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Sample records for canada consensus meeting

  1. Proceedings from an international consensus meeting on posttransplantation diabetes mellitus : recommendations and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharif, A.; Hecking, M.; de Vries, A. P. J.; Porrini, E.; Hornum, M.; Rasoul-Rockenschaub, S.; Berlakovich, G.; Krebs, M.; Kautzky-Willer, A.; Schernthaner, G.; Marchetti, P.; Pacini, G.; Ojo, A.; Takahara, S.; Larsen, J. L.; Budde, K.; Eller, K.; Pascual, J.; Jardine, A.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Valderhaug, T. G.; Jenssen, T. G.; Cohney, S.; Saeemann, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    A consensus meeting was held in Vienna on September 8-9, 2013, to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic challenges surrounding development of diabetes mellitus after transplantation. The International Expert Panel comprised 24 transplant nephrologists, surgeons, diabetologists and clinical scientists,

  2. Proceedings from an international consensus meeting on posttransplantation diabetes mellitus: recommendations and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharif, A.; Hecking, M.; de Vries, A.P.;

    2014-01-01

    A consensus meeting was held in Vienna on September 8-9, 2013, to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic challenges surrounding development of diabetes mellitus after transplantation. The International Expert Panel comprised 24 transplant nephrologists, surgeons, diabetologists and clinical scientists......, which met with the aim to review previous guidelines in light of emerging clinical data and research. Recommendations from the consensus discussions are provided in this article. Although the meeting was kidney-centric, reflecting the expertise present, these recommendations are likely to be relevant......-based and intended to serve as a template for planned guidelines update, based on systematic and graded literature review, on the diagnosis and management of PTDM...

  3. Team self-regulation and meeting deadlines in project teams: antecedents and effects of temporal consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, J.M.P.; van Eerde, W.; Rutte, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    In a longitudinal study among 48 project teams, we investigated how temporal consensus (i.e., the extent to which team members have a shared understanding of the temporal aspects of their collective task) affects the ability of teams to establish coordinated action and meet deadlines. In addition, w

  4. Neuroprotection as initial therapy in acute stroke - Third report of an Ad Hoc Consensus Group Meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogousslavsky, J; De Keyser, J; Diener, HC; Fieschi, C; Hacke, W; Kaste, M; Orgogozo, JM; Pulsinelli, W; Wahlgren, NG

    1998-01-01

    Although a considerable body of scientific data is now available on neuroprotection in acute ischaemic stroke, this field is not yet established in clinical practice. At its third meeting, the European Ad Hoc Consensus Group considered the potential for neuroprotection in acute stroke and the practi

  5. Canadian Consensus Guidelines on Use of Amyloid Imaging in Canada: Update and Future Directions from the Specialized Task Force on Amyloid imaging in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforce, Robert; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Rabinovici, Gil D; Dubois, Bruno; Gauthier, S

    2016-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of brain amyloid beta is now clinically available in several countries including the United States and the United Kingdom, but not Canada. It has become an established technique in the field of neuroimaging of aging and dementia, with data incorporated in the new consensus guidelines for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and predementia Alzheimer's disease-related conditions. At this point, there are three US Food and Drug Administration- and European Union-approved tracers. Guided by appropriate use criteria developed in 2013 by the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the utility of amyloid imaging in medical practice is now supported by a growing body of research. In this paper, we aimed to provide an update on the 2012 Canadian consensus guidelines to dementia care practitioners on proper use of amyloid imaging. We also wished to generate momentum for the industry to submit a new drug proposal to Health Canada. A group of local, national, and international dementia experts and imaging specialists met to discuss scenarios in which amyloid PET could be used appropriately. Peer-reviewed and published literature between January 2004 and May 2015 was searched. Technical and regulatory considerations pertaining to Canada were considered. The results of a survey of current practices in Canadian dementia centers were considered. A set of specific clinical and research guidelines was agreed on that defines the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used in Canada. Future research directions were also outlined, notably the importance of studies that would assess the pharmaco-economics of amyloid imaging.

  6. Hot air : meeting Canada's climate change challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.; Jaccard, M.; Rivers, N.

    2007-07-01

    As a large northern country, Canada will change significantly as a result of climate change. Global warming is expected to cause diminutions of snow and ice changes in the Arctic, as well as changes to glaciers, and the mountain snowpacks that feed rivers, and provide sources of fresh water. This book argued that the effects of global warming have been apparent in Canada for many years. Water levels in lakes and rivers have been falling, and a thawing permafrost has led to difficulties in building and maintaining winter roads in the far north. Disturbances such as the mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation in British Columbia have also been attributed to global warming, the beetles are only killed by cold weather. The book also considered Canada's current climate change policies, and discussed attempts to arrive at meaningful and effective strategies. 30 refs.

  7. The Alpha consensus meeting on cryopreservation key performance indicators and benchmarks: proceedings of an expert meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This proceedings report presents the outcomes from an international workshop designed to establish consensus on: definitions for key performance indicators (KPIs) for oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, using either slow freezing or vitrification; minimum performance level values for each KPI, representing basic competency; and aspirational benchmark values for each KPI, representing best practice goals. This report includes general presentations about current practice and factors for consideration in the development of KPIs. A total of 14 KPIs were recommended and benchmarks for each are presented. No recommendations were made regarding specific cryopreservation techniques or devices, or whether vitrification is 'better' than slow freezing, or vice versa, for any particular stage or application, as this was considered to be outside the scope of this workshop.

  8. Lignes directrices pour le suivi des cardiostimulateurs au canada : consensus du groupe de travail canadien sur la cardiostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Fraser JD; M Gillis AM; Irwin; Nishimura; Tyers; Philippon

    2000-03-01

    Un sondage sur les pratiques de cardiostimulation au Canada effectue en 1997 a revele un profond desir pour des lignes directrices nationales sur le suivi des cardiostimulateurs. Ces lignes directrices sur le suivi des cardiostimulateurs representent une declaration de consensus du Groupe de travail canadien sur la cardiostimulation. Le suivi des patients en personne plutot que par moyens transtelephoniques est preferable. Les patients devraient etre examines au minimum dans les 72 heures suivant l'implantation, 2 a 12 semaines et 6 mois apres l'implantation, et annuellement par la suite. Des examens plus frequents peuvent etre requis pour certains patients. Ceci dependra des problemes cardiovasculaires associes et des appareils en particulier. Une visite de suivi typique devrait comprendre un examen cardiovasculaire oriente, l'interrogation du systeme de cardiostimulation et une revue des donnees de telemetrie, un examen du rythme sous-jacent, un examen des seuils de stimulation et de detection et une reprogrammation adequate des parametres pour optimaliser le fonctionnement et la longevite de l'appareil.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients: recommendations from the 2012 European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) consensus meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barbaro, Brunella [Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luis [Coimbra University Hospitals, Coimbra (Portugal); Fenlon, Helen M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Gourtsoyianni, Sofia [University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS FT, London (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Hoeffel, Christine [Reims University Hospital, Reims (France); Kim, Seung Ho [Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Laghi, Andrea [Sapienza - University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Maier, Andrea [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Rafaelsen, Soeren R. [Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Torkzad, Michael R. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart [Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) was conducted following the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Two independent (non-voting) chairs facilitated the meeting. Two hundred and thirty-six items were scored by participants for appropriateness and classified subsequently as appropriate or inappropriate (defined by {>=} 80 % consensus) or uncertain (defined by < 80 % consensus). Items not reaching 80 % consensus were noted. Consensus was reached for 88 % of items: recommendations regarding hardware, patient preparation, imaging sequences, angulation, criteria for MRI assessment and MRI reporting were constructed from these. These expert consensus recommendations can be used as clinical guidelines for primary staging and restaging of rectal cancer using MRI. (orig.)

  10. A meeting of minds: interdisciplinary research in the health sciences in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Judith G; Bainbridge, Lesley; Buchan, Alison; Cribb, Alastair; Drummond, Jane; Gyles, Carlton; Hicks, T Philip; McWilliam, Carol; Paterson, Barbara; Ratner, Pamela A; Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth; Solomon, Patty

    2006-09-26

    Brought together by the newly formed Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS), recognized national leaders in the 6 health sciences disciplines consider the environment for conducting interdisciplinary health research (IDHR) in Canada. Based on first-hand knowledge and thoughtful reflection, the authors argue that although much progress has been made in support of IDHR in Canada, the practical experience of researchers does not always bear this out. This article examines government, industry and academia to identify the cultural and structural characteristics that demand, promote or prevent IDHR in each sector. At its heart is the question, How can universities best support and enhance IDHR, not only for the benefit of science, but also to meet the growing needs of industry and government for intellectual capital? Focusing on the predominant health sciences disciplines, the authors define IDHR as a team of researchers, solidly grounded in their respective disciplines, who come together around an important and challenging health issue, the research question for which is determined by a shared understanding in an interactive and iterative process. In addition, they suggest that IDHR is directly linked to translational research, which is the application of basic science to clinical practice and the generation of scientific questions through clinical observation. This analysis of academic, industry and government sectors is not intended to offer rigorous data on the current state of IDHR in Canada. Rather, the goal is to stimulate research-policy dialogue by suggesting a number of immediate measures that can help promote IDHR in Canada. Recommended measures to support IDHR are aimed at better resourcing and recognition (by universities and granting agencies), along with novel approaches to training, such as government-and industry-based studentships. In addition, we recommend that professional organizations reconsider their policies on publication and governance

  11. Report from the fourth international consensus meeting to harmonize core outcome measures for atopic eczema/dermatitis clinical trials (HOME initiative)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalmers, J. R.; Simpson, E.; Apfelbacher, C. J.; Thomas, K. S.; von Kobyletzki, L.; Schmitt, J.; Singh, J. A.; Svensson, A.; Williams, H. C.; Abuabara, K.; Aoki, V.; Ardeleanu, M.; Awici-Rasmussen, M.; Barbarot, S.; Berents, T. L.; Block, J.; Bragg, A.; Burton, T.; Clemmensen, K. K. Bjerring; Creswell-Melville, A.; Dinesen, M.; Drucker, A.; Eckert, L.; Flohr, C.; Garg, M.; Gerbens, L. A. A.; Graff, A. L. B.; Hanifin, J.; Heinl, D.; Humphreys, R.; Ishii, H. A.; Kataoka, Y.; Leshem, Y. A.; Marquort, B.; Massuel, M. -A.; Merhand, S.; Mizutani, H.; Murota, H.; Murrell, D. F.; Nakahara, T.; Nasr, I.; Nograles, K.; Ohya, Y.; Osterloh, I.; Pander, Jan; Prinsen, C.; Purkins, L.; Ridd, M.; Sach, T.; Schuttelaar, M. -L. A.; Shindo, S.; Smirnova, J.; Sulzer, A.; Gjerde, E. Synnove; Takaoka, R.; Talmo, H. Vestby; Tauber, M.; Torchet, F.; Volke, A.; Wahlgren, C. -F.; Weidinger, S.; Weisshaar, E.; Wollenberg, A.; Yamaga, K.; Zhao, C. Y.; Spuls, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    This article is a report of the fourth meeting of the Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative held in Malmo, Sweden on 23-24 April 2015 (HOME IV). The aim of the meeting was to achieve consensus over the preferred outcome instruments for measuring patient-reported symptoms and qual

  12. Current management of CML patients: Summary of the Italian Consensus Meeting held in Rome, April 11-12, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana; Baccarani, Michele; Bocchia, Monica; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Gozzini, Antonella; Morra, Enrica; Pane, Fabrizio; Pregno, Patrizia; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Rosti, Gianantonio; Specchia, Giorgina; Vigneri, Paolo; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) has evolved rapidly in the last 10 years. The objectives of this national consensus meeting were to describe the optimal procedures to perform at diagnosis, the most appropriate choice of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in the first line setting, the correct monitoring procedures, the appropriate timing for resistance identification allowing a rapid TKI switch, and the future possibility of treatment discontinuation. A panel of experts in CML management were invited for a 2-day workshop. Prior to the conference, the organizing committee selected several topics and assigned them to different physicians divided in four groups. Issues discussed were (1) role of cytogenetic and molecular response monitoring in 2013; (2) frontline treatment of CML in 2013 and therapeutic objectives; (3) how to monitor response and when to change therapy after resistance or non-optimal responses; (4) possible therapy discontinuation after achievement of deep and stable molecular responses. Different national experts reviewed the literature, analyzed levels of evidence for each topic and, after extensive discussions within smaller working groups, presented their conclusions during the meeting. Each consensus aim was then evaluated by a general vote in the plenary sessions.

  13. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. de; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Ares, L.P.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the Amst

  14. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  15. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  16. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  17. [Consensus Meeting of Course Directors in Breast Imaging, 9 May 2009, in Frankfurt am Main - Topic: Masses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schimpfle, M P; Heindel, W; Kettritz, U; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Bick, U

    2010-08-01

    Fourteen directors of breast imaging courses met on behalf of the German Society of Radiology to discuss the actual standards of the diagnosis of masses. Open questions on the fields of mammography, breast ultrasound and breast MRI were elucidated by a presentation of one of the 14 panel members, followed by an electronic anonymous voting. Beside of the panel members, more than 300 participants of the consensus meeting contributed their opinions by electronic voting. Answers with definite majorities (> 75 %), answers with narrow majorities and those with missing majorities were discriminated from each other. The opinions of the plenum were compared to the majorities of the podium and showed only a few critical differences. Due to unequivocal majorities seven answers to important questions concerning the diagnosis of masses can lead to a further standardization of breast cancer diagnosis.

  18. [IV Consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation (SETH) 2012. Liver transplant with non-conventional grafts: Split liver transplantation and non-heart beating donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abradelo, Manuel; Fondevila, Constantino

    2014-03-01

    The disbalance between the number of candidates to liver transplant and the number of liver grafts leads to waiting list mortality. Two potential ways of increasing the number of liver grafts are split liver transplantation and the transplantation of grafts from non-heart beating donors. Both of them were discussed in a consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation in October 2012. This paper outlines the conclusions of that meeting.

  19. Hepatocellular carcinoma: consensus recommendations of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melanie B; Jaffe, Deborah; Choti, Michael M; Belghiti, Jacques; Curley, Steven; Fong, Yuman; Gores, Gregory; Kerlan, Robert; Merle, Phillipe; O'Neil, Bert; Poon, Ronnie; Schwartz, Lawrence; Tepper, Joel; Yao, Francis; Haller, Daniel; Mooney, Margaret; Venook, Alan

    2010-09-01

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults and the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The incidence of HCC in the United States is rising steadily because of the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infection and other causes of hepatic cirrhosis. The majority of patients have underlying hepatic dysfunction, which complicates patient management and the search for safe and effective therapies. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) in HCC was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to identify the key knowledge gaps in HCC and define clinical research priorities. The CTPM structured its review according to current evidence-based treatment modalities in HCC and prioritized the recommendations on the basis of the patient populations representing the greatest unmet medical need.

  20. Consensus Paper-ICIS Expert Meeting Basel 2009 treatment milestones in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamary, Hannah; Roganovic, Jelena; Chitlur, Meera; Nugent, Diane J

    2010-07-01

    The rarity of severe complications of this disease in children makes randomized clinical trials in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) unfeasible. Therefore, the current management recommendations for ITP are largely dependent on clinical expertise and observations. As part of its discussions during the Intercontinental Cooperative ITP Study Group Expert Meeting in Basel, the Management working group recommended that the decision to treat an ITP patient be individualized and based mainly on bleeding symptoms and not on the actual platelet count number and should be supported by bleeding scores using a validated assessment tool. The group stressed the need to develop a uniform validated bleeding score system and to explore new measures to evaluate bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic patients-the role of rituximab as a splenectomy-sparing agent in resistant disease was also discussed. Given the apparently high recurrence rate to rituximab therapy in children and the drug's possible toxicity, the group felt that until more data are available, a conservative approach may be considered, reserving rituximab for patients who failed splenectomy. More studies of the effectiveness and side effects of drugs to treat refractory patients, such as TPO mimetics, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cytotoxic agents are required, as are long-term data on post-splenectomy complications. In the patient with either acute or chronic ITP, using a more personalized approach to treatment based on bleeding symptoms rather than platelet count should result in less toxicity and empower both physicians and families to focus on quality-of-life.

  1. Consensus report of the national cancer institute clinical trials planning meeting on pancreas cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philip A; Mooney, Margaret; Jaffe, Deborah; Eckhardt, Gail; Moore, Malcolm; Meropol, Neal; Emens, Leisha; O'Reilly, Eileen; Korc, Murray; Ellis, Lee; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Rothenberg, Mace; Willett, Christopher; Tempero, Margaret; Lowy, Andrew; Abbruzzese, James; Simeone, Diane; Hingorani, Sunil; Berlin, Jordan; Tepper, Joel

    2009-11-20

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality, despite significant improvements in diagnostic imaging and operative mortality rates. The 5-year survival rate remains less than 5% because of microscopic or gross metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting in pancreatic cancer was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to discuss the integration of basic and clinical knowledge in the design of clinical trials in PDAC. Major emphasis was placed on the enhancement of research to identify and validate the relevant targets and molecular pathways in PDAC, cancer stem cells, and the microenvironment. Emphasis was also placed on developing rational combinations of targeted agents and the development of predictive biomarkers to assist selection of patient subsets. The development of preclinical tumor models that are better predictive of human PDAC must be supported with wider availability to the research community. Phase III clinical trials should be implemented only if there is a meaningful clinical signal of efficacy and safety in the phase II setting. The emphasis must therefore be on performing well-designed phase II studies with uniform sets of basic entry and evaluation criteria with survival as a primary endpoint. Patients with either metastatic or locally advanced PDAC must be studied separately.

  2. Trends in Qualifying Biomarkers in Drug Safety. Consensus of the 2011 Meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agúndez, José A. G.; del Barrio, Jaime; Padró, Teresa; Stephens, Camilla; Farré, Magí; Andrade, Raúl J.; Badimon, Lina; García-Martín, Elena; Vilahur, Gemma; Lucena, M. Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the consensus view on the use of qualifying biomarkers in drug safety, raised within the frame of the XXIV meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology held in Málaga (Spain) in October, 2011. The widespread use of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is a goal that scientists have long been pursuing. Thirty years ago, when molecular pharmacogenomics evolved, we anticipated that these genetic biomarkers would soon obviate the routine use of drug therapies in a way that patients should adapt to the therapy rather than the opposite. This expected revolution in routine clinical practice never took place as quickly nor with the intensity as initially expected. The concerted action of operating multicenter networks holds great promise for future studies to identify biomarkers related to drug toxicity and to provide better insight into the underlying pathogenesis. Today some pharmacogenomic advances are already widely accepted, but pharmacogenomics still needs further development to elaborate more precise algorithms and many barriers to implementing individualized medicine exist. We briefly discuss our view about these barriers and we provide suggestions and areas of focus to advance in the field. PMID:22294980

  3. Core outcome measures for exercise studies in people with multiple sclerosis: recommendations from a multidisciplinary consensus meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lorna; Coote, Susan; Crosbie, Jean; Dixon, Diane; Hale, Leigh; Holloway, Ed; McCrone, Paul; Miller, Linda; Saxton, John; Sincock, Caroline; White, Lesley

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that exercise is beneficial for people with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, statistical pooling of data is difficult because of the diversity of outcome measures used. The objective of this review is to report the recommendations of an International Consensus Meeting for a core set of outcome measures for use in exercise studies in MS. From the 100 categories of the International Classification of Function Core Sets for MS, 57 categories were considered as likely/potentially likely to be affected by exercise and were clustered into seven core groups. Outcome measures to address each group were evaluated regarding, for example, psychometric properties. The following are recommended: Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) or Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) for energy and drive, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) for exercise tolerance, Timed Up and Go (TUG) for muscle function and moving around, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) or Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 Instrument (MSQoL54) for quality of life and body mass index (BMI) or waist-hip ratio (WHR) for the health risks associated with excess body fat. A cost effectiveness analysis and qualitative evaluation should be included where possible. Using these core measures ensures that future meta-analyses of exercise studies in MS are more robust and thus more effectively inform practice.

  4. Tunnelling Association of Canada. Fourth annual general meeting with technical program. Innovation and opportunity. Preprint volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The following papers were presented: opportunities for Canadians in tunnelling; mining related underground construction - what's new in Canada; development in shotcrete for underground support; control of water in tunnelling; support - who needs it.; developments in extruded tunnel lining systems; recent developments in mechanical excavation; technical advancements in raise boring equipment and application; the world's largest- diameter soil tunnel; the ABC's of the Export Development Corporation.

  5. Aligning research to meet policy objectives for migrant families: an example from Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joly MP

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Evidence-based policy making' for immigrants is a complicated undertaking. In striving toward this goal, federal Canadian partners created the Metropolis Project in 1995 to optimize a two-way transfer of knowledge (researchers – policy makers within five Canadian Centres of Excellence focused on migrants newly arrived in Canada. Most recently, Metropolis federal partners, including the Public Health Agency of Canada, defined one of six research priority areas as, immigrant 'families, children, and youth'. In order to build on previous work in the partnership, we sought to determine what has been studied within this research-policy partnership about immigrant 'families, children, and youth' since its inception. Methods Annual reports and working papers produced in the five Centres of Excellence between 1996–2006 were culled. Data on academic works were extracted, results coded according to eleven stated federal policy priority themes, and analyzed descriptively. Results 139 academic works were reviewed. All federal priority themes, but few specific policy questions were addressed. The greatest volume of policy relevant works were identified for Services (n = 42 and Education and Cultural Identity (n = 39 priority themes. Conclusion Research conducted within the last 10 years is available to inform certain, not all, federal policy questions. Greater specificity in federal priorities can be expected to more clearly direct future research within this policy-research partnership.

  6. The challenge of meeting Canada's greenhouse gas reduction targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Larry; Chaudhry, Nikhil

    2010-09-15

    In 2007, Canada's federal government announced its medium and long-term greenhouse gas emissions reduction plan entitled 'Turning the Corner', which proposed emission cuts of 20% below 2006 levels by 2020 and 60% to 70% below 2006 levels by 2050. A government advisory organization, the National Round Table on Environment and Economy presented a set of 'fast and deep' pathways to emissions reduction through the large-scale electrification of the Canadian economy. This paper examines the likelihood of the 'fast and deep' pathways being met by considering the technical report's proposed energy systems, their associated energy sources, and the magnitude of the changes.

  7. Canadian Rheumatology Association Meeting, Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada, February 17-20, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Earl D

    2016-04-15

    The 71st Annual Meeting of The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) was held at the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada, February 17-20, 2016. The program consisted of presentations covering original research, symposia, awards, and lectures. Highlights of the meeting include the following 2016 Award Winners: Distinguished Rheumatologist, Ronald Laxer; Distinguished Investigator, Proton Rahman; Teacher-Educator, Lori Albert; Young Investigator, Nigil Haroon; Best Abstract on Basic Science Research by a Trainee, Liam O'Neil; Best Abstract on Research by a Rheumatology Resident, Valérie Leclair; Best Abstract by a Medical Student, Matthew Jessome; Best Abstract by a Post-Graduate Resident, Hyein Kim; CRA/Arthritis Research Foundation (ARF) Best Epidemiology/Health Services Research Award, Cheryl Barnabe; Summer Studentship Mentor Award, Ines Colmegna; CRA/ARF Best Paediatric Research Award, Lily Lim; CRA/ARF Best Clinical Research Award, Zahi Touma; CRA/ARF Best Basic Science Research Award, Nigil Haroon; Best Abstract on SLE Research by a Trainee - Ian Watson Award, Stephanie Nantes.

  8. Guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada: recommendations of a joint Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Echocardiography Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Anthony J; Bewick, David; Chan, K L; Cujec, Bibiana; Dumesnil, J G; Honos, George; Munt, Brad; Sasson, Zion; Tam, James; Tomlinson, Charles; Aboguddah, Ayman; Ahmed, Shaheeda; Ali, Mohamed; Arsenault, Marie; Ascah, Kathryn; Ashton, Tom; Baird, Michael; Basmadjian, Arsene; Beique, Francois; Blakeley, Michael; Blais, Marie-Josee; Burggraf, Gary; Burwash, Ian; Cochrane, Jessica; Fagan, Susan; Giannoccaro, Peter; Hughes, William; Jones, Alan; Jue, John; Koilpillai, Chris; Leblanc, Marie-Helene; Londry, Colleen; Morgan, Dennis; O'Reilly, Michael; Sawchuk, Corey; Siu, Samuel; Sochowski, Randy; Tremblay, Guy; Welikovitch, Lisa; Yu, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Recognizing the central role of echocardiographic examinations in the assessment of most cardiac disorders and the need to ensure the provision of these services in a highly reliable, timely, economical and safe manner, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Canadian Society of Echocardiography undertook a comprehensive review of all aspects influencing the provision of echocardiographic services in Canada. Five regional panels were established to develop preliminary recommendations in the five component areas, which included the echocardiographic examination, the echocardiographic laboratory and report, the physician, the sonographer and indications for examinations. Membership in the panels was structured to recognize the regional professional diversity of individuals involved in the provision of echocardiography. In addition, a focus group of cardiac sonograhers was recruited to review aspects of the document impacting on sonographer responsibilities and qualification. The document is intended to be used as a comprehensive and practical reference for all of those involved in the provision of echocardiography in Canada.

  9. Surgery for Intermediate and Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Consensus Report from the 5th Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert Meeting (APPLE 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Chih; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Nagano, Hiroaki; Lee, Young-Joo; Chau, Gar-Yang; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Chih-Chi; Choi, Young Rok; Poon, Ronnie Tung-Ping; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging and treatment strategy does not recommended surgery for treating BCLC stage B and C hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, numerous Asia-Pacific institutes still perform surgery for this patient group. This consensus report from the 5th Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert Meeting aimed to share opinions and experiences pertaining to liver resection for intermediate and advanced HCCs and to provide evidence to issue recommendations for surgery in this patient group. Summary Thirteen experts from five Asia-Pacific regions were invited to the meeting; 10 of them (Japan: 2, Taiwan: 3, South Korea: 2, Hong Kong: 1, and China: 2) voted for the final consensus. The discussion focused on evaluating the preoperative liver functional reserve and surgery for large tumors, multiple tumors, HCCs with vascular invasion, and HCCs with distant metastasis. The feasibility of future prospective randomized trials comparing surgery with transarterial chemoembolization for intermediate HCC and with sorafenib for advanced HCC was also discussed. The Child-Pugh score (9/10 experts) and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (8/10) were the most widely accepted methods for evaluating the preoperative liver functional reserve. All (10/10) experts agreed that portal hypertension, tumor size >5 cm, portal venous invasion, hepatic venous invasion, and extrahepatic metastasis are not absolute contraindications for the surgical resection of HCC. Furthermore, 9 of the 10 experts agreed that tumor resection may be performed for patients with >3 tumors. The limitations of surgery are associated with a poor liver functional reserve, incomplete tumor resection, and a high probability of recurrence. Key Messages Surgery provides significant survival benefits for Asian-Pacific patients with intermediate and advanced HCCs, particularly when the liver functional reserve is favorable. However, prospective randomized controlled trials

  10. Current state of the art, multimodality research and future visions for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer: consensus results from "Challenges and Chances in Prostate Cancer Research Meeting 2013".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Debus, Jürgen; Feick, Günter; Hadaschik, Boris; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schüle, Roland; Zacharias, Jens-Peter; Schwardt, Malte

    2014-11-04

    A brainstorming and consensus meeting organized by the German Cancer Aid focused on modern treatment of prostate cancer and promising innovative techniques and research areas. Besides optimization of screening algorithms, molecular-based stratification and individually tailored treatment regimens will be the future of multimodal prostate cancer management. Effective interdisciplinary structures, including biobanking and data collection mechanisms are the basis for such developments.

  11. A REVISED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE BALTIMORE CONSENSUS MEETING FOR NEOPLASTIC PRECURSOR LESIONS IN THE PANCREAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Olca; Hong, Seung-Mo; Wood, Laura D.; Adsay, N. Volkan; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Biankin, Andrew V.; Brosens, Lodewijk A.A.; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kato, Yo; Klimstra, David S.; Klöppel, Günter; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Matthaei, Hanno; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Shimizu, Michio; Takaori, Kyoichi; Terris, Benoit; Yachida, Shinichi; Esposito, Irene; Furukawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    International experts met to discuss recent advances and to revise the 2004 recommendations for assessing and reporting precursor lesions to invasive carcinomas of the pancreas, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), mucinous cystic neoplasm, and other lesions. Consensus recommendations include the following: 1) To improve concordance and to align with practical consequences, a two-tiered system (low vs. high-grade) is proposed for all precursor lesions, with the provision that the current PanIN-2 and neoplasms with intermediate-grade dysplasia now be categorized as low-grade. Thus, “high-grade dysplasia” is to be reserved for only the uppermost end of the spectrum (“carcinoma in situ” type lesions). 2) Current data indicate that PanIN of any grade at a margin of a resected pancreas with invasive carcinoma does not have prognostic implications; the clinical significance of dysplasia at a margin in a resected pancreas with IPMN lacking invasive carcinoma remains to be determined. 3) Intraductal lesions 0.5–1 cm can be either large PanINs or small IPMNs. The term “incipient IPMN” should be reserved for lesions in this size with intestinal- or oncocytic-papillae or GNAS mutations. 4) Measurement of the distance between an IPMN and invasive carcinoma and sampling of intervening tissue are recommended to assess concomitant versus associated status. Conceptually, concomitant invasive carcinoma (in contrast with the “associated” group) ought to be genetically distinct from an IPMN elsewhere in the gland. 5) “Intraductal spread of invasive carcinoma” (aka, “colonization”) is recommended to describe lesions of invasive carcinoma invading back into and extending along the duct system, which may morphologically mimic high-grade PanIN or even IPMN. 6) “Simple mucinous cyst” is recommended to describe cysts > 1 cm having gastric-type flat mucinous lining at most minimal atypia without

  12. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  13. Rapporteur summaries of plenary, symposia, and oral sessions from the XXIIIrd World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics Meeting in Toronto, Canada, 16-20 October 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zai, Gwyneth; Alberry, Bonnie; Arloth, Janine; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Bares, Cristina; Boot, Erik; Camilo, Caroline; Chadha, Kartikay; Chen, Qi; Cole, Christopher B; Cost, Katherine T; Crow, Megan; Ekpor, Ibene; Fischer, Sascha B; Flatau, Laura; Gagliano, Sarah; Kirli, Umut; Kukshal, Prachi; Labrie, Viviane; Lang, Maren; Lett, Tristram A; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Maier, Robert; Mihaljevic, Marina; Mittal, Kirti; Monson, Eric T; O'Brien, Niamh L; Østergaard, Søren D; Ovenden, Ellen; Patel, Sejal; Peterson, Roseann E; Pouget, Jennie G; Rovaris, Diego L; Seaman, Lauren; Shankarappa, Bhagya; Tsetsos, Fotis; Vereczkei, Andrea; Wang, Chenyao; Xulu, Khethelo; Yuen, Ryan K C; Zhao, Jingjing; Zai, Clement C; Kennedy, James L

    2016-12-01

    The XXIIIrd World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics meeting, sponsored by the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, was held in Toronto, ON, Canada, on 16-20 October 2015. Approximately 700 participants attended to discuss the latest state-of-the-art findings in this rapidly advancing and evolving field. The following report was written by trainee travel awardees. Each was assigned one session as a rapporteur. This manuscript represents the highlights and topics that were covered in the plenary sessions, symposia, and oral sessions during the conference, and contains major notable and new findings.

  14. BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting: Acute dosimetry consensus committee recommendations on biodosimetry applications in events involving uses of radiation by terrorists and radiation accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, George A. [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Preparedness and Emergency Operations, 200 Independence Avenue, SW, Room 403B-1, Washington, DC 20201 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Dept. of Radiology and Physiology Dept., Dartmouth Medical School, HB 7785, Vail 702, Rubin 601, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Amundson, Sally A. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 W. 168th Street, VC11-215, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Blakely, William F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil; Buddemeier, Brooke [Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528 (United States); Gallez, Bernard [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit and Lab. of Medicinal Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Dainiak, Nicholas [Dept. of Medicine, Bridgeport Hospital, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Goans, Ronald E. [MJW Corporation, 1422 Eagle Bend Drive, Clinton, TN 37716-4029 (United States); Hayes, Robert B. [Remote Sensing Lab., MS RSL-47, P.O. Box 98421, Las Vegas, NV 89193 (United States); Lowry, Patrick C. [Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 (United States); Noska, Michael A. [Food and Drug Administration, FDA/CDRH, 1350 Piccard Drive, HFZ-240, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology (Box 647), Univ. of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Salner, Andrew L. [Helen and Harry Gray Cancer Center, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour Street, Hartford, CT 06102 (United States); Schauer, David A. [National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 400, Bethesda, MD 20814-3095 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-07-15

    , USA; NCRP, 2005. Key elements of preparing emergency responders for nuclear and radiological terrorism. NCRP Commentary No. 19, Bethesda, Maryland, USA] and international [IAEA, 2005. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. EPR-Medical 2005, IAEA, Vienna, Austria] agencies have reviewed strategies for acute-phase biodosimetry. Consensus biodosimetric guidelines include: (a) clinical signs and symptoms, including peripheral blood counts, time to onset of nausea and vomiting and presence of impaired cognition and neurological deficits, (b) radioactivity assessment, (c) personal and area dosimetry, (d) cytogenetics, (e) in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and (f) other dosimetry approaches (i.e. blood protein assays, etc.). Emerging biodosimetric technologies may further refine triage and dose assessment strategies. However, guidance is needed regarding which biodosimetry techniques are most useful for different radiological scenarios and consensus protocols must be developed. The Local Organizing Committee for the Second International Conference on Biodosimetry and Seventh International Symposium on EPR Dosimetry and Applications (BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting) convened an Acute Dosimetry Consensus Committee composed of national and international experts to: (a) review the current literature for biodosimetry applications for acute-phase applications in radiological emergencies, (b) describe the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, (c) provide recommendations for the use of biodosimetry assays for selected defined radiation scenarios, and (d) develop protocols to apply these recommended biological dosimetry techniques with currently available supplies and equipment for first responders. The Acute Dosimetry Consensus Committee developed recommendations for use of a prioritized multiple-assay biodosimetric-based strategy, concluding that no single assay is sufficiently robust to address all of the potential radiation

  15. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  16. Variceal bleeding: consensus meeting report from the Brazilian Society of Hepatology Hemorragia digestiva alta varicosa: relatório do 1º Consenso da Sociedade Brasileira de Hepatologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Lisboa Bittencourt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, several improvements in the management of variceal bleeding have resulted in a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality of patients with cirrhosis and bleeding varices. Progress in the multidisciplinary approach to these patients has led to a better management of this disease by critical care physicians, hepatologists, gastroenterologists, endoscopists, radiologists and surgeons. In this respect, the Brazilian Society of Hepatology has, recently, sponsored a consensus meeting in order to draw evidence-based recommendations on the management of these difficult-to-treat subjects. An organizing committee comprised of four people was elected by the Governing Board and was responsible to invite 27 researchers from distinct regions of the country to make a systematic review of the subject and to present topics related to variceal bleeding, including prevention, diagnosis, management and treatment, according to evidence-based medicine. After the meeting, all participants met together for discussion of the topics and the elaboration of the aforementioned recommendations. The organizing committee was responsible for writing the final document. The meeting was held at Salvador, May 6th, 2009 and the present manuscript is the summary of the systematic review that was presented during the meeting, organized in topics, followed by the recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Hepatology.Vários avanços científicos obtidos nas últimas duas décadas foram incorporados no manejo da hemorragia digestiva alta varicosa, levando a uma redução significante da sua morbimortalidade, atribuída à abordagem multidisciplinar do sangramento varicoso por paramédicos, emergencistas, intensivistas, gastroenterologistas, hepatologistas, endoscopistas, radiologistas intervencionistas e cirurgiões. Recentemente, a Sociedade Brasileira de Hepatologia patrocinou uma reunião de consenso, visando o estabelecimento de recomendações nacionais

  17. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    Our results point to significant national variation both in terms of the perceived aim of consensus conferences, expectations to conference outcomes, conceptions of the roles of lay people and experts, and in terms of the way in which the role of public deliberation is interpreted. Interestingly...

  18. 77 FR 72296 - Public Meeting of the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) Motor Vehicles Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... Cooperation Council (RCC) Motor Vehicles Working Group AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... 30 and 31, 2012, the RCC and its bi-national working groups facilitated stakeholder meetings in Washington, DC. This notice announces a public meeting of the RCC Motor Vehicles Working Group. DATES:...

  19. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  20. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Matthew C; D'Agati, Vivette D; Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J; Haas, Mark; Appel, Gerald B; Alpers, Charles E; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bedrosian, Camille; Braun, Michael; Doyle, Mittie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fogo, Agnes B; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Gale, Daniel P; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Griffin, Gene; Harris, Claire L; Holers, V Michael; Johnson, Sally; Lavin, Peter J; Medjeral-Thomas, Nicholas; Paul Morgan, B; Nast, Cynthia C; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Peters, D Keith; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Servais, Aude; Sethi, Sanjeev; Song, Wen-Chao; Tamburini, Paul; Thurman, Joshua M; Zavros, Michael; Cook, H Terence

    2013-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the definition of C3 glomerulopathy, appropriate complement investigations that should be performed in these patients, and how complement therapeutics should be explored in the condition. This meeting report represents the current consensus view of the group. PMID:24172683

  1. Canadian Asthma Consensus Conference Summary of Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ernst

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Asthma Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society invited a group of Canadian physicians with a particular interest in asthma to meet in Montebello, Quebec, March 9-12, 1995 to arrive at a consensus statement on the optimal approach to the management of asthma in the pediatric and adult ambulatory care settings. The societies and associations represented are listed in the appendix with the names of the contributors to this document. The objectives of the Montebello conference were: 1. To review the current ambulatory care management of asthma in Canada; 2. To develop guidelines with the participation of family physicians and specialists; 3. To develop guidelines which are evidence-based; 4. In creating evidence-based guidelines to focus attention on aspects of asthma management that are currently not supported by randomized controlled trials; 5. To develop strategies that allow for the implementation of rational guidelines at a local level. Recommendations were based on a critical review of the scientific literature by small groups prior to the meeting and are categorized according to the strength of the scientific evidence supporting each recommendation (Table 1.

  2. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (24th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 26-30, 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.; McLoughlin, John Grant, Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG) held at the University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada, May 26-30, 2000. The proceedings consist of two plenary lectures, five working groups, four topic sessions, new Ph.D. reports, and panel discussions. Papers include: (1)…

  3. Stop TB-Halte à la Tuberculose-Canada: engaging industrialised nations in the challenge to meet global targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, A; Billo, N; Tannenbaum, T; Phypers, M; Little, C; Graham, B; Mill, J

    2004-01-01

    The Stop TB Partnership has engaged the 22 high-burden countries in a drive toward the goal of finding 70% of cases and curing 85% by 2005. Traditional partners, aid agencies and governments of industrialised nations have joined the Partnership, but the broader range of civil society remains outside the discourse, risking disinterest on the part of the donor community. Stop TB-Halte à la Tuberculose-Canada was organised to engage new partners to support the Canadian government's commitment to the goal of reducing poverty and diseases of poverty, including tuberculosis, by 50% by 2010. The successes and challenges are explored, and the possibility raised that having a Stop TB movement in every country will ensure that support is sustained and goals of global tuberculosis control reached.

  4. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2016-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  5. [Consensus Meeting of the 9th International Conference on Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer (St. Gall, January 26-29, 2005)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thürlimann, B; Senn, H J

    2005-06-01

    More than 4,000 participants attended the congress and the consensus conference 2005, an increase of more than 1,000 participants. The conference had 2 highlights. (1) The presentation of the first results of the study BIG 1-98 -- letrozole as adjuvant, endocrine therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer -- showed a relative risk reduction in the disease-free survival of 19% when compared to tamoxifen. (2) The consensus conference adopted 2 new relevant developments: endocrine responsiveness as criterion for both chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. The newly introduced electronic voting system allowed the audience to observe the forming of the panelists' opinions on more than 100 predefined questions.

  6. Report on the inaugural meeting of the international consortium on hallucination research : a clinical and research update and 16 consensus-set goals for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, F.; Aleman, A.; Fernyhough, C.; Allen, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a report on the first meeting of the International Consortium on Hallucination Research, which took place on September 13-14, 2011 at the Institute of Psychiatry, London. The first day of the meeting served to reflect on the current state of knowledge regarding auditory halluci

  7. Meetings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUGuowen; QINPeng; FENGYilun

    1994-01-01

    The International Workshop on Rice Sheath Bright Management was held in the Experimental Farm of CNRRI from Oct 10 to 15, 1993. The workshop was sponsored by IRRI and co-hosted by CNRRI. About 38 scientists from IRRI, Indonesia, South Korea, Thailand, Vietnam,Japan, Great Britain, France, Malaysia and P. R. China attended the meeting.

  8. Consensus meeting of course directors in breast imaging, 9 May 2009, in Frankfurt am Main - Topic: Masses; Konsensustreffen der Kursleiter in der Mammadiagnostik am 9.5.2009 in Frankfurt am Main - Thema: Herdbefunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Schimpfle, M.P. [Klinikum Frankfurt Hoechst (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Heindel, W. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Radiologie; Kettritz, U. [Mammographie-Referenzzentrum Berlin (Germany); Schulz-Wendtland, R. [Erlangen Univ. (Germany). Radiologie; Bick, U. [Charite Berlin (Germany). Radiologie

    2010-08-15

    Fourteen directors of breast imaging courses met on behalf of the German Society of Radiology to discuss the actual standards of the diagnosis of masses. Open questions on the fields of mammography, breast ultrasound and breast MRI were elucidated by a presentation of one of the 14 panel members, followed by an electronic anonymous voting. Beside of the panel members, more than 300 participants of the consensus meeting contributed their opinions by electronic voting. Answers with definite majorities (> 75 %), answers with narrow majorities and those with missing majorities were discriminated from each other. The opinions of the plenum were compared to the majorities of the podium and showed only a few critical differences. Due to unequivocal majorities seven answers to important questions concerning the diagnosis of masses can lead to a further standardization of breast cancer diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Toward a Global Consensus on Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Tinnitus: Report From the First International Meeting of the COMiT Initiative, November 14, 2014, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Hall

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Europe alone, over 70 million people experience tinnitus; for seven million people, it creates a debilitating condition. Despite its enormous socioeconomic relevance, progress in successfully treating the condition is somewhat limited. The European Union has approved funding to create a pan-European tinnitus research collaboration network (2014–2018. The goal of one working group is to establish an international standard for outcome measurements in clinical trials of tinnitus. Importantly, this would enhance tinnitus research by informing sample-size calculations, enabling meta-analyses, and facilitating the identification of tinnitus subtypes, ultimately leading to improved treatments. The first meeting followed a workshop on “Agreed Standards for Measurement: An International Perspective” with invited talks on clinimetrics and existing international initiatives to define core sets for outcome measurements in hearing loss (International classification of functioning, disability, and health core sets for hearing loss and eczema (Harmonizing outcome measures for eczema. Both initiatives have taken an approach that clearly distinguishes the specification of what to measure from that of how to measure it. Meeting delegates agreed on taking a step-wise roadmap for which the first output would be a consensus on what outcome domains are essential for all trials. The working group seeks to embrace inclusivity and brings together clinicians, tinnitus researchers, experts on clinical research methodology, statisticians, and representatives of the health industry. People who experience tinnitus are another important participant group. This meeting report is a call to those stakeholders across the globe to actively participate in the initiative.

  10. Proceedings of the Consensus Day Meeting: Implications for Rotavirus Vaccination in the 2014 Apulian Lifetime Immunization Schedule. Foggia, 17 April 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, D; Fortunato, F; Cappelli, M G; Gallone, M S; Tafuri, S; Prato, R

    2015-01-01

    Recommendations for vaccination against rotavirus (RV) were issued in Apulia in 2006; the vaccine was free of charge to children who entered day care or nursery school by 1 year of age or those affected by chronic diseases for which diarrhea caused by rotavirus can increase the risk of complications and hospitalization. In 2014, vaccination became available to all healthy children with only a copayment. However, there has not been a significant increase in vaccination coverage. On April 17, 2015, Apulian public health physicians and paediatricians met to share strategies to promote the RV vaccine indications provided in the regional immunization schedule. During the meeting, presentation of data reports were interspersed with discussions that were led with a "bottom-up" approach. The discussants responded to pre-planned questions raised by the participants and encouraged by the discussion.

  11. EDITORIAL: Theory Meets Data Analysis at Comparable and Extreme Mass Ratios Conference (NRDA/Capra 2010), Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Canada, 20-26 June 2010 Theory Meets Data Analysis at Comparable and Extreme Mass Ratios Conference (NRDA/Capra 2010), Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Canada, 20-26 June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, L.; Pfeiffer, H.; Poisson, E.

    2011-07-01

    This special issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity contains articles submitted in relation to the 'Theory Meets Data Analysis at Comparable and Extreme Mass Ratios' conference held at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Canada, 20-26 June 2010. This conference, organized by S Fairhurst, G Gonzalez, L Lehner, Y Liu, H Pfeiffer, and E Poisson brought together researchers from three gravitational wave communities: experiment, theory and data analysis, who discussed the latest advances and challenges for detecting and exploiting gravitational waves. Approximately 60 talks spread over one week, together with many lively discussions provided an excellent atmosphere for debate. With so much packed in over seven days there were too many highlights to list specifics here. However, several common themes could be clearly discerned: the tremendous progress achieved in the detector level; the understanding of key comparable-mass systems and the data analysis techniques required for searching for their signals; the significant progress achieved in obtaining predictions in extreme mass ratio scenarios and the understanding of remaining challenges; as well as several new efforts towards making multi-messenger astronomy a reality. This issue contains research articles presented at this conference which, together with online talks (all of which can be found at pirsa.org/C10015), illustrate the level of maturity the field has reached. Many challenges still remain and the communities involved are actively working towards addressing them.

  12. Future directions in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors: consensus report of the National Cancer Institute Neuroendocrine Tumor clinical trials planning meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulke, Matthew H; Siu, Lillian L; Tepper, Joel E; Fisher, George; Jaffe, Deborah; Haller, Daniel G; Ellis, Lee M; Benedetti, Jacqueline K; Bergsland, Emily K; Hobday, Timothy J; Van Cutsem, Eric; Pingpank, James; Oberg, Kjell; Cohen, Steven J; Posner, Mitchell C; Yao, James C

    2011-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) arise from a variety of anatomic sites and share the capacity for production of hormones and vasoactive peptides. Because of their perceived rarity, NETs have not historically been a focus of rigorous clinical research. However, the diagnosed incidence of NETs has been increasing, and the estimated prevalence in the United States exceeds 100,000 individuals. The recent completion of several phase III studies, including those evaluating octreotide, sunitinib, and everolimus, has demonstrated that rigorous evaluation of novel agents in this disease is both feasible and can lead to practice-changing outcomes. The NET Task Force of the National Cancer Institute GI Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting to identify key unmet needs, develop appropriate study end points, standardize clinical trial inclusion criteria, and formulate priorities for future NET studies for the US cooperative group program. Emphasis was placed on the development of well-designed clinical trials with clearly defined efficacy criteria. Key recommendations include the evaluation of pancreatic NET separately from NETs of other sites and the exclusion of patients with poorly differentiated histologies from trials focused on low-grade histologies. Studies evaluating novel agents for the control of hormonal syndromes should avoid somatostatin analog washout periods when possible and should include quality-of-life end points. Because of the observed long survival after progression of many patients, progression-free survival is recommended as a feasible and relevant primary end point for both phase III studies and phase II studies where a delay in progression is expected in the absence of radiologic responses.

  13. Canada Lithium Corp. powers it up : Val d'Or property could be key to helping meet global demand for lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-08-15

    Advances in battery technology powering vehicles will help to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Canada. The sale of hybrid cars has been growing steadily in the country. This article discussed a company that is currently raising funds to finance a lithium extraction facility near Val d'Or, Quebec. Future lithium demand is expected to grow as a result of increased usage of hybrid vehicles. Canada's largest auto parts maker recently announced that it would invest up to $600 million on new plants for making lithium-ion batteries. 1 fig.

  14. Expert consensus document: A consensus on the medical treatment of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustina, Andrea; Chanson, Philippe; Kleinberg, David; Bronstein, Marcello D; Clemmons, David R; Klibanski, Anne; van der Lely, Aart J; Strasburger, Christian J; Lamberts, Steven W; Ho, Ken K Y; Casanueva, Felipe F; Melmed, Shlomo

    2014-04-01

    In March 2013, the Acromegaly Consensus Group met to revise and update guidelines for the medical treatment of acromegaly. The meeting comprised experts skilled in the medical management of acromegaly. The group considered treatment goals covering biochemical, clinical and tumour volume outcomes, and the place in guidelines of somatostatin receptor ligands, growth hormone receptor antagonists and dopamine agonists, and alternative modalities for treatment including combination therapy and novel treatments. This document represents the conclusions of the workshop consensus.

  15. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sugano (Kentaro); J. Tack (Jan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); D.Y. Graham (David Y.); E. El-Omar; S. Miura (Soichiro); K. Haruma (Ken); M. Asaka (Masahiro); N. Uemura (Naomi); P. Malfertheiner

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate dia

  16. The Limits of Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, John B.

    Dynamics in the education policy arena suggest that, despite two generations of researchers extolling democratic leadership styles and consensus building over autocratic techniques, wide participation in policymaking and the broadest possible consensus are not always productive: American society has not yet agreed on what schools should…

  17. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce "rational consensus", that is, "mathematical aggregation", by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  18. Consensus meeting on microdialysis in neurointensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellander, Bo-Michael; Cantais, Emmanuel; Enblad, Per;

    2004-01-01

    Microdialysis is used in many European neurointensive care units to monitor brain chemistry in patients suffering subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or traumatic brain injury (TBI).......Microdialysis is used in many European neurointensive care units to monitor brain chemistry in patients suffering subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or traumatic brain injury (TBI)....

  19. Canadian Athletic Therapists' Association Education Task Force Consensus Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafave, Mark R.; Bergeron, Glen; Klassen, Connie; Parr, Kelly; Valdez, Dennis; Elliott, Jacqueline; Peeler, Jason; Orecchio, Elsa; McKenzie, Kirsty; Streed, Kristin; DeMont, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Context: A published commentary from 2 of the current authors acted as a catalyst for raising some key issues that have arisen in athletic therapy education in Canada over the years. Objective: The purpose of this article is to report on the process followed to establish a number of consensus statements related to postsecondary athletic therapy…

  20. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  1. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  2. Too Fit To Fracture: a consensus on future research priorities in osteoporosis and exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, N. J.; Heinonen, A.; Cheung, A. M.; Wark, J. D.; Shipp, K.; McGill, S.; Ashe, M. C.; Laprade, J.; Jain, R.; Keller, H.; Papaioannou, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary An international consensus process identified the following research priorities in osteoporosis and exercise: study of exercise in high-risk cohorts, evaluation of multimodal interventions, research examining translation into practice and a goal to examine fracture outcomes. Introduction To identify future research priorities related to exercise for people with osteoporosis with and without osteoporotic spine fracture via international consensus. Methods An international expert panel and representatives from Osteoporosis Canada led the process and identified opinion leaders or stakeholders to contribute. A focus group of four patient advocates identified quality of life, mobility, activities of daily living, falls, bone mineral density, and harms as outcomes important for decision-making. Seventy-five individuals were invited to participate in an online survey asking respondents to define future research priorities in the area of osteoporosis and exercise; the response rate was 57 %. Fifty-five individuals from seven countries were invited to a half-day consensus meeting; 60 % of invitees attended. The results of the online survey, knowledge synthesis activities, and results of the focus group were presented. Nominal group technique was used to come to consensus on research priorities. Results Research priorities included the study of exercise in high-risk cohorts (e.g., ≥ 65 years, low BMD, moderate/high risk of fracture, history of osteoporotic vertebral fractures, hyperkyphotic posture, functional impairments, or sedentary), the evaluation of multimodal interventions, research examining translation into practice, and a goal to examine fracture outcomes. The standardization of outcomes or protocols that could be evolved into large multicentre trials was discussed. Conclusions The research priorities identified as part of the Too Fit To Fracture initiative can be used to inform the development of multicentre collaborations to evaluate and implement

  3. Practical Techniques for Achieving Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, John A.

    Consensus is important in the making of a policy decision. If a decision is reached without consensus, morale and unit satisfaction may both suffer. With genuine consensus, a unit tends to willingly support and implement the new policy. After analyzing how observed small groups had actually reached consensus, the following ten techniques were…

  4. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1994 Annual Meeting (Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, June 3-7, 1994).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers from the 1994 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are divided into the following sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; (4) ad hoc groups; and (5) reports on ICMI (International Committee on Mathematical Instruction) studies. Papers include: (1)…

  5. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1995 Annual Meeting (Ontario, Canada, May 26-30, 1995).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothier, Yvonne M., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at the 1995 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are organized into four sections: (1) plenary lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic sessions; and (4) ad hoc sessions. Papers include: (1) "The Role of Epistemology in the Analysis of Teaching/Learning…

  6. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1993 Annual Meeting (York, Ontario, Canada, May 28-June 1, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the 1993 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are presented in four sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; and (4) ad hoc groups. Papers include: (1) "What is a Square Root? A Study of Geometrical Representation in Different…

  7. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  8. The Consensus: Another View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    Comments on the seven points of consensus presented in "A Theoretical Basis for Teaching the Receptive Skills" by Stephen Krashen, et al., particularly on the terminology that is derived from Krashen's other writings. Offers eight statements which reflect in more general terms an interpretation of Krashen's theories for language teachers…

  9. Making Consensus Tractable

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2010-01-01

    The process of consensus voting has many distinct advantages: it fosters discussion and participation, empowers minorities and independent thinkers, and is more likely, after a decision has been made, to secure the participants' support for the chosen course of action. The disadvantage of consensus decision making is, of course, the difficulty of reaching consensus. While this challenge is largely overcome in many theoretical settings such as Aumann's ``agree to disagree'' result, a hitherto unsolved difficulty is the lack of a framework offering rational (i.e., Bayesian) consensus decision making that can be performed using simple and efficient calculations. We propose a model featuring two possible states of the world and a finite number of individuals. The group has to come to a binary decision, where the merit of each of the two possible courses of action depends on the state of the world. Each member of the group has a private and independent signal at his or her disposal, giving some indication as to wh...

  10. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce “rational consensus”, that is, “mathematical aggregation”, by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  11. Meeting the privacy requirements for the development of a multi-centre patient registry in Canada: the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Vanessa K; Thorogood, Nancy P; Joshi, Phalgun B; Fehlings, Michael G; Craven, B Catharine; Linassi, Gary; Fourney, Daryl R; Kwon, Brian K; Bailey, Christopher S; Tsai, Eve C; Drew, Brian M; Ahn, Henry; Tsui, Deborah; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2013-05-01

    Privacy legislation addresses concerns regarding the privacy of personal information; however, its interpretation by research ethics boards has resulted in significant challenges to the collection, management, use and disclosure of personal health information for multi-centre research studies. This paper describes the strategy used to develop the national Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) in accordance with privacy statutes and benchmarked against best practices. An analysis of the regional and national privacy legislation was conducted to determine the requirements for each of the 31 local RHSCIR sites and the national RHSCIR office. A national privacy and security framework was created for RHSCIR that includes a governance structure, standard operating procedures, training processes, physical and technical security and privacy impact assessments. The framework meets a high-water mark in ensuring privacy and security of personal health information nationally and may assist in the development of other national or international research initiatives.

  12. Continuity and consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In Danish family policy, changes initiated by the present conservative-liberal government differ little from those proposed by the opposition. Recent changes are minor, but significant ones occurred in the 1960s, when childcare was universalized, and in the 1980s, when parental leave substituted...... policy reflect changing conditions for employment and the minding of children and that there has been a high degree of continuity and consensus about the change, as indicated by the strong increase in female labour market involvement....

  13. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  14. Meet Mr. Energizer Bunny -- Canada`s Lew Urry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, P.

    1999-10-01

    The induction of the inventor of the alkaline battery, Lew Urry, a Canadian, into the Hall of Fame of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, is reported. The alkaline battery was invented about 40 years ago by Mr. Urry, working at the Energizer research and development facility in Westlake, Ohio. The advantage of the alkaline system over the then conventional systems was its ability to work with a high degree of efficiency and under continuous or high-drain conditions. Until the late 1950s, batteries were used mainly to power transistor radios, flashlights and toys. Today alkaline batteries power everything from flashlights to cell phones, camcorders, CD players and a host of other devices. It is anticipated that further advances in miniaturization will allow for invisible battery-powered hearing aids inside the ear, battery-powered personal digital devices capable of everything from remote reception of e-mail and global navigation to health monitoring by devices powered by batteries and implanted under the skin.

  15. Defining inappropriate practices in prescribing for elderly people: a national consensus panel

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, P. J.; Huang, A R; Tamblyn, R M; Gayton, D. C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a consensus-based list of inappropriate practices in prescribing for elderly people. DESIGN: Mail survey of a 32-member national panel. SETTING: Academic medical centres across Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two specialists selected arbitrarily, including 7 clinical pharmacologists, 9 geriatricians, 8 family practitioners and 8 pharmacists. OUTCOME MEASURES: Consensus that the practice would introduce a substantial and significant increase in the risk of serious adverse ef...

  16. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  17. 22 CFR 401.5 - Meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE General § 401.5 Meetings. (a) Subject at all times to special call or direction by the two Governments, meetings of the Commission shall be held at such times and places in the United States and Canada as the Commission or the...

  18. Expert consensus document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boehm, Ulrich; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T;

    2015-01-01

    migration of GnRH-synthesizing neurons. CHH can be challenging to diagnose, particularly when attempting to differentiate it from constitutional delay of puberty. A timely diagnosis and treatment to induce puberty can be beneficial for sexual, bone and metabolic health, and might help minimize some......Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare disorder caused by the deficient production, secretion or action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which is the master hormone regulating the reproductive axis. CHH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with >25 different...... of the psychological effects of CHH. In most cases, fertility can be induced using specialized treatment regimens and several predictors of outcome have been identified. Patients typically require lifelong treatment, yet ∼10-20% of patients exhibit a spontaneous recovery of reproductive function. This Consensus...

  19. On consensus biomarker selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambin Anna

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent development of mass spectrometry technology enabled the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. A lot of effort is currently devoted to the identification of biomarkers in human body fluids like serum or plasma, based on which new diagnostic tests for different diseases could be constructed. Various biomarker selection procedures have been exploited in recent studies. It has been noted that they often lead to different biomarker lists and as a consequence, the patient classification may also vary. Results Here we propose a new approach to the biomarker selection problem: to apply several competing feature ranking procedures and compute a consensus list of features based on their outcomes. We validate our methods on two proteomic datasets for the diagnosis of ovarian and prostate cancer. Conclusion The proposed methodology can improve the classification results and at the same time provide a unified biomarker list for further biological examinations and interpretation.

  20. Conflict or Consensus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Poulsen, Birgitte

    forms of institutional design of citizen participation processes, less attention has been paid to the role of public administrators, and their role in facilitating processes of citizen participation. Public administrators have to work with diverse groups of citizens with diverging, and often conflicting......, interests. However, many public administrators have not been adequately exposed to the rationales of conflicts and the skills in resolving conflicts. The aim of this paper is to analyse the different types of conflicts that public administrators experience in formal processes of citizen involvement. Whereas...... the literature of deliberative democracy claims that consensus is most often the result of rational deliberative processes, the claim of this paper is that conflicts is more likely a natural and integrated part of such deliberative acts. Conflicts are, thus, seen as inevitable. Also conflicts may function...

  1. PASC ⅩⅩⅦ held in Vancouver Canada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The 27th Pacific Area Standards Congress (PSAC ⅩⅩⅦ) was held in Vancouver Canada on May 24-27. It was hosted by SCC (Standards Council of Canada). About 70 delegates from 20 countries attended the meeting and representatives of the international standards organizations like ISO, IEC and ITU were invited. Chinese delegation led by is Mr. Shi Baoquan from the Standardization Administration of China attended the meeting.

  2. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming difficult to maintain consensus in a period of economic austerity, and this possibly challenges the ability of democratic institutions to take decisions on tough economic questions. In order to find out how political consensus influences fiscal outcomes, this article sets out...

  3. Main: ANAERO5CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO5CONSENSUS S000481 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO5CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  4. Main: ANAERO3CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO3CONSENSUS S000479 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO3CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00048

  5. Main: ANAERO4CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO4CONSENSUS S000480 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO4CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  6. Main: ANAERO1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO1CONSENSUS S000477 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO1CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000478, S000479, S00048

  7. Main: ANAERO2CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO2CONSENSUS S000478 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO2CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000479, S00048

  8. Multiple chemical sensitivity: a 1999 consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Consensus criteria for the definition of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) were first identified in a 1989 multidisciplinary survey of 89 clinicians and researchers with extensive experience in, but widely differing views of, MCS. A decade later, their top 5 consensus criteria (i.e., defining MCS as [1] a chronic condition [2] with symptoms that recur reproducibly [3] in response to low levels of exposure [4] to multiple unrelated chemicals and [5] improve or resolve when incitants are removed) are still unrefuted in published literature. Along with a 6th criterion that we now propose adding (i.e., requiring that symptoms occur in multiple organ systems), these criteria are all commonly encompassed by research definitions of MCS. Nonetheless, their standardized use in clinical settings is still lacking, long overdue, and greatly needed--especially in light of government studies in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada that revealed 2-4 times as many cases of chemical sensitivity among Gulf War veterans than undeployed controls. In addition, state health department surveys of civilians in New Mexico and California showed that 2-6%, respectively, already had been diagnosed with MCS and that 16% of the civilians reported an "unusual sensitivity" to common everyday chemicals. Given this high prevalence, as well as the 1994 consensus of the American Lung Association, American Medical Association, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission that "complaints [of MCS] should not be dismissed as psychogenic, and a thorough workup is essential," we recommend that MCS be formally diagnosed--in addition to any other disorders that may be present--in all cases in which the 6 aforementioned consensus criteria are met and no single other organic disorder (e.g., mastocytosis) can account for all the signs and symptoms associated with chemical exposure. The millions of civilians and tens of thousands of Gulf War veterans who

  9. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%-100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  10. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Cancer Biomarker: Consensus and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar R. Padhani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available On May 3, 2008, a National Cancer Institute (NCI-sponsored open consensus conference was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, during the 2008 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Meeting. Approximately 100 experts and stakeholders summarized the current understanding of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI and reached consensus on the use of DW-MRI as a cancer imaging biomarker. DW-MRI should be tested as an imaging biomarker in the context of well-defined clinical trials, by adding DW-MRI to existing NCI-sponsored trials, particularly those with tissue sampling or survival indicators. Where possible, DW-MRI measurements should be compared with histologic indices including cellularity and tissue response. There is a need for tissue equivalent diffusivity phantoms; meanwhile, simple fluid-filled phantoms should be used. Monoexponential assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient values should use two b values (> 100 and between 500 and 1000 mm2/sec depending on the application. Free breathing with multiple acquisitions is superior to complex gating techniques. Baseline patient reproducibility studies should be part of study designs. Both region of interest and histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements should be obtained. Standards for measurement, analysis, and display are needed. Annotated data from validation studies (along with outcome measures should be made publicly available. Magnetic resonance imaging vendors should be engaged in this process. The NCI should establish a task force of experts (physicists, radiologists, and oncologists to plan, organize technical aspects, and conduct pilot trials. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network infrastructure may be suitable for these purposes. There is an extraordinary opportunity for DW-MRI to evolve into a clinically valuable imaging tool, potentially important for drug development.

  11. Between consensus and contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices.

  12. Aim to unify the narrow band imaging (NBI) magnifying classification for colorectal tumors: current status in Japan from a summary of the consensus symposium in the 79th Annual Meeting of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shinji; Sano, Yasushi

    2011-05-01

    At present, there are many narrow band imaging (NBI) magnifying observation classifications for colorectal tumor in Japan. To internationally standardize the NBI observation criteria, a simple classification system is required. When a colorectal tumor is closely observed using the recent high-resolution videocolonoscope, a pit-like pattern on the tumor can be observed to a certain degree without magnification. In the symposium we could have a consensus that we will name the pit-like pattern as 'surface pattern.' Using the NBI system, the microvessels on the tumor surface can also be recognized to a certain degree. When the NBI system is used, the structure is emphasized, and consequently, the surface pattern can be recognized easily. Recently, an international cooperative group was formed and consists of members from Japan, the USA and Europe, which is named as the Colon Tumor NBI Interest Group. This group has developed a simple category classification (NBI international colorectal endoscopic [NICE] classification), which classifies colorectal tumors into types 1-3 even by closely observing colorectal tumors using a high-resolution videocolonoscope (Validation study is now ongoing by Colon Tumor NBI Interest Group.). The key advantage of this is simplification of the NBI classification. Although the magnifying observation is the best for getting detailed NBI findings, both close observation and magnifying observation using the NICE classification might give almost similar results. Of course the NICE classification can be used more precisely with magnification. In this report we also refer the issues on NBI magnification, which should be solved as early as possible.

  13. 2014 consensus statement from the first Economics of Physical Inactivity Consensus (EPIC) conference (Vancouver).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer C; Verhagen, Evert; Bryan, Stirling; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Borland, Jeff; Buchner, David; Hendriks, Marike R C; Weiler, Richard; Morrow, James R; van Mechelen, Willem; Blair, Steven N; Pratt, Mike; Windt, Johann; al-Tunaiji, Hashel; Macri, Erin; Khan, Karim M

    2014-06-01

    This article describes major topics discussed from the 'Economics of Physical Inactivity Consensus Workshop' (EPIC), held in Vancouver, Canada, in April 2011. Specifically, we (1) detail existing evidence on effective physical inactivity prevention strategies; (2) introduce economic evaluation and its role in health policy decisions; (3) discuss key challenges in establishing and building health economic evaluation evidence (including accurate and reliable costs and clinical outcome measurement) and (4) provide insight into interpretation of economic evaluations in this critically important field. We found that most methodological challenges are related to (1) accurately and objectively valuing outcomes; (2) determining meaningful clinically important differences in objective measures of physical inactivity; (3) estimating investment and disinvestment costs and (4) addressing barriers to implementation. We propose that guidelines specific for economic evaluations of physical inactivity intervention studies are developed to ensure that related costs and effects are robustly, consistently and accurately measured. This will also facilitate comparisons among future economic evidence.

  14. Is There a Consensus on Consensus Methodology? Descriptions and Recommendations for Future Consensus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jane; Carline, Jan D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    The authors of this article reviewed the methodology of three common consensus methods: nominal group process, consensus development panels, and the Delphi technique. The authors set out to determine how a majority of researchers are conducting these studies, how they are analyzing results, and subsequently the manner in which they are reporting their findings. The authors conclude with a set of guidelines and suggestions designed to aid researchers who choose to use the consensus methodology in their work.Overall, researchers need to describe their inclusion criteria. In addition to this, on the basis of the current literature the authors found that a panel size of 5 to 11 members was most beneficial across all consensus methods described. Lastly, the authors agreed that the statistical analyses done in consensus method studies should be as rigorous as possible and that the predetermined definition of consensus must be included in the ultimate manuscript. More specific recommendations are given for each of the three consensus methods described in the article.

  15. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Tom; Cicardi, Marco; Farkas, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency) and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007...... International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. OBJECTIVE: To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010). METHODS: The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN...... approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. RESULTS: This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. CONCLUSIONS: Consensus approach is only...

  16. The "Gent" consensus on perforator flap terminology: preliminary definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeel, Phillip N; Van Landuyt, Koen H I; Monstrey, Stan J M; Hamdi, Moustapha; Matton, Guido E; Allen, Robert J; Dupin, Charles; Feller, Axel-Mario; Koshima, Isao; Kostakoglu, Naci; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2003-10-01

    Due to its increasing popularity, more and more articles on the use of perforator flaps have been reported in the literature during the past few years. Because the area of perforator flaps is new and rapidly evolving, there are no definitions and standard rules on terminology and nomenclature, which creates confusion when surgeons try to communicate and compare surgical techniques. This article attempts to represent the opinion of a group of pioneers in the field of perforator flap surgery. This consensus was reached after a terminology consensus meeting held during the Fifth International Course on Perforator Flaps in Gent, Belgium, on September 29, 2001. It stipulates not only the definitions of perforator vessels and perforator flaps but also the correct nomenclature for different perforator flaps. The authors believe that this consensus is a foundation that will stimulate further discussion and encourage further refinements in the future.

  17. Uranium industry in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Current state of uranium industry in Canada has been considered. It is shown that in Canada, which is the major supplier of uranium, new methods of prospecting, mining and processing of uranium are developed and the old ones are improved. Owing to automation and mechanization a higher labour productivity in uranium ore mining is achieved. The uranium industry of Canada can satisfy the future demands in uranium but introduction of any new improvement will depend completely on the rate of nuclear power development.

  18. Planning and conducting meetings effectively, part I: planning a meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay

    2011-12-01

    Meetings are held by leaders for many purposes, including conveying information, raising morale, asking for opinions, brain storming, making people part of the problem-solving process, building trust, getting to a consensus, and making decisions. However, many meetings waste time, some undermine the leader's power, and some decrease morale. Part I of this series of articles gives some tips on basic planning for decision-making meetings. Part II of this series of articles analyzes selected components of decision-making meetings. Part III of this series will be on how the chairperson keeps decision-making meetings on track to make them efficient and productive.

  19. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  20. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  1. One Canada, Two Languages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ByMurrayGreig; 赵金前

    2004-01-01

    Canada is one of the few nations in theworld to have two official languages: Englishand French. There are 10 provinces in thecountry but only one of these--Quebec isknown as "French Canada". This is because itwas founded by French explorers while Britishadventurers discovered the rest.

  2. Consensus clustering in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; 10.1038/srep00336

    2012-01-01

    The community structure of complex networks reveals both their organization and hidden relationships among their constituents. Most community detection methods currently available are not deterministic, and their results typically depend on the specific random seeds, initial conditions and tie-break rules adopted for their execution. Consensus clustering is used in data analysis to generate stable results out of a set of partitions delivered by stochastic methods. Here we show that consensus clustering can be combined with any existing method in a self-consistent way, enhancing considerably both the stability and the accuracy of the resulting partitions. This framework is also particularly suitable to monitor the evolution of community structure in temporal networks. An application of consensus clustering to a large citation network of physics papers demonstrates its capability to keep track of the birth, death and diversification of topics.

  3. A consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly complications

    OpenAIRE

    Melmed, S; Casanueva, F.F.; Klibanski, A; Bronstein, M. D.; Chanson, P.; Lamberts, S. W.; Strasburger, C. J.; Wass, J. A. H.; Giustina, A

    2012-01-01

    In March 2011, the Acromegaly Consensus Group met to revise and update the guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly complications. The meeting was sponsored by the Pituitary Society and the European Neuroendocrinology Association and included experts skilled in the management of acromegaly. Complications considered included cardiovascular, endocrine and metabolic, sleep apnea, bone diseases, and mortality. Outcomes in selected, related clinical conditions were also considered, ...

  4. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan

    2016-01-01

    on the effects of physical activity on children’s and youth’s fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process......From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term...

  5. Febrile Seizures: Controversy and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Omer A.

    1983-01-01

    Although febrile convulsions are a relatively common complaint, the approach to their management is far from uniform and highly controversial. This article reviews the consensus statement on febrile convulsions arrived at by the Consensus Development Conference held in 1980 by the National Institutes of Health, together with other literature of interest to family physicians. Guidelines are given for the assessment, diagnosis and emergency treatment of febrile seizures. Epilepsy and atypical febrile convulsions are distinguished from simple febrile seizures. Prognosis, prevention, and the importance of counselling parents are discussed, as well as the controversial issue of prophylactic treatment. PMID:21286583

  6. USArray - Seismic Reconnaissance in Northwest Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Spiers, K.; Murray, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    This poster describes the results of reconnaissance carried out by the Arctic Institute of North America in summer 2014 in collaboration with USArray and IRIS for deployment of the USArray in northern British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada. USArray is a 15-year program to place a dense network of permanent and portable seismographs across the continental United States and parts of Canada. The seismographs record local, regional, and distant (teleseismic) earthquakes. The array records seismic waves that propagate through finer and finer slices of the earth enabling scientists to link structures inherited from earlier stages of continental formation to known and potential geologic hazards (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides) (www.usarray.org). USArray deployment in Canada will complement existing Canadian seismic network(s). This project will be particularly significant in the St. Elias region of southwest Yukon, northwest British Columbia, and southeast Alaska as this one of the most seismically active areas and tectonically complex areas in Canada . The deployment will complement ongoing geological mapping carried out by both Yukon Geological Survey, the Geological Survey of Canada and several universities. This reconnaissance work is part of a growing portfolio of research conducted by the Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary designed to meet needs for information and enable synthesis and transfer of knowledge for problem solving and decision-making in the north.

  7. Eliminating health disparities through culturally and linguistically centered integrated health care: consensus statements, recommendations, and key strategies from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Katherine; Chapa, Teresa; Ybarra, Rick; Martinez, Octavio N

    2014-05-01

    This report is the outcome of an expert consensus meeting sponsored by the United States Deparment of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, which was convened to formulate consensus statements, provide recommendations and identify key strategies from practice for implementing integrated health and behavioral health care intended to improve health status for underserved populations.

  8. Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2002 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (26th, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, May 24-28, 2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the Study…

  9. Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2009 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (33rd, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 5-June 9, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.; Oesterle, Susan, Ed.; Abu-Bakare, Veda, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at York University in Toronto, Ontario. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the Study Group…

  10. Proceedings of the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2004 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (28th, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, May 28-Jun 1, 2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at Universite Laval in Quebec City, Quebec. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the Study…

  11. Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2003 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (27th, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada, May 30-June 3, 2003)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the…

  12. Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2006 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (30th, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Jun 3-7, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the…

  13. Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2007 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (31st, Fredricton, New Brunswick, Canada, Jun 8-12, 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of New Brunswick in Fredricton, New Brunswick. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning.…

  14. Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2008 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (32nd, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, May 23-27, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.; Oesterle, Susan, Ed.; Berneche, Christian, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the Universite de Sherbrooke in Sherbrooke, Quebec. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of…

  15. Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2010 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (34th, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, May 21-25, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.; Oesterle, Susan, Ed.; Allan, Darien, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims…

  16. Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2005 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (29th, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May 27-31, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Ontario. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the…

  17. CANADA: designing nucleic acid sequences for nanobiotechnology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkamp, Udo

    2010-02-01

    The design of nucleic acid sequences for a highly specific and efficient hybridization is a crucial step in DNA computing and DNA-based nanotechnology applications. The CANADA package contains software tools for designing DNA sequences that meet these and other requirements, as well as for analyzing and handling sequences. CANADA is freely available, including a detailed manual and example input files, at http://ls11-www.cs.uni-dortmund.de/molcomp/downloads.

  18. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan;

    2016-01-01

    that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord...

  19. Balancing multiple roles through consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates how participants in haircutting sessions merge different roles during one of the most sensitive moments of an encounter: requesting and/or making revisions to a new cut. During the process of arriving at a consensus of whether or not changes need to be made to the new cut,...

  20. Quantized average consensus with delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafarian, Matin; De Persis, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Average consensus problem is a special case of cooperative control in which the agents of the network asymptotically converge to the average state (i.e., position) of the network by transferring information via a communication topology. One of the issues of the large scale networks is the cost of co

  1. Canada and veterinary parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, J Owen D

    2009-08-07

    A World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology tradition for its conference is to present some highlights of the country hosting the event, and with an emphasis on the history of, and research in, veterinary parasitology. A review of Canada's peoples, physiography, climate, natural resources, agriculture, animal populations, pioneers in veterinary parasitology, research accomplishments by other veterinary parasitologists, centres for research in veterinary parasitology, and major current research had been presented at a World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology Conference in Canada in 1987, and was published. The present paper updates the information on the above topics for the 22 years since this conference was last held in Canada.

  2. Meeting Proceedings: Recommendations for Improved Acute Pain Services: Canadian Collaborative Acute Pain Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H Goldstein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Collaborative Acute Pain Initiative, established in 2002, is a voluntary, multidisciplinary consortium of acute pain health professionals from across Canada whose goal is to improve acute pain management through discussion and consensus. The group met in January 2002 to define strategic areas related to the treatment of acute pain. The areas identified were: the definition of pain; the epidemiology of pain; the concept of an 'ideal' acute pain management service; education; therapeutic options; symptom management; and research and safety. In November 2002, a second meeting was held to develop objectives and recommendations for the management of acute pain based on the defined areas. The outcome of these discussions is summarized in this paper.

  3. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  4. ECNP consensus meeting. Bipolar depression. Nice, March 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodwin, Guy M.; Anderson, Ian; Arango, Celso; Bowden, Charles L.; Henry, Chantal; Mitchell, Philip B.; Nolen, Willem A.; Vieta, Eduard; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis and epidemiology: DSM-IV, specifically its text revision DSM-IV-TR, remains the preferred diagnostic system. When employed in general population samples, prevalence estimates of bipolar disorder are relatively consistent across studies in Europe and USA. In community studies, first onset o

  5. Stroke and the antiphospholipid syndrome : consensus meeting Taormina 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, RL; Chapman, J; Levine, [No Value; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Derksen, RHWM; Khamashta, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2003-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is the only neurological manifestation accepted as a clinical diagnostic criterion for the antiphospholipidsyndrome (APS). This association is reasonably well established in patients first diagnosed with APS but is less clear in randomly selected stroke patients who test positive on

  6. Medication errors: problems and recommendations from a consensus meeting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, A.; Aronson, J.K.; Britten, N.; Ferner, R.E.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Fialova, D.; Fitzgerald, R.J.; Likic, R.; Maxwell, S.R.; Meyboom, R.H.; Minuz, P.; Onder, G.; Schachter, M.; Velo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Here we discuss 15 recommendations for reducing the risks of medication errors: 1. Provision of sufficient undergraduate learning opportunities to make medical students safe prescribers. 2. Provision of opportunities for students to practise skills that help to reduce errors. 3. Education of student

  7. Breast cancer in pregnancy: recommendations of an international consensus meeting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amant, F.; Deckers, S.; Calsteren, K. van; Loibl, S.; Halaska, M.; Brepoels, L.; Beijnen, J.; Cardoso, F.; Gentilini, O.; Lagae, L.; Mir, O.; Neven, P.; Ottevanger, N.; Pans, S.; Peccatori, F.; Rouzier, R.; Senn, H.J.; Struikmans, H.; Christiaens, M.R.; Cameron, D.; Bois, A. du

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide guidance for clinicians about the diagnosis, staging and treatment of breast cancer occurring during an otherwise uncomplicated pregnancy. METHODS: An international expert Panel convened to address a series of questions identified by a literature review and personal experience. I

  8. Bioactive compounds: Safety and efficacy (Consensus Meeting - Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Dragsted, L.O.; Elmadfa, I.; Grossklaus, R.; Müller, M.R.; Schrenk, D.; Walter, P.; Weber, P.

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of bioactive compounds depend on a few known and unknown parameters. What is a physiologic dose and how can that dose be defined in cases of bioactive compounds with a poor knowledge of supply and distribution? What safety sets are needed? How can individual aspects such as p

  9. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one the five main topics of the meeting: H. pylori and dyspepsia, H. pylori and NSAIDs, H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, H. pylori treatment, and H. pylori retreatment. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. The results were presented during a special session on the VI Brazilian Week of Digestive System, in Recife, PE (October 2004), and this publication represents the summary of the main recommendations and conclusions emerged from the meeting.

  10. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  11. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  12. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (25th, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, May 25-29, 2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 2001 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG) held at the University of Alberta, May 25-39, 2000. The proceedings consist of two plenary lectures, four working groups, five topic sessions, new Ph.D. reports, an AD Hoc Session, and panel discussions. Papers include: (1)…

  13. A consensus statement on critical thinking in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, B K; Rubenfeld, M G

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to define critical thinking in nursing. A Delphi technique with 5 rounds of input was used to achieve this purpose. An international panel of expert nurses from nine countries: Brazil, Canada, England, Iceland, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Thailand, and 23 states in the U.S. participated in this study between 1995 and 1998. A consensus definition (statement) of critical thinking in nursing was achieved. The panel also identified and defined 10 habits of the mind (affective components) and 7 skills (cognitive components) of critical thinking in nursing. The habits of the mind of critical thinking in nursing included: confidence, contextual perspective, creativity, flexibility, inquisitiveness, intellectual integrity, intuition, open-mindedness, perseverance, and reflection. Skills of critical thinking in nursing included: analyzing, applying standards, discriminating, information seeking, logical reasoning, predicting and transforming knowledge. These findings can be used by practitioners, educators and researchers to advance understanding of the essential role of critical thinking in nursing.

  14. Reaching consensus through electronic brainstorming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, K A

    1997-01-01

    Obtaining feedback on data elements from national experts was crucial to the development of the core patient data set. This was accomplished, in part, through using GroupSystems electronic meeting software.

  15. Consensus statement on injury definitions and data collection procedures for studies of injuries in rugby union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Colin W; Molloy, Michael G; Bagate, Christian; Bahr, Roald; Brooks, John H M; Donson, Hilton; Kemp, Simon P T; McCrory, Paul; McIntosh, Andrew S; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Quarrie, Kenneth L; Raftery, Martin; Wiley, Preston

    2007-05-01

    Wide variations in the definitions and methodologies used for studies of injuries in rugby union have created inconsistencies in reported data and made interstudy comparisons of results difficult. The International Rugby Board established a Rugby Injury Consensus Group (RICG) to reach an agreement on the appropriate definitions and methodologies to standardise the recording of injuries and reporting of studies in rugby union. The RICG reviewed the consensus definitions and methodologies previously published for football (soccer) at a meeting in Dublin in order to assess their suitability for and application to rugby union. Following this meeting, iterative draft statements were prepared and circulated to members of the RICG for comment; a follow-up meeting was arranged in Dublin, at which time all definitions and procedures were finalised. At this stage, all authors confirmed their agreement with the consensus statement. The agreed document was presented to and approved by the International Rugby Board Council. Agreement was reached on definitions for injury, recurrent injury, non-fatal catastrophic injury, and training and match exposures, together with criteria for classifying injuries in terms of severity, location, type, diagnosis and causation. The definitions and methodology presented in this consensus statement for rugby union are similar to those proposed for football. Adoption of the proposals presented in this consensus statement should ensure that more consistent and comparable results will be obtained from studies of injuries within rugby union.

  16. Knowledge Matters: Skills and Learning for Canadians. Canada's Innovation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources Development Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This paper outlines the skills and learning challenges that Canada faces to ensure it meets its skills and learning requirements for the 21st century. It proposes a series of national goals and milestones against which progress can be measured over time and reported on regularly to Canadians. Following an introduction, Sections 2-5 discuss the…

  17. Sylvatic trichinosis in Canada.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, H. J.; Snowdon, K E

    1988-01-01

    Pepsin digestion of musculature from 2253 animals revealed that sylvatic trichinosis occurred in various species of mammals from the eastern to the western Arctic and extended down into the Rocky Mountain and Foothills regions of western Canada. Infections were demonstrated in Arctic fox, red fox, wolf, raccoon, coyote, lynx, bobcat and dog.

  18. In Canada: Friendly Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Heather-jane

    2004-01-01

    One of Canada's more frequently quoted political malapropisms is attributed to Robert Thompson, who sternly reminded his fellow parliamentarians in 1973 that "the Americans are our best friends, whether we like it or not." This cross-border friendship is partly expedient, partly geographic, partly genuine, sometimes one-sided, and almost always…

  19. National consensus in China on diagnosis and treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xichun; Jiang, Zefei; Li, Huiping; Chen, Jiayi; Cui, Shude; Li, Qing; Liao, Ning; Liu, Donggeng; Liu, Jian; Lu, Jinsong; Shen, Kunwei; Sun, Tao; Teng, Yuee; Tong, Zhongsheng; Wang, Shulian; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Xiaojia; Wang, Yongsheng; Wu, Jiong; Yuan, Peng; Zhang, Pin; Zhang, Qingyuan; Zheng, Hong; Pang, Da; Ren, Guosheng; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Zhenzhou; Song, Erwei; Song, Santai

    2015-01-01

    The recently available guidelines on the management of advanced breast cancer (ABC) organized by Chinese Anti-Cancer Association, Committee of Breast Cancer Society (CACA-CBCS) do not elucidate ABC in details. To instruct clinicians in treatment of ABC, a Chinese expert consensus meeting on diagnosis and treatment of ABC was held in June 2014 and a consensus is developed. The following consensus provides the level of evidence and supporting documents for each recommendation, and introduces research topics to be urgently addressed. Notably, the consensus on diagnosis and treatment of ABC in China is developed to be applied nationwide. In different areas, multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) tailored to the each patient and the disease itself should be applied based on the basic principles of modern oncology. PMID:26605288

  20. Comparison of IAEA TECDOC 717 technical basis with consensus codes and standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E. [Applied Science and Technology, Inc., Poway, CA (United States); Saegusa, T.; Ito, C. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Civil Engineering Lab.; Sorenson, K.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The original IAEA TECDOC 717 prepared at the consensus Consultants Service Meetings contained specific guidance with respect to the application of linear-elastic fracture mechanics principles to the evaluation of potential non-ductile failure for radioactive material shipping package containment boundaries. No specific guidance was provided with respect to elastic-plastic fracture mechanics procedures, due to a lack of consensus. This paper proposes that the inclusion of three alternative elastic-plastic evaluation approaches may provide the basis for consensus guidance to be added to a revised TECDOC. These three alternatives have been incorporated into consensus ASME Code non-mandatory appendices, and are widely accepted in combination. One of the three alternatives, an applied J-integral/crack resistance curve approach, is examined in some detail. (author).

  1. Diagnosis and treatments of Prader-Willi syndrome: a review of current consensuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Vital'evna Vitebskaya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed international consensuses of experts and clinical recommendations on diagnosis and treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS: PWS consensus diagnostic criteria (1993; US PWS Association (PWSA-USA consensus statements on evaluating of breathing abnormalities (2007, osteoporosis (2008, growth hormone treatment in PWS (2000 and 2009; Endocrine society clinical practice guideline on Prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity (2008; the Second Expert Meeting of the Comprehensive Care of Patients with PWS Consensus published as Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of PWS (2008. Historical analysis and comparison of recommendations are presented in this review article. Absence of Russian clinical practice guidelines on PWS patients management makes necessary the detailed study of listed documents.

  2. IYPE in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, J.; Nowlan, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Canadian National Committee picked five of the ten IYPE themes for emphasis in Canada - Water, Hazards, Energy, Resources and Environment. They are summarized in the acronym WHERE - WHERE on Earth, WHERE in Canada. Our committee raised funds from industry, with some generous support from The Geological Survey of Canada. Funds were used for publishing “Four Billion Years and Counting”, a book on Canadian geology designed for the general public. It will be useful to educators who can download many of the illustrations and images for classroom support. Recognizing the looming shortage of Geoscientists, we designed a new careers website to help attract young people to the Earth sciences. It can be seen on our website, www.EarthsciencesCanada.com. The website will be updated regularly. The WHERE Challenge was a national contest for children aged 10 to 14. They were asked to select an object, often something from their household, identify at least one non-renewable resource used to make the object, and submit an entry describing the object, the resources within it, and WHERE they came from. We received entries from more than 1000 students Some of the winning entries are posted on our website. We developed a partnership with Parks Canada called Egoists, which is a series of pamphlets on iconic views within the parks explaining the Earth science behind the views. We also supported the celebration of the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the Burgess Shale by providing funding for the publication of a field guide. At the end of the year all programs will transfer to the Canadian Federation of Earth Sciences. The WHERE Challenge will be repeated in 2010. It, plus our book and careers website will continue our outreach activities.

  3. Trastuzumab in the treatment of advanced breast cancer: Our single-center experience and spotlights of the latest national consensus meeting Trastuzumab en el tratamiento del cáncer de mama avanzado. Nuestra experiencia y aspectos de la última Reunión Nacional de Consenso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Tomadoni

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER 2 is amplified in 25 to 30% of breast cancer patients and those whose tumors demonstrate HER 2 gene amplification and protein overexpression have an inferior prognosis manifested by shorter disease-free and overall survival. Trastuzumab, the humanized murine anti-HER 2 monoclonal antibody, inhibits tumor growth when used alone and has synergistic and additive effects when used with chemotherapeutic agents (paclitacel-doxorrubicine. At the present time, the accurate diagnostic assessment of HER 2 is essential for appropriate application of the humanized anti HER 2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer.FDA has approved its use for patients with metastatic breast cancer with HER 2 over-expression since 1998, as a first line treatment in association with paclitaxel or as a second or third line monotherapy. In Argentina, two Consensus Meetings of HER 2 Diagnosis have taken place: the first one on May 15th, 2002 and the second on April 11th, 2003, supported by Roche Laboratories (Herceptin®. In this paper, some topics of these meetings are reviewed. Our single-public center experience is discussed.El receptor para el factor humano de crecimiento epidérmico (HER 2 se encuentra amplificado en el 25 a 30% de los cánceres de mama y aquellas pacientes con tumores que amplifiquen el gen HER 2 y sobreexpresen su proteína tienen un peor pronóstico que se traduce en menor sobreviva global y tiempo libre de enfermedad. Usado como monodroga, Trastuzumab, el anticuerpo monoclonal murino humanizado anti-HER 2, inhibe el crecimiento tumoral y posee efectos sinérgicos y aditivos cuando se agrega a otros agentes quimioterápicos (paclitaxel-doxorrubicina. La determinación diagnóstica precisa del HER 2 es esencial para establecer el uso racional de trastuzumab en el tratamiento de pacientes con cáncer de mama metastático. La FDA aprobó su uso para pacientes

  4. Consensus of Hybrid Multi-Agent Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshi; Ma, Jingying; Wang, Long

    2017-01-27

    In this brief, we consider the consensus problem of hybrid multiagent systems. First, the hybrid multiagent system is proposed, which is composed of continuous-time and discrete-time dynamic agents. Then, three kinds of consensus protocols are presented for the hybrid multiagent system. The analysis tool developed in this brief is based on the matrix theory and graph theory. With different restrictions of the sampling period, some necessary and sufficient conditions are established for solving the consensus of the hybrid multiagent system. The consensus states are also obtained under different protocols. Finally, simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  5. Theories about consensus-based conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, William D

    2006-04-01

    "Conservation and the Myth of Consensus" (Peterson et al. 2005) levels several serious indictments against consensus-based approaches to environmental decision making. Namely, the authors argue that consensus processes (1) reinforce apathy and ignorance of conservation issues; (2) legitimize damage to the environment; (3) quash public debate about conservation; (4) solidify the existing balance of power in favor of prodevelopment forces; and (5) block progress toward an ecologically sustainable future. Careful scrutiny of consensus-based approaches is important, especially considering their surging use in conservation policy. In the spirit of advancing the debate further, I review some of the limitations of the essay and its modes of inquiry.

  6. 12 consensuses gained in the Annual EU-China Trade Talks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Brussels,on June 12th,2007,China’s Minister of Commerce Bo Xilai,European Commissioner for External Relations and Neighbourhood Policy, Benita Ferrero Waldner, and European trade commissioner,Peter Mandelson,co-chaired the meeting.The two parties exchanged views and negotiated honestly,broadly and deeply.12 consensuses were gained in the meeting on perfecting talks of Sino-EU trade and economic

  7. An Exploration of the Relationship among Teacher Efficacy, Collective Teacher Efficacy, and Goal Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Terri Barber; Knight, Stephanie L.

    2004-01-01

    This study explored the relationships among individual teacher efficacy, collective teacher efficacy, and goal consensus/vision. Participants included 113 teachers of a high school located in the southwestern USA. During a teacher inservice meeting, teachers completed three surveys that measured the variables under study. Correlational and…

  8. Learning consensus in adversarial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G.; García Carrillo, Luis R.; Hespanha, João. P.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a game theory-based consensus problem for leaderless multi-agent systems in the presence of adversarial inputs that are introducing disturbance to the dynamics. Given the presence of enemy components and the possibility of malicious cyber attacks compromising the security of networked teams, a position agreement must be reached by the networked mobile team based on environmental changes. The problem is addressed under a distributed decision making framework that is robust to possible cyber attacks, which has an advantage over centralized decision making in the sense that a decision maker is not required to access information from all the other decision makers. The proposed framework derives three tuning laws for every agent; one associated with the cost, one associated with the controller, and one with the adversarial input.

  9. Humanitarian war: a new consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, S L

    2001-12-01

    The NATO bombing operation Allied Force against Yugoslavia in March-June 1999 represents the final disappearance of the narrowing divide between humanitarianism and politics: a war initiated and justified on humanitarian grounds. Although unlikely to be repeated any time soon, the Kosovo case appears to have cemented an ideological shift on the international right and even necessity of sing military force to protect civilians within sovereign states. Rather than humanitarians acknowledging the political context and consequences of their work, however, the case suggests the embrace of humanitarian principles of universality and neutrality by military organisations. This article discusses some consequences of the new consensus: neglect of the political context (both local and foreign) of such operations, interaction between the operational dynamics of relief operations and the logic of war and the political consequences of using the humanitarian legitimation and mission in such cases.

  10. Spanish Consensus Statement: The Treatment of Muscle Tears in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jaén, Tomas F; Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel Del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2015-12-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms-without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period-all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain.

  11. International Consensus on drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, P; Adkinson, N F; Brockow, K; Castells, M; Chiriac, A M; Greenberger, P A; Khan, D A; Lang, D M; Park, H-S; Pichler, W; Sanchez-Borges, M; Shiohara, T; Thong, B Y- H

    2014-04-01

    When drug reactions resembling allergy occur, they are called drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) before showing the evidence of either drug-specific antibodies or T cells. DHRs may be allergic or nonallergic in nature, with drug allergies being immunologically mediated DHRs. These reactions are typically unpredictable. They can be life-threatening, may require or prolong hospitalization, and may necessitate changes in subsequent therapy. Both underdiagnosis (due to under-reporting) and overdiagnosis (due to an overuse of the term ‘allergy’) are common. A definitive diagnosis of such reactions is required in order to institute adequate treatment options and proper preventive measures. Misclassification based solely on the DHR history without further testing may affect treatment options, result in adverse consequences, and lead to the use of more-expensive or less-effective drugs, in contrast to patients who had undergone a complete drug allergy workup. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents on general or specific drug class-induced DHRs are available to support the medical decision process. The use of standardized systematic approaches for the diagnosis and management of DHRs carries the potential to improve outcomes and should thus be disseminated and implemented. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), and the World Allergy Organization (WAO), has decided to issue an International CONsensus (ICON) on drug allergy. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences and deficiencies of evidence, thus providing a comprehensive reference document for the diagnosis and management of

  12. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012 : Science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, C. J. H.; Boelens, P. G.; Tanis, P. J.; Espin, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Naredi, P.; Pahlman, L.; Ortiz, H.; Rutten, H. J.; Breugom, A. J.; Smith, J. J.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Valentini, V.

    2014-01-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the c

  13. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Vincenzo (Cattedra di Radioterapia, Univ. Cattolica S.Cuore, Rome (Italy)), E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Glimelius, Bengt (Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  14. Strategic consensus mapping : A new method for testing and visualizing strategic consensus within and between teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarakci, M.; Ates, N.Y.; Porck, J.P.; van Knippenberg, D.; Groenen, P.J.F.; de Haas, M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on strategic consensus focuses primarily on the extent of agreement among team members regarding organizational strategy. It does not include elements such as the content of the agreement, between-group consensus, or the significance of differences in consensus (e.g., for evaluating the eff

  15. DEWI partnership in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutilleux, P.; Klug, H.; Molly, J.P. [DEWI, Wilhelmshaven (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Canada is with its 9.982.000 km{sup 2} the second largest country in the world. It has plenty of natural resources for a population density of 3 inhabitants per km{sup 2}. Now that the time for wind energy is coming, DEWI is willing to contribute with its know-how to the development of wind energy in this country. In this article we review briefly two of the market drivers for the development of wind energy: the need for additional electricity generation capacity and the political framework. After considering the volume of projects under development, a way is shown how DEWI will be present in Canada in order to support its clients. (orig.)

  16. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, J.; Glaros, A.G.; Kato, T.; Koyano, K.; Lavigne, G.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Manfredini, D.; Svensson, P.; Winocur, E.

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined

  17. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...

  18. Nordic consensus on treatment of undescended testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritzén, E Martin; Bergh, A; Bjerknes, R;

    2007-01-01

    To reach consensus among specialists from the Nordic countries on the present state-of-the-art in treatment of undescended testicles.......To reach consensus among specialists from the Nordic countries on the present state-of-the-art in treatment of undescended testicles....

  19. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...

  20. Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhou; N. Hu; C.J. Spanos

    2016-01-01

    We propose Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning (VCMKL), a novel way of combining multiple kernels such that one class of samples is described by the logical intersection (consensus) of base kernelized decision rules, whereas the other classes by the union (veto) of their complements. The propose

  1. Transnational surrogacy: Canada's contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozanski, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Transnational commercial surrogacy represents a form of medical tourism undertaken by intended parents who seek to hire women in other countries, increasingly often in the global South, as surrogates. While much of the scholarly literature focuses on the conditions of surrogacy within host countries, such as India, there has been limited analysis of transnational surrogacy focused upon origin countries. In this article, I build upon the scholarship that explores the impact of host country structures on transnational surrogacy, with special attention to the significance of Canadian citizenship policy through analysis of legislation and policy vis-à-vis transnational commercial surrogacy. The Canadian case demonstrates clear contradictions between the legislation and policy that is enacted domestically to prohibit commercial surrogacy within Canada and legislation and policy that implicitly sanctions commercial surrogacy through the straightforward provision of citizenship for children born of such arrangements abroad. The ethical underpinnings of Canada's domestic prohibition of commercial surrogacy, which is presumed to exploit women and children and to impede gender equality, are violated in Canada's bureaucratic willingness to accept children born of transnational commercial surrogacy as citizens. Thus, the ethical discourses apply only to Canadian citizens within Canadian geography. The failure of the Canadian government to hold Canadian citizens who participate in transnational commercial surrogacy to the normative imperatives that prohibit the practice within the country, or to undertake a more nuanced, and necessarily controversial, discussion of commercial surrogacy reinforces transnational disparities in terms of whose bodies may be commodified as a measure of gendered inequality.

  2. Environmental performance reviews: Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    OECD's comprehensive 2004 report on Canada's environmental policies and programmes systematically examines policy related to air, water, and nature/biodiversity as well as the interface between environmental policy and economic policy, social policy, and specific sectors. It finds that while Canada has made satisfactory progress since 1985, there are still significant challenges, and the report makes specific recommendations for more use of economic instruments and use of the polluter and user pays principles, rationalising water governance, strengthening nature protection, reducing energy intensity, implementing climate change policies, reviewing environmentally related taxes, and implementing marine and aid commitments. Coal provides about 20% of Canada's electric power. Most direct subsidisation of the fossil fuel supply industries (upstream oil, gas and coal) has been reduced. The report recommends subsidies to the mining industry for exploration should also be phased out. Recent measurements indicate emissions of mercury are increasing, mainly due to long-range transboundary air pollution from coal-burning plants. 42 figs., 24 tabs.

  3. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  4. Consensus statement on diabetes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Prasanna Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While T1DM has been traditionally seen as a minor concern in the larger picture of pediatric ailments, new data reveals that the incidence of T1DM has assumed alarming proportions. It has long been clear that while the disease may be diagnosed at an early age, its impact is not isolated to afflicted children. The direct impact of the disease on the patient is debilitating due to the nature of the disease and lack of proper access to treatment in India. But this impact is further compounded by the utter apathy and often times antipathy, which patients withT1DM have to face. Lack of awareness of the issue in all stakeholders, low access to quality healthcare, patient, physician, and system level barriers to the delivery of optimal diabetes care are some of the factors which hinder successful management of T1DM. The first international consensus meet on diabetes in children was convened with the aim of providing a common platform to all the stakeholders in the management of T1DM, to discuss the academic, administrative and healthcare system related issues. The ultimate aim was to articulate the problems faced by children with diabetes in a way that centralized their position and focused on creating modalities of management sensitive to their needs and aspirations. It was conceptualized to raise a strong voice of advocacy for improving the management of T1DM and ensuring that "No child should die of diabetes". The unique clinical presentations of T1DM coupled with ignorance on the part of the medical community and society in general results in outcomes that are far worse than that seen with T2DM. So there is a need to substantially improve training of HCPs at all levels on this neglected aspect of healthcare.

  5. Consensus statement on diabetes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna Kumar, K M; Dev, N Prabhu; Raman, K V; Desai, Rajnanda; Prasadini, T Geetha; Das, A K; Ramoul, Soraya

    2014-05-01

    While T1DM has been traditionally seen as a minor concern in the larger picture of pediatric ailments, new data reveals that the incidence of T1DM has assumed alarming proportions. It has long been clear that while the disease may be diagnosed at an early age, its impact is not isolated to afflicted children. The direct impact of the disease on the patient is debilitating due to the nature of the disease and lack of proper access to treatment in India. But this impact is further compounded by the utter apathy and often times antipathy, which patients withT1DM have to face. Lack of awareness of the issue in all stakeholders, low access to quality healthcare, patient, physician, and system level barriers to the delivery of optimal diabetes care are some of the factors which hinder successful management of T1DM. The first international consensus meet on diabetes in children was convened with the aim of providing a common platform to all the stakeholders in the management of T1DM, to discuss the academic, administrative and healthcare system related issues. The ultimate aim was to articulate the problems faced by children with diabetes in a way that centralized their position and focused on creating modalities of management sensitive to their needs and aspirations. It was conceptualized to raise a strong voice of advocacy for improving the management of T1DM and ensuring that "No child should die of diabetes". The unique clinical presentations of T1DM coupled with ignorance on the part of the medical community and society in general results in outcomes that are far worse than that seen with T2DM. So there is a need to substantially improve training of HCPs at all levels on this neglected aspect of healthcare.

  6. In control? IQC consensus and statutory regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Graham R; Fitzgibbon, Maria C; O'Shea, Paula

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - Internal quality control (IQC) represents an essential risk management tool within the total testing pathway (TTP) that contributes to the overall objective of assuring the quality of results produced in medical laboratories. Controlling analytical phase quality alone requires significant expertise and input by scientifically trained staff. This effort has escalated exponentially following the publication of the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO)15189:2012 requirements for quality and competence in medical laboratories. The reported inconsistency and diversity to IQC approaches in diagnostic laboratories is definitive evidence that international guidance in IQC programme design and implementation is long overdue. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach - Herein, the authors define, describe and critically examine the essential elements four stages of an IQC programme and suggest a template to inform both design and ease of implementation. For practical application, the authors have stratified the proposed methodology into four stages: staff education and training; IQC material; IQC targets; and IQC procedure, and provide recommendations that meet ISO15189:2012 requirements. Findings - These recommendations are informed by the published literature together with the collective experience working in clinical biochemistry and diagnostic endocrinology laboratories. The authors note that the laboratory staff's effort on IQC is a continuous process, driven by changes within each IQC stage, in response to risk analysis, maximising economic value or through professional leadership and central to IQC programme implementation and delivery. Practical implications - The authors offer a template that laboratories can use to inform the design and implementation of their IQC programme. Originality/value - The proposed IQC programme is user friendly, flexible and pragmatic with the potential to harmonise practice. The authors

  7. Development of EIA Issues in Canada and Practices in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr. Robert C. Lao

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction The requirement for conducting environmental impact assessment (EIA) for all economic and construction development projects and activities in Canada is based on the law. The federal government of Canada, and all provincial and territorial governments have developed relevant processes and procedures to meet this legal obligation. As early as in 1973, the federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process (EARP) was established, and in 1984 the Guidelines Order issued was by the federal cabinet which clarified roles and responsibilities of various parties and stakeholders for participating and/or implementing EARP.

  8. Canada Finance Minster:Welcome China's Investment in Canada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2009-01-01

    @@ To forward the relationship between China and Canada in financial and trade sectors and strengthen the cooperation in avoiding the worse impact of international financial crisis,Canadian financial high-level leaders involving Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney,Canada's Minister of Finance Jim Flaherty,Federal Superintendent of Financial Institutions Julie Dickson.as well as tive malor banks and the two biggest insurance companies in Canada,who are lpoking to strengthen and expand business ties with China,visited China from August 8 to August 14,2009.

  9. Scientific principles for the identification of endocrine-disrupting chemicals: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Roland; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Bergman, Åke; Chahoud, Ibrahim; Degen, Gisela H; Dietrich, Daniel; Greim, Helmut; Håkansson, Helen; Hass, Ulla; Husoy, Trine; Jacobs, Miriam; Jobling, Susan; Mantovani, Alberto; Marx-Stoelting, Philip; Piersma, Aldert; Ritz, Vera; Slama, Remy; Stahlmann, Ralf; van den Berg, Martin; Zoeller, R Thomas; Boobis, Alan R

    2017-02-01

    Endocrine disruption is a specific form of toxicity, where natural and/or anthropogenic chemicals, known as "endocrine disruptors" (EDs), trigger adverse health effects by disrupting the endogenous hormone system. There is need to harmonize guidance on the regulation of EDs, but this has been hampered by what appeared as a lack of consensus among scientists. This publication provides summary information about a consensus reached by a group of world-leading scientists that can serve as the basis for the development of ED criteria in relevant EU legislation. Twenty-three international scientists from different disciplines discussed principles and open questions on ED identification as outlined in a draft consensus paper at an expert meeting hosted by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) in Berlin, Germany on 11-12 April 2016. Participants reached a consensus regarding scientific principles for the identification of EDs. The paper discusses the consensus reached on background, definition of an ED and related concepts, sources of uncertainty, scientific principles important for ED identification, and research needs. It highlights the difficulty in retrospectively reconstructing ED exposure, insufficient range of validated test systems for EDs, and some issues impacting on the evaluation of the risk from EDs, such as non-monotonic dose-response and thresholds, modes of action, and exposure assessment. This report provides the consensus statement on EDs agreed among all participating scientists. The meeting facilitated a productive debate and reduced a number of differences in views. It is expected that the consensus reached will serve as an important basis for the development of regulatory ED criteria.

  10. Definition of a COPD self-management intervention: International Expert Group consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effing, Tanja W; Vercoulen, Jan H; Bourbeau, Jean; Trappenburg, Jaap; Lenferink, Anke; Cafarella, Paul; Coultas, David; Meek, Paula; van der Valk, Paul; Bischoff, Erik W M A; Bucknall, Christine; Dewan, Naresh A; Early, Frances; Fan, Vincent; Frith, Peter; Janssen, Daisy J A; Mitchell, Katy; Morgan, Mike; Nici, Linda; Patel, Irem; Walters, Haydn; Rice, Kathryn L; Singh, Sally; Zuwallack, Richard; Benzo, Roberto; Goldstein, Roger; Partridge, Martyn R; van der Palen, Job

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent need for consensus on what defines a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management intervention. We aimed to obtain consensus regarding the conceptual definition of a COPD self-management intervention by engaging an international panel of COPD self-management experts using Delphi technique features and an additional group meeting.In each consensus round the experts were asked to provide feedback on the proposed definition and to score their level of agreement (1=totally disagree; 5=totally agree). The information provided was used to modify the definition for the next consensus round. Thematic analysis was used for free text responses and descriptive statistics were used for agreement scores.In total, 28 experts participated. The consensus round response rate varied randomly over the five rounds (ranging from 48% (n=13) to 85% (n=23)), and mean definition agreement scores increased from 3.8 (round 1) to 4.8 (round 5) with an increasing percentage of experts allocating the highest score of 5 (round 1: 14% (n=3); round 5: 83% (n=19)).In this study we reached consensus regarding a conceptual definition of what should be a COPD self-management intervention, clarifying the requisites for such an intervention. Operationalisation of this conceptual definition in the near future will be an essential next step.

  11. Management of Hepatitis B: A Longitudinal National Survey – Impact of the Canadian Hepatitis B Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marotta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver, and The Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Canada, jointly developed the Canadian Chronic Hepatitis B (HBV Consensus Guidelines to assist practitioners involved in the management of this complex disease. These guidelines were published in The Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology in June 2007 and distributed to all Canadian gastroenterologists and hepatologists.

  12. IncobotulinumtoxinA in aesthetics: Russian multidisciplinary expert consensus recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutskovskaya Y

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Yana Yutskovskaya,1 Elena Gubanova,2 Irina Khrustaleva,3 Vasiliy Atamanov,4 Anastasiya Saybel,5 Elena Parsagashvili,6 Irina Dmitrieva,7 Elena Sanchez,8 Natalia Lapatina,9 Tatiana Korolkova,10 Alena Saromytskaya,11 Elena Goltsova,12 Elmira Satardinova13 1Department of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Pacific State Medical University, Vladivostock, 2Department of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Moscow National University of Food Production, Moscow, 3Department of Plastic Surgery, IP Pavlov Medical State University, St Petersburg, 4Department of Reconstructive and Plastic Surgery, SN Fedorova, Federal State Institution, Novosibirsk, 5Clinic Ideal, Laser Technologies Center, Moscow, 6Aestima-clinic, 7Clinic “Academy”, St Petersburg, 8Eklan Medical Center of Cosmetological Correction, 9Clinic of Aesthetic Medicine and Plastic Surgery, Moscow, 10Department of Cosmetology, II Mechnikov North-Western State Medical University, St Petersburg, 11Plastic Surgery Clinic, Center of Aesthetic Medicine and Beauty Cosmetology, 12“Neo-Clinic,” Tyumen, 13Botulinum Toxin Therapy Department, Diagnostic Center of the Irkutsk State Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Irkutsk, Russia Background: Although there are various international consensus recommendations on the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A in facial aesthetics, there are no global or Russian guidelines on the optimal dose of incobotulinumtoxinA, free from complexing proteins, within specific aesthetic indications. This article reports the outcomes of two expert consensus meetings, conducted to review and analyze efficacy and tolerability data for incobotulinumtoxinA in various facial aesthetic indications and to give expert consensus recommendations to ensure best clinical practice among Russian clinicians. Methods: Thirteen dermatology and/or plastic surgery experts attended meetings held in Paris, France (November 2013, and Moscow, Russia (March 2014

  13. Canada and access to medicines in developing countries: intellectual property rights first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel

    2013-09-03

    Canadian reports have recommended that health as a human right must be Canada's overarching global commitment and that the primacy of human rights should be prioritized over other elements of international law including international trade and investment law as it applies to access to pharmaceuticals. This paper uses a series of case reports to examine Canada's commitment to this goal. Specifically it examines cases where improved access has been in conflict with increased intellectual property rights. The 6 cases are: Canada's position when 39 pharmaceutical companies took South Africa to court in 1998 over its legislation to allow parallel importation of patented medicines and to regulate the price of medications; the stance that Canada took in the negotiations around the Doha Declaration in 2001; the passage of Canada's Access to Medicines Regime in 2004 and subsequent attempts to amend the legislation in 2011 and 2012; Canada's involvement in the final declaration at the United Nations High-Level meeting on non-communicable diseases in 2012; Canada's views about the terms in the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement as expressed in 2009; and Canada's 2013 position on the extension of the exemption for least developed countries from having to comply with the terms of the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement. In the first case Canada was neutral but in the remaining 5 cases Canada prioritized intellectual property rights over access. This position is consistent with how Canada has acted around domestic issues involving intellectual property rights for pharmaceutical products. Canada has supported strengthened rights despite the fact that their touted benefits have not been realized either domestically or in developing countries. As a result Canada has failed in its humanitarian duty to protect the human right to health in the form of safe and low cost medicines for the people in developing countries.

  14. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.

    2008-01-01

    to analyze relevant stakeholders' positions by describing their statements on the possibilities and limitations of research into genetic determinants of Alzheimer disease and to describe and analyze the moral desirability of genetic research on Alzheimer disease. The conclusions drawn from the Delphi......In this article, the authors describe how the European Dementia Consensus Network developed a consensus on research ethics in dementia, taking into account the questions posed by the era of genetic research and its new research methods. The consensus process started with a Delphi procedure...

  15. A Study On Distributed Model Predictive Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Keviczky, Tamas

    2008-01-01

    We investigate convergence properties of a proposed distributed model predictive control (DMPC) scheme, where agents negotiate to compute an optimal consensus point using an incremental subgradient method based on primal decomposition as described in Johansson et al. [2006, 2007]. The objective of the distributed control strategy is to agree upon and achieve an optimal common output value for a group of agents in the presence of constraints on the agent dynamics using local predictive controllers. Stability analysis using a receding horizon implementation of the distributed optimal consensus scheme is performed. Conditions are given under which convergence can be obtained even if the negotiations do not reach full consensus.

  16. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... treatment protocols, 1) is based on current published evidence-based literature, 2) considers the current legal framework of the cascade regulation for the prescription of veterinary drugs in Europe, and 3) reflects the authors' experience. With this paper it is aimed to provide a consensus...

  17. Indicateurs cles au Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Au cours des dernieres annees, on s'est beaucoup interesse sur la scene internationale aux indicateurs cles. Le present document se veut un tour d'horizon des efforts deployes recemment au Canada en vue d'elaborer des indicateurs cles du bien etre economique, social, environnemental et physique. Y sont classifies et examines en detail plus de 40 projets et publications portant sur ce sujet. Y figurent aussi l'enumeration breve de 20 autres projets, ainsi que des renvois a plusieurs enquetes a...

  18. Acute kidney injury in the era of big data: the 15(th) Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A

    2016-01-01

    The world is immersed in "big data". Big data has brought about radical innovations in the methods used to capture, transfer, store and analyze the vast quantities of data generated every minute of every day. At the same time; however, it has also become far easier and relatively inexpensive to do so. Rapidly transforming, integrating and applying this large volume and variety of data are what underlie the future of big data. The application of big data and predictive analytics in healthcare holds great promise to drive innovation, reduce cost and improve patient outcomes, health services operations and value. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be an ideal syndrome from which various dimensions and applications built within the context of big data may influence the structure of services delivery, care processes and outcomes for patients. The use of innovative forms of "information technology" was originally identified by the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) in 2002 as a core concept in need of attention to improve the care and outcomes for patients with AKI. For this 15(th) ADQI consensus meeting held on September 6-8, 2015 in Banff, Canada, five topics focused on AKI and acute renal replacement therapy were developed where extensive applications for use of big data were recognized and/or foreseen. In this series of articles in the Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, we describe the output from these discussions.

  19. Consensus statement on the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carel, Jean-Claude; Eugster, Erica A; Rogol, Alan;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs revolutionized the treatment of central precocious puberty. However, questions remain regarding their optimal use in central precocious puberty and other conditions. The Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society and the European Society...... for Pediatric Endocrinology convened a consensus conference to review the clinical use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children and adolescents. PARTICIPANTS: When selecting the 30 participants, consideration was given to equal representation from North America (United States and Canada) and Europe...... assembly for final review. If consensus could not be reached, conclusions were based on majority vote. All participants approved the final statement. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in increasing adult height is undisputed only in early-onset (girls

  20. Development of North American consensus guidelines for medical laboratories that perform and interpret platelet function testing using light transmission aggregometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Catherine P M; Moffat, Karen A; Raby, Anne; Israels, Sara; Plumhoff, Elizabeth; Flynn, Greg; Zehnder, James L

    2010-12-01

    Platelet function testing is important for the diagnostic evaluation of common and rare bleeding disorders. Our study goals were to promote best practices and reduce unnecessary testing variances by developing North American guidelines on platelet function testing. Guidelines were developed by consensus for expert recommendations (minimum level for approval, 70%) that included recommendations on the evaluation and interpretation of light transmission platelet aggregometry (LTA). To assess consensus, medical opinions on recommendations were gathered from diagnostic laboratories that perform LTA, in collaboration with the Quality Management Program-Laboratory Services (QMP-LS) in Ontario, Canada (10 laboratories), and the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association (NASCOLA; 47 laboratories, 5 overlapping the QMP-LS group). Adequate consensus was achieved for all and 89% of recommendations for the QMP-LS and NASCOLA groups, respectively. The recommendations adopted provide North American laboratories with additional guidance on platelet function testing, including how to interpret LTA abnormalities.

  1. Canadian society of transplantation consensus workshop on cytomegalovirus management in solid organ transplantation final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiksaitis, Jutta K; Brennan, Daniel C; Fishman, Jay; Allen, Upton

    2005-02-01

    The Canadian Society of Transplantation sponsored a Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Consensus Working Group that met on March 19, 2003. The objectives of this group were to determine the current burden of CMV-associated disease in the setting of solid organ transplantation in Canada, make recommendations regarding optimal strategies for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of CMV infection and disease, highlight gaps in knowledge and outline priorities for research and other initiatives that might further reduce the burden of CMV-associated effects in this setting. This report summarizes the recommendations of the working group including ratings of the strength of evidence supporting the recommendations.

  2. OGC Consensus: How Successful Standards Are Made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the history, background, and current status of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards development consensus process. The roots of the formation of the OGC lie in the early 1990s when a very strong market requirement for exchanging GIS data content was clearly stated. At that time, each GIS vendor had their own formats for publishing and/or exchanging their GIS data. There was no mechanism or organization that provided a forum for the GIS vendors and GIS data users to collaborate and agree on how to share GIS data. That requirement, along with the vision of a few individuals, led to the formation of the OGC. This paper describes the early development of the consensus process in the OGC, how this process has evolved over time, why consensus is so important for defining open standards that are implemented in the marketplace, and the future of the OGC consensus process.

  3. Canada and the Third World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Andrew F.

    1984-01-01

    Canada did not develop strong ties with the Third World until well after World War II. Three factors that have channeled and limited Canada's relationships with developing nations--location, history, and internal political relationships--are discussed. Also examined are patterns of Canadian foreign aid and investment and peace-seeking efforts. (RM)

  4. Q Fever Update, Maritime Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J.; Campbell, Nancy; McNeil, Shelly A.; Webster, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined. Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate. PMID:18258080

  5. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-07-01

    In our day the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has in a way revived these Peircean insights, putting forward an influential theory to the effect that consensus indeed plays a key role in human praxis, so that the primary task of philosophy is to foster it by eliminating the disagreement which we constantly have to face in the course of our daily life. In his “communicative theory of consensus,” furthermore, he claims that human communication rests on an implicit commitment to a sort of “ideal speech situation” which is the normative foundation of agreement in linguistic matters. Consequently, the quest for consensus is a constitutive feature of our nature of (rational human beings: rationality and consensus are tied together. A very strong consequence derives from Habermas’ premises: were we to abandon the search for consensus we would lose rationality, too, and this makes us understand that he views the pursuit of consensus as a regulative principle (rather than as a merely practical objective. Rescher opposes both Peirce’s eschatological view and Habermas’ regulative and idealized one.

  6. Population conference: consensus and conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P D

    1984-01-01

    The United Nations-sponsored International Conference on Population held in Mexico City was both a rejection and an affirmation of a new policy of the Reagan administration. The policy denies international family planning funds to nongovernmental organizations that perform or actively promote abortion as a family planning method in other nations. A compromise statement was accepted urging governments to take appropriate measures to discourage abortion as a family planning method and when possible to provide for the humane treatment and counseling of women ho resorted to abortion. The statement on abortion was 1 of 88 reccomendations approved by the conference. The commitment expressed in the 10-year-old World Population Plan of Action to the rights and responsiblity to all people as reaffirmed. The conference also endorsed family life education and sex education as well as suitable family planning, information and services for adolescents, with due consideration given to the role, rights and obligations of parents. Increased support for international population and family planning programs was urged and World Bank President, Clausen, urged a 4-fold increase in international funding by the year 2000. Most of the conference's recommendations re devoted to the broad range of population policy issues, including morbidity and mortality, international and internal migration, the relationship between population and economic development and the status of women. The purpose of the recommendations is to increase the momentum of international support. The Mexico City conference was characterized by a remarkable degree of consensus about population policies with respect to integration with economic development, the need to respect individual rights and the recognition that all nations have sovereign rights to develop and implement their own population policies. Conflict and controversy arose in the areas of the arms race and the Middle East. The US position on abortion funding

  7. Child maltreatment in Canada: an understudied public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Tracie O

    2011-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a major public health problem associated with impairment in childhood, adolescence, and extending throughout the lifespan. Within Canada, high-quality child maltreatment studies have been conducted and are critical for informing prevention and intervention efforts. However, compared to other parts of the world (e.g., United States, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Mexico), the number of studies conducted in Canada is far fewer and the data used to study this important public health problem are less diverse. Importantly, to date, representative data on child maltreatment from the general population at the national level in Canada do not exist. This means that many questions regarding child maltreatment in Canada remain unanswered. To advance our understanding of child maltreatment in Canada and to make significant strides towards protecting Canadian children and families, research using Canadian data is essential. To begin to meet these important public health goals, we need to invest in collecting high-quality, nationally representative Canadian data on child maltreatment. Solutions for the barriers and challenges for the inclusion of child maltreatment data into nationally representative Canadian surveys are provided.

  8. Contaminant Research in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wren C.

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available Contaminant Research in CanadaPages 9 - 11 (ReportChristopher WrenAbstract:During the 1983/84 and 1984/85 trapping seasons, carcasses of river otter (Lutra canadensis were collected for contaminant analysis from trappers in Ontario. The studies identified clear differences in tissue levels of Hg, Pb and Cd between different collection areas. There is evidence to support Hg poisoning as the cause of death in at least one otter along this river system. The studies emphasize the potential interactions of toxic chemicals with each other and with natural stresses (e.g. cold, starvation, disease. More research is required along these lines since simultaneous exposure to more than one chemical and other stresses is more typical of conditions in the wild.

  9. Mackenzie River Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada, with its headstreams the Peace and Finley, is the longest river in North America at 4241 km, and drains an area of 1,805,000 square km. The large marshy delta provides habitat for migrating Snow Geese, Tundra Swans, Brant, and other waterfowl. The estuary is a calving area for Beluga whales. The Mackenzie (previously the Disappointment River) was named after Alexander Mackenzie who travelled the river while trying to reach the Pacific in 1789. The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  10. An assessment of antimicrobial resistant disease threats in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Garner

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance (AMR of infectious agents is a growing concern for public health organizations. Given the complexity of this issue and how widespread the problem has become, resources are often insufficient to address all concerns, thus prioritization of AMR pathogens is essential for the optimal allocation of risk management attention. Since the epidemiology of AMR pathogens differs between countries, country-specific assessments are important for the determination of national priorities.To develop a systematic and transparent approach to AMR risk prioritization in Canada.Relevant AMR pathogens in Canada were selected through a transparent multi-step consensus process (n=32. Each pathogen was assessed using ten criteria: incidence, mortality, case-fatality, communicability, treatability, clinical impact, public/political attention, ten-year projection of incidence, economic impact, and preventability. For each pathogen, each criterion was assigned a numerical score of 0, 1, or 2, and multiplied by criteria-specific weighting determined through researcher consensus of importance. The scores for each AMR pathogen were summed and ranked by total score, where a higher score indicated greater importance. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effects of changing the criteria-specific weights.The AMR pathogen with the highest total weighted score was extended spectrum B-lactamase-producing (ESBL Enterobacteriaceae (score=77. When grouped by percentile, ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium difficile, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were in the 80-100th percentile.This assessment provides useful information for prioritising public health strategies regarding AMR resistance at the national level in Canada. As the AMR environment and challenges change over time and space, this systematic and transparent approach can be adapted for use by other stakeholders domestically and

  11. Combination therapy in hypertension: an Asia-Pacific consensus viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Abdul Rashid; Reyes, Eugenio B; Sritara, Piyamitr; Pancholia, Arvind; Van Phuoc, Dang; Tomlinson, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension incurs a significant healthcare burden in Asia-Pacific countries, which have suboptimal rates of blood pressure (BP) treatment and control. A consensus meeting of hypertension experts from the Asia-Pacific region convened in Hanoi, Vietnam, in April 2013. The principal objectives were to discuss the growing problem of hypertension in the Asia-Pacific region, and to develop consensus recommendations to promote standards of care across the region. A particular focus was recommendations for combination therapy, since it is known that most patients with hypertension will require two or more antihypertensive drugs to achieve BP control, and also that combinations of drugs with complementary mechanisms of action achieve BP targets more effectively than monotherapy. The expert panel reviewed guidelines for hypertension management from the USA and Europe, as well as individual Asia-Pacific countries, and devised a treatment matrix/guide, in which they propose the preferred combination therapy regimens for patients with hypertension, both with and without compelling indications. This report summarizes key recommendations from the group, including recommended antihypertensive combinations for specific patient populations. These strategies generally entail initiating therapy with free drug combinations, starting with the lowest available dosage, followed by treatment with single-pill combinations once the BP target has been achieved. A single reference for the whole Asia-Pacific region may contribute to increased consistency of treatment and greater proportions of patients achieving BP control, and hence reducing hypertension-related morbidity and mortality.

  12. Small renal mass biopsy--how, what and when: report from an international consensus panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivian, Matvey; Rampersaud, Edward N; del Pilar Laguna Pes, Maria; Joniau, Steven; Leveillee, Raymond J; Shingleton, William B; Aron, Monish; Kim, Charles Y; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Desai, Mihir M; Meler, James D; Donovan, James F; Klingler, Hans Christoph; Sopko, David R; Madden, John F; Marberger, Michael; Ferrandino, Michael N; Polascik, Thomas J

    2014-06-01

    To discuss the use of renal mass biopsy (RMB) for small renal masses (SRMs), formulate technical aspects, outline potential pitfalls and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. The meeting was conducted as an informal consensus process and no scoring system was used to measure the levels of agreement on the different topics. A moderated general discussion was used as the basis for consensus and arising issues were resolved at this point. A consensus was established and lack of agreement to topics or specific items was noted at this point. Recommended biopsy technique: at least two cores, sampling different tumour regions with ultrasonography being the preferred method of image guidance. Pathological interpretation: 'non-diagnostic samples' should refer to insufficient material, inconclusive and normal renal parenchyma. For non-diagnostic samples, a repeat biopsy is recommended. Fine-needle aspiration may provide additional information but cannot substitute for core biopsy. Indications for RMB: biopsy is recommended in most cases except in patients with imaging or clinical characteristics indicative of pathology (syndromes, imaging characteristics) and cases whereby conservative management is not contemplated. RMB is recommended for active surveillance but not for watchful-waiting candidates. We report the results of an international consensus meeting on the use of RMB for SRMs, defining the technique, pathological interpretation and indications.

  13. Stroke rehabilitation in Canada: a work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Willems, Deb

    2009-01-01

    Stroke rehabilitation in Canada continues to function under models and practices that have changed little in the last four decades and struggles to implement new evidence-based or best practices. Ontario, Canada's largest province, has had a coordinated stroke strategy since 2000. The Ontario Stroke System has developed an extensive infrastructure of research syntheses, consensus panel recommendations, practice guidelines, standards of care, and centralized data collection across the continuum of stroke care. This has produced a solid foundation upon which an evidence-based stroke rehabilitation system can be developed. However, failure to invest in stroke rehabilitation or provide incentives to implement change has resulted in the stroke rehabilitation system and critical outcomes remaining largely unchanged. Improvements in time to admission have been countered by rising admission FIM scores such that severe stroke patients often cannot access the stroke rehabilitation system. Many stroke patients are still rehabilitated on general rehabilitation units, therapy intensities remain unacceptably low, and many outpatient programs are being reduced or even closed. Although there are pockets of innovation, the stroke rehabilitation system continues to function more according to traditional ways of practicing. The hope is that with appropriate investments and incentives, Canadians and Ontarians can build upon the existing infrastructure to ensure stroke patients receive optimal rehabilitative care based on best evidence. In the meantime, stroke rehabilitation in Canada remains a work in progress.

  14. Dynamic Average Consensus and Consensusability of General Linear Multiagent Systems with Random Packet Dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Min Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the consensus problem of general linear discrete-time multiagent systems (MASs with random packet dropout that happens during information exchange between agents. The packet dropout phenomenon is characterized as being a Bernoulli random process. A distributed consensus protocol with weighted graph is proposed to address the packet dropout phenomenon. Through introducing a new disagreement vector, a new framework is established to solve the consensus problem. Based on the control theory, the perturbation argument, and the matrix theory, the necessary and sufficient condition for MASs to reach mean-square consensus is derived in terms of stability of an array of low-dimensional matrices. Moreover, mean-square consensusable conditions with regard to network topology and agent dynamic structure are also provided. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  15. Managing Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Meetings are a means of giving people a chance to contribute. Meetings are also the nursery where the people's skills of listening, speaking, and building good working relationships are honed. They are where people practice being courteously challenging and confident, and they are where people are fascinated and fascinating. Meetings are where…

  16. Reaching Consensus by Allowing Moments of Indecision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Swami, A.

    2015-10-01

    Group decision-making processes often turn into a drawn out and costly battle between two opposing subgroups. Using analytical arguments based on a master equation description of the opinion dynamics occurring in a three-state model of cooperatively interacting units, we show how the capability of a social group to reach consensus can be enhanced when there is an intermediate state for indecisive individuals to pass through. The time spent in the intermediate state must be relatively short compared to that of the two polar states in order to create the beneficial effect. Furthermore, the cooperation between individuals must not be too low, as the benefit to consensus is possible only when the cooperation level exceeds a specific threshold. We also discuss how zealots, agents that remain in one state forever, can affect the consensus among the rest of the population by counteracting the benefit of the intermediate state or making it virtually impossible for an opposition to form.

  17. [The 2014 consensus conference of the ISUP on Gleason grading of prostatic carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, G; Egevad, L; Amin, M; Delahunt, B; Srigley, J R; Humphrey, P A; Epstein, J I

    2016-02-01

    In 2005 the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) held a concensus conference on Gleason grading in order to bring this grading system up to the current state of contemporary practice; however, it became clear that further modifications on the grading of prostatic carcinoma were necessary. The International Society of Urological Pathology therefore held a further consensus conference in 2014 to clarify these points. This article presents the essential results of the Chicago grading meeting.

  18. Coal facies studies in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkreuth, Wolfgang D. [Laboratorio de Carvao e de Petrologia Organica, Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2004-04-23

    The present study is a compilation of published data on coal facies studies in Canada based on coal petrological and other methods. The geological age of the coals range from the Devonian coal deposits in Arctic Canada to coals of Tertiary age in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, intermontane British Columbia and Arctic Canada. In terms of rank, the coal deposits studied range from lignite to low volatile bituminous. Coal petrological methods include maceral and microlithotype analyses, frequently integrated with data from palynological and geochemical analyses. Most recently, a number of studies have applied sequence stratigraphic concepts to the coal-bearing strata including the interpretation of coal petrological data in the context of this concept.

  19. Obstetric medical care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Laura A; Cote, Anne-Marie; Joseph, Geena; Firoz, Tabassum; Sia, Winnie

    2016-09-01

    Obstetric medicine is a growing area of interest within internal medicine in Canada. Canadians continue to travel broadly to obtain relevant training, particularly in the United Kingdom. However, there is now a sufficient body of expertise in Canada that a cadre of 'home-grown' obstetric internists is emerging and staying within Canada to improve maternity care. As this critical mass of practitioners grows, it is apparent that models of obstetric medicine delivery have developed according to local needs and patterns of practice. This article aims to describe the state of obstetric medicine in Canada, including general internal medicine services as the rock on which Canadian obstetric medicine has been built, the Canadian training curriculum and opportunities, organisation of obstetric medicine service delivery and the future.

  20. Canada goose behavior: Fall 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Canada geese use four divisions of the Mark Twin NWR: Louisa, Delair, Cannon, and Calhoun. There was a shortage of cultivated crops, corn and soybeans, on all refuge...

  1. A staff shortage in Canada?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, P. [Human Resources Development Canada, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-04-01

    Attrition of experienced staff, falling student enrolments and closure of university courses are symptoms of the contraction of the Canadian nuclear industry over the last two decades. It is not alone. A study carried out by Human Resources Development Canada, a government department, to forecast the demand for qualified nuclear staff in Canada over the next 15 years has reached similar conclusions to an OECD/NEA study of its members` future personnel requirements. (author).

  2. Overlapping community detection using weighted consensus clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LINTAO YANG; ZETAI YU; JING QIAN; SHOUYIN LIU

    2016-10-01

    Many overlapping community detection algorithms have been proposed. Most of them are unstable and behave non-deterministically. In this paper, we use weighted consensus clustering for combining multiple base covers obtained by classic non-deterministic algorithms to improve the quality of the results. We first evaluate a reliability measure for each community in all base covers and assign a proportional weight to each one. Then we redefine the consensus matrix that takes into account not only the common membership of nodes, but also the reliability of the communities. Experimental results on both artificial and real-world networks show that our algorithm can find overlapping communities accurately.

  3. On Conditions for Convergence to Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, Jan

    2008-01-01

    A new theorem on conditions for convergence to consensus of a multiagent time-dependent time-discrete dynamical system is presented. The theorem is build up on the notion of averaging maps. We compare this theorem to Moreau's Theorem and his proposed set-valued Lyapunov theory (IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 50, no. 2, 2005). We give examples that point out differences of approaches including examples where Moreau's theorem is not applicable but ours is. Further on, we give examples that demonstrate that the theory of convergence to consensus is still not complete.

  4. Consensus over peri-implantaire infecties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, A J

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, in a workshop of the European Federation on Periodontology, a consensus was reached concerning oral peri-implant infections on the basis of the state of the art in the relevant sciences. Important conclusions were that peri-implant mucositis occurs in 80% of subjects with oral implants, and

  5. Health Promoting Schools: Consensus, Strategies, and Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew J.; Gagnon, Faith A.; Stewart, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize a consensus statement generated on the current challenges, strategies, and potential of health promoting schools (HPS) at a 2011 colloquium at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study where 40 people from five continents came together to share their global and regional experience surrounding…

  6. Discontinuities and hysteresis in quantized average consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceragioli, Francesca; Persis, Claudio De; Frasca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    We consider continuous-time average consensus dynamics in which the agents’ states are communicated through uniform quantizers. Solutions to the resulting system are defined in the Krasowskii sense and are proven to converge to conditions of ‘‘practical consensus’’. To cope with undesired chattering

  7. ESMO consensus conference on malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladetto, M; Buske, C; Hutchings, M;

    2016-01-01

    into three working groups; each group focused on one of these areas in order to address four clinically relevant questions relating to that topic. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, each working group developed...

  8. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roila, Fausto; Warr, David; Hesketh, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: An update of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy published after the last MASCC/ESMO antiemetic consensus conference in 2009 has been carried out. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed from January...

  9. The Overreliance of Accreditors on Consensus Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Frank B.

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the legitimacy of accreditation in teacher education is rooted in political consensus, power, and scholarship. Because these roots are fragile, there is no accepted concept of educational malpractice. The legitimacy of accreditation should be rooted in scholarly evidence that the program has fulfilled the claim that its graduates are…

  10. Introduction: experts and consensus in social science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans; C. Martini

    2014-01-01

    The ideals of science as objectivity and consensus are - unsurprisingly - not so easy to attain in scientific practice. Science is ultimately a product of individual scientists with their own personal backgrounds and experiences, and there is no unique methodology to de-personalize and objectify kno

  11. Adult Asthma Consensus Guidelines Update 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lemière

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several sets of Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the past 15 years. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines.

  12. Optimal Use of Raltegravir (Isentress® in the Treatment of HIV-Infected Adults – Canadian Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Rachlis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A meeting of a Canadian group with significant experience and knowledge in HIV management, consisting of five physicians, a pharmacist and an AIDS researcher, was convened. Their goal was to develop guidance for Canadian HIV-treating physicians on the appropriate use of raltegravir (MK-0518, Isentress®, Merck Frosst Canada Inc in HIV-infected adults.

  13. International Consensus on Key Concepts and Data Definitions for Mass-gathering Health: Process and Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turris, Sheila A; Steenkamp, Malinda; Lund, Adam; Hutton, Alison; Ranse, Jamie; Bowles, Ron; Arbuthnott, Katherine; Anikeeva, Olga; Arbon, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Mass gatherings (MGs) occur worldwide on any given day, yet mass-gathering health (MGH) is a relatively new field of scientific inquiry. As the science underpinning the study of MGH continues to develop, there will be increasing opportunities to improve health and safety of those attending events. The emerging body of MG literature demonstrates considerable variation in the collection and reporting of data. This complicates comparison across settings and limits the value and utility of these reported data. Standardization of data points and/or reporting in relation to events would aid in creating a robust evidence base from which governments, researchers, clinicians, and event planners could benefit. Moving towards international consensus on any topic is a complex undertaking. This report describes a collaborative initiative to develop consensus on key concepts and data definitions for a MGH "Minimum Data Set." This report makes transparent the process undertaken, demonstrates a pragmatic way of managing international collaboration, and proposes a number of steps for progressing international consensus. The process included correspondence through a journal, face-to-face meetings at a conference, then a four-day working meeting; virtual meetings over a two-year period supported by online project management tools; consultation with an international group of MGH researchers via an online Delphi process; and a workshop delivered at the 19thWorld Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine held in Cape Town, South Africa in April 2015. This resulted in an agreement by workshop participants that there is a need for international consensus on key concepts and data definitions.

  14. Traditional Chinese medicine education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huan-bin

    2015-03-01

    The history of education and legislation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and acupuncture in Canada is short. The first school of TCM opened its door to the general public in Canada in 1985 and the first legislation of acupuncture was introduced in Alberta, Canada in 1988. Currently, TCM and/or acupuncture have been regulated in five provinces in Canada. The legislation and regulation, as well as education of TCM and acupuncture vary among the five provinces in Canada. Opportunities and challenges facing TCM education exist simultaneously. Strategies are proposed to develop an international standard for TCM education in Canada, and possibly in other English speaking countries as well.

  15. Consensus Through Conversation How to Achieve High-Commitment Decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dressler, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Facilitation expert Larry Dressler's Consensus Through Conversation is a guide for the effective facilitation and practice of one of business's most popular - but most widely misunderstood - decision-making models: consensus.

  16. Logic Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Tugué, Tosiyuki; Slaman, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    These proceedings include the papers presented at the logic meeting held at the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University, in the summer of 1987. The meeting mainly covered the current research in various areas of mathematical logic and its applications in Japan. Several lectures were also presented by logicians from other countries, who visited Japan in the summer of 1987.

  17. In vitro and in vivo replication of a chemically synthesized consensus genome of hepatitis B virus genotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Xia, Jianbo; Sun, Binghu; Dai, Yu; Li, Xu; Schlaak, Joerg F; Lu, Mengji

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes vary in their geographical distribution and virological features. Previous investigations have shown that HBV genotype B is a predominant HBV genotype in China. Studies on HBV concerning different isolates frequently meet the question about the HBV reference strain and its representativeness. Although HBV consensus sequences can be generated easily by sequence alignment, they may not exist in nature or could not usually be isolated from patient samples. Thus, the construction of a consensus HBV genome has been proposed. In this study, an HBV genotype B consensus sequence was established by comparing 42 full-length HBV genotype B sequences and the genome was generated by chemical synthesis. This consensus genome was fully replication competent by in vitro transfection into hepatoma cells. The plasmid pHBV1.3B carrying a 1.3× full-length HBV consensus genome was hydrodynamically injected into Balb/c mice. HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HBe, and anti-HBc detection indicated expression and replication of this HBV genome in mice, similar to other HBV isolates. This approach represents a strategy to design and create consensus HBV genomes for future studies.

  18. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J; Albers, P; Altena, R; Aparicio, J; Bokemeyer, C; Busch, J; Cathomas, R; Cavallin-Stahl, E; Clarke, N W; Claßen, J; Cohn-Cedermark, G; Dahl, A A; Daugaard, G; De Giorgi, U; De Santis, M; De Wit, M; De Wit, R; Dieckmann, K P; Fenner, M; Fizazi, K; Flechon, A; Fossa, S D; Germá Lluch, J R; Gietema, J A; Gillessen, S; Giwercman, A; Hartmann, J T; Heidenreich, A; Hentrich, M; Honecker, F; Horwich, A; Huddart, R A; Kliesch, S; Kollmannsberger, C; Krege, S; Laguna, M P; Looijenga, L H J; Lorch, A; Lotz, J P; Mayer, F; Necchi, A; Nicolai, N; Nuver, J; Oechsle, K; Oldenburg, J; Oosterhuis, J W; Powles, T; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Rick, O; Rosti, G; Salvioni, R; Schrader, M; Schweyer, S; Sedlmayer, F; Sohaib, A; Souchon, R; Tandstad, T; Winter, C; Wittekind, C

    2013-04-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377-1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478-496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497-513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements.

  19. [History of trachoma in canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Jean

    2010-06-01

    The author retraces the history of trachoma in Canada. The numerous articles in Canadian medical journals from the middle of the 18th to the middle of the 19th century show the remarkable contribution of Canadian ophthalmologists. The clinical symptoms and signs followed by the etiology and the different modes of treatment are reviewed. The presence and prevention of trachoma in Canada, ranging from Montreal to Toronto, also in Halifax with the arrival of the transatlantic immigrants, as well as those reaching the western provinces of Canada are described. How the Canadian Department of Health belatedly introduced a prevention campaign only after a widespread dissemination of trachoma across the country is also examined.

  20. Crisis of Identity in a Multi-cultural Society: The Case of Muslims in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Serajul Islam

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A great majority of studies on ethnic identity or ethnic separatism indicate that a minority group dealing with severe deprivation becomes more frustrated, more aggressive, and more demanding of autonomy or separation. However, in a multi-cultural society where the people can live with their both separate and co-existing identities, the minority group usually demands for greater rights within societies, not an exit from them. This is the case of the Muslims in Canada who constitute a tiny minority in the Canadian population. Since Canada is a multicultural country, the Muslims have not demanded any kind of autonomy but have demanded rights to preserve Islamic values, and their own distinct identity as Muslims. In this article some basic questions are raised regarding the Canadian Muslims. When and how did the Muslims arrive in Canada? What types of challenges they are facing? How do they meet these challenges? What is the future of Muslims in Canada?

  1. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  2. Consensus formation in science modeled by aggregated bibliographic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific journal...

  3. Developing Canada`s climate change strategy : electricity sector table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellan, A. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Canada`s climate change strategy has been the focus of extensive consultation processes whose objective is to provide recommendations to federal and provincial ministers by the end of 1999. They are also designed to study the impact, the cost and the benefits of implementation of the Kyoto Protocol and to develop immediate actions to provide early reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions. The development of long-term actions that will result in sustained greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions is also on the agenda. The role of the Electricity Sector Table is to determine the contribution of GHG emissions by power generation, transmission and distribution elements as well as by electricity and cogeneration industries. The contribution of GHG emissions by renewable energy is also being studied. One of the recommended early actions is that the federal government should include solution gas as a qualifying fuel in Class 43.1 of the Income Tax Act to provide incentives to produce electricity from waste solution gas in fossil fuel production. Natural Resources Canada predicts that GHG emissions from the electricity sector will have increased from 94 MT in 1990 to 146 MT by 2020. The current sources of power generation in Canada are as follows: hydroelectric (65 per cent), nuclear (15 per cent), coal (15 per cent), and other (5 per cent).

  4. Police suicide research: conflict and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violanti, John M

    2008-01-01

    Despite new frontiers in suicide research over the past ten years, police suicide remains a difficult, persistent, and controversial problem. Controversy appears to focus on the accuracy and validity of police suicide rates, but other controversies exist as well. This is likely due to studies that are methodologically flawed, incomplete, or specific to limited geographic areas. The objective of this paper is to review issues related to both conflicts and consensus on police suicide.

  5. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-01-01

    A pragmatist thinker like Nicholas Rescher deems the idea that social harmony must be predicated in consensus to be both dangerous and misleading. An essential problem of our time is the creation of political and social institutions that enable people to live together in peaceful and productive ways, despite the presence of not eliminable disagreements about theoretical and practical issues. Such remarks, in turn, strictly recall the “practical” impossibility of settling philosophical dispute...

  6. Sarcopenia: European consensus on definition and diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso J Cruz-Jentoft; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Jürgen M Bauer; Boirie, Yves; Cederholm, Tommy; Landi, Francesco; Martin, Finbarr C; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Rolland, Yves; Schneider, Stéphane M; Topinková, Eva; Vandewoude, Maurits; Zamboni, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) developed a practical clinical definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for age-related sarcopenia. EWGSOP included representatives from four participant organisations, i.e. the European Geriatric Medicine Society, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics—European Region and the International Association of Nutrition and Aging. These organisation...

  7. Consensus contact prediction by linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Bu, Dongbo; Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming; Xu, Jinbo

    2007-01-01

    Protein inter-residue contacts are of great use for protein structure determination or prediction. Recent CASP events have shown that a few accurately predicted contacts can help improve both computational efficiency and prediction accuracy of the ab inito folding methods. This paper develops an integer linear programming (ILP) method for consensus-based contact prediction. In contrast to the simple "majority voting" method assuming that all the individual servers are equal and independent, our method evaluates their correlations using the maximum likelihood method and constructs some latent independent servers using the principal component analysis technique. Then, we use an integer linear programming model to assign weights to these latent servers in order to maximize the deviation between the correct contacts and incorrect ones; our consensus prediction server is the weighted combination of these latent servers. In addition to the consensus information, our method also uses server-independent correlated mutation (CM) as one of the prediction features. Experimental results demonstrate that our contact prediction server performs better than the "majority voting" method. The accuracy of our method for the top L/5 contacts on CASP7 targets is 73.41%, which is much higher than previously reported studies. On the 16 free modeling (FM) targets, our method achieves an accuracy of 37.21%.

  8. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Periprosthetic Joint Infection (PJI: literature Review and World Consensus (Part Seven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Parvizi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context There is a need to find if patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or autoimmune disease require different perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. There is also a need to determine if antibiotic prophylaxis should be different for primary cases, revision cases, hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The best antibiotic prophylaxis to choose in patients with colonization by carbapenem resistant enterobacteriaceae or multi-drug resistant (MDR-Acinetobacter spp needs to be determined. Evidence Acquisition Delegates in workgroup 3 of the consensus meeting on PJI reviewed English literature for relevant articles. 30 of 221 articles were relevant to the 4 following questions regarding perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent PJI. Results There is no need to use different antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or autoimmune disease than routine antibiotic prophylaxis. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis should be the same for primary and uninfected revision arthroplasty. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis should be the same for hips and knees arthroplasties. There is insufficient data to recommend expanded antibiotic prophylaxis in patients known to be colonized or recently infected with multi-drug resistant pathogens. Conclusions Based on evidences in the literature and consensus of expert delegates from consensus meeting recommendations for type of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or autoimmune disease, primary and uninfected revision arthroplasty, hip or knee arthroplasties and patients known to be colonized or recently infected with multi-drug resistant pathogens were provided.

  9. Canada-U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    56 RBC Financial Group, Daily Forex Fundamentals, February 27, 2009. [ http...www.actionforex.com/fundamental- analysis/daily- forex -fundamentals/canada%27s-fourth%11quarter-current-account-moves-into-deficit-after-nine-years- of-surpluses

  10. Consensus Formation in Science Modeled by Aggregated Bibliographic Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific...... journal as their unit of analysis. To produce a more fine grained citation analysis one needs to study consensus formation on an even more detailed level – i.e. the scientific document or article. To do so, we have developed a new technique that measures consensus by aggregated bibliographic couplings...

  11. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    You were hundreds of persons to participate in our information meetings of October 3 and 6 2014, and we thank you for your participation! The full presentation is available here. A summary of the topics is available here (in french).

  12. Advancing Primary Care Use of Electronic Medical Records in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Zelmer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, the federal government's Economic Action Plan funded Canada Health Infoway to co-invest with provinces, territories, and health care providers in electronic medical records (EMRs in primary care. The goal is to help improve access to care, quality of health services, and productivity of the health system, as well as to deliver economic benefits. The decision to fund EMRs was consistent with a long-term framework for digital health established in consultation with stakeholders across the country, spurred by analysis demonstrating the economic impact of such investments and data on Canada's low rate of EMR use in primary care compared with other countries. The decision reflected widespread public and stakeholder consensus regarding the importance of such investments. EMR adoption has more than doubled since 2006, with evaluations identifying efficiency and patient care benefits (e.g., reduced time managing laboratory test results and fewer adverse drug events in community-based practices. These benefits are expected to rise further as EMR adoption continues to grow and practices gain more experience with their use.

  13. Consensus-oriented group peer review: a new process to review radiologist work output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasab, Tarik K; Harvey, H Benjamin; Gowda, Vrushab; Thrall, James H; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Gazelle, G Scott

    2014-02-01

    The Joint Commission and other regulatory bodies have mandated that health care organizations implement processes for ongoing physician performance review. Software solutions, such as RADPEER™, have been created to meet this need efficiently. However, the authors believe that available systems are not optimally designed to produce changes in practice and overlook many important aspects of quality by excessive focus on diagnosis. The authors present a new model of peer review known as consensus-oriented group review, which is based on group discussion of cases in a conference setting and places greater emphasis on feedback than traditional systems of radiology peer review. By focusing on the process of peer review, consensus-oriented group review is intended to optimize performance improvement and foster group standards of practice. The authors also describe the software tool developed to implement this process of enriched peer review.

  14. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action.

  15. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens: rationale and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The activities of the conference were coordinated through five workgroups. The results are presented in five separate reports covering (1) specimen handling, (2) T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume, (3) extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease, (4) seminal vesicles and lymph node metastases and (5) surgical margins. In this introductory article we describe some novel features of the organization of the consensus process. Following the completion of a pre-meeting survey conference, participants discussed and voted on 43 specific issues of contention relating to the pathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Consensus, defined as agreement by at least 65% of participants present, was achieved for 30 questions.

  16. Developing a guideline for clinical trial protocol content: Delphi consensus survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetzlaff Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence has highlighted deficiencies in clinical trial protocols, having implications for many groups. Existing guidelines for randomized clinical trial (RCT protocol content vary substantially and most do not describe systematic methodology for their development. As one of three prespecified steps for the systematic development of a guideline for trial protocol content, the objective of this study was to conduct a three-round Delphi consensus survey to develop and refine minimum content for RCT protocols. Methods Panellists were identified using a multistep iterative approach, met prespecified minimum criteria and represented key stakeholders who develop or use clinical trial protocols. They were asked to rate concepts for importance in a minimum set of items for RCT protocols. The main outcome measures were degree of importance (scale of 1 to 10; higher scores indicating higher importance and level of consensus for items. Results were presented as medians, interquartile ranges, counts and percentages. Results Ninety-six expert panellists participated in the Delphi consensus survey including trial investigators, methodologists, research ethics board members, funders, industry, regulators and journal editors. Response rates were between 88 and 93% per round. Overall, panellists rated 63 of 88 concepts of high importance (of which 50 had a 25th percentile rating of 8 or greater, 13 of moderate importance (median 6 or 7 and 12 of low importance (median less than or equal to 5 for minimum trial protocol content. General and item-specific comments and subgroup results provided valuable insight for further discussions. Conclusions This Delphi process achieved consensus from a large panel of experts from diverse stakeholder groups on essential content for RCT protocols. It also highlights areas of divergence. These results, complemented by other empirical research and consensus meetings, are helping guide the development of

  17. Recommendations for the long-term treatment of psoriasis with infliximab: A dermatology expert group consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reich, K.; Griffiths, C.; Barker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims: Infliximab has been approved for the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis for only a few years. As physicians gain confidence in initiating and maintaining this therapy, guidance on the management of patients beyond several months or years is needed. To date, there is little...... Europe and Canada experienced in long-term therapy with infliximab. Results/Conclusion: The Delphi participants reviewed several important topics related to biological therapy and infliximab. This paper is not intended to provide a recommendation on all practical aspects related to biological therapy...... or no information about the long-term management in clinical trials or guidelines. Methods: Here we report on the key aspects related to the use of infliximab for the treatment of psoriasis. The data presented here were derived using a modified Delphi survey to obtain a consensus opinion of 11 dermatologists from...

  18. Restricting marketing to children: Consensus on policy interventions to address obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Kim D; Lobstein, Tim; Landon, Jane; Kent, Monique Potvin; Pellerin, Suzie; Caulfield, Timothy; Finegood, Diane; Mongeau, Lyne; Neary, Neil; Spence, John C

    2013-01-01

    Obesity presents major challenges for public health and the evidence is strong. Lessons from tobacco control indicate a need for changing the policy and environments to make healthy choices easier and to create more opportunities for children to achieve healthy weights. In April 2011, the Alberta Policy Coalition for Chronic Disease Prevention convened a consensus conference on environmental determinants of obesity such as marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. We examine the political environment, evidence, issues, and challenges of placing restrictions on marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages within Canada. We recommend a national regulatory system prohibiting commercial marketing of foods and beverages to children and suggest that effective regulations must set minimum standards, monitor compliance, and enact penalties for non-compliance. PMID:23447026

  19. Developing consensus criteria for sarcopenia: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert R; Kiel, Douglas P

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a major cause of impaired physical function, which contributes to mobility disability, falls and hospitalizations in older adults. Lower muscle mass and strength are also associated with lower bone mineral density and greater risk for osteoporotic fractures. Thus, identification of sarcopenia could be important for fracture prevention as it may help improve fracture risk assessment, and muscle mass and strength can be improved with exercise, even among the frailest older adults. Unfortunately, there are no consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia. Consequently there is no guidance to help clinicians identify older adults with clinically meaningful low muscle mass or weakness. Further, development of novel sarcopenia therapies is hindered not only due to the difficulty in identifying participants for clinical trials, and but also because there are no validated, clinically appropriate endpoints for assessment of treatment efficacy. There is currently a major push to establish a consensus definition of sarcopenia, and recent work holds promise that this goal may be within reach. This article discusses the evolution of the definition of sarcopenia, and focuses on the latest recommended diagnostic criteria proposed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project. While these empirically-based cut-points for clinically important low muscle mass and weakness are a significant step forward for the sarcopenia field, important questions remain to be answered before consensus diagnostic criteria can be definitively established. Ongoing work to refine sarcopenia criteria will further advance the field and bring this important contributor to falls, fractures and disability into the mainstream of clinical care and ultimately lead to better quality of life with aging.

  20. Wireless sensor networks distributed consensus estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cailian; Guan, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief evaluates the cooperative effort of sensor nodes to accomplish high-level tasks with sensing, data processing and communication. The metrics of network-wide convergence, unbiasedness, consistency and optimality are discussed through network topology, distributed estimation algorithms and consensus strategy. Systematic analysis reveals that proper deployment of sensor nodes and a small number of low-cost relays (without sensing function) can speed up the information fusion and thus improve the estimation capability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This brief also investiga

  1. Using the modified Delphi method to establish clinical consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with rotator cuff pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breda H. Eubank

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients presenting to the healthcare system with rotator cuff pathology do not always receive high quality care. High quality care occurs when a patient receives care that is accessible, appropriate, acceptable, effective, efficient, and safe. The aim of this study was twofold: 1 to develop a clinical pathway algorithm that sets forth a stepwise process for making decisions about the diagnosis and treatment of rotator cuff pathology presenting to primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare settings; and 2 to establish clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of rotator cuff pathology to inform decision-making processes within the algorithm. Methods A three-step modified Delphi method was used to establish consensus. Fourteen experts representing athletic therapy, physiotherapy, sport medicine, and orthopaedic surgery were invited to participate as the expert panel. In round 1, 123 best practice statements were distributed to the panel. Panel members were asked to mark “agree” or “disagree” beside each statement, and provide comments. The same voting method was again used for round 2. Round 3 consisted of a final face-to-face meeting. Results In round 1, statements were grouped and reduced to 44 statements that met consensus. In round 2, five statements reached consensus. In round 3, ten statements reached consensus. Consensus was reached for 59 statements representing five domains: screening, diagnosis, physical examination, investigations, and treatment. The final face-to-face meeting was also used to develop clinical pathway algorithms (i.e., clinical care pathways for three types of rotator cuff pathology: acute, chronic, and acute-on-chronic. Conclusion This consensus guideline will help to standardize care, provide guidance on the diagnosis and treatment of rotator cuff pathology, and assist in clinical decision-making for all healthcare professionals.

  2. [Therapy of leishmaniasis in France: consensus on proposed guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Pierre A; Rosenthal, Éric; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Lightburne, Edward; Couppié, Pierre; Morizot, Gloria; Lachaud, Laurence; Marty, Pierre; Dedet, Jean-Pierre

    2011-02-01

    Because it relies on potentially toxic, difficult-to-handle, or expensive compounds the therapy of leishmaniasis is still a complex issue in 2010, especially for visceral leishmaniasis in immuno-suppressed subjects, or in patients with cutaneous and mucosal involvement. This induces a wide diversity of observed therapeutic practices, some being sub-optimal. The Société de Pathologie Exotique organised a meeting dedicated to the therapy of leishmaniasis in France that led to the first consensus on therapeutic guidelines. Liposomal amphotericin B is the first-line option for visceral leishmaniasis both in immunocompetent, and immunosuppressed patients (cumulated doses of 20 mg/kg and 30-40 mg/kg, respectively). Secondary prophylaxis with either liposomal amphotericin B, pentamidine or meglumine antimoniate is proposed to patients with heavy immunosuppression until immunity has been restored for at least 6 months. While the efficacy of new topical formulations of paromomycin is being tested, patients with Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis may be left untreated, or be administered a combination of superficial cryotherapy plus intralesional antimony, or even--in complex situations--receive systemic therapy. The efficacy of a short course of pentamidine (L. guyanensis/L. panamensis) and a 20-day schedule of meglumine antimoniate (L. braziliensis) is solidly established. However, in well-defined situations, local therapy of New World cutaneous leishmaniasis is now considered acceptable.

  3. Treatment of Seborrhoeic Dermatitis in Asia: A Consensus Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Wai Kwong; Yeung, Chi Keung; Torsekar, Raghunandan Govind; Suh, Dae Hun; Ungpakorn, Rataporn; Widaty, Sandra; Azizan, Noor Zalmy; Gabriel, Maria Teresita; Tran, Hau Khang; Chong, Wei Sheng; Shih, I-Hsin; Dall'Oglio, Federica; Micali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) is common in Asia. Its prevalence is estimated to be 1-5% in adults. However, larger population-based studies into the epidemiology of SD in Asia are lacking, and the aetiology of SD may differ widely from Western countries and in different parts of Asia. In addition, clinically significant differences between Asian and Caucasian skin have been reported. There is a need to define standardized clinical diagnostic criteria and/or a grading system to help determine appropriate treatments for SD within Asia. With this in mind, experts from India, South Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Italy convened to define the landscape of SD in Asia at a meeting held in Singapore. The consensus group developed a comprehensive algorithm to aid clinicians to recommend appropriate treatment of SD in both adults and children. In most cases, satisfactory therapeutic results can be accomplished with topical antifungal agents or topical corticosteroids. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents with antifungal properties have been shown to be a viable option for both acute and maintenance therapy. PMID:27386464

  4. Multiple sclerosis in the Arabian Gulf countries: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlega, Saeed; Inshasi, Jihad; Al Tahan, Abdel Rahman; Madani, Abu Bakr; Qahtani, Hussien; Rieckmann, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is rapidly changing in many parts of the world. Based on the Kurtzke classification, the Arabian Gulf Region is located in a low-risk zone for MS; however, recent studies suggest a moderate-to-high prevalence nearby (31-55 MS per 10,0000 individuals), with an increase in incidence in recent years. The relapsing-remitting disease course ratio is 2.5:1 versus the primary progressive type. In a geographic area that was previously associated with low prevalence; the recent high prevalence and fast rising incidence of MS in the gulf countries, encouraged the neurologists of this region to meet in a consensus panel, in order to share our latest findings in terms of MS epidemiology and consent on MS management in the Arabian Gulf. Therefore 20 key opinion leader neurologists and MS experts representing various countries of the Arabian Gulf have met in Dubai on the 2 and 3 February 2012, they shared their latest epidemiological findings, discussed recent MS aspects in the region, and consented on MS management relevantly to this geographic area.

  5. Hong Kong Consensus Recommendations on the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ronnie Tung-Ping; Cheung, Tom Tan-To; Kwok, Philip Chong-Hei; Lee, Ann-Shing; Li, Tat-Wing; Loke, Kwok-Loon; Chan, Stephen Lam; Cheung, Moon-Tong; Lai, Tak-Wing; Cheung, Chin-Cheung; Cheung, Foon-Yiu; Loo, Ching-Kong; But, Yiu-Kuen; Hsu, Shing-Jih; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Yau, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is particularly prevalent in Hong Kong because of the high prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection; HCC is the fourth commonest cancer in men and the seventh commonest in women, and it is the third leading cause of cancer death in Hong Kong. The full spectrum of treatment modalities for HCC is available locally; however, there is currently no local consensus document detailing how these modalities should be used. Summary In a series of meetings held between May and October 2013, a multidisciplinary group of Hong Kong clinicians − liver surgeons, medical oncologists, clinical oncologists, hepatologists, and interventional radiologists − convened to formulate local recommendations on HCC management. These recommendations consolidate the most current evidence pertaining to HCC treatment modalities, together with the latest thinking of practicing clinicians engaged in HCC management, and give detailed guidance on how to deploy these modalities effectively for patients in various disease stages. Key messages Distinct from other regional guidelines, these recommendations provide guidance on the use of antiviral therapy to reduce the incidence of HCC in CHB patients with cirrhosis and to reduce recurrence of CHB-related HCC. PMID:26020029

  6. Second insulin pump safety meeting: summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Jones, Paul L; Klonoff, David C

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes Technology Society facilitated a second meeting of insulin pump experts at Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, California on November 4, 2009, at the request of the Food and Drug Administration, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories. The first such meeting was held in Bethesda, Maryland, on November 12, 2008. The group of physicians, nurses, diabetes educators, and engineers from across the United States discussed safety issues in insulin pump therapy and recommended adjustments to current insulin pump design and use to enhance overall safety. The meeting discussed safety issues in the context of pump operation; software; hardware; physical structure; electrical, biological, and chemical considerations; use; and environment from engineering, medical, nursing, and pump/user perspectives. There was consensus among meeting participants that insulin pump designs have made great progress in improving the quality of life of people with diabetes, but much more remains to be done.

  7. 7th SOSORT consensus paper: conservative treatment of idiopathic & Scheuermann's kyphosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Loon PJM

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracic hyperkyphosis is a frequent problem and can impact greatly on patient's quality of life during adolescence. This condition can be idiopathic or secondary to Scheuermann disease, a disease disturbing vertebral growth. To date, there is no sound scientific data available on the management of this condition. Some studies discuss the effects of bracing, however no guidelines, protocols or indication's of treatment for this condition were found. The aim of this paper was to develop and verify the consensus on managing thoracic hyperkyphosis patients treated with braces and/or physiotherapy. Methods The Delphi process was utilised in four steps gradually modified according to the results of a set of recommendations: we involved the SOSORT Board twice, then all SOSORT members twice, with a Pre-Meeting Questionnaire (PMQ, and during a Consensus Session at the SOSORT Lyon Meeting with a Meeting Questionnaire (MQ. Results There was an unanimous agreement on the general efficacy of bracing and physiotherapy for this condition. Most experts suggested the use of 4-5 point bracing systems, however there was some controversy with regards to physiotherapeutic aims and modalities. Conclusion The SOSORT panel of experts suggest the use of rigid braces and physiotherapy to correct thoracic hyperkyphosis during adolescence. The evaluation of specific braces and physiotherapy techniques has been recommended.

  8. Public meeting

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to a public meeting which will be held on Thursday 11 November 2010 at 2:30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium (welcome coffee from 2 p.m.) In this meeting Sigurd Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure will present the Management’s proposals towards restoring full funding of the Pension Fund. The meeting will follow discussions which took place with the Staff Association, at the Standing Concertation Committee (CCP) of 1 November 2010 and will be held with the Members States, at the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) of 4 November 2010. You will be able to attend this presentation in the Main Auditorium or via the webcast. The Management will also be available to reply to your questions on this subject. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  9. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN The new account management system Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium ...

  10. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department The CERN Ombuds The new account management system Crèche progress + Restaurants Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch   Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  11. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department CERN Global Network An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) ...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS Department An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Summer Student program Bringing Library services to users Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  13. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  14. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  15. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Public meetings : Come and talk about your future employment conditions !   The Staff Association will come and present the results of our survey on the 2015 five-yearly review. Following the survey, the topics discussed, will be contract policy, recognition of merit (MARS), working time arrangements and family policy. After each meeting and around a cup of coffee or tea you will be able to continue the discussions. Do not hesitate to join us, the five-yearly review, it is with YOU!

  16. Can Canada Avoid Arctic Militarization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Passage is considered an international strait because it joins two high-seas areas used for international navigations.28 Geography is the key to the...2014). 42Roger Howard, 54. 43Sian Griffith, “US-Canada Arctic Border Dispute Key to Maritime Riches,” BBC News , August 2, 2010, http://www.bbc.com...Chilingarov, Deputy Chairman of the Russian Duma and a famous Polar scientist, directed a submarine expedition to the North Pole and planted a Russian flag

  17. Canada's family violence initiative: partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Elaine

    1994-01-01

    Under Canada's four-year, $136 million Family Violence Initiative, the federal government is calling upon all Canadians to work in partnerships towards the elimination of family violence - child abuse, violence against women, and elder (senior) abuse. Family violence is a complex problem and requires the efforts of all Canadians to resolve it. One of the key themes of the Initiative - a multidisciplinary approach to the problem of family violence - is reflected in the selection and developmen...

  18. China, Canada Strengthen Energy Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ China and Canada released a joint statement to work together to promote the bilateral cooperation in the oil and gas sector in lateJanuary when Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin paid a state visit to China. Encouraging respective enterprises to expand commercial partnership, the two nations have agreed to take on the energy sector - oil and gas, nuclear energy,energy efficiency and cleaner energy - as "priority areas of long-term mutual cooperation".

  19. Consensus statement on panic disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballenger, JC; Lecrubier, Y; Nutt, DJ; Baldwin, DS; den Boer, JA; Kasper, S; Shear, MK

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To provide primary care clinicians with a better understanding of management issues in panic disorder and guide clinical practice with recommendations for appropriate pharmacotherapy. Participants: The 4 members of the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety were James C.

  20. Consensus in networks of mobile communicating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Populations of mobile and communicating agents describe a vast array of technological and natural systems, ranging from sensor networks to animal groups. Here, we investigate how a group-level agreement may emerge in the continuously evolving network defined by the local interactions of the moving individuals. We adopt a general scheme of motion in two dimensions and we let the individuals interact through the minimal naming game, a prototypical scheme to investigate social consensus. We distinguish different regimes of convergence determined by the emission range of the agents and by their mobility, and we identify the corresponding scaling behaviors of the consensus time. In the same way, we rationalize also the behavior of the maximum memory used during the convergence process, which determines the minimum cognitive/storage capacity needed by the individuals. Overall, we believe that the simple and general model presented in this paper can represent a helpful reference for a better understanding of the behavior of populations of mobile agents.

  1. Consensus in evolving networks of mobile agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-02-01

    Populations of mobile and communicating agents describe a vast array of technological and natural systems, ranging from sensor networks to animal groups. Here, we investigate how a group-level agreement may emerge in the continuously evolving networks defined by the local interactions of the moving individuals. We adopt a general scheme of motion in two dimensions and we let the individuals interact through the minimal naming game, a prototypical scheme to investigate social consensus. We distinguish different regimes of convergence determined by the emission range of the agents and by their mobility, and we identify the corresponding scaling behaviors of the consensus time. In the same way, we rationalize also the behavior of the maximum memory used during the convergence process, which determines the minimum cognitive/storage capacity needed by the individuals. Overall, we believe that the simple and general model presented in this talk can represent a helpful reference for a better understanding of the behavior of populations of mobile agents.

  2. International Consensus On (ICON) Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N. G.; Arakawa, H.; Carlsen, K.-H.; Custovic, A.; Gern, J.; Lemanske, R.; Le Souef, P.; Makela, M.; Roberts, G.; Wong, G.; Zar, H.; Akdis, C. A.; Bacharier, L. B.; Baraldi, E.; van Bever, H. P.; de Blic, J.; Boner, A.; Burks, W.; Casale, T. B.; Castro-Rodriguez, J. A.; Chen, Y. Z.; El-Gamal, Y. M.; Everard, M. L.; Frischer, T.; Geller, M.; Gereda, J.; Goh, D. Y.; Guilbert, T. W.; Hedlin, G.; Heymann, P. W.; Hong, S. J.; Hossny, E. M.; Huang, J. L.; Jackson, D. J.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kalayci, O.; Khaled, N.; Kling, S.; Kuna, P.; Lau, S.; Ledford, D. K.; Lee, S. I.; Liu, A. H.; Lockey, R. F.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Lotvall, J.; Morikawa, A.; Nieto, A.; Paramesh, H.; Pawankar, R.; Pohunek, P.; Pongracic, J.; Price, D.; Robertson, C.; Rosario, N.; Rossenwasser, L. J.; Sly, P. D.; Stein, R.; Stick, S.; Szefler, S.; Taussig, L. M.; Valovirta, E.; Vichyanond, P.; Wallace, D.; Weinberg, E.; Wennergren, G.; Wildhaber, J.; Zeiger, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. In order to achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with health care professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent from chronic treatment. There is a trend towards considering phenotype specific treatment choices; however this goal has not yet been achieved. PMID:22702533

  3. International consensus on (ICON) pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N G; Arakawa, H; Carlsen, K-H; Custovic, A; Gern, J; Lemanske, R; Le Souef, P; Mäkelä, M; Roberts, G; Wong, G; Zar, H; Akdis, C A; Bacharier, L B; Baraldi, E; van Bever, H P; de Blic, J; Boner, A; Burks, W; Casale, T B; Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Chen, Y Z; El-Gamal, Y M; Everard, M L; Frischer, T; Geller, M; Gereda, J; Goh, D Y; Guilbert, T W; Hedlin, G; Heymann, P W; Hong, S J; Hossny, E M; Huang, J L; Jackson, D J; de Jongste, J C; Kalayci, O; Aït-Khaled, N; Kling, S; Kuna, P; Lau, S; Ledford, D K; Lee, S I; Liu, A H; Lockey, R F; Lødrup-Carlsen, K; Lötvall, J; Morikawa, A; Nieto, A; Paramesh, H; Pawankar, R; Pohunek, P; Pongracic, J; Price, D; Robertson, C; Rosario, N; Rossenwasser, L J; Sly, P D; Stein, R; Stick, S; Szefler, S; Taussig, L M; Valovirta, E; Vichyanond, P; Wallace, D; Weinberg, E; Wennergren, G; Wildhaber, J; Zeiger, R S

    2012-08-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI, and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. To achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with healthcare professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent of chronic treatment. There is a trend toward considering phenotype-specific treatment choices; however, this goal has not yet been achieved.

  4. Frailty Consensus: A Call to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E.; Vellas, Bruno; van Kan, G. Abellan; Anker, Stefan D.; Bauer, Juergen M.; Bernabei, Roberto; Cesari, Matteo; Chumlea, W.C.; Doehner, Wolfram; Evans, Jonathan; Fried, Linda P.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Katz, Paul R.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; McCarter, Roger J.; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis M.; Rockwood, Ken; von Haehling, Stephan; Vandewoude, Maurits F.; Walston, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Frailty is a clinical state in which there is an increase in an individual’s vulnerability for developing increased dependency and/or mortality when exposed to a stressor. Frailty can occur as the result of a range of diseases and medical conditions. A consensus group consisting of delegates from 6 major international, European, and US societies created 4 major consensus points on a specific form of frailty: physical frailty. Physical frailty is an important medical syndrome. The group defined physical frailty as “a medical syndrome with multiple causes and contributors that is characterized by diminished strength, endurance, and reduced physiologic function that increases an individual’s vulnerability for developing increased dependency and/or death.”Physical frailty can potentially be prevented or treated with specific modalities, such as exercise, protein-calorie supplementation, vitamin D, and reduction of polypharmacy.Simple, rapid screening tests have been developed and validated, such as the simple FRAIL scale, to allow physicians to objectively recognize frail persons.For the purposes of optimally managing individuals with physical frailty, all persons older than 70 years and all individuals with significant weight loss (≥5%) due to chronic disease should be screened for frailty. PMID:23764209

  5. Prevention and management of non-communicable disease: the IOC consensus statement, Lausanne 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Klügl, Martin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bendiksen, Fredrik; Blair, Steven N; Börjesson, Mats; Budgett, Richard; Derman, Wayne; Erdener, Uğur; Ioannidis, John P A; Khan, Karim M; Martinez, Rodrigo; van Mechelen, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Sallis, Robert E; Schwellnus, Martin; Shultz, Rebecca; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Weiler, Richard; Ljungqvist, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative approaches that leverage and integrate evidence through the support of big data, technology, and design thinking. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of a consensus meeting on NCD prevention sponsored by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in April, 2013. Within the context of advocacy for multifaceted systems change, the IOC's focus is to create solutions that gain traction within health care systems. The group of participants attending the meeting achieved consensus on a strategy for the prevention and management of chronic disease that includes the following: 1. Focus on behavioural change as the core component of all clinical programs for the prevention and management of chronic disease. 2. Establish actual centres to design, implement, study, and improve preventive programs for chronic disease. 3. Use human-centered design in the creation of prevention programs with an inclination to action, rapid prototyping and multiple iterations. 4. Extend the knowledge and skills of Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) professionals to build new programs for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease focused on physical activity, diet and lifestyle. 5. Mobilize resources and leverage networks to scale and distribute programs of prevention. True innovation lies in the ability to align thinking around these core strategies to ensure successful implementation of NCD prevention and management programs within health care. The IOC and SEM community are in an ideal position to lead this disruptive change. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the IOC Non-Communicable Diseases ad-hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this

  6. Prevention and management of noncommunicable disease: the IOC Consensus Statement, Lausanne 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Klügl, Martin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bendiksen, Fredrik; Blair, Steven N; Börjesson, Mats; Budgett, Richard; Derman, Wayne; Erdener, Uğur; Ioannidis, John P A; Khan, Karim M; Martinez, Rodrigo; van Mechelen, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Sallis, Robert E; Schwellnus, Martin; Shultz, Rebecca; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Weiler, Richard; Ljungqvist, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, noncommunicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative approaches that leverage and integrate evidence through the support of big data, technology, and design thinking. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of a consensus meeting on NCD prevention sponsored by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in April 2013. Within the context of advocacy for multifaceted systems change, the IOC's focus is to create solutions that gain traction within health care systems. The group of participants attending the meeting achieved consensus on a strategy for the prevention and management of chronic disease that includes the following: 1. Focus on behavioral change as the core component of all clinical programs for the prevention and management of chronic disease. 2. Establish actual centers to design, implement, study, and improve preventive programs for chronic disease. 3. Use human-centered design (HCD) in the creation of prevention programs with an inclination to action, rapid prototyping and multiple iterations. 4. Extend the knowledge and skills of Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) professionals to build new programs for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease focused on physical activity, diet, and lifestyle. 5. Mobilize resources and leverage networks to scale and distribute programs of prevention. True innovation lies in the ability to align thinking around these core strategies to ensure successful implementation of NCD prevention and management programs within health care. The IOC and SEM community are in an ideal position to lead this disruptive change. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the IOC Non-Communicable Diseases ad hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this

  7. Prevention and management of non-communicable disease: the IOC consensus statement, Lausanne 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Klügl, Martin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bendiksen, Fredrik; Blair, Steven N; Börjesson, Mats; Budgett, Richard; Derman, Wayne; Erdener, Ugur; Ioannidis, John P A; Khan, Karim M; Martinez, Rodrigo; Van Mechelen, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Sallis, Robert E; Schwellnus, Martin; Shultz, Rebecca; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Weiler, Richard; Ljungqvist, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative approaches that leverage and integrate evidence through the support of big data, technology and design thinking. The purpose of this paper is to summarise the results of a consensus meeting on NCD prevention sponsored by the IOC in April 2013. Within the context of advocacy for multifaceted systems change, the IOC's focus is to create solutions that gain traction within healthcare systems. The group of participants attending the meeting achieved consensus on a strategy for the prevention and management of chronic disease that includes the following: (1) Focus on behavioural change as the core component of all clinical programmes for the prevention and management of chronic disease. (2) Establish actual centres to design, implement, study and improve preventive programmes for chronic disease. (3) Use human-centred design in the creation of prevention programmes with an inclination to action, rapid prototyping and multiple iterations. (4) Extend the knowledge and skills of Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) professionals to build new programmes for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease focused on physical activity, diet and lifestyle. (5) Mobilise resources and leverage networks to scale and distribute programmes of prevention. True innovation lies in the ability to align thinking around these core strategies to ensure successful implementation of NCD prevention and management programmes within healthcare. The IOC and SEM community are in an ideal position to lead this disruptive change. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the IOC Non-Communicable Diseases ad hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this agenda forward.

  8. Indigenous Educational Attainment in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the educational attainment of Indigenous peoples of working age (25 to 64 years in Canada is examined. This diverse population has typically had lower educational levels than the general population in Canada. Results indicate that, while on the positive side there are a greater number of highly educated Indigenous peoples, there is also a continuing gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. Data also indicate that the proportion with less than high school education declined, which corresponds with a rise of those with a PSE; the reverse was true in 1996. Despite these gains, however, the large and increasing absolute numbers of those without a high school education is alarming. There are intra-Indigenous differences: First Nations with Indian Status and the Inuit are not doing as well as non-Status and Métis peoples. Comparisons between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations reveal that the documented gap in post-secondary educational attainment is at best stagnant. Out of the data analysis, and based on the history of educational policy, we comment on the current reform proposed by the Government of Canada, announced in February of 2014, and propose several policy recommendations to move educational attainment forward.

  9. Restoring balance: a consensus statement on the protection of vulnerable research participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, James M; Beskow, Laura; Campbell, Jean; Dugosh, Karen; Festinger, David; Hartz, Sarah; James, Rosalina; Lidz, Charles

    2012-12-01

    A diverse panel convened in June 2011 to explore a dilemma in human research: some traits may make individuals or communities particularly vulnerable to a variety of harms in research; however, well-intended efforts to protect these vulnerable individuals and communities from harm may actually generate a series of new harms. We have presented a consensus statement forged by the panel through discussion during a 2-day meeting and the article-writing process. We have identified practical problems that sometimes arise in connection with providing additional safeguards for groups labeled as vulnerable and offered recommendations on how we might better balance concerns for protection with concerns for justice and participant autonomy.

  10. Central America and Caribbean consensus on use of viscosupplementation for Osteoarthritis: multimodal treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo Rigueros, Franklin; Castro Majano, William; Contreras Soares, Fernando; De Peña Rojas, Servio; García, Andrés Nicolás; Guerrero De León, Estela; Ivancovich Cruz, Rodolfo; Lee Choy, Luis; Quiñonez Magaña, Luis; Ruiz Pitano, Marcos; Sosa Sagastume, Eddy; Villanueva García, Andrés; Villatoro Bran, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A meeting of Central American and Caribbean experts was hold with the support of the Latin American Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (SLAOT), which aimed to review the published eviden- ce on viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) in the multimodal management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and generating the basis for a consensus. Se realizó una reunión de expertos centroamericanos y del caribe, con el apoyo de la Sociedad Latinoamericana de de Ortopedia y Traumatología ...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Re...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :   Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 4 December 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Fellows, Associates and Summer Student Programmes Particle Data Book distribution Revoking Computer accounts Equipment insurance on site Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Dates for meetings in 2003 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (74837...

  14. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 15 June 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) b. IT Service Review Meeting (ITSRM) c. GS User Commission Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in bra...

  15. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk ! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Wednesday 2nd April at 10:30 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned !

  16. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Thursday 7th May 2015 at 9 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned!

  17. Consensus on Moving Neighborhood Model of Peterson Graph

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the consensus problem of multiple agents on a kind of famous graph, Peterson graph. It is an undirected graph with 10 vertices and 15 edges. Each agent randomly walks on this graph and communicates with each other if and only if they coincide on a node at the same time. We conduct numerical study on the consensus problem in this framework and show that global consensus can be achieved.

  18. Consensus and Stability Analysis of Networked Multiagent Predictive Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Ping

    2016-03-17

    This paper is concerned with the consensus and stability problem of multiagent control systems via networks with communication delays and data loss. A networked multiagent predictive control scheme is proposed to achieve output consensus and also compensate for the communication delays and data loss actively. The necessary and sufficient conditions of achieving both consensus and stability of the closed-loop networked multiagent control systems are derived. An important result that is obtained is that the consensus and stability of closed-loop networked multiagent predictive control systems are not related to the communication delays and data loss. An example illustrates the performance of the networked multiagent predictive control scheme.

  19. Finite-time consensus of heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Ya-Kun; Guan Xin-Ping; Luo Xiao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the finite-time consensus problem for heterogeneous multi-agent systems composed of first-order and second-order agents.A novel continuous nonlinear distributed consensus protocol is constructed,and finite-time consensus criteria are obtained for the heterogeneous multi-agent systems.Compared with the existing results,the stationary and kinetic consensuses of the heterogeneous multi-agent systems can be achieved in a finite time respectively.Moreover,the leader can be a first-order or a second-order integrator agent.Finally,some simulation examples are employed to verify the efficiency of the theoretical results.

  20. Suicide policy in Canada: lessons from history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiwak, Rae; Elias, Brenda; Bolton, James M; Martens, Patricia J; Sareen, Jitender

    2012-07-18

    In Canada, suicide has transitioned from being a criminal activity with much associated stigma, to being a public health concern that needs to be managed by governments and clinicians in a culturally sensitive manner. In Canada and worldwide, the social attitudes toward and legal interpretation of suicide have been dynamic. Much has been proposed in the development of suicide policy in Canada, however Canada is unique in that it remains one of the only industrialized countries without a national suicide prevention strategy. The current article provides a critical review of the history of suicide in Canada, as well as an appraisal of Canadian suicide prevention policies and key government and political milestones that have impacted suicide policy. Current activity regarding a national suicide prevention strategy in Canada is discussed, as well as potential options for clinician involvement.

  1. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship : highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Classen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germa Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J.T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  2. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: Highlights from the third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Beyer (Jörg); P. Albers (Peter); R. Altena (Renske); J. Aparicio (Jorge); C. Bokemeyer; J. Busch (Jamie); R. Cathomas (Richard); E. Cavallin-Stahl (Eva); N.W. Clarke (Noel); J. Claßen (Johannes); G. Cohn-Cedermark (Gabriella); A.A. Dahl; G. Daugaard (Gedske); U. de Giorgi (Ugo); M. de Santis (Maria); M. De Wit (Meike); R. de Wit (Ronald); K.P. Dieckmann; M. Fenner (Martin); K. Fizazi (Karim); A. Flechon (Aude); S.D. Fossa (Sophie); J.R. Germá Lluch (José Ramón); J.A. Gietema (Jourik); S. Gillessen (Silke); A. Giwercman (Aleksander); J.T. Hartmann; A. Heidenreich (Axel); M. Hentrich (Marcus); F.U. Honecker (Friedemann); A. Horwich; R.A. Huddart (Robbert); S. Kliesch (Sabine); C. Kollmannsberger (Christian); S. Krege (Susanne); M.P. Laguna (Maria Pilar); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); A. Lorch (Anja); J.P. Lotz (Jean Pierre); F. Mayer; A. Necchi (Andrea); N. Nicolai (Nicola); J. Nuver (Janine); K. Oechsle (Karin); J. Oldenburg (Jan); J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); T. Powles (Tom); E. Rajpert-De Meyts (Ewa); O. Rick (Oliver); G. Rosti (Giovanni); R. Salvioni (Roberto); C. Winter (Christopher); C. Wittekind (Christian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et a

  3. Consensus document on European brain research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Luca, Monica; Baker, Mary; Corradetti, Renato;

    2011-01-01

    the economic and social challenge posed by management of brain diseases in European countries. To setup a platform for discussion, EBC published in 2006 a Consensus Document on European Brain Research, describing needs and achievements of research in Europe and presenting proposals for future research programs....... Since 2006, European research in neuroscience has advanced tremendously. The present document represents an update elaborated to reflect changes in research priorities and advances in brain research that have taken place since 2006. The same approach and format have been used here as in the previous......Psychiatric and neurological diseases combined represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. A recent study conducted by the European Brain Council (EBC) quantified the 'cost and burden' of major brain diseases in Europe, amounting to €386bn per year. Considering that these costs...

  4. Distributed consensus and fault tolerance - Lecture 1

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In a world where clusters with thousands of nodes are becoming commonplace, we are often faced with the task of having them coordinate and share state. As the number of machines goes up, so does the probability that something goes wrong: a node could temporarily lose connectivity, crash because of some race condition, or have its hard drive fail. What are the challenges when designing fault-tolerant distributed systems, where a cluster is able to survive the loss of individual nodes? In this lecture, we will discuss some basics on this topic (consistency models, CAP theorem, failure modes, byzantine faults), detail the raft consensus algorithm, and showcase an interesting example of a highly resilient distributed system, bitcoin.

  5. Distributed consensus and fault tolerance - Lecture 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In a world where clusters with thousands of nodes are becoming commonplace, we are often faced with the task of having them coordinate and share state. As the number of machines goes up, so does the probability that something goes wrong: a node could temporarily lose connectivity, crash because of some race condition, or have its hard drive fail. What are the challenges when designing fault-tolerant distributed systems, where a cluster is able to survive the loss of individual nodes? In this lecture, we will discuss some basics on this topic (consistency models, CAP theorem, failure modes, byzantine faults), detail the raft consensus algorithm, and showcase an interesting example of a highly resilient distributed system, bitcoin.

  6. Consensus control of flexible-joint robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Becerril, Sofía; Espinosa-Pérez, Gerardo; Panteley, Elena; Ortega, Romeo

    2015-06-01

    Synchronisation of networks composed by fully actuated robot manipulators has received a lot of attention from the control theory community. Unfortunately, the case of under-actuated robots has not been deeply studied. The aim of this paper is to extend previous results reported by the authors addressing the particular (but of practical interest) case of networks composed by flexible-joint robots. The main feature of the contribution is to consider a change of coordinates, first introduced in Nuno, Ortega, Basanes and Hill, to solve the consensus problem assuming the existence of unknown delays in the communication channels. The extension is twofold, namely: the presentation of a control scheme that, in contrast to the one considered in Avila-Becerril and Espinosa-Perez, does not require knowledge of the initial conditions and the proof that the controller can also be implemented in Cartesian coordinates. The usefulness of the contribution is illustrated through numerical simulations.

  7. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; MacDonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-05-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks.

  8. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  9. [Consensus on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to pain and stress in the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus-Varela, María de Lourdes; Sola, Augusto; Golombek, Sergio; Baquero, Hernando; Borbonet, Daniel; Dávila-Aliaga, Carmen; Del Moral, Teresa; Lara-Flores, Gabriel; Lima-Rogel, María Victoria; Neira-Safi, Freddy; Natta, Diego; Oviedo-Barrantes, Ada; Rodríguez, Susana

    2014-11-01

    Pain and stress experienced by the newborn have not been addressed adequately. Infants in neonatal intensive care units often undergo painful and stressful invasive procedures, and inappropriate treatment increases morbidity and mortality. At the 5th Clinical Consensus of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology, 32 neonatologists from the region were invited to establish recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of neonatal pain and stress. Key themes were explored based on the best scientific evidence available in indexed databases. All attendees participated actively in a meeting in Santiago, Chile, with the objective of reaching a consensus on recommendations and conclusions. Pain and neonatal stress affect neurological development and long-term behavior and require timely diagnosis and appropriate management and treatment, including the use of drugs with an appropriate balance between effectiveness and toxicity. The Consensus emphasized the importance of assessing pain in the newborn from a multidimensional viewpoint, and provided recommendations on the indications and limitations for an individualized pharmacological therapy. The use of analgesics has precise indications but also important limitations; there is a lack of randomized studies in newborns, and adverse effects need to be considered. Nonpharmacological measures to mitigate pain were proposed. Stress management should begin in the delivery room, including maternal contact, stimulus reduction and the implementation of intervention reduction protocols. Recommendations for improving clinical practices related to neonatal pain and stress are presented.

  10. Validating indicators of sheep welfare through a consensus of expert opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phythian, C J; Michalopoulou, E; Jones, P H; Winter, A C; Clarkson, M J; Stubbings, L A; Grove-White, D; Cripps, P J; Duncan, J S

    2011-05-01

    A consensus of expert opinion was used to provide both face and consensual validity to a list of potential indicators of sheep welfare. This approach was used as a first step in the identification of valid welfare indicators for sheep. The consensus methodology of the National Institute of Health, using pre-meeting consultation and focus group discussions, was used to ascertain the consensus opinion of a panel of sheep welfare experts. The Farm Animal Welfare Council's five freedoms were used as a framework to organise a list of current on-farm welfare issues for sheep. The five freedoms were also the welfare criterion used to identify potential on-farm welfare indicators for sheep. As a result, experts identified 193 welfare issues for sheep and lambs managed on farms across England and Wales. Subsequently, a combination of animal- (n = 26), resource- (n = 13) and management- (n = 22) based indicators was suggested for (i) adult rams, (ii) adult ewes (male and female sheep, over 1 year old), (iii) growing lambs (male and female sheep, over 6 weeks to 1 year old) and (iv) young lambs (male and female lambs, 6 weeks old and under). The results from this study could therefore be used to inform the further development of valid methods of assessing the on-farm welfare of sheep.

  11. Report on the second International Consensus on ANA Pattern (ICAP) workshop in Dresden 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, E K L; Damoiseaux, J; de Melo Cruvinel, W; Carballo, O G; Conrad, K; Francescantonio, P L C; Fritzler, M J; Garcia-De La Torre, I; Herold, M; Mimori, T; Satoh, M; von Mühlen, C A; Andrade, L E C

    2016-07-01

    The second meeting for the International Consensus on Antinuclear antibody (ANA) Pattern (ICAP) was held on 22 September 2015, one day prior to the opening of the 12th Dresden Symposium on Autoantibodies in Dresden, Germany. The ultimate goal of ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody nomenclature, and thereby optimizing ANA usage in patient care. The newly developed ICAP website www.ANApatterns.org was introduced to the more than 50 participants. This was followed by several presentations and discussions focusing on key issues including the two-tier classification of ANA patterns into competent-level versus expert-level, the consideration of how to report composite versus mixed ANA patterns, and the necessity for developing a consensus on how ANA results should be reported. The need to establish on-line training modules to help users gain competency in identifying ANA patterns was discussed as a future addition to the website. To advance the ICAP goal of promoting wider international participation, it was agreed that there should be a consolidated plan to translate consensus documents into other languages by recruiting help from members of the respective communities.

  12. Consensus on melanonychia nail plate dermoscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiacchio, Nilton Di; de Farias, Débora Cadore; Piraccini, Bianca Maria; Hirata, Sergio Henrique; Richert, Bertrand; Zaiac, Martin; Daniel, Ralph; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Andre, Josette; Ruben, Beth S; Fleckman, Philip; Rich, Phoebe; Haneke, Eckart; Chang, Patricia; Cherit, Judith Dominguez; Scher, Richard; Tosti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    This statement, focused on melanonychia and nail plate dermoscopy, is intended to guide medical professionals working with melanonychia and to assist choosing appropriate management for melanonychia patients. The International Study Group on Melanonychia was founded in 2007 and currently has 30 members, including nail experts and dermatopathologists with special expertise in nails. The need for common definitions of nail plate dermoscopy was addressed during the Second Meeting of this Group held in February 2008. Prior to this meeting and to date (2010) there have been no evidence-based guidelines on the use of dermoscopy in the management of nail pigmentation. PMID:23739699

  13. Canada Education Savings Program: Annual Statistical Review 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Canada Education Savings Program (CESP) has been an initiative of the Government of Canada since 1998. As part of the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, the program administers the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB). These two initiatives help Canadian families save for a child's…

  14. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  15. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    MARS PENSIONS CONTRACT POLICY GENERAL INFORMATION   PUBLIC MEETINGS COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Monday 15 Oct. 2 pm Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Wednesday 17 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Thursday 18 Oct. 10 am Salle du Conseil/ Council Chamber 503-1-001 Meyrin Thursday 18 Oct. 2 pm Filtration Plant, 222-R-001(in English) Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2012 : lessons learned Pension Fund Capital preservation policy : what is it ? Contract policy LC2IC statistics SA proposal General information CVI 2013 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS)  

  16. Methodological Quality of Consensus Guidelines in Implant Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Apaza, Karol; Ariza-Fritas, Tania; Málaga, Lilian; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Alarcón, Marco Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Consensus guidelines are useful to improve clinical decision making. Therefore, the methodological evaluation of these guidelines is of paramount importance. Low quality information may guide to inadequate or harmful clinical decisions. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of consensus guidelines published in implant dentistry using a validated methodological instrument. Methods The six implant dentistry journals with impact factors were scrutinised for consensus guidelines related to implant dentistry. Two assessors independently selected consensus guidelines, and four assessors independently evaluated their methodological quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Disagreements in the selection and evaluation of guidelines were resolved by consensus. First, the consensus guidelines were analysed alone. Then, systematic reviews conducted to support the guidelines were included in the analysis. Non-parametric statistics for dependent variables (Wilcoxon signed rank test) was used to compare both groups. Results Of 258 initially retrieved articles, 27 consensus guidelines were selected. Median scores in four domains (applicability, rigour of development, stakeholder involvement, and editorial independence), expressed as percentages of maximum possible domain scores, were below 50% (median, 26%, 30.70%, 41.70%, and 41.70%, respectively). The consensus guidelines and consensus guidelines + systematic reviews data sets could be compared for 19 guidelines, and the results showed significant improvements in all domain scores (p < 0.05). Conclusions Methodological improvement of consensus guidelines published in major implant dentistry journals is needed. The findings of the present study may help researchers to better develop consensus guidelines in implant dentistry, which will improve the quality and trust of information needed to make proper clinical decisions. PMID:28107405

  17. Public policy discourse, planning and measures toward sustainable energy strategies in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liming, Huang [Department of International Economics and Trade, Jinan University (China); Haque, Emdad [Natural Resources Institute, The University of Manitoba (Canada); Barg, Stephan [International Institute for Sustainable Development (Canada)

    2008-01-15

    's emissions level was already 24% above 1990 levels by 2003. As nearly 90% of all anthropogenic GHG emissions in Canada result from the production and consumption of fossil fuels, meeting the Kyoto target will challenge all Canadian governments and the energy industry to develop new and more effective strategies for speeding the development of sustainable energy to limit GHG emissions. There is an urgent need for analyzing current strategies of sustainable energy in Canada and examining the issues of these strategies. In theory and practice, however, there has so far been no a clear, integrated and comprehensive strategy framework for sustainable energy in Canada. Nor a clear definition of sustainable energy strategy was formulated. In this paper, we attempted to define sustainable energy strategy as the energy strategy aiming at improving energy efficiency and promoting renewable energy. Based on the definition above, we formulated an analytical framework for developing the strategies of sustainable energy. In the analytical framework, (1) sustainable energy strategy embraces strategic objectives, measures and management; (2) sustainable energy strategy is divided into two major groups: energy efficiency strategy and renewable energy strategy; (3) strategy measures of energy efficiency are classified as ten types; and (4) strategy measures of renewable energy are classified as four types. We have employed the framework to analyze current strategic objectives, strategic measures and policy and management strategies concerning sustainable energy in Canada and examine the issues of these strategies. (author)

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 September 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. News from the CERN Management 4. Minutes of the previous meeting 5. Matters arising 6. Report from the Scientific Information Policy Board 7. Report from ETT Division: The Press Office 8. Update on Computing Issues 9. Users' Office News 10. Any Other Business 11. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Bryan Pattison (Secretary). ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Z vada (75...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Bryan Pattison

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 September 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building1. Chairman's remarks2. Adoption of the agenda3. News from the CERN Management4. Minutes of the previous meeting5. Matters arising6. Report from the Scientific Information Policy Board7. Report from ETT Division: The Press Office8. Update on Computing Issues9. Users' Office News10. Any Other Business11. Agenda for the next meetingAnyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail toBryan Pattison(Secretary).ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :Austria G. Neuhofer (74094)Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)Czech Republic P. Závada (75877)Den...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Video-conferencing/recording Fellows programme Operational Circular No. 6 EP Space management Update on Computing Issues Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary)  ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic...

  1. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions / EP Division

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 June 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising EP Space management Cars Housing EDH from the User's point of view VRVS Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) France M. Déj...

  2. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 June 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Logistics and Self-service stores EP Space management follow-up How to improve IT User Support? Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Roger.Jones@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiis...

  3. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 September 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Logistics at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer S. Laplace...

  4. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Logistics and Self-service stores EP Space management follow-up How to improve IT User Support? Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Roger.Jones@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskin...

  5. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 June 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Logistics at CERN Open Access Publishing Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini ...

  6. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda of the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 March 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Proposal for a centralised access control service Report from PH Space Management Policy Board Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) ...

  7. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agendafor the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 March 2006At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Proposal for a centralised access control service Report from PH Space Management Policy Board Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Fin...

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 December 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Report from IT division on Computing matters 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Young Particle Physicists Association 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 10. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 11. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 12. Election of the ACCU Chair 6. Report from the new Director-General 13. Any Other Business 7. CERN's 50th anniversary 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 13 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (716...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 March 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equipment insurance on site 2. Adoption of the agenda 8. ACCU reporting mechanisms in the different countries 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. Health Insurance news and follow-up of survey 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wil...

  10. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 March 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in the Council Chamber Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Follow-up on Space Management Users' Desktop needs PIE procedures Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer L. Serin (712...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 June 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management PIE procedures CERN Cars EP Electronics Advisory Board Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (71143) Germany H. Kroha...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 June 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management PIE procedures CERN Cars EP Electronics Advisory Board Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (71143) Germany H. Kroha ...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Matters arising The PH Department Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin...

  14. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 December 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Report from IT division on Computing matters 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Young Particle Physicists Association 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 10. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 11. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 12. Election of the ACCU Chair 6. Report from the new Director-General 13. Any Other Business 7. CERN's 50th anniversary 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 13 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Ada...

  15. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 6. The PH Department 2. Adoption of the agenda 7. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 8. Users' Office news 4. News from the CERN Management 9. Any Other Business 5. Matters arising 10. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Portugal P. Bordalo (74704) Czech Republic P. Závada ...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Reports from ACCU representatives 2. Adoption of the agenda on other committees 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 8. Users' Office news 4. Matters arising 9. Any Other Business 5. News from the CERN Management 10. Agenda for the next meeting 6. Property Protection at CERN Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (74837) Portugal P. Bordalo (74704) Czech Republic ...

  17. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 March 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equipment insurance on site 2. Adoption of the agenda,8. ACCU reporting mechanisms in the different countries 3. Minutes of the previous meeting9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management11. Any Other Business 6. CHIS news and follow-up of survey12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661)NorwayH. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (7591...

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 September 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Health Insurance Questionnaire Host States Relations Service Update on EP Space management Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (...

  19. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Registration plans for portables 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Reports from ACCU representatives 3. Minutes of the previous meeting on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. The Press Office 12. Agenda for the next meeting 7. Equal Opportunities Commission Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): AustriaW. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgari...

  20. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equal Opportunities Commission 2. Adoption of the agenda 8. Registration plans for portables 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. The Press Office 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgar...

  1. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 160-1-009 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Purchasing procedures at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news CERN Clubs Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Las...

  2. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The Visits Service Lifetime of Computer Accounts Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer (...

  3. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 14 June 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car sharing pilot project The CERN Document Server : the portal to Open Access Videoconferencing and collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users'Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) ...

  4. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 14 June 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car sharing pilot project The CERN Document Server : the portal to Open Access Videoconferencing and collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (7...

  5. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting The effects of the reorganization of CERN's structure, one year on Matters arising News from the CERN Management Computer Security The new CERN Dosimeter Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  6. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda of the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 September 2006 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on Fellows and Associates Programme Overview of safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K....

  7. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2004 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Update on CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations Report from the EPOG (European Particle Physics Outreach Group) Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941...

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Safety at CERN Car sharing pilot project CERN Public Web Sites and Intranet Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria   Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  9. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The Visits Service Lifetime of Computer Accounts Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer (7...

  10. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2004 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Update on CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations Report from the EPOG (European Particle Physics Outreach Group) Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finlan...

  11. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 December 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Closure of computer accounts upon CERN contract expiry Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Election of ACCU Chair Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets). Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) ...

  12. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Safety at CERN Car sharing pilot project CERN Public Web Sites and Intranet Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria   Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 September 2006 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.     Chairman's remarks 2.     Adoption of the agenda 3.     Minutes of the previous meeting 4.     Matters arising 5.     News from the CERN Management 6.     Report on Fellows and Associates programme 7.     Overview of safety at CERN 8.     Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 9.     Users' Office news 10.  Any Other Business 11.  Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets):Austria W. Adam  (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria ...

  14. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting The effects of the reorganization of CERN's structure, one year on Matters arising News from the CERN Management Computer Security The new CERN Dosimeter Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (7594...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 September 2011 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising       News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Report on new CHIS rules Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria M. Jeitler (76307) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson)...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  17. ACCU meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks7.\tCar sharing pilot project 2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting9.\tUsers’ Office newss 4.\tMatters arising10.\tAny Other Business 5.\tNews from the CERN Management11.\tAgenda for the next meeting 6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria\tW. Adam (71661)NorwayG. Løvhøiden (73176)Belgium\tG. Wilquet (74664)PolandM. Witek (78967)...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t7.\tCar sharing pilot project3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees4.\tMatters arising9.\tUsers’ Office newss5.\tNews from the CERN Management10.\tAny Other Business11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria\tW. Adam (71661)NorwayG. Løvhøiden (73176)Belgium\tG. Wilquet (74664)PolandM. Witek (78967)Bulgaria\tPortugalP...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks7.\tEmergency Services at CERN 2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t8.\tThe Meyrin Tram project 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4.\tMatters arising10.\tUsers’ Office news 5.\tNews from the CERN Management11.\tElection of ACCU Chair 6. LHC 2008 start-up events 6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Aust...

  1. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car-sharing pilot project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Kunne S. La...

  2. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car-sharing pilot project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Kunne S. ...

  3. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 June 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Dosimetry at CERN Status of collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office newss Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (7935...

  4. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 June 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 6.\tDosimetry at CERN 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 7.\tStatus of collaborative tools at CERN 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4.\tMatters arising 9.\tUsers’ Office newss 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 10.\tAny Other Business 11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway G. Løvhøiden (73176) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland M. Witek (78967) Bulgaria Portugal...

  5. ACCU meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2007 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tLHC 2008 start-up events 7.\tEmergency Services at CERN 8.\tThe Meyrin Tram project 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tElection of ACCU Chair 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilq...

  6. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - W. Adam (71661) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (75877) Denmark - J.B. Hansen...

  7. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tAn update on safety at CERN 7.\tChildcare initiative 8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 9.\tUsers’ Office news 10.\tAny Other Business 11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75...

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria, W. Adam (71661) Belgium, C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic, P. Závada (75877) Denmark, J.B. Hansen (...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 3 December 2008 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tReport from the new Director-General 7.\tReport on the Fellows and Associates programme 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. ...

  10. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tThe CERN Press Office 7.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 8.\tThe Burotel project 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria C...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The CERN Press Office An update on Safety at CERN The Burotel project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark...

  12. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 December 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Restaurant No. 1 extension An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Election of the ACCU Chair Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Záv...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 June 2009At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management CERN Social Services User services in GS Department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - G. Walzel (76592) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (7587...

  14. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tOther business 13.\tAgenda of the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Re...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson) (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic S. Nemecek (71144) ...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of Conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Cze...

  17. Canada's family violence initiative: partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Scott

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Under Canada's four-year, $136 million Family Violence Initiative, the federal government is calling upon all Canadians to work in partnerships towards the elimination of family violence - child abuse, violence against women, and elder (senior abuse. Family violence is a complex problem and requires the efforts of all Canadians to resolve it. One of the key themes of the Initiative - a multidisciplinary approach to the problem of family violence - is reflected in the selection and development of projects. Activities funded by the seven federal departments and agencies involved in the Initiative emphasize partnerships with the professional, voluntary, corporate, non-government and government sectors.

  18. History of geriatrics in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, David B

    2007-01-01

    Specialization is a pervasive movement in medicine. How specialties develop is a complex phenomenon and does not depend solely on the growth of knowledge. The history of geriatrics in Canada is presented as an example of specialization in our country. The gestation period extended over decades. Practitioners moved from partial specialization to a full-time practice in the care of older patients. Opposition to the emerging specialty was mounted by established fields of practice. The choices made by the leaders of Canadian geriatrics molded the evolution of the specialty and have contributed to its precarious status at the present time.

  19. Ensemble distribution models in conservation prioritization: from consensus predictions to consensus reserve networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Laura; Cabeza, Mar; Pironon, Samuel; Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Maiorano, Luigi; Georges, Damien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Aim Conservation planning exercises increasingly rely on species distributions predicted either from one particular statistical model or, more recently, from an ensemble of models (i.e. ensemble forecasting). However, it has not yet been explored how different ways of summarizing ensemble predictions affect conservation planning outcomes. We evaluate these effects and compare commonplace consensus methods, applied before the conservation prioritization phase, to a novel method that applies consensus after reserve selection. Location Europe. Methods We used an ensemble of predicted distributions of 146 Western Palaearctic bird species in alternative ways: four different consensus methods, as well as distributions discounted with variability, were used to produce inputs for spatial conservation prioritization. In addition, we developed and tested a novel method, in which we built 100 datasets by sampling the ensemble of predicted distributions, ran a conservation prioritization analysis on each of them and averaged the resulting priority ranks. We evaluated the conservation outcome against three controls: (i) a null control, based on random ranking of cells; (2) the reference solution, based on an expert-refined dataset; and (3) the independent solution, based on an independent dataset. Results Networks based on predicted distributions were more representative of rare species than randomly selected networks. Alternative methods to summarize ensemble predictions differed in representativeness of resulting reserve networks. Our novel method resulted in better representation of rare species than pre-selection consensus methods. Main conclusions Retaining information about the variation in the predicted distributions throughout the conservation prioritization seems to provide better results than summarizing the predictions before conservation prioritization. Our results highlight the need to understand and consider model-based uncertainty when using predicted

  20. Reaching consensus on the physiotherapeutic management of patients following upper abdominal surgery: a pragmatic approach to interpret equivocal evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanekom Susan D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative pulmonary complications remain the most significant cause of morbidity following open upper abdominal surgery despite advances in perioperative care. However, due to the poor quality primary research uncertainty surrounding the value of prophylactic physiotherapy intervention in the management of patients following abdominal surgery persists. The Delphi process has been proposed as a pragmatic methodology to guide clinical practice when evidence is equivocal. Methods The objective was to develop a clinical management algorithm for the post operative management of abdominal surgery patients. Eleven draft algorithm statements extracted from the extant literature by the primary research team were verified and rated by scientist clinicians (n = 5 in an electronic three round Delphi process. Algorithm statements which reached a priori defined consensus-semi-interquartile range (SIQR Results The five panelists allocated to the abdominal surgery Delphi panel were from Australia, Canada, Sweden, and South Africa. The 11 draft algorithm statements were edited and 5 additional statements were formulated. The panel reached consensus on the rating of all statements. Four statements were rated essential. Conclusion An expert Delphi panel interpreted the equivocal evidence for the physiotherapeutic management of patients following upper abdominal surgery. Through a process of consensus a clinical management algorithm was formulated. This algorithm can now be used by clinicians to guide clinical practice in this population.

  1. Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Virginia

    1994-01-01

    Annotates 122 publications from the Canadian federal government and from 9 Canadian provinces. Topics include environmental programs and problems, gambling, crime, young offenders, health and welfare issues, use of electronic information, materials on education, employment, tourism, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and issues relating to…

  2. Consensus in Directed Networks of Agents With Nonlinear Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Qu, Z.

    2011-01-01

    This technical note studies the consensus problem for cooperative agents with nonlinear dynamics in a directed network. Both local and global consensus are defined and investigated. Techniques for studying the synchronization in such complex networks are exploited to establish various sufficient con

  3. The Consensus Definition Redefined from a Representational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand Scholten, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the author's critique to Paul E. Newton's article titled "Clarifying the consensus definition of validity." In his article, Newton not only clarifies but also redefines the consensus definition of validity. In this redefinition he omits the term "construct" and introduces the term "measurement." Both omission and introduction…

  4. A consensus on criteria for cure of acromegaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Giustina (Andrea); P. Chanson (Philippe); M.D. Bronstein; A. Klibanski; S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); F.F. Casanueva; P. Trainer; E. Ghigo (Ezio); K.K.Y. Ho; S. Melmed (Shlomo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The Acromegaly Consensus Group met in April 2009 to revisit the guidelines on criteria for cure as defined in 2000. Participants: Participants included 74 neurosurgeons and endocrinologists with extensive experience of treating acromegaly. Evidence/Consensus Process: Relevant

  5. 77 FR 24251 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of three new and three revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004....

  6. 78 FR 35085 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of one new and seven revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM...

  7. Consensus of Multiagent Systems with Sampled Information and Noisy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Jun Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider consensus problems of first-order multiagent systems with sampled information and noisy measurements. A distributed stochastic approximation type algorithm is employed to attenuate the measurement noises. We provide conditions under which almost sure strong consensus is guaranteed for fixed and switching directed network topologies. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the theoretical results.

  8. Consensus networks with time-delays over finite fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuxian; Su, Housheng; Chen, Michael Z. Q.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the consensus problem in networks with time-delays over finite fields. The delays are categorised into three cases: single constant delay, multiple constant delays, and time-varying bounded delays. For all cases, some sufficient and necessary conditions for consensus are derived. Furthermore, assuming that the communication graph is strongly connected, some of the obtained necessary conditions reveal that the conditions for consensus with time-delays over finite fields depend not only on the diagonal entries but also on the off-diagonal entries, something that is intrinsically distinct from the case over real numbers (where having at least one nonzero diagonal entry is a sufficient and necessary condition to guarantee consensus). In addition, it is shown that delayed networks cannot achieve consensus when the interaction graph is a tree if the corresponding delay-free networks cannot reach consensus, which is consistent with the result over real numbers. As for average consensus, we show that it can never be achieved for delayed networks over finite fields, although it indeed can be reached under several conditions for delay-free networks over finite fields. Finally, networks with time-varying delays are discussed and one sufficient condition for consensus is presented by graph-theoretic method.

  9. Recommendations for research studies on treatment of idiopathic scoliosis: Consensus 2014 between SOSORT and SRS non-operative management committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Stefano; Hresko, Timothy M; O'Brien, Joseph P; Price, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The two main societies clinically dealing with idiopathic scoliosis are the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), founded in 1966, and the international Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT), started in 2004. Inside the SRS, the Non-Operative Management Committee (SRS-NOC) has the same clinical interest of SOSORT, that is the Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation (or Non-Operative, or conservative) Management of idiopathic scoliosis patients. The aim of this paper is to present the results of a Consensus among the best experts of non-operative treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis, as represented by SOSORT and SRS, on the recommendation for research studies on treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. The goal of the consensus statement is to establish a framework for research with clearly delineated inclusion criteria, methodologies, and outcome measures so that future meta- analysis or comparative studies could occur. A Delphi method was used to generate a consensus to develop a set of recommendations for clinical studies on treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. It included the development of a reference scheme, which was judged during two Delphi Rounds; after this first phase, it was decided to develop the recommendations and 4 other Delphi Rounds followed. The process finished with a Consensus Meeting, that was held during the SOSORT Meeting in Wiesbaden, 8-10 May 2014, moderated by the Presidents of SOSORT (JP O'Brien) and SRS (SD Glassman) and by the Chairs of the involved Committees (SOSORT Consensus Committee: S Negrini; SRS Non-Operative Committee: MT Hresko). The Boards of the SRS and SOSORT formally accepted the final recommendations. The 18 Recommendations focused: Research needs (3), Clinically significant outcomes (4), Radiographic outcomes (3), Other key outcomes (Quality of Life, adherence to treatment) (2), Standardization of methods of non-operative research (6).

  10. Randomized Consensus Processing over Random Graphs: Independence and Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Guodong

    2011-01-01

    Various consensus algorithms over random networks have been investigated in the literature. In this paper, we focus on the role that randomized individual decision-making plays to consensus seeking under stochastic communications. At each time step, each node will independently choose to follow the consensus algorithm, or to stick to current state by a simple Bernoulli trial with time-dependent success probabilities. This node decision strategy characterizes the random node-failures on a communication networks, or a biased opinion selection in the belief evolution over social networks. Connectivity-independent and arc-independent graphs are defined, respectively, to capture the fundamental nature of random network processes with regard to the convergence of the consensus algorithms. A series of sufficient and/or necessary conditions are given on the success probability sequence for the network to reach a global consensus with probability one under different stochastic connectivity assumptions, by which a comp...

  11. Developing an undergraduate curriculum in Special Care Dentistry - by consensus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dougall, A

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that healthcare providers often lack the skills set to provide care for people with disabilities, leading to inequalities in health and reduced access to health care. Newly graduating dentists are likely to see a significant number of patients with special healthcare needs in the course of their practicing lives. However, there is evidence of national and international variation in the availability of education and training at the undergraduate level in this important, emerging area. The quality and content of undergraduate education in Special Care Dentistry has been shown to correlate with students\\' confidence and their expressed willingness, towards providing care for patients with special healthcare needs in their future practice. The aim of this study was to use information from a three-round Delphi process, continued into a face-to-face meeting, to establish consensus on what constitutes the essential core knowledge, skills and attitudes required by a newly qualified dentist so that they are able to deliver patient care to diverse populations following graduation. A high level of agreement was established amongst an international panel of experts from 30 countries. The final core items identified by the panel showed a paradigm shift away from the traditional emphasis on medical diagnosis within a curriculum towards an approach based on the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) with patient-centred treatment planning for people with disabilities and special healthcare needs according to function or environment. Many of the core skills identified by the panel are transferable across a curriculum and should encourage a person-centred approach to treatment planning based on the function, needs and wishes of the patient rather than their specific diagnosis.

  12. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      MARS 2015 FIVE YEARLY REVIEW CONTRACT POLICY PENSION FUND GENERAL INFORMATION   COME AND BE INFORMED! PUBLIC MEETINGS Friday 3rd October at 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Friday 3rd October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Monday 6th October at 10 am Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-018 Meyrin Monday 6th October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin  

  13. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, 2007 is a very special year for CERN. I would like to review the status of our activities with you, and I invite you to a presentation on Wednesday 27 June 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  14. Open Educational Resources in Canada 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreal, Rory; Anderson, Terry; Conrad, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Canada's important areas of expertise in open educational resources (OER) are beginning to be built upon or replicated more broadly in all education and training sectors. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in OER initiatives and open higher education in general in Canada, providing insights into what is happening nationally…

  15. Canada's Changing Geography of Jobs and Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, David

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the impact of globalization on the jobs and trade of Canada. Emphasizes new relationships with countries in Latin America and Africa. Notes the types of trade that Canada enjoys with these two areas and encourages expansion of business into them. (DSK)

  16. Historical Empathy and "Canada: A People's History"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Darren; Clark, Penney

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we examine the CBC/Radio-Canada series, "Canada: A People's History," for its use of empathy, specifically with regard to its portrayal of Aboriginal people. We call the empathy promoted in the series, emotive empathy, and compare it to the concept of historical empathy constructed by researchers in history education. The emotive…

  17. Sustainable development and Kyoto implementation in Canada : the road not taken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, D. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Inst. for Environmental Studies; VanNijnatten, D. [Wilfrid Laurier Univ., Waterloo, ON (Canada). Dept. of Political Science

    2005-08-01

    All levels of government in Canada have been developing and implementing policy intended to meet their international commitments to sustainable development, to increase the economic and social well-being of the current generation without imposing environmental costs on future generations, particularly in terms of pollution and depletion of nonrenewable resources. The authors discuss why Canada has been unable to meet the challenges of sustainable development and climate change. In particular, they present the obstacles facing the current government's climate change plan. Canada has been a leader in stabilizing global greenhouse gas emissions by hosting the first international conference on the issue. Canada has also been a supporter of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and as a signatory member of the Kyoto Protocol, has committed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 6 per cent below 1990 levels by 2012. The authors state that Canada's decarbonization efforts will require horizontal integration and synchronization across various policy fields and also innovation in terms of policy instruments. They claim that one of the problems is that governments continue to address environmental, economic and social issues through separate departments, with only limited inter-departmental coordination. Another problem lies in the fact that greenhouse gas emissions and revenues from fossil-fuel extraction are regionally concentrated and the cost of meeting the Kyoto Protocol commitment is also unevenly distributed. The authors suggest that the federal government must do 3 things for an effective climate policy: restart the federal-provincial policy process; change its approach to industry through regulation; and, reduce consumption of fossil-fuels by implementing a comprehensive set of economic instruments and incentives. 1 fig.

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meetingto be held on Wednesday 3 December 2008 at 9:15 a.m.in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tReport from the new Director-General 7.\tReport on the Fellows and Associates programme 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. Va...

  19. Sarcopenia With Limited Mobility: An International Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E.; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Argiles, Josep M.; Baracos, Vickie; Bauer, Juergen; Bhasin, Shalender; Cederholm, Tommy; Stewart Coats, Andrew J.; Cummings, Steven R.; Evans, William J.; Fearon, Kenneth; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fielding, Roger A.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Inui, Akio; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Mantovani, Giovanni; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Newman, Anne B.; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo; Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Schambelan, Morris; Sokol, Gerald H.; Storer, Thomas W.; Vellas, Bruno; von Haehling, Stephan; Yeh, Shing-Shing; Anker, Stefan D.

    2016-01-01

    A consensus conference convened by the Society of Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders has concluded that “Sarcopenia, ie, reduced muscle mass, with limited mobility” should be considered an important clinical entity and that most older persons should be screened for this condition. “Sarcopenia with limited mobility” is defined as a person with muscle loss whose walking speed is equal to or less than 1 m/s or who walks less than 400 m during a 6-minute walk, and who has a lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean of healthy persons between 20 and 30 years of age of the same ethnic group. The limitation in mobility should not clearly be a result of otherwise defined specific diseases of muscle, peripheral vascular disease with intermittent claudication, central and peripheral nervous system disorders, or cachexia. Clinically significant interventions are defined as an increase in the 6-minute walk of at least 50 meters or an increase of walking speed of at least 0.1 m/s. “A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged; it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstances and the time when it is used.”—Oliver Wendell Holmes PMID:21640657

  20. The Delphi Technique: Making Sense of Consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chien Hsu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Delphi technique is a widely used and accepted method for gathering data from respondents within their domain of expertise. The technique is designed as a group communication process which aims to achieve a convergence of opinion on a specific real-world issue. The Delphi process has been used in various fields of study such as program planning, needs assessment, policy determination, and resource utilization to develop a full range of alternatives, explore or expose underlying assumptions, as well as correlate judgments on a topic spanning a wide range of disciplines. The Delphi technique is well suited as a method for consensus-building by using a series of questionnaires delivered using multiple iterations to collect data from a panel of selected subjects. Subject selection, time frames for conducting and completing a study, the possibility of low response rates, and unintentionally guiding feedback from the respondent group are areas which should be considered when designing and implementing a Delphi study.

  1. National consensus on geriatric immunization 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    As the growth of elderly population increases, the number of geriatric patients who may demand health care services is also increasing since the elderly are more vulnerable to various conditions of acute illnesses. Upper respiratory tract infections are the leading cause of death and the most significant cause that impairs quality of life in the elderly. Upper respiratory tract infections and influenza are common in the elderly and may develop into pneumonia. Considering the high morbidity and mortality rates related to pneumonia in the elderly, it is important to have prevention strategies. A delay in diagnosis due to non-specific signs and symptoms of pneumonia in the elderly has demanded greater concern on the importance of pneumonia prevention strategies. Influenza and pneumonia impair quality of life in the elderly, resulted in decreased functional status (ADL scores) during infection and recovery period. With increasing antibiotic resistance, the management may be complicated as it may lead to conditions that reduce quality of life and cause high mortality rate. Therefore, immunization is very important as the prevention strategy against influenza and or pneumonia, reducing the incidence as well as the complication. The consensus has been made in order to provide immunization against influenza and pneumonia for elderly population in Indonesia. It is expected that by 2025, about 60% of the elderly in Indonesia would have immunization against influenza and 50% of them would have immunization against pneumonia annually.

  2. Consensus maps of cloned plant cuticle genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eviatar; Nevo

    2010-01-01

    Plant cuticle,which covers the plant surface,consists of waxes and cutins,and is associated with plant drought,cold,and salt resistance.Hitherto,at least 47 genes participating in the formation of plant cuticle have been cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana,Oryza sativa,Zea mays,Ricinus communis,Brassica napus,and Medicago truncatula;and about 85% of them encode proteins sharing above 50% identities with their rice homologous sequences.These cloned cuticle genes were mapped in silico on different chromosomes of rice and Arabidopsis,respectively.The mapping results revealed that plant cuticle genes were not evenly distributed in both genomes.About 40% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 1 in Arabidopsis,while 20% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 2 but none on chromosome 12 in rice.Some cloned plant cuticle genes have several rice homologous sequences,which might be produced by chromosomal segment duplication.The consensus map of cloned plant cuticle genes will provide important clues for the selection of candidate genes in a positional cloning of an unknown cuticle gene in plants.

  3. Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, N P T; Frencken, J E; Bjørndal, L; Maltz, M; Manton, D J; Ricketts, D; Van Landuyt, K; Banerjee, A; Campus, G; Doméjean, S; Fontana, M; Leal, S; Lo, E; Machiulskiene, V; Schulte, A; Splieth, C; Zandona, A; Schwendicke, F

    2016-05-01

    Variation in the terminology used to describe clinical management of carious lesions has contributed to a lack of clarity in the scientific literature and beyond. In this article, the International Caries Consensus Collaboration presents 1) issues around terminology, a scoping review of current words used in the literature for caries removal techniques, and 2) agreed terms and definitions, explaining how these were decided.Dental cariesis the name of the disease, and thecarious lesionis the consequence and manifestation of the disease-the signs or symptoms of the disease. The termdental caries managementshould be limited to situations involving control of the disease through preventive and noninvasive means at a patient level, whereascarious lesion managementcontrols the disease symptoms at the tooth level. While it is not possible to directly relate the visual appearance of carious lesions' clinical manifestations to the histopathology, we have based the terminology around the clinical consequences of disease (soft, leathery, firm, and hard dentine). Approaches to carious tissue removal are defined: 1)selective removal of carious tissue-includingselective removal to soft dentineandselective removal to firm dentine; 2)stepwise removal-including stage 1,selective removal to soft dentine, and stage 2,selective removal to firm dentine6 to 12 mo later; and 3)nonselective removal to hard dentine-formerly known ascomplete caries removal(technique no longer recommended). Adoption of these terms, around managing dental caries and its sequelae, will facilitate improved understanding and communication among researchers and within dental educators and the wider clinical dentistry community.

  4. Consensus and Synchronization in Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization in complex networks is one of the most captivating cooperative phenomena in nature and has been shown to be of fundamental importance in such varied circumstances as the continued existence of species, the functioning of heart pacemaker cells, epileptic seizures, neuronal firing in the feline visual cortex and cognitive tasks in humans. E.g. coupled visual and acoustic interactions make fireflies flash, crickets chirp, and an audience clap in unison. On the other hand, in distributed systems and networks, it is often necessary for some or all of the nodes to calculate some function of certain parameters, e.g. sink nodes in sensor networks being tasked with calculating the average measurement value of all the sensors or multi-agent systems in which all agents are required to coordinate their speed and direction. When all nodes calculate the same function of the initial values in the system, they are said to reach consensus. Such concepts - sometimes also called state agreement, rendezvous, and ...

  5. Public Awareness of the Scientific Consensus on Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence C. Hamilton

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Questions about climate change elicit some of the widest political divisions of any items on recent U.S. surveys. Severe polarization affects even basic questions about the reality of anthropogenic climate change (ACC, or whether most scientists agree that humans are changing the Earth’s climate. Statements about scientific consensus have been contentious among social scientists, with some arguing for consensus awareness as a “gateway cognition” that leads to greater public acceptance of ACC, but others characterizing consensus messaging (deliberate communication about the level of scientific agreement as a counterproductive tactic that exacerbates polarization. A series of statewide surveys, with nationwide benchmarks, repeated questions about the reality of ACC and scientific consensus many times over 2010 to 2016. These data permit tests for change in beliefs and polarization. ACC and consensus beliefs have similar trends and individual background predictors. Both rose gradually by about 10 points over 2010 to 2016, showing no abrupt shifts that might correspond to events such as scientific reports, leadership statements, or weather. Growing awareness of the scientific consensus, whether from deliberate messaging or the cumulative impact of many studies and publicly engaged scientists, provides the most plausible explanation for this rise in both series. In state-level data, the gap between liberal and conservative views on the reality of ACC did not widen over this period, whereas the liberal–conservative gap regarding existence of a scientific consensus narrowed.

  6. Meeting Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Aspaas, Per Pippin

    2013-06-01

    On 2-3 June 2012, the University of Tromsoe hosted a conference about the cultural and scientific history of the transits of Venus. The conference took place in Tromsoe for two very specific reasons. First and foremost, the last transit of Venus of this century lent itself to be observed on the disc of the Midnight Sun in this part of Europe during the night of 5 to 6 June 2012. Second, several Venus transit expeditions in this region were central in the global enterprise of measuring the scale of the solar system in the eighteenth century. The site of the conference was the Nordnorsk Vitensenter (Science Centre of Northern Norway), which is located at the campus of the University of Tromsoe. After the conference, participants were invited to either stay in Tromsoe until the midnight of 5-6 June, or take part in a Venus transit voyage in Finnmark, during which the historical sites Vardoe, Hammerfest, and the North Cape were to be visited. The post-conference program culminated with the participants observing the transit of Venus in or near Tromsoe, Vardoe and even from a plane near Alta. These Proceedings contain a selection of the lectures delivered on 2-3 June 2012, and also a narrative description of the transit viewing from Tromsoe, Vardoe and Alta. The title of the book, Meeting Venus, refers the title of a play by the Hungarian film director, screenwriter and opera director Istvan Szabo (1938-). The autobiographical movie Meeting Venus (1991) directed by him is based on his experience directing Tannhauser at the Paris Opera in 1984. The movie brings the story of an imaginary international opera company that encounters a never ending series of difficulties and pitfalls that symbolise the challenges of any multicultural and international endeavour. As is evident from the many papers presented in this book, Meeting Venus not only contains the epic tales of the transits of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it also covers the conference

  7. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Nils; Moreira, Tiago; Michel, Patrik; Steiner, Thorsten; Jansen, Olav; Cognard, Christophe; Mattle, Heinrich P; van Zwam, Wim; Holmin, Staffan; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Petersson, Jesper; Caso, Valeria; Hacke, Werner; Mazighi, Mikael; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Szikora, Istvan; Pierot, Laurent; Fiehler, Jens; Gralla, Jan; Fazekas, Franz; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-01-01

    The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16-18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then been approved by each society. The recommendations are identical to the original version with evidence level upgraded by 20 February 2015 and confirmed by 15 May 2015. The purpose of the ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update meetings is to provide updates on recent stroke therapy research and to discuss how the results may be implemented into clinical routine. Selected topics are discussed at consensus sessions, for which a consensus statement is prepared and discussed by the participants at the meeting. The statements are advisory to the ESO guidelines committee. This consensus statement includes recommendations on mechanical thrombectomy after acute stroke. The statement is supported by ESO, European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), and European Academy of Neurology (EAN).

  8. Cinéma / Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Berthomé, Jean-Pierre; Coulombe, Michel; Dvorak, Marta; Garel, Sylvain; Noguez, Dominique; Suchet, Simone; Vimenet, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Longtemps connue en France par le biais de cinéastes québécois tels que Claude Jutra, Gilles Carle, ou Pierre Perrault, l'industrie cinématographique du Canada a dû se développer dans l'ombre d'Hollywood. Elle s'est forgée une réputation internationale d'excellence dans les domaines qui ne concurrençaient pas les studios américains : le documentaire, le court-métrage, et les films d'animation. Nous sommes en présence d'un cinéma fortement subventionné (et même d'un cinéma d'État) qui repose s...

  9. Paint removal activities in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Terry

    1993-03-01

    Paint removal activities currently under way in Canada include: research and development of laser paint stripping; development and commercialization of a new blasting medium based on wheat starch; commercialization of a new blasting medium and process using crystalline ice blasting for paint removal and surface cleaning; and the development of automated and robotic systems for paint stripping applications. A specification for plastic media blasting (PMB) of aircraft and aircraft components is currently being drafted by NDHQ for use by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and contractors involved in coating removal for the CAF. Defense Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) is studying the effects of various blast media on coating removal rates, and minimizing the possibility of damage to substrates other than aluminum such as graphite epoxy composite and Kevlar. The effects of plastic media blasting on liquid penetrant detection of fatigue cracks is also under investigation.

  10. Skin tears: state of the science: consensus statements for the prevention, prediction, assessment, and treatment of skin tears©.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Kimberly; Baranoski, Sharon

    2011-09-01

    The appropriate management of patients with skin tears is an ongoing challenge for healthcare professionals. Skins tears are often painful, acute wounds resulting from trauma to the skin and are largely preventable. Healthcare professionals must be able to identify individuals at risk for skin tears and aid in the prevention of these wounds and in their treatment when they occur. Despite preliminary studies that suggest skin tears may be more prevalent than pressure ulcers, there remains a paucity of literature to guide prevention, assessment, and treatment of skin tears. As a result, these wounds are often mismanaged and misdiagnosed, leading to complications, including pain, infection, and delayed wound healing. In addition, skin tears increase caregiver time and facility costs, cause anxiety for patients and families, and may reflect poorly on the quality of care delivered in a facility. In an effort to shift awareness toward this largely unheeded healthcare issue, a consensus panel of 13 internationally recognized key opinion leaders convened to establish consensus statements on the prevention, prediction, assessment, and treatment of skin tears. The initial consensus panel meeting was held in January 2011 and was made possible by an unrestricted educational grant from Hollister Wound Care. This document details the consensus definition and statements, as well as recommendations for future research and steps toward establishing a validated, comprehensive program for managing skin tears.

  11. Canada's population: growth and dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujot, R P

    1978-04-01

    In Canada the current 1.3% population growth rate is causing some concern. Those concerned argue that such a rate of growth in combination with high levels of consumption could jeopardize the country's resource base and its comfortable style of living. Many Canadians are questioning high levels of immigration, for now that the fertility level is below replacement level, net immigration contributes substantially to population growth (over 1/3 in 1976). The growing proportion of non-Europeans among recent immigrants is causing resentment, and, in a tight job market, immigrants are regarded as threats to the World War 2 baby boom cohort who are now at working ages. The baby boom generation also puts stress on housing and health services, and it will increase the need for pension checks as it ages. Although French fertility is no longer high and immigration is no longer dominated by the British, the French group's 200-year struggle to preserve its identity continues on in the current effort of the Quebec government to enforce the use of French language by law within that province. Geography and climate dictate another demographic fact that divides the country and pervades its history. In addition to intense regionalism, uneven population distribution is responsible for 2 other concerns: the rapid growth of several already large cities and depopulation of many small communities. Focus in this discussion is on Canada's population growth in the past and as projected for the future, historical and current fertility, mortality and immigration trends, the search for a new immigration policy, the impact of the baby boom generation on the population's age structure and the problems this creates, and recent shifts in population distribution and in the country's ethnic and linguistic makeup. The population policy proposals evolved thus far involve to a great extent the use of immigration as a lever for achieving given population objectives.

  12. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    MARS SURVEY 5YR 2015 GENERAL INFORMATION ELECTIONS 2013   COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Tuesday 1st Oct. 10 am Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Tuesday 1st Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin Friday 4 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Monday 7 Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Tuesday 8 Oct. 10 am Amphi Kjell Johnsen, 30-7-018 Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2013: lessons learned Survey: five-yearly review, give us your opinion General information CVI 2014 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS) Elections 2013 Renewal of the Staff Council 2014 - 2015  

  13. The Tenth Annual Ion Channel Retreat, Vancouver, Canada, June 25–27, 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Kimlicka, Lynn; Jamieson, Ashley Lauren; Liang, Sophia; Brugger, Saranna; Liang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Ten years after Aurora Biomed (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) hosted the inaugural Ion Channel Retreat, this event is recognized as a leading conference for ion channel researchers. Held annually in Vancouver, this meeting consistently provides an outlet for researchers to share their findings while learning about new concepts, methods, and technologies. Researchers use this forum to discuss and debate a spectrum of topics from ion channel research and technology to drug discovery and s...

  14. Consensus protocol for multi-agent continuous systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Fu-Xiao; Guan Xin-Ping; Liu De-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the algebraic graph theory,the networked multi-agent continuous systems are investigated.Firstly,the digraph(directed graph)represents the topology of a networked system,and then a consensus convergence criterion of system is proposed.Secondly,the issue of stability of multi-agent systems and the consensus convergence problem of information states are all analysed.Furthermore,the Consensus equilibrium point of system is proved to be global and asymptotically reach the convex combination of initial states.Finally,two examples are taken to show the effectiveness of the results obtained in this paper.

  15. Recent consensus statements in pediatric endocrinology: a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michelle; Sathasivam, Anpalakan; Novoa, Yeray; Rapaport, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Clinical guidelines and consensus statements serve to summarize and organize current knowledge on diverse subjects and provide practical guidelines for proper clinical management. Recommendations should be based on research and evidence derived from appropriate sources. In 2008, more than 20 consensus statements were published in the pediatric literature alone. This article summarizes the salient points of the latest consensus statements jointly developed by multiple endocrine societies including the Lawson Wilkins Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology. As much as possible, the original intent and language of the statements was respected and paraphrased.

  16. Leader-Based Consensus of Heterogeneous Nonlinear Multiagent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairen Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the leader-based consensus of heterogeneous multiple agents with nonlinear uncertain systems. Based on the information obtained from the following agents’ neighbors, leader observers are designed by the following agents to estimate the leader’s states and nonlinear dynamics. Then, to achieve leader-based consensus, adaptive distributed controllers are designed for the following agents to track the designed corresponding leader observers. The effectiveness of the leader observers and distributed consensus controllers are illustrated by formal proof and simulation results.

  17. Optimal Timing and Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Periprosthetic Joint Infection (PJI: Literature Review and World Consensus (Part Five

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Parvizi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Context There is a need to find the optimal doses and any need for weight adjustment in patients who have higher than standard BMI. There is also a need to determine if repeating doses of antibiotics is necessary when the surgery takes longer than usual. Evidence Acquisition Delegates in workgroup 3 of the consensus meeting on PJI reviewed English literature for relevant articles. 28 of 221 articles were relevant to the 2 following questions regarding perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent PJI. Results Preoperative antibiotics have different pharmacokinetics based on patient weight and should be weight-adjusted. An additional dose of antibiotic should be administered intraoperatively after two half-lives of the prophylactic agent. The general guidelines for frequency of intraoperative antibiotic administration are provided. We recommend that re-dosing of antibiotics be considered in cases of large blood volume loss (> 2000 cc and fluid resuscitation (> 2000 cc. As these are independent variables, re-dosing should be considered as soon as the first of these parameters are met. Conclusions Recommendations for need for weight adjustment doses and repeat of doses in longer duration surgeries in terms of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in hip and knee arthroplasty were provided based on evidences in the literature and consensus of expert delegates from consensus meeting.

  18. Carotid endarterectomy: current consensus and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Hermus, Linda; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2010-10-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of mortality, and carotid artery stenosis causes 8% to 29% of all ischemic strokes. Best medical treatment forms the basis of carotid stenosis treatment, and carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has an additional beneficial effect in high-grade stenosis. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has challenged CEA as a primary carotid intervention. At present, CEA remains the gold standard, but in the future, CAS techniques will evolve and might become beneficial for subgroups of patients with carotid stenosis. This chapter briefly describes the history of carotid interventions and current consensus and controversies in CEA. In the last two years, several meta-analyses were published on a variety of aspects of best medical treatment, CEA, and CAS. It is still a matter of debate as to whether asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis should undergo a carotid intervention. Especially because medical treatment has dramatically evolved since the early carotid trials. On the other hand, it is clear that carotid interventions in symptomatic patients with a high-grade stenosis should be performed as early as possible after the initial neurological event in order to achieve optimal stroke risk reduction. In CEA, the use of patching is advocated above primary closure, while the role of selective patching is still unclear. No differences in stroke and mortality rates are observed for routine versus selective shunting, for conventional versus eversion CEA, or for local versus general anesthesia. It is anticipated that in the future, there will be several interesting developments in carotid interventions such as plaque morphology analysis, acute interventions during stroke in progress, and further evolvement of CAS techniques.

  19. Latin American Consensus on Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of anti-VEGF agents has allowed unprecedented progress in the management and treatment of ophthalmologic conditions characterized by an increased vascular permeability and intraocular neovascularization. One of these conditions is retinal vein occlusion (RVO.  RVO is one of the most common causes of reduced vision due to retinal vascular disease. Without timely treatment, macular edema, macular ischemia, neovascularization and other potential sequelae of RVO can lead to photoreceptor cell death and consequently to irreversible vision loss.   Treatments for this indication that have been recently approved by several regulatory agencies throughout the world include: the VEGF inhibitor ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech, the VEGF and placental growth factor inhibitor aflibercept (Eylea, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Bayer HealthCare, and a slow release intravitreal implant of dexamethasone (Ozurdex, Allergan. In addition bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech has been used extensively in an off-label manner.   These new treatments allow us to preserve vision for many RVO patients who could not have expected such favorable results just 5 or 6 years ago. However, not every treatment is effective for every patient, and whether one option is superior to another or a combination of options is superior to monotherapy, have yet to be definitively determined.   A growing body of literature with strong evidence supports the use of these new treatments. However, in several instances the literature is not conclusive to support unified management of RVO. This document is a summary analysis on RVO assembled by a group of specialists summoned by the Pan-American Vitreo-Retinal Society (SPRV to participate in this Latin American consensus.

  20. The development of a consensus definition for healthcare improvement science (HIS) in seven European countries: A consensus methods approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Rhoda; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel; Rooney, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction There is a limited body of research in the field of healthcare improvement science (HIS). Quality improvement and ‘change making’ should become an intrinsic part of everyone’s job, every day in all parts of the healthcare system. The lack of theoretical grounding may partly explain the minimal transfer of health research into health policy. Methods This article seeks to present the development of the definition for healthcare improvement science. A consensus method approach was adopted with a two-stage Delphi process, expert panel and consensus group techniques. A total of 18 participants were involved in the expert panel and consensus group, and 153 answers were analysed as a part of the Delphi survey. Participants were researchers, educators and healthcare professionals from Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Italy, England, Poland, and Romania. Results A high level of consensus was achieved for the broad definition in the 2nd Delphi iteration (86%). The final definition was agreed on by the consensus group: ‘Healthcare improvement science is the generation of knowledge to cultivate change and deliver person-centred care that is safe, effective, efficient, equitable and timely. It improves patient outcomes, health system performance and population health.’ Conclusions The process of developing a consensus definition revealed different understandings of healthcare improvement science between the participants. Having a shared consensus definition of healthcare improvement science is an important step forward, bringing about a common understanding in order to advance the professional education and practice of healthcare improvement science. PMID:28289467

  1. Framing ethical acceptability: a problem with nuclear waste in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Ethan T

    2012-06-01

    Ethical frameworks are often used in professional fields as a means of providing explicit ethical guidance for individuals and institutions when confronted with ethically important decisions. The notion of an ethical framework has received little critical attention, however, and the concept subsequently lends itself easily to misuse and ambiguous application. This is the case with the 'ethical framework' offered by Canada's Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), the crown-corporation which owns and is responsible for the long-term management of Canada's high-level nuclear fuel waste. It makes a very specific claim, namely that it is managing Canada's long-lived radioactive nuclear fuel waste in an ethically responsible manner. According to this organization, what it means to behave in an ethically responsible manner is to act and develop policy in accordance with its ethical framework. What, then, is its ethical framework, and can it be satisfied? In this paper I will show that the NWMO's ethical and social framework is deeply flawed in two respects: (a) it fails to meet the minimum requirements of a code of ethic or ethical framework by offering only questions, and no principles or rules of conduct; and (b) if posed as principles or rules of conduct, some of its questions are unsatisfiable. In particular, I will show that one of its claims, namely that it seek informed consent from individuals exposed to risk of harm from nuclear waste, cannot be satisfied as formulated. The result is that the NWMO's ethical framework is not, at present, ethically acceptable.

  2. 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability. Whistler, British Columbia, Canada, 14–18 March 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher J; Ausió, Juan

    2012-06-01

    The 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability in Whistler, Canada, 14-18 March 2012, brought together 31 speakers from different nationalities. The organizing committee, led by Jim Davie (Chair) at the University of Manitoba (Manitoba, Canada), consisted of several established researchers in the fields of chromatin and epigenetics from across Canada. The meeting was centered on the contribution of epigenetics to gene expression, DNA damage and repair, and the role of environmental factors. A few interesting talks on replication added some insightful information on the controversial issue of histone post-translational modifications as genuine epigenetic marks that are inherited through cell division.

  3. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Claßen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germá Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J. T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Winter, C.; Wittekind, C.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377–1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478–496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497–513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements. PMID:23152360

  4. Operational expert system applications in Canada

    CERN Document Server

    Suen, Ching Y

    1992-01-01

    This book is part of a new series on operational expert systems worldwide. Expert systems are now widely used in different parts of the world for various applications. The past four years have witnessed a steady growth in the development and deployment of expert systems in Canada. Research in this field has also gained considerable momentum during the past few years. However, the field of expert systems is still young in Canada. This book contains 13 chapters contributed by 31 experts from both universities and industries across Canada covering a wide range of applications related to electric

  5. Physician Asthma Management Practices in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jin

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To establish national baseline information on asthma management practices of physicians, to compare the reported practices with the Canadian Consensus recommendations and to identify results potentially useful for interventions that improve physician asthma management practices.

  6. Consensus on Exercise Reporting Template (CERT) : A Modified Delphi Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slade, Susan C; Dionne, Clermont E; Underwood, Martin; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Beck, Belinda; Bennell, Kim; Brosseau, Lucie; Costa, Leonardo; Cramp, Fiona; Cup, Edith; Feehan, Lynne; Ferreira, Manuela; Forbes, Scott; Glasziou, Paul; Habets, Bas; Harris, Susan; Hay-Smith, Jean; Hillier, Susan; Hinman, Rana; Holland, Ann; Hondras, Maria; Kelly, George; Kent, Peter; Lauret, Gert-Jan; Long, Audrey; Maher, Chris; Morso, Lars; Osteras, Nina; Peterson, Tom; Quinlivan, Ros; Rees, Karen; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Reitberg, Marc; Saunders, Dave; Skoetz, Nicole; Sogaard, Karen; Takken, Tim; van Tulder, Maurits; Voet, Nicoline; Ward, Lesley; White, Claire

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise interventions are often incompletely described in reports of clinical trials hampering evaluation of results and replication and implementation into practice. OBJECTIVE: To develop a standardized method for reporting exercise programs in clinical trials, the Consensus on Exercis

  7. Robust consensus of multi-agent systems with noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; LIU ZhiXin

    2009-01-01

    The consensus problem of multi-agent systems has attracted wide attention from researchers in recent years, following the initial work of Jadbabaie et al. on the analysis of a simplified Vicsek model. While the original Vicsek model contains noise effects, almost all the existing theoretical results on consensus problem, however, do not take the noise effects into account. The purpose of this paper is to initiate a study of the consensus problems under noise disturbances. First, the class of multi-agent systems under study is transformed into a general time-varying system with noise. Then, for such a system, the equivalent relationships are established among (ⅰ) robust consensus, (ⅱ) the positivity of the second smallest eigenvalue of a weighted Laplacian matrix, and (ⅲ) the joint connectivity of the associated dynamical neighbor graphs. Finally, this basic equivalence result is shown to be applicable to several classes of concrete multi-agent models with noise.

  8. Adaptive neural network consensus based control of robot formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, H. M.; Sarangapani, Jagannathan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, adaptive consensus based formation control scheme is derived for mobile robots in a pre-defined formation when full dynamics of the robots which include inertia, Corolis, and friction vector are considered. It is shown that dynamic uncertainties of robots can make overall formation unstable when traditional consensus scheme is utilized. In order to estimate the affine nonlinear robot dynamics, a NN based adaptive scheme is utilized. In addition to this adaptive feedback control input, an additional control input is introduced based on the consensus approach to make the robots keep their desired formation. Subsequently, the outer consensus loop is redesigned for reduced communication. Lyapunov theory is used to show the stability of overall system. Simulation results are included at the end.

  9. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  10. Degree Fluctuations and the Convergence Time of Consensus Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We consider a consensus algorithm in which every node in a time-varying undirected connected graph assigns equal weight to each of its neighbors. Under the assumption that the degree of any given node is constant in time, we show that the algorithm achieves consensus within a given accuracy epsilon on n nodes in time O(n^3 log(n/epsilon)). Because there is a direct relation between consensus algorithms in time-varying environments and inhomogeneous random walks, our result also translates into a general statement on such random walks. Moreover, we give simple proofs that the convergence time becomes exponentially large in the number of nodes n under slight relaxations of the above assumptions. We prove that exponential convergence time is possible for consensus algorithms on fixed directed graphs, and we use an example of Cao, Spielman, and Morse to give a simple argument that the same is possible if the constant degrees assumption is even slightly relaxed.

  11. Green building challenge 2002 in Canada : an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    The Green Building Challenge (GBC) in Canada was launched to help the building community meet environmental challenges and improve the environmental performance of buildings. Tools have been made available to the building industry to make informed environmental choices during the conception design stage of a project. The tools help architects, researchers and policy analysts in choosing material mixes and other design options that will minimize a building's potential life cycle environmental impacts and promote sustainable development. Green buildings involve the complete structure and envelope, including cladding, insulation, gypsum wall board, roofing and windows. The type of building and its location is also considered. Long term sustainability also considers energy use and emissions related to a building's energy system. This presentation described the following 3 projects which were selected for assessment in the GBC-2002: (1) the Mayo School in Mayo, Yukon Territory, (2) the Jackson-Triggs Winery in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, and (3) the Red River College in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The GBC-2002 Canadian Team nominated them as the best buildings being designed in Canada.10 figs.

  12. Deriving consensus rankings via multicriteria decision making methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Poh Ai Ling; Mohamad Nasir Saludin; Masao Mukaidono

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - This paper seeks to take a cautionary stance to the impact of the marketing mix on customer satisfaction, via a case study deriving consensus rankings for benchmarking on selected retail stores in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach - The ELECTRE I model is used in deriving consensus rankings via multicriteria decision making method for benchmarking base on the marketing mix model 4P's. Descriptive analysis is used to analyze best practice among the four marketing tactics. Finding...

  13. Consensus algorithm in smart grid and communication networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfagee, Husain Abdulaziz

    On a daily basis, consensus theory attracts more and more researches from different areas of interest, to apply its techniques to solve technical problems in a way that is faster, more reliable, and even more precise than ever before. A power system network is one of those fields that consensus theory employs extensively. The use of the consensus algorithm to solve the Economic Dispatch and Load Restoration Problems is a good example. Instead of a conventional central controller, some researchers have explored an algorithm to solve the above mentioned problems, in a distribution manner, using the consensus algorithm, which is based on calculation methods, i.e., non estimation methods, for updating the information consensus matrix. Starting from this point of solving these types of problems mentioned, specifically, in a distribution fashion, using the consensus algorithm, we have implemented a new advanced consensus algorithm. It is based on the adaptive estimation techniques, such as the Gradient Algorithm and the Recursive Least Square Algorithm, to solve the same problems. This advanced work was tested on different case studies that had formerly been explored, as seen in references 5, 7, and 18. Three and five generators, or agents, with different topologies, correspond to the Economic Dispatch Problem and the IEEE 16-Bus power system corresponds to the Load Restoration Problem. In all the cases we have studied, the results met our expectations with extreme accuracy, and completely matched the results of the previous researchers. There is little question that this research proves the capability and dependability of using the consensus algorithm, based on the estimation methods as the Gradient Algorithm and the Recursive Least Square Algorithm to solve such power problems.

  14. Consensus of Multiagent Networks with Intermittent Interaction and Directed Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent interaction control is introduced to solve the consensus problem for second-order multiagent networks due to the limited sensing abilities and environmental changes periodically. And, we get some sufficient conditions for the agents to reach consensus with linear protocol from the theoretical findings by using the Lyapunov control approach. Finally, the validity of the theoretical results is validated through the numerical example.

  15. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Last Monday at 9 a.m. the Council Chamber was full, with several people standing, for the public meeting of the Staff Association. Simultaneously, many of our colleagues followed the presentations in the Amphitheatre in Prévessin. We would like to thank all of you for the interest you have shown and for your feedback. In the introduction we explained how the Staff Association represents the staff in its discussions with Management and Member States, and how the staff itself defined, by its participation in the 2013 staff survey, the priority assigned to various points related to the employment conditions. The position of the Staff Association regarding the new contract policy, to be implemented as of 31 March 2015 after approval by Council, was stated. Then, in the framework of the 2015 five-yearly review, the general approach that we would like to see for the new career structure, was explained. Concerning diversity, based on what we know about the situation in other international organiza...

  16. Fruitful meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Mike Lamont

    2010-01-01

    The annual meeting for the LHC Performance Workshop was held in Chamonix from 25 to 29 January 2010 in the Centre de Congrès Le Majestic. The Workshop focused on how to reach the maximum operating energy.   The LHC Performance Workshop took place between 25 and 29 January 2010 in a rather chilly Chamonix. Following the successful start of beam commissioning last year, there remain a number of important questions about the near future of the machine. Topics discussed included the maximum operational energy that will be possible in 2010 and the steps need to go above the planned 2010 start-up energy of 3.5 TeV. Of particular importance were the required splice and magnet consolidation measures that would be demanded by an increase above this energy.  The energy in the magnets and beams will always represent a considerable threat, and the possible impact of an incident and the potential measures required to speed up a recovery were put on the table. Safety is critical and there were...

  17. Canada Education Savings Program: Annual Statistical Review 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Canada Education Savings Program has been an initiative of the Government of Canada since 1998. As part of the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development, the program administers the Canada Education Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond. These two initiatives help Canadian families save for a child's post-secondary education in…

  18. Canada Education Savings Program: Annual Statistical Review--2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Canada Education Savings Program is an initiative of the Government of Canada. As part of the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development, the program administers the Canada Education Savings Grant and the Canada Learning Bond. These two initiatives help Canadian families save for a child's post-secondary education in Registered…

  19. 9 CFR 93.418 - Cattle from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle from Canada. 93.418 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Canada 8 § 93.418 Cattle from Canada. (a) Health certificates. Cattle intended for importation from Canada must be accompanied by a certificate issued in...

  20. 9 CFR 93.317 - Horses from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Canada. 93.317 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Canada 16 § 93.317 Horses from Canada. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, horses from Canada shall be inspected as provided in § 93.306; shall...

  1. Cost Effectiveness of Infant Vaccination for Rotavirus in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Coyle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus is the main cause of gastroenteritis in Canadian children younger than five years of age, resulting in significant morbidity and cost. The present study provides evidence on the cost effectiveness of two alternative rotavirus vaccinations (RotaTeq [Merck Frosst Canada Ltd, Canada] and Rotarix [GlaxoSmithKline, Canada] available in Canada.

  2. 2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardern, Clare L; Glasgow, Philip; Schneiders, Anthony;

    2016-01-01

    Deciding when to return to sport after injury is complex and multifactorial-an exercise in risk management. Return to sport decisions are made every day by clinicians, athletes and coaches, ideally in a collaborative way. The purpose of this consensus statement was to present and synthesise current...... evidence to make recommendations for return to sport decision-making, clinical practice and future research directions related to returning athletes to sport. A half day meeting was held in Bern, Switzerland, after the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy. 17 expert clinicians participated. 4...... consensus on the content of the 4 sections. Return to sport is not a decision taken in isolation at the end of the recovery and rehabilitation process. Instead, return to sport should be viewed as a continuum, paralleled with recovery and rehabilitation. Biopsychosocial models may help the clinician make...

  3. Is local participation always optimal for sustainable action? The costs of consensus-building in Local Agenda 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Urs Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2013-11-15

    Is local participation always optimal for sustainable action? Here, Local Agenda 21 is a relevant case as it broadly calls for consensus-building among stakeholders. Consensus-building is, however, costly. We show that the costs of making local decisions are likely to rapidly exceed the benefits. Why? Because as the number of participants grows, the more likely it is that the group will include individuals who have an extreme position and are unwilling to make compromises. Thus, the net gain of self-organization should be compared with those of its alternatives, for example voting, market-solutions, or not making any choices at all. Even though the informational value of meetings may be helpful to policy makers, the model shows that it also decreases as the number of participants increase. Overall, the result is a thought provoking scenario for Local Agenda 21 as it highlights the risk of less sustainable action in the future.

  4. A consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game. In our model, both of the two connected agents receive a benefit if they have the same opinion, otherwise they both pay a cost. Agents update their opinions by comparing payoffs with neighbors. The opinion of an agent with higher payoff is more likely to be imitated. We apply this model in scale-free networks with tunable degree distribution. Interestingly, we find that there exists an optimal ratio of cost to benefit, leading to the shortest consensus time. Qualitative analysis is obtained by examining the evolution of the opinion clusters. Moreover, we find that the consensus time decreases as the average degree of the network increases, but increases with the noise introduced to permit irrational choices. The dependence of the consensus time on the network size is found to be a power-law form. For small or larger ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time decreases as the degree exponent increases. However, for moderate ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time increases with the degree exponent. Our results may provide new insights into opinion dynamics driven by the evolutionary game theory.

  5. Chinese Consensus on Combination Therapy of Chronic Hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In May 2011,editorial boards of Chinese Journal of Experimental and Clinical Infectious Diseases (Electronic Edition),Chinese Journal of Liver Diseases (Electronic Edition) and Infection International (Electronic Edition) organized an expert committee to form an expert consensus on antiviral combination therapy of chronic hepatitis B (CHB).The consensus publication promoted and standardized the combination therapy concept of chronic hepatitis B.Clinical evidence of combination therapy for CHB is incomplete.The concept of combination therapy is gradually extended,from combination of antiviral drugs plus antiviral drugs,to antiviral drugs plus hepatoprotective drugs,and antiviral drugs plus immunomodulatory drugs.Therefore,editorial boards once again asked experts to analyze the new clinical evidence,and form the expert consensus on combination therapy of chronic hepatitis B.The formulation of this consensus is according to the principles of evidence-based medicine.Large number of clinical studies of combination therapy is still in progress.This consensus can not fully answer all the problems encountered in the combination therapy of CHB.With the progress of clinical practice of antiviral therapy,and the accumulation of evidence in combination therapy,the expert committee will update the consensus timely.

  6. Gynecologic cancers in pregnancy: guidelines of a second international consensus meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amant, F.; Halaska, M.J.; Fumagalli, M.; Dahl Steffensen, K.; Lok, C.; Calsteren, K. van; Han, S.N.; Mir, O.; Fruscio, R.; Uzan, C.; Maxwell, C.; Dekrem, J.; Strauven, G.; Mhallem Gziri, M.; Kesic, V.; Berveiller, P.; Heuvel, F. van den; Ottevanger, P.B.; Vergote, I.; Lishner, M.; Morice, P.; Nulman, I.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to provide timely and effective guidance for pregnant women and health care providers to optimize maternal treatment and fetal protection and to promote effective management of the mother, fetus, and neonate when administering potentially teratogenic medications. New ins

  7. Consensus for tinnitus patient assessment and treatment outcome measurement : Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting, Regensburg, July 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langguth, B.; Goodey, R.; Azevedo, A.; Bjorne, A.; Cacace, A.; Crocetti, A.; Del Bo, L.; De Ridder, D.; Diges, I.; Elbert, T.; Flor, H.; Herraiz, C.; Ganz Sanchez, T.; Eichhammer, P.; Figueiredo, R.; Hajak, G.; Kleinjung, T.; Landgrebe, M.; Londero, A.; Lainez, M. J. A.; Mazzoli, M.; Meikle, M. B.; Melcher, J.; Rauschecker, J. P.; Sand, P. G.; Struve, M.; Van de Heyning, P.; Van Dijk, P.; Vergara, R.; Langguth, B; Hajak, G; Kleinjung, T; Cacace, A; Moller, AR

    2007-01-01

    There is widespread recognition that consistency between research centres in the ways that patients with tinnitus are assessed and outcomes following interventions are measured would facilitate more effective co-operation and more meaningful evaluations and comparisons of outcomes. At the first Tinn

  8. Guidelines for preclinical animal research in ALS/MND : A consensus meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludolph, Albert C.; Bendotti, Caterina; Blaugrund, Eran; Chio, Adriano; Greensmith, Linda; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Mead, Richard; Niessen, Heiko G.; Petri, Susanne; Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Robberecht, Wim; Ruegg, Markus; Schwalenstoecker, Birgit; Stiller, Detlev; van den Berg, Leonard; Vieira, Fernando; von Horsten, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    The development of therapeutics for ALS/MND is largely based on work in experimental animals carrying human SOD mutations. However, translation of apparent therapeutic successes from in vivo to the human disease has proven difficult and a considerable amount of financial resources has been apparentl

  9. Meeting report of the International Policy Dialogue on HIV/AIDS and Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peake Sharon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As part of a partnership arrangement with the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS and the Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada hosted an International Policy Dialogue on HIV/AIDS and Disability from 11 to 13 March 2009 in Ottawa, Canada. The dialogue provided a forum for stakeholders from governments, academia, and non-governmental and multilateral organizations to explore the issues and evidence related to HIV/AIDS and disability, and to chart a way forward in terms of policy and programme development. This meeting report outlines the participants, objectives and high-level outcomes.

  10. Meeting report of the International Policy Dialogue on HIV/AIDS and Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Sharon

    2009-11-09

    As part of a partnership arrangement with the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS and the Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada hosted an International Policy Dialogue on HIV/AIDS and Disability from 11 to 13 March 2009 in Ottawa, Canada. The dialogue provided a forum for stakeholders from governments, academia, and non-governmental and multilateral organizations to explore the issues and evidence related to HIV/AIDS and disability, and to chart a way forward in terms of policy and programme development. This meeting report outlines the participants, objectives and high-level outcomes.

  11. Ammi Canada 2015 Annual Conference: Abstract Titles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts to be presented at the 2015 Annual Conference of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, April 16 to 18, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, alphabetized according to the surname of the first author.

  12. Emerging Churches in Post-Christian Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Studebaker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional mainline and evangelical churches in Canada, as in most western countries, are either in decline or static. Taken as a measure of the future, the prospects for Christianity in Canada, and more broadly the West, are bleak. Post-Christian Canada, however, contains thriving alternative and innovative forms of church, often called ‘emerging’ churches. They take many forms of expression, but share common theological convictions. Based on site research and personal interviews, this article describes the various types and contexts of these churches in Canada. It then highlights three of their central theological characteristics. First, rejecting the ‘culture wars’ social involvement of Christendom churches, they embrace practices and initiatives that transform their local communities. Second, they embrace an incarnational and contextual understanding of Christian life and ministry. Eschewing mega-church franchise models, they endeavor to shape their ministry to the their local communities. Third, they adopt a comprehensive rather than compartmental spirituality.

  13. Coaxial Connections: Art Education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, James V.

    1984-01-01

    Several avenues of communication that bind art education in the United States and Canada are described. Developments of mutual understanding have tightened the art education relationship between the two countries. (RM)

  14. Mineral Operations of Latin America and Canada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries...

  15. 1982 Aleutian Canada goose nesting survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Investigation of the endangered Aleutian Canada goose (Branta canadensis leucopareia) was conducted from 1974 to 1976, again in 1977 and in 1979 on Buldir. During...

  16. Cackling Canada goose nesting populations, Yukon Delta

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Number of potential territories, number of cackling Canada Goose nests, and percent occupancy of available territories from CCG plots on the Yukon Delta National...

  17. Immunizing Canada geese against avian cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J.I.

    1985-01-01

    A small flock of captive giant Canada geese were vaccinated with the experimental bac- terin in Nebraska to test its efficacy under field conditions. Only 2 of 157 vaccinates died from avian cholera during an annual spring die-off.

  18. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einhorn, Lawrence H; Rapoport, Bernardo; Navari, Rudolph M;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: This review summarizes the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting induced by multiple-day chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy, and breakthrough nausea and vomiting as agreed at the MASCC/ESMO Antiemetic Guidelines update meeting in Copenhagen in June......-induced nausea and vomiting, a phase III randomized trial investigating the use of olanzapine versus metoclopramide in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy and a second single arm study looking at the effectiveness of olanzapine were identified. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that for patients...... receiving high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant, a combination of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with dexamethasone and aprepitant (125 mg orally on day 1 and 80 mg orally on days 2 to 4) is recommended before chemotherapy. For patients undergoing multiple-day chemotherapy-induced nausea...

  19. Plating effluent management in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paine, P. [Environment Canada, Hull, PQ (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    There are some 600 firms in Canada classified as metal finishers, employing about 8,000 people; 60 per cent of these firms are located in Ontario. Annual sales are in the range of $800 million. About 25 per cent of the total effort is devoted to the automotive industry. Regulatory initiatives are based on the Toxic Substance Management Policy 1995 Framework, and involve multi-stakeholder consultation to identify, evaluate and recommend goals, targets, and management options to reduce exposure to hexavalent chromium, maximize the recycling of nickel and minimize the releases of cadmium from industry operations by promoting and encouraging appropriate P2 practices. Other regulatory initiatives follow from the Fisheries Act of 1970, the Metal Finishing Liquid Effluent Guidelines of 1977, and the Canadian Environmental Protection Act of 1988. There are also non-regulatory initiatives, such as the Metal Finishing Industry Pollution Project, a voluntary cooperative effort directed towards formulating plans to reduce toxic effluents from metal finishing operations and to develop and implement site-specific P2 plans. The various treatment technologies such as physico-chemical treatment of multi-metal rinse waters and periodic bath dumpings at on-site waste water treatment plants, water reduction practices to make more effective use of rinse water, evaporation, ion exchange, packed bed scrubbers, fume suppressants, composite mesh pads and separate ventilation for degreasing are also described. Specific case studies are cited to illustrate the various treatment technologies.

  20. Bombardier Inc. Factory, Valcourt, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollick, J. [Solar Wall International Ltd., Downsview (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Bombardier Inc. of Montreal, Canada has installed over 15,000 m{sup 2} of unglazed solar air collectors at its various manufacturing plants in Quebec. The solar collectors decrease operating expenses and significantly improve indoor air quality. Bombardier's engineers compared the cost of this system with other methods of recladding and improving ventilation and found the costs to be the same. With no extra costs for free solar heating, the system has an immediate payback, along with other benefits of improved air quality and attractive architecturally designed walls that utilize solar energy. Bombardier's first solar heating installation at their Sea Doo manufacturing plant has a solar wall area of 740 m{sup 2}. The heat-absorbing surface area is 611 m{sup 2} of a custom dark olive-green colour, with the balance being the white canopy plenum along the top and vertical dividers. The entire surface of the solar panel is separated into six sections with one fan per section. Wall-mounted ventilation fans were installed to bring in a total of 71,400 m{sup 3}/h of heated ventilation air. Monitored solar and destratification savings for the year 1993-94 were CA $33,000 (ECU 20,440) based on energy savings of 894,000 kWh. (author)

  1. Increasing turbine vendor competition in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, J.T. [Emerging Energy Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    An overview of the wind turbine market in Canada was presented. Canada is now experiencing increased turbine vendor competition. Trends in wind turbine OEM market shares in Canada have increased from 10 per cent in 2000 to over 70 per cent in 2007. Several major companies in Canada have signed large-scale orders for delivery in 2010. It is expected that future wind turbine demands in all areas of Canada will increase. However, projections for Canadian wind growth demonstrate the difficulties provinces are now facing in trying to attract manufacturing investment away from the United States. Growth in wind turbine investment is in the process of creating a more robust North American wind turbine generator chain. However, the majority of new facilities are located in the United States. It is not known if Quebec's wind turbine generators will be viable outside of fulfilling Hydro-Quebec's tendering process. Canada's wind industry must consider equipment transport costs as well as a shortage of operating and maintenance service infrastructure. It was concluded that growth in the United States is expected to have a positive impact on Canadian wind energy customers. tabs., figs.

  2. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 2 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans

  3. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 1 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans

  4. Canada-United States air quality agreement : progress report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This biennial progress report highlighted actions undertaken by Canada and the United States in the last 2 years to address transboundary air pollution within the context of the Air Quality Agreement regarding acid rain and ground-level ozone. The report was divided into 3 sections. The first section provided information concerning commitments to emission reductions in acid rain and ozone annexes. Section 2 provided details of related air quality efforts. Section 3 presented information on scientific and technical cooperation and research, which included details of health effects and acid deposition effects, recovery efforts and critical loads and exceedances. The progress report also included the third 5-year comprehensive review of the Air Quality Agreement, which was organized in a question and answer format to address requirements in the agreement and public comments on the 2004 progress report. In October 2006, Canada's federal government tabled the Clean Air Act as a new legislation that would expand the government's authorities to take action to reduce air emissions of greenhouse gases and other air pollutants. The Notice of Intent to develop and implement regulations and other measures to reduce air emissions was also revealed. The regulations would address anthropogenic sources of air pollution, including fossil-fuel electricity production, petroleum industry, smelters, forest products, chemicals production and transportation. The report showed that over the last 2 years, both countries have reduced their emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and have made progress in meeting the requirements of the Ozone Annex to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Actions have focused on reducing emissions from major sources such as electric generating units, industrial sources, and on-road and nonroad transportation. It was concluded that to date, the agreement has provided opportunities for

  5. Developing consensus-based policy solutions for medicines adherence for Europe: a delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyne Wendy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-adherence to prescribed medication is a pervasive problem that can incur serious effects on patients’ health outcomes and well-being, and the availability of resources in healthcare systems. This study aimed to develop practical consensus-based policy solutions to address medicines non-adherence for Europe. Methods A four-round Delphi study was conducted. The Delphi Expert Panel comprised 50 participants from 14 countries and was representative of: patient/carers organisations; healthcare providers and professionals; commissioners and policy makers; academics; and industry representatives. Participants engaged in the study remotely, anonymously and electronically. Participants were invited to respond to open questions about the causes, consequences and solutions to medicines non-adherence. Subsequent rounds refined responses, and sought ratings of the relative importance, and operational and political feasibility of each potential solution to medicines non-adherence. Feedback of individual and group responses was provided to participants after each round. Members of the Delphi Expert Panel and members of the research group participated in a consensus meeting upon completion of the Delphi study to discuss and further refine the proposed policy solutions. Results 43 separate policy solutions to medication non-adherence were agreed by the Panel. 25 policy solutions were prioritised based on composite scores for importance, and operational and political feasibility. Prioritised policy solutions focused on interventions for patients, training for healthcare professionals, and actions to support partnership between patients and healthcare professionals. Few solutions concerned actions by governments, healthcare commissioners, or interventions at the system level. Conclusions Consensus about practical actions necessary to address non-adherence to medicines has been developed for Europe. These actions are also applicable to

  6. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  7. A Fifth Option for Funding Long-Term Care in Canada - Shift the Resources from Medical Treatment and Universal Pension Entitlements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, J C Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Needs for non-medical residential care services, long-term care (LTC), will increase over the next 30 years as Canada's population ages. Adams and Vanin (2016) explore four options for raising the public and private monies required to meet LTC needs. In this commentary, I raise a fifth option for finding the resources to meet emerging LTC needs. An alternative approach is to divert resources from Canada's well-resourced, but inefficient, medical treatment system. The dividend of provinces pursuing long overdue reforms to medicare is the liberation of public funds to finance emerging priorities for Canadians like LTC.

  8. 78 FR 76101 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... regarding the meetings, please contact David Capozzi, Executive Director, (202) 272- 0010 (voice); (202) 272...; Information and Communications Technologies; Classroom Acoustics; Emergency Transportable Housing; Passenger... sign language interpreters will be available at the Board meeting and committee meetings....

  9. 75 FR 66061 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  10. 76 FR 37062 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  11. 78 FR 12715 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  12. 76 FR 68127 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular Board meeting in Washington, DC, Wednesday, November...

  13. 77 FR 7126 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  14. 77 FR 36479 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  15. 76 FR 21702 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  16. 75 FR 13075 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  17. 77 FR 74827 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  18. 76 FR 78611 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  19. 75 FR 80455 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... rules that are applicable to the public. Notices of hearings #0;and investigations, committee meetings...; ] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and...

  20. 75 FR 22100 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. ] SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  1. 77 FR 51513 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  2. 76 FR 10557 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings in Washington, DC,...

  3. International Society Of Neuropathology--Haarlem consensus guidelines for nervous system tumor classification and grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, David N; Perry, Arie; Burger, Peter; Ellison, David W; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas; Aldape, Kenneth; Brat, Daniel; Collins, V Peter; Eberhart, Charles; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Fuller, Gregory N; Giangaspero, Felice; Giannini, Caterina; Hawkins, Cynthia; Kleihues, Paul; Korshunov, Andrey; Kros, Johan M; Beatriz Lopes, M; Ng, Ho-Keung; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Paulus, Werner; Pietsch, Torsten; Rosenblum, Marc; Rushing, Elisabeth; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Wiestler, Otmar; Wesseling, Pieter

    2014-09-01

    Major discoveries in the biology of nervous system tumors have raised the question of how non-histological data such as molecular information can be incorporated into the next World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors. To address this question, a meeting of neuropathologists with expertise in molecular diagnosis was held in Haarlem, the Netherlands, under the sponsorship of the International Society of Neuropathology (ISN). Prior to the meeting, participants solicited input from clinical colleagues in diverse neuro-oncological specialties. The present "white paper" catalogs the recommendations of the meeting, at which a consensus was reached that incorporation of molecular information into the next WHO classification should follow a set of provided "ISN-Haarlem" guidelines. Salient recommendations include that (i) diagnostic entities should be defined as narrowly as possible to optimize interobserver reproducibility, clinicopathological predictions and therapeutic planning; (ii) diagnoses should be "layered" with histologic classification, WHO grade and molecular information listed below an "integrated diagnosis"; (iii) determinations should be made for each tumor entity as to whether molecular information is required, suggested or not needed for its definition; (iv) some pediatric entities should be separated from their adult counterparts; (v) input for guiding decisions regarding tumor classification should be solicited from experts in complementary disciplines of neuro-oncology; and (iv) entity-specific molecular testing and reporting formats should be followed in diagnostic reports. It is hoped that these guidelines will facilitate the forthcoming update of the fourth edition of the WHO classification of central nervous system tumors.

  4. A Consensus on Mantle Potential Temperatures? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    Recent publications may indicate a mounting consensus regarding mantle temperatures - an agreement that can be crucial for improving our understanding of mantle dynamics. To compare temperatures at various localities, McKenzie & Bickle (1988) proposed the concept of a mantle potential temperature (Tp) as a reference; Tp is the temperature the mantle would have at the surface, if it ascended along an adiabat without undergoing melting. Perhaps the most precise method to estimate Tp involves estimating the conditions of partial melting, and then correcting for the heat of fusion. The several sources of error include estimation of: a parental liquid, an equilibrium mantle olivine, the degree of partial melting (F), and the depth at which the parental melt is generated. There is also model error inherent to any thermometer. And when correcting for the heat of fusion we assume that we are correcting up to the convective adiabat, but if the parental melt was generated within the conductive lithosphere, Tp will be low. In any case, if we accept that the highest Tp estimates at Hawaii are of most interest (since magmas generated away from a plume centerline will not reflect the full heat content of a high T source), then in spite of these sources of error, recent estimates, published over a span of 10 months by three independent research groups, indicate considerable convergence. At Hawaii maximum Tp values are: 1600 deg. C by Herzberg & Asimow (2008), ca. 1630 deg. C by Lee et al. (2009; their Fig. 2B), and using two slightly different equation sets, 1687 deg. C by Putirka (2008; Geology) and 1660 deg. C by Putirka (2008; RiMG volume 69), yielding an average of 1644±38oC. Similarly, there is convergence for mean Tp at MORs (accepting that MORs are not isothermal; Klein and Langmuir, 1987): Herzberg & Asimow (2008) and Lee et al. (2009) estimate that Tp is ca. 1350 deg. C, and Putirka (2008; Geology) estimates a Tp of 1396 deg. C; these estimates average to 1365±26o

  5. 75 FR 39023 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Guidelines dated April 13, 2004 (69 FR 19644), the following laboratories meet the minimum standards to... in Urine Drug Testing for Federal Agencies,'' sets strict standards that laboratories must meet in... 20755-5235, 301-677-7085. * The Standards Council of Canada (SCC) voted to end its...

  6. 75 FR 27348 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Guidelines dated April 13, 2004 (69 FR 19644), the following laboratories meet the minimum standards to... Urine Drug Testing for Federal Agencies,'' sets strict standards that laboratories must meet in order to... 20755-5235, 301-677-7085. *The Standards Council of Canada (SCC) voted to end its...

  7. Nutrition and exercise--a consensus view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, M

    1995-11-01

    The ability to perform exercise is impaired if the diet is inadequate. Conversely, performance may be improved by appropriate dietary manipulation. The primary need for the diet of athletes in training is to meet additional nutrient requirements imposed by the training load. Many athletes consider that a high protein diet is essential to stimulate muscle growth and promote repair. Evidence shows that hard exercise increases the protein requirement, but athletes eating a varied diet in sufficient quantity to meet their energy demands will obtain adequate protein. Carbohydrate is the main fuel used by the muscle in hard exercise, and carbohydrate intake must be sufficient to enable the training load to be sustained. During each strenuous training session, depletion of the glycogen stores in the exercising muscles and in the liver takes place. If this carbohydrate reserve is not replenished before the next training session, training intensity must be reduced, leading to corresponding decrements in the training response. It is recommended for athletes in training that carbohydrate should account for 60-70% of total energy intake, but the type of carbohydrate consumed is not crucial. With regular training, there must be an increased total energy intake to balance the increased energy expenditure. Provided that a reasonably normal diet is consumed this will supply more than adequate amounts of protein, minerals, vitamins and other micronutrients. Possible exceptions are iron and calcium, especially when energy intake is restricted to control body weight. There is no good evidence to suggest that specific supplementation with any of these dietary components is necessary or that it will improve performance. Attention must be paid, however, to ensure an adequate water intake during training: dehydration will reduce performance. The body does not adapt to dehydration. Consumption of a high-carbohydrate diet for the few days before competition with a reduction in the training

  8. Meeting Summary, Credit Trading Work Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Bryan

    2000-12-07

    OAK-B135 Credit Trading Work Group Meeting Summary. The purpose of the meeting is to: (1) Provide an opportunity for NWCC Work Group Members, NWCC Members, and invited expert participants to hear an overview of the draft NWCC Credit Trading Report and to critically review and discuss the report's recommendations and principles. (2) Hear presentations from several perspectives of other experts on credit trading which provide: (a) a brief summary of credit trading activities they are involved in, and (b) critical responses to the NWCC draft report. (3) Identify how the report can be improved at the big picture level. Attempt to resolve issues or concerns if necessary. (4) Discuss the recommendations and credit trading principles in detail and attempt to reach consensus on these sections for presentation to the NWCC. (5) Discuss if any of the outreach and communication recommendations in the report should be conducted by the NWCC.

  9. Chronic edema of the lower extremities: international consensus recommendations for compression therapy clinical research trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, N; Partsch, H; Szolnoky, G; Forner-Cordero, I; Mosti, G; Mortimer, P; Flour, M; Damstra, R; Piller, N; Geyer, M J; Benigni, J-P; Moffat, C; Cornu-Thenard, A; Schingale, F; Clark, M; Chauveau, M

    2012-08-01

    Chronic edema is a multifactorial condition affecting patients with various diseases. Although the pathophysiology of edema varies, compression therapy is a basic tenant of treatment, vital to reducing swelling. Clinical trials are disparate or lacking regarding specific protocols and application recommendations for compression materials and methodology to enable optimal efficacy. Compression therapy is a basic treatment modality for chronic leg edema; however, the evidence base for the optimal application, duration and intensity of compression therapy is lacking. The aim of this document was to present the proceedings of a day-long international expert consensus group meeting that examined the current state of the science for the use of compression therapy in chronic edema. An expert consensus group met in Brighton, UK, in March 2010 to examine the current state of the science for compression therapy in chronic edema of the lower extremities. Panel discussions and open space discussions examined the current literature, clinical practice patterns, common materials and emerging technologies for the management of chronic edema. This document outlines a proposed clinical research agenda focusing on compression therapy in chronic edema. Future trials comparing different compression devices, materials, pressures and parameters for application are needed to enhance the evidence base for optimal chronic oedema management. Important outcomes measures and methods of pressure and oedema quantification are outlined. Future trials are encouraged to optimize compression therapy in chronic edema of the lower extremities.

  10. Successful Translation of Fluorescence Navigation During Oncologic Surgery: A Consensus Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Eben L; Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Basilion, James P; Biel, Merrill A; Bogyo, Matthew; Bouvet, Michael; Brigman, Brian E; Colson, Yolonda L; DeMeester, Steven R; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Jacobs, Paula M; Keereweer, Stijn; Liao, Joseph C; Nguyen, Quyen T; Olson, James M; Paulsen, Keith D; Rieves, Dwaine; Sumer, Baran D; Tweedle, Michael F; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Weichert, Jamey P; Wilson, Brian C; Zenn, Michael R; Zinn, Kurt R; van Dam, Gooitzen M

    2016-01-01

    Navigation with fluorescence guidance has emerged in the last decade as a promising strategy to improve the efficacy of oncologic surgery. To achieve routine clinical use, the onus is on the surgical community to objectively assess the value of this technique. This assessment may facilitate both Food and Drug Administration approval of new optical imaging agents and reimbursement for the imaging procedures. It is critical to characterize fluorescence-guided procedural benefits over existing practices and to elucidate both the costs and the safety risks. This report is the result of a meeting of the International Society of Image Guided Surgery (www.isigs.org) on February 6, 2015, in Miami, Florida, and reflects a consensus of the participants' opinions. Our objective was to critically evaluate the imaging platform technology and optical imaging agents and to make recommendations for successful clinical trial development of this highly promising approach in oncologic surgery.

  11. Fuzzy Approach for Selecting Optimal COTS Based Software Products Under Consensus Recovery Block Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Jha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost associated with development of a large and complex software system is formidable. In today's customer driven market, improvement of quality aspects in terms of reliability of the product is also gaining increased importance. But the resources are limited and the manager has to maneuver within a tight schedule. In order to meet these challenges, many organizations are making use of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS software. This paper develops a fuzzy multi objective optimization model approach for selecting the optimal COTS software product among alternatives for each module in the development of modular software system. The problem is formulated for consensus recovery block fault tolerant scheme. In today’s ever changing environment, it is arduous to estimate the precise cost and reliability of software. Therefore, we develop a fuzzy multi objective optimization models for selecting optimal COTS software products. Numerical illustrations are provided to demonstrate the models developed.

  12. Nutritional objectives for the Spanish population. Consensus from the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Majem, L; Aranceta, J

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the development of the Nutritional Objectives for the Spanish Population. Preparation of draft documents contributed by different working groups was followed by a consensus meeting held in Bilbao on 5-7 October 2000, hosted by the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition and sponsored by the World Health Organisation. Establishing nutritional guidelines was conducted by: (1) analysing current food and nutritional data from nutritional surveys, for intermediate objectives; and (2) reviewing current scientific knowledge for final objectives. The objectives include intermediate and ultimate figures, and comprise percentage of energy from macronutrients and fatty acids, fruit and vegetable consumption, frequency of sweets, physical activity and body mass index, folate, calcium, sodium, fluoride and iodine intake, dietary fibre, cholesterol, alcohol and duration of breast-feeding. The nutritional objectives for the Spanish population create a rational framework for the development of dietary guidelines and nutritional policies in Spain, within a Mediterranean context.

  13. Only in Canada: A Study of National Market Potential for Christian Higher Education Canada (CHEC) Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Al

    2011-01-01

    In July 2007 Ipsos Reid delivered to Christian Higher Education Canada (CHEC) a report entitled "Christian Post-Secondary Education in Canada, Phase 3: Defining the Market". This article is a selective summary of the full 353-page report. It tabulates and analyzes findings from 1,000 phone interviews and 6,689 online surveys from six population…

  14. Diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: An evidence-based Canadian consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Simron; Asa, Sylvia L; Dey, Chris; Kennecke, Hagen; Laidley, David; Law, Calvin; Asmis, Timothy; Chan, David; Ezzat, Shereen; Goodwin, Rachel; Mete, Ozgur; Pasieka, Janice; Rivera, Juan; Wong, Ralph; Segelov, Eva; Rayson, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The majority of neuroendocrine tumors originate in the digestive system and incidence is increasing within Canada and globally. Due to rapidly evolving evidence related to diagnosis and clinical management, updated guidance on the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are of clinical importance. Well-differentiated GI-NETs may exhibit indolent clinical behavior and are often metastatic at diagnosis. Some NET patients will develop secretory disease requiring symptom control to optimize quality of life and clinical outcomes. Optimal management of GI-NETs is in a multidisciplinary environment and is multimodal, requiring collaboration between medical, surgical, imaging and pathology specialties. Clinical application of advances in pathological classification and diagnostic technologies, along with evolving surgical, radiotherapeutic and medical therapies are critical to the advancement of patient care. We performed a systematic literature search to update our last set of published guidelines (2010) and identified new level 1 evidence for novel therapies, including telotristat etiprate (TELESTAR), lanreotide (CLARINET), everolimus (RADIANT-2; RADIANT-4) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; NETTER-1). Integrating these data with the clinical knowledge of 16 multi-disciplinary experts, we devised consensus recommendations to guide state of the art clinical management of GI-NETs.

  15. Optimal Network Design for Consensus Formation: Wisdom of Networked Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene S. Kitamura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The wisdom of crowds refers to the phenomenon in which the collective knowledge of a community is greater than the knowledge of any individual. This paper proposes a network design for the fastest and slowest consensus formation under average node degree restrictions, which is one aspect of the wisdom of crowds concept. Consensus and synchronization problems are closely related to variety of issues such as collective behavior in nature, the interaction among agents as a matter of the robot control, and building efficient wireless sensor networks. However, designing networks with desirable properties is complex and it may pose a multi-constraint and multi-criterion optimization problem. For the purpose of realizing such efficient network topology, this paper presents an optimization approach to design networks for better consensus formation by focusing on the eigenvalue spectral of Laplacian matrix. In both the fastest and slowest networks presented, consensus is formed among local structures first, then on a global scale. This suggests that both local and global topology influence the networks dynamics. These findings are useful for those who seek to manage efficient consensus and synchronization in a setting that can be modeled as a multi-agent system.

  16. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  17. A Delphic consensus assessment: imaging and biomarkers in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Oberg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the clinical management of neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN is exacerbated by limitations in imaging modalities and a paucity of clinically useful biomarkers. Limitations in currently available imaging modalities reflect difficulties in measuring an intrinsically indolent disease, resolution inadequacies and inter-/intra-facility device variability and that RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria are not optimal for NEN. Limitations of currently used biomarkers are that they are secretory biomarkers (chromogranin A, serotonin, neuron-specific enolase and pancreastatin; monoanalyte measurements; and lack sensitivity, specificity and predictive capacity. None of them meet the NIH metrics for clinical usage. A multinational, multidisciplinary Delphi consensus meeting of NEN experts (n = 33 assessed current imaging strategies and biomarkers in NEN management. Consensus (>75% was achieved for 78% of the 142 questions. The panel concluded that morphological imaging has a diagnostic value. However, both imaging and current single-analyte biomarkers exhibit substantial limitations in measuring the disease status and predicting the therapeutic efficacy. RECIST remains suboptimal as a metric. A critical unmet need is the development of a clinico-biological tool to provide enhanced information regarding precise disease status and treatment response. The group considered that circulating RNA was better than current general NEN biomarkers and preliminary clinical data were considered promising. It was resolved that circulating multianalyte mRNA (NETest had clinical utility in both diagnosis and monitoring disease status and therapeutic efficacy. Overall, it was concluded that a combination of tumor spatial and functional imaging with circulating transcripts (mRNA would represent the future strategy for real-time monitoring of disease progress and therapeutic efficacy.

  18. Initiation and use of propranolol for infantile hemangioma: report of a consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Beth A; Frommelt, Peter C; Chamlin, Sarah L; Haggstrom, Anita; Bauman, Nancy M; Chiu, Yvonne E; Chun, Robert H; Garzon, Maria C; Holland, Kristen E; Liberman, Leonardo; MacLellan-Tobert, Susan; Mancini, Anthony J; Metry, Denise; Puttgen, Katherine B; Seefeldt, Marcia; Sidbury, Robert; Ward, Kendra M; Blei, Francine; Baselga, Eulalia; Cassidy, Laura; Darrow, David H; Joachim, Shawna; Kwon, Eun-Kyung M; Martin, Kari; Perkins, Jonathan; Siegel, Dawn H; Boucek, Robert J; Frieden, Ilona J

    2013-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are common neoplasms composed of proliferating endothelial-like cells. Despite the relative frequency of IH and the potential severity of complications, there are currently no uniform guidelines for treatment. Although propranolol has rapidly been adopted, there is significant uncertainty and divergence of opinion regarding safety monitoring, dose escalation, and its use in PHACE syndrome (PHACE = posterior fossa, hemangioma, arterial lesions, cardiac abnormalities, eye abnormalities; a cutaneous neurovascular syndrome characterized by large, segmental hemangiomas of the head and neck along with congenital anomalies of the brain, heart, eyes and/or chest wall). A consensus conference was held on December 9, 2011. The multidisciplinary team reviewed existing data on the pharmacologic properties of propranolol and all published reports pertaining to the use of propranolol in pediatric patients. Workgroups were assigned specific topics to propose protocols on the following subjects: contraindications, special populations, pretreatment evaluation, dose escalation, and monitoring. Consensus protocols were recorded during the meeting and refined after the meeting. When appropriate, protocol clarifications and revision were made and agreed upon by the group via teleconference. Because of the absence of high-quality clinical research data, evidence-based recommendations are not possible at present. However, the team agreed on a number of recommendations that arose from a review of existing evidence, including when to treat complicated IH; contraindications and pretreatment evaluation protocols; propranolol use in PHACE syndrome; formulation, target dose, and frequency of propranolol; initiation of propranolol in infants; cardiovascular monitoring; ongoing monitoring; and prevention of hypoglycemia. Where there was considerable controversy, the more conservative approach was selected. We acknowledge that the recommendations are conservative in

  19. Compression of digital images in radiology. Results of a consensus conference; Kompression digitaler Bilddaten in der Radiologie. Ergebnisse einer Konsensuskonferenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loose, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Braunschweig, R. [BG Kliniken Bergmannstrost, Halle/Saale (Germany). Klinik fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik und Interventionsradiologie; Kotter, E. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Mildenberger, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Simmler, R.; Wucherer, M. [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Recommendations for lossy compression of digital radiological DICOM images in Germany by means of a consensus conference. The compression of digital radiological images was evaluated in many studies. Even though the results demonstrate full diagnostic image quality of modality-dependent compression between 1:5 and 1:200, there are only a few clinical applications. Materials and Methods: A consensus conference with approx. 80 interested participants (radiology, industry, physics, and agencies) without individual invitation was organized by the working groups AGIT and APT of the German Roentgen Society DRG to determine compression factors without loss of diagnostic image quality for different anatomical regions for CT, CR/DR, MR, RF/XA examinations. The consent level was specified as at least 66 %. Results: For individual modalities the following compression factors were recommended: CT (brain) 1:5, CT (all other applications) 1:8, CR/DR (all applications except mammography) 1:10, CR/DR (mammography) 1:15, MR (all applications) 1:7, RF/XA (fluoroscopy, DSA, cardiac angio) 1:6. The recommended compression ratios are valid for JPEG and JPEG 2000 /Wavelet compressions. Conclusion: The results may be understood as recommendations and indicate limits of compression factors with no expected reduction of diagnostic image quality. They are similar to the current national recommendations for Canada and England. (orig.)

  20. Tenth target fabrication specialists` meeting: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foreman, L.R.; Stark, J.C. [comp.

    1995-11-01

    This tenth meeting of specialists in target fabrication for inertial confinement is unique in that it is the first meeting that was completely unclassified. As a result of the new classification, we were able to invite more foreign participation. In addition to participants from the US, UK, and Canada, representatives from France, Japan, and two Russian laboratories attended, about 115 in all. This booklet presents full papers and poster sessions. Indirect and direct drive laser implosions are considered. Typical topics include: polymer or aluminium or resorcinol/formaldehyde shells, laser technology, photon tunneling microscopy as a characterization tool, foams, coatings, hohlraums, and beryllium capsules. Hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, and beryllium are all considered as fuels.

  1. Human health impacts of biodiesel use in on-road heavy duty diesel vehicles in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Mathieu; Egyed, Marika; Taylor, Brett; Chen, Jack; Samaali, Mehrez; Davignon, Didier; Morneau, Gilles

    2013-11-19

    Regulatory requirements for renewable content in diesel fuel have been adopted in Canada. Fatty acid alkyl esters, that is, biodiesel, will likely be used to meet the regulations. However, the impacts on ambient atmospheric pollutant concentrations and human health outcomes associated with the use of biodiesel fuel blends in heavy duty diesel vehicles across Canada have not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to assess the potential human health implications of the widespread use of biodiesel in Canada compared to those from ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD). The health impacts/benefits resulting from biodiesel use were determined with the Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool, based on output from the AURAMS air quality modeling system and the MOBILE6.2C on-road vehicle emissions model. Scenarios included runs for ULSD and biodiesel blends with 5 and 20% of biodiesel by volume, and compared their use in 2006 and 2020. Although modeling and data limitations exist, the results of this study suggested that the use of biodiesel fuel blends compared to ULSD was expected to result in very minimal changes in air quality and health benefits/costs across Canada, and these were likely to diminish over time.

  2. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  3. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  4. Demand for human allograft tissue in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Jonathan R T; Mirbolooki, Mohammadreza; Rogers, Christina; Mohr, Jim

    2007-01-01

    There is relatively little known about the demand for allograft tissues in Canada. The Canadian Council for Donation and Transplantation (CCDT) is a national advisory body that undertook a comprehensive "market survey" to estimate surgical demand for human allograft tissues in Canada. The report "Demand for Human Allograft Tissue in Canada" reflects survey results sent to 5 prominent User Groups. User Groups were identified as orthopaedic surgeons; neurosurgeons; corneal transplant surgeons; plastic surgeons, specifically those at Canadian Burn Units; and cardiac surgeons (adult and paediatric surgery). The demand for allograft grafts was determined and then extrapolated across the total User Group and then increases in allograft tissue use over the next 1-2 years across User Groups were predicted. The overall response rate for the survey was 21.4%. It varied from a low of 19.6% for the orthopaedic survey to a high of 40.5% for the corneal survey. The estimated current demand for allograft tissue in Canada ranges from a low of 34,442 grafts per year to a high of 62,098 grafts per year. The predicted increase in use of allograft tissue over the next 1-2 year period would suggest that annual demand could rise to somewhere in the range of 42,589-72,210 grafts. The highest rated preferences (98% and 94%) were for accredited and Canadian tissue banks, respectively. This study represents a key step in addressing the paucity of information concerning the demand for allograft tissue in Canada.

  5. William D. Stevenson: Atlantic Canada's first neurosurgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhida, Karim; Mendez, Ivar

    2007-12-01

    The origins of neurosurgical services in Atlantic Canada are tied to the individual efforts of William D. Stevenson. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, Stevenson completed his senior matriculation in Dunnville, Ontario, before studying medicine at the University of Toronto. He completed the Gallie surgical course in Toronto and then spent 1 year training with Edward Archibald at McGill University. After working for 2 years with the Canadian Mobile Neurosurgical Unit in Europe during the Second World War, Stevenson undertook formal neurosurgical training with Kenneth G. McKenzie, Canada's first neurosurgeon. Stevenson was thereafter recruited to Halifax to start the neurosurgical service at the Victoria General Hospital in January 1948, and he remained head of the division for the next 26 years. His pioneering work laid the foundations for the establishment of a major academic neurosurgical service at Dalhousie University and was crucial for the establishment of neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada. After his retirement, Stevenson moved back to Ontario and began his second career, transferring his passion for neurosurgery to oil painting. His legacy to neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada will be remembered in perpetuity with the annual Neurosurgery Resident Research Award at Dalhousie University, established and named in his honour. This paper focuses on Stevenson's life and work in neurosurgery as Atlantic Canada's first neurosurgeon.

  6. Critical phenomena in the spreading of opinion consensus and disagreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Chacoma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of models of opinion formation where the dissemination of individual opinions occurs through the spreading of local consensus and disagreement. We study the emergence of full collective consensus or maximal disagreement in one- and two-dimensional arrays. In both cases, the probability of reaching full consensus exhibits well-defined scaling properties as a function of the system size. Two-dimensional systems, in particular, possess nontrivial exponents and critical points. The dynamical rules of our models, which emphasize the interaction between small groups of agents, should be considered as complementary to the imitation mechanisms of traditional opinion dynamics. Received: 11 March 2014, Accepted: 1 August 2014; Reviewed by: F. Bagnoli, Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Italy; Edited by: G. Martinez Mekler; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.060003 Cite as: A Chacoma, D H Zanette, Papers in Physics 6, 060003 (2014

  7. Does Having More Options Mean Harder to Reach Consensus?

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Degang

    2016-01-01

    We generalize a binary majority-vote model on adaptive networks to a plurality-vote counterpart. When opinions are uniformly distributed in the population of voters in the initial state, it is found that having more available opinions in the initial state actually accelerate the time to consensus. In particular, we investigate the three-state plurality-vote model. While time to consensus in two state model scales exponentially with population size $N$, for finite-size system, there is a non-zero probability that either the population reaches the consensus state in a time that is very short and independent of $N$ (in the heterophily regime), or in a time that scales exponentially with $N$ but is still much faster than two-state model.

  8. The importance of assessing and communicating scientific consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W.; van der Linden, Sander L.

    2016-09-01

    The spread of influential misinformation, such as conspiracy theories about the existence of a secret, large-scale atmospheric spraying program (SLAP), is contributing to the politicization of science. In an important recent study, Shearer et al (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 084011) employ a novel methodology to quantify the expert consensus of popular SLAP assertions. The authors find that 99% (76/77) of surveyed experts have not encountered any evidence that would support the existence of such a program. Here we argue that this finding is important because a growing body of research has shown that the public’s perception of expert consensus on key societal issues acts an important ‘gateway’ to science acceptance. Furthermore, communicating normative agreement among experts, such as the strong scientific consensus against the existence of a SLAP, can help limit the spread of misinformation and promote more effective public decision-making about science and society.

  9. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  10. Cohesion, consensus and extreme information in opinion dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sîrbu, Alina; Servedio, Vito D P; Tria, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Opinion formation is an important element of social dynamics. It has been widely studied in the last years with tools from physics, mathematics and computer science. Here, a continuous model of opinion dynamics for multiple possible choices is analysed. Its main features are the inclusion of disagreement and possibility of modulating information, both from one and multiple sources. The interest is in identifying the effect of the initial cohesion of the population, the interplay between cohesion and information extremism, and the effect of using multiple sources of information that can influence the system. Final consensus, especially with external information, depends highly on these factors, as numerical simulations show. When no information is present, consensus or segregation is determined by the initial cohesion of the population. Interestingly, when only one source of information is present, consensus can be obtained, in general, only when this is extremely mild, i.e. there is not a single opinion stron...

  11. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlgren, N; Moreira, T.; Michel, P.; Steiner, T.; Jansen, O; Cognard, C; Mattle, H P; van Zwam, W.; Holmin, S.; Tatlisumak, T.; Petersson, J; Caso, V.; Hacke, W; Mazighi, M.; Arnold, M.

    2016-01-01

    The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16–18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then bee...

  12. ConStruct: Improved construction of RNA consensus structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steger Gerhard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aligning homologous non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs correctly in terms of sequence and structure is an unresolved problem, due to both mathematical complexity and imperfect scoring functions. High quality alignments, however, are a prerequisite for most consensus structure prediction approaches, homology searches, and tools for phylogeny inference. Automatically created ncRNA alignments often need manual corrections, yet this manual refinement is tedious and error-prone. Results We present an extended version of CONSTRUCT, a semi-automatic, graphical tool suitable for creating RNA alignments correct in terms of both consensus sequence and consensus structure. To this purpose CONSTRUCT combines sequence alignment, thermodynamic data and various measures of covariation. One important feature is that the user is guided during the alignment correction step by a consensus dotplot, which displays all thermodynamically optimal base pairs and the corresponding covariation. Once the initial alignment is corrected, optimal and suboptimal secondary structures as well as tertiary interaction can be predicted. We demonstrate CONSTRUCT's ability to guide the user in correcting an initial alignment, and show an example for optimal secondary consensus structure prediction on very hard to align SECIS elements. Moreover we use CONSTRUCT to predict tertiary interactions from sequences of the internal ribosome entry site of CrP-like viruses. In addition we show that alignments specifically designed for benchmarking can be easily be optimized using CONSTRUCT, although they share very little sequence identity. Conclusion CONSTRUCT's graphical interface allows for an easy alignment correction based on and guided by predicted and known structural constraints. It combines several algorithms for prediction of secondary consensus structure and even tertiary interactions. The CONSTRUCT package can be downloaded from the URL listed in the Availability and

  13. 75 FR 1780 - Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... CORPORATION Meetings AGENCY: Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board; Regular Meeting. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the regular meeting of the Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board (Board). DATE AND TIME: The meeting of the Board will be held at the offices of the Farm Credit...

  14. Modelling consensus building in Delphi practices for participated transport planning

    CERN Document Server

    Pira, Michela Le; Ignaccolo, Matteo; Pluchino, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In this study a consensus building process based on a combination of Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Delphi method is presented and applied to the decision-making process about alternative policy measures to promote cycling mobility. An agent-based model is here used to reproduce the same process of convergence of opinions, with the aim to understand the role of network topology, stakeholder influence and other sensitive variables on the emergence of consensus. It can be a useful tool for decision-makers to guide them in planning effective participation processes.

  15. [GEITDAH consensus on conduct disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasot-Llevadot, Jordi; Ibáñez-Bordas, Rosa M; Soto-López, Antonio; Montañés-Rada, Francisco; Gastaminza-Pérez, Xavier; Alda-Díez, José A; Cantó-Díez, Tomás; Catalá, Miguel A; Ferrin-Erdozáin, Maite; García-Giral, Marta; Graell-Bernal, Montserrat; Granada-Jiménez, Olvido; Herreros-Rodríguez, Óscar; Mardomingo-Sanz, María J; Mojarro-Práxedes, Dolores; Morey-Canyelles, Jaume; Ortiz-Guerra, Juan; Pàmies-Massana, Montserrat; Rey-Sánchez, Francisco; Romera-Torrens, María; Rubio-Morell, Belén; Ruiz-Lázaro, Pedro M; Ruiz-Sanz, Francisco

    2015-08-16

    In this paper, the Special Interest Group on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (GEITDAH, from its name in Spanish) presents a consensus reached by experts from all over Spain on conduct disorders in children and adolescents. Following the initial work by the team at the Pedopsychiatry Unit at the Quiron-Teknon Hospital in Barcelona, agreements have been reached on a number of basic aspects that could be the starting point for future consensuses. A top priority aim of the work was also to update the criteria in the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fifth edition, for conduct disorders in children and adolescents, together with their comorbidity with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  16. Ethics and immunization policy: promoting dialogue to sustain consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, C; Marcuse, E K

    2001-05-01

    The societal consensus that has supported the United States' universal childhood immunization programs for the past 50 years shows signs of eroding. This article proposes a systematic approach to evaluate immunization policy options. Through a unifying framework that combines epidemiologic, economic, and ethical concerns, this approach promotes a clearer understanding of underlying issues and inherent tradeoffs between alternative policies. Such a systematic examination of policy options could facilitate the public dialogue necessary to continually recreate a broad consensus on immunization practices and enable us to choose policies most in accord with our fundamental values.

  17. Eating Disorders: Cultural Model and Consensus Regarding Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manochio-Pina, Marina; Dos Santos, José Ernesto; Dressler, William W; Pessa Ribeiro, Rosane Pilot

    2015-01-01

    The cultural model of food was applied to 112 adult patients with eating disorders (PG) and 36 healthy adult women (CG) of similar age. The Free List and Ranking of Foods was used to group foods and verify consensus and cultural aspects. Calories, health, and taste were the dimensions used by the participants to group the foods, and strong consensus was achieved in regard to calories and health. There were, however, inter- and intra-group divergences in regard to these ideas, especially in the PG. The CG used distinct criteria, showing a more complex model.

  18. Acute pancreatitis: reflections through the history of the Atlanta Consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres López, Ana María

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with systemic and local repercussions. Most cases are mild with low mortality rate, but 20% of the patients have severe pancreatitis with a mortality rate up to 30%. Through the years the medical community has tried to reach consensus about this disease in order to better understand, classify and treat it. The most important of these has been known as the Atlanta Consensus 1992, in use for many years. However, it has been recently the subject of various proposals for changes and updates, which are discussed in this review article.

  19. Consensus statement: octreotide dose titration in secretory diarrhea. Diarrhea Management Consensus Development Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A G; O'Dorisio, T M; Woltering, E A; Anthony, L B; Burton, F R; Geller, R B; Grendell, J H; Levin, B; Redfern, J S

    1995-07-01

    Octreotide is an effective therapeutic option in controlling secretory diarrhea of varied etiology. However, marked patient-to-patient differences in the antidiarrheal effects necessitate titration of octreotide dose in individual patients to achieve optimal symptom control. A consensus development panel established guidelines for octreotide dose titration in patients with secretory diarrhea. Overall, the panel recommended an aggressive approach in selecting the initial octreotide dose and in making subsequent dose escalations in patients with secretory diarrhea due to gastrointestinal tumors (eg, carcinoids, VIPomas), AIDS, dumping syndrome, short bowel syndrome, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. To avoid hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus-associated secretory diarrhea, the panel recommended a low initial octreotide dose and a conservative titration regimen with close monitoring a blood glucose levels. The end point of therapy should focus on a reduction in diarrhea (frequency of bowel movements or stool volume) rather than normalization of hormonal profile. Overall, octreotide is well tolerated; principal side effects are transient injection site pain and gastrointestinal discomfort. For many patients with secretory diarrhea, octreotide therapy is expected to improve the overall health and quality of life and in the long run will lessen health care costs.

  20. The Hybridisation of Higher Education in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Shale

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Canada's postsecondary institutions are becoming increasingly involved with technology enhanced learning, generally under the rubric of distance education. Growth and activity in distance education stems from rapid developments in communication and information technologies such as videoconferencing and the Internet. This case study focuses on the use of new technologies, primarily within the context of higher education institutions operating in Canada's English speaking provinces. Capitalising on the interactive capabilities of "new" learning technologies, some distance education providers are starting to behave more like conventional educational institutions in terms of forming study groups and student cohorts. Conversely, new telecommunications technologies are having a reverse impact on traditional classroom settings, and as a result conventional universities are beginning to establish administrative structures reflective of those used by distance education providers. When viewed in tandem, these trends reflect growing convergence between conventional and distance learning modes, leading to the hybridisation of higher education in Canada.