 cancer survivors, 2 family caregivers, and 8 clinicians and researchers (members of PC4-Primary Care Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Group). Qualitative data from group discussion of the objectives. Participants stressed that successful shared care required patients being at the centre, ensuring accurate communication, ownership, and access to their medical records. PCPs were perceived to lack skills and confidence to lead complex cancer care. Patients expressed burden in being responsible for navigating information sharing and communication processes between health professionals and services. Effective shared care should include: shared electronic health records, key individuals as care coordinators; case conferences; shared decision making; preparing patients for self-management; building general practitioners' skills; and measuring outcomes. There was clear support for shared care but a lack of good examples to help guide it for this population. Recognizing cancer as a chronic condition requires a shift in how care is provided to these patients. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Quality of pathology reporting is crucial for cancer care and registration: a baseline assessment for breast cancers diagnosed in Belgium in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schutter, H; Van Damme, N; Colpaert, C; Galant, C; Lambein, K; Cornelis, A; Neven, P; Van Eycken, E

    2015-04-01

    Given the crucial role of pathology reporting in the management of breast cancers, we aimed to investigate the quality and variability of breast cancer pathology reporting in Belgium. Detailed information on non-molecular and molecular parameters was retrieved from the pathology protocols available at the Belgian Cancer Registry for 10,007 breast cancers diagnosed in Belgium in 2008. Substantial underreporting was shown for several clinically relevant non-molecular parameters, such as lymphovascular invasion. High-volume laboratories performed only slightly better than others, and analyses at the individual laboratory level showed clear inter-laboratory variability in reporting for all volume categories. Information on ER/PR and HER2 IHC was mentioned in respectively 91.7% and 90.8% of evaluative cases. HER2 ISH data were available for 78.5% of the cases judged to be 2+ for HER2 IHC. For cases with different specimens analysed, discordance between these specimens was highest for HER2, followed by PR. For HER2, results obtained from different laboratories were even less concordant. In addition, inter-laboratory differences were noted in the used ER/PR scoring systems, the proportion of ER-/PR+ cases, and the relation between histological grade and ER/PR positivity. Data on Ki67 were only available for 43.8% of the investigated cases, and showed inconsistent use of cut-off values. Breast pathology reporting in Belgium in 2008 was suboptimal and showed considerable inter-laboratory variability. Synoptic reporting has been proposed as a facilitator towards increased reporting quality and harmonization, but the lack of aligned informatics remains a major hurdle in its concrete implementation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CARE Track for Advanced Cancer: Impact and Timing of an Outpatient Palliative Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhall, Leslie J; Read, Paul; Stukenborg, George; Dillon, Patrick; Barclay, Joshua; Romano, Andrew; Harrison, James

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that outpatient palliative care can reduce hospitalization and increase hospice utilization for patients with cancer, however there are insufficient resources to provide palliative care to all patients from time of diagnosis. It is also unclear whether inpatient consultation alone provides similar benefits. A better understanding of the timing, setting, and impact of palliative care for patients with cancer is needed. The purpose of this study was to measure timing of referral to outpatient palliative care and impact on end-of-life (EOL) care. The Comprehensive Assessment with Rapid Evaluation and Treatment (CARE Track) program is a phased intervention integrating outpatient palliative care into cancer care. In Year 1 patients were referred at the discretion of their oncologist. Academic medical center. We compared EOL hospitalization, hospice utilization, and costs of care for CARE Track patients compared to those never seen by palliative care or seen only in hospital. Patients were referred a median of 72.5 days prior to death. CARE Track patients had few hospitalizations at end of life, were less likely to die in hospital, had increased hospice utilization, and decreased costs of care; these results were significant even after controlling for differences between groups. Inpatient consultation alone did not impact these variables. However, only approximately half of patients with incurable cancers were referred to this program. Referral outpatient palliative care within 3 months of death improved EOL care and reduced costs, benefits not seen with inpatient care only. However, many patients were never referred, and methods of systematically identifying appropriate patients are needed.

  19. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Colorectal cancer family history assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia Paul

    2011-10-01

    This article describes family history assessment for colorectal cancer in three outpatient gastroenterology units and examines gastroenterology unit nurses' knowledge and attitudes about family history assessments. Eighty-eight colonoscopy records were surveyed, and 16 RNs were interviewed. The medical record documentation was surveyed using a researcher-developed tool to identify type of cancer, age at disease onset, family relationship, and number of family members with cancer. Gastroenterology unit nurses were interviewed to assess knowledge and attitudes about family history assessment regarding colorectal cancer. Findings indicate that limited family history documentation was present in the medical record and that important age-at-disease-onset information was missing in 95% of patients with a family history of colorectal cancer and in 85% of patients with a family history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. No documentation was found in any charts about the number of affected relatives within the same family. Inconsistencies in family history documentation within the same medical record were noted, and family history information was found in multiple chart forms. Gastroenterology nurses rated family history as very important but gave a lower rating to personal knowledge about and resources for family history assessment.

  1. Referral Criteria for Outpatient Palliative Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yee-Choon; Bruera, Sebastian; Geng, Yimin; Hutchins, Ron; Mori, Masanori; Strasser, Florian; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Outpatient palliative care clinics facilitate early referral and are associated with improved outcomes in cancer patients. However, appropriate candidates for outpatient palliative care referral and optimal timing remain unclear. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify criteria that are considered when an outpatient palliative cancer care referral is initiated. Methods. We searched Ovid MEDLINE (1948–2013 citations) and Ovid Embase (1947–2015 citations) for articles related to outpatient palliative cancer care. Two researchers independently reviewed each citation for inclusion and extracted the referral criteria. The interrater agreement was high (κ = 0.96). Results. Of the 186 publications in our initial search, 21 were included in the final sample. We identified 20 unique referral criteria. Among these, 6 were recurrent themes, which included physical symptoms (n = 13 [62%]), cancer trajectory (n = 13 [62%]), prognosis (n = 7 [33%]), performance status (n = 7 [33%]), psychosocial distress (n = 6 [29%]), and end-of-life care planning (n = 5 [24%]). We found significant variations among the articles regarding the definition of advanced cancer and the assessment tools for symptom/distress screening. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (n = 7 [33%]) and the distress thermometer (n = 2 [10%]) were used most often. Furthermore, there was a lack of consensus in the cutoffs in symptom assessment tools and timing for outpatient palliative care referral. Conclusion. This systematic review identified 20 criteria including 6 recurrent themes for outpatient cancer palliative care referral. It highlights the significant heterogeneity regarding the timing and process for referral and the need for further research to develop standardized referral criteria. Implications for Practice: Outpatient palliative care clinics improve patient outcomes; however, it remains unclear who is appropriate for referral and what is the optimal timing. A

  2. Process of Care Failures in Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weingart, Saul N; Saadeh, Mark G; Simchowitz, Brett; Gandhi, Tejal K; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Studdert, David M; Puopolo, Ann Louise; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2009-01-01

    Process of care failures may contribute to diagnostic errors in breast cancer care.To identify patient- and provider-related process of care failures in breast cancer screening and follow-up in a non-claims-based...

  3. Care in the perception of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Henriques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being a cancer patient is a unique and singular. The cancer disease associated with pain and suffering is a challenging process for the sufferer, for whom have around or for those caring for the sick. Pain, considered the 5 th vital sign, is often identified as the main complaint of our patients suffering from cancer. We dare to say that to explore the essence of the care provided by nurses and primary health care to cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time found in his home and family, we would be helping to build a know -how by itself, with positive externalities for patients, families, professionals and nursing itself. Methods: Ask "What does Care for Nurses and primary health care for cancer patients with prolonged pain in time for your family?" we may lead the cornerstone of our problems, by studying quantitative nature using a questionnaire and a significance level of care. Results: the average age is 59.27 years, mostly women, 51% are married and in 29.8% of studies has only completed the first cycle of education. The majority of cancer patients who participated in this study share a room with a relative. In regard to aspects of their pain, cancer patients referred to 47.1% of cases, that their pain started weeks ago and 38.5% even refers to the pain persists for months. The pain felt by these patients is not the severe type, in 68.3% of cases, and has an average intensity of 5, although we have 25% of these patients with pain greater than a 6.75. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of nurses who provide care at primary health reveals an alpha of 0.8857 and 0.9025 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time they are at home shows an alpha of 0.6672and 0.7374 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer family patients with prolonged pain shows an alpha of 0.6712 and an alpha standardized 0

  4. Oncologists' perspectives on concurrent palliative care in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Ahles, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand oncology clinicians' perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. This was a qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: (1) treating the whole patient, (2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, (3) “some patients just want to fight,” and (4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists' views on the complementary role of palliative care: (1) “refer early and often,” (2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals “hospice”; “Heme patients are different,” (3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, (4) palliative care “shares the load,” and (5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care.

  5. Music therapy in supportive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-06-08

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients-interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life.

  6. Site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, A M J; van der Heiden-van der Loo, M; Visser, O; Karim-Kos, H E; Lieverst, J A; de Ridder-Sluiter, J G; Coebergh, J W W; Kremer, L C; Pieters, R

    2017-12-01

    Due to the complexity of diagnosis and treatment, care for children and young adolescents with cancer preferably occurs in specialised paediatric oncology centres with potentially better cure rates and minimal late effects. This study assessed where children with cancer in the Netherlands were treated since 2004. All patients aged under 18 diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and linked with the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) database. Associations between patient and tumour characteristics and site of care were tested statistically with logistic regression analyses. This population-based study of 6021 children diagnosed with cancer showed that 82% of them were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. Ninety-four percent of the patients under 10 years of age, 85% of the patients aged 10-14 and 48% of the patients aged 15-17 were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. All International Classification of Childhood Cancers (ICCC), 3rd edition, ICCC-3 categories, except embryonal tumours, were associated with a higher risk of treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre compared to leukaemia. Multivariable analyses by ICCC-3 category revealed that specific tumour types such as chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), embryonal carcinomas, bone tumours other type than osteosarcoma, non-rhabdomyosarcomas, thyroid carcinomas, melanomas and skin carcinomas as well as lower-staged tumours were associated with treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre. The site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands depends on the age of the cancer patient, type of tumour and stage at diagnosis. Collaboration between paediatric oncology centre(s), other academic units is needed to ensure most up-to-date paediatric cancer care for childhood cancer patients at the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modularity in Cancer Care Provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobbi, Chiara; Hsuan, Juliana

    2012-01-01

    and treatment service. Customization is obtained by combining different components in the diagnosis phase (examinations) and different treatment options in the treating phase. Findings show that the process of delivery cure for cancer is highly modularized and customization is driven by cancer specificity (type...

  8. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  9. Discrepancies Between the Supports Needed for Discharge of Patients With Terminal Cancer to Family Caregivers and What Supports Were Actually Provided in Japan: Assessment of Palliative Care Unit Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosono, Yasufumi; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Itoh, Hiroaki; Enomoto, Miyuki; Ishiwata, Miki

    2017-01-01

    Even if patients with terminal cancer hope to spend the rest of their lives at home, they are often unable to leave the hospital early due to their family caregivers' anxiety. This study aimed to investigate in Japan the discrepancies between the supports needed by and actually provided by palliative care unit nurses (PCUNs) to the family caregivers for discharge of patients with terminal cancer. In this cross-sectional study, self-administered questionnaires including 6-point Likert-type scales assessing the reasons for difficulties in transition to home-based care were distributed to 1227 PCUNs. Using paired t tests, the differences between the scores on perceived importance and actual supports to family caregivers were examined. The supports actually provided were classified by factor analysis. The relationships between the PCUNs' characteristics and mean scores on the supports in each category were examined using multiple regression analysis. A total of 1023 (83.4%) completed questionnaires were returned. Scores on the actually provided supports for discharge to family caregivers were consistently and significantly lower than the corresponding scores on perceived importance for all 57 items ( P care, receiving necessary training, cooperating with palliative care staff, and cooperating with local service providers were significantly associated with higher levels of actual supply of supports to family caregivers. Our findings suggest that PCUNs need to be encouraged to provide further support to family caregivers for the discharge of patients with terminal cancer.

  10. Models of helping and coping in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, L L; Wortman, C B

    1990-02-01

    This paper provides a theoretical analysis of four models of helping and coping as they relate to cancer care. The four conceptual models focus on the issue of whether or not patients should be viewed as responsible for the cause or the treatment of their cancer. The moral model, characterized by the holistic health movement, holds patients responsible for both causing and resolving health problems. The compensatory model, exemplified by cancer education programs, attributes low responsibility to patients for causing health problems but high responsibility for resolving them. The medical model views patients as neither responsible for causing nor for resolving health problems. The enlightenment model, typified by the healing movement, holds people responsible for causing their health problems, but not for resolving them. An attempt is made to examine existing programs in cancer care in light of these models. The present analysis addresses the following questions. Why is each of these models appealing? Why are they sometimes embraced by patients or health care providers? What are the benefits and disadvantages of using each of these models with cancer patients? What happens when the health care provider and patient hold different models regarding the patient's responsibility or participation in the cause of the disease or its treatment? Further research is needed to determine the conditions under which a particular model results in better health outcomes for patients, and to assess how factors such as extent of disease or type of cancer influence the patient's choice of a model.

  11. Quality assessments for cancer centers in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Anke; Rajan, Abinaya; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-09-07

    Cancer centers are pressured to deliver high-quality services that can be measured and improved, which has led to an increase of assessments in many countries. A critical area of quality improvement is to improve patient outcome. An overview of existing assessments can help stakeholders (e.g., healthcare professionals, managers and policy makers) improve the quality of cancer research and care and lead to patient benefits. This paper presents key aspects of assessments undertaken by European cancer centers, such as: are assessments mandatory or voluntary? Do they focus on evaluating research, care or both? And are they international or national? A survey was sent to 33 cancer centers in 28 European Union member states. Participants were asked to score the specifics for each assessment that they listed. Based on the responses from 19 cancer centers from 18 member states, we found 109 assessments. The numbers have steadily increased from 1990's till 2015. Although, a majority of assessments are on patient-care aspects (n = 45), it is unclear how many of those include assessing patient benefits. Only few assessments cover basic research. There is an increasing trend towards mixed assessments (i.e., combining research and patient-care aspects) The need for assessments in cancer centers is increasing. To improve efforts in the quality of research and patient care and to prevent new assessments that "reinvent the wheel", it is advised to start comparative research into the assessments that are likely to bring patient benefits and improve patient outcome. Do assessments provide consistent and reliable information that create added value for all key stakeholders?

  12. Practical multimodal care for cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Matthew; Hopkinson, Jane; Conibear, John; Reeves, Annie; Shaw, Clare; Fearon, Ken C H

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is common and reduces function, treatment tolerability and quality of life. Given its multifaceted pathophysiology a multimodal approach to cachexia management is advocated for, but can be difficult to realise in practice. We use a case-based approach to highlight practical approaches to the multimodal management of cachexia for patients across the cancer trajectory. Four cases with lung cancer spanning surgical resection, radical chemoradiotherapy, palliative chemotherapy and no anticancer treatment are presented. We propose multimodal care approaches that incorporate nutritional support, exercise, and anti-inflammatory agents, on a background of personalized oncology care and family-centred education. Collectively, the cases reveal that multimodal care is part of everyone's remit, often focuses on supported self-management, and demands buy-in from the patient and their family. Once operationalized, multimodal care approaches can be tested pragmatically, including alongside emerging pharmacological cachexia treatments. We demonstrate that multimodal care for cancer cachexia can be achieved using simple treatments and without a dedicated team of specialists. The sharing of advice between health professionals can help build collective confidence and expertise, moving towards a position in which every team member feels they can contribute towards multimodal care.

  13. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  14. History taking and physical assessment in holistic palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Marie; Martin, Daphne

    2016-12-08

    In carrying out a holistic palliative care assessment the palliative care clinical nurse specialist needs to develop the knowledge and skill of history taking and health assessment to make safe and competent decisions with patients regarding the future management of their care. This article examines this process in making a differential diagnosis with particular reference to the respiratory physical examination of a patient with a history of lung cancer using the Calgary-Cambridge Model. The model gives structure to the preparation, history taking, and physical examination (inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation) before explaining, planning and closing the consultation, while considering the palliative patient's and family's individual wishes and goals.

  15. Gender-related needs and preferences in cancer care indicate the need for an individualized approach to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Hester; de Graeff, Alexander; Wynia, Klaske; de Heus, Miriam; Kruitwagen, Cas L J J; Woltjer, Gerda T G J; Teunissen, Saskia C C M; Voest, Emile E

    2010-01-01

    Improving quality of care for cancer patients requires insight into their specific wishes, needs, and preferences concerning cancer care. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of gender on cancer patients' needs and preferences. Data were obtained from 386 questionnaires assessing cancer patients' preferences for health care. Multivariate regression analyses were performed with data obtained from medical oncology patients treated in seven Dutch hospitals, using the scales of the questionnaire as dependent variables. Patients rated safety, expertise, performance, and attitude of physicians and nurses highest on their list of preferences. There were significant differences between male and female patients concerning preferences in health care in 15 of the 21 scales and in two of the eight single items. Without exception, women found the care aspects mentioned in these scales and items more important than men. Multivariate regression analysis showed that, of all the patient- and disease-related factors, gender was the most important independent predictor of patient preferences. Gender impacts cancer patients' needs and preferences and should be taken into account for optimal cancer care. Cancer care might be tailored toward gender, for example, with regard to the means and extent of communication, manner and extent of support, counseling and rehabilitation, consultation length, and physician assignment. The results of this study may guide health care professionals and organizations to develop a gender-specific health care approach to further improve cancer patient-centered care.

  16. Familial colorectal cancer: Patient assessment, surveillance and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, R P; Gryfe, R; Winter, D C

    2017-02-01

    Germline mutations account for 5-10% of colorectal cancer. Most mutations are autosomal dominant with high penetrance and affected patients benefit greatly from appropriate treatment. This review presents the current knowledge regarding familial colorectal cancer and provides practical information based on international guidelines and the best available evidence regarding patient assessment, surveillance and surgical management. Surgeons are often the first point of contact and frequently, the main provider of care for families with cancer syndromes or patients with familial cancer. Patients with a polyposis phenotype should undergo appropriate genetic testing. In non-polyposis patients with a cancer diagnosis, tumor testing for Lynch syndrome can guide the use of genetic testing. In patients without a personal history of cancer or polyposis, a carefully obtained family history with testing of available tumor tissue or of a living relative affected by colorectal cancer informs the need for genetic testing. Surveillance and surgical management should be planned following thorough assessment of familial cancer risk. Evidence exists to provide guidance as to the surveillance strategies required, the specific indications of genetic testing and the appropriate timing of operative intervention. A carefully obtained family history with selective genetic testing should inform surveillance and surgical management in patients who have a genetic predisposition for the development of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  17. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advanced Cancer for information on end-of-life issues.) Spirituality and religion may have different meanings. The terms spirituality and ... to the wishes of the patient. Spirituality and religion are very personal issues. Patients should expect doctors and caregivers to respect ...

  18. [Assessment of our home care and home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Yasuhiko; Suzushino, Seiko; Tamotsu, Kiyokazu

    2014-12-01

    We conducted home care and home palliative care from the department of home care. We provided home care services to 190 patients(105 men, 85 women)in October 2013. Their average age was 78.7(range: 32-102)years old, and home care had been underway from 1 day to 8 years, 10 months. Among all participants, 168(88.4%)suffered from malignant diseases, 168 patients had died, and over half of deceased patients(88 out of 168)had died at home. We used opioids for control of cancer pain, carried out home parenteral nutrition(HPN), home enteral nutrition(HEN), percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy( PEG), and removed pleural effusion and ascites during home care. In order to facilitate the practice of palliative care by the palliative care team, which consists of various medical staff in the hospital, we are giving high priority to education and enlightenment in the hospital. To provide enlightenment, education, and cooperation between regional home care and home palliative care, we are also conducting educational lectures in the regional party of the Iwaki city medical associate, and providing combined educational-medical training for home care and home palliative care by various medical staff.

  19. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery : An evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs-Boer, FM; de Kruif, ATC; van de Wiel, HBM

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals

  20. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, R.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews

  1. Patterns of surgical care for uterine cancers in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, L; Schultz, S; Prysbysz, R; Kwon, J; Saskin, R; Gunraj, N; Wilton, A S; Simunovic, M; Urbach, D

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate the planning of future resources for cancer services in Ontario, Cancer Care Ontario commissioned an evaluation of operative services delivered for uterine cancer. Women with an incident diagnosis of a uterine malignancy were identified from 1 April 2003 to 31 March 2004 using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Record linkages were created to other provincial health databases such as the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Uterine cancer affected 1,436 women. Disease specific rates of cancer were higher in rural areas and those from the highest income quintiles. Surgery occurred in 94.7% of women. Use of surgery did not appear to vary by SEC, urban/rural residence or LHIN. Gynecologists conducted 76.1% of the operations. Lymphadenectomy took place in 18.7% of women. Lymphadenectomy rates were highest in gynecologic oncologists (43.3%). All women were assessed by CXR. Radiation therapy consults were preformed in half of the women with uterine cancer but treatment was only delivered in half of those seen. Medical oncologists saw about 6.3% of women with uterine cancers. There appear to be variations in incidence rates of uterine cancer with disease being more frequent in those of the highest SES. In two-thirds of the population, surgery is delivered in the region where the patient lives. Subspecialty care from gynecologic oncologists was provided to one-third of women. Rates of lymphadenectomy as part of a surgical attempt to assess disease spread appear low. These pilot data would be enhanced with further information such as comorbidity, treatment intent (palliative/curative), histology, grade and stage.

  2. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level.This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care.Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death.This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  3. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadoud, Amy; Kane, Eleanor; Macleod, Una; Ansell, Pat; Oliver, Steven; Johnson, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122) were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608) of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234) were entered onto the register within a week of their death. This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  4. Specialized palliative care in advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmenlund, Kristina; Sjogren, Per; Nordly, Mie

    2017-01-01

    was to review the existing literature about SPC and its effect on QoL, on physical and psychological symptoms, and on survival in adult patients with advanced cancer. Method: We utilized a search strategy based on the PICO (problem/population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework and employed......Objective: Due to the multiple physical, psychological, existential, and social symptoms involved, patients with advanced cancer often have a reduced quality of life (QoL), which requires specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions. The primary objective of the present systematic review...... terminology related to cancer, QoL, symptoms, mood, and palliative care. The search was performed in Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Selected studies were analyzed and categorized according to methods, results, quality of evidence, and strength of recommendation...

  5. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  6. Rational use and effectiveness of morphine in the palliative care of cancer patients at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamuhabwa, A; Ezekiel, D

    2009-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to assess the rational use and effectiveness of morphine for management of pain in the palliative care of cancer patients at Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) in Tanzania...

  7. Rational use and effectiveness of morphine in the palliative care of cancer patients at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es salaam, Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamuhabwa, A; Ezekiel, D

    2010-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to assess the rational use and effectiveness of morphine for management of pain in the palliative care of cancer patients at Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) in Tanzania...

  8. Early palliative care for adults with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Markus W; Estel, Stephanie; Rücker, Gerta; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Villalobos, Matthias; Thomas, Michael; Hartmann, Mechthild

    2017-06-12

    Incurable cancer, which often constitutes an enormous challenge for patients, their families, and medical professionals, profoundly affects the patient's physical and psychosocial well-being. In standard cancer care, palliative measures generally are initiated when it is evident that disease-modifying treatments have been unsuccessful, no treatments can be offered, or death is anticipated. In contrast, early palliative care is initiated much earlier in the disease trajectory and closer to the diagnosis of incurable cancer. To compare effects of early palliative care interventions versus treatment as usual/standard cancer care on health-related quality of life, depression, symptom intensity, and survival among adults with a diagnosis of advanced cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, OpenGrey (a database for grey literature), and three clinical trial registers to October 2016. We checked reference lists, searched citations, and contacted study authors to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-randomised controlled trials (cRCTs) on professional palliative care services that provided or co-ordinated comprehensive care for adults at early advanced stages of cancer. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. We assessed risk of bias, extracted data, and collected information on adverse events. For quantitative synthesis, we combined respective results on our primary outcomes of health-related quality of life, survival (death hazard ratio), depression, and symptom intensity across studies in meta-analyses using an inverse variance random-effects model. We expressed pooled effects as standardised mean differences (SMDs, or Hedges' adjusted g). We assessed certainty of evidence at the outcome level using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and

  9. Feasibility of Conducting a Palliative Care Randomized Controlled Trial in Children With Advanced Cancer: Assessment of the PediQUEST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussel, Veronica; Orellana, Liliana; Soto, Natalie; Chen, Kun; Ullrich, Christina; Kang, Tammy I; Geyer, Jeffrey R; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric palliative care randomized controlled trials (PPC-RCTs) are uncommon. To evaluate the feasibility of conducting a PPC-RCT in pediatric cancer patients. This was a cohort study embedded in the Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology Study (NCT01838564). This multicenter PPC-RCT evaluated an electronic patient-reported outcomes system. Children aged two years and older, with advanced cancer, and potentially eligible for the study were included. Outcomes included: pre-inclusion attrition (patients not approached, refusals); post-inclusion attrition (drop-out, elimination, death, and intermittent attrition (IA; missing surveys) over nine months of follow-up); child/teenager self-report rates; and, reasons to enroll/participate. Over five years, of the 339 identified patients, 231 were eligible (in 22, we could not verify eligibility); 84 eligible patients were not approached and 43 declined participation. Patients not approached were more likely to die or have brain tumors. We enrolled 104 patients. Average enrollment rate was one patient per site per month; shortening follow-up from nine to three months (with optional re-enrollment) increased recruitment by 20%. A total of 87 patients completed the study (24 died) and 17 dropped out. Median IA was 41% in the first 20 weeks of follow-up and more than 60% in the eight weeks preceding death. Child/teenager self-report was 94%. Helping others, low burden procedures, incentives, and staff attitude were frequent reasons to enroll/participate. A PPC-RCT in children with advanced cancer was feasible, post-inclusion retention adequate; many families participated for altruistic reasons. Strategies that may further PPC-RCT feasibility include: increasing target population through large multicenter studies, approaching sicker patients, preventing exclusion of certain patient groups, and improving data collection at end of life. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

  10. Challenges of Rural Cancer Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Mary; Schlichting, Jennifer; Chioreso, Catherine; Ward, Marcia; Vikas, Praveen

    2015-09-01

    Rural cancer patients face many challenges in receiving care, including limited availability of cancer treatments and cancer support providers (oncologists, social workers, mental healthcare providers, palliative care specialists, etc), transportation barriers, financial issues, and limited access to clinical trials. Oncologists and other cancer care providers experience parallel challenges in delivering care to their rural cancer patients. Although no one approach fully addresses the many challenges of rural cancer care, a number of promising strategies and interventions have been developed that transcend the issues associated with long travel distances. These include outreach clinics, virtual tumor boards, teleoncology and other telemedicine applications, workforce recruitment and retention initiatives, and provider and patient education programs. Given the projected increase in demand for cancer care due to the aging population and increasing number of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, expansion of these efforts and development of new approaches are critical to ensure access to high-quality care.

  11. Double-Edged Sword: Women with Breast Cancer Caring for a Spouse with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Yakir; Baider, Lea; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Peretz, Tamar; Goldzweig, Gil

    2016-12-01

    Experiences in caregiving may affect further coping with illness. The aim of this study was to assess mortality risk among women diagnosed with breast cancer while caring for a male spouse who had been diagnosed with cancer before or at the time of their own diagnosis. We used a historical prospective study of a nationally representative cohort that was assessed by the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics 1995 census and followed until 2011. The study population was divided into 2 × 2 groups (according to a positive/negative cancer history of the male spouse before the time of breast cancer diagnosis of the women X spouse alive/dead). The analyses were adjusted for age, ethnicity, breast cancer staging, and time of diagnosis. A total of 14,429 cases of breast cancer and 3,400 deaths were reported during the study period. Mortality was not mediated by the spouse's survival at the time of breast cancer diagnosis of the women. However, decreased risk of death was seen in women with a positive spouse history of cancer when the spouse was alive at the time of diagnosis in women who were diagnosed with breast cancer stages II and III (hazard ratio = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.98). Among a subset of women diagnosed with breast cancer, there is evidence of a significant protective association between a history of caregiving for cancer of a spouse who is alive at the time of self-diagnosis and subsequent survival. Our findings support hypotheses concerning a positive experience of caregiving and emphasize the need to define the patient and the caregiver as an integrative "unit of care."

  12. Oral Cancer Care and Oromaxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, S K

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancers are one of the most common cancers affecting people of Nepal and it the sixth most common cancer in the world. Unlike other cancers the early detection of the disease is possible through a routine examination of the oral cavity which is usually done by a dental practitioner. Through a series of phases like prevention, screening, early intervention, diagnosis and staging, management with tumor ablative surgeries, and rehabilitation to restore the function and esthetic part for better clinical outcome, the role of the specialty of dentistry is immensified. From a patient perspective, having a direct referral line within the dental community between dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons will contribute to cost reduction and improvement in outcomes. Trained oral and maxillofacial surgeon especially in the head and neck oncology plays a vital role in exploring functional multidisciplinary efforts to enhance patient care, academic excellence and research initiatives and evaluate for gaps in patient care. This article highlights the role of such professionals in a multidisciplinary team approach for the proper management of head and neck cancers which have significantly and logically additive effect for a better outcome.

  13. Integrating Palliative and Oncology Care for Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Quality Improvement Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Laura C; Collichio, Frances; Bernard, Stephen A; Wood, William A; Milowsky, Matt; Burgess, Erin; Creedle, Crista J; Cheek, Summer; Chang, Lydia; Chera, Bhisham; Fox, Alexandra; Lin, Feng-Chang

    2017-12-01

    Practice guidelines recommend palliative care for patients with advanced cancer, but gaps in access and quality of care persist. To increase goals-of-care (GOC) communication for hospitalized patients with Stage IV cancer. An interdisciplinary team designed a quality improvement intervention to enhance oncology palliative care, including training in communication skills and triggers for palliative care consults. All adult inpatients with Stage IV cancer and unplanned admission at an 804-bed hospital affiliated with a National Cancer Institute (NCI) Comprehensive Cancer Center. The primary quality measure was the percentage of patients with Stage IV cancer who had a GOC discussion during hospitalization; secondary measures included screening for pain, dyspnea, spiritual needs, and outcomes of intensive care, hospice, and 30-day readmission. In the 11-month study period, n = 330, Stage IV cancer patients were hospitalized. Comparing the first three months with the final three months, rates of GOC discussion increased from 29% to 48% (p = 0.013), and specialty palliative care consultation increased from 18% to 33%, (p = 0.026). Rates of symptom screening, intensive care unit transfer, hospice, and 30-day re-admission did not change overall. However, patients with specialty palliative care more frequently had pain screening (91% vs. 81%, p = 0.020), spiritual assessment (48% vs. 10%, p palliative care consults for patients with Stage IV cancer.

  14. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Timeliness of cancer care from diagnosis to treatment: a comparison between patients with breast, colon, rectal or lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Scarfe, Andrew; King, Karen; Fenton, David; Butts, Charles; Winget, Marcy

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value in measuring specific time intervals across cancer sites to identify potentially important variation in the timeliness of cancer care that may inform needed changes and/or improvements in coordination of care. Retrospective population-level study. Demographic and treatment information were obtained from the Alberta Cancer Registry. Date of oncologist-consult was obtained from cancer medical records. Alberta, Canada. All patients diagnosed in 2005 with breast, colon, rectal or lung cancer who were residents of Alberta, Canada. (i) Number of days from diagnosis to first treatment by treatment modality and cancer site, (ii) number of days from surgery to post-surgery consultation and subsequent treatment and (iii) relationship between clinical and demographic factors and the cancer-specific provincial median time for outcome measures (i) and (ii). Time from diagnosis to surgery, if first treatment, was ∼4 months for lung cancer compared with 1-2 months for breast and colorectal cancers. Factors associated with this time interval for breast and colorectal cancers was stage at diagnosis but was region of residence for lung cancer. Important variation within and across cancer sites identified in the care intervals evaluated in this study provides relevant information to inform local areas for improvement. Comparisons of these intervals across healthcare systems may also provide insights into strengths of different models for coordinating care.

  16. Promoting Early Detection of Breast Cancer and Care Strategies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    care for patients with advanced breast cancer because, at this stage, patients will no longer gain from antitumor interventions 10. The creation of palliative and supportive care for patients with advanced breast cancer will help to prevent unnecessary and avoidable suffering. Palliative and supportive care. Palliative care has ...

  17. Intensive care for cancer patients: An interdisciplinary challenge for cancer specialists and intensive care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellongowski, Peter; Kiehl, Michael; Kochanek, Matthias; Staudinger, Thomas; Beutel, Gernot

    Every sixth to eighth European intensive care unit patient suffers from an underlying malignant disease. A large proportion of these patients present with cancer-related complications. This review explains why the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients has improved substantially over the last decades and which risk factors are of prognostic importance. Furthermore, the main reasons for intensive care unit admission - acute respiratory failure and septic complications - are discussed with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic specifics. In addition, we discuss potential intensive care unit admission criteria with respect to cancer prognosis. The successful management of critically ill cancer patients requires a close collaboration of intensivists with hematologists, oncologists and colleagues from other disciplines, such as infectious disease specialists, microbiologists, radiologists, surgeons, pharmacists, and others.

  18. Do Patients with Advanced Cancer and Unmet Palliative Care Needs Have an Interest in Receiving Palliative Care Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seo Young; Maciasz, Rachael; Arnold, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: It is not known whether unmet palliative care needs are associated with an interest in palliative care services among patients with advanced cancer receiving ongoing oncology care. Objective: To assess the association between unmet palliative care needs and patient interest in subspecialty palliative care services. Design: Cross-sectional telephone survey. Subjects and setting: One hundred sixty-nine patients with advanced cancer receiving care from 20 oncologists at two academic cancer centers. Measurements: Surveys assessed palliative care needs in six domains. Patients were read a description of palliative care and then asked three questions about their current interest in subspecialty palliative care services (perceived need, likelihood of requesting, willingness to see if their oncologist recommended; all outcomes on 0–10 Likert scale). Results: The vast majority of patients described unmet palliative care needs, most commonly related to psychological/emotional distress (62%) and symptoms (62%). In fully adjusted models accounting for clustering by oncologist, unmet needs in these domains were associated with a higher perceived need for subspecialty palliative care services (psychological/emotional needs odds ratio [OR] 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06–1.58; p=0.01; symptom needs OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.01–1.60; p=0.04). There was no significant association between unmet needs and likelihood of requesting palliative care services. Willingness to see palliative care if oncologist recommended was high (mean 8.6/10, standard deviation [SD] 2). Conclusion: Patients with advanced cancer and unmet symptom and psychological/emotional needs perceive a high need for subspecialty palliative care services but may not request them. Efforts to increase appropriate use of subspecialty palliative care for cancer may require oncologist-initiated referrals. PMID:24673544

  19. Cancer-specific geriatric assessment and quality of life: important factors in caring for older patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribi, Karin; Rondeau, Stéphanie; Hitz, Felicitas; Mey, Ulrich; Enoiu, Milica; Pabst, Thomas; Stathis, Anastasios; Fischer, Natalie; Clough-Gorr, Kerri M

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of chemotherapy, a geriatric assessment is recommended in elderly patients with cancer. We aimed to characterize and compare patients with aggressive lymphoma by objective response and survival status based on pre-treatment cancer-specific geriatric (C-SGA) and quality of life (QoL) assessments. Patients not eligible for anthracycline-based first-line therapy or intensive salvage regimens completed C-SGA and QoL assessment before and after a rituximab-bendamustine-lenalidomide (R-BL) treatment in a phase II clinical trial. Clinical outcomes were compared based on pre-treatment individual and summary C-SGA measures, their cutoff-based subcategories and QoL indicators, using Wilcoxon rank sum or chi-square tests. A total of 57 patients (41 included in the clinical trial) completed a C-SGA. Participants with pre-treatment impaired functional status (Vulnerable Elders Survey-13 score ≥3) were more likely to experience worse outcomes: a higher proportion were non-responders, died before the median follow-up of 31.6 months (interquartile range (IQR) 27.9-37.9) or died during treatment. Non-responders were patients categorized as having possible depression (Geriatric Depression Scale-5 score ≥2) and with worse QoL scores for functional performance. Patients with worse C-SGA summary scores and with greater tiredness were more likely to die during treatment. A pre-treatment impaired functional status is an important factor with respect to clinical outcomes in patients receiving an R-BL regimen. Individual geriatric and related QoL domains showed similar associations with clinical outcomes. Whether interventions targeting specific geriatric dimensions also translate in better symptom- or domain-specific QoL warrants further research.

  20. Telemedicine for rural cancer care in North Queensland: bringing cancer care home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Sabe; Larkins, Sarah; Evans, Rebecca; Varma, Suresh; Andrews, Athena; Beuttner, Petra; Brennan, Sean; Young, Michael

    2012-10-01

    To describe the use of telemedicine in cancer care (teleoncology model of care) for rural patients in North Queensland. This is a descriptive study. Data on demographical and clinical factors were retrieved from the teleoncology database of Townsville Hospital and review of medical records for the period between May 2007 and May 2011. The medical oncologists at the Townsville Cancer Centre, a regional cancer centre in North Queensland, have been providing their services to rural hospitals in Townsville and Mt Isa districts via videoconferencing since 2007.   Cancer care delivery to rural sites via Townsville teleoncology model. The ability of the teleoncology model to provide the following services to rural towns: (i) specialist consultations; (ii) urgent specialist medical care; (iii) care for Indigenous patients; and (iv) remote supervision of chemotherapy administration. Between May 2007 and May 2011, 158 patients from 18 rural towns received a total of 745 consultations. Ten of these patients were consulted urgently and treatment plans initiated locally, avoiding interhospital transfers. Eighteen Indigenous patients received consultative services, being accompanied by more than four to six family members. Eighty-three patients received a range of intravenous and oral chemotherapy regimens in Mt Isa and oral agents in other towns through remote supervision by medical oncologists from Townsville. Teleoncology model of care allows rural and Indigenous cancer patients to receive specialist consultations and chemotherapy treatments closer to home, thus minimising the access difficulties faced by the rural sector. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  1. The Clinician's Toolbox: Assessing the Sexual Impacts of Cancer on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer (AYAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Aubin, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Cancer can have a significant impact on numerous domains of AYAC sexuality. The assessment of and attention to the impact of sexuality on AYAC is crucial in order to provide effective and comprehensive quality patient cancer care. Aubin S and Perez S. The clinician's toolbox: assessing the sexual impacts of cancer on adolescents and young adults with cancer (AYAC. Sex Med 2015;3:198–212.

  2. Specialist breast care nurses for supportive care of women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, S; Kennedy, C; Lockhart, K; Dosser, I; Dallas, L

    2008-01-23

    Breast Care Nurses (BCNs) are now established internationally, predominantly in well resourced healthcare systems. The role of BCNs has expanded to reflect the diversity of the population in which they work, and the improvements in survival of women with breast cancer. Interventions by BCNs aim to support women and help them cope with the impact of the disease on their quality of life. To assess the effectiveness of individual interventions carried out by BCN's on quality of life outcomes for women with breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group Specialised Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (15 January 2007). We also searched MEDLINE (1966 to September 2006), CINAHL (1982 to September 2006), EMBASE (1980 to September 2006), British Nursing Index (1984 to September 2006), CancerLit (1961 to September 2006), PsycInfo (1967 to September 2006), Library and Info Science Abstracts (LISA) (1969 to September 2006), Dissertation Abstracts International (only available 2005 to September 2006). We contacted authors as appropriate. Randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of interventions carried out by BCN's on quality of life outcomes, for women with breast cancer. Two authors independently assessed relevant studies for inclusion and undertook data extraction and quality assessment of included studies. We incuded five studies, categorised into three groups. Three studies assessing psychosocial nursing interventions around diagnosis and early treatment found that the BCN could affect some components of quality of life, such as anxiety and early recognition of depressive symptoms. However, their impact on social and functional aspects of the disease trajectory was inconclusive. Supportive care interventions during radiotherapy was assessed by one study which showed that specific BCN interventions can alleviate perceived distress during radiotherapy treatment, but did not improve coping skills, mood or overall quality of

  3. Cancer Fatalism and Preferred Sources of Cancer Information: an Assessment Using 2012 HINTS Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinky, Tassnym H; Faith, Jennifer; Lindly, Olivia; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2018-02-01

    Cancer fatalism is associated with lower participation in cancer screening, nonadherence to cancer screening guidelines, and avoidance of medical care. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between cancer fatalism and health information seeking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between endorsement of fatalistic beliefs regarding cancer and preferred sources of cancer information. We analyzed data from the Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycle 2, which were collected in late 2012 and early 2013 (N = 3630). When weighted, the data are representative of the non-institutionalized US population aged 18 or older. In bivariate and multivariate analyses, we assessed three cancer fatalism beliefs as predictors of preferred use of healthcare provider versus preferred use of the Internet for cancer information. Results indicate the majority of US adults endorse one or more fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Unadjusted results indicate endorsing the fatalistic belief that "there's not much you can do to lower your chances of getting cancer" was significantly associated with lower odds of preferring the Internet (versus healthcare providers) as the source of cancer information (OR: 0.70; CI: 0.50, 0.98). In the adjusted model, however, none of the three cancer fatalism measures were significantly associated with preferred source of cancer information. In conclusion, fatalistic beliefs about cancer are common, and further research is warranted to understand cancer fatalism and whether and how it may impact health information-seeking behaviors.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to implementing cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulko, Dorothy; Pace, Claire M; Dittus, Kim L; Sprague, Brian L; Pollack, Lori A; Hawkins, Nikki A; Geller, Berta M

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the process of survivorship care plan (SCP) completion and to survey oncology staff and primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding challenges of implementing SCPs. Descriptive pilot study. Two facilities in Vermont, an urban academic medical center and a rural community academic cancer center. 17 oncology clinical staff created SCPs, 39 PCPs completed surveys, and 58 patients (breast or colorectal cancer) participated in a telephone survey. Using Journey Forward tools, SCPs were created and presented to patients. PCPs received the SCP with a survey assessing its usefulness and barriers to delivery. Oncology staff were interviewed to assess perceived challenges and benefits of SCPs. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to identify challenges to the development and implementation process as well as patient perceptions of the SCP visit. SCP, healthcare provider perception of barriers to completion and implementation, and patient perception of SCP visit. Oncology staff cited the time required to obtain information for SCPs as a challenge. Completing SCPs 3-6 months after treatment ended was optimal. All participants felt advanced practice professionals should complete and review SCPs with patients. The most common challenge for PCPs to implement SCP recommendations was insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues. Most patients found the care plan visit very useful, particularly within six months of diagnosis. Creation time may be a barrier to widespread SCP implementation. Cancer survivors find SCPs useful, but PCPs feel insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues is a barrier to providing best follow-up care. Incorporating SCPs in electronic medical records may facilitate patient identification, appropriate staff scheduling, and timely SCP creation. Oncology nurse practitioners are well positioned to create and deliver SCPs, transitioning patients from oncology care to a PCP in a shared-care model of optimal wellness. Institution support for

  5. Using method triangulation to validate a new instrument (CPWQ-com) assessing cancer patients' satisfaction with communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Lundstrøm, Louise Hyldborg; Petersen, Morten Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    Patients' perceptions of care including the communication with health care staff is recognized as an important aspect of the quality of cancer care. Using mixed methods, we developed and validated a short instrument assessing this communication....

  6. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  7. Psychosexual care in prostate cancer survivorship: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, Sanchia Shanika; Persad, Raj

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men. Due to improvements in medical care, the number of PC survivors is increasing. Current literature demonstrates survivors have significant unmet needs including psychosexual care. We assess patients psychosexual needs by systematic review of literature over the past 20 years up to May 2015 in order to see what issues need to be addressed within psychosexual care. A systematic review was conducted on PC survivorship and psychosexual care. The search strategy aimed to identify all references related to PC survivorship programme components (parts of survivorship programmes) AND survivorship AND psychosexual concerns. Search terms used were as follows: (PC OR prostate neoplasms) AND (survivorship OR survivor*) OR [psychosexual impairment or sexual dysfunction or erectile dysfunction (ED)] AND [comorbidity or quality of life (QoL)]. The systematic review identified 17 papers, examining unmet needs in psychosexual care post PC therapy. These findings of this review may change psychosexual care of PC survivors, as national and international guidance is needed.

  8. Internet tools to enhance breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Shlomit Strulov; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-01-01

    Internet tools have become a great aid in the daily practice of physicians who treat breast cancer patients. In cancer care there are frequent and important intersections where major decisions need to be made; these include (1) whether or not to give chemotherapy; (2) how much toxicity to expect, and (3) the life expectancy of the patient, considering non-breast cancer comorbidities. These decisions can be made more accurately using calculators based on data sets of thousands of patients as opposed to physician intuition. Such tools also help patients and caregivers in optimal decision making, as they estimate the absolute benefits and risks of treatment. In this perspective we describe selected internet sites that are useful across several domains of care, including the potential benefits of different adjuvant regimens for early breast cancer, prognosis after neoadjuvant therapy, prognosis for ductal carcinoma in situ, and toxicity and life expectancy estimates. We review the variables required to use the tools, the results obtained, the methods of validation, and the advantages and disadvantages of each tool.

  9. Transportation – A Vehicle or Roadblock to Cancer Care for VA Colorectal Cancer Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullig, Leah L.; Jackson, George L.; Provenzale, Dawn; Griffin, Joan M.; Phelan, Sean; van Ryn, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Patients must have transportation to the treatment site before they can access appropriate cancer care. This paper describes factors associated with patients experiencing transportation-related barriers to accessing cancer care. Patients and Methods The Cancer Care Assessment & Responsive Evaluation Studies (C-CARES) questionnaire was mailed to VA colorectal cancer (CRC) patients during fall 2009. Eligible patients were diagnosed at any VA facility in 2008, male, and alive at time of mailing. A total of 1,409 surveys were returned (approximately 67% response rate). To assess transportation barriers, patients were asked how often it was difficult to get transportation to or from treatment. Symptoms were assessed using validated PROMIS scales for fatigue, pain, and depression. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine determinants of transportation barriers. Results A minority (19%) of respondents reported transportation barriers. Patients experiencing pain (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02, 1.06) had greater odds of transportation barriers than patients without this symptom. Patients who reported no primary social support (OR 6.13, 95% CI 3.10, 12.14) or non-spousal support (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.40, 2.87) were more likely to experience transportation barriers than patients whose spouse provided social support. Discussion Patients with uncontrolled pain or less social support have greater odds of transportation barriers. The directional association between social support, symptoms, and transportation cannot be determined in this data. Conclusion Inquiring about accessible transportation should become a routine part of cancer care, particularly for patients with known risk factors. PMID:21803001

  10. Pursuing Normality: Reflections on Cancer Survivorship Care of Lymphoma Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Louise S; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-16

    The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. The aim of this study was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46 semistructured interviews with 9 lymphoma survivors. Interpretive description methodology and social practice theory guided the analytical framework. "Pursuing normality" was an overall finding and was comprised of 2 overarching patterns, "future prospects" and "survivorship care perceptions," both implying an influence on whether to participate in cancer survivorship care programs. Because of "pursuing normality," 8 of 9 participants opted out of cancer survivorship care programming due to prospects of "being cured" and perceptions of cancer survivorship care as "a continuation of the disease." The findings add to our understanding of possible barriers for participation in cancer survivorship care and outline important aspects to account for in the practice of health professionals. The study findings may guide practice to establish a systematic approach for providing information to cancer survivors regarding the possible management of their symptoms and of the content and purpose of cancer survivorship care.

  11. Perspectives on Palliative Care in Cancer Clinical Trials: Diverse Meanings from Multidisciplinary Cancer Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Michelle A; Kent, Erin E; Castro, Kathleen M; Ellis, Erin M; Ferrer, Rebecca A; Falisi, Angela L; Gaysynsky, Anna; Huang, Grace C; Palan, Martha A; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care (PC) is often misunderstood as exclusively pertaining to end-of-life care, which may be consequential for its delivery. There is little research on how PC is operationalized and delivered to cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials. We sought to understand the diverse perspectives of multidisciplinary oncology care providers caring for such patients in a teaching hospital. We conducted qualitative semistructured interviews with 19 key informants, including clinical trial principal investigators, oncology fellows, research nurses, inpatient and outpatient nurses, spiritual care providers, and PC fellows. Questions elicited information about the meaning providers assigned to the term "palliative care," as well as their experiences with the delivery of PC in the clinical trial context. Using grounded theory, a team-based coding method was employed to identify major themes. Four main themes emerged regarding the meaning of PC: (1) the holistic nature of PC, (2) the importance of symptom care, (3) conflict between PC and curative care, and (4) conflation between PC and end-of-life care. Three key themes emerged with regard to the delivery of PC: (1) dynamics among providers, (2) discussing PC with patients and family, and (3) the timing of PC delivery. There was great variability in personal meanings of PC, conflation with hospice/end-of-life care, and appropriateness of PC delivery and timing, particularly within cancer clinical trials. A standard and acceptable model for integrating PC concurrently with treatment in clinical trials is needed.

  12. Quality assessment of palliative home care in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaccabarozzi, Gianlorenzo; Lovaglio, Pietro Giorgio; Limonta, Fabrizio; Floriani, Maddalena; Pellegrini, Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    The complexity of end-of-life care, represented by a large number of units caring for dying patients, of different types of organizations motivates the importance of measure the quality of provided care. Despite the law 38/2010 promulgated to remove the barriers and provide affordable access to palliative care, measurement, and monitoring of processes of home care providers in Italy has not been attempted. Using data drawn by an institutional voluntary observatory established in Italy in 2013, collecting home palliative care units caring for people between January and December 2013, we assess the degree to which Italian home palliative care teams endorse a set of standards required by the 38/2010 law and best practices as emerged from the literature. The evaluation strategy is based on Rasch analysis, allowing to objectively measuring both performances of facilities and quality indicators' difficulty on the same metric, using 14 quality indicators identified by the observatory's steering committee. Globally, 195 home care teams were registered in the observatory reporting globally 40 955 cured patients in 2013 representing 66% of the population of home palliative care units active in Italy in 2013. Rasch analysis identifies 5 indicators ("interview" with caregivers, continuous training provided to medical and nursing staff, provision of specialized multidisciplinary interventions, psychological support to the patient and family, and drug supply at home) easy to endorse by health care providers and 3 problematic indicators (presence of a formally established Local Network of Palliative care in the area of reference, provision of the care for most problematic patient requiring high intensity of the care, and the percentage of cancer patient dying at Home). The lack of Local Network of Palliative care, required by law 38/2010, is, at the present, the main barrier to its application. However, the adopted methodology suggests that a clear roadmap for health facilities

  13. Determinants of increased primary health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.; Schellevis, F.; Rijken, M.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The number of cancer survivors is increasing, and patients with cancer often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment. Because of the variety of health problems and high prevalence of comorbidity, primary care physicians (PCPs) seem obvious candidates to take care of

  14. Follow-up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Follow-Up Medical Care Once you’re done with cancer treatment, you ... to this page included, e.g., “Follow-Up Medical Care was originally published by the National Cancer Institute.” ...

  15. Psychosocial care for family caregivers of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel; Williams, Anna-Leila; Given, Barbara; McCorkle, Ruth

    2012-04-10

    To understand family caregivers' needs for better preparation and care, this state-of-the-science review examines the effect of caregiving on the health and well-being of caregivers, the efficacy of research-tested interventions on patient and caregiver outcomes, implications of the research on policy and practice, and recommendations for practice and future research. We reviewed research that described the multiple effects of cancer on caregivers' well-being. Five meta-analyses were analyzed to determine the effect of interventions with caregivers on patient and caregiver outcomes. In addition, we reviewed legislation such as the Affordable Care Act and the Family Leave Act along with current primary care practice to determine whether family caregivers' needs have been addressed. Research findings indicate that caregiver stress can lead to psychological and sleep disturbances and changes in caregivers' physical health, immune function, and financial well-being. Research-tested interventions delivered to caregivers of patients with cancer or other chronic illnesses can reduce many of these negative effects and improve caregivers' coping skills, knowledge, and quality of life. Although these interventions also decrease patients' symptoms, reduce mortality (non-dementia patients), and improve patients' physical and mental health, they are seldom implemented in practice. Recommendations for practice include development of standardized guidelines that address caregiver assessment, education, and resources; identification of "caregiver champions" in practice settings; provision of referrals to established support organizations for caregivers (eg, Cancer Support Community, Cancer Care); and collaboration among caregiving, professional, and cancer-related organizations to advocate policy and practice changes for family caregivers.

  16. Prostate cancer survivorship care guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Matthew J; Lacchetti, Christina; Bergman, Jonathan; Hauke, Ralph J; Hoffman, Karen E; Kungel, Terrence M; Morgans, Alicia K; Penson, David F

    2015-03-20

    The guideline aims to optimize health and quality of life for the post-treatment prostate cancer survivor by comprehensively addressing components of follow-up care, including health promotion, prostate cancer surveillance, screening for new cancers, long-term and late functional effects of the disease and its treatment, psychosocial issues, and coordination of care between the survivor's primary care physician and prostate cancer specialist. The American Cancer Society (ACS) Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines were reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Endorsement Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the 2014 ACS Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines are clear, thorough, and relevant, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorses the ACS Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines, with a number of qualifying statements and modifications. Assess information needs related to prostate cancer, prostate cancer treatment, adverse effects, and other health concerns and provide or refer survivors to appropriate resources. Measure prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level every 6 to 12 months for the first 5 years and then annually, considering more frequent evaluation in men at high risk for recurrence and in candidates for salvage therapy. Refer survivors with elevated or increasing PSA levels back to their primary treating physician for evaluation and management. Adhere to ACS guidelines for the early detection of cancer. Assess and manage physical and psychosocial effects of prostate cancer and its treatment. Annually assess for the presence of long-term or late effects of prostate cancer and its treatment. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Nutritional assessment of children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar; Barr, Ronald D; Pencharz, Paul B

    2009-01-01

    Regardless of which parts of the world they live in, most children will develop and grow at a similar rate if proper nutrition is ensured. Children from developing countries are at risk for primary malnutrition. Children undergoing anticancer therapy are at higher risk for secondary malnutrition, including obesity and growth retardation. Periodic nutritional assessments are important for planning effective dietary interventions for such children. In this review, we describe malnutrition as it occurs in children with cancer and various ways of assessing the nutritional status of these children, depending on the availability of resources in their local hospitals. Objective and subjective data should be used to complete the nutritional assessment. We discuss screening methods, including the use of subjective global assessment. Different parts of nutritional assessment include medical history; physical examination; biochemical and hematological data, such as visceral proteins, blood glucose levels, and lipid profiles, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and the lymphocyte count; anthropometric measurements; and food and nutrition history. We review medical tests and procedures to determine nutritional status, including nitrogen balance, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity, prognostic nutritional index, creatinine height index, maldigestion and malabsorption tests, indirect calorimetry, and dual energy X ray absorptiometry (DXA scan). Evaluation and interpretation of data and estimation of nutritional risk are discussed, including proper techniques and use of anthropometric measures, selection and use of growth charts, calculation of caloric and protein needs, and the percentage of calories ingested. These methods will enable local health care providers to accurately assess the nutritional status of children with cancer, identify children at risk, and plan adequate nutritional interventions.

  18. Supportive care organisation in France: an in depth study by the French speaking association for supportive care in cancer (AFSOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotté, F; Hervé, C; Oudard, S; Bugat, M E; Bugat, R; Farsi, F; Namer, M; Tourani, J M; Tournigand, C; Yazbek, G; Richard, S; Krakowski, I

    2013-03-01

    Supportive care in cancer (SCC) was further enhanced in the Second National Cancer Act decreed in December 2009. The aim of our study was to assess current SCC efficacy. The French speaking association for supportive care in cancer (AFSOS) conducted an observational study to evaluate practices, organisations and information given to patients. A specific 32 point questionnaire was sent to 1621 French physicians (MDs) caring for cancer patients. Three different organisations were evaluated: the individual MDs, the transversal team and its particular structure specialised in global patient care specifically developed at comprehensive cancer centres - CCC. During their disease, 68% of patients received SCC, which was more available during the palliative period (90%) than at the diagnosis (44%). Our results found that 71% of cancer departments had a specific interdisciplinary cross-team to provide SCC, particularly in CCC (62%; p=0.01) while 37% had specific inpatient units. A specific organisation dedicated to home care was greater in CCC than in public or private centres (69%, 45%, 20% respectively; p=0.01). Adverse event information was performed more by an oncologist than other specialists (p=0.01). Our results suggest that the specific SCC organisation could be a useful management tool to improve supportive care for cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of using willingness to pay as a measure of value in cancer supportive care: an assessment of amifostine cytoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, G

    1997-11-01

    The most commonly used method for pharmacoeconomic studies has been the cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA), where the outcome is expressed as an incremental cost per unit of effectiveness (e.g. quality-adjusted life years). Although CEA is a valuable tool for identifying therapies that are more effective and less expensive, deficiencies develop when a given treatment is both more expensive and more effective. An alternative that has not been investigated in the oncology setting is the willingness-to-pay (WTP) method. In this pilot study, a WTP strategy was utilized to estimate the value that the Canadian tax-paying public puts on amifostine, a new cytoprotective agent that reduces the risk of chemotherapy-induced toxicity. The method of WTP was used within the framework of a classical cost-benefit analysis to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic amifostine in patients with ovarian cancer who were receiving chemotherapy. This included direct costs for amifostine administration and hospital savings secondary to the reduced incidence of antineoplastic toxicity. A random sample of 50 Canadian tax-payers were interviewed to ascertain their maximum WTP for the new drug. The WTP survey instrument was simple to administer and easily understood by participants. Respondents stated that they would be willing to pay an average of $Can3,476 (95% confidence interval = $Can2,275 to $Can4,676) as an income tax increase to be paid over their lifetime for the value offered by the product. The benefit was then subtracted from the overall cost of amifostine ($Can3,826). This produced a net cost of $Can350 per patient (95% confidence interval = -$Can850 to $Can1,551), suggesting a situation of cost neutrality. WTP as a measure of value for oncology products is feasible and should be considered for future economic evaluations. The strategy is currently being used at this institution to determine the net societal cost or benefit of other cancer supportive care therapies, such

  20. Management and geriatric assessment of cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terret, Catherine

    2004-06-01

    Due to the demographic evolution, the management of elderly patients with cancer currently represents a major challenge for the medical community. Aging may be associated with an increased rate of health problems possibly resulting in a loss of independence. These problems can interfere with cancer treatment strategies. Therefore, treatment decision making requires a multidisciplinary and multidimensional assessment of both the characteristics of the malignant disease and the host's general health status. Several oncological groups have developed specific programs for elderly cancer patients. Based on a multidimensional geriatric assessment tool, they aim to establish the best pattern of care for the population of elderly patients with cancer. Clinical research in geriatric oncology is also a very exciting field, particularly regarding the conception of clinical trials specifically designed for elderly patients. The particular aspects of the management of elderly patients with cancer and some critical challenges of clinical research will be presented and discussed in this review.

  1. Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyeon Cheon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture’s effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.14–1.44. The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12–2.89. Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation.

  2. Dutch digital breast cancer screening: implications for breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Johanna M; den Heeten, Gerard J; Adang, Eddy M; Otten, Johannes D; Verbeek, André L; Broeders, Mireille J

    2012-12-01

    In comparison to other European population-based breast cancer screening programmes, the Dutch programme has a low referral rate, similar breast cancer detection and a high breast cancer mortality reduction. The referral rate in the Netherlands has increased over time and is expected to rise further, mainly following nationwide introduction of digital mammography, completed in 2010. This study explores the consequences of the introduction of digital mammography on the balance between referral rate, detection of breast cancer, diagnostic work-up and associated costs. Detailed information on diagnostic work-up (chart review) was obtained from referred women (n = 988) in 2000-06 (100% analogue mammography) and 2007 (75% digital mammography) in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The average referral rate increased from 15 (2000-06) to 34 (2007) per 1000 women screened. The number of breast cancers detected increased from 5.5 to 7.8 per 1000 screens, whereas the positive predictive value fell from 37% to 23%. A sharp rise in diagnostic work-up procedures and total diagnostic costs was seen. On the other hand, costs of a single work-up slightly decreased, as less surgical biopsies were performed. Our study shows that a low referral rate in combination with the introduction of digital mammography affects the balance between referral rate and detection rate and can substantially influence breast cancer care and associated costs. Referral rates in the Netherlands are now more comparable to other countries. This effect is therefore of value in countries where implementation of digital breast cancer screening has just started or is still under discussion.

  3. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective communication in cancer care between the health care team, cancer patients, and their family is important. Learn about communication skills that support a patient-centered practice and how to talk with adults and children about their diagnosis, prognosis, and transition to end-of-life care in this expert-reviewed summary.

  4. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Anota, Amélie; Dick, Julia; Kuboth, Violetta; Lareyre, Olivier; De Pauw, Antoine; Cano, Alejandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Schmutzler, Rita; Dolbeault, Sylvie; Kop, Jean-Luc

    2018-02-12

    With advances in breast cancer (BC) gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83%) in France and 180 (97%) in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively), returned the 'Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer' questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the "living with cancer" and "children-related issues" domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = -0.05), higher anxiety (b = 0.78), and having children (b = 1.51), but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  6. In search of the sixth vital sign: cancer care in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégi, Csaba L

    2013-05-01

    Romania still has to adapt and develop psychosocial assessment protocols which would allow standardized screening for the sixth vital sign in cancer patients, namely distress and quality of life. The present study screens for the psychosocial and communication needs of cancer outpatients in palliative care and in rehabilitation. These data are also compared with those obtained from a sample of cancer inpatients. Subjects for this study were recruited from cancer care services from the Transylvania region in Romania. A total of 203 persons with cancer were included in the screening. Of this number, 68 were in the hospitalized group, 71 were from the rehabilitation group, and 64 were palliative care cases. FACT-G 4.0 and BDI screening instruments were used in these clinical samples. Statistical analysis performed was: associational and comparative statistics, one-way analysis of variance. Statistically and clinically significant results were found in relation to symptoms of depression, physical and functional well-being, and overall quality of life. However, with regard to psychosocial well-being, there were no clinically relevant or significant differences among cancer patients under hospital treatment, or in rehabilitation and palliative care programs. More than 40 % of the cancer patients included in our pilot screening were not open to talk about their illness and their related needs. Cancer is an unmet psychosocial challenge to patients and to the specialized services, regardless of care type. The urgency of psychosocial screening in the Romanian cancer care system is revealed. Based on these findings, there is a need for psychosocial screening and related supportive care services that need to be integrated into Romania's cancer care programs. A recommendation is to pilot psychosocial and supportive care model within the four regional cancer care institutions.

  7. Comparing the Palliative Care Needs of Those With Cancer to Those With Common Non-Cancer Serious Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Doran; Wolf, Steven; Samsa, Greg; Bull, Janet; Taylor, Donald H; Johnson, Kimberly S; Kamal, Arif H

    2017-06-01

    Historically, palliative care has been focused on those with cancer. Although these ties persist, palliative care is rapidly integrating into the care of patients with common, non-cancer serious illnesses. Despite this, the bulk of literature informing palliative care practices stems from the care of cancer patients. We compared functionality, advanced care planning, hospital admissions, prognosis, quality of life, pain, dyspnea, fatigue, and depression between patients with cancer and three non-cancer diagnoses-end-stage renal disease (ESRD), heart failure (HF), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective analysis of the characteristics and symptoms of patient's with ESRD, HF, COPD, and cancer at time of first specialty palliative care referral. Using a web-based point of care quality assessment and reporting tool, Quality Data and Collection Tool-Palliative care, this analysis evaluated all eligible patients who received a palliative care consultation between October 1, 2012 and November 25, 2014. Data were obtained from 13 participating sites. The primary outcome for the study was functionality using the palliative performance scale. Hospital admission in the last 30 days, prognosis, patient's understanding of prognosis, advanced care planning including code status and appointed decision maker, pain, fatigue, depression, and dyspnea were also evaluated as secondary outcomes. We tested for an association between our outcomes with disease type (cancer vs. non-cancer) fitting multivariable logistic regression models. We found that the patients with primary diagnoses other than cancer were less functional at time of referral (odds ratio: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.3; P palliative care than cancer patients. These findings may be reflective of the slower and more varied trajectory of non-cancer serious illness. One aim of palliative care for those with non-cancer severe illness should be directed toward improving and

  8. Lung cancer patterns of care in south western Sydney, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod, S; Delaney, G; Bauman, A; Barton, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in New South Wales (NSW). There is a significantly higher incidence of lung cancer in the South Western Sydney Area Health Service (SWSAHS) than the NSW average. The aim of this study was to document patterns of lung cancer care for SWSAHS residents.

  9. Quality of care: Distress, health care use and needs of women with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lo-Fo-Wong, D.N.N.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to: (1) examine enduring distress and its predictors in women with breast cancer; (2) determine the extent to which distress-related problems are portrayed in a graphic novel about breast cancer; (3) examine health care use and additional needs (with regard to medical, paramedical, psychosocial, supplementary, CAM, and dental care services), and predictors of health care use in women with breast cancer; and (4) examine predictors of unmet care needs of women with ...

  10. Providing culturally sensitive care to Egyptians with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N S

    1996-01-01

    This article describes key aspects of Egyptian culture and provides intervention strategies that oncology practitioners may use to provide quality care to Egyptian immigrants and Egyptian-American oncology patients. The growing diversity of the United States population challenges oncology professionals to provide culturally appropriate care. Egyptian immigrants and Americans of Egyptian descent comprise a unique population whose cultural and religious beliefs impact on decision making and behaviors related to cancer diagnosis and treatment. This population is overwhelmingly Muslim, although a sizeable minority are members of Eastern Christian sects. Dietary restrictions, social conduct, and religious observance are among the areas that require understanding by health providers. Learning about patients' perspectives on health and illness, in light of their cultural values and beliefs, will allow health professionals to enhance the quality of assessments and interventions and provide culturally appropriate care.

  11. Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0540 TITLE: Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nina Bickell CONTRACTING...11-1-0540 Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC101939 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...the quality of prostate cancer care delivered may be contributing to the racial disparity in mortality. While it is clear that physician

  12. Quality of care in cancer: An exploration of patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mahapatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is as important as is the care itself. When the patient has a disease like cancer it becomes even more important. A cancer patient not only suffers from the disease but also undergoes substantial mental trauma, agony, stress, uncertainty, and apprehension. There are limited studies in India eliciting patient's views on the quality of care being received by cancer patients. Methodology: A cross-sectional triangulation data transformation model mixed method design (Quant + Qual was used to conduct the study between March and May 2015 among patients attending specialty hospitals providing oncology services in Odisha, India. The quantitative data were collected using, Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 to assess satisfaction. The qualitative data were obtained through in-depth interviews using open-ended questionnaire. Results: The results showed that general satisfaction among the patients was 60%. The maximum score was obtained for the communication of doctors. The qualitative findings revealed that travel for distant places for minor illness, waiting period, and lack of services at the primary care facilities were reasons for patient's dissatisfaction. Conclusion: The study found that the patients were generally satisfied with the quality of services. However, more studies should be conducted including perceptions of the patients as well as the caregiver.

  13. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  14. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield

  15. Subcutaneous trastuzumab (Herceptin) versus intravenous trastuzumab for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer: A time, motion and cost assessment study in a lean operating day care oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Van den Mooter, Tom; Mertens, Tim; Bastiaens, Valerie; Huizing, Manon T; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos

    2018-02-01

    The subcutaneous (SC) formulation of trastuzumab represents an alternative to the intravenous (IV) infusion in the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic and early breast cancer. We compared the two formulations in terms of time and cost differential. We conducted a time, motion and cost assessment study in a lean operating day care oncology unit to determine and compare the time and costs of trastuzumab SC versus IV administration in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Outcomes were the mean costs and the mean dedicated time of the health care professional (HCP) and patient chair time. Direct observation methodology was applied to collect data and statistical analysis was performed. The total preparation and administration time for trastuzumab IV was 4.07 times longer than the total time required for the trastuzumab SC administration. The total patient time spent in the day care oncology unit (in minutes) was 71% shorter with using SC administration. IV administration costs € 50.4 ($54,89) more in HCP time and consumable supplies and €162.53 ($177.00) of drug wastage. SC administration was associated with a total time saving of 53.7min for the HCPs and 122.5min for the patients. The administration of trastuzumab SC was translated in a cost saving of €212.93 ($231.73) per patient episode compared to trastuzumab IV, which could lead to a total potential saving of €3,832.74 ($4,171.06) over a full course of treatment (18 cycles) CONCLUSION: SC administration of trastuzumab was associated with a substantial reduction in active HCP time, patient chair time, unit time, and overall cost. These time and cost could be used to increase capacity within existing resources in a lean operating day dare oncology unit. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A comparative study on resilience, perceived social support and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindran Ottilingam Somasundaram; Devamani, Kiran A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Psychological distress is common among patients affected by cancer. In this study, we examined the relationship between resilience, social support, and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care. Patients and Methods: Sixty cancer patients in the age range of 18?65 years were randomly selected and divided into two groups based on their treatment intent namely, curative care (n = 30) and palliative care (n = 30). Both groups were assessed by the following...

  17. Cancer-related follow-up care among Hispanic and non-Hispanic childhood cancer survivors: The Project Forward study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Joel E; Meeske, Kathleen; Slaughter, Rhona I; Sherman-Bien, Sandra; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Kuperberg, Aura; Freyer, David R; Hamilton, Ann S

    2015-02-15

    Follow-up care is critical for childhood cancer survivors (CCS), who are at high risk for comorbidities and late effects of cancer treatments. Understanding the factors associated with maintaining follow-up care is needed, especially for Hispanic CCS, who have been under-represented in previous studies. Risk factors and protective factors for receiving cancer-related follow-up care were examined among 193 Los Angeles County CCS diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 (54% Hispanic; mean ± standard deviation age, 19.9 ± 2.8 years; age at diagnosis, 12.1 ± 3.0 years; time since diagnosis, 7.8 ± 2.0 years). Self-report surveys were used to assess follow-up care, insurance status, demographics, clinical factors, and psychosocial risk (eg, depression) and protective (eg, self-efficacy [SE]) factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with the previous receipt of cancer-related follow-up care (in prior 2 years) and the intent to seek future cancer-related follow-up care. Seventy-three percent of CCS reported a cancer follow-up visit in the previous 2 years, which was positively associated (P Cancer Society.

  18. Concordance in the Assessment of Effectiveness of Palliative Care between Patients and Palliative Care Nurses in Malaysia: A Study with the Palliative Care Outcome Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Kwee Choy Koh; Esha Das Gupta; Sangeetha Poovaneswaran; Siaw Ling Then; Michelle Jia Jui Teo; Teik Yiap Gan; Joanne Hwei Yean Thing

    2017-01-01

    Context: The Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS) is an easy-to-use assessment tool to evaluate the effectiveness of palliative care. There is no published literature on the use of POS as an assessment tool in Malaysia. Aim: To define the concordance in the assessment of quality of life between patients with advanced cancers and their palliative care nurses using a Malay version of the POS. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the palliative care unit of the Hospital Tuanku Ja'afar...

  19. Improving dementia care in nursing homes: experiences with a palliative care symptom-assessment tool (MIDOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Norbert; Larkin, Philip; Connolly, Michael; Rode, Peter; Elsner, Frank

    2014-04-01

    In the past decade, the palliative care approach has been used in the care of frail older people living with debilitating chronic conditions, including dementia. To describe health professionals' experiences of assessing the symptoms of people with dementia using a cancer-patient-oriented symptom-assessment tool from a palliative care context. This was a qualitative study that used semi-structured interviews (n=13) with clinical staff in three nursing homes prior to and following the implementation of the Minimal Documentation system for Palliative care (MIDOS) tool for assessing symptoms over a period of 6 weeks. Baseline interviews showed specific concerns about symptom assessment, such as uncertainty about underlying symptoms in residents who appeared to be in distress. After the implementation of the MIDOS tool, participants reported that daily use of the tool was perceived as helpful in evaluating symptoms other than pain and improved internal communication between staff regarding clinical decision making. The MIDOS tool was perceived as a helpful and valuable complement to existing tools. Participants expressed some concerns regarding the subjective nature of perceiving symptoms and clinical decision making. The use of tools such as the MIDOS tool has the potential to enhance the quality of palliative care in dementia care.

  20. A framework for improving the quality of cancer care: the case of breast and cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Jane G; Taplin, Stephen H; Solberg, Leif I; Manos, M Michele

    2003-01-01

    This commentary presents a conceptual framework, Quality in the Continuum of Cancer Care (QCCC), for quality improvement studies and research. Data sources include review of relevant literature (cancer care, quality improvement, organizational behavior, health services evaluation, and research). The Detecting Early Tumors Enables Cancer Therapy (DETECT) project is used to apply the QCCC model to evaluate the quality of secondary prevention. Cancer care includes risk assessment, primary prevention, screening, detection, diagnosis, treatment, recurrence surveillance, and end-of-life care. The QCCC model represents a systematic approach for assessing factors that influence types of cancer care and the transitions between them, the factors at several levels (community, plan and practice setting) that potentially impact access and quality, and the strategies groups and organizations can consider to reduce potential failures. Focusing on the steps and transitions in care where failures can occur can facilitate more organized systems and medical practices that improve care, establish meaningful measures of quality that promote improved outcomes, and enhance interdisciplinary research.

  1. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  2. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  3. Spiritual care by nurses in curative cancer care: Protocol for a national, multicentre, mixed method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Marieke; Ebenau, Anne F.; Koning, Helen; Visser, Anja; Leget, Carlo; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Leeuwen, René; Ruben, Riet; Wulp, Marijke; Garssen, Bert

    2017-01-01

    To gain insight into the quantity and quality of spiritual care provided by nurses in curative cancer care, from the perspectives of both patients and nurses. Cancer causes patients to suffer from diverse symptoms related to their illness. Nurses play an important role in the care for people with

  4. Spiritual care by nurses in curative cancer care : Protocol for a national, multicentre, mixed method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Marieke; Ebenau, Anne F; Koning, Helen; Visser, Anja; Leget, Carlo; Van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Van Leeuwen, René; Ruben, Riet; Wulp, Marijke; Garssen, Bert

    Aim: To gain insight into the quantity and quality of spiritual care provided by nurses in curative cancer care, from the perspectives of both patients and nurses. Background: Cancer causes patients to suffer from diverse symptoms related to their illness. Nurses play an important role in the care

  5. The Role of Advanced Practice Nurses in Cancer Survivorship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Stacie; Dunne, Megan; McCabe, Mary S

    2015-11-01

    To review advanced practice nursing roles in planning, implementing, and evaluating survivorship care. Review of the literature, published articles, government and organizational reports. The increased focus on improving post-treatment cancer care presents opportunities for advanced practice nurses to meet the physical and psychosocial needs of cancer survivors. As experts in the comprehensive delivery of care, oncology advanced practice nurses are positioned to initiate, deliver, and evaluate survivorship care through innovative models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer survivorship: implications for improving quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2013-08-01

    Primary care providers often care for men with prostate cancer due to its prolonged clinical course and an increasing number of survivors. However, their attitudes and care patterns are inadequately studied. In this context, we surveyed primary care providers regarding the scope of their prostate cancer survivorship care. The 2006 Early Detection and Screening for Prostate Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice Survey conducted by the Michigan Public Health Institute investigated the beliefs and practice patterns of primary care providers in Michigan. We evaluated responses from 902 primary care providers regarding the timing and content of their prostate cancer survivorship care and relationships with specialty care. Two-thirds (67.6%) of providers cared for men during and after prostate cancer treatment. Providers routinely inquired about incontinence, impotence and bowel problems (83.3%), with a few (14.2%) using surveys to measure symptoms. However, only a minority felt 'very comfortable' managing the side effects of prostate cancer treatment. Clear plans (76.1%) and details regarding management of treatment complications (65.2%) from treating specialists were suboptimal. Nearly one-half (45.1%) of providers felt it was equally appropriate for them and treating specialists to provide prostate cancer survivorship care. Primary care providers reported that prostate cancer survivorship care is prevalent in their practice, yet few felt very comfortable managing side effects of prostate cancer treatment. To improve quality of care, implementing prostate cancer survivorship care plans across specialties, or transferring primary responsibility to primary care providers through survivorship guidelines, should be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Match of psychosocial risk and psychosocial care in families of a child with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sint Nicolaas, S. M.; Schepers, S. A.; van den Bergh, E. M. M.; de Boer, Y.; Streng, I.; van Dijk-Lokkart, E. M.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Verhaak, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) was developed to screen for psychosocial risk, aimed to be supportive in directing psychosocial care to families of a child with cancer. This study aimed to determine (i) the match between PAT risk score and provided psychosocial care with healthcare

  8. Bicalutamide 150 mg plus standard care vs standard care alone for early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; See, William A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer....

  9. Time perception of cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in a palliative, end-of-life-care setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Schilderman, Johannes; Verhagen, Constans A. H. H. V. M.; Prins, Judith B.

    2011-01-01

    Time perception may be an important factor influencing distress of cancer patients. However, no comparative studies have been performed for cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in the palliative, end-of-life-care setting. The objectives of the study were to assess

  10. Trans sectoral care of geriatric cancer patients based on comprehensive geriatric assessment and patient-reported quality of life - Results of a multicenter study to develop and pilot test a patient-centered interdisciplinary care concept for geriatric oncology patients (PIVOG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heike; Boese, Stephanie; Lampe, Katharina; Jordan, Karin; Fiedler, Eckhard; Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Wienke, Andreas; Vordermark, Dirk

    2017-07-01

    For older patients with cancer the maintenance of independence, functionality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is of great importance. Aiming to maintain HRQOL of older patients with cancer we developed an interdisciplinary care program based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and patient-reported HRQOL comprising tailored supportive measures and telephone-based counseling during 6month aftercare. Pilot-testing of the intervention took place in three centers at the University Hospital Halle to examine feasibility, acceptance and potential benefit. Patients≥70years with confirmed diagnosis of cancer, at least one comorbidity and/or one functional impairment, receiving curative or palliative care were eligible. Primary endpoint was global HRQOL (EORTC QLQ C30). Mean age of the participants (n=100) was 76.3years (SD 4.8), 47% were female. On average they had 5 comorbidities (SD 2.8, min. 0, max. 15) and took 8 prescribed medications (SD 3.6, min. 0, max. 15). According to predefined treatment pathways, supportive care was triggered by summarized individual assessments that were presented to the treating physicians. Descriptive analyses showed that global HRQOL measured at the 6-month follow-up (n=57) had declined (≥10 points) for n=16 (28%) and improved or remained unchanged for n=41 (72%) patients, although some functional scales (e.g. mobility, role function) and some symptoms (e.g. fatigue, pain) had worsened. The nurse-led telephone-based aftercare was well accepted. The results show feasibility and potential benefit of the combination of CGA and HRQOL to complement standard assessments. Patient-reported symptoms and functioning indicate the need for intensified supportive therapy during aftercare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors predicting the effectiveness of palliative care in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiviboontham, Suchira

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the factors that predict the effectiveness of palliative care in patients with advanced cancer. Cross-sectional data were collected from 240 patients recruited from three tertiary care hospitals in Bangkok and suburban Thailand aged 18 years or older who were willing to participate; able to speak, read, and write Thai; were not receiving aggressive cancer treatment; and had been diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer. Participants were asked to complete a Personal Information Questionnaire (PIQ), a Palliative Care Assessment Form (PCAF), and the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS). The significant predictors of the effectiveness of palliative care in patients with advanced cancer were found to be spiritual well-being (p = 0.000) and palliative care strategies: a combination of pharmacological and psychosocial care, mind-body intervention, and spiritual care; physical management; and traditional medicine, herbal treatment, and diet management (p = 0.027). The likelihood of effectiveness for patients whose spiritual well-being and palliative care strategies scores increased by an average of one point increased by factors of 1.058 and 2.271, respectively. These findings suggest that patients who experienced better spiritual well-being and who employed a variety of palliative care strategies also experienced enhanced effectiveness of palliative care.

  12. The assessment and management of family distress during palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaider, Talia; Kissane, David

    2009-03-01

    In the advanced stages of illness, families manage multiple caregiving demands while facing the emotional task of preparing for the loss of their loved one. Palliative care settings are well suited to identifying families at risk for elevated distress, and providing support as they navigate this process. This review summarizes current research in the assessment and management of family distress at the end of life. The recent literature on families of terminally ill cancer patients has provided a more precise description of the relational and cultural factors that contribute to family distress. Studies eliciting the perspectives of family members on what is needed at the end of life affirm the importance of supportive communication and continuity of psychosocial care into bereavement. Other developments include efforts to establish guidelines for conducting family meetings in the palliative care setting, and to train palliative care practitioners in family-centered assessment techniques. Finally, there is a limited but growing evidence base for the utility of delivering family-focused psychosocial interventions during palliative care. The knowledge gained from current research on what is most salient to family members during palliative care is critical for ensuring effective delivery of supportive services and collaborative engagement in those services.

  13. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  14. [Quality of life and supportive care in head and neck cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Emmanuel; Heutte, Natacha; Grandazzi, Guillaume; Prévost, Virginie; Robard, Laetitia

    2014-05-01

    The quality of life of patients treated for head and neck cancers and their carers is part of the current concerns of health care teams. Assessment tools were created and helped to highlight the severe physical effects (pain, mucositis…) and chronic (mutilation, post-radiation complications…) related to the disease or to different treatments but also to consider the psychosocial impact of this disease. Improving the quality of life through a thoughtful and comprehensive support that must be associated with somatic care, mental health care, rehabilitation and inclusion of social difficulties and suffering relatives. Supportive care shall ensure a good quality of life for patients treated and their families but also reduce the physical effects associated with the disease and treatment. They rely on coordination of care including the cancer networks established in the cancer plan to ensure comprehensive and continuous care for these patients.

  15. Concordance in the assessment of effectiveness of palliative care between patients and palliative care nurses in Malaysia: A study with the palliative care outcome scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwee Choy Koh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS is an easy-to-use assessment tool to evaluate the effectiveness of palliative care. There is no published literature on the use of POS as an assessment tool in Malaysia. Aim: To define the concordance in the assessment of quality of life between patients with advanced cancers and their palliative care nurses using a Malay version of the POS. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the palliative care unit of the Hospital Tuanku Ja'afar Seremban, Malaysia, from February 2014 to June 2014. Subjects and Methods: We adapted and validated the English version of the 3-day recall POS into Malay and used it to define the concordance in the assessment of quality of life between patients and palliative care nurses. Forty patients with advanced stage cancers and forty palliative care nurses completed the Malay POS questionnaire. Statistical Analysis Used: The kappa statistical test was used to assess the agreement between patients and their palliative care nurses. Results: Slight to fair concordance was found in all items, except for one item (family anxiety where there was no agreement. Conclusions: The Malay version of the POS was well accepted and reliable as an assessment tool for evaluation of the effectiveness of palliative care in Malaysia. Slight to fair concordance was shown between the patients and their palliative care nurses, suggesting the needs for more training of the nurses.

  16. Concordance in the Assessment of Effectiveness of Palliative Care between Patients and Palliative Care Nurses in Malaysia: A Study with the Palliative Care Outcome Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kwee Choy; Gupta, Esha Das; Poovaneswaran, Sangeetha; Then, Siaw Ling; Teo, Michelle Jia Jui; Gan, Teik Yiap; Thing, Joanne Hwei Yean

    2017-01-01

    The Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS) is an easy-to-use assessment tool to evaluate the effectiveness of palliative care. There is no published literature on the use of POS as an assessment tool in Malaysia. To define the concordance in the assessment of quality of life between patients with advanced cancers and their palliative care nurses using a Malay version of the POS. This study was conducted in the palliative care unit of the Hospital Tuanku Ja'afar Seremban, Malaysia, from February 2014 to June 2014. We adapted and validated the English version of the 3-day recall POS into Malay and used it to define the concordance in the assessment of quality of life between patients and palliative care nurses. Forty patients with advanced stage cancers and forty palliative care nurses completed the Malay POS questionnaire. The kappa statistical test was used to assess the agreement between patients and their palliative care nurses. Slight to fair concordance was found in all items, except for one item (family anxiety) where there was no agreement. The Malay version of the POS was well accepted and reliable as an assessment tool for evaluation of the effectiveness of palliative care in Malaysia. Slight to fair concordance was shown between the patients and their palliative care nurses, suggesting the needs for more training of the nurses.

  17. Bicalutamide 150 mg plus standard care vs standard care alone for early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; See, William A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer.......To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer....

  18. Cancer care Ontario guideline recommendations for hormone receptor testing in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofech-Mozes, S; Vella, E T; Dhesy-Thind, S; Hanna, W M

    2012-12-01

    Hormone receptor testing (oestrogen and progesterone) in breast cancer at the time of primary diagnosis is used to guide treatment decisions. Accurate and standardised testing methods are critical to ensure the proper classification of the patient's hormone receptor status. Recommendations were developed to improve the quality and accuracy of hormone receptor testing based on a systematic review conducted jointly by the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists and Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-Based Care. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated to set standards for optimising immunohistochemistry in assessing hormone receptor status, as well as assuring quality and proficiency between and within laboratories. A formal external review was conducted to validate the relevance of these recommendations. It is anticipated that widespread adoption of these guidelines will further improve the accuracy of hormone receptor testing in Canada. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health care use after diagnosis of cancer in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Lorenzi, M.F.; Korevaar, J.C.; McBride, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Young patients with cancer often require extensive care during and shortly after cancer treatment for medical, psychosocial and educational problems. Approximately 85% are treated by an oncologist; however, their additional health care in this phase has barely been studied. The role of the

  20. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holge-Hazelton, B.; Blake-Gumbs, L.; Miedema, B.; Rijswijk, E. van

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare and

  1. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Bazzan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

  2. Association between serious psychological distress and health care use and expenditures by cancer history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Lin, Chun Chieh; Li, Chunyu; de Moor, Janet S; Rodriguez, Juan L; Kent, Erin E; Forsythe, Laura P

    2015-02-15

    Serious psychological distress (SPD) is associated with adverse health outcomes such as poor quality of life and shorter survival in cancer survivors, but to the authors' knowledge, the relationship between SPD and health care use and medical expenditures is not clear. A total of 4326 cancer survivors and 57,109 noncancer participants were identified from the 2008 through 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationwide population-based survey, and their psychological distress was assessed with the 6-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (SPD defined by a score ≥13). The association between SPD and use and medical expenditures of various types of health care (office-based, outpatient, hospital inpatient, emergency department, dental, and prescriptions) was examined using a 2-part modeling approach that adjusted for demographic, personal, and comorbidity factors. The marginal effects of SPD on health care use and expenditures were calculated for cancer survivors and were compared with those of noncancer participants. The weighted prevalence of SPD in cancer survivors was 8.2% compared with 4.8% in the noncancer participants. SPD was significantly associated with higher use of all care types except dental care in cancer survivors. Cancer survivors with SPD spent $4431 (95% confidence interval, $3419-$5443) more than survivors without SPD on medical services each year, whereas this extra expenditure associated with SPD for participants without cancer was $2685 (95% confidence interval, $2099-$3271). In a national representative sample of cancer survivors, SPD was found to be associated with higher health care use and medical expenditures. Distress screening and psychosocial care in cancer survivors may help reduce the economic burden of cancer in the United States. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. Quality of Cancer Care Among Foreign-Born and US-Born Patients With Lung or Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; He, Yulei; Ayanian, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    of care (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.65-1.00), a difference partly explained by the language of the survey, an indicator of English proficiency. Rates of recommended therapies ranged from 64% to 85%; foreign-born patients were less likely to receive chemotherapy......  BACKGROUND: Disparities in care have been documented for foreign-born cancer patients in the United States. However, few data are available regarding patients with lung and colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether patient-reported quality and receipt of recommended...... care differed between US-born and foreign-born cancer patients. METHODS: The authors collected surveys and medical records for a population-based cohort including white, Hispanic, and Asian adults (2205 US-born and 890 foreign-born individuals) with lung or colorectal cancer diagnosed in California...

  4. PALLIATIVE CARE AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN OLDER CANCER PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Older cancer patients are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with Palliative Care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of the cancer patient with an emphasis on quality of life. In this article, we discuss the evaluation and management of pain and other common non-pain symptoms that occur in the elderly cancer patient, as well as end of life care. PMID:26614860

  5. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Blake-Gumbs, Lyla; Miedema, Baujke

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare...... issues the YA cancer patient may present with. The role of the FP in follow-up care seems to be very limited. CONCLUSIONS: YACs in the western world seem to have comparable medical and psychosocial problems. However, the nature of health insurance is such that it impacts differently on the care...

  6. Best Practice in Basic Oral Care among Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wanyonyi, Celestine; Suila, Jennibeth

    2015-01-01

    Basic oral care maintains oral cleanliness, reduces the impact of oral microbial flora, prevents infections in the oral cavity, thereby preventing cancer treatment complications. Nurses caring for cancer patients are well situated to perform various roles that affect the patients’ oral health such as identifying patients at risk of developing oral complications, and educating cancer patients about the importance and means of having good oral health throughout their treatment to prevent, ...

  7. Information communication technology: new approach for rural cancer care improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserat, Elham

    2008-01-01

    Cancer control aims to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of cancer and to improve the quality of life of cancer patients. For rural populations this presents particular problems. This article covers challenges of oncology care in rural areas and solutions via applying information communication technology with specialty telemedicine for overcoming problems in prevention, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. In addition, telecommunications infrastructures and frameworks for implementation of telemedicine are described.

  8. Inequalities in End-of-Life Care for Colorectal Cancer Patients in Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yukiko; Burge, Fred; Johnston, Grace W.; Urquhart, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Access to high-quality end-of-life (EOL) care is critical for all those with incurable cancer. The objective of this study was to examine inequalities in access to, and quality of, EOL care by assessing registration in a palliative care program, emergency room visits in the last 30 days of life, and location of death among individuals who died of colorectal cancer in Nova Scotia, Canada, between 2001 and 2008. We used population-based linked administrative data and performed multivariate logistic regression models to assess the association between socio-economic, geographic, and demographic factors and outcomes related to access to, and quality of, EOL care (n=1,201). This study demonstrates that although access to, and quality of, EOL care appears to have improved, there remain significant inequalities throughout the population. Of primary concern is the variation in access to, and quality of, EOL care based on geographic location of residence and patient age. PMID:22860381

  9. Are health care professionals able to judge cancer patients' health care preferences correctly? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruitwagen Cas LJJ

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care for cancer patients is primarily shaped by health care professionals. This raises the question to what extent health care professionals are aware of patients' preferences, needs and values. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent there is concordance between patients' preferences in cancer care and patients' preferences as estimated by health care professionals. We also examined whether there were gender differences between health care professionals with regard to the degree in which they can estimate patients' preferences correctly. Methods To obtain unbiased insight into the specific preferences of cancer patients, we developed the 'Cancer patients' health care preferences' questionnaire'. With this questionnaire we assessed a large sample of cancer patients (n = 386. Next, we asked health care professionals (medical oncologists, nurses and policymakers, n = 60 to fill out this questionnaire and to indicate preferences they thought cancer patients would have. Mean scores between groups were compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Effect sizes (ESs were calculated for statistically significant differences. Results We found significant differences (ESs 0.31 to 0.90 between patients and professionals for eight out of twenty-one scales and two out of eight single items. Patients valued care aspects related to expertise and attitude of health care providers and accessibility of services as more important than the professionals thought they would do. Health care professionals overestimated the value that patients set on particularly organisational and environmental aspects. We found significant gender-related differences between the professionals (ESs 0.69 to 1.39 for eight out of twenty-one scales and two out of eight single items. When there were significant differences between male and female healthcare professionals in their estimation of patients health care preferences, female health care professionals

  10. Quality of Life among Immigrant Latina Breast Cancer Survivors: Realities of Culture and Enhancing Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. Design We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n=19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n=9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Results Participants were largely mono-lingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for 10 or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women’s survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner’s difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in participants’ health care interactions. Conclusion Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors’ quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally-sensitive navigation programs and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters. PMID:21706194

  11. Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact the quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n = 19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n = 9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Participants were largely monolingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for ten or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women's survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner's difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in the participants' health care interactions. Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors' quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally sensitive navigation programs, and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters.

  12. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  13. Palliative care for patients with cancer: do patients receive the care they consider important?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Hofstede, J.; Rijken, P.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care from a GP and homecare nurse. Care for physical/psychosocial well-being, respect for patients’ autonomy and information provision are important elements of palliative care, but it is not known whether patients receive the care

  14. What are the ethical aspects surrounding intensive care unit admission in patients with cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Large, Audrey; Meunier-Beillard, Nicolas; Gélinotte, Stéphanie; Declercq, Pierre-Louis; Ecarnot, Fiona; Dargent, Auguste; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2017-12-01

    Improvements in living conditions and increasing life expectancy have combined to result in ever older patients being admitted to hospital. In parallel, the increasing incidence of cancer, along with the improved efficacy of anti-cancer therapies has led to greater needs for intensive care among cancer patients. The objectives underpinning the management of cancer patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are to achieve a return to a clinical status that would allow the patient to be either, transferred back to the original unit, or discharged from the hospital with an acceptable quality of life, and where warranted, pursuit of cancer therapy. The relevance of ICU admission should be assessed systematically for patients with active cancer. The decision needs to be made taking into account the expected benefit for the patient, the life-support therapies that are possible with discussion about a care project, and also considering the future quality of life and the short and long-term prognosis. Anticipating the question of potential ICU admission should help protect the patient against both inappropriate refusal of intensive care, and inappropriate admission to the ICU that might only lead to unreasonable therapeutic obstinacy. The intensive care physician has a major role to play in helping the cancer patient to develop an appropriate and flexible healthcare project. Anticipating the question of ICU admission in advance, as well as a close alliance between the oncologist and the intensive care physician are the two keys to the success of a healthcare project focused on the patient.

  15. Redesigning Cancer Care Delivery: Views From Patients and Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manali I; Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Blayney, Douglas W; Moore, David; Nevedal, Andrea; Asch, Steven; Milstein, Arnold; Coker, Tumaini R

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Although treatments have improved, patients and caregivers continue to report significant gaps in their care. The objective of this study was to examine the views of patients and caregivers on their experiences with current cancer care delivery and identify key strategies to improve the delivery of care. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 75 patients and 45 caregivers across the United States. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparative method of qualitative analysis. Participants reported multiple gaps in care delivery, including barriers in health communication with health care providers, lack of elucidation of care goals, lack of care coordination, and challenges in accessing care. Participants identified that greater use of nonphysician providers and alternative formats, such as telephone-based care and home and community-based care, would narrow these gaps. Understanding patients' and caregivers' experiences with gaps in cancer care delivery can inform cancer care delivery redesign efforts and lead to targeted interventions that result in patient-centered and family-oriented care.

  16. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra I; Chopra A

    2014-01-01

    Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs) and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an under...

  17. Impact of combined hospice care on terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Song-Seng; Rau, Kung-Ming; Huang, Chih-Fang

    2011-06-01

    Many patients with advanced cancer will develop physical and psychological symptoms related to their disease. These symptoms are infrequently treated by conventional care. Palliative care programs have been developed to fill this gap in care. However, there are limited beds in hospice units. To allow more terminal cancer patients to receive care from a hospice team, a combined hospice care system was recently developed in Taiwan. This study is a report of our experiences with this system. From January to December 2009, terminal cancer patients who accepted consultation from a hospice team for combined hospice care were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, clinical symptoms, referring department, type of cancer, and outcome were analyzed. A total of 354 terminal cancer patients in acute wards were referred to a hospice consulting team. The mean patient age was 61 years, and the proportion of males was 63.28%. After combined hospice care, there was a significant improvement in the sign rate of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders from 41.53% to 71.47% (p care also enabled 64.21% of terminal cancer patients who were not transferred to hospice ward to receive combined care by a hospice consulting team while in acute wards, thus increasing the hospice utilization of terminal cancer patients. The major symptoms presented by the patients were pain (58%), dyspnea (52%), constipation (45%), and fatigue (23%). Through the hospice consulting system, hospice combined care has a positive effect on the utilization of hospice care, rate of DNR signing and quality of end-of-life care for terminal cancer patients.

  18. Palliative care needs in hospitalized cancer patients: a 5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandgren, A; Strang, P

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe and compare diagnoses, symptoms, and care needs in palliative cancer patients in two medium-sized hospitals in a county council with no specialized palliative care available 24/7; to analyze the relationships between diagnosis and symptoms/care needs; and to compare results and trends from two datasets (from 2007 and 2012). The study was population-based with a cross-sectional design and was conducted at two acute care hospitals. We performed 142 one-day inventories (n = 2972) in 2007 and 139 in 2012 (n = 2843) to register symptoms, care needs, and diagnosis based on a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression models were used in the analysis. During 2007 and 2012 combined, 10% (n = 589) of hospitalized patients were assessed as having cancer in a palliative phase. Prostate (12%) and colorectal (12%) cancers were most common. Pain (42%) and deterioration (42%) were the most prevalent symptoms and were associated with pancreas cancer in our regression models (p = 0.003 and p = 0.019, respectively). Other cancers had different associations: hematologic malignancies were associated with infections and blood transfusions (p care needs was 2.9; patients with stomach/esophagus cancer had the highest number of symptoms/care needs (3.5). Acute care hospitals still play an important role for patients requiring palliative care. Symptoms and care needs were not strongly associated with specific diagnoses. Therefore, symptoms, rather than the specific cancer diagnoses, should be the focus of care.

  19. Low socioeconomic status is associated with more aggressive end-of-life care for working-age terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Wu, Chin-Chia; Yin, Wen-Yao; Juang, Shiun-Yang; Yu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between low socioeconomic status (SES) and aggressiveness of end-of-life (EOL) care in cancer patients of working age (older than 18 years and younger than 65 years) is not clear. We assessed the association between aggressiveness of EOL care and differences in SES among working-age terminal cancer patients from Taiwan between 2009 and 2011. A total of 32,800 cancer deaths were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The indicators of aggressive EOL care (chemotherapy, more than one emergency room [ER] visit or hospital admission, more than 14 days of hospitalization, intensive care unit [ICU] admission, and death in an acute care hospital) in the last month of life were examined. The associations between SES and the indicators were explored. Up to 81% of the cancer deaths presented at least one indicator of aggressive EOL care. Those who were aged 35-44 years and male, had low SES, had metastatic malignant disease, lived in urban areas, or were in hospitals with more abundant health care resources were more likely to receive aggressive EOL care. In multilevel logistic regression analyses, high-SES cancer deaths had less chemotherapy (p terminal cancer patients in Taiwan received aggressive EOL care. EOL cancer care was even more aggressive in those with low SES. Public health strategies should continue to focus on low-SES patients to provide them with better EOL cancer care. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. [Consensus on hereditary cancer between the Spanish Oncology Society and the primary care societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, L; Balmaña, J; Barrel, I; Grandes, S; Graña, B; Guillén, C; Marcos, H; Ramírez, D; Redondo, E; Sánchez, J

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that 5% of all cancers are hereditary, on being caused by mutations in the germinal line in cancer susceptibility genes. The hereditary pattern in the majority of cases is autosomal dominant. Genetic tests are only recommended to individuals whose personal or family history is highly suggestive of a hereditary cancer. The appropriate assessment of these individuals and their families must be performed in Cancer Genetic Counselling Units (UCGC). Representatives of the Spanish Medical Oncology Society (Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica [SEOM]) and the three primary care scientific societies: Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [SEMFyC]), Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN]) and the Spanish Society of General and Family Doctors (Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG]), met to prepare this consensus document on hereditary cancer. The consensus identified the three main aspects: how to identify subjects at risk of hereditary cancer; how to refer to a UCGC; and the usefulness of the assessment and genetic studies. A document, with the text fully agreed by all the participants, has been prepared. It contains a summary of the principal characteristics of the care for individuals with hereditary cancer. It shows how to; identify them, assess them, refer them to a UCGC. How to assess their genetic risk, perform genetic studies, as well as prevention measures and reduction of the risk is also presented. This consensus document is a landmark in the relationships with several Scientific Societies that represent the professionals who provide care to individuals with cancer and their families, and will help to improve care in hereditary cancer in Spain. Copyright © 2013. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  1. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Concurrent Palliative Care in an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Ahles, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To understand oncology clinicians’ perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. Methods Qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Results Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: 1) treating the whole patient, 2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, 3) “some patients just want to fight”, and 4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists’ views on the complementary role of palliative care: 1) “refer early and often”, 2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals hospice; “Heme patients are different”, 3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, 4) palliative care “shares the load”, and 5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Conclusions Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care. PMID:23040412

  2. Cancer patients' perceptions of quality-of-care attributes-Associations with age, perceived health status, gender and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Riitta; Stolt, Minna; Berg, Agneta; Katajisto, Jouko; Lemonidou, Chryssoula; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Sjövall, Katarina; Charalambous, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the associations between patients' gender, education, health status in relation to assessments of patient-centred quality and individuality in care and trust in nurses for those quality of care they receive are essential for the development of the provision of patient care and services. Previous studies have revealed age of the patient is associated with their assessment of care quality attributes. The study employed a cross-sectional, multicultural comparative survey design. The data were collected using questionnaires among hospitalised cancer patients (N = 876, n = 599, 68%) in four European countries: Greece, Cyprus, Sweden and Finland. The data were divided into two subgroups based on age (cut point 65 years) and were analysed statistically. Cancer patients' age, gender and level of education were not related to their assessments of care quality attributes: person-centred care quality, individuality in care and trust in nurses. Subgroup analysis of the older adults and those of working age showed clear associations with patients' assessments of quality-of-care attributes and perceived health status. The lower the perceived health status, the lower the assessment of care quality attributes. The results suggest that the cancer itself is the strongest determinant of the care delivered, rather than any patient characteristics, such as age, education or gender. Perceived health status, in association with cancer patient assessments of care quality attributes, may be useful in the development of patient-centred, individualised care strategies alongside a stronger focus on people instead of cancer-care-related processes and duties. Health status was the only factor associated with cancer patients' assessments of care quality attributes. Cancer itself may be the strongest determinant of the care quality perceptions, rather than any patient characteristics. The findings of this study have implications for cancer care

  3. Health care providers underestimate symptom intensities of cancer patients: A multicenter European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laugsand, E.A.; Sprangers, M.A.G.; Bjordal, K.; Skorpen, F.; Kaasa, S.; Klepstad, P.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many patients with advanced cancer depend upon health care providers for symptom assessment. The extent of agreement between patient and provider symptom assessments and the association of agreement with demographic- and disease-related factors was examined. METHODS: This

  4. [Depression in palliative care: prevalence and assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julião, Miguel; Barbosa, António

    2011-12-01

    Depression is the most common mental health problem in palliative care, yet it's widely misunderstood, underdiagnosed, undertreated and considered a complex medical task. Psychological distress is a major cause of suffering among patients and families and it's highly correlated with reduced quality of life and amplification of pain. Terminally-ill individuals who suffer from depression are also at high risk of suicide and desire for a hastened death. Every patient receiving palliative care should receive a complete personal and familial psychiatric history, with risk factors, as well as the typical signs and symptoms in the terminal disease. There are two different approaches to assess depression in palliative care: Categorial vs Dimensional The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is the most used assessment method for depression in advanced disease and it's validated to the Portuguese population. HADS overcomes the biggest problem when evaluating depression in the terminally-ill: the influence of somatic symptoms due to the underlying disease on the results of the depression scales. In this article we revise other approaches for the assessment of depression in advanced disease: single question vs two-item question; structured clinical interview and diagnostic criteria. Clinicians who care for terminally-ill patients must develop competences on the psychological area, developing state-of-the-art clinical skills that provide quality of life and comfort to patients and their families.

  5. Cancer patient and staff ratings of caring behaviors: relationship to level of pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuanmay; Lin, Ya-Ping; Chang, Hsiu-Ju; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2005-01-01

    This study explored differences in the perceived importance of nursing caring behaviors between patients with cancer pain and oncology nurses and to explore the relationship between level of pain intensity and the importance of various nursing caring behaviors. The study included 50 matched cancer patient-staff pairs from oncology inpatient units of 3 hospitals in northern Taiwan. The Brief Pain Inventory-Chinese version (BPI-C) and the Caring Assessment Report Evaluation Q-sort (CARE-Q) were used for data collection. Results revealed that cancer pain patients ranked "being accessible," "monitors and follows through," and "anticipates" as being the most important nursing caring behaviors; the nursing staff ranked "being accessible," "explains and facilitates," and "monitors and follows through" as being the most important behaviors. No correlations were found between cancer pain patients and staff rankings of the perceived importance of various caring behaviors. The self-reported level of pain intensity by patients was significantly positively correlated with the patient rating of the "anticipates" behavior. Patient self-reported level of pain interference was significantly positively correlated with the "monitors and follows through" behavior and significantly negatively correlated with the "explains and facilitates" behavior. Staff perception of both a patient's level of pain intensity and pain interference was significantly positively correlated with staff rating of the "being accessible" behavior. Results demonstrated that greater patient-staff communication is needed for staff to more accurately provide caring interventions to make patients with cancer pain feel cared for.

  6. Emerging Models of Interprofessional Collaboration in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Teresa; Wujcik, Debra; Wujcik, Kari

    2017-11-01

    To present emerging models for oncology health professionals to consider when coordinating cancer care among professionals, beginning as early as initial professional education and training and continuing along the cancer continuum to include cancer treatment and psychosocial support. Journal articles indexed on the National Library of Medicine database and personal communications with oncology colleagues. Interprofessional collaboration is becoming increasingly important in the specialty of oncology. The complexity of new therapies and their associated side-effect profiles benefit from a collaborative, interprofessional approach to the care of the patient with cancer. Additionally, oncology patients can benefit from interprofessional collaboration across the complexities of the care continuum. Oncology nurses are often in roles that can facilitate interprofessional collaboration, optimizing the care of patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. End-of-life care among head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Andrew G; Yang, Ye; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Prince, Mark E

    2011-05-01

    This study is designed to (1) determine the perceived quality of care received by patients with head and neck cancer at the end of their lives, in order to (2) better anticipate and improve upon the experiences of future patients. Cross-sectional survey. Single-institution, academic tertiary care medical center. A validated survey instrument, the Family Assessment of Treatment at the End of life (FATE), was administered to families of patients who died of head and neck cancer (n = 58). The primary outcome was the overall FATE score. Independent variables included clinical characteristics, treatments received, and the care provided at the time of death. Overall FATE scores and the domains assessing management of symptoms and care at the time of death did not vary by disease status (logoregional vs distant metastasis) at the end of life (P = .989). The location of death in the home or in hospice (vs hospital) significantly improves scores in all 3 categories (P = .023). Involvement of a palliative care team improved the care at the time of death (P care at the time of death (P = .011, P = .017). The FATE survey is a useful measure of the end-of-life experience of head and neck cancer patients. Palliative treatments of head and neck cancer, death outside of the hospital, and palliative care team involvement all improve the end-of-life experience in this population.

  8. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  9. Using mixed methods to assess how cancer patients' needs in relation to their relatives are met in the Danish health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this paper were to validate four items assessing how patients' needs regarding support to and from their relatives are met and to investigate patients' evaluation of this support.......The aims of this paper were to validate four items assessing how patients' needs regarding support to and from their relatives are met and to investigate patients' evaluation of this support....

  10. A multidimensional view of racial differences in access to prostate cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Armstrong, Katrina A; Mitra, Nandita; Chen, Xinwei; Ward, Katelyn R; Radhakrishnan, Archana; Wong, Michelle S; Bekelman, Justin E; Branas, Charles C; Rhodes, Karin V; Grande, David T

    2017-11-15

    Racial disparities in prostate cancer treatment and outcomes are widespread and poorly understood. In the current study, the authors sought to determine whether access to care, measured across multiple dimensions, contributed to racial differences in prostate cancer. The Philadelphia Area Prostate Cancer Access Study (P2 Access) included 2374 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between 2012 and 2014. Men were surveyed to assess their experiences accessing care (response rate of 51.1%). The authors determined appointment availability at 151 urology practices using simulated patient telephone calls and calculated travel distances using geospatial techniques. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the association between 5 different domains of access (availability, accessibility, accommodation, affordability, and acceptability) and receipt of treatment, perceived quality of care, and physician-patient communication. There were 1907 non-Hispanic white and 394 black men in the study cohort. Overall, approximately 85% of the men received definitive treatment with no differences noted by race. Black men were less likely to report a high quality of care (69% vs 81%; Paccess were found to be associated with definitive treatment overall or with radical prostatectomy. All access domains were associated with perceived quality of care and communication, although these domains did not mediate racial disparities. To the authors' knowledge, the current study presents the first comprehensive assessment of prostate cancer care access, treatment, and patient experience, demonstrating that although access was related to overall perceived quality of care and better physician-patient communication, it did not appear to explain observed racial differences. Cancer 2017;123:4449-57. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. Treatment preference and patient centered prostate cancer care: Design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadevappa, Ravishankar; Chhatre, Sumedha; Gallo, Joseph J; Wittink, Marsha; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce Malkowicz, S; Lee, David; Guzzo, Thomas; Caruso, Adele; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Wein, Alan J; Sanford Schwartz, J

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a slow progressing cancer that affects millions of men in the US. Due to uncertainties in outcomes and treatment complications, it is important that patients engage in informed decision making to choose the "optimal treatment". Patient centered care that encompasses informed decision-making can improve treatment choice and quality of care. Thus, assessing patient treatment preferences is critical for developing an effective decision support system. The objective of this patient-centered randomized clinical trial was to study the comparative effectiveness of a conjoint analysis intervention compared to usual care in improving subjective and objective outcomes in prostate cancer patients. We identified preferred attributes of alternative prostate cancer treatments that will aid in evaluating attributes of treatment options. In this two-phase study, in Phase 1 we used mixed methods to develop an adaptive conjoint task instrument. The conjoint task required the patients to trade-off attributes associated with treatments by assessing their relative importance. Phase 2 consisted of a randomized controlled trial of men with localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the effect of conjoint task intervention on the association between preferences, treatment and objective and subjective outcomes. Our conjoint task instrument can lead to a values-based patient-centered decision aid tool and help tailor treatment decision making to the values of prostate cancer patients. This will ultimately improve clinical decision making, clinical policy process, enhance patient centered care and improve prostate cancer outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: Changes in Psychosocial Quality of Care Indicators Over a 3-Year Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paul B; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William; Siegel, Erin M; Shibata, David; Laronga, Christine; Gray, Jhanelle; Tanvetyanon, Tawee; Schreiber, Fred; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Philip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Malafa, Mokenge

    2015-01-01

    Identifying and addressing psychosocial concerns is increasingly recognized as an important aspect of cancer care that needs to be improved. As part of the Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care, medical record reviews were conducted to evaluate cancer care, including psychosocial care, at oncology practices in Florida in 2006. Results were subsequently disseminated to the practices, and performance was reassessed at the same practices in 2009. Data were available for patients with colorectal, breast, and non-small-cell lung cancer first seen by a medical oncologist in 2006 (n = 1,609) and 2009 (n = 1,720) at the same 10 practice sites. Performance on each psychosocial indicator was evaluated for overall change over time and for variability in change based on practice site and cancer type. The percentage of patients identified as having a problem in emotional well-being increased significantly over time, from 24% to 31% among those assessed (P = .002) and from 13% to 16% overall (P = .026). In contrast, there no significant changes over time in assessment of emotional well-being (53% to 51%, P = .661) or in action taken to address problems (57% to 45%, P = .098). Findings suggest more intensive efforts than audit and feedback will be required to improve the quality of psychosocial care and that greater recognition of problems with emotional well-being may tax the ability of practices to link patients with appropriate services. Systematic research is needed to identify and disseminate effective strategies for implementing routine assessment of well-being and addressing the increased demands for care this will generate. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Arkansas Special Populations Access Network perception versus reality--cancer screening in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, William; Gibson, Regina; Siegel, Eric; Duke, Kelly; Jones, Rise; Rucinski, Diane; Nunn, Gary; Torrence, W Alvin; Lewellen-Williams, Charlotte; Stewart, Chara; Blann, Kimberly; Belleton, Larry; Fincher, Lindsey; Klimberg, V Suzanne; Greene, Paul; Thomas, Billy; Erwin, Deborah; Henry-Tillman, Ronda

    2006-10-15

    The origin of cancer health disparities and mortality in Arkansas is multifactorial. In response to a cooperative agreement with the National Cancer Institute's Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, the Arkansas Special Populations Access Network (ASPAN) was developed to reduce these disparities. ASPAN's partnership with local primary care physicians of the Arkansas Medical, Dental, and Pharmaceutical Association through the Cancer Education Awareness Program is the focus of this article. A quasi-experimental intervention, the Community Cancer Education Awareness Program, was employed that included 1) physician education to increase awareness of risk factors and cancer screening; and 2) patient education to increase screening, and 3) patient-generated screening questionnaires to prompt discussion of cancer risk and screening recommendations between patients and physicians. Two urban and 2 rural clinics were targeted during a 12-month period with interval intervention assessments. Baseline review of records (n = 200) from patients >/=40 were utilized to assess the rate of breast, prostate, and colorectal screenings among clinics. For the patient education intervention, patients (n = 120) were interviewed via a 34-item assessment. Physician awareness of cancer risk factors and screening recommendations significantly increased. Statistically significant increases were seen for prostate (P = .028), breast (P = .036), and colorectal (P change agent, the ASPAN provider network successfully enhanced cancer screening awareness of minority physicians and their patients. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  14. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Impact of patient navigation on timely cancer care: the Patient Navigation Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Karen M; Battaglia, Tracy A; Calhoun, Elizabeth; Darnell, Julie S; Dudley, Donald J; Fiscella, Kevin; Hare, Martha L; LaVerda, Nancy; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Levine, Paul; Murray, David M; Patierno, Steven R; Raich, Peter C; Roetzheim, Richard G; Simon, Melissa; Snyder, Frederick R; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Winters, Paul; Young, Gregory S; Paskett, Electra D

    2014-06-01

    Patient navigation is a promising intervention to address cancer disparities but requires a multisite controlled trial to assess its effectiveness. The Patient Navigation Research Program compared patient navigation with usual care on time to diagnosis or treatment for participants with breast, cervical, colorectal, or prostate screening abnormalities and/or cancers between 2007 and 2010. Patient navigators developed individualized strategies to address barriers to care, with the focus on preventing delays in care. To assess timeliness of diagnostic resolution, we conducted a meta-analysis of center- and cancer-specific adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) comparing patient navigation vs usual care. To assess initiation of cancer therapy, we calculated a single aHR, pooling data across all centers and cancer types. We conducted a metaregression to evaluate variability across centers. All statistical tests were two-sided. The 10521 participants with abnormal screening tests and 2105 with a cancer or precancer diagnosis were predominantly from racial/ethnic minority groups (73%) and publically insured (40%) or uninsured (31%). There was no benefit during the first 90 days of care, but a benefit of navigation was seen from 91 to 365 days for both diagnostic resolution (aHR = 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.84; P < .001)) and treatment initiation (aHR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.86; P < .007). Metaregression revealed that navigation had its greatest benefits within centers with the greatest delays in follow-up under usual care. Patient navigation demonstrated a moderate benefit in improving timely cancer care. These results support adoption of patient navigation in settings that serve populations at risk of being lost to follow-up. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Gynecologic and Obstetric Care for Breast Cancer Survivors: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer Griffin

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer treatment has an impact on the physical, psychologic, sexual, and reproductive aspects of women's lives. Therefore, it is important for obstetrician-gynecologists to be well versed in the screening, diagnosis, and management of breast cancer. This monograph is an overview of critical issues related to the provision of ongoing care to breast cancer survivors.

  17. Providing palliative care to patients with cancer: Addressing the needs in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Malloy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the third highest cause of death in Kenya, preceded by infectious and cardiovascular diseases, and in most cases, diagnosed in later stages. Nurses are the primary caregivers, assessing and managing these patients in the clinic, in inpatient settings, and in rural and remote communities. While cancer rates remain high, the burden to the patient, the caregiver, and society as a whole continues to rise. Kenya's poverty complicates cancer even further. Many Kenyans are unaware of cancer's signs and symptoms, and limited diagnostic and treatment centers are available. Despite these barriers, there is still hope and help for those in Kenya, who suffer from cancer. The World Health Organization has stated that palliative care is a basic human right and nurses providing this care in Kenya are making efforts to support cancer patients' ongoing needs, in order to promote compassionate palliative care and prevent suffering. The purpose of this paper is to address the palliative care needs of patients with cancer in Kenya by providing education to nurses and influencing health-care policy and education at micro and macro levels. A case study weaved throughout will highlight these issues.

  18. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Long, Margaret E; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M

    2015-11-01

    Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health.

  19. Promoting High-Quality Cancer Care and Equity Through Disciplinary Diversity in Team Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Susan K; Fineberg, Iris C; Lin, Mingqian; Singer, Marybeth; Tang, May; Erban, John K

    2016-11-01

    Disciplinary diversity in team composition is a valuable vehicle for oncology care teams to provide high-quality, person-centered comprehensive care. Such diversity facilitates care that effectively addresses the complex needs (biologic, psychosocial, and spiritual) of the whole person. The concept of professional or disciplinary diversity centers on differences in function, education, and culture, reflecting variety and heterogeneity in the perspectives of team members contributing to care. Thorough understanding of the skills, knowledge, and education related to each team member's professional or lay expertise is critical for members to be able to optimize the team's potential. Furthermore, respect and appreciation for differences and similarities across disciplinary cultures allow team members to create a positive collaboration dynamic that maintains a focus on the care of the person with cancer. We present a case study of one oncology team's provision of care to the patient, a Chinese immigrant woman with breast cancer. The case illuminates the strengths and challenges of disciplinary diversity in team composition in assessing and addressing potential barriers to care. Coordinated sharing of information among the varied team members facilitated understanding and care planning focused on the patient's concerns, needs, and strengths. Importantly, collaboration across the disciplinarily diverse set of team members facilitated high-quality oncology care and promoted equity in access to the full range of care options, including enrollment on a National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trial. Further implications of disciplinary diversity in oncology care teams are considered for both clinical practice and research.

  20. General practitioners' role in cancer care: a French-Norwegian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bungener Martine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer care, a GP's work is rarely defined clearly. Our aim was to assess GPs' work with cancer patients in France and in Norway, where the roles of the GP and the organization of the system are rather different. Findings A questionnaire with 40 closed-ended questions about GP involvement in diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and terminal care was constructed and mailed to samples of GPs. The patients had seen the doctor at least once over the past year. In France 1679 and in Norway 386 individual patient questionnaires were completed. GPs have a major role in the diagnosis of cancer, and this role varies according to cancer type. The GPs participated actively in different phases of follow-up after cancer treatment. Low response rates do not allow direct comparison between countries, but higher PSA screening rates in France seem to increase the percentage of patients diagnosed after screening rather than after a clinical suspicion. Interaction between GPs and specialists during cancer treatment and follow-up was important in both countries. Conclusion Both in France and in Norway GPs participate actively in cancer care. Early clinical diagnosis is a challenge. More research is needed about how GPs can improve their early diagnostic work. Organisational issues may influence cancer responsibilities for the GP, and national health systems should be challenged to look at possible new roles for GPs in cancer care. Medical training, both pre- and post-graduate, should prepare doctors for collaboration between primary and secondary care, particularly important in cancer care.

  1. What do surgical oncology staff nurses know about colorectal cancer ostomy care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Robin; Kravits, Kathy; Ortiz, Mildred; Anderson, Casandra; Lai, Lily; Grant, Marcia

    2011-02-01

    For most patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, dealing with the adjustment and rehabilitation after treatment can be overwhelming. There is a significant need for expert educational and counseling support, especially for the patient with a new ostomy. This pilot study describes acute care oncology staff nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward providing direct ostomy care support and education. This study is part of a larger project assessing gaps in education and services in support of patients with colorectal cancer. The Survey on Ostomy Care questionnaire designed to assess nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward ostomy care was administered to oncology staff nurses at a comprehensive cancer center. Only 30% of staff nurses surveyed strongly agreed or agreed with the statement, "I care for ostomy patients often enough to keep up my skills in ostomy care." Maintaining staff nurses' ability to teach and demonstrate to patients complex care such as ostomy care depends on the ability to practice both education and hands-on skills. Staff nurses identify that lack of opportunity to care for the new ostomy patient influences their ability to maintain skill expertise. The results show the need to explore the provision of ongoing staff education for low-volume patient populations using creative teaching strategies, such as clinical simulation and short videos. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, illness understanding, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We also discuss how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available.

  3. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We end by discussing how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  4. Technology integration performance assessment using lean principles in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Florentino; Yalcin, Ali; Eikman, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of an automated infusion system (AIS) integration at a positron emission tomography (PET) center based on "lean thinking" principles. The authors propose a systematic measurement system that evaluates improvement in terms of the "8 wastes." This adaptation to the health care context consisted of performance measurement before and after integration of AIS in terms of time, utilization of resources, amount of materials wasted/saved, system variability, distances traveled, and worker strain. The authors' observations indicate that AIS stands to be very effective in a busy PET department, such as the one in Moffitt Cancer Center, owing to its accuracy, pace, and reliability, especially after the necessary adjustments are made to reduce or eliminate the source of errors. This integration must be accompanied by a process reengineering exercise to realize the full potential of AIS in reducing waste and improving patient care and worker satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Setting the stage for universal financial distress screening in routine cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Nandita; Holland, Jimmie C; Griffin, Joan M

    2017-11-01

    Financial burden from cancer treatment is increasingly being recognized as a threat to optimal access, quality, and outcomes of cancer care for patients. Although research in the area is moving at a fast pace, multiple questions remain unanswered, such as how to practically integrate the assessment and management of financial burden into routine health care delivery for patients with cancer. Although psychological distress screening for patients undergoing cancer treatment now is commonplace, the authors raise the provocative idea of universal screening for financial distress to identify and assist vulnerable groups of patients. Herein, the authors outline the arguments to support screening for financial burden in addition to psychological distress, examining it as an independent patient-reported outcome for all patients with cancer at various time points during their treatment. The authors describe the proximal and downstream impact of such a strategy and reflect on some challenges and potential solutions to help integrate this concept into routine cancer care delivery. Cancer 2017;123:4092-4096. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Development of multi-disciplinary breast cancer care in Southern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E R S; Bartlett, J; Chalulu, K; Gadama, L; Gorman, D; Hayward, L; Jere, Y; Mpinganjira, M; Noah, P; Raphael, M; Taylor, F; Masamba, L

    2017-01-01

    The Edinburgh Malawi Breast Cancer Project, a collaborative partnership project between the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) Oncology Unit, Blantyre, Malawi and the Edinburgh Cancer Centre, UK, was established in 2015. The principal objective of the project is to help to develop high quality multi-disciplinary breast cancer care in Malawi. A needs assessment identified three priority areas for further improvement of breast cancer services: multi-disciplinary working, development of oestrogen receptor (ER) testing and management of clinical data. A 3-year project plan was implemented which has been conducted through a series of reciprocal training visits. Key achievements to date have been: (1) Development of a new specialist breast care nursing role; (2) Development of multi-disciplinary meetings; (3) Completion of a programme of oncology nursing education; (4) Development of a clinical database that enables prospective collection of data of all new patients with breast cancer; (5) Training of local staff in molecular and conventional approaches to ER testing. The Edinburgh Malawi Breast Cancer Project is supporting nursing education, data use and cross-specialty collaboration that we are confident will improve cancer care in Malawi. Future work will include the development of a breast cancer diagnostic clinic and a breast cancer registry. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Classification of a palliative care population in a comprehensive cancer centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benthien, Kirstine Skov; Nordly, Mie; Videbæk, Katja

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purposes of the present study were to classify the palliative care population (PCP) in a comprehensive cancer centre by using information on antineoplastic treatment options and to analyse associations between socio-demographic factors, cancer diagnoses, treatment characteristics...... and receiving specialist palliative care (SPC). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional screening study of patients with cancer in the Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital for 6 months. Patients were assessed to be included in the DOMUS study: a randomised controlled trial...... of accelerated transition to SPC at home (NCT01885637). The PCP was classified as patients with incurable cancer and limited or no antineoplastic treatment options. Patients with performance status 2-4 were further classified as the essential palliative care population (EPCP). RESULTS: During the study period...

  8. Classification of a palliative care population in a comprehensive cancer centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benthien, Kirstine Skov; Nordly, Mie; Videbæk, Katja

    2016-01-01

    of accelerated transition to SPC at home (NCT01885637). The PCP was classified as patients with incurable cancer and limited or no antineoplastic treatment options. Patients with performance status 2-4 were further classified as the essential palliative care population (EPCP). RESULTS: During the study period......PURPOSE: The purposes of the present study were to classify the palliative care population (PCP) in a comprehensive cancer centre by using information on antineoplastic treatment options and to analyse associations between socio-demographic factors, cancer diagnoses, treatment characteristics...... and receiving specialist palliative care (SPC). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional screening study of patients with cancer in the Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital for 6 months. Patients were assessed to be included in the DOMUS study: a randomised controlled trial...

  9. Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmer MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrah L Foster,1,2 Cynthia J Bell,1 Carey F McDonald,2 Joy S Harris,3 Mary Jo Gilmer,1,21Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, 2Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pediatric palliative care aims to enhance life and decrease suffering of children and adolescents living with life-threatening conditions and their loved ones. Oncology nurses are instrumental in providing palliative care to pediatric oncology populations. This paper describes pediatric palliative care and provides an overview of literature related to the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains of palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer. Nurses can provide optimal palliative care by accounting for children's understanding of death, encouraging early initiation of palliative care services, and improving utilization of pediatric palliative care in cancer settings. Specific roles of registered nurses and advanced practice nurses in pediatric palliative care will be addressed. Recommendations for future research are made to further advance the science of pediatric palliative care and decrease suffering for children and teens with cancer.Keywords: pediatric palliative care, pediatric cancer, oncology, child, suffering

  10. Lung cancer physicians’ referral practices for palliative care consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. B.; Nelson, J. E.; Berman, A. R.; Powell, C. A.; Fleischman, J.; Salazar-Schicchi, J.; Wisnivesky, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Integration of palliative care with standard oncologic care improves quality of life and survival of lung cancer patients. We surveyed physicians to identify factors influencing their decisions for referral to palliative care. Methods: We provided a self-administered questionnaire to physicians caring for lung cancer patients at five medical centers. The questionnaire asked about practices and views with respect to palliative care referral. We used multiple regression analysis to identify predictors of low referral rates (palliative care consultation. Multivariate analysis, controlling for provider characteristics, found that low referral rates were associated with physicians’ concerns that palliative care referral would alarm patients and families [odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21–0.98], while the belief that palliative care specialists have more time to discuss complex issues (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.56–6.02) was associated with higher rates of referral. Conclusions: Although palliative care consultation is increasingly available and recommended throughout the trajectory of lung cancer, our data indicate it is underutilized. Understanding factors influencing decisions to refer can be used to improve integration of palliative care as part of lung cancer management. PMID:21804051

  11. Cancer pain management at a tertiary care cancer center in India--a retrospective analysis of 3,238 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Srikanti, Madhurima; Gupta, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Effective pain control is essential for the management of patients with cancer. About 70-80 percent of patients with cancer present in an advanced stage of disease. Patients with advanced cancer frequently experience intractable pain, with diverse symptoms that can make daily living impossible and affect the quality of life. This article reports the management of 3,238 patients with cancer pain over a period of five years. Nearly 89.6 percent patients had good pain relief with Visual Analogue Scale score less than 3. These promising results were achieved by careful patient assessment, close liaison with clinicians from other specialties, and using a variety of analgesic regimen including oral analgesics, anesthetic procedures, psychological interventions, and supportive care. However, the main stay of treatment was oral analgesics, following the principles of World Health Organization ladder, with continuing follow-up.

  12. The nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Jane B

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome. Its defining feature is involuntary weight loss, which arises, in part, because of muscle atrophy and is accompanied by functional decline. International expert consensus recommends that nutritional support and counselling is a component of multimodal therapy for cancer cachexia, as poor nutritional intake can contribute to progression of the syndrome. The present paper focuses on what is presently known about the nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia. There is potential for nurses to play an important role. However, obstacles to this include lack of a robust evidence base to support their nutritional care practices and unmet need for education about nutrition in cancer. The nursing role's boundaries and the outcomes of nurse-delivered nutritional care in cancer cachexia are both uncertain and should be investigated.

  13. Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare...

  14. Fighting Global Disparities in Cancer Care: A Surgical Oncology View

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoekstra, Harald J; Wobbes, Theo; Heineman, Erik; Haryono, Samuel; Aryandono, Teguh; Balch, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    .... Surgery is still the mainstay for most solid tumors; however, low- and middle-income countries are facing an increasing lack of primary surgical care for easily treatable conditions, including breast, colon, and head and neck cancers...

  15. Cancer Care Gets Personal: How Tumor Treatments Are Changing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... January 2018 Print this issue Cancer Care Gets Personal How Tumor Treatments Are Changing En español Send ... also be passed down from your parents. These insights have led scientists to look for the unique ...

  16. Metrics for evaluating patient navigation during cancer diagnosis and treatment: crafting a policy-relevant research agenda for patient navigation in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Dohan, Daniel; Raich, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities as well as other vulnerable populations experience disparate cancer-related health outcomes. Patient navigation is an emerging health care delivery innovation that offers promise in improving quality of cancer care delivery to these patients who experience unique health-access barriers. Metrics are needed to evaluate whether patient navigation can improve quality of care delivery, health outcomes, and overall value in health care during diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Information regarding the current state of the science examining patient navigation interventions was gathered via search of the published scientific literature. A focus group of providers, patient navigators, and health-policy experts was convened as part of the Patient Navigation Leadership Summit sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Key metrics were identified for assessing the efficacy of patient navigation in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Patient navigation data exist for all stages of cancer care; however, the literature is more robust for its implementation during prevention, screening, and early diagnostic workup of cancer. Relatively fewer data are reported for outcomes and efficacy of patient navigation during cancer treatment. Metrics are proposed for a policy-relevant research agenda to evaluate the efficacy of patient navigation in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Patient navigation is understudied with respect to its use in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Core metrics are defined to evaluate its efficacy in improving outcomes and mitigating health-access barriers. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  17. Documenting coordination of cancer care between primary care providers and oncology specialists in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Melissa C; Vukmirovic, Marija; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Grunfeld, Eva; Urquhart, Robin; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    To report on the findings of the CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum) Casebook project, which systematically documented Canadian initiatives (ie, programs and projects) designed to improve or support coordination and continuity of cancer care between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists. Pan-Canadian environmental scan. Canada. Individuals representing the various initiatives provided data for the analysis. Initiatives included in the Casebook met the following criteria: they supported coordination and collaboration between PCPs and oncology specialists; they were related to diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, or personalized medicine; and they included breast or colorectal cancer or both. Data were collected on forms that were compiled into summaries (ie, profiles) for each initiative. Casebook initiatives were organized based on the targeted stage of the cancer care continuum, jurisdiction, and strategy (ie, model of care or type of intervention) employed. Thematic analysis identified similarities and differences among employed strategies, the level of primary care engagement, implementation barriers and facilitators, and initiative evaluation. The CanIMPACT Casebook profiles 24 initiatives. Eleven initiatives targeted the survivorship stage of the cancer care continuum and 15 focused specifically on breast or colorectal cancer or both. Initiative teams implemented the following strategies: nurse patient navigation, multidisciplinary care teams, electronic communication or information systems, PCP education, and multicomponent initiatives. Initiatives engaged PCPs at various levels. Implementation barriers included lack of care standardization across jurisdictions and incompatibility among electronic communication systems. Implementation facilitators included having clinical and program leaders publicly support the initiative, repurposing existing resources, receiving financial support, and

  18. Health care and cancer screening experience of chinese immigrants in New York City: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kenny; Mak, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess the health care and cancer screening experience of Chinese immigrants in New York City and identify health care delivery system barriers to cancer education and screening activities. A qualitative, exploratory research methodology based on a grounded theory approach was used. Thirty-nine low-income and medically underserved Chinese men and women participated in 4 focus group sessions and 14 in-depth interviews. Findings revealed numerous barriers experienced by participants: red tape and bureaucracy in the health care system, provider insensitivity to their concerns, lack of availability in doctor schedule, long waiting time in clinics, and fragmentation of the medical care system. This study highlighted the importance of cultural relevancy and appropriateness in the design and implementation of effective cancer screening programs for this population.

  19. Match of psychosocial risk and psychosocial care in families of a child with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sint Nicolaas, S M; Schepers, S A; van den Bergh, E M M; de Boer, Y; Streng, I; van Dijk-Lokkart, E M; Grootenhuis, M A; Verhaak, C M

    2017-12-01

    The Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) was developed to screen for psychosocial risk, aimed to be supportive in directing psychosocial care to families of a child with cancer. This study aimed to determine (i) the match between PAT risk score and provided psychosocial care with healthcare professionals blind to outcome of PAT assessment, and (ii) the match between PAT risk score and team risk estimation. Eighty-three families of children with cancer from four pediatric oncology centers in the Netherlands participated (59% response rate). The PAT and team risk estimation was assessed at diagnosis (M = 40.2 days, SD = 14.1 days), and the content of provided psychosocial care in the 5-month period thereafter resulting in basic or specialized care. According to the PAT, 65% of families were defined as having low (universal), 30% medium (targeted), and 5% high (clinical) risk for developing psychosocial problems. Thirty percent of patients from universal group got basic psychosocial care, 63% got specialized care, and 7% did not get any care. Fourteen percent of the families at risk got basic care, 86% got specialized care. Team risk estimations and PAT risk scores matched with 58% of the families. This study showed that families at risk, based on standardized risk assessment with the PAT, received more specialized care than families without risk. However, still 14% of the families with high risks only received basic care, and 63% of the families with standard risk got specialized care. Standardized risk assessment can be used as part of comprehensive care delivery, complementing the team. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Disparities in quality of cancer care: The role of health insurance and population demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh-Patel, Arti; Morris, Cyllene R; Kizer, Kenneth W

    2017-12-01

    Escalating costs and concerns about quality of cancer care have increased calls for quality measurement and performance accountability for providers and health plans. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to assess variability in the quality of cancer care by health insurance type in California.Persons with breast, ovary, endometrium, cervix, colon, lung, or gastric cancer during the period 2004 to 2014 were identified in the California Cancer Registry. Individuals were stratified into 5 health insurance categories: private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, dual Medicare and Medicaid eligible, and uninsured. Quality of care was evaluated using Commission on Cancer quality measures. Logistic regression models were generated to assess the independent effect of health insurance type on stage at diagnosis, quality of care and survival after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES).A total of 763,884 cancer cases were evaluated. Individuals with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual-eligible coverage and the uninsured had significantly lower odds of receiving recommended radiation and/or chemotherapy after diagnosis or surgery for breast, endometrial, and colon cancer, relative to those with private insurance. Dual eligible patients with gastric cancer had 21% lower odds of having the recommended number of lymph nodes removed and examined compared to privately insured patients.After adjusting for known demographic confounders, substantial and consistent disparities in quality of cancer care exist according to type of health insurance in California. Further study is needed to identify particular factors and mechanisms underlying the identified treatment disparities across sources of health insurance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Learning the landscape: implementation challenges of primary care innovators around cancer survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Denalee; Hudson, Shawna V; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Howard, Jenna; Rubinstein, Ellen; Lee, Heather S; Overholser, Linda S; Shaw, Amy; Givens, Sarah; Burton, Jay S; Grunfeld, Eva; Parry, Carly; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the experiences of early implementers of primary care-focused cancer survivorship delivery models. Snowball sampling was used to identify innovators. Twelve participants (five cancer survivorship primary care innovators and seven content experts) attended a working conference focused on cancer survivorship population strategies and primary care transformation. Data included meeting discussion transcripts/field notes, transcribed in-depth innovator interviews, and innovators' summaries of care models. We used a multistep immersion/crystallization analytic approach, guided by a primary care organizational change model. Innovative practice models included: (1) a consultative model in a primary care setting; (2) a primary care physician (PCP)-led, blended consultative/panel-based model in an oncology setting; (3) an oncology nurse navigator in a primary care practice; and (4) two subspecialty models where PCPs in a general medical practice dedicated part of their patient panel to cancer survivors. Implementation challenges included (1) lack of key stakeholder buy-in; (2) practice resources allocated to competing (non-survivorship) change efforts; and (3) competition with higher priority initiatives incentivized by payers. Cancer survivorship delivery models are potentially feasible in primary care; however, significant barriers to widespread implementation exist. Implementation efforts would benefit from increasing the awareness and potential value-add of primary care-focused strategies to address survivors' needs. Current models of primary care-based cancer survivorship care may not be sustainable. Innovative strategies to provide quality care to this growing population of survivors need to be developed and integrated into primary care settings.

  2. Telemedicine and telesurgery in cancer care: inaugural conference at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcher, Robert L; Bogler, Oliver; Hyle, Laurel; Lee, Andrew; Simmons, Angela; Williams, Robert; Hawk, Ernest; Matin, Surena; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2014-09-01

    Despite the growing incidence of cancer worldwide, there are an insufficient number of primary care physicians, community oncologists, and surgeons to meet the demand for cancer care, especially in rural and other medically underserved areas. Teleoncology, including diagnostics, treatment, and supportive care, has the potential to enhance access to cancer care and to improve clinician education and training. Major cancer centers such as The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center must determine how teleoncology will be used as part of strategic planning for the future. The Telemedicine and Telesurgery in Cancer Care (TTCC) conference was convened to determine technologically based strategies for addressing global access to essential cancer care services. The TTCC conference brought policy makers together with physicians, legal and regulatory experts to define strategies to optimize available resources, including teleoncology, to advance global cancer care. The TTCC conference discourse provided insight into the present state of access to care, expertise, training, technology and other interventions, including teleoncology, currently available through MD Anderson, as well as a vision of what might be achievable in the future, and proposals for moving forward with a comprehensive strategy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Nutritional care of cancer patients: a survey on patients' needs and medical care in reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschke, J; Kruk, U; Kastrati, K; Kleeberg, J; Buchholz, D; Erickson, N; Huebner, J

    2017-02-01

    Cancer patients represent a patient group with a wide-range of nutrition related problems which are often under-recognized and undertreated. In order to assess the status quo of nutritional care in Germany, we conducted a survey among patients with different types of cancer. A standardized questionnaire was distributed online by two national umbrella organizations for self-help groups. 1335 participants completed the questionnaire. 69 % of the participants reported having received information on nutrition and/or specific nutrition-related symptoms. Most often this information was derived from print media (68.5 %) or from within self-help groups (58.7 %). 57.0 % of participants reported having had questions concerning nutrition and/or problems with food intake. most frequently named topics of interest were "healthy diet" (35.0 %) weakness/fatigue (24.3 %), dietary supplements (21.3 %) and taste changes (19.8 %). Nutrition information was most often provided by dietitians (38.7 %) followed by physicians (9.8 %). Women reported receiving nutrition counseling in the hospital nearly twice as often as men (12.5 % versus 5.7 %; p nutrition information more often reported using supplements (p Nutrition is an essential element in cancer care and patients report a high interest and need: Yet, many patients do not have access to high quality nutrition therapy during and after cancer therapy. With respect to survival and quality of life, increasing the availability and resources for provision of evidence based nutrition information seems mandatory.

  4. Teleoncology: Current and future applications for improving cancer care globally

    OpenAIRE

    Hazin, Ribhi; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Access to quality cancer care is often unavailable not only in low- and middle-income countries but also in rural or remote areas of high-income countries. Teleoncology (oncology applications of medical telecommunications, including pathology, radiology, and other related disciplines) has the potential to enhance both access to and the quality of clinical cancer care as well as education and training. Its implementation in the developing world requires an approach tailored to priorities, reso...

  5. A survey of National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers' oral health supportive care practices and resources in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joel B; Parker, Ira R; Epstein, Matthew S; Gupta, Anurag; Kutis, Susan; Witkowski, Daniela M

    2007-04-01

    The oral complications and morbidity resulting from overall cancer therapy utilizing radiation, chemotherapy, and/or stem cell transplantation can have significant impact on a patient's health, quality of life, cost of care, and cancer management. There has been minimal health services research focusing on the status of medically necessary, oral supportive services at US cancer centers. A pre-tested, survey questionnaire was distributed to the directors of National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer centers to assess each institution's resource availability and clinical practices, as it relates to the prevention and management of oral complications during cancer treatment. Sixteen of the 39 comprehensive cancer centers responded to the survey. Of the respondents, 56% of the centers did not have a dental department. The sites of delivery of oral supportive care services range from the provision of in-house dental care to community-based, private practice sites. No standard protocols were in place for either oral preventive care or for supportive services for oral complications during or after cancer therapy. Fifty percent of the responding comprehensive cancer centers reported orally focused research and/or clinical trial activities. Comprehensive cancer care must include an oral care component, particularly for those cancer patients who are at high risk for oral complications. This requires a functional team of oral care providers collaborating closely within the oncology team. Considering the number of cancer patients receiving aggressive oncologic treatment that may result in oral toxicity, the impact of oral conditions on a compromised host, and the potential lack of appropriate resources and healthcare personnel to manage these complications, future research efforts are needed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of present oral supportive care delivery systems at both NCI-designated cancer centers and community-based oncology practices.

  6. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. AIM: To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The Danish...... Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...... scales and survival. RESULTS: Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0...

  7. Early palliative care for patients with metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Jan; Wolf, J; Voltz, R

    2012-07-01

    At present, clinicians and healthcare providers are increasingly urged to advance the provision of state-of-the-art palliative care for patients with incurable cancer. This review provides an overview about the recent findings and practical suggestions. In the last decade, the awareness about the logistic and personal resources needed to meet the somatic and psychological needs of patients with progressive and life-threatening diseases has increased and in parallel, palliative care concepts and expertise have evolved substantially. Care concepts for patients with metastatic cancer emphasized the potential of interdisciplinary care. For example, in 2010, a randomized trial reported a benefit for patients with lung cancer who received early palliative care in addition to routine care. It is discussed that this was because of increased quality of life and detailed exploration of patient preferences. Patients, families and physicians benefit from shared care concepts of oncology and specialized palliative care. Although this concept is already becoming increasingly implemented in tertiary (comprehensive cancer-) care settings, the potential of this approach should be explored for other clinical settings such as office-based oncology.

  8. Cancer survivors' rehabilitation needs in a primary health care context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Thorbjørn; Søndergaard, Jens; Sokolowski, Ineta

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of cancer survivors' rehabilitation needs have mostly addressed specific areas of needs, e.g. physical aspects and/or rehabilitation needs in relation to specific cancer types. OBJECTIVE: To assess cancer survivors' perceived need for physical and psychosocial rehabilitation, ...

  9. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  10. The Perceptions Of Traditional Healers Of Cervical Cancer Care At ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Women report at clinics and hospitals ... Black women consult traditional healers first, before they consult health-care professionals. Although cervical cancer survival rates are said to be improving across South Africa, not ... Keywords: Traditional healers, traditional medicine, western medicine, cervical cancer, perceptions.

  11. The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Peter; Lawler, Mark; Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Johnston, Patrick; Nurse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Following the UK "Brexit" vote in June 2016, there are many uncertainties and risks for cancer research and cancer care in the UK. These are summarised and the importance of sustained engagement and influence from the cancer community on UK governments is emphasised.

  12. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction. | Examining symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment, quality of life and end of life.

  13. Financial Burden of Cancer Care | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. The burden of selected cancers in the US: health behaviors and health care resource utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iadeluca L

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Laura Iadeluca,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Pratibha Chander,2 Markay Hopps,1 Geoffrey T Makinson1 1Pfizer Inc., 2Atrium Staffing, New York, NY, USA Objective: To characterize the disease burden among survivors of those cancers having the highest incidence in the US.Methods: Adult (≥18 years survivors of the 11 most frequently diagnosed cancers were identified from publically available data sources, including the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results 9 1973–2012, National Health Interview Survey 2013, and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2011. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were utilized to assess differences between cancer survivors and non-cancer controls in behavioral characteristics, symptoms and functions, preventative screenings, and health care costs.Results: Hematologic malignancies, melanoma, and breast, prostate, lung, colon/rectal, bladder, kidney/renal, uterine, thyroid, and pancreatic cancers had the highest incidence rates. Breast cancer had the highest incidence among women (156.4 per 100,000 and prostate cancer among men (167.2 per 100,000. The presence of pain (P=0.0003, fatigue (P=0.0005, and sadness (P=0.0012 was consistently higher in cancer survivors 40–64 years old vs. non-cancer controls. Cancer survivors ≥65 years old had higher rates of any functional limitations (P=0.0039 and reported a lack of exercise (P<0.0001 compared with the non-cancer controls. However, obesity rates were similar between cancer survivors and non-cancer controls. Among cancer survivors, an estimated 13.5 million spent $169.4 billion a year on treatment, with the highest direct expenditures for breast cancer ($39 billion, prostate cancer ($37 billion, and hematologic malignancies ($25 billion. Prescription medications and office-based visits contributed equally as the cost drivers of direct medical spending for breast cancer, while inpatient hospitalization was the driver for prostate (52.8% and lung (38.6% cancers

  15. Primary care patient experience and cancer screening uptake among women: an exploratory cross-sectional study in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takuya; Inoue, Machiko

    2017-01-01

    Patient experience and clinical quality, which are represented by preventive care measures such as cancer screening, are both widely used for the evaluation of primary care quality. The aim of this study was to examine the association between patient experience and cancer screening uptake among women in a Japanese population. We conducted a cross-sectional mail survey. The questionnaire was sent to 1000 adult female residents randomly selected from a basic resident register in Yugawara town, Kanagawa, Japan. We assessed patient experience of primary care using a Japanese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool (JPCAT) and uptake of breast and cervical cancer screening. The overall response rate was 46.5%. Data were analyzed for 190 female participants aged 21-74 years who had a usual source of primary care. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that the JPCAT total score was significantly associated with uptake of breast cancer screening [odds ratio (OR) per 1 standard deviation increase = 1.63; 95% CI 1.11-2.41], but not with uptake of cervical cancer screening (OR per 1 standard deviation increase = 1.47; 95% CI 0.97-2.24). Patient experience of primary care was associated with uptake of breast cancer screening among Japanese women. The results of our study might support the argument that patient experience of primary care and the clinical process of preventive care, such as breast cancer screening, are linked.

  16. Dutch digital breast cancer screening: implications for breast cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Johanna M.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Adang, Eddy M.; Otten, Johannes D.; Verbeek, André L.; Broeders, Mireille J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In comparison to other European population-based breast cancer screening programmes, the Dutch programme has a low referral rate, similar breast cancer detection and a high breast cancer mortality reduction. The referral rate in the Netherlands has increased over time and is expected to

  17. Admittance to specialized palliative care (SPC) of patients with an assessed need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adsersen, Mathilde; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Admittance to specialized palliative care (SPC) has been discussed in the literature, but previous studies examined exclusively those admitted, not those with an assessed need for SPC but not admitted. The aim was to investigate whether admittance to SPC for referred adult patients...... with cancer was related to sex, age, diagnosis, geographic region or referral unit. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A register-based study with data from the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD). From DPD we identified all adult patients with cancer, who died in 2010-2012 and who were referred to and assessed to have...

  18. Estudo de adaptação cultural e validação da Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General em cuidados paliativos Estudio de adaptación cultural y validación de Functional Assessment of Cancer Thera-General en cuidados paliativos Study of cultural adaptation and validation of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy -General in palliative care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Moreira Pinto Pereira

    2011-12-01

    ón Funcional Assesment of Chronic Illnes Therapy (FACIT, fue aplicado a una muestra de 346 enfermos. Los resultados demostraron que el instrumento presenta una buena consistencia interna global, con alpha de Cronbach de 0,91, así como una buena fidelidad de test-retest con r de 0,99 y un split-half de 0,57. El Análisis de Componentes Principales, seguido del estudio de la validad convergente-discriminante de los ítems, indica que la FACT-G bajo análisis es concordante con su constructo inicial. Fue además analizada la sensibilidad de la escala que se mostró discriminativa para el género y religión. Se concluyó que este instrumento es fiable, válido y sensible para el estudio de la calidad de vida de pacientes con enfermedad oncológica, en la fase final de la vida, acompañados en los cuidados paliativos.This study aims to validate the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G version 4 by Cella et al. (1993 for the Portuguese culture as far as end-of-life oncology patients, treated in palliative care units, are concerned. This scale was developed to measure the general quality of life of oncology patients in 4 domains: Physical Well-Being (PWB; Functional Well-Being (FWB; Social/Family Well-Being (SWB and Emotional Well-Being (EWB. The questionnaire survey, already translated into Portuguese by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT Organization, was applied to a group of 346 patients. Results revealed that this instrument shows good overall internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha 0.91, good test-retest reliability (r of 0.99 and a split-half of r of 0.57. Principal Components Analysis, followed by convergent and discriminant validity tests of the items, demonstrated that the FACT-G under analysis is consistent with its initial construct. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the scale was analyzed, and this showed that it was discriminative about gender and religion. Therefore this instrument is reliable, valid and sensitive for the

  19. Exploring associations between psychiatric disorder, psychological distress, and health care utilization in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compen, F R; Adang, E M M; Bisseling, E M; Van der Lee, M L; Speckens, A E M

    2017-12-04

    The mental burden of cancer might elicit additional health care utilization. However, it is unclear how psychiatric disorder and psychological distress relate to health care utilization. Therefore, this study explores associations between psychiatric disorder, psychological distress, and health care utilization. It was hypothesized that presence of psychiatric disorder and psychological distress was associated with increased health care utilization and costs. The current study consisted of secondary analyses of baseline data of a larger randomized controlled trial. Two hundred forty-five mixed-cancer patients with at least mild symptoms of psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-T ≥ 11) were mainly recruited via online media, participating centers and patient associations. Patients were assessed with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) for depressive, anxiety, and/or adjustment disorder. Psychological distress was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Retrospective self-reported health care utilization in the past 3 months was collected. Associations between predictors and health care utilization in terms of incidence rate ratios (IRR) and costs per category (mental, primary, somatic, and complementary) were assessed by negative binomial, logistic, and gamma regression. Eighty-nine (36.3%) patients suffered from psychiatric disorder, which was associated with mental health care utilization (IRR = 1.63) and costs (OR = 3.11). We observed a nonsignificant trend of somatic health care utilization in patients with psychiatric disorder. Psychological distress was associated with mental health care utilization (IRR = 1.09) and costs (OR = 1.09). Psychological distress was also associated with complementary health care utilization (IRR = 1.03). Psychiatric disorder and psychological distress were associated with mental health care use and costs. Psychological distress was associated

  20. Microbiological risk assessment for personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S E; Parker, M D; Amézquita, A; Pitt, T L

    2016-12-01

    Regulatory decisions regarding microbiological safety of cosmetics and personal care products are primarily hazard-based, where the presence of a potential pathogen determines decision-making. This contrasts with the Food industry where it is a commonplace to use a risk-based approach for ensuring microbiological safety. A risk-based approach allows consideration of the degree of exposure to assess unacceptable health risks. As there can be a number of advantages in using a risk-based approach to safety, this study explores the Codex Alimentarius (Codex) four-step Microbiological Risk Assessment (MRA) framework frequently used in the Food industry and examines how it can be applied to the safety assessment of personal care products. The hazard identification and hazard characterization steps (one and two) of the Codex MRA framework consider the main microorganisms of concern. These are addressed by reviewing the current industry guidelines for objectionable organisms and analysing reports of contaminated products notified by government agencies over a recent 5-year period, together with examples of reported outbreaks. Data related to estimation of exposure (step three) are discussed, and examples of possible calculations and references are included. The fourth step, performed by the risk assessor (risk characterization), is specific to each assessment and brings together the information from the first three steps to assess the risk. Although there are very few documented uses of the MRA approach for personal care products, this study illustrates that it is a practicable and sound approach for producing products that are safe by design. It can be helpful in the context of designing products and processes going to market and with setting of microbiological specifications. Additionally, it can be applied reactively to facilitate decision-making when contaminated products are released on to the marketplace. Currently, the knowledge available may only allow a

  1. Time perception of cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in a palliative, end-of-life-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Schilderman, Johannes; Verhagen, Constans A H H V M; Prins, Judith B

    2011-01-01

    Time perception may be an important factor influencing distress of cancer patients. However, no comparative studies have been performed for cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in the palliative, end-of-life-care setting. The objectives of the study were to assess time perception in disease-free and advanced cancer patients and examine the relation of time perception with patients' distress. A descriptive research design was used. Ninety-six disease-free and 63 advanced cancer patients filled out Cottle's Circle Test to assess time coherence and time dominance, Cottle's Line Test to assess temporal extension and Bayes' question on speed of time, the European Organisation for Research-and-Treatment of Cancer QOL-Questionnaire version 2.0, Beck's Depression Inventory for primary care, and Beck's Hopelessness-Scale. In patients without evidence of disease, future dominance was most often observed, whereas in advanced cancer patients, the present was the dominant time segment. In both groups, a focus on the past was associated with distress. In contrast with patients without evidence of disease, advanced cancer patients perceived time as moving slowly, and this was correlated with distress. The time perception of cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients is significantly different and is related to distress. The observed relation between a focus on the past and distress gives room for interventions of nurses and other healthcare professionals. Specific attention is needed for differences between cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients.

  2. Cancer Survivorship Care Plan Utilization and Impact on Clinical Decision-Making at Point-of-Care Visits with Primary Care: Results from an Engineering, Primary Care, and Oncology Collaborative for Survivorship Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Haine, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Feldstein, David A; Micek, Mark; Trowbridge, Elizabeth R; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Sosman, James M; Wilke, Lee G; Sesto, Mary E; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-11-02

    Every cancer survivor and his/her primary care provider should receive an individualized survivorship care plan (SCP) following curative treatment. Little is known regarding point-of-care utilization at primary care visits. We assessed SCP utilization in the clinical context of primary care visits. Primary care physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) who had seen survivors following provision of an SCP were identified. Eligible primary care physicians and APPs were sent an online survey, evaluating SCP utilization and influence on decision-making at the point-of-care, accompanied by copies of the survivor's SCP and the clinic note. Eighty-eight primary care physicians and APPs were surveyed November 2016, with 40 (45%) responding. Most respondents (60%) reported discussing cancer or related issues during the visit. Information needed included treatment (66%) and follow-up visits, and the cancer team was responsible for (58%) vs primary care (58%). Respondents acquired this information by asking the patient (79%), checking oncology notes (75%), the SCP (17%), or online resources (8%). Barriers to SCP use included being unaware of the SCP (73%), difficulty locating it (30%), and finding needed information faster via another mechanism (15%). Despite largely not using the SCP for the visit (90%), most respondents (61%) believed one would be quite or very helpful for future visits. Most primary care visits included discussion of cancer or cancer-related issues. SCPs may provide the information necessary to deliver optimal survivor care but efforts are needed to reduce barriers and design SCPs for primary care use.

  3. Spiritual care of cancer patients by integrated medicine in urban green space: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakau, Maiko; Imanishi, Jiro; Imanishi, Junichi; Watanabe, Satoko; Imanishi, Ayumi; Baba, Takeshi; Hirai, Kei; Ito, Toshinori; Chiba, Wataru; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    Psycho-oncological care, including spiritual care, is essential for cancer patients. Integrated medicine, a therapy combining modern western medicine with various kinds of complementary and alternative medicine, can be appropriate for the spiritual care of cancer because of the multidimensional characteristics of the spirituality. In particular, therapies that enable patients to establish a deeper contact with nature, inspire feelings of life and growth of plants, and involve meditation may be useful for spiritual care as well as related aspects such as emotion. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of spiritual care of cancer patients by integrated medicine in a green environment. The present study involved 22 cancer patients. Integrated medicine consisted of forest therapy, horticultural therapy, yoga meditation, and support group therapy, and sessions were conducted once a week for 12 weeks. The spirituality (the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual well-being), quality of life (Short Form-36 Health Survey Questionnaire), fatigue (Cancer Fatigue Scale), psychological state (Profile of Mood States, short form, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and natural killer cell activity were assessed before and after intervention. In Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual well-being, there were significant differences in functional well-being and spiritual well-being pre- and postintervention. This program improved quality of life and reduced cancer-associated fatigue. Furthermore, some aspects of psychological state were improved and natural killer cell activity was increased. It is indicated that integrated medicine performed in a green environment is potentially useful for the emotional and spiritual well-being of cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of life and religious-spiritual coping in palliative cancer care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ticiane Dionizio de Sousa Matos; Silmara Meneguin; Maria de Lourdes da Silva Ferreira; Helio Amante Miot

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the quality of life and religious-spiritual coping of palliative cancer care patients with a group of healthy participants; assess whether the perceived quality of life is associated with the religious-spiritual coping strategies; identify the clinical and sociodemographic variables related to quality of life and religious-spiritual coping. Method: cross-sectional study involving 96 palliative outpatient care patient at a public hospital in the interior of th...

  5. Social Support, a Mediator in Collaborative Depression Care for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed whether perceived social support (PSS) is a factor in improving physical and functional well-being observed among cancer patients receiving collaborative depression care. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of collaborative depression…

  6. Living with prostate cancer: randomised controlled trial of a multimodal supportive care intervention for men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepore Stephen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer in developed countries and diagnosis and treatment carries with it substantial morbidity and related unmet supportive care needs. These difficulties may be amplified by physical inactivity and obesity. We propose to apply a multimodal intervention approach that targets both unmet supportive care needs and physical activity. Methods/design A two arm randomised controlled trial will compare usual care to a multimodal supportive care intervention "Living with Prostate Cancer" that will combine self-management with tele-based group peer support. A series of previously validated and reliable self-report measures will be administered to men at four time points: baseline/recruitment (when men are approximately 3-6 months post-diagnosis and at 3, 6, and 12 months after recruitment and intervention commencement. Social constraints, social support, self-efficacy, group cohesion and therapeutic alliance will be included as potential moderators/mediators of intervention effect. Primary outcomes are unmet supportive care needs and physical activity levels. Secondary outcomes are domain-specific and health-related quality of life (QoL; psychological distress; benefit finding; body mass index and waist circumference. Disease variables (e.g. cancer grade, stage will be assessed through medical and cancer registry records. An economic evaluation will be conducted alongside the randomised trial. Discussion This study will address a critical but as yet unanswered research question: to identify a population-based way to reduce unmet supportive care needs; promote regular physical activity; and improve disease-specific and health-related QoL for prostate cancer survivors. The study will also determine the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Trial Registration ACTRN12611000392965

  7. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen Salins; Raghavendra Ramanjulu; Lipika Patra; Jayita Deodhar; Mary Ann Muckaden

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was - Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to ...

  8. Symptom interpretation and health care seeking in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Lene; Petersen, Lone K; Blaakær, Jan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among women suffering from gynaecological malignancies in the Western world. Worldwide, approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with the disease each year. This article deals with the health care seeking and symptom interpretation process...... with ovarian cancer. These results were combined with findings from semi-structured qualitative research interviews on women's bodily experiences with symptom development. RESULTS: A number of 663 Danish women with ovarian cancer attended 27 different kinds of primary health care providers in a total of 14...... knowledge concerning the onset of their symptoms. The early symptoms of ovarian cancer might be uncharacteristic and non-disease-specific when interpreted as personal experiences, but they had similarities when analysed together. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic delay in ovarian cancer seems far from being...

  9. Barriers to lung cancer care: health professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J; Garvey, G; Valery, P C; Ball, D; Fong, K M; Vinod, S; O'Connell, D L; Chambers, S K

    2017-02-01

    Globally, lung cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death. Problematically, there is a wide variation in the management and survival for people with lung cancer and there is limited understanding of the reasons for these variations. To date, the views of health professionals across relevant disciplines who deliver such care are largely absent. The present study describes Australian health professionals' views about barriers to lung cancer care to help build a research and action agenda for improving lung cancer outcomes. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a multidisciplinary group of 31 Australian health professionals working in lung cancer care for an average of 16 years (range 1-35 yrs.; SD = 10.2) seeing a mean of 116 patients annually. Three superordinate themes were identified: illness representations, cultural influences, and health system context. Illness representations included three themes: symptoms attributed as smoking-related but not cancer, health-related stigma, and therapeutic nihilism. Cultural influence themes included Indigenous health care preferences, language and communication, and sociodemographic factors. Health system context included lack of regional services and distance to treatment, poor care coordination, lack of effective screening methods, and health professional behaviours. Fractured and locally isolated approaches routinely confound responses to the social, cultural and health system complexities that surround a diagnosis of lung cancer and subsequent treatment. Improving outcomes for this disadvantaged patient group will require government, health agencies, and the community to take an aggressive, integrated approach balancing health policy, treatment priorities, and societal values.

  10. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment......, as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory...

  11. Is admittance to specialised palliative care among cancer patients related to sex, age and cancer diagnosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adsersen, Mathilde; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-01-01

    /units. Patients with brain cancer were more often admitted to hospices, whereas patients with prostate cancer were more often admitted to hospital-based palliative care teams/units. CONCLUSION: It is unlikely that the variations in relation to sex, age and cancer diagnoses can be fully explained by differences...... to investigate whether cancer patients' admittance to SPC in Denmark varied in relation to sex, age and diagnosis, and whether the patterns differed by type of institution (hospital-based palliative care team/unit, hospice, or both). METHODS: This was a register-based study of adult patients living in Denmark...... who died from cancer in 2010-2012. Data sources were the Danish Palliative Care Database, Danish Register of Causes of Death and Danish Cancer Registry. The associations between the explanatory variables (sex, age, diagnosis) and admittance to SPC were investigated using logistic regression. RESULTS...

  12. Social objectives in cancer care: the example of palliative day care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, M

    2006-12-01

    Social objectives are poorly specified and evaluated in cancer care. Palliative day care is an example where social objectives are often identified but research has focused on health-care outcomes. A literature review identifies four types of social objective: emotional and spiritual care, general social care, services for families and carers and creative arts. Social objectives include: distinguishing between therapeutic work and leisure and supportive interventions, promoting service continuity, reducing social isolation, increasing social interaction, reassuring introduction to palliative care, rehearsal of reactions to illness with a sympathetic audience, integration of families and carers into care services, respite for carers and creative work for three separable objectives. It is argued that interventions to achieve social objectives may be defined and evaluated in a measurable way. Similarly, social objectives and interventions can be specified at other stages in the cancer journey.

  13. Supportive Care Needs and Association With Quality of Life of Mexican Adults With Solid Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Casales-Hernández, Maria Guadalupe; Perez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2017-04-20

    Patients with cancer have supportive care needs. Studies that analyze the relationship between supportive care needs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are scarce. Cultural differences in supportive care needs and perceived QoL are also worth analyzing. The aim of this study was to assess the association between supportive care needs and HRQoL of Mexican adults given a diagnosis of solid cancers. We performed a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 825 adult patients with cancer treated at the Oncology Hospital of the Mexican Institute of Social Security. The QLQ-30 from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer served to measure HRQoL, and the Supportive Care Needs Questionnaire was used to ascertain the needs. The analysis included multiple linear regression models for each HRQoL domain controlled for demographic, clinical, and social support covariates. There was an association between psychological needs with low scores in the HRQoL domains of global health, emotional functioning, and increased fatigue. Physical and daily living needs were associated with most HRQoL domains except the emotional domain. Patient care needs were related to low scores in the emotional and social functioning domains. Health systems and information needs were associated with low scores on cognitive functioning. Physical, psychological, patient care, and informational needs were associated with decreased HRQoL of Mexican patients with cancer. Healthcare providers, including nurses, are encouraged to perform routine, comprehensive evaluations of the supportive care needs and HRQoL of patients with solid cancers to respond in a timely manner to their needs.

  14. Stress among care givers: The impact of nursing a relative with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the present study is to assess the level and areas of stress among care givers nursing their loved ones suffering from cancer. Setting and Design: An assessment of care givers′ stress providing care to cancer patients at Cipla Palliative Care Center was conducted. The study involves data collection using a questionnaire and subsequent analysis. Materials and Methods: A close-ended questionnaire that had seven sections on different aspects of caregivers′ stress was developed and administered to 137 participants and purpose of conducting the survey was explained to their understanding. Caregivers who were willing to participate were asked to read and/or explained the questions and requested to reply as per the scales given. Data was collected in the questionnaires and was quantitatively analyzed. Results: The study results showed that overall stress level among caregivers is 5.18 ± 0.26 (on a scale of 0-10; of the total, nearly 62% of caregivers were ready to ask for professional help from nurses, medical social workers and counselors to cope up with their stress. Conclusion: Stress among caregivers ultimately affects quality of care that is being provided to the patient. This is also because they are unprepared to provide care, have inadequate knowledge about care giving along with financial burden, physical and emotional stress. Thus interventions are needed to help caregivers to strengthen their confidence in giving care and come out with better quality of care.

  15. Genetic toxicology and cancer risk assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choy, Wai Nang

    2001-01-01

    ... their risks to humans are obvious goals for the protection of public health. When exposure is unavoidable, an accurate estimation of human risk as a result of exposure is essential for making regulatory decisions. Quantitative cancer risk assessment is an intricate process that utilizes knowledge from many different scien...

  16. Assessment of fatigue in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    Increased recognition of the problem of fatigue in cancer patients can be attributed, in part, to the development of measures that have provided researchers with the tools necessary for quantifying and characterizing fatigue and exploring its etiology and treatment. Although a consensus regarding the definition of fatigue is lacking, there is general agreement that it is a subjective and multidimensional phenomenon whose assessment requires the use of self-report methods. Consistent with this view, several multidimensional measures of fatigue have been developed and validated for use with cancer patients. These measures differ considerably in their format and content and, as with the definition of fatigue, there is no consensus at the present time regarding the dimensional structure of fatigue. In addition to measuring fatigue on a continuum along one or more dimensions, it may also be possible to assess a clinical syndrome of cancer-related fatigue. Criteria for assessing fatigue in this manner have been proposed and are currently undergoing evaluation. Despite the progress that has been made, there are several important unresolved issues in the assessment of fatigue in cancer patients. These include how to distinguish fatigue from depression, how to use self-reports of fatigue in clinical decision-making, how to capture temporal changes in fatigue, and how best to address the continuing lack of consensus regarding the conceptualization and measurement of fatigue.

  17. Prostate Cancer Mortality-To-Incidence Ratios Are Associated with Cancer Care Disparities in 35 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Lang; Wang, Shao-Chuan; Ho, Cheng-Ju; Kao, Yu-Lin; Hsieh, Tzuo-Yi; Chen, Wen-Jung; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Pei-Ru; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Lee, Huei; Sung, Wen-Wei

    2017-01-04

    The variation in mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) among countries reflects the clinical outcomes and the available interventions for colorectal cancer treatments. The association between MIR of prostate cancer and cancer care disparities among countries is an interesting issue that is rarely investigated. For the present study, cancer incidence and mortality rates were obtained from the GLOBOCAN 2012 database. The rankings and total expenditures on health of various countries were obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO). The association between variables was analyzed by linear regression analyses. In this study, we estimated the role of MIRs from 35 countries that had a prostate cancer incidence greater than 5,000 cases per year. As expected, high prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates were observed in more developed regions, such as Europe and the Americas. However, the MIRs were 2.5 times higher in the less developed regions. Regarding the association between MIR and cancer care disparities, countries with good WHO ranking and high total expenditures on health/gross domestic product (GDP) were significant correlated with low MIR. The MIR variation for prostate cancer correlates with cancer care disparities among countries further support the role of cancer care disparities in clinical outcome.

  18. Caring for cancer patients with an intellectual disability: Attitudes and care perceptions of UK oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Samantha; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Bramwell, Ros; Stevens-Gill, Debbie; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Caring for people with cancer or an intellectual disability (ID) is stressful: little is known about the combined impact of caring for cancer patients with an ID, though this is expected to be especially challenging. Eighty-three nurses, working in oncology or a related field (i.e. palliative care) were recruited. Perceptions of caring for patients with and without an ID were measured, alongside potentially confounding information about participant demographic characteristics and perceived stress. Participants felt less comfortable communicating with patients with an ID about their illness (F(1,82) = 59.52, p cancer patients with an ID may intensify this, already difficult, role. Through training and knowledge exchange, oncology nurse's confidence in communication, providing appropriate care, and positivity towards this patient group may be improved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Palliative Care in Iran: Moving Toward the Development of Palliative Care for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassouli, Maryam; Sajjadi, Moosa

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is the third leading cause of death in Iran and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. Patients' quality of life is altered rather enormously due to cancer, which doubles the importance of and the need for providing palliative care in Iran. Although many steps have been taken toward the development and providing of palliative care in Iran, there is still a large gap between the status quo and the desirable state. This study presents the current state of palliative care for cancer patients and discusses the barriers, challenges and outlook of palliative care in Iran. If infrastructural projects that have recently been launched prove successful, proper advancement toward the providing of palliative care services in Iran will then not far on the horizon. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Quality of care: Distress, health care use and needs of women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, D.N.N.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to: (1) examine enduring distress and its predictors in women with breast cancer; (2) determine the extent to which distress-related problems are portrayed in a graphic novel about breast cancer; (3) examine health care use and additional needs (with regard to medical,

  1. Prostate cancer in primary care, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bock-Oruma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Prostate cancer (PC is under-researched in primary care settings in the developing world, and diagnostic modalities available to the primary care physician could limit the making of the diagnosis, thus affecting the prevalence. Aims: This study aims to determine the prevalence of prostate cancer in patients that presented with LUTS to a family medicine clinic, using the screening tools (DRE and PSA available in the facility. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study of middle-aged and elderly men that presented to the Family Medicine Clinic, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria, with LUTS. Materials and Methods: Consenting and eligible males that presented to the Family Medicine Clinic with LUTS were assessed for prostate cancer using the PSA and digital rectal examination (DRE between October 2010 and April 2012. Data were entered and analyzed using the statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS version 16.0. Association between the variables was compared using chi-Square test with statistical significance set at P < 0.05. Results: Two hundred and ninety subjects participated in the study; the mean age of the subjects was 62.50 ± 11.66 years with an age range of 40 to 100 years. The prevalence for DRE-detected abnormal prostate was 13%, suggestive of PC. One hundred and sixty-one (55.5% of the subjects had their PSA done and results retrieved, with 51.6% of them having PSA values within the normal range of 0-4 ng/ml, and 48.4% had PSA values outside the normal limits. An association of PSA and DRE gave 24.2% prevalence for probable PC and a significant association between elevated PSA and DRE. Conclusion: The diagnostic modality in study is inconclusive, but it offers the family physician the opportunity of improving the quality of life of the patient that presented to him with PC by initiating early referral for secondary care.

  2. The Acute Care Assessment Tool: 'Pharmacy ACAT'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubraj, Barry; Patel, Sheena; Naseem, Iram; Copp, Samantha; Karagkounis, Dimitrios

    2017-06-01

    The Acute Care Assessment Tool (ACAT) was developed as a workplace-based assessment (WPBA) for trainee performance whilst working in acute medicine. Here, we discuss the multi-professional potential of ACAT through a pilot with foundation and senior hospital pharmacists. The pharmacy profession is engaging meaningfully with foundation training for pharmacists akin to doctor foundation training, and has launched a post-foundation recognition scheme as a route to advanced generalist or specialist practice. Foundation training has included the adoption of familiar WPBA, such as the mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) and case-based discussion (CbD). However, mini-CEX and CbD are 'snapshot' assessments, and we identified a need for the assessment of practice over a short period of time. A local director of medical education suggested ACAT. We identified a need for the assessment of practice over a short period of time INNOVATION: Permission was gained from the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians to adapt the ACAT to form the 'Pharmacy ACAT'. Adaptations were based on the two current Royal Pharmaceutical Society competency frameworks used for foundation and post-foundation practice. The 'Pharmacy ACAT' was piloted across three acute hospitals (known as 'Trusts') in London for foundation trainees, and was found to be broadly acceptable in terms of time and was valued for feedback, particularly for foundation pharmacy trainees. Senior pharmacists at the single pilot site were more sceptical. We believe that the 'Pharmacy ACAT' should be considered for routine use in pharmacy foundation training in hospital and community practice as it 'plugs a gap' in the current scheme of WPBA, by allowing the assessment of a short period of practice as opposed to a snapshot. It also has potential for use at undergraduate level. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Regarding Cervical Cancer and Screening among Haitian Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilah Zahedi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that Haiti has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in the Western Hemisphere. There are currently no sustainable and affordable cervical cancer screening programs in Haiti. The current status of screening services and knowledge of health care professionals was assessed through a Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices survey on cervical cancer screening and prevention. It was distributed to Project Medishare for Haiti health care workers (n = 27 in the Central Plateau. The majority (22/27 of participants stated pre-cancerous cells could be detected through screening, however, only four had ever performed a pap smear. All of the participants felt a screening program should be started in their area. Our data establishes that knowledge is fairly lacking among healthcare workers and there is an opportunity to train them in simple, cost effective “screen-and-treat” programs that could have a great impact on the overall health of the population.

  4. Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding cervical cancer and screening among Haitian health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Leilah; Sizemore, Emma; Malcolm, Stuart; Grossniklaus, Emily; Nwosu, Oguchi

    2014-11-10

    It is estimated that Haiti has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in the Western Hemisphere. There are currently no sustainable and affordable cervical cancer screening programs in Haiti. The current status of screening services and knowledge of health care professionals was assessed through a Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices survey on cervical cancer screening and prevention. It was distributed to Project Medishare for Haiti health care workers (n = 27) in the Central Plateau. The majority (22/27) of participants stated pre-cancerous cells could be detected through screening, however, only four had ever performed a pap smear. All of the participants felt a screening program should be started in their area. Our data establishes that knowledge is fairly lacking among healthcare workers and there is an opportunity to train them in simple, cost effective "screen-and-treat" programs that could have a great impact on the overall health of the population.

  5. Burnout and the provision of psychosocial care amongst Australian cancer nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmillan, Kirsty; Butow, Phyllis; Turner, Jane; Yates, Patsy; White, Kate; Lambert, Sylvie; Stephens, Moira; Lawsin, Catalina

    2016-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of burnout amongst Australian cancer nurses as well as investigate the systemic and individual factors associated with burnout, including training and supervision for nurses in psychosocial care. Burnout amongst cancer nurses can have serious consequences for the individual nurse, the hospital and patients. Psychosocial care has been demonstrated in many studies to reduce distress in cancer patients; however, previous studies have suggested that providing psychosocial care can be stressful if nurses feel they lack appropriate training. Psychosocial skill training and supervision may be a way of improving job satisfaction and reducing burnout amongst nurses. Two hundred and thirty cancer nurses were recruited between November 2010 and April 2011 and completed an online questionnaire. Burnout levels within this population were found to be below nursing norms. Adequacy of training and supervision, frequency of supervision and percentage of role spent managing psychosocial care were found to be associated with burnout. Workload, Control, Reward and Community were independent predictors of burnout, and nurses with a greater mismatch in these areas identified as having High levels of burnout. Strategies to reduce burnout include providing cancer nurses with a varied and sustainable workload, awarding financial and social recognition of efforts and encouraging nurses to develop a sense of control over their work. Providing regular training and supervision in psychosocial care that is perceived to be adequate may also assist in reducing burnout. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Creating a culture of compassion: developing supportive care for people with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alison

    2004-12-01

    Receiving the 2003 Distinguished Merit Award from the European Oncology Nursing Society is a great moment in my professional career. It is also a time for reflection. We can easily become immersed in the specifics of our work and forget the larger picture. An opportunity such as this allows me to step back, reflect and review what I have accomplished. It also challenges me to think about the totality of cancer nursing and cancer care, look at where we have been and about where we should be going. At the heart of this lies the concept of supportive care. I would like to consider three pertinent areas. First, I will define what I consider the domain of supportive care in cancer to be. Second, I will look at what is needed to further supportive care for people with cancer. This involves building the discipline of more rigorous symptom assessment and documentation; better management of the symptoms and concerns that confront people with cancer; moving beyond the traditional framework of treatment and care, embracing a more integrated approach; addressing quality whilst at the same expediting the delivery of supportive care services. Third, I would like to consider the challenges to reform that this presents for cancer nursing and cancer nurses. A road map for change will be presented which highlights both the necessity to promote a supportive care culture whilst simultaneously building a dedicated infrastructure of staff and services. Nurses must play a key role in supportive care. Because of our unique clinical and research base, we are primed to assume leadership roles in both these spheres. Mutual valuing, partnership and shared working are the only means of delivering enhanced cancer care. We should grasp opportunities, confident that together we have the skills and knowledge to move forward. Today is yesterday's tomorrow. We cannot do anything about yesterday, but we can do something about today to ensure tomorrow is how we want it to be. We can become what we

  7. Knowledge and attitudes toward palliative terminal cancer care among Thai generalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budkaew, Jiratha; Chumworathayi, Bandit

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the knowledge and attitudes of Thai generalists (general physicians) toward palliative terminal cancer care (PC) in a primary care setting. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire. The total number of completed and returned questionnaires was 63, giving a 56% response rate. Data analysis was based on these (Cronbach's alpha=0.82) and percentages and mean values were assessed using the Fisher's exact test to determine the correlation of variables. Overall, attitude and knowledge levels were slightly satisfactory. Results indicated that general physicians had moderate scores in both attitudes (84.1%) and knowledge (55.7%) regarding palliative terminal cancer care. However, they had insufficient knowledge regarding truth telling, pain control and management with morphine, emergency management in terminal cancer care and treatment of fluid intake in terminal stages. Attitude and knowledge scores were statistically correlated (p=0.036). Knowledge scores were further positively associated with being taught palliative care in their medical curriculum (p=0.042). Formal education in palliative care and development of palliative care services are very much needed in Thailand to provide holistic care to terminally ill patients.

  8. A Rapid Access Clinic to improve delivery of ambulatory care to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, James C; De Silva, Madhawa; Diwakarla, Chandra; Yip, Desmond

    2017-06-01

    Cancer patients may find it challenging to access timely advice and care. We evaluated the improvement in delivering ambulatory care in establishing a Rapid Assessment Clinic (RAC) in a cancer center. Patients receiving chemotherapy who presented for assessment at the RAC from September 2013 to June 2014 were included for review. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, presenting complaints, time to assessment, total time spent at the RAC and assessment outcome were extracted. Similar data for cancer patients presented to the emergency department (ED) but were appropriate for RAC assessment from February 2012 to August 2012 were reviewed for comparison. For patients with febrile neutropenia, time to empirical antibiotic therapy was also reviewed and analyzed. Comparing to ED presentation (n = 152), patients reviewed at the RAC (n = 217) had a shorter waiting time to medical review (28.5 vs 40 min, P = 0.12), shorter total time spent for review (3.1 vs 9.7 hrs, P care, resulting in a lower rate of hospital admission and inpatient length of stay for cancer patients. There was, however, no difference in the management of febrile neutropenia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Primary care physician compliance with colorectal cancer screening guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Martz, William D; Ashbeck, Erin L; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Thompson, Patricia A; Martínez, María Elena

    2011-09-01

    To assess self-reported compliance to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines among primary care physicians (PCPs) and to assess physician and practice characteristics associated with reported compliance. Survey data from 984 PCPs in Arizona were used. Self-reported CRC screening practices, recommendations, and compliance with guidelines were assessed. Physician and practice characteristics associated with guideline compliance were also evaluated. While 77.5% of physicians reported using national screening guidelines, only 51.7% reported recommendations consistent with the guidelines. Younger physicians were significantly more likely to report compliance with screening guidelines (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.07-2.10) as were female clinicians (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.11-1.92). Physicians practicing in solo (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.19-0.58), group (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.21-0.62), or community health centers (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.17-0.81) were significantly less likely to report following guidelines as compared to those in academic practice. Guideline compliance was higher for fecal occult blood test (FOBT) (65.0%) than colonoscopy (56.7%); overuse of screening for these modalities was reported among 34.4% of physicians. PCPs are not adequately following CRC screening guidelines. Further studies are needed to clarify the reasons for this lack of compliance, especially as guidelines become more complex.

  10. Are patients willing to travel for better ovarian cancer care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalowitz, David I; Nivasch, Esther; Burger, Robert A; Schapira, Marilyn M

    2018-01-01

    Improved outcomes realized by patients treated at high-volume institutions have led to a call for centralization of ovarian cancer care. However, it is unknown whether centralization respects patients' preferences regarding treatment location. This study's objective was to determine how patients balance survival benefit against the burdens of travel to a distant treatment center. Patients presenting for evaluation of adnexal masses completed two discrete choice experiments (DCEs) assessing 1) the 5-year survival benefit required to justify 50miles of additional travel, and 2) the additional distance patients would travel for a 6% 5-year survival benefit. Demographic data were collected with measures of health numeracy, social support, and comfort with travel. t-Tests were performed to test for significant differences between group means. 81% (50/62) of participants required a 5-year survival benefit of ≤6% to justify 50miles of additional travel (DCE#1). These participants were less likely to be employed (56% vs 83%, p=0.05) and more likely to rate their health as good to excellent (86% vs 50%, p=0.04) than those requiring >6% benefit to travel 50miles. 80% (44/55) of participants would travel ≥50miles for a set 5-year survival benefit of 6% (DCE#2). No association was identified in DCE#2 between willingness to travel and collected sociodemographic covariates. 1 in 5 patients with ovarian cancer may prefer not to travel to a referral center, even when aware of the survival benefits of doing so. Policymakers should consider patients' travel preferences in designing referral structures for care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  12. Capacity for Cancer Care Delivery Research in National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program Community Practices: Availability of Radiology and Primary Care Research Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Ruth C; Sicks, JoRean D; Chang, George J; Lyss, Alan P; Stewart, Teresa L; Sung, Lillian; Weaver, Kathryn E

    2017-12-01

    Cancer care spans the spectrum from screening and diagnosis through therapy and into survivorship. Delivering appropriate care requires patient transitions across multiple specialties, such as primary care, radiology, and oncology. From the program's inception, the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites were tasked with conducting cancer care delivery research (CCDR) that evaluates structural, organizational, and social factors, including care transitions that determine patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the capacity of the NCORP to conduct multidisciplinary CCDR that includes radiology and primary care practices. The NCORP includes 34 community and 12 minority and underserved community sites. The Landscape Capacity Assessment was conducted in 2015 across these 46 sites, composed of the 401 components and subcomponents designated to conduct CCDR. Each respondent had the opportunity to designate an operational practice group, defined as a group of components and subcomponents with common care practices and resources. The primary outcomes were the proportion of adult oncology practice groups with affiliated radiology and primary care practices. The secondary outcomes were the proportion of those affiliated radiology and primary care groups that participate in research. Eighty-seven percent of components and subcomponents responded to at least some portion of the assessment, representing 230 practice groups. Analyzing the 201 adult oncology practice groups, 85% had affiliated radiologists, 69% of whom participate in research. Seventy-nine percent had affiliated primary care practitioners, 31% of whom participate in research. Institutional size, multidisciplinary group practice, and ownership by large regional or multistate health systems was associated with research participation by affiliated radiology and primary care groups. Research participation by these affiliated specialists was not significantly

  13. Singing and Vocal Interventions in Palliative and Cancer Care: Music Therapists' Perceptions of Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements-Cortés, Amy

    2017-11-01

    Music therapists in palliative and cancer care settings often use singing and vocal interventions. Although benefits for these interventions are emerging, more information is needed on what type of singing interventions are being used by credentialed music therapists, and what goal areas are being addressed. To assess music therapists' perceptions on how they use singing and vocal interventions in palliative and cancer care environments. Eighty credentialed music therapists from Canada and the United States participated in this two-part convergent mixed-methods study that began with an online survey, followed by individual interviews with 50% (n = 40) of the survey participants. In both palliative and cancer care, singing client-preferred music and singing for relaxation were the most frequently used interventions. In palliative care, the most commonly addressed goals were to increase self-expression, improve mood, and create a feeling of togetherness between individuals receiving palliative care and their family. In cancer care, the most commonly addressed goals were to support breathing, improve mood, and support reminiscence. Seven themes emerged from therapist interviews: containing the space, connection, soothing, identity, freeing the voice within, letting go, and honoring. Music therapists use singing to address the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual goals of patients, and described singing interventions as accessible and effective. Further research is recommended to examine intervention efficacy and identify factors responsible that contribute to clinical benefit.

  14. A Pilot Trial of Early Specialty Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Challenges Encountered and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Yael; Bahary, Nathan; Claxton, Rene; Childers, Julie; Chu, Edward; Kavalieratos, Dio; King, Linda; Lembersky, Barry; Tiver, Greer; Arnold, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer suffer from high morbidity and mortality. Specialty palliative care may improve quality of life. Assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of early specialty physician-led palliative care for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and their caregivers. A mixed-methods pilot randomized controlled trial in which patient-caregiver pairs were randomized (2:1) to receive specialty palliative care, in addition to standard oncology care versus standard oncology care alone. At a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in Western Pennsylvania, 30 patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma and their caregivers (N = 30), oncologists (N = 4), and palliative care physicians (N = 3) participated. Feasibility (enrollment, three-month outcome-assessment, and intervention completion rates), acceptability, and perceived effectiveness (process interviews with patients, caregivers, and physicians). Consent:approach rate was 49%, randomized:consent rate 55%, and three-month outcome assessment rate 75%. Two patients and three caregivers withdrew early. The three-month mortality rate was 13%. Patients attended a mean of 1.3 (standard deviation 1.1) palliative care visits during the three-month period. Positive experiences with palliative care included receiving emotional support and symptom management. Negative experiences included inconvenience, long travel times, spending too much time at the cancer center, and no perceived palliative care needs. Physicians suggested embedding palliative care within oncology clinics, tailoring services to patient needs, and facilitating face-to-face communication between oncologists and palliative physicians. A randomized trial of early palliative care for advanced pancreatic cancer did not achieve feasibility goals. Integrating palliative care within oncology clinics may increase acceptability and perceived effectiveness.

  15. Ophthalmic Skills Assessment of Primary Health Care Workers at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary eye care is at the frontline in the elimina on of the avoidable causes of blindness. Proficiency in the basic ophthalmic skills is a cri cal factor in the effec ve delivery of eye care services at the primary level of care. The aim of the study was to assess the ability of the primary health care workers to provide basic.

  16. Breast Cancer Diagnosed During Pregnancy: Adapting Recent Advances in Breast Cancer Care for Pregnant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Sibylle; Schmidt, André; Gentilini, Oreste; Kaufman, Bella; Kuhl, Christine; Denkert, Carsten; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Parokonnaya, Anastasia; Stensheim, Hanne; Thomssen, Christoph; van Calsteren, Kristel; Poortmans, Philip; Berveiller, Paul; Markert, Udo R; Amant, Frederic

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer during pregnancy (BCP), although rare, is becoming more common and treatment should be as similar as possible to that for nonpregnant young patients with breast cancer. A group of specialists convened to review current guidelines and provide guidance on how recent advances in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment can be adapted for pregnant patients. The majority of patients with BCP will be considered for treatment during the pregnancy. Premature delivery should be avoided whenever possible. Most treatments, including sentinel lymph node biopsy, systemic therapy with taxanes, platinum agents, or dose-dense treatment can be safely given during pregnancy, after careful risk/benefit assessment for mother and child. Chemotherapy is contraindicated during the first trimester because of a higher risk of fetal malformations but is feasible in the second and third trimesters. Other treatments such as radiation therapy or anti-human epidermal growth receptor 2 treatment are in general not indicated during pregnancy but might be considered in some instances. Patient data should be collected in a systematic way whenever possible.

  17. The Nursing Dimension of Providing Palliative Care to Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharron L. Docherty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer includes interventions that focus on the relief of suffering, optimization of function, and improvement of quality of life at any and all stages of disease. This care is most effectively provided by a multidisciplinary team. Nurses perform an integral role on that team by identifying symptoms, providing care coordination, and assuring clear communication. Several basic tenets appear essential to the provision of optimal palliative care. First, palliative care should be administered concurrently with curative therapy beginning at diagnosis and assuming a more significant role at end of life. This treatment approach, recommended by many medical societies, has been associated with numerous benefits including longer survival. Second, realistic, objective goals of care must be developed. A clear understanding of the prognosis by the patient, family, and all members of the medical team is essential to the development of these goals. The pediatric oncology nurse is pivotal in developing these goals and assuring that they are adhered to across all specialties. Third, effective therapies to prevent and relieve the symptoms of suffering must be provided. This can only be accomplished with accurate and repeated assessments. The pediatric oncology nurse is vital in providing these assessments and must possess a working knowledge of the most common symptoms associated with suffering. With a basic understanding of these palliative care principles and competency in the core skills required for this care, the pediatric oncology nurse will optimize quality of life for children and adolescents with cancer.

  18. Challenges faced by palliative care physicians when caring for doctors with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S I R; Nelson, A; Finlay, I G

    2008-01-01

    It is possible that patients with advanced cancer, who are from the medical profession, have different or additional care needs than other patients. Previous training, professional experiences and access to information and services may influence their needs and subsequent illness behaviour. Caring for ;one of our own' may also evoke particular feelings and emotions from health professionals involved in their care and pose unique challenges in the delivery of equitable patient-centred care. To explore the experiences of palliative care physicians when caring for members of the medical profession with advanced incurable cancer. Semi-structured interviews exploring the experiences of senior palliative care physicians were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) for emergent themes. Data were collected from ten senior palliative care physicians with a combined total of 107 years of palliative care career experience, caring for a reported combined estimate of 120 doctor-patients. On the basis of their reflections, palliative care physicians reported that doctor-patients appear to find it difficult to assume a patient role, especially at a time they are likely to be truly vulnerable. This patient group will routinely attempt to maintain control of their care and environment using various strategies. These include self-referrals, accessing their own tests, directing the consultation and putting barriers up to psychosocial aspects of palliative care. Doctor-patients' general practitioners are at risk of exclusion from the management of care, and referral to palliative care services appears to occur later in the illness journey of doctor-patients compared to lay patients. Participants recalled how caring for colleagues evokes powerful emotional responses, such as a strong desire to provide the best care possible as well as feelings of anxiety. They frequently find themselves under pressure to disclose

  19. original article assessment of quality of care delivered for infectious

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    evaluate over all quality of TB care. Operational definition of quality of care, data collection and analysis. Three dimensions of quality of TB care; structure, process and outcome were assessed. The instruments used to assess structure- process- out come dimension were developed from published literature (8) and modified ...

  20. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  1. The Future of LGBT Cancer Care: Practice and Research Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, David; Schabath, Matthew B

    2018-02-01

    To synthesize state of the knowledge collected in this volume and propose future directions for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer practice, education, research, and advocacy. Current and extant literature. Health care disparities that are known but not yet fully elucidated in the LGBT population carry into the cancer arena. Substantially more effort is required in the domains of patient care, nursing practice, nursing and patient-facing services provider education, patient education, nursing and interprofessional research, governmental commitment, professional organization action, and patient advocacy. Professional nurses are committed to the uniqueness of each individual and respect and value the health and well-being of each individual. To that commitment, oncology nurses are positioned to advance the research in the field, which will help to clarify the issues and concerns related to LGBT cancer, address the health care inequities in this important population, and lead to improved outcomes for all. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Teleoncology: current and future applications for improving cancer care globally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazin, Ribhi; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2010-02-01

    Access to quality cancer care is often unavailable in low-income and middle-income countries, and also in rural or remote areas of high-income countries. Teleoncology-oncology applications of medical telecommunications, including pathology, radiology, and other related disciplines-has the potential to enhance access to and quality of clinical cancer care, and to improve education and training. Implementation of teleoncology in the developing world requires an approach tailored to priorities, resources, and needs. Teleoncology can best achieve its proposed goals through consistent and long-term application. We review teleoncology initiatives that have the potential to decrease cancer-care inequality between resource-poor and resource-rich institutions and offer guidelines for the development of teleoncology programmes in low-income and middle-income countries. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Engagement and experience with cancer-related follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancer after transfer to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalda, Dava; Pierce, Lisa; Hobbie, Wendy; Ginsberg, Jill P; Brumley, Lauren; Wasik, Monika; Li, Yimei; Schwartz, Lisa A

    2016-04-01

    Young adult survivors (YAS) of childhood cancer require annual adult-focused, cancer-related follow-up given their risk for late effects of treatment. This study describes perception of and engagement with adult-focused, cancer-related follow-up care and general health care among YAS formally transferred to adult care from pediatric survivorship care. YAS transferred from pediatric survivorship care in the prior 1-5 years completed measures indicating engagement with cancer-related follow-up care, other health care utilization, content of communication by providers, quality of cancer-related care, and satisfaction with health care in the prior year. Eighty YAS (M age = 27.7 years, M time since diagnosis = 10.4 years) participated. Just over half of YAS surveyed (n = 44, 55%) endorsed continuing cancer-related follow-up care since transfer. Those with cancer-related follow-up endorsed seeing subspecialty survivorship providers (n = 16, 44%) and primary care providers (n = 22, 50%) or utilizing a shared care model (n = 6, 14%). About a third of YAS endorsed seeing subspecialists (n = 29, 36%) or using other support services (n = 22, 27%). YAS-perceived content of communication varied significantly depending on care model with less cancer-related content being discussed by primary care providers, though perceived quality of cancer-related care and satisfaction with health care was generally favorable. YAS report less than optimal engagement in cancer-related follow-up care and communication in their health care encounters. Young adult survivors should receive anticipatory guidance about expectations for delivery and content of adult-focused cancer-related follow-up care.

  4. Developing cancer services strategy in primary care in England: primary care trust managers' views of the primary care cancer leads initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, Brenda; Heywood, Phil; Allgar, Victoria; Walker, Reg; Darr, Aamra; Din, Ikhlaq

    2006-01-01

    Primary care cancer lead clinicians (PCCLs) act strategically in primary care trusts (PCTs) in England to improve communication and understanding of cancer across primary and secondary care and provide a link between Cancer Networks and primary care. The aim is to evaluate the first three years of the initiative. A postal questionnaire was sent to all PCT chief executives in all PCTs in England and some were passed on to other PCT managers for completion. The response rate was 61 per cent. PCT directors of public health were the largest group of respondents (29 per cent). Most (74 per cent) PCCLs were GPs and 22 per cent were nurses. PCCLs were most likely to focus on palliative care and preventive services. Key achievements were identified as raising awareness of cancer, developing relationships and promoting primary care. The personal skills of the PCCLs were important as was support of colleagues at all levels. Lack of time was a major barrier to achievement, as was a lack of understanding of the role from others. Links with the Cancer Networks were being developed. About 85 per cent of managers wanted the role to continue. The paper illustrates that PCCLs are at the forefront of improving cancer services in primary care. They are particularly important in view of the priority of reducing premature deaths and promotion of healthy lifestyles.

  5. Young adult cancer survivors' follow-up care expectations of oncologists and primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh-Yeun, Kiara; Kumar, Divjot; Moghaddamjou, Ali; Ruan, Jenny Y; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-06-01

    Young adult cancer survivors face unique challenges associated with their illness. While both oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) may be involved in the follow-up care of these cancer survivors, we hypothesized that there is a lack of clarity regarding each physician's roles and responsibilities. A self-administered survey was mailed to young adult cancer survivors in British Columbia, Canada, who were aged 20 to 39 years at the time of diagnosis and alive at 2 to 5 years following the diagnosis to capture their expectations of oncologists and PCPs in various important domains of cancer survivorship care. Multivariate logistic regression models that adjusted for confounders were constructed to examine for predictors of the different expectations. Of 722 young cancer survivors surveyed, 426 (59%) responded. Among them, the majority were White women with breast cancer. Oncologists were expected to follow the patient's most recent cancer and treatment-related side effects while PCPs were expected to manage ongoing and future cancer surveillance as well as general preventative care. Neither physician was perceived to be responsible for addressing the return to daily activities, reintegration to interpersonal relationships, or sexual function. Older survivors were significantly less likely to expect oncologists (p = 0.03) and PCPs (p = 0.01) to discuss family planning when compared to their younger counterparts. Those who were White were significantly more likely to expect PCPs to discuss comorbidities (p = 0.009) and preventative care (p = 0.001). Young adult cancer survivors have different expectations of oncologists and PCPs with respect to their follow-up care. Physicians need to better clarify their roles in order to further improve the survivorship phase of cancer care for young adults. Young adult cancer survivors have different expectations of their oncologists and PCPs. Clarification of the roles of each physician group during follow-up can

  6. Play as a care strategy for children with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Kálya Yasmine Nunes de; Santos, Viviane Euzébia Pereira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To understand the influence of play in the care process as perceived by children with cancer. METHOD: A descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study conducted in a children's cancer unit in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Data were collected between October 2013 and January 2014 by means of photographic records and semi-structured interviews with eight children, and content analysis with emphasis on two categories: Auxiliary instruments during play; and The influence of play ...

  7. Distress, delay of gratification and preference for palliative care in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James; Asvat, Yasmin; Lattie, Emily; O'Mahony, Sean; Duberstein, Paul; Hoerger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Patient-centered cancer care standards include routine psychosocial distress screening and referral for supportive care services. Although many cancer patients report psychosocial distress that could be alleviated by supportive services including palliative care, patients often decline such services for reasons that are poorly understood. Research on decision-making suggests that during periods of acute distress, individuals have more difficulty prioritizing long-term over immediate gains. Thus, distressed cancer patients may prioritize immediate gains (e.g., avoidance of palliative care discussions in the moment) over longer-term gains (e.g., improved quality of life in the future). This study investigated the associations between psychosocial distress, difficulties with delay of gratification (tendency to prioritize short-term over longer-term gains), and preference for palliative care in a sample of 212 men with a history of prostate cancer (94% white men and 27% advanced stage, age M = 62, SD = 8). It was hypothesized that psychosocial distress would be associated with lower preferences for palliative care, and this association would be explained, in part, by difficulty delaying gratification. Self-report measures included the depression anxiety stress scales, delay of gratification inventory, and ratings on an item assessing preferences for palliative care. Consistent with the hypothesis, mediation models confirmed that the association of psychosocial distress with lower preference for palliative care was mediated by delay of gratification. Findings suggest that distressed prostate cancer patients may benefit from additional support managing the emotional aspects of medical decisions and weighing immediate versus delayed outcomes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Assessment of parents' perception of quality of pediatric oncology inpatient care at Kenyatta National Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Mmbone Keiza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adequate knowledge of parents' perception of quality of pediatric cancer care helps to identify the areas of care improvement which would contribute to disease outcome in regard to the quality of life and satisfaction with the care provided. The aim of the study was to assess the parents' perception of the quality of Pediatric Oncology Inpatient Care at Kenyatta National Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative and qualitative study was undertaken using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire and a focused group discussion guide. Assessment of parents' perception of quality of care was done in relation to the institution's structures and care delivery processes. These included the ward environment, resources for cancer treatment, care processes, service providers, and parents' knowledge empowerment. Participants were systematically selected. Parents' perception was defined as satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the care provided. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. and presented as frequencies and percentages. Chi-square was used to test the significant association between variables. Level of significance was set at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: A total of 107 respondents were interviewed and 57.9% were satisfied with the overall quality of care they received. The determinants of overall satisfaction in this study were found to be related to resources for cancer treatment (odds ratio [OR] =3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.39–6.90; P = 0.005, care delivery processes (OR = 2.87; 95% CI = 1.28–6.43; P = 0.009, and the ward environment (OR = 2.59; 95% CI = 1.17–5.74; P = 0.018. Conclusions: The parents were moderately satisfied with the oncology care services their children received. The gaps identified in service delivery included those related to the availability of the required resources for efficient care delivery and also educational as well as psychosocial needs of the

  9. The voice of experience: results from Cancer Control New Zealand's first national cancer care survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Inga; Britton, Emma; Sarfati, Diana; Naylor, Wayne; Borman, Barry; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Simpson, Andrew; Tamblyn, Craig; Atkinson, Chris

    2010-11-05

    The 2009 Cancer Care Survey aimed to gather information from patients about their experiences receiving outpatient cancer care. In mid-2009, Cancer Control New Zealand sent an NRC+Picker postal survey to a stratified sample of 3251 eligible adults, who had received outpatient cancer care between October 2008 and March 2009. Eight cancer treatment facilities across New Zealand provided patient lists from which potential respondents were selected. The final response rate to the survey was 68%. Most of the patients surveyed responded very positively to questions related to specialist care coordination (91% positive response; 95%CI: 90-93), the level of privacy (87% positive response; 95%CI: 85-89), and the dignity and respect provided by healthcare professionals (86% positive response; 95%CI: 85-88). However, patients tended to be much less positive about the level of information they received on the effects of cancer treatment on their day-to-day life (responses ranging between 30% and 40% positive) and the level of emotional support provided (36% positive response; 95%CI: 33-39). Responses from different cancer services tended to follow similar patterns, although for twelve questions there was at least a 20% difference in response between services. Overall, patients rated their outpatient cancer care experiences as positive, but important gaps exist in the provision of information, emotional support, and treating patients within the context of their living situation. Cancer patient experience surveys can achieve high response rates and generate useful information on patient perceptions of their care. This data can be used to inform quality improvement efforts at both national and cancer treatment service levels.

  10. Assessing the efficacy of cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Jacklyn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Population-based cancer screening has been established for several types of cancer in Australia and internationally. Screening may perform differently in practice from randomised controlled trials, which makes evaluating programs complex. Materials and methods: We discuss how to assess the evidence of benefits and harms of cancer screening, including the main biases that can mislead clinicians and policy makers (such as volunteer, lead-time, length-time and overdiagnosis bias. We also discuss ways in which communication of risks can inform or mislead the community. Results: The evaluation of cancer screening programs should involve balancing the benefits and harms. When considering the overall worth of an intervention and allocation of scarce health resources, decisions should focus on the net benefits and be informed by systematic reviews. Communication of screening outcomes can be misleading. Many messages highlight the benefits while downplaying the harms, and often use relative risks and 5-year survival to persuade people to screen rather than support informed choice. Lessons learned: An evidence based approach is essential when evaluating and communicating the benefits and harms of cancer screening, to minimise misleading biases and the reliance on intuition.

  11. [Radiation therapy in breast cancer. Education and care nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaños Jaúregui, Iratxe; Balsa Marco, José Carmelo

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. One in ten women must face breast cancer during her life. Radiotherapy is an essential part of the treatment. 87% of patient undergoing Radiotherapy will experience radiodermitis. The care during the treatment is part of the daily practice of the nursing staff In the nursing consultation nurses give to the patient self-care recommendations. It's important that the patient follows these recommendations given by the nurse in order to prevent the appearance of the possible side effects.

  12. An action plan for translating cancer survivorship research into care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Catherine M; Smith, Tenbroeck; de Moor, Janet S; Glasgow, Russell E; Khoury, Muin J; Hawkins, Nikki A; Stein, Kevin D; Rechis, Ruth; Parry, Carla; Leach, Corinne R; Padgett, Lynne; Rowland, Julia H

    2014-11-01

    To meet the complex needs of a growing number of cancer survivors, it is essential to accelerate the translation of survivorship research into evidence-based interventions and, as appropriate, recommendations for care that may be implemented in a wide variety of settings. Current progress in translating research into care is stymied, with results of many studies un- or underutilized. To better understand this problem and identify strategies to encourage the translation of survivorship research findings into practice, four agencies (American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, LIVE STRONG: Foundation, National Cancer Institute) hosted a meeting in June, 2012, titled: "Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference: Translating Science to Care." Meeting participants concluded that accelerating science into care will require a coordinated, collaborative effort by individuals from diverse settings, including researchers and clinicians, survivors and families, public health professionals, and policy makers. This commentary describes an approach stemming from that meeting to facilitate translating research into care by changing the process of conducting research-improving communication, collaboration, evaluation, and feedback through true and ongoing partnerships. We apply the T0-T4 translational process model to survivorship research and provide illustrations of its use. The resultant framework is intended to orient stakeholders to the role of their work in the translational process and facilitate the transdisciplinary collaboration needed to translate basic discoveries into best practices regarding clinical care, self-care/management, and community programs for cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss barriers to implementing translational survivorship science identified at the meeting, along with future directions to accelerate this process. Published by Oxford University Press 2014.

  13. [Palliative care in patients without cancer: Impact of the end-of-life care team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Kubokawa, Naomi; Hukuda, Koji; Hattori, Hideyuki; Hong, Young-Jae; Miura, Hisayuki; Shibasaki, Masataka; Endo, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Jun; Odate, Mitsuru; Senda, Kazuyoshi; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing problems associated with life-threatening illnesses by promoting the prevention and relief of suffering. Palliative care in Japan has been developed mainly for cancer patients. At the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, an end-of-life care team (EOLCT) has been developed to promote palliative care for patients without cancer. In the first 6 months of its operation, 109 requests were received by the team, 40% of which were for patients without cancer or related disease, including dementia, frailty due to advanced age, chronic respiratory failure, chronic heart failure, and intractable neurologic diseases. The main purpose of the EOLCT is to alleviate suffering. The relevant activities of the team include the use of opioids, providing family care, and giving support in decision-making (advance care planning) regarding withholding; enforcement; and withdrawal of mechanical ventilators, gastric feeding tubes, and artificial alimentation. The EOLCT is also involved in ongoing discussions of ethical problems. The team is actively engaged in the activities of the Japanese Geriatric Society and contributes to the development of decision-making guidelines for end-of-life by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The EOLCT can be helpful in promoting palliative care for patients with diseases other than cancer. The team offers support during times of difficulty and decision-making.

  14. Quality of life during chemotherapy and satisfaction with nursing care in Turkish breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Z; Durna, Z; Akin, S

    2014-09-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate quality of life for breast cancer patients (n = 105) undergoing chemotherapy, and to assess their satisfaction with nursing care. It also explored relationships between quality of life, satisfaction with nursing care, and demographic and disease-related characteristics. Ethics approval for this study was provided. The research was carried out between October 2011 and June 2012. Quality of life and satisfaction with nursing care were assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Scale, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale. We found that emotional well-being was the area most negatively affected, with patients reporting being afraid of death, feeling sad and being worried about their health. Patients were overall quite satisfied with the nursing care they received at the hospital. We found a positive correlation between total scores on the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale and social and family well-being scores. Breast cancer patients have fears and concerns about their health and need support during chemotherapy for coping with negative changes in their emotional well-being, physical and functional well-being. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Translating basic research in cancer patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maugeri-Saccà

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of molecular targeted therapies and the development of high-throughput biotechnologies, it has become evident that progress in cancer research is largely due to the creation of multidisciplinary teams able to plan clinical trials supported by appropriate molecular hypotheses. These efforts have culminated in the identification and validation of biomarkers predictive of response, as well as in the generation of more accurate prognostic tools. The identification of cancer stem cells has provided further insights into mechanisms of cancer, and many studies have tried to translate this biological notion into prognostic and predictive information. In this regard, new agents targeting key stemness-related pathways have entered the clinical development, and preliminary data suggested an encouraging antitumor activity.

  16. Evaluation of end-of-life cancer care in the ICU: perceptions of the bereaved family in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the evaluation of end-of-life care from bereaved family of cancer patients who had died in intensive care units in Japan. Cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire surveys were conducted on community dwelling individuals aged 40-79 who were randomly sampled from census tracts. End-of-life care was assessed using the Good Death Inventory and Care Evaluation Scale. The respondents were 4011 bereaved family and response rate was 40%. Of 390 respondents had experienced bereavement in intensive care unit. Of 152 respondents had lost a loved one due to cancer. The result showed that bereaved family of cancer patients evaluated lower than the non-cancer patients for "The doctors dealt promptly with discomforting symptoms of the patients' (p=0.009), 'The nurses had adequate knowledge and skills' (p=0.016), 'Admission (use) was possible when necessary without waiting' (p=0.008) , Consideration was given to the health of the family (P=0.039) and Physical and psychological comfort (p=0.03). Overall, it can be presumed that the cancer patients' bereaved family evaluated about symptoms management and doctors and nurses skills was low. There is a need to improve for end-of-life care of cancer patients and to conduct further research to explore quality-improvement interventions to bereaved family of cancer in intensive care unit.

  17. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani Jamwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers' necessities and patients' biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care.

  18. Early stage cervical cancer : quality of cancer care and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, Quirine Dionne

    2007-01-01

    To improve quality of cancer care treatment-related information is needed. This could be acquired by registries. Since January 1984, the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) collects prospectively more than 200 relevant clinical and pathological parameters of women with cervical cancer treated in

  19. Using a Mystery-Caller Approach to Examine Access to Prostate Cancer Care in Philadelphia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Evan Pollack

    Full Text Available Prior work suggests that access to health care may influence the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Mystery-caller methods have been used previously to measure access to care for health services such as primary care, where patients' self-initiate requests for care. We used a mystery-caller survey for specialized prostate cancer care to assess dimensions of access to prostate cancer care.We created an inventory of urology and radiation oncology practices in southeastern Pennsylvania. Using a 'mystery caller' approach, a research assistant posing as a medical office scheduler in a primary care office, attempted to make a new patient appointment on behalf of a referred patient. Linear regression was used to determine the association between time to next available appointment with practice and census tract characteristics.We successfully obtained information on new patient appointments from 198 practices out of the 223 in the region (88.8%. Radiation oncology practices were more likely to accept Medicaid compared to urology practices (91.3% vs 36.4% and had shorter mean wait times for new patient appointments (9.0 vs 12.8 days. We did not observe significant differences in wait times according to census tract characteristics including neighborhood socioeconomic status and the proportion of male African American residents.Mystery-caller methods that reflect real-world referral processes from primary care offices can be used to measure access to specialized cancer care. We observed significant differences in wait times and insurance acceptance between radiation oncology and urology practices.

  20. Multidisciplinary cancer care in Spain, or when the function creates the organ: qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borràs Josep M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Spanish National Health System recognised multidisciplinary care as a health priority in 2006, when a national strategy for promoting quality in cancer care was first published. This institutional effort is being implemented on a co-operative basis within the context of Spain's decentralised health care system, so a high degree of variability is to be expected. This study was aimed to explore the views of professionals working with multidisciplinary cancer teams and identify which barriers to effective team work should be considered to ensure implementation of health policy. Methods Qualitative interview study with semi-structured, one-to-one interviews. Data were examined inductively, using content analysis to generate categories and an explanatory framework. 39 professionals performing their tasks, wholly or in part, in different multidisciplinary cancer teams were interviewed. The breakdown of participants' medical specialisations was as follows: medical oncologists (n = 10; radiation oncologists (n = 8; surgeons (n = 7; pathologists or radiologists (n = 6; oncology nurses (n = 5; and others (n = 3. Results Teams could be classified into three models of professional co-operation in multidisciplinary cancer care, namely, advisory committee, formal co-adaptation and integrated care process. The following barriers to implementation were posed: existence of different gateways for the same patient profile; variability in development and use of clinical protocols and guidelines; role of the hospital executive board; outcomes assessment; and the recording and documenting of clinical decisions in a multidisciplinary team setting. All these play a key role in the development of cancer teams and their ability to improve quality of care. Conclusion Cancer team development results from an specific adaptation to the hospital environment. Nevertheless, health policy plays an important role in promoting an organisational approach

  1. Symptom assessment in children receiving cancer therapy: the parents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, L Lee; Milne-Wren, Cindy; Cassidy, Marilyn; Barrera, Maru; Portwine, Carol; Johnston, Donna L; Silva, Mariana Pradier; Sibbald, Cathryn; Leaker, Michael; Routh, Stacey; Sung, Lillian

    2010-03-01

    We aimed to develop an instrument to assess cancer-treatment-related adverse effects that parents believe children find most bothersome and use it to solicit the opinions of parents regarding this issue. Parents of children 4 to 18 years of age who had received intravenous antineoplastic therapy in the last month were asked to rank prevalence, severity, and degree of bother of each symptom on behalf of their child using a questionnaire. One hundred fifty-eight of 200 (82%) questionnaires were evaluable. The most prevalent symptoms identified were mood swings (85%), fatigue (80%), and disappointment at missing activities with friends/peers (74%). These symptoms were also most commonly identified as being significantly severe. Symptoms most commonly identified as the most bothersome were disappointment at missing activities with friends/peers (50%) and feeling worried about receiving treatment, procedures, or side effects (43%). Symptoms most commonly identified as the most severe and bothersome were disappointment at missing activities with friend/peers (46%); feeling worried about receiving treatment, procedures, or side effects (40%); and painful, aching, or stiff bones, joints, or muscles (36%). This information can be used when explaining the effects of cancer treatment to patients/families, creating policies regarding pediatric cancer care and framing research hypotheses in pediatric supportive care.

  2. Patterns of care for the initial management of cervical cancer in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, L; Schultz, S; Prysbysz, R; Barbera, L; Saskin, R; Gunraj, N; Wilton, A S; Urbach, D; Simunovic, M

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate the planning of resources for cancer services in Ontario, Cancer Care Ontario commissioned an evaluation of operative services delivered for cervical cancer. Women with an incident diagnosis of cervical cancer were identified from 1 April, 2003 to 31 March, 2004 using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Record linkages were created to other provincial health databases such as the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. There were 513 incident cases. Disease-specific rates of cancer were higher in rural areas and those from lower income quintiles. Forty-three percent of women had no surgery. Use of surgery did not appear to vary by SEC, urban/rural residence or LHIN. Women of younger age were more like to receive surgery for cervical cancer. Gynecologists conducted 63% of the operations. Gynecologics were most likely to complete a lymphadenectomy (70.3%). All women were assessed by CXR. Only 22% of women had a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis. Radiation consults were performed in half of the women with cervix cancer but treatment was only delivered to half of those seen. Medical oncologists saw about 10% of women with cervical cancers. There appear to be variations in incidence rates of cervical cancer, with cancers being more frequent in rural areas. In two-thirds of the population, surgery is performed in the region where the patient lives. Subspecialty care from gynecologic oncologists was provided to one-third of women. These preliminary data would be enhanced with further information such as comorbidity, treatment intent (palliative/curative), histology, grade and stage.

  3. Measuring the quality of a childhood cancer care delivery system: quality indicator development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Nicole M E; Robinson, Paula D; Greenberg, Mark L; Barr, Ronald D; Klassen, Anne F; Chan, Y Lilian; Greenberg, Corin M

    2013-06-01

    A set of indicators to assess the quality of a childhood cancer system has not been identified in any jurisdiction internationally, despite the movement toward increased accountability and provision of high-quality care with limited health care resources. This study was conducted to develop a set of quality indicators (QIs) of a childhood cancer control and health care delivery system in Ontario, Canada. A systematic review and targeted gray literature search were conducted to identify potential childhood cancer QIs. A series of investigator focus group sessions followed to review all QIs identified in the literature, and to generate a provisional QI set for a childhood cancer system. QIs were evaluated by three content experts in a sequential selection process on the basis of a series of criteria to select a subset for presentation to stakeholders. Following an appraisal of the relevance of quality assessment frameworks, remaining QIs were mapped onto the Cancer System Quality Index framework. The systematic review yielded few relevant childhood cancer system QIs. Overall, 120 provisional QIs were developed by the investigator group. Based on median QI rating scores, representation across the childhood cancer continuum, and feasibility of data collection, a subset of 33 QIs was selected for stakeholder consideration. The subset of 33 QIs developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and consensus provides the basis for the selection of a set of QIs for ongoing, standardized monitoring of various dimensions of quality in a childhood cancer system. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlyskyj, K; Roddam, H; Rawlinson, G; Selfe, J

    2014-06-01

    To explore the reported value of physiotherapy care received by patients who had accessed a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service. Exploratory qualitative study using in-depth interviews to explore aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients. Thematic network analysis was used to interpret the data and bring together the different experiences of the participants and identify common themes. Physiotherapy Department at a NHS Foundation Trust Teaching Hospital. Nineteen participants were recruited and three were selected to take part in the in-depth interviews. All participants had received physiotherapy care from a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service and had been discharged within the last six months. Participants valued a patient-centred holistic approach to care and access to a Specialist Service with an experienced clinician. In particular the importance of the therapeutic alliance and the value of psychological, emotional and educational support emerged, with the participants feeling empowered in their recovery. Participants reported an overall positive experience of their physiotherapy care. This study supports the need for service providers to evaluate their current physiotherapy provision and subsequently develop Specialised Services to meet the physiotherapy needs of breast cancer patients throughout all stages of their treatment pathway from the delivery of pre-operative care through to post-treatment follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, S

    2000-07-01

    In the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.

  6. Comparison of prostate cancer diagnosis in patients receiving unrelated urological and non-urological cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Anthony T; Smaldone, Marc C; Egleston, Brian L; Simhan, Jay; Ginzburg, Serge; Morgan, Todd M; Walton, John; Chen, David Y T; Viterbo, Rosalia; Greenberg, Richard E; Uzzo, Robert G; Kutikov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate prostate cancer diagnosis rates and survival outcomes in patients receiving unrelated (non-prostate) urological care with those in patients receiving non-urological care. We conducted a population-based study using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify men who underwent surgical treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC; n = 18,188) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC; n = 45,093) between 1992 and 2008. Using SEER*stat software to estimate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), we investigated rates of prostate cancer diagnosis in patients with RCC and patients with CRC. Adjusting for patient age, race and year of diagnosis on multivariate analysis, we used Cox and Fine and Gray proportional hazards regressions to evaluate overall and disease-specific survival endpoints. The observed incidence of prostate cancer was higher in both the patients with RCC and those with CRC: SIR = 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-1.46) vs 1.06 (95% CI 1.02-1.11). Adjusted prostate cancer SIRs were 30% higher (P cancer-adjusted mortalities (sub-distribution Hazard Ratio (sHR) = 1.17, P prostate cancer-specific mortality (sHR = 0.827, P = 0.391). Rates of prostate cancer diagnosis were higher in patients with RCC (a cohort with unrelated urological cancer care) than in those with CRC. Despite higher overall mortality in patients with RCC, prostate cancer-specific survival was similar in both groups. Opportunities may exist to better target prostate cancer screening in patients who receive non-prostate-related urological care. Furthermore, urologists should not feel obligated to perform prostate-specific antigen screening for all patients receiving non-prostate-related urological care. © 2013 BJU International.

  7. Managing Matajoosh: determinants of first Nations' cancer care decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Josée G; Kaufert, Joseph; Browne, Annette J; O'Neil, John D

    2016-08-18

    Accessing cancer treatment requires First Nation peoples living in rural and remote communities to either commute to care, or to relocate to an urban centre for the length or part of the treatment. While Canadians living in rural and remote communities must often make difficult decisions following a cancer diagnosis, such decisions are further complicated by the unique policy and socio-historical contexts affecting many First Nation peoples in Canada. These contexts often intersect with negative healthcare experiences which can be related to jurisdictional confusion encountered when seeking care. Given the rising incidence of cancer within First Nation populations, there is a growing potential for negative health outcomes. The analysis presented in this paper focuses on the experience of First Nation peoples' access to cancer care in the province of Manitoba. We analyzed policy documents and government websites; interviewed individuals who have experienced relocation (N = 5), family members (N = 8), healthcare providers and administrators (N = 15). Although the healthcare providers (social workers, physicians, nurses, patient navigators, and administrators) we interviewed wanted to assist patients and their families, the focus of care remained informed by patients' clinical reality, without recognition of the context which impacts and constrains access to cancer care services. Contrasting and converging narratives identify barriers to early diagnosis, poor coordination of care across jurisdictions and logistic complexities that result in fatigue and undermine adherence. Providers and decision-makers who were aware of this broader context were not empowered to address system's limitations. We argue that a whole system's approach is required in order to address these limitations.

  8. A review on cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Jansen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several psychosocial care interventions have been found effective in improving psychosocial outcomes in cancer patients. At present, there is increasingly being asked for information on the value for money of this type of intervention. This review therefore evaluates current evidence from studies investigating cost-effectiveness or cost-utility of psychosocial care in cancer patients. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science yielding 539 unique records, of which 11 studies were included in the study. Studies were mainly performed in breast cancer populations or mixed cancer populations. Studied interventions included collaborative care (four studies, group interventions (four studies, individual psychological support (two studies, and individual psycho-education (one study. Seven studies assessed the cost-utility of psychosocial care (based on quality-adjusted-life-years while three studies investigated its cost-effectiveness (based on profile of mood states [mood], Revised Impact of Events Scale [distress], 12-Item Health Survey [mental health], or Fear of Progression Questionnaire [fear of cancer progression]. One study did both. Costs included were intervention costs (three studies, intervention and direct medical costs (five studies, or intervention, direct medical, and direct nonmedical costs (three studies. In general, results indicated that psychosocial care is likely to be cost-effective at different, potentially acceptable, willingness-to-pay thresholds. Further research should be performed to provide more clear information as to which psychosocial care interventions are most cost-effective and for whom. In addition, more research should be performed encompassing potential important cost drivers from a societal perspective, such as productivity losses or informal care costs, in the analyses.

  9. Identification of the predictors of cognitive impairment in patients with cancer in palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Benthien, Kirstine Skov; Sjøgren, Per

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Studies with neuropsychological assessments in patients with cancer are sparse, and the evidence is very limited regarding their status of cognitive function over time. This study aimed at assessing the prevalence and predictors of cognitive impairment in patients with cancer in palliative...... of the patients with complete MMSE at both assessments (n = 801) showed that 64.5% were not impaired, 12.5% remained cognitively impaired, 11.4% developed impairment, and 11.6% improved. Those who improved cognitively also reported reduced pain intensity and increased appetite. The predictive model (n = 1351......) showed that those with low KPS (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.5) most often developed cognitive impairment, while patients with breast cancer (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7) had lower odds for impairment. CONCLUSIONS: During palliative care, a substantial number of patients remained cognitively impaired or developed...

  10. Current practice and knowledge of oral care for cancer patients: a survey of supportive health care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, Gerry J.; Epstein, Joel B.; Williams, Karen B.; Gorsky, Meir; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.

    2005-01-01

    The Oral Care Study Section of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO) conducted a survey on clinical practices of oral/dental management of cancer patients among supportive health care providers. The main purpose was

  11. Quantifying the Cumulative Impact of Differences in Care on Prostate Cancer Outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fesinmeyer, Megan

    2007-01-01

    ... of the disparity in prostate cancer outcomes. This work involves first examining how care patterns are correlated throughout all phases of cancer care within racial groups in order to gain a fuller understanding of how racial differences across...

  12. Differences in parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals of care among children with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I; Geyer, J Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2014-09-20

    Concordance between parents of children with advanced cancer and health care providers has not been described. We aimed to describe parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals of care, including differences by cancer type. A total of 104 pediatric patients with recurrent or refractory cancer were enrolled at three large children’s hospitals. On enrollment, their parents and providers were invited to complete a survey assessing perceived prognosis and goals of care. Patients’ survival status was retrospectively abstracted from medical records. Concordance was assessed via discrepancies in perceived prognosis, statistics, and McNemar’s test. Distribution of categorical variables and survival rates across cancer type were compared with Fisher’s exact and log-rank tests, respectively. Data were available from 77 dyads (74% of enrolled). Parent-provider agreement regarding prognosis and goals of care was poor (kappa, 0.12 to 0.30). Parents were more likely to report cure was likely (P < .001). The frequency of perceived likelihood of cure and the goal of cure varied by cancer type for both parents and providers (P < .001 to .004). Relatively optimistic responses were more common among parents and providers of patients with hematologic malignancies, although there were no differences in survival. Parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals in advanced pediatric cancer is generally poor. Perceptions of prognosis and goals of care vary by cancer type. Understanding these differences may inform parent-provider communication and decision making.

  13. Robotic surgery in cancer care: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Malignancy-associated mortality, decreased productivity, and spiritual, social and physical burden in cancer patients and their families impose heavy costs on communities. Therefore cancer prevention, early detection, rapid diagnosis and timely treatment are very important. Use of modern methods based on information technology in cancer can improve patient survival and increase patient and health care provider satisfaction. Robot technology is used in different areas of health care and applications in surgery have emerged affecting the cancer treatment domain. Computerized and robotic devices can offer enhanced dexterity by tremor abolition, motion scaling, high quality 3D vision for surgeons and decreased blood loss, significant reduction in narcotic use, and reduced hospital stay for patients. However, there are many challenges like lack of surgical community support, large size, high costs and absence of tactile and haptic feedback. A comprehensive view to identify all factors in different aspects such as technical, legal and ethical items that prevent robotic surgery adoption is thus very necessary. Also evidence must be presented to surgeons to achieve appropriate support from physicians. The aim of this review article is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers to this advanced technology in patients and surgeons as an approach to improve cancer care.

  14. Environmental assessment in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Isabel; Carnero, María Carmen

    2017-12-22

    The aim of this research is to design a multi-criteria model for environmental assessment of health care organizations. This is a model which guarantees the objectivity of the results obtained, is easy to apply, and incorporates a series of criteria, and their corresponding descriptors, relevant to the internal environmental auditing processes of the hospital. Furthermore, judgments were given by three experts from the areas of health, the environment, and multi-criteria decision techniques. From the values assigned, geometric means were calculated, giving weightings for the criteria of the model. This innovative model is intended for application within a continuous improvement process. A practical case from a Spanish hospital is included at the end. Information contained in the sustainability report provided the data needed to apply the model. The example contains all the criteria previously defined in the model. The results obtained show that the best-satisfied criteria are those related to energy consumption, generation of hazardous waste, legal matters, environmental sensitivity of staff, patients and others, and the environmental management of suppliers. On the other hand, those areas returning poor results are control of atmospheric emissions, increase in consumption of renewable energies, and the logistics of waste produced. It is recommended that steps be taken to correct these deficiencies, thus leading to an acceptable increase in the sustainability of the hospital.

  15. Point of Care Assessment of Coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Clare E; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of hemostasis can be difficult to fully elucidate but can severely affect patient outcome. The optimal therapy for coagulopathies is also not always clear. Point of care (POC) testing in veterinary medicine can assist in the diagnosis of hemostatic disorders and also direct treatment. Advantages of POC testing include rapid turnaround times, ease of use, and proximity to the patient. Disadvantages include differences in analytic performance compared with reference laboratory devices, the potential for operator error, and limited test options per device. Conventional coagulation tests such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and activated clotting time can be measured by POC devices and can accurately diagnose hypocoagulability, but they cannot detect hypercoagulability or disorders of fibrinolysis. Viscoelastic POC coagulation testing more accurately evaluates in vivo coagulation, and can detect hypocoagulability, hypercoagulability, and alterations in fibrinolysis. POC platelet function testing methodologies can detect platelet adhesion abnormalities including von Willebrand disease, and can be used to monitor the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs. It is unlikely that a single test would be ideal for assessing the complete coagulation status of all patients; therefore, the ideal combination of tests for a specific patient needs to be determined based on an understanding of the underlying disease, and protocols must be standardized to minimize interoperator and interinstitutional variability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Finding the Right Care | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trained as a registered nurse and with a doctoral degree in public health, Jane D. is no stranger to the U.S. health care system. But, when she found herself facing a diagnosis of anal cancer in 2013, she felt adrift.

  17. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T. (Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry)

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  18. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  19. Original Research Characterising cancer burden and quality of care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unattended to.” (MCH healthcare worker). obtained from the directors of each palliative care facility. Identification numbers instead of names were used for all data obtained, and raw data were solely available to the study investigators. Results. Quantitative. There were 2362 cancer patients registered between October.

  20. Promoting Early Detection of Breast Cancer and Care Strategies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    It is recommended that guidelines and policies about breast cancer early detection, care strategies, and ongoing management pathways be produced, disseminated, .... control strategies globally, three goals must be addressed: a) the development ... symptomatic disease through self-breast examination and clinical-breast ...

  1. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...... for children with cancer....

  2. Follow-Up Care for Older Women With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Begg C, Glicksman A, et al. 20. Greene MG, Adelman R, Charon R, Hoffman S. Ageism inThe effect of age on the care of women with breast cancer in the...713-8. 11. Greene MG, Adelman R, Charon R, Hoffman S. Ageism in the medical encounter: An exp loratory study of the doctor-elderly patient

  3. Psychological support of a cancer patient based on nursing care process records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, J; Gaworska-Krzemińska, A; Piotrkowska, R

    2007-01-01

    The care of a cancer patient undergoes considerable changes. Patients' most important need is a demand of support in dealing with somatic, psychological, emotional and social complaints. The purpose of this research is to analyse the realization of the psychological support of a cancer patient based on nursing care process records. The research analysis is based on 150 nursing care case histories of cancer children and adults treated in the Independent Public Clinical Hospital No 1 of the Academic Clinical Centre at the Medical University of Gdańsk in such wards as: Paediatric Haematology, Paediatric Chemotherapy, Adults' Haematology, Oncology and Radiotherapy, Thoracic Surgery. Evaluation chart of nursing care histories and statistical methods were tools in this research. The nursing case history evaluation chart created for this very research is successfully used by members of nursing records team in all of 61 wards. The results indicate that in all analysed wards the most problematic factor for nurses was taking the patients' (children's) habits and free time planning into account while establishing the plan of action. In numerous cases a stated nursing care diagnosis was not connected with the realization of psychological support. Providing patients with the feeling of safety and contact with family was positively assessed. In the care process nurses should pay more attention to the evaluation of patients and their families' need of social support.

  4. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  5. Does fear of cancer recurrence predict cancer survivors' health care use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Sophie; Tomei, Christina; Feldstain, Andrea; Beattie, Sara; McCallum, Megan

    2013-03-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is the most frequently cited unmet need among cancer survivors. Theoretical models of FCR suggest that patients with elevated levels of FCR will more frequently consult health care professionals for reassurance about their health. However, the relationship between FCR and health care utilization has not yet been firmly established. We examined the relationship between FCR and quantity of medications, number of emergency room (ER) visits, outpatient visits, specialist visits, allied health visits, and hospital overnight visits. A total of 231 participants diagnosed with breast, colon, prostate, or lung cancer in the past 10 years were recruited from a cancer survivor registry. Participants were sent a survey package that included demographic and medical characteristics, a health care utilization questionnaire, and the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory. A multiple regression analysis indicated that higher FCR significantly predicted greater number of outpatient visits in the past 6 months (ß = .016, F(1, 193) = 5.08, p = .025). A hierarchical multiple regression indicated that higher FCR significantly predicted greater number of ER visits in the past 6 months when controlling for relationship status and education level (F(1, 179) = 4.00, p = .047). The relationship between FCR and health care use has been understudied. Results indicate that patients with elevated FCR may indeed use more health care services. We recommend that clinicians monitor health care use in patients who are struggling with FCR.

  6. Experiences of nursing students in caring for pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostak, Melahat Akgun; Mutlu, Aysel; Bilsel, Aysegul

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the experiences of nursing students in caring for paediatric cancer patients and their families. This qualitative survey was carried out with 14 students studying in the nursing department of the Faculty of Health Sciences of a university in Edirne, Turkey. Data were obtained through focus group interviews and evaluated based on a qualitative content analysis. It was determined that students, for the most part, experienced problems related to communication, sadness, helplessness, fear, anxiety, resentment and anger. In addition, the students were affected most often by effects of the disease and invasive procedures on paediatric cancer patients and their families during the process of caring for them in the oncology clinic. It would be useful to inform nursing students, prior to clinical practice, about the special needs of paediatric cancer patients and families who stay in oncology clinics, and to follow up with appropriate guidance during the clinical practices.

  7. A Qualitative Evaluation of Web-Based Cancer Care Quality Improvement Toolkit Use in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Candice; Luck, Jeff; Gale, Randall C; Smith, Nina; York, Laura S; Asch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Disease severity, complexity, and patient burden highlight cancer care as a target for quality improvement (QI) interventions. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implemented a series of disease-specific online cancer care QI toolkits. To describe characteristics of the toolkits, target users, and VHA cancer care facilities that influenced toolkit access and use and assess whether such resources were beneficial for users. Deductive content analysis of detailed notes from 94 telephone interviews with individuals from 48 VHA facilities. We evaluated toolkit access and use across cancer types, participation in learning collaboratives, and affiliation with VHA cancer care facilities. The presence of champions was identified as a strong facilitator of toolkit use, and learning collaboratives were important for spreading information about toolkit availability. Identified barriers included lack of personnel and financial resources and complicated approval processes to support tool use. Online cancer care toolkits are well received across cancer specialties and provider types. Clinicians, administrators, and QI staff may benefit from the availability of toolkits as they become more reliant on rapid access to strategies that support comprehensive delivery of evidence-based care. Toolkits should be considered as a complement to other QI approaches.

  8. Family Caregivers to Adults with Cancer: The Consequences of Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anna-Leila

    2018-01-01

    A person living with cancer will potentially have some degree of physical, cognitive, and/or psychological impairment, periods of unemployment, financial concerns, social isolation, and existential questions, any or all of which can impact the family and friends who surround them. In our current era of health care, patients with cancer receive invasive diagnostic studies and aggressive treatment as outpatients, and then convalesce at home. As such, cancer family caregivers are de facto partners with the healthcare team. The cancer family caregiver role is demanding and may lead to increased morbidity and mortality-in effect, the cancer family caregiver can become a second patient in need of care. This chapter discusses the consequences cancer family caregivers may accrue. The topics covered include caregiver mood disturbance and psychological impairment and some of the mutable factors that contribute to these states (i.e., sleep disturbance, decline in physical health, restriction of activities, and financial concerns), uncertainty, spiritual concerns, and caregiver witnessing. There is a discussion of the factors that influence the caregiving experience (caregiver characteristics, patient characteristics, and social supports). The chapter concludes with comments on intervention studies that have been conducted to ameliorate the burden of caregiving, and the state of caregiver research.

  9. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical oncologist. The report further suggested that a lead clinician with a well established interest in cancer care should be appointed to organise and coordinate the whole range of cancer services provided within the Cancer Unit. Many people have argued that the multidisciplinary team management of patients has resulted in better care and improved survival. However, there are barriers to the optimal effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team. This paper aims to review various studies on the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team in the management of cancer patients and also discuss some of the barriers to the multidisciplinary team.

  10. Complementary medicine in palliative care and cancer symptom management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansky, Patrick J; Wallerstedt, Dawn B

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients varies according to geographical area, gender, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence of CAM use among cancer patients in the United States has been estimated to be between 7% and 54%. Most cancer patients use CAM with the hope of boosting the immune system, relieving pain, and controlling side effects related to disease or treatment. Only a minority of patients include CAM in the treatment plan with curative intent. This review article focuses on practices belonging to the CAM domains of mind-body medicine, CAM botanicals, manipulative practices, and energy medicine, because they are widely used as complementary approaches to palliative cancer care and cancer symptom management. In the area of cancer symptom management, auricular acupuncture, therapeutic touch, and hypnosis may help to manage cancer pain. Music therapy, massage, and hypnosis may have an effect on anxiety, and both acupuncture and massage may have a therapeutic role in cancer fatigue. Acupuncture and selected botanicals may reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and hypnosis and guided imagery may be beneficial in anticipatory nausea and vomiting. Transcendental meditation and the mindfulness-based stress reduction can play a role in the management of depressed mood and anxiety. Black cohosh and phytoestrogen-rich foods may reduce vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Most CAM approaches to the treatment of cancer are safe when used by a CAM practitioner experienced in the treatment of cancer patients. The potential for many commonly used botanical to interact with prescription drugs continues to be a concern. Botanicals should be used with caution by cancer patients and only under the guidance of an oncologist knowledgeable in their use.

  11. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiener L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lori Wiener,1,*,# Meaghann Shaw Weaver,2,3,*,# Cynthia J Bell,4,# Ursula M Sansom-Daly,5–7 1Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Oncology, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Oncology, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA; 4College of Nursing, Wayne State University and Hospice of Michigan Institute, Detroit, MI, USA; 5Behavioural Sciences Unit, Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia; 6Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women’s and Children’s Health, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia; 7Sydney Youth Cancer Service, Sydney Children’s/Prince of Wales Hospitals, Randwick, NSW, Australia *These authors have contributed equally to this work #On behalf of the Pediatric Palliative Care Special Interest Group at Children’s National Health System Abstract: Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs. The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential

  12. Access to Accredited Cancer Hospitals Within Federal Exchange Plans Under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Kenneth L; Liao, Kai-Ping; Krause, Trudy M; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-02-20

    Purpose The Affordable Care Act expanded access to health insurance in the United States, but concerns have arisen about access to specialized cancer care within narrow provider networks. To characterize the scope and potential impact of this problem, we assessed rates of inclusion of Commission on Cancer (CoC) -accredited hospitals and National Cancer Institute (NCI) -designated cancer centers within federal exchange networks. Methods We downloaded publicly available machine-readable network data and public use files for individual federal exchange plans from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for the 2016 enrollment year. We linked this information to National Provider Identifier data, identified a set of distinct provider networks, and assessed the rates of inclusion of CoC-accredited hospitals and NCI-designated centers. We measured variation in these rates according to geography, plan type, and metal level. Results Of 4,058 unique individual plans, network data were available for 3,637 (90%); hospital information was available for 3,531 (87%). Provider lists for these plans reduced into 295 unique networks for analysis. Ninety-five percent of networks included at least one CoC-accredited hospital, but just 41% of networks included NCI-designated centers. States and counties each varied substantially in the proportion of networks listed that included NCI-designated centers (range, 0% to 100%). The proportion of networks that included NCI-designated centers also varied by plan type (range, 31% for health maintenance organizations to 49% for preferred provider organizations; P = .04) but not by metal level. Conclusion A large majority of federal exchange networks contain CoC-accredited hospitals, but most do not contain NCI-designated cancer centers. These results will inform policy regarding access to cancer care, and they reinforce the importance of promoting access to clinical trials and specialized care through community sites.

  13. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (IV/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Hernández, C; Brusint, B; Vich, P; Díaz-García, N; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Hernández-García, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians must thoroughly understand this pathology in order to optimize the health care services and make the best use of available resources, for these patients. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. This fourth article deals with the treatment of the disease, the role of the primary care physician, and management of major complications. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support their patients and care for them throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Palliative Care for the Lung Cancer Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiep, Brian; Sun, Virginia; Koczywas, Marianna; Kim, Jae; Raz, Dan; Hurria, Arti; Hayter, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation, as a quality of life intervention, has a role to play in palliative care for lung cancer patients. Combining the art and skills of clinical care, physiological, and behavioral tools, pulmonary rehabilitation can serve to rebuild the functional capacity of patients limited by breathlessness and deconditioning. Exercise programs are the primary tool used to restore and rebuild the patient's endurance by challenging the entire pathway of oxygen transport and improving gas exchange. Other tools of pulmonary rehabilitation include breathing retraining, self-management skills, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilitation, smoking cessation and oxygen therapy. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now becoming a part of supportive care for patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The ability to be more active without suffering the consequences of dyspnea on exertion boosts the patient's self-efficacy and allows for an improved quality of life, so that lung cancer patients can participate in their family lives during this therapeutic challenge.

  15. Palliative care and the cancer patient: current state and state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Roenn, Jamie H

    2011-10-01

    Comprehensive cancer care requires the integration of palliative care practices and principles across the trajectory of the cancer experience. It complements the treatment of curable disease and may be the sole focus of care for those patients with advanced incurable disease. As the incidence of cancer increases worldwide and the burden of cancer rises, especially in low and middle resource countries, the need for palliative care is greater than ever before. There are numerous barriers to the provision of integrated care, including the ongoing misconception that palliative care is end-of-life care, the "cure-care dichotomy," inadequate training of health professionals and lack of resources. This article reviews the essential elements of comprehensive cancer care and the challenges to providing integrated cancer and palliative care to patients world-wide.

  16. Managing Cancer Care: a psycho-educational intervention to improve knowledge of care options and breast cancer self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman-Green, Dena; Jeon, Sangchoon

    2017-02-01

    We tested the feasibility and acceptability of a psycho-educational self-management intervention, Managing Cancer Care: A Personal Guide (MCC), to improve knowledge of care options (curative, palliative, and hospice care) among a range of breast cancer self-management skills. We conducted a one-group, pre-post-test study among women with non-metastatic breast cancer (n = 105). We gave participants the printed, self-guided, seven-module intervention following enrollment. At baseline and 2  months, we measured knowledge of care options, desired and actual role in self-management, medical communication skills, experience and management of transitions, anxiety, depression, uncertainty, and self-efficacy. We conducted interviews to obtain module ratings and qualitative data on strengths and limitations of MCC. Knowledge of care options (δ = 0.40 (1.11), p = 0.0005) and desired role in self-management (δ = -0.28 (1.08), p = 0.0177) significantly improved. Less skilled medical communicators significantly improved their communication (δ = 3.47, standard deviation = 6.58, p = 0.0449). Multivariate modeling showed that changes in our primary outcomes of medical communication and management of transitions seemed to drive positive changes in our secondary outcomes of anxiety, depression, uncertainty, and self-efficacy. Participants highly rated MCC and reported the importance of understanding care options despite non-metastatic disease. MCC is a feasible and acceptable means of improving knowledge of care options and other aspects of breast cancer self-management. The combination of modules offered in MCC appears to have beneficial interactive effects. We are currently testing MCC more rigorously in a randomized controlled trial to explore mediating and moderating relationships. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Cancer Phenotype Diagnosis and Drug Efficacy within Japanese Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihide Nishimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on targeted personalized medicine is given describing the developments in Japan of lung cancer patients. These new targeted therapies with novel personalized medicine drugs require new implementations, in order to follow and monitor drug efficacy and outcome. Examples from IRESSA (Gefitinib and TARCEVA (Erlotinib treatments used in medication of lung cancer patients are presented. Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in the world. The importance of both the quantification of disease progression, where diagnostic-related biomarkers are being implemented, in addition to the actual measurement of disease-specific mechanisms relating to pathway signalling activation of disease-progressive protein targets is summarised. An outline is also presented, describing changes and adaptations in Japan, meeting the rising costs and challenges. Today, urgent implementation of programs to address these needs has led to a rebuilding of the entire approach of medical evaluation and clinical care.

  18. Cancer Care at Times of Crisis and War: The Syrian Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahloul, Eman; Salem, Riad; Alrez, Wessam; Alkarim, Tayseer; Sukari, Ammar; Maziak, Wasim; Atassi, M Bassel

    2017-08-01

    As Syria enters its fifth year of conflict, the number of civilians killed and injured continues to rise sharply. Along with this conflict comes the rapid decline of medical care, specifically cancer care. To determine physician and equipment availability, cancer screening and management, and possible solutions relative to various major cities, a survey was distributed to physicians inside Syria through the help of the humanitarian organization Syrian American Medical Society. Online surveys were distributed to both certified oncologists who work in cancer clinics and general physicians who work in rural and mobile clinics inside Syria. Variables assessed were physician specialty, location, population, cost, regional situation (besieged versus government controlled), and resource availability and access. Results were stratified by location and physician specialty. Survey results revealed a large shortage of specialized physicians and inhibited accessibility to screening and management options in besieged areas compared with government-controlled regions. Physicians within both government-controlled and besieged cities reported limited or no targeted agents, radiation therapy, clinical trials, bone marrow transplantation, positron emission tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and genetic testing. The Syrian civil war has resulted in suboptimal oncology care in the majority of the region. In consideration of specific deficiencies in cancer care, we recommend several solutions that may better the level of care in Syria: patient education on medical documentation and self-examination; online consultation; and cheap, effective screening methods. The implementation of these recommendations may change the course of cancer care in a country that has deteriorated into the worst humanitarian crisis of the century.

  19. Cancer Care at Times of Crisis and War: The Syrian Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Sahloul

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As Syria enters its fifth year of conflict, the number of civilians killed and injured continues to rise sharply. Along with this conflict comes the rapid decline of medical care, specifically cancer care. To determine physician and equipment availability, cancer screening and management, and possible solutions relative to various major cities, a survey was distributed to physicians inside Syria through the help of the humanitarian organization Syrian American Medical Society. Methods: Online surveys were distributed to both certified oncologists who work in cancer clinics and general physicians who work in rural and mobile clinics inside Syria. Variables assessed were physician specialty, location, population, cost, regional situation (besieged versus government controlled, and resource availability and access. Results were stratified by location and physician specialty. Results: Survey results revealed a large shortage of specialized physicians and inhibited accessibility to screening and management options in besieged areas compared with government-controlled regions. Physicians within both government-controlled and besieged cities reported limited or no targeted agents, radiation therapy, clinical trials, bone marrow transplantation, positron emission tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and genetic testing. Conclusion: The Syrian civil war has resulted in suboptimal oncology care in the majority of the region. In consideration of specific deficiencies in cancer care, we recommend several solutions that may better the level of care in Syria: patient education on medical documentation and self-examination; online consultation; and cheap, effective screening methods. The implementation of these recommendations may change the course of cancer care in a country that has deteriorated into the worst humanitarian crisis of the century.

  20. Determinants of complicated grief in caregivers who cared for terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Wen; Huang, Chia-Tsuan; Yin, Shao-Min; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Chien, Ching-Hsin; Chuang, Hung-Yi

    2010-10-01

    There is little research on determinants and the grief that caregivers experience after their relatives die of cancer. This study evaluated factors which influence complicated grief among caregivers who cared for patients who died of cancer in Taiwan. This prospective study recruited 668 caregivers who cared for terminally ill cancer patients in the hospice ward or who received shared-care consultation. Caregivers were interviewed on the telephone an average 8.9 months after the cancer patients passed away. The Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG), modified for use in a Chinese population, was used to assess the grief status of caregivers. ICG >25 was defined as complicated grief. Our study found that female gender (odds ratio (OR), 2.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.75-2.82), spouse relationship (OR, 1.20; 1.01-1.40), parents-children relationship (OR, 1.70; 1.11-2.31), lack of religious belief (OR, 1.47; 1.19-1.75), unavailable family support (OR, 1.42; 1.03-1.83), and history of mood co-morbidity (OR, 1.41; 1.02-1.83) were risk factors that would predispose towards complicated grief; whereas, longer duration of caring (months, OR, 0.79; 0.69-0.91), medical disease history in the carer (OR, 0.77; 0.57-0.99), and patients being cared for on the hospice ward (OR, 0.60; 0.44-0.77) were factors that would mitigate against complicated grief. These results suggest that clinical professionals who care for terminal cancer patients and their caregivers should pay particular attention to caregivers with these predisposing factors.

  1. [Current Status and Effectiveness of Perioperative Oral Health Care Management for Lung Cancer and Esophageal Cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Takahiro; Inui, Tomohiro; Takasugi, Haruka; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Kawakita, Naoya; Inoue, Seiya; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Azuma, Masayuki; Yamamura, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management to decrease the risk of postoperative pneumonia have been reported lately. Since 2014, we introduced perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. We report current status and effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. Every 100 cases of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients treated by surgery were classified 2 group with or without perioperative oral health care management and compared about postoperative complications retrospectively. In the lung cancer patients, the group with oral health care management could prevent postoperative pneumonia significantly and had shorter length of hospital stay than the group without oral health care management. In the esophageal cancer patients, there was little occurrence of postoperative pneumonia without significant difference between both group with or without oral health care management. A large number of esophageal cancer patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and some patients developed oral mucositis and received oral care treatment before surgery. Treatment for oral mucositis probably improved oral environment and affected prevention of postoperative pneumonia. Perioperative oral health care management can prevent postoperative pneumonia of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients by improvement of oral hygiene.

  2. Understanding of prognosis and goals of care among couples whose child died of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kelly E; Neville, Bridget A; Cook, Earl F; Aldridge, Sarah H; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2008-03-10

    Little is known about how couples care for the terminally ill child with cancer. We assessed both parents' understanding of prognosis and treatment goals for children with cancer and explored whether sex mediates these views. We also investigated whether discordance within couples regarding treatment goals was related to parental perception of the child's end-of-life (EOL) experience. We surveyed mothers and fathers of children who died of cancer and were cared for at Children's Hospital (Boston, MA) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Boston, MA) between 2000 and 2004. Our sample included 38 couples (response rate, 56%). Willingness to participate did not differ by sex. At diagnosis, fathers and mothers held a similar understanding of the child's prognosis, and 58% of couples agreed on the goal of cure. During the EOL period, a majority of fathers and mothers reported lessening suffering as the primary goal. However, within couples there was poor agreement about the primary goal of care (kappa = 0.07). When parents did not agree on the primary goal of lessening suffering, both parents were more likely to report that the child suffered significantly from cancer-directed treatment (P = .03). Though parent goals are often concurrent at diagnosis, they frequently differ during the EOL period. Parent disagreement about the goal of lessening suffering at the EOL appears to impact how parents describe their child's experience of suffering. Creating opportunities for parents to work through their goals together may lead to improvements in the child's EOL experience.

  3. Early breast cancer in the elderly: assessment and management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrand, Gilles; Terret, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common tumour in the elderly and management of early disease in particular is a major challenge for oncologists and geriatricians alike. The process should begin with the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA), which should be undertaken before any decisions about treatment are made. The important role of co-morbidities and their effect on life expectancy also need to be taken into account when making treatment decisions. The primary treatments for early breast cancer are surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and adjuvant systemic therapy. Unfortunately, lack of a specific literature relating to early breast cancer in the elderly means formulating an evidence-based approach to treatment in this context is difficult. We have developed a new approach based on the CGA and comprehensive oncological assessment. This approach facilitates the development of an individualized oncogeriatric care plan and follow-up based on several considerations: the average patient's life expectancy at a given age; the patient's co-morbidities, level of dependence, and the impact of these considerations on diagnostic and therapeutic options as well as life expectancy; and the potential benefit-risk balance of treatment. In the elderly patient with breast cancer, the standard primary therapy is surgical resection (mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy). While node dissection is a major component of staging and local control of breast cancer, no data are available to guide decision-making in women aged >70 years. Primary endocrine therapy (tamoxifen) should be offered to elderly women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer only if they are unfit for or refuse surgery. Trials are needed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of aromatase inhibitors as primary therapy for infirm older patients with ER-positive tumours. Breast irradiation should be recommended to older women with a life expectancy >5 years, particularly those with large tumours, positive lymph nodes

  4. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Bisht

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. The data obtained from the patients included symptoms reported by the patients, currently prescribed treatments and the site of cancer. Results: The average number of symptoms reported per patient was 5.33 ± 0.67 (mean ± SE. The most common symptoms were pain, weakness/fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, nausea/vomiting, dyspnea, constipation and cough. Polypharmacy was frequent. Patients consumed approximately 8.7 ± 0.38 (mean ± SE drugs on average during the 2-month period of follow-up. Conclusion: The result gives insight into the varied symptomatology of patients with advanced cancer. Polypharmacy was quite common in patients with advanced cancer, predisposing them to complicated drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

  5. Improving breast cancer care through a regional quality collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Tara M; Caughran, Jamie; Pettinga, Jane; Wesen, Cheryl; Mehringer, Ann; Yin, Huiying; Share, David; Silver, Samuel M

    2011-10-01

    Regional collaborative organizations provide an effective structure for improving the quality of surgical care. With low complication rates and a long latency between surgical care and outcomes such as survival and local recurrence, quality measurement in breast cancer surgery is ideally suited to process measures. Diagnostic biopsy technique for breast cancer diagnosis is measurable and amenable to change at the provider level. We present initial results from our analysis of institutional variation in surgical and core needle biopsy use within a regional breast cancer quality collaborative. Established in 2006, the Michigan Breast Oncology Quality Initiative (MiBOQI) consists of 18 hospitals collecting data on breast cancer care using the National Comprehensive Cancer Centers Network (NCCN) Oncology Outcomes Database Project platform to analyze and compare breast cancer practices and outcomes amongst member institutions. Institutional review board approval is obtained at each site. Data are submitted electronically to the NCCN and analyzed for concordance with practice guidelines. Aggregate and blinded data are shared with project directors and institutions at collaborative meetings, and ongoing practice patterns are observed for change. We analyzed variation in breast biopsy technique for initial cancer diagnosis over time and between institutions. Diagnostic biopsies were categorized as core needle, surgical excisional, surgical incisional, and other surgical biopsy. Procedural data for 8,066 patients treated for breast cancer between November 1, 2006 and December 31, 2009 were analyzed. The mean patient age was 59.5 years (range, 25.4-90.0 years). Within MiBOQI, 21% of patients underwent surgical biopsy for initial diagnosis. The percentage of patients undergoing surgical biopsy ranged from 8% to 37%, and the majority of surgical biopsies were classified as excisional biopsies. Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ were more likely to undergo surgical biopsy

  6. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede

    that is vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care......) The primary sector needs easy access to specialist advise, supervision and empowerment. 4) Better and easier communication pathways are important, both within the primary sector and across the sectors to improve accessibility.CONCLUSION. Our study shows a need for improvements in palliative home care...... and provides important knowledge about how these improvements are achieved.The GPs want closer supervision and improved shared care. They want to be key persons in palliative home care, but to fill this role it is vital that they take or are given the responsibility in a very transparent way, i.e.: A way...

  7. The Relationship Between Cancer Survivors' Socioeconomic Status and Reports of Follow-up Care Discussions with Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMartino, Lisa D; Birken, Sarah A; Mayer, Deborah K

    2017-12-01

    Socioeconomically disadvantaged cancer survivors are less likely to have adequate follow-up care. In this study, we examined whether socioeconomically disadvantaged survivors are at risk for not having follow-up care discussions with providers, a critical determinant of access to follow-up care and desirable health outcomes. Using the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and Experiences with Cancer Survivorship Supplement, we used a binary logit model with sample weights to examine associations between 1320 cancer survivors' socioeconomic status (SES) and reports of follow-up care discussions with providers, controlling for clinical and demographic characteristics. The multivariable model indicated survivors with incomes ≤200 % Federal Poverty Level (FPL) had a lower probability of reporting a follow-up care discussion than survivors with incomes >400 % FPL (p  0.05). Socioeconomically disadvantaged cancer survivors are at risk for not having follow-up care discussions with providers, particularly those who report lower income and education. The development of educational interventions targeting provider communication with socioeconomically disadvantaged cancer survivors, and survivors' understanding of the benefits of follow-up care discussions, may promote access to these services. Future research assessing mechanisms underlying relationships between survivors' SES indicators and reports of follow-up care discussions with providers is also warranted.

  8. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The translation of cancer genomics: time for a revolution in clinical cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Elaine R

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of next-generation sequencing technologies has dramatically impacted the life sciences, perhaps most profoundly in the area of cancer genomics. Clinical applications of next-generation sequencing and associated methods are emerging from ongoing large-scale discovery projects that have catalogued hundreds of genes as having a role in cancer susceptibility, onset and progression. For example, discovery cancer genomics has confirmed that many of the same genes are altered by mutation, copy number gain or loss, or structural variation across multiple tumor types, resulting in a gain or loss of function that likely contributes to cancer development in these tissues. Beyond these frequently mutated genes, we now know there is a 'long tail' of less frequently mutated, but probably important, genes that play roles in cancer onset or progression. Here, I discuss some of the remaining barriers to clinical translation, and look forward to new applications of these technologies in cancer care.

  10. The patient-breast cancer care pathway: how could it be optimized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffert, Sandrine; Hoang, Huong Ly; Brédart, Anne; Asselain, Bernard; Alran, Séverine; Berseneff, Hélène; Huchon, Cyrille; Trichot, Caroline; Combes, Aline; Alves, Karine; Koskas, Martin; Nguyen, Thuy; Roulot, Aurélie; Rouzier, Roman; Héquet, Delphine

    2015-05-12

    A care pathway is defined as patient-focused global care that addresses temporal (effective and coordinated management throughout the illness) and spatial issues (treatment is provided near the health territory in or around the patient's home). Heterogeneity of the care pathways in breast cancer (BC) is presumed but not well evaluated. The OPTISOINS01 study aims to assess every aspect of the care pathway for early BC patients using a temporal and spatial scope. An observational, prospective, multicenter study in a regional health territory (Ile-de-France, France) in different types of structures: university or local hospitals and comprehensive cancer centers. We will include and follow during 1 year 1,000 patients. The study consists of 3 work-packages: - Cost of pathway The aim of this WP is to calculate the overall costs of the early BC pathway at 1 year from different perspectives (society, health insurance and patient) using a cost-of-illness analysis. Using a bottom-up method, we will assess direct costs, including medical direct costs and nonmedical direct costs (transportation, home modifications, home care services, and social services), and indirect costs (loss of production). - Patient satisfaction and work reintegration Three questionnaires will assess the patients' satisfaction and possible return to work: the occupational questionnaire for employed women; the questionnaire on the need for supportive care, SCNS-SF34 ('breast cancer' module, SCNS-BR8); and the OUTPASSAT-35 questionnaire. - Quality, coordination and access to innovation Quality will be evaluated based on visits and treatment within a set period, whether the setting offers a multidisciplinary consultative framework, the management by nurse coordinators, the use of a personalized care plan, the provision of information via documents about treatments and the provision of supportive care. The coordination between structures and caregivers will be evaluated at several levels. Day surgery, home

  11. Experiences of gynecological cancer patients receiving care from specialist nurses: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Olivia; McIntyre, Meredith; Recoche, Katrina; Lee, Susan

    2017-08-01

    was utilized in this review. An initial limited search of MEDLINE and CINAHL was undertaken followed by a comprehensive search using all identified keywords and index terms across all included databases. The reference lists of all identified reports and articles were hand searched for additional studies. Each paper was independently assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using the standardized critical appraisal instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute the Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. When disagreement arose between the reviewers, the given paper was independently appraised by a third reviewer. Data were extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from Joanna Briggs Institute the Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. Data extraction was completed independently by two reviewers. Extracted findings from seven included papers were grouped according to similarity in meaning from which 11 categories were developed. These categories were then subjected to a meta-synthesis that produced a set of three synthesized findings. Key findings were extracted from six included papers and classified as unequivocal (U) or credible (C). A total of 30 findings were extracted and aggregated into 11 categories based on similarity in meaning. From the 11 categories, three synthesized findings were developed: i) Tailored care: specialist nurses play a role in understanding and meeting the individual needs of women with gynecological cancer; ii) Accessible care: specialist nurses guide women with gynecological cancer along the continuum of care and are an easily accessed source of knowledge and support; iii) Dependable expertise: women with gynecological cancer express trust and reassurance in the experience and expertise of the specialist nurse. This systematic review synthesized the findings of seven studies that captured the experiences of women with

  12. Nutritional care of medical inpatients: a health technology assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse Filip; Grinderslev Edvin; Olsen Jens; Lassen Karin O; Bjerrum Merete

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The inspiration for the present assessment of the nutritional care of medical patients is puzzlement about the divide that exists between the theoretical knowledge about the importance of the diet for ill persons, and the common failure to incorporate nutritional aspects in the treatment and care of the patients. The purpose is to clarify existing problems in the nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients, to elucidate how the nutritional care for these inpatients can b...

  13. Quality of palliative care in children with cancer in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Sagherian, Knar; Tamim, Hani; Naifeh Khoury, May; Abboud, Miguel R

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing research interest in pediatric palliative care in Lebanon. To date the existing studies have focused on the perspective of parents of children with cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QoL), symptom prevalence and management, functional ability, and the quality of care among children with cancer at the Children's Cancer Center of Lebanon. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A convenience sample of 85 patients on therapy aged 7 to 18 years participated in the study between 2010 and 2011. Using face to face interviews, a combination of four instruments were administered in Arabic. The mean age of the participants was 12.5 years, with the majority having leukemia. Overall, the children had satisfactory health-related QoL, with the exception of the nausea and worry subscales, had no limitations in functional abilities, and were satisfied with the care that they received. In children between 7 to 12 years, the most common symptoms were lack of appetite, pain, and nausea, while adolescents between 13 to 18 years experienced lack of energy, irritability, and pain. Pain and nausea were the most frequently treated symptoms. Although the participants reported satisfactory QoL, yet symptom management was inadequate and mainly focused on treating the physical symptoms. It is recommended to provide both pharmacological and psychological interventions in order to alleviate symptom burden and hence improve QoL in children with cancer.

  14. Availability of palliative care services for children with cancer in economically diverse regions of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eduardo; Barfield, Raymond C; Baker, Justin N; Hinds, Pamela S; Yang, Jie; Nambayan, Ayda; Quintana, Yuri; Kane, Javier R

    2010-08-01

    We assessed the availability and quality of palliative care for children with cancer according to national income per capita. We surveyed physicians who care for children with cancer using the Cure4Kids website (http://www.cure4kids.org). Queries addressed oncology practice site; reimbursement; specialised palliative care, pain management and bereavement care; location of death; decision-making support and perceived quality of care. Responses were categorised by low-, middle- and high-income country (LIC, MIC and HIC). Of 262 completed questionnaires from 58 countries (response rate, 59.8%), 242 were evaluable (55%). Out-of-pocket payment for oncology (14.8%), palliative care (21.9%) and comfort care medications (24.3%) was most likely to be required in LIC (pregions, but particularly in LIC. Access to adequate palliation is associated with national income. Programme development strategies and collaborations less dependent on a single country's economy are suggested. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Re-organisation of oesophago-gastric cancer care in England: progress and remaining challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenaway Kimberley

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oesophago-gastric cancer services in England have been extensively reorganised since 2001 to deliver a centralised, specialist-led service. Our aim was to assess how well the National Health Service (NHS in England met organisational standards for oesophago-gastric cancer care. Methods Questionnaires that asked about the provision of staging investigations, curative and palliative treatments and key personnel were sent in September 2007 to the lead clinician for oesophago-gastric cancer at all 30 cancer networks and 156 NHS acute trusts in England. Results Responses were received from all networks and 81% of NHS trusts. All networks provided essential staging investigations and a range of endoscopic palliative therapies. Only 16 of the 30 cancer networks discussed all patients at the specialist multi-disciplinary team meeting and 11 networks had not fully centralised curative surgery. There was also variation between NHS trusts in the integration of the palliative care team, the availability of nurse specialists and the use of dieticians to provide nutritional support. Conclusion There has been considerable progress in reforming oesophago-gastric cancer services but the process of reorganisation is still incomplete and regional differences in service provision exist that may lead to variation in patient outcomes.

  16. Case management used to optimize cancer care pathways: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søndergaard Jens

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of inadequate cancer patient care have given rise to various interventions to support cancer care pathways which, overall, seem poorly studied. Case management (CM is one method that may support a cost-effective, high-quality patient-centred treatment and care. The purpose of this article was to summarise intervention characteristics, outcomes of interest, results, and validity components of the published randomized controlled trials (RCTs examining CM as a method for optimizing cancer care pathways. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched for RCTs published all years up to August 2008. Identified papers were included if they passed the following standards. Inclusion criteria: 1 The intervention should meet the criteria for CM which includes multidisciplinary collaboration, care co-ordination, and it should include in-person meetings between patient and the case manager aimed at supporting, informing and educating the patient. 2 The intervention should focus on cancer patient care. 3 The intervention should aim to improve subjective or objective quality outcomes, and effects should be reported in the paper. Exclusion criteria: Studies centred on cancer screening or palliative cancer care. Data extraction was conducted in order to obtain a descriptive overview of intervention characteristics, outcomes of interest and findings. Elements of CONSORT guidelines and checklists were used to assess aspects of study validity. Results The searches identified 654 unique papers, of which 25 were retrieved for scrutiny. Seven papers were finally included. Intervention characteristics, outcomes studied, findings and methodological aspects were all very diverse. Conclusion Due to the scarcity of papers included (seven, significant heterogeneity in target group, intervention setting, outcomes measured and methodologies applied, no conclusions

  17. Assessing primary care in Austria: room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, Florian L; Starfield, Barbara; Sprenger, Martin; Salzer, Helmut J F; Campbell, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    There is emerging evidence that strong primary care achieves better health at lower costs. Although primary care can be measured, in many countries, including Austria, there is little understanding of primary care development. Assessing the primary care development in Austria. A primary care assessment tool developed by Barbara Starfield in 1998 was implemented in Austria. This tool defines 15 primary care characteristics and distinguishes between system and practice characteristics. Each characteristic was evaluated by six Austrian primary care experts and rated as 2 (high), 1 (intermediate) or 0 (low) points, respectively, to their primary care strength (maximum score: n = 30). Austria received 7 out of 30 points; no characteristic was rated as '2' but 8 were rated as '0'. Compared with the 13 previously assessed countries, Austria ranks 10th of 14 countries and is classified as a 'low primary care' country. This study provides the first evidence concerning primary care in Austria, benchmarking it as weak and in need of development. The practicable application of an existing assessment tool can be encouraging for other countries to generate evidence about their primary care system as well.

  18. Language barriers and patient-centered breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Hwang, E Shelley; Nickleach, Dana; Kaplan, Celia P

    2011-08-01

    Provision of high quality patient-centered care is fundamental to eliminating healthcare disparities in breast cancer. We investigated physicians' experiences communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer patients. Survey of a random sample of California oncologists and surgeons. Of 301 respondents who reported treating LEP patients, 46% were oncologists, 75% male, 68% in private practice, and on average 33% of their patients had breast cancer. Only 40% reported at least sometimes using professional interpretation services. Although 75% felt they were usually able to communicate effectively with LEP patients, more than half reported difficulty discussing treatment options and prognosis, and 56% acknowledged having less-patient-centered treatment discussions with LEP breast cancer patients. In multivariate analysis, use of professional interpreters was associated with 53% lower odds of reporting less-patient-centered treatment discussions (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.26-0.85). California surgeons and oncologists caring for breast cancer patients report substantial communication challenges when faced with a language barrier. Although use of professional interpreters is associated with more patient-centered communication, there is a low rate of professional interpreter utilization. Future research and policy should focus on increasing access to and reimbursement for professional interpreter services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quality of palliative care. Perspective of Lebanese patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Doumit, Myrna; Abboud, Sarah; Dimassi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Lebanon is increasing, and patients are living longer due to early detection and enhanced methods of treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of life, symptom management, functional ability, and the quality of palliative care in adult Lebanese cancer patients at the American University of Beirut-Medical Center. A cross sectional survey design was used. A number of internationally validated instruments were translated into Arabic. A total of 200 cancer patients participated in the study; the majority was female with breast cancer and mean age 54. The cognitive functioning domain of the Quality of Life scale was found to have the highest score and social functioning the lowest. The most prevalent symptom was lack of energy and the least prevalent was shortness of breath. Nausea and pain were the symptoms mostly treated. In conclusion, this sample reported a fair quality of life and social functioning with high prevalence of physical and psychological symptoms. Inadequate symptom management was reported especially for the psychological symptoms. Participants reported a satisfactory level with the quality of care. Based on these results, providing adequate symptom management and social support to Lebanese cancer patients is highly recommended.

  20. Hypnosis in breast cancer care: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger; Lauche, Romy; Paul, Anna; Langhorst, Jost; Kümmel, Sherko; Dobos, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    Many breast cancer patients and survivors experience pain and emotional stress related to their disease, its diagnostic procedures, or treatment. Hypnosis has long been used for the treatment of such symptoms. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the effectiveness of hypnosis in women with breast cancer, breast cancer survivors, and in women undergoing diagnostic breast biopsy. PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and CAMBASE were screened through February 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of hypnosis in women with breast cancer or undergoing diagnostic breast biopsy. RCTs on postmenopausal women without a history of breast cancer were also eligible. Primary outcomes were pain, distress, fatigue, nausea/vomiting, and hot flashes. Safety was defined as secondary outcome measure. Risk of bias was assessed by 2 reviewers independently using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Thirteen RCTs with 1357 patients were included. In women undergoing diagnostic breast biopsy (3 RCTs), hypnosis positively influenced pain and distress; 1 RCT on breast cancer surgery found effects of hypnosis on pain, distress, fatigue, and nausea. For women undergoing radiotherapy (3 RCTs), hypnosis combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy improved distress and fatigue. In 3 RCTs on women with and without a history of breast cancer experiencing hot flashes, hypnosis improved hot flashes and distress. Three RCTs on women with metastatic breast cancer found effects on pain and distress. This systematic review found sparse but promising evidence for the effectiveness of hypnosis in breast cancer care. While more research is needed to underpin these results, hypnosis can be considered as an ancillary intervention in the management of breast cancer-related symptoms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Estimation of an optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate for cancer: setting an evidence-based benchmark for quality cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S A; Ng, W L; Do, V

    2015-02-01

    There is wide variation in the proportion of newly diagnosed cancer patients who receive chemotherapy, indicating the need for a benchmark rate of chemotherapy utilisation. This study describes an evidence-based model that estimates the proportion of new cancer patients in whom chemotherapy is indicated at least once (defined as the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate). The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can act as a benchmark for measuring and improving the quality of care. Models of optimal chemotherapy utilisation were constructed for each cancer site based on indications for chemotherapy identified from evidence-based treatment guidelines. Data on the proportion of patient- and tumour-related attributes for which chemotherapy was indicated were obtained, using population-based data where possible. Treatment indications and epidemiological data were merged to calculate the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate. Monte Carlo simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to assess the effect of controversial chemotherapy indications and variations in epidemiological data on our model. Chemotherapy is indicated at least once in 49.1% (95% confidence interval 48.8-49.6%) of all new cancer patients in Australia. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rates for individual tumour sites ranged from a low of 13% in thyroid cancers to a high of 94% in myeloma. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can serve as a benchmark for planning chemotherapy services on a population basis. The model can be used to evaluate service delivery by comparing the benchmark rate with patterns of care data. The overall estimate for other countries can be obtained by substituting the relevant distribution of cancer types. It can also be used to predict future chemotherapy workload and can be easily modified to take into account future changes in cancer incidence, presentation stage or chemotherapy indications. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by

  2. The challenge of quality cancer care for family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given, Barbara A; Given, Charles W; Sherwood, Paula

    2012-11-01

    To provide an overview of the factors that challenge family caregivers of patients with cancer and review issues related to the role of family members as caregivers. Research based and other articles and reports from the government and professional groups. There are many challenges for family caregivers of cancer patients. Nurses must be sensitive to the unmet needs of caregivers and provide the support they need to provide patient care. Health policy is needed to provide support to these caregivers. Nurses must take a leadership role to provide standards, guidelines, and best practices for support of the caregiver. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Management of infections in palliative and terminal cancer care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochor, M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cancer are highly susceptible to infections. There is a lack of evidencebased guidelines or protocols for their management in palliative and endoflife care. To define an optimal dia-gnostic approach and therapeutic management of infections in patients with palliative and terminal cancer care. Along with thromboembolic disease and cancer progression, infections are the most frequent causes of death in oncology. Besides the impact on mortality, they are accompanied with a myriad of symptoms decreasing the quality of life. High incidence of infectons is due to a malignancy itself, the oncolgical therapy and host factors. There is a lack of evidencebased guidelines and protocols for the therapy of infections in palliative and terminal cancer care. Most of available studies are retrospective in nature, with diverse methods and cohorts. Incidence of infections in these patient oscillates between 16- 55% in specialized palliative units, and rises up to 83% in acute care hospitals. From the epidemiologic viewpoint, urinary (39- 42%) and respiratory infections (22- 36%) are the most frequent cases, followed by soft tissue and skin infections (6- 12%) and bacteremias (5- 14%). At present, the antibio-tic treatment does not seem to have a positive impact on the survival rate. Symptom control antibio-tic therapy as a means of symptom control still remains controversial, since it meets this purpose only in a few percents of studies. The most successful is the symtom control in urinary tract infections (60- 79%), in contrast to other sites of infection (30- 43%). In the last week of life there the symptom control is achieved only in 10% of patient. One should always consider the prognosis, actual preformance status and patients preferences when it comes to the management of dia-gnostics and therapy of infections. If the prognosis counts in weeks or months the dia-gnostics and therapy should not differ from the approach to any other oncological patient

  4. Patterns of care in the initial management of women with vulvar cancers in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, L; Schultz, S; Prysbysz, R; Barbera, L; Saskin, R; Gunraj, N; Wilton, A S; Simunovic, M; Urbach, D

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate the planning of future resources for cancer services in Ontario, Cancer Care Ontario commissioned an evaluation of operative services delivered for vulvar cancer. Women with an incident diagnosis of vulvar malignancy were identified from 1, April 2003 to 31 March, 2004 using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Record linkages were created to other provincial health databases such as the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. Vulvar cancers affected 148 women. Disease specific rates of cancer were higher in rural areas and in women in the lower income quintiles. No surgery occurred in 17.6% of women. Use of surgery did not appear to vary by urban/rural residence or LHIN. Ontario's 17 gynecologic oncologists performed 75% of the surgeries. Groin lymphadenectomy rate was 52.8%. Surgery was performed in the LHIN of residence for 41% of women. All women were assessed by CXR. CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis occurred in 77%. MRIs were done infrequently. Radiation consults were preformed in half of the women with vulvar cancer but treatment was only delivered in half of those seen. Medical oncologists saw about 10% of women with gynecologic cancers. There appear to be variations in incidence rates of vulvar cancer with disease being more frequent in rural areas. Subspecialty care from gynecologic oncologists was provided to 75% of women. Rates of lymphadenectomy as part of a surgical attempt occurred in 52.8% of women. These data would be enhanced with further information such as comorbidity, treatment intent (palliative/curative), histology, grade and stage.

  5. Cost effectiveness of a survivorship care plan for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Doug; Grunfeld, Eva; Coyle, Kathryn; Pond, Gregory; Julian, Jim A; Levine, Mark N

    2014-03-01

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) are recommended for patients who have completed primary treatment and are transitioning to routine follow-up care. However, SCPs may be costly, and their effectiveness is unproven. The study objective was to assess the cost effectiveness of an SCP for breast cancer survivors transitioning to routine follow-up care with their own primary care physician (PCP) using data from a recent randomized controlled trial (RCT). Resource use and utility data for 408 patients with breast cancer enrolled in the RCT comparing an SCP with standard care (no SCP) were used. The intervention group received a 30-minute educational session with a nurse and their SCP, and their PCPs received the SCP plus a full guideline on follow-up. Analysis assessed the societal costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for the intervention group and the control group over the 2-year follow-up of the RCT. Uncertainty concerning cost effectiveness was assessed through nonparametric bootstrapping and deterministic sensitivity analysis. The no-SCP group had better outcomes than the SCP group: total costs per patient were lower for standard care (Canadian $698 v $765), and total QALYs were almost equivalent (1.42 for standard care v 1.41 for the SCP). The probability that the SCP was cost effective was 0.26 at a threshold value of a QALY of $50,000. A variety of sensitivity analyses did not change the conclusions of the analysis. This SCP would be costly to introduce and would not be a cost effective use of scarce health care resources.

  6. Potential risks associated with traditional herbal medicine use in cancer care: A study of Middle Eastern oncology health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah; Goldstein, Lee Hilary; Mutafoglu, Kamer; Omran, Suha; Schiff, Elad; Charalambous, Haris; Dweikat, Tahani; Ghrayeb, Ibtisam; Bar-Sela, Gil; Turker, Ibrahim; Hassan, Azza; Hassan, Esmat; Saad, Bashar; Nimri, Omar; Kebudi, Rejin; Silbermann, Michael

    2016-02-15

    The authors assessed the use of herbal medicine by Middle Eastern patients with cancer, as reported by their oncology health care professionals (HCPs). Herbal products identified by the study HCPs were evaluated for potential negative effects. Oncology HCPs from 16 Middle Eastern countries received a 17-item questionnaire asking them to list 5 herbal products in use by their patients with cancer. A literature search (PubMed, Micromedex, AltMedDex, and the Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database) was conducted to identify safety-related concerns associated with the products listed. A total of 339 HCPs completed the study questionnaire (response rate of 80.3%), identifying 44 herbal and 3 nonherbal nutritional supplements. Safety-related concerns were associated with 29 products, including herb-drug interactions with altered pharmacodynamics (15 herbs), direct toxic effects (18 herbs), and increased in vitro response of cancer cells to chemotherapy (7 herbs). Herbal medicine use, which is prevalent in Middle Eastern countries, has several potentially negative effects that include direct toxic effects, negative interactions with anticancer drugs, and increased chemosensitivity of cancer cells, requiring a reduction in dose-density. Oncology HCPs working in countries in which herbal medicine use is prevalent need to better understand the implications of this practice. The presence of integrative physicians with training in complementary and traditional medicine can help patients and their HCPs reach an informed decision regarding the safety and effective use of these products. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  7. Age and Gender Moderate the Impact of Early Palliative Care in Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Ryan D; Greer, Joseph A; El-Jawahri, Areej; Traeger, Lara; Gallagher, Emily R; Park, Elyse R; Jackson, Vicki A; Pirl, William F; Temel, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Studies demonstrate that early palliative care (EPC) improves advanced cancer patients' quality of life (QOL) and mood. However, it remains unclear whether the role of palliative care differs based upon patients' demographic characteristics. We explored whether age and gender moderate the improvements in QOL and mood seen with EPC. We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Patients received either EPC integrated with oncology care or oncology care alone. We assessed the degree to which QOL (Trial Outcome Index [TOI]) and mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS] and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 [PHQ-9]) outcomes at week 12 varied by patient age (early palliative care improves patients' quality of life and mood differentially based on their age and gender. Specifically, males and younger patients receiving early palliative care experienced better quality of life and mood than those receiving oncology care alone. Conversely, females and older patients did not experience this treatment effect. Thus, palliative care interventions may need to be tailored to patients' age- and gender-specific care needs. Studying how patients' demographic characteristics affect their experience with palliative care will enable the development of interventions targeted to the distinct supportive care needs of patients with cancer. ©AlphaMed Press.

  8. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  9. [The Nutritional Care Experience of a Post-Operative Periampullary Cancer Patient With Cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yan-Ting; Chiang, Pin-Yi; Shun, Shiow-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Cachexia is one of the most widely overlooked of the syndromes that are experienced by cancer patients. This syndrome is especially prevalent among patients with gastroenterology tract cancer. Although the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) issued palliative-care practice guidelines for cachexia in 2015, guidelines have yet to be issued for the clinical setting. The authors reviewed the literature and applied their clinical experience to create an approach for identifying the degree of cachexia in a post-operative patient with periampullary cancer. This approach assesses the nutritional status, physical status, laboratory results, and gastrointestinal system functions of the patient using the Cachexia Assessment Scale (CAS) and NCCN Practice Guidelines for Cachexia. The patient improved under nursing care with an increase in nutritional intake and physical activity facilitating their process of post-surgical physical recovery. The authors hope that this experience using the combined CAS-NCCN Practice Guidelines will help clinical caregivers better understand how to apply the relevant guidelines in clinical settings. The developed approach may help nurses assess the comprehensive nutrition status of patients and related factors in order to provide interventions that will decrease the progression of cachexia effectively and promote quality of life.

  10. Health-related quality of life and the perceived palliative care needs among oral cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C V Deepan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Survival rate is the only outcome measure for cancer management which fails to recognize the impact of on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Optimizing QoL before a timely, dignified, and peaceful death is the primary aim of good palliative care. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the HRQoL of oral cancer patients and explore whether there is a need for professional palliative services to focus on social, psychological, and spiritual well-being. Materials and Methods: A mixed methodological approach was adopted. A validated closed-ended questionnaire was used to assess the HRQoL, and in-depth interviews were conducted to assess the palliative care needs. The study encompassed of 876 participants, among which 317 consented for administration of questionnaire and 12 participants consented for interview. Karl Pearson's coefficient test was used to find the association between the well-being score and demographic factors. Results: The general well-being of these patients was compromised. Elderly participants experienced bad (31% general well-being. Semi-skilled (7% and unskilled workers (5% experienced bad general well-being while unemployed (13% and retired (13% experienced good general well-being in majority. Conclusions: HRQoLs are low in oral cancer patients, and early referral for palliative care might increase the QoL.

  11. The contributions of family care-givers at end of life: A national post-bereavement census survey of cancer carers' hours of care and expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Christine; Hanratty, Barbara; Pilling, Mark; van den Berg, Bernard; Grande, Gunn

    2017-04-01

    Family members provide vital care at end of life, enabling patients to remain at home. Such informal care contributes significantly to the economy while supporting patients' preferences and government policy. However, the value of care-givers' contributions is often underestimated or overlooked in evaluations. Without information on the activities and expenditures involved in informal care-giving, it is impossible to provide an accurate assessment of carers' contribution to end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to investigate the contributions and expenditure of informal, family care-giving in end-of-life cancer care. A national census survey of English cancer carers was conducted. Survey packs were mailed to 5271 people who registered the death of a relative to cancer during 1-16 May 2015. Data were collected on decedents' health and situation, care support given, financial expenditure resulting from care, carer well-being and general background information. In all, 1504 completed surveys were returned (28.5%). Over 90% of respondents reported spending time on care-giving in the last 3 months of the decedent's life, contributing a median 69 h 30 min of care-giving each week. Those who reported details of expenditure (72.5%) spent a median £370 in the last 3 months of the decedent's life. Carers contribute a great deal of time and money for day-to-day support and care of patients. This study has yielded a unique, population-level data set of end-of-life care-giving and future analyses will provide estimates of the economic value of family care-givers' contributions.

  12. Medical care utilization and costs on end-of-life cancer patients: The role of hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Chen, Chun-Ku; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shu-Lin; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Tsai, Shih-Tzu; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2016-11-01

    Although there are 3 hospice care programs for terminal cancer patients in Taiwan, the medical utilization and expenses for these patients by programs have not been well-explored. The aim of this study was to examine the medical utilization and expenses of terminal cancer patients under different programs of hospice care in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.This was a retrospective observational study by secondary data analysis. By using the National Health Insurance claim database and Hospice Shared Care Databases. We identified cancer descents from these databases and classified them into nonhospice care and hospice care groups based on different combination of hospice care received. We then analyzed medical utilization including inpatient care, outpatient care, emergency room visits, and medical expenses by patient groups in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.Among 118,376 cancer descents, 46.9% ever received hospice care. Patients had ever received hospice care had significantly lower average medical utilization and expenses in their last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P care group. Each hospice care group had significantly less medical utilization and expenses in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P care program have different effects on medical care utilization reduction and cost-saving at different stage of the end of life of terminal cancer patients.

  13. Primary Patient-Derived Cancer Cells and Their Potential for Personalized Cancer Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Kodack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalized cancer therapy is based on a patient’s tumor lineage, histopathology, expression analyses, and/or tumor DNA or RNA analysis. Here, we aim to develop an in vitro functional assay of a patient’s living cancer cells that could complement these approaches. We present methods for developing cell cultures from tumor biopsies and identify the types of samples and culture conditions associated with higher efficiency of model establishment. Toward the application of patient-derived cell cultures for personalized care, we established an immunofluorescence-based functional assay that quantifies cancer cell responses to targeted therapy in mixed cell cultures. Assaying patient-derived lung cancer cultures with this method showed promise in modeling patient response for diagnostic use. This platform should allow for the development of co-clinical trial studies to prospectively test the value of drug profiling on tumor-biopsy-derived cultures to direct patient care.

  14. Is admittance to specialised palliative care among cancer patients related to sex, age and cancer diagnosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adsersen, Mathilde; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Specialised palliative care (SPC) takes place in specialised services for patients with complex symptoms and problems. Little is known about what determines the admission of patients to SPC and whether there are differences in relation to institution type. The aims of the study were...... to investigate whether cancer patients' admittance to SPC in Denmark varied in relation to sex, age and diagnosis, and whether the patterns differed by type of institution (hospital-based palliative care team/unit, hospice, or both). METHODS: This was a register-based study of adult patients living in Denmark...... who died from cancer in 2010-2012. Data sources were the Danish Palliative Care Database, Danish Register of Causes of Death and Danish Cancer Registry. The associations between the explanatory variables (sex, age, diagnosis) and admittance to SPC were investigated using logistic regression. RESULTS...

  15. The role of a public-private partnership: translating science to improve cancer care in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Donna M; Kaluzny, Arnold D

    2014-01-01

    Health reform is bringing about changes in the healthcare environment, but an equally significant transformation is occurring in science with the sequencing of the human genome and the increasing role of personalized medicine in the delivery of new cancer therapies. These changes directly affect the ability of hospitals to provide value-based, state-of-the-art care and represent major strategic decisions that must be made by management. In the United States, an estimated 85% of cancer patients receive care in community settings, but patients' outcomes are often not equivalent to those achieved in academic health centers. Care of cancer patients in the community is often fragmented, as most oncologists are in private practice and have limited access to formal mechanisms for coordinating care across specialties or with primary care physicians. Furthermore, genetic analysis, advanced diagnostic tests, and clinical trials are not always available to patients in these settings. The evolution of cancer care requires a reconfiguration of processes and investment in new services. In response, the National Cancer Institute launched the Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 as a public-private partnership with 16 community hospitals. This article draws on the results of an external evaluation of the pilot program and assesses the role of such a partnership as a means of facilitating the translation of the developing science to the community setting, with reference to the role of management in the implementation of such partnerships.

  16. Factors that affect quality of dying and death in terminal cancer patients on inpatient palliative care units: perspectives of bereaved family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Young; Chang, Yoon Jung; Song, Hye Young; Jho, Hyun Jung; Lee, Myung Kyung

    2013-04-01

    There is an increasing use of palliative care units (PCUs) for the treatment of terminally ill cancer patients. Thus, it is important to evaluate the care and quality of life of terminally ill cancer patients treated in PCUs so that improvements can be made. Limited research has investigated the quality of dying and death in PCUs. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with the quality of dying and death for terminally ill cancer patients in PCUs. Data were collected from 570 bereaved family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. All patients were registered and died in one of the 40 inpatient PCUs designated by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare. We assessed the perceived timing of referral to a PCU; the quality of end-of-life cancer care with the Care Evaluation Scale; and the quality of dying and death with the Good Death Inventory. The perception of appropriate timing of referral, use of a community-based PCU, and higher quality of cancer care as assessed by the Care Evaluation Scale were associated with good dying and death in all domains of the Good Death Inventory. The good quality of end-of-life care in a PCU improves the quality of dying in terminally ill cancer patients. The data have the potential to guide the development of interventions aimed at achieving a good quality of dying for patients with terminal cancer. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between physical and psychological symptoms and health care utilization in hospitalized patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Ryan D; El-Jawahri, Areej; Moran, Samantha M; D'Arpino, Sara M; Johnson, P Connor; Lage, Daniel E; Wong, Risa L; Pirl, William F; Traeger, Lara; Lennes, Inga T; Cashavelly, Barbara J; Jackson, Vicki A; Greer, Joseph A; Ryan, David P; Hochberg, Ephraim P; Temel, Jennifer S

    2017-12-01

    Patients with advanced cancer often experience frequent and prolonged hospitalizations; however, the factors associated with greater health care utilization have not been described. We sought to investigate the relation between patients' physical and psychological symptom burden and health care utilization. We enrolled patients with advanced cancer and unplanned hospitalizations from September 2014-May 2016. Upon admission, we assessed physical (Edmonton Symptom Assessment System [ESAS]) and psychological symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire 4 [PHQ-4]). We examined the relationship between symptom burden and healthcare utilization using linear regression for hospital length of stay (LOS) and Cox regression for time to first unplanned readmission within 90 days. We adjusted all models for age, sex, marital status, comorbidity, education, time since advanced cancer diagnosis, and cancer type. We enrolled 1,036 of 1,152 (89.9%) consecutive patients approached. Over one-half reported moderate/severe fatigue, poor well being, drowsiness, pain, and lack of appetite. PHQ-4 scores indicated that 28.8% and 28.0% of patients had depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. The mean hospital LOS was 6.3 days, and the 90-day readmission rate was 43.1%. Physical symptoms (ESAS: unstandardized coefficient [B], 0.06; P cancer experience a high symptom burden, which is significantly associated with prolonged hospitalizations and readmissions. Interventions are needed to address the symptom burden of this population to improve health care delivery and utilization. Cancer 2017;123:4720-4727. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  19. A specialized home care intervention improves survival among older post-surgical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkle, R; Strumpf, N E; Nuamah, I F; Adler, D C; Cooley, M E; Jepson, C; Lusk, E J; Torosian, M

    2000-12-01

    Changes in the healthcare system have resulted in shortened hospital stays, moving the focus of care from the hospital to the home. Patients are discharged post-operatively with ongoing needs, and whether they receive nursing care post-hospitalization can influence their recovery and survival. Little information is available about the factors that influence outcomes, including the survival of older cancer patients after cancer surgery. To compare the length of survival of older post-surgical cancer patients who received a specialized home care intervention provided by advanced practice nurses (APNs) with that of patients who received usual follow-up care in an ambulatory setting. We also assessed potential predictors of survival in terms of depressive symptoms, symptom distress, functional status, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, age of patient, and stage of disease. A randomized controlled intervention study. Discharged older cancer patients after surgery at a Comprehensive Cancer Center in southeastern Pennsylvania. Three hundred seventy-five patients aged 60 to 92, newly diagnosed with solid cancers, were treated surgically between February 1993 and December 1995. One hundred ninety patients were randomized to the intervention groups and 185 to the usual care group. The intervention was a standardized protocol that consisted of standard assessment and management post-surgical guidelines, doses of instructional content, and schedules of contacts. The intervention lasted 4 weeks and consisted of three home visits and five telephone contacts provided by APNs. Both the patients and their family caregivers received comprehensive clinical assessments, monitoring, and teaching, including skills training. Time from enrollment of patients into the study until death or last date known alive at the end of November 1996. During the 44-month follow-up period, 93 (24.8%) of 375 patients died. Forty-one (22%) of those who died were patients in the specialized home care

  20. Care Management by Oncology Nurses To Address Palliative Care Needs: A Pilot Trial To Assess Feasibility, Acceptability, and Perceived Effectiveness of the CONNECT Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas; Rosenzweig, Margaret; Chu, Edward; Moore, Charity; Ellis, Peter; Nikolajski, Peggy; Ford, Colleen; Tiver, Greer; McCarthy, Lauren; Arnold, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Specialty palliative care is not accessible for many patients with advanced cancer. There is a need to find alternative palliative care strategies in oncology clinics. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of an oncology nurse-led care management approach to improve primary palliative care. Methods: The study design was a single-arm pilot trial of the Care Management by Oncology Nurses (CONNECT) intervention, in which registered oncology nurses receive specialized training and work closely with oncologists to (1) address symptom needs; (2) engage patients and caregivers in advance care planning; (3) provide emotional support; and (4) coordinate care. The subjects were 23 patients with advanced cancer, 19 caregivers, and 5 oncologists from a community oncology clinic in western Pennsylvania. Feasibility was assessed through enrollment rates, outcome assessment rates, and visit checklists. Patients, caregivers, and oncologists completed three-month assessments of acceptability and perceived effectiveness. Results: The consent-to-approach rate was 86% and enrolled-to-consent rate, 77%. CONNECT was implemented according to protocol for all participants. No participants withdrew after enrollment. Four patients died during the study; three-month outcome assessments were completed with all remaining participants (83%). Patients and caregivers reported high satisfaction with CONNECT and perceived the intervention as helpful in addressing symptoms (85%), coping (91%), and planning for the future (82%). Oncologists unanimously agreed that CONNECT improved the quality of care provided for patients with advanced cancer. Conclusion: An oncology nurse-led care management intervention is feasible, acceptable, and was perceived to be effective for improving provision of primary palliative care. A randomized trial of CONNECT is warranted. PMID:25517219

  1. [Palliative care for patients with oesophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, T; Gockel, I; Gönner, U; Schmidberger, H

    2010-12-01

    Palliative therapy for patients with incurable oesophageal cancer necessitates a broad spectrum of different measures to relieve symptoms. Surgical procedures (palliative tumour resections, bypass surgery) are rarely indicated on account of the high morbidity. Preeminent treatment options to eliminate dysphagia and to ensure food passage are endoscopic procedures, in particular, the endoscopically or radiologically guided stent implantation. In case of failure, a percutaneous feeding tube and general palliative measures are required. Furthermore tumour-specific therapies (brachytherapy, radiochemotherapy, chemotherapy) are applied. The choice of the procedure is based on the symptoms, the tumour situation, the patients' general status, and their preferences. If possible, an individual, interdisciplinary treatment concept for each patient should be designed and modified according to the course of the disease. It should be the aim of future studies to elucidate the optimal combination of a merely symptomatic treatment with tumour-specific measures under the aspect of the achievable quality of life. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart ˙ New York.

  2. Palliative care needs assessment in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Daisy J A; Johnson, Miriam J; Spruit, Martijn A

    2017-11-27

    The unmet palliative care needs of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are well known. Palliative care needs assessment is paramount for timely provision of palliative care. The present review provides an overview of palliative care needs assessment in patients with CHF: the role of prognostic tools, the role of the surprise question, and the role of palliative care needs assessment tools. Multiple prognostic tools are available, but offer little guidance for individual patients. The surprise question is a simple tool to create awareness about a limited prognosis, but the reliability in CHF seems less than in oncology and further identification and assessment of palliative care needs is required. Several tools are available to identify palliative care needs. Data about the ability of these tools to facilitate timely initiation of palliative care in CHF are lacking. Several tools are available aiming to facilitate timely introduction of palliative care. Focus on identification of needs rather than prognosis appears to be more fitting for people with CHF. Future studies are needed to explore whether and to what extent these tools can help in addressing palliative care needs in CHF in a timely manner.

  3. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Klein

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL, fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  4. The Project ENABLE II Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Balan, Stefan; Brokaw, Frances C.; Seville, Janette; Hull, Jay G.; Li, Zhongze; Tosteson, Tor; Byock, Ira R.; Ahles, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Context There are few randomized controlled trials of the effectiveness of palliative care. Objective To determine the effect of a palliative care intervention on quality of life (QOL), symptom intensity, mood, and resource utilization. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled trial (November 2003-May 2008) of 322 patients with advanced cancer and an identified caregiver in a rural, NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center (the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH) and affiliated outreach clinics and Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center (White River Junction, VT). Intervention A multi-component, psycho-educational, palliative care intervention (Project ENABLE) conducted by an advanced practice nurse consisting of 4 weekly educational sessions and monthly follow-up until death or study completion. Main Outcome Measures (1) The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative (range: 0 to 184; higher scores indicate better QOL), (2) Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (range: 0 to 900; higher scores indicate greater symptom intensity), (3) Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (range: 0 to 60; higher scores indicate more depressive symptoms), completed at baseline, 1 month and every 3 months until death or study completion, (4) days in hospital, intensive care unit (ICU), and emergency department visits recorded in the medical record. Results 322 participants with gastrointestinal (41%), lung (36%), genitourinary (12%), and breast (10%) cancer were randomized. Estimated treatment effects (intervention minus usual care) for all subjects were 4.6 (P = .02) for QOL, −27.8 (P = .06) for symptom intensity, and −1.8 (P = .02) for depressed mood. Estimated average treatment effects in the sample of participants who died during the study were 8.6 (P = .02) for QOL, −24.2 (P = .24) for symptom intensity, and −2.7 (P = .03) for depressed mood. Days in hospital, intensive care unit, and emergency department visits were not different

  5. Assessing effects of structural zeros on models of canine cancer incidence: a case study of the Swiss Canine Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Boo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological research of canine cancers could inform comparative studies of environmental determinants for a number of human cancers. However, such an approach is currently limited because canine cancer data sources are still few in number and often incomplete. Incompleteness is typically due to under-ascertainment of canine cancers. A main reason for this is because dog owners commonly do not seek veterinary care for this diagnosis. Deeper knowledge on under-ascertainment is critical for modelling canine cancer incidence, as an indication of zero incidence might originate from the sole absence of diagnostic examinations within a given sample unit. In the present case study, we investigated effects of such structural zeros on models of canine cancer incidence. In doing so, we contrasted two scenarios for modelling incidence data retrieved from the Swiss Canine Cancer Registry. The first scenario was based on the complete enumeration of incidence data for all Swiss municipal units. The second scenario was based on a filtered sample that systematically discarded structural zeros in those municipal units where no diagnostic examination had been performed. By means of cross-validation, we assessed and contrasted statistical performance and predictive power of the two modelling scenarios. This analytical step allowed us to demonstrate that structural zeros impact on the generalisability of the model of canine cancer incidence, thus challenging future comparative studies of canine and human cancers. The results of this case study show that increased awareness about the effects of structural zeros is critical to epidemiological research.

  6. A Comparative Study on Resilience, Perceived Social Support and Hopelessness Among Cancer Patients Treated with Curative and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Ravindran Ottilingam; Devamani, Kiran A

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress is common among patients affected by cancer. In this study, we examined the relationship between resilience, social support, and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care. Sixty cancer patients in the age range of 18-65 years were randomly selected and divided into two groups based on their treatment intent namely, curative care (n = 30) and palliative care (n = 30). Both groups were assessed by the following instruments: Bharathiar University Resilience Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Resilience was significantly associated with less hopelessness and higher levels of perceived social support. Cancer patients are found to be resilient, and the role of social support and hopelessness on promoting resilience cannot be ignored.

  7. Cervical cancer screening in primary health care setting in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Aro, Arja R.; Rasch, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of visual inspection with the use of acetic acid (VIA) as a screening method for cervical cancer, an alternative to the Pap smear used in primary health care setting in Sudan, and to compare sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values......, and histological diagnosis of positive cases of both tests. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 934 asymptomatic women living in Khartoum, Sudan, was conducted during 2009-2010. A semi-structured questionnaire containing socio-economic and reproductive variables was used to collect data from each participant...... of this study showed that VIA has higher sensitivity and lower specificity compared to Pap smear, but a combination of both tests has greater sensitivity and specificity than each test independently. It indicates that VIA is useful for screening of cervical cancer in the primary health care setting in Sudan...

  8. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (II/V)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusint, B; Vich, P; Ávarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Díaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family doctors need to thoroughly understand this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The second one deals with population screening and its controversies, screening in high-risk women, and the current recommendations. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors, and helping them to be able to care for their patients for their benefit throughout their illness. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Hereditary breast cancer: an update on risk assessment and genetic testing in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Ashley R; Onstad, Michaela A

    2015-08-01

    The last 5 years have brought significant innovation and advancement in the genetics of breast cancer. This clinical opinion aims to summarize and update current approaches to the care of women at risk for a hereditary predisposition to breast cancer. Implications of the BRCA mutation and several other hereditary syndromes will be discussed. Risk assessment and criteria for referral to cancer genetic professionals as well as high-risk screening and prophylactic options will be reviewed. Finally, the newly available genetic cancer panels and implications of mutations in some of these lesser known genes will be discussed. As the field of cancer genetics continues to evolve, the education of medical students, residents, and faculty will be paramount to identify appropriate candidates for genetic counseling and testing in conjunction with cancer genetic professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spiritual well-being of Italian advanced cancer patients in the home palliative care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martoni, A A; Varani, S; Peghetti, B; Roganti, D; Volpicella, E; Pannuti, R; Pannuti, F

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluates the spiritual well-being (SpWB) in very advanced cancer patients assisted by the home palliative care program of ANT Foundation, a no-profit Italian organisation. SpWB was assessed by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (FACIT-Sp12), including Meaning, Peace, and Faith subscales. The quality-of-life (QoL) was evaluated by using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General scale. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,055 patients and 683 were compiled and evaluable for analysis. The mean scores of FACIT-Sp12 as well as of QoL were notably lower than reference values for cancer survivors. The FACIT-Sp12 score was higher in patients with less impaired Karnofsky Performance Status, fully participating in religious rituals and living in central Italy. A high Pearson's correlation was found between QoL and FACIT-Sp12 (r = .60), Peace (r = .71) and Meaning (r = .52), while it was marginal for Faith (r = .27). The hierarchical regression analysis showed that FACIT-Sp12 is a significant predictor of QoL. The study suggests that Italian patients with advanced cancer assisted by expert multi-professional teams in the home palliative care setting have a low level of SpWB thereby highlighting the need for the integration of spiritual support as part of comprehensive cancer care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Cancer incidence in a Cancer Care Unit of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) in Toluca, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Villanueva, Angel; Chacón Sánchez, Jesús; Santillán Arreygue, Leopoldo; Sánchez González, Yolanda; Romero-Figueroa, María del Socorro

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, malignant tumors were responsible for 12% of nearly 56 million deaths that occurred in the world from all causes. To determine the incidence of cancer in a Cancer Care Unit of IMSS in Toluca, Mexico. Prospective cross-sectional study; we identified the primary tumor, age, family history of cancer, comorbidities, risk factors, and ECOG in patients with newly diagnosed cancer. We identified 446 cases, 66.1% were women. The age group of age 50 to 59 had the highest number of cases (98). The most common cancers in women are breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer, and in men, testicular, prostate, and colorectal cancer. The most common cancers in both sexes were breast cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, and testicular cancer.

  12. Family Perspectives on Aggressive Cancer