WorldWideScience

Sample records for call frequency variation

  1. Frequency synchronization of blue whale calls near Pioneer Seamount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael D; Garfield, Newell; Bland, Roger W

    2010-07-01

    Vocalizations of blue whales were recorded with a cabled hydrophone array at Pioneer Seamount, 50 miles off the California coast. Most calls occurred in repeated sequences of two-call pairs (A, then B). The B call is a frequency-modulated tone highly repeatable in form and pitch. A model of this sound is described which permits detecting very small frequency shifts. B calls are found to be aligned in frequency to about one part in 180. This requires very fine pitch discrimination and control over calling frequency, and suggests that synchronizing to a common frequency pattern carries some adaptive advantage. Some possibilities for acoustic sensing by whales requiring this fine frequency resolution are discussed.

  2. Taxonomic and phylogenetic utility of variation in advertising calls of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxonomic and phylogenetic utility of variation in advertising calls of francolins and spurfowls (Galliformes: Phasianidae). Tshifhiwa G. Mandiwana-Neudani, Rauri C.K. Bowie, Martine Hausberger, Laurence Henry, Timothy M. Crowe ...

  3. Nuthatches eavesdrop on variations in heterospecific chickadee mobbing alarm calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Christopher N.; Greene, Erick

    2007-01-01

    Many animals recognize the alarm calls produced by other species, but the amount of information they glean from these eavesdropped signals is unknown. We previously showed that black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) have a sophisticated alarm call system in which they encode complex information about the size and risk of potential predators in variations of a single type of mobbing alarm call. Here we show experimentally that red-breasted nuthatches (Sitta canadensis) respond appropriately to subtle variations of these heterospecific “chick-a-dee” alarm calls, thereby evidencing that they have gained important information about potential predators in their environment. This study demonstrates a previously unsuspected level of discrimination in intertaxon eavesdropping. PMID:17372225

  4. Calling behaviour under climate change: geographical and seasonal variation of calling temperatures in ectotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llusia, Diego; Márquez, Rafael; Beltrán, Juan F; Benítez, Maribel; do Amaral, José P

    2013-09-01

    Calling behaviour is strongly temperature-dependent and critical for sexual selection and reproduction in a variety of ectothermic taxa, including anuran amphibians, which are the most globally threatened vertebrates. However, few studies have explored how species respond to distinct thermal environments at time of displaying calling behaviour, and thus it is still unknown whether ongoing climate change might compromise the performance of calling activity in ectotherms. Here, we used new audio-trapping techniques (automated sound recording and detection systems) between 2006 and 2009 to examine annual calling temperatures of five temperate anurans and their patterns of geographical and seasonal variation at the thermal extremes of species ranges, providing insights into the thermal breadths of calling activity of species, and the mechanisms that enable ectotherms to adjust to changing thermal environments. All species showed wide thermal breadths during calling behaviour (above 15 °C) and increases in calling temperatures in extremely warm populations and seasons. Thereby, calling temperatures differed both geographically and seasonally, both in terrestrial and aquatic species, and were 8-22 °C below the specific upper critical thermal limits (CTmax ) and strongly associated with the potential temperatures of each thermal environment (operative temperatures during the potential period of breeding). This suggests that calling behaviour in ectotherms may take place at population-specific thermal ranges, diverging when species are subjected to distinct thermal environments, and might imply plasticity of thermal adjustment mechanisms (seasonal and developmental acclimation) that supply species with means of coping with climate change. Furthermore, the thermal thresholds of calling at the onset of the breeding season were dissimilar between conspecific populations, suggesting that other factors besides temperature are needed to trigger the onset of reproduction. Our

  5. Geographic Variation in Advertisement Calls in a Tree Frog Species: Gene Flow and Selection Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yikweon; Hahm, Eun Hye; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Park, Soyeon; Won, Yong-Jin; Choe, Jae C.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a species with a large distribution relative to its dispersal capacity, geographic variation in traits may be explained by gene flow, selection, or the combined effects of both. Studies of genetic diversity using neutral molecular markers show that patterns of isolation by distance (IBD) or barrier effect may be evident for geographic variation at the molecular level in amphibian species. However, selective factors such as habitat, predator, or interspecific interactions may be critical for geographic variation in sexual traits. We studied geographic variation in advertisement calls in the tree frog Hyla japonica to understand patterns of variation in these traits across Korea and provide clues about the underlying forces for variation. Methodology We recorded calls of H. japonica in three breeding seasons from 17 localities including localities in remote Jeju Island. Call characters analyzed were note repetition rate (NRR), note duration (ND), and dominant frequency (DF), along with snout-to-vent length. Results The findings of a barrier effect on DF and a longitudinal variation in NRR seemed to suggest that an open sea between the mainland and Jeju Island and mountain ranges dominated by the north-south Taebaek Mountains were related to geographic variation in call characters. Furthermore, there was a pattern of IBD in mitochondrial DNA sequences. However, no comparable pattern of IBD was found between geographic distance and call characters. We also failed to detect any effects of habitat or interspecific interaction on call characters. Conclusions Geographic variations in call characters as well as mitochondrial DNA sequences were largely stratified by geographic factors such as distance and barriers in Korean populations of H. japoinca. Although we did not detect effects of habitat or interspecific interaction, some other selective factors such as sexual selection might still be operating on call characters in conjunction with restricted gene

  6. Geographic variation in advertisement calls in a tree frog species: gene flow and selection hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yikweon Jang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a species with a large distribution relative to its dispersal capacity, geographic variation in traits may be explained by gene flow, selection, or the combined effects of both. Studies of genetic diversity using neutral molecular markers show that patterns of isolation by distance (IBD or barrier effect may be evident for geographic variation at the molecular level in amphibian species. However, selective factors such as habitat, predator, or interspecific interactions may be critical for geographic variation in sexual traits. We studied geographic variation in advertisement calls in the tree frog Hyla japonica to understand patterns of variation in these traits across Korea and provide clues about the underlying forces for variation. METHODOLOGY: We recorded calls of H. japonica in three breeding seasons from 17 localities including localities in remote Jeju Island. Call characters analyzed were note repetition rate (NRR, note duration (ND, and dominant frequency (DF, along with snout-to-vent length. RESULTS: The findings of a barrier effect on DF and a longitudinal variation in NRR seemed to suggest that an open sea between the mainland and Jeju Island and mountain ranges dominated by the north-south Taebaek Mountains were related to geographic variation in call characters. Furthermore, there was a pattern of IBD in mitochondrial DNA sequences. However, no comparable pattern of IBD was found between geographic distance and call characters. We also failed to detect any effects of habitat or interspecific interaction on call characters. CONCLUSIONS: Geographic variations in call characters as well as mitochondrial DNA sequences were largely stratified by geographic factors such as distance and barriers in Korean populations of H. japonica. Although we did not detect effects of habitat or interspecific interaction, some other selective factors such as sexual selection might still be operating on call characters in conjunction with

  7. The Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service: High Frequency of Nontransported Calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwin E. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. There are no published studies on the Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service and no assessment of the calls that end in nontransported individuals. We describe reasons for the nontransport of potential clients. Methods. We used the Emergency Medical Dispatch (Medical Priority Dispatch System instrument, augmented with five local call types, to collect information on types of calls. The calls were categorised under 7 headings. Correlations between call types and response time were calculated. Results. Most calls were from the category medical (54%. Nineteen (19% percent of calls were in the non-transported category. Calls from call type Cancelled accounted for most of these and this was related to response time, while Refused service was inversely related (. Conclusions. The Barbados Ambulance Service is mostly used by people with a known illness and for trauma cases. One-fifth of calls fall into a category where the ambulance is not used often due to cancellation which is related to response time. Other factors such as the use of alternative transport are also important. Further study to identify factors that contribute to the non-transported category of calls is necessary if improvements in service quality are to be made.

  8. SNP calling, genotype calling, and sample allele frequency estimation from new-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimation and application of sample allele frequency spectra from New-Generation Sequencing (NGS) data. In this method, we first estimate the allele frequency spectrum using maximum likelihood. In contrast to previous methods, the likelihood function is cal...... be extended to various other cases including cases with deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We evaluate the statistical properties of the methods using simulations and by application to a real data set....

  9. Temporal and spatial variation in harbor seal (Phoca vitulina L.) roar calls from southern Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Puk Faxe; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Male harbor seals gather around breeding sites for competitive mating displays. Here, they produce underwater vocalizations possibly to attract females and/or scare off other males. These calls offer prospects for passive acoustic monitoring. Acoustic monitoring requires a good understanding...... of natural variation in calling behavior both temporally and among geographically separate sites. Such variation in call structure and calling patterns were studied in harbor seal vocalizations recorded at three locations in Danish and Swedish waters. There was a strong seasonality in the calls from end...... biological differences when comparing harbor seal roars among recording sites and between years....

  10. Adult vampire bats produce contact calls when isolated: acoustic variation by species, population, colony, and individual.

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    Gerald G Carter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bat pups produce individually distinct isolation calls to facilitate maternal recognition. Increasing evidence suggests that, in group-living bat species, adults often use similar calls to maintain contact. We investigated if isolated adults from all three species of the highly cooperative vampire bats (Phyllostomidae: Desmodontinae would produce vocally distinct contact calls when physically isolated. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed variation in contact calls recorded from isolated captive and wild-caught adult common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus, white-winged vampire bats (Diaemus youngi and hairy-legged vampire bats (Diphylla ecaudata. We compared species-typical contact call structure, and used information theory and permuted discriminate function analyses to examine call structure variation, and to determine if the individuality of contact calls is encoded by different call features across species and populations. We found that isolated adult vampire bats produce contact calls that vary by species, population, colony, and individual. However, much variation occurred within a single context and individual. We estimated signature information for captive Diaemus (same colony, captive Desmodus (same colony, and wild Desmodus (different colonies at 3.21, 3.26, and 3.88 bits, respectively. Contact calls from a captive colony of Desmodus were less individually distinct than calls from wild-caught Desmodus from different colonies. Both the degree of individuality and parameters encoding individuality differed between the bats from a single captive colony and the wild-caught individuals from different groups. This result is consistent with, but not sufficient evidence of, vocal convergence in groups. CONCLUSION: Our results show that adult vampire bats of all three species produce highly variable contact calls when isolated. Contact calls contain sufficient information for vocal discrimination, but also possess more intra

  11. Adult vampire bats produce contact calls when isolated: acoustic variation by species, population, colony, and individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Gerald G; Logsdon, Ryane; Arnold, Bryan D; Menchaca, Angelica; Medellin, Rodrigo A

    2012-01-01

    Bat pups produce individually distinct isolation calls to facilitate maternal recognition. Increasing evidence suggests that, in group-living bat species, adults often use similar calls to maintain contact. We investigated if isolated adults from all three species of the highly cooperative vampire bats (Phyllostomidae: Desmodontinae) would produce vocally distinct contact calls when physically isolated. We assessed variation in contact calls recorded from isolated captive and wild-caught adult common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus), white-winged vampire bats (Diaemus youngi) and hairy-legged vampire bats (Diphylla ecaudata). We compared species-typical contact call structure, and used information theory and permuted discriminate function analyses to examine call structure variation, and to determine if the individuality of contact calls is encoded by different call features across species and populations. We found that isolated adult vampire bats produce contact calls that vary by species, population, colony, and individual. However, much variation occurred within a single context and individual. We estimated signature information for captive Diaemus (same colony), captive Desmodus (same colony), and wild Desmodus (different colonies) at 3.21, 3.26, and 3.88 bits, respectively. Contact calls from a captive colony of Desmodus were less individually distinct than calls from wild-caught Desmodus from different colonies. Both the degree of individuality and parameters encoding individuality differed between the bats from a single captive colony and the wild-caught individuals from different groups. This result is consistent with, but not sufficient evidence of, vocal convergence in groups. Our results show that adult vampire bats of all three species produce highly variable contact calls when isolated. Contact calls contain sufficient information for vocal discrimination, but also possess more intra-individual variation than is required for the sole purpose of

  12. Interspecific variation of calls in clownfishes: degree of similarity in closely related species

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    Colleye Orphal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clownfishes are colorful coral reef fishes living in groups in association with sea anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Within their small societies, size hierarchy determines which fish have access to reproduction. These fishes are also prolific callers whose aggressive sounds seem to play an important role in the social hierarchy. Agonistic interactions being involved in daily behaviour suggest how acoustic communication might play an important role in clownfish group. Sounds were recorded and compared in fourteen clownfish species (some of which have never been recorded before to evaluate the potential role of acoustic communication as an evolutionary driving force. Results Surprisingly, the relationship between fish size and both dominant frequency and pulse duration is not only species-specific; all the specimens of the 14 species are situated on exactly the same slope, which means the size of any Amphiprion can be predicted by both acoustic features. The number of pulses broadly overlaps among species, whereas the pulse period displays the most variation even if it shows overlap among sympatric species. Sound comparisons between three species (A. akallopisos, A. ocellaris and A. frenatus having different types of teeth and body shape do not show differences neither in the acoustic waveform nor in the power spectrum. Conclusion Significant overlap in acoustic features demonstrates that the sound-producing mechanism is highly conservative among species. Differences in the calls of some species are due to size dimorphism and the sound variation might be in this case a by-product. This morphological constraint does not permit a consideration of acoustic communication as the main driving force in the diversification of clownfishes. Moreover, calls are not produced to find mate and consequently are less subject to variations due to partner preference, which restricts the constraints of diversification. Calls are

  13. A multivariate analysis of genetic variation in the advertisement call of the gray treefrog, Hyla versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Allison M; Smith, Michael J; Gerhardt, H Carl

    2014-06-01

    Genetic variation in sexual displays is crucial for an evolutionary response to sexual selection, but can be eroded by strong selection. Identifying the magnitude and sources of additive genetic variance underlying sexually selected traits is thus an important issue in evolutionary biology. We conducted a quantitative genetics experiment with gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) to investigate genetic variances and covariances among features of the male advertisement call. Two energetically expensive traits showed significant genetic variation: call duration, expressed as number of pulses per call, and call rate, represented by its inverse, call period. These two properties also showed significant genetic covariance, consistent with an energetic constraint to call production. Combining the genetic variance-covariance matrix with previous estimates of directional sexual selection imposed by female preferences predicts a limited increase in call duration but no change in call rate despite significant selection on both traits. In addition to constraints imposed by the genetic covariance structure, an evolutionary response to sexual selection may also be limited by high energetic costs of long-duration calls and by preferences that act most strongly against very short-duration calls. Meanwhile, the persistence of these preferences could be explained by costs of mating with males with especially unattractive calls. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Climatic Variations, Trends and Drought Frequency in Dejen District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-31

    ajol.info and www.bioline.org.br/ja. Climatic Variations, Trends and ... Keywords: Climate change, drought frequency, standardized precipitation index, rainfall variations ... Due to various climate risks, East Africa is one of the.

  15. Variation of word frequencies in Russian literary texts

    OpenAIRE

    Kargin, Vladislav

    2015-01-01

    We study the variation of word frequencies in Russian literary texts. Our findings indicate that the standard deviation of a word's frequency across texts depends on its average frequency according to a power law with exponent $0.62,$ showing that the rarer words have a relatively larger degree of frequency volatility (i.e., "burstiness"). Several latent factors models have been estimated to investigate the structure of the word frequency distribution. The dependence of a word's frequency vol...

  16. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless... and +6 percent to −10 percent of rated voltage. This limitation does not address transient conditions. ...

  17. Geographic variation in advertisement calls of a Microhylid frog - testing the role of drift and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ko-Huan; Shaner, Pei-Jen L; Lin, Yen-Po; Lin, Si-Min

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic signals for mating are important traits that could drive population differentiation and speciation. Ecology may play a role in acoustic divergence through direct selection (e.g., local adaptation to abiotic environment), constraint of correlated traits (e.g., acoustic traits linked to another trait under selection), and/or interspecific competition (e.g., character displacement). However, genetic drift alone can also drive acoustic divergence. It is not always easy to differentiate the role of ecology versus drift in acoustic divergence. In this study, we tested the role of ecology and drift in shaping geographic variation in the advertisement calls of Microhyla fissipes. We examined three predictions based on ecological processes: (1) the correlation between temperature and call properties across M. fissipes populations; (2) the correlation between call properties and body size across M. fissipes populations; and (3) reproductive character displacement (RCD) in call properties between M. fissipes populations that are sympatric with and allopatric to a congener M. heymonsi. To test genetic drift, we examined correlations among call divergence, geographic distance, and genetic distance across M. fissipes populations. We recorded the advertisement calls from 11 populations of M. fissipes in Taiwan, five of which are sympatrically distributed with M. heymonsi. We found geographic variation in both temporal and spectral properties of the advertisement calls of M. fissipes. However, the call properties were not correlated with local temperature or the callers' body size. Furthermore, we did not detect RCD. By contrast, call divergence, geographic distance, and genetic distance between M. fissipes populations were all positively correlated. The comparisons between phenotypic Q st (P st) and F st values did not show significant differences, suggesting a role of drift. We concluded that genetic drift, rather than ecological processes, is the more likely

  18. Killer whale call frequency is similar across the oceans, but varies across sympatric ecotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Olga A; Miller, Patrick J O; Yurk, Harald; Samarra, Filipa I P; Hoyt, Erich; Ford, John K B; Matkin, Craig O; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G

    2015-07-01

    Killer whale populations may differ in genetics, morphology, ecology, and behavior. In the North Pacific, two sympatric populations ("resident" and "transient") specialize on different prey (fish and marine mammals) and retain reproductive isolation. In the eastern North Atlantic, whales from the same populations have been observed feeding on both fish and marine mammals. Fish-eating North Pacific "residents" are more genetically related to eastern North Atlantic killer whales than to sympatric mammal-eating "transients." In this paper, a comparison of frequency variables in killer whale calls recorded from four North Pacific resident, two North Pacific transient, and two eastern North Atlantic populations is reported to assess which factors drive the large-scale changes in call structure. Both low-frequency and high-frequency components of North Pacific transient killer whale calls have significantly lower frequencies than those of the North Pacific resident and North Atlantic populations. The difference in frequencies could be related to ecological specialization or to the phylogenetic history of these populations. North Pacific transient killer whales may have genetically inherited predisposition toward lower frequencies that may shape their learned repertoires.

  19. Acoustic Repertoire of the Philippine Tarsier (Tarsius syrichta fraterculus and Individual Variation of Long-Distance Calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada Řeháková-Petrů

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the spectrographic description of the vocal repertoire of the Philippine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta fraterculus, a solitary living nocturnal primate for which a very limited information about acoustic communication exists to date. The majority of vocalizations were performed around sunset and, less frequently, at sunrise. We identified eight call types. Five calls recorded during communication between adults included three long-distance calls—loud call, smack-whistle, and whistle—then a soft locust-like chirp and a bird-like trill. Two other calls—cheep and twitter—were recorded during mother-infant communication. One distress call was emitted by adults during handling. All calls were performed in the 9752 Hz to more than 22 kHz frequency range. This study provides the first evidence of individual variation in the long-distance calls performed by tarsiers. Moreover, our study provides a basis for future comparison within as well as between tarsier species taxonomy. Bioacoustic methods can be used in monitoring of these cryptic species and determining their distribution range. Thus, bioacoustic studies can help to improve conservation strategies of different population/species.

  20. Interspecific variation in the phenology of advertisement calling in a temperate Australian frog community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Geoffrey W; Canessa, Stefano; Parris, Kirsten M

    2015-09-01

    Spatial and temporal partitioning of resources underlies the coexistence of species with similar niches. In communities of frogs and toads, the phenology of advertisement calling provides insights into temporal partitioning of reproductive effort and its implications for community dynamics. This study assessed the phenology of advertisement calling in an anuran community from Melbourne, in southern Australia. We collated data from 1432 surveys of 253 sites and used logistic regression to quantify seasonality in the nightly probability of calling and the influence of meteorological variables on this probability for six species of frogs. We found limited overlap in the predicted seasonal peaks of calling among these species. Those shown to have overlapping calling peaks are unlikely to be in direct competition, due to differences in larval ecology (Crinia signifera and Litoria ewingii) or differences in calling behavior and acoustics (Limnodynastes dumerilii and Litoria raniformis). In contrast, closely related and ecologically similar species (Crinia signfera and Crinia parinsignifera;Litoria ewingii and Litoria verreauxii) appear to have staggered seasonal peaks of calling. In combination with interspecific variation in the meteorological correlates of calling, these results may be indicative of temporal partitioning of reproductive activity to facilitate coexistence, as has been reported for tropical and temperate anurans from other parts of the globe.

  1. [Variation in mycoses frequency in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez Tovar, L J; López Martínez, R; Macotela Ruiz, E; Manzano Gayosso, P; Serrano Jaén, L; Carmona Castañón, A; Mondragón Gonźalez, R

    1999-01-01

    We show the records about diagnosed mycoses in a hospital in Mexico City in two periods of time: from 1967 to 1977 and from 1993 to 1997. In the former 15,429 patients were studied and in the latter, 5,998. Striking differences among frequency, etiological agents and clinical outcome, were observed. The most frequent infections in both lapses were the superficial ones, however the most recent scores showed a notorious increase in opportunistic infections. We diagnosed only one histoplasmosis case during the period from 1993 to 1997. Etiological agents have also changed, dermatophytes frequency like Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. tonsurans have diminished while T. rubrum increased from 60% to 80% of the whole dermatophytoses cases. Even though Criptococcus neoformans used to be the only agent causing criptococosis, in the most recent report we found that C. laurentii, C. terreus and C. unigutulatus were also isolated. Another important difference was mortality in rhinocerebral mucormicosis: twenty years ago it was fairly 80%, nowadays it has decreased to 20%.

  2. Rapid differentiation of sexual signals in invasive toads: call variation among populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumiba, Kiyomi; Duffy, Richard L.; Parsons, Scott A.; Alford, Ross A.; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Advertisement calls tend to differ among populations, based on morphological and environmental factors, or simply geographic distance, in many taxa. Invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) were introduced to Australia in 1935 and their distribution has expanded at increasing rates over time. Rapid evolution occurred in morphological and behavioural characters that accelerate dispersal, but the effects of rapid expansion on sexual signals have not been examined. We collected advertisement calls from four populations of different ages since invasion, and analysed the geographic differentiation of seven call parameters. Our comparisons indicate that the calls of R. marina differ among Australian populations. The signal variation was not simply clinal with respect to population age, climate, or morphological differentiation. We suggest that selection on signalling among populations has been idiosyncratic and may reflect local female preferences or adaptation to environmental factors that are not clinal such as energy availability. PMID:27328666

  3. A cervid vocal fold model suggests greater glottal efficiency in calling at high frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo R Titze

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Male Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni produce loud and high fundamental frequency bugles during the mating season, in contrast to the male European Red Deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus who produces loud and low fundamental frequency roaring calls. A critical step in understanding vocal communication is to relate sound complexity to anatomy and physiology in a causal manner. Experimentation at the sound source, often difficult in vivo in mammals, is simulated here by a finite element model of the larynx and a wave propagation model of the vocal tract, both based on the morphology and biomechanics of the elk. The model can produce a wide range of fundamental frequencies. Low fundamental frequencies require low vocal fold strain, but large lung pressure and large glottal flow if sound intensity level is to exceed 70 dB at 10 m distance. A high-frequency bugle requires both large muscular effort (to strain the vocal ligament and high lung pressure (to overcome phonation threshold pressure, but at least 10 dB more intensity level can be achieved. Glottal efficiency, the ration of radiated sound power to aerodynamic power at the glottis, is higher in elk, suggesting an advantage of high-pitched signaling. This advantage is based on two aspects; first, the lower airflow required for aerodynamic power and, second, an acoustic radiation advantage at higher frequencies. Both signal types are used by the respective males during the mating season and probably serve as honest signals. The two signal types relate differently to physical qualities of the sender. The low-frequency sound (Red Deer call relates to overall body size via a strong relationship between acoustic parameters and the size of vocal organs and body size. The high-frequency bugle may signal muscular strength and endurance, via a 'vocalizing at the edge' mechanism, for which efficiency is critical.

  4. Geographic variation in the advertisement calls of Hyla eximia and its possible explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Tejeda, Ruth E; Méndez-Cárdenas, María Guadalupe; Islas-Villanueva, Valentina; Macías Garcia, Constantino

    2014-01-01

    Populations of species occupying large geographic ranges are often phenotypically diverse as a consequence of variation in selective pressures and drift. This applies to attributes involved in mate choice, particularly when both geographic range and breeding biology overlap between related species. This condition may lead to interference of mating signals, which would in turn promote reproductive character displacement (RCD). We investigated whether variation in the advertisement call of the mountain treefrog (Hyla eximia) is linked to geographic distribution with respect to major Mexican river basins (Panuco, Lerma, Balsas and Magdalena), or to coexistence with its sister (the canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor) or another related species (the dwarf treefrog, Tlalocohyla smithii). We also evaluated whether call divergence across the main river basins could be linked to genetic structure. We found that the multidimensional acoustic space of calls from two basins where H. eximia currently interacts with T. smithii, was different from the acoustic space of calls from H. eximia elsewhere. Individuals from these two basins were also distinguishable from the rest by both the phylogeny inferred from mitochondrial sequences, and the genetic structure inferred from nuclear markers. The discordant divergence of H. eximia advertisement calls in the two separate basins where its geographic range overlaps that of T. smithii can be interpreted as the result of two independent events of RCD, presumably as a consequence of acoustic interference in the breeding choruses, although more data are required to evaluate this possibility.

  5. Estimating inbreeding coefficients from NGS data: Impact on genotype calling and allele frequency estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Filipe G.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Albrechtsen, Anders; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    Most methods for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data analyses incorporate information regarding allele frequencies using the assumption of Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) as a prior. However, many organisms including those that are domesticated, partially selfing, or with asexual life cycles show strong deviations from HWE. For such species, and specially for low-coverage data, it is necessary to obtain estimates of inbreeding coefficients (F) for each individual before calling genotypes. Here, we present two methods for estimating inbreeding coefficients from NGS data based on an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. We assess the impact of taking inbreeding into account when calling genotypes or estimating the site frequency spectrum (SFS), and demonstrate a marked increase in accuracy on low-coverage highly inbred samples. We demonstrate the applicability and efficacy of these methods in both simulated and real data sets. PMID:23950147

  6. Paralinguistic variation and invariance in the characteristic frequencies of vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traunmüller, H

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that within-speaker variations in vocal effort and phonation affect fundamental frequency (F0) and the formant frequencies of vowels in the sense of a linear compression/expansion of the spectral separations between them, given an adequate scaling of pitch. Between-speaker variations in size correspond to a translation of the spectral peaks shaped by F0 and the formants if pitch is scaled tonotopically (in Bark). On the basis of these observations, invariant cues to vowel quality are suggested. It is further shown that vowels produced by adult women tend to be phonetically more explicit and, hence, more peripheral in 'vowel space' than those of men and children. It is also shown that the formant frequencies of vowels subjected to paralinguistic variation are related by power functions of frequency.

  7. Radiology residency call in the northeastern United States: comparison of difficulty and frequency in programs of different size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenshtein, Anna; Bauman-Fishkin, Olga; Fishkin, Igor; Homel, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop objective measures of residency call frequency and difficulty, to establish mean values for the northeastern United States, and to test those values for correlation with program size. A survey questionnaire was sent to 104 radiology residency programs in the northeastern United States. The programs were classified according to number of residents, as small ( or = 31 residents). The call difficulty index was defined as the number of emergency examinations per resident per year. Call frequency indexes were defined as the numbers of evenings and of nights during the 4-year residency when residents were scheduled for call. The average call difficulty index and standard deviation for the respondent programs was 3,855 +/- 1,779. The average call frequency index and standard deviation for evenings was 140 +/- 53 and for nights was 120 +/- 59. A significant negative correlation was found between program size on one hand and call difficulty index (r = -0.36, P = .01), evening call frequency index (r = -0.29, P = .033), and night call frequency index (r = -0.51, P < .001) on the other. Residents in small programs could expect to be on call 192 evenings and 192 nights in the 4-year residency and to perform 4,866 emergency examinations per year, as opposed to the 110 evenings and 89 nights on call and the 3,213 emergency examinations that residents in very large programs could expect. In other words, the smaller the program, the more calls residents can expect to take, and the more emergency examinations they will interpret. The mean call difficulty and off-hours call frequency indexes established for residency programs of different size in the Northeast demonstrate increasing call difficulty and increasing off-hours call frequency with decreasing program size.

  8. Significant variation in transformation frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Benjamin A; Rozen, Daniel E

    2013-04-01

    The naturally transformable bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to take up extracellular DNA and incorporate it into its genome. Maintaining natural transformation within a species requires that the benefits of transformation outweigh its costs. Although much is known about the distribution of natural transformation among bacterial species, little is known about the degree to which transformation frequencies vary within species. Here we find that there is significant variation in transformation frequency between strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from asymptomatic carriage, and that this variation is not concordant with isolate genetic relatedness. Polymorphism in the signalling system regulating competence is also not causally related to differences in transformation frequency, although this polymorphism does influence the degree of genetic admixture experienced by bacterial strains. These data suggest that bacteria can evolve new transformation frequencies over short evolutionary timescales. This facility may permit cells to balance the potential costs and benefits of transformation by regulating transformation frequency in response to environmental conditions.

  9. Significant variation in transformation frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Benjamin A; Rozen, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The naturally transformable bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to take up extracellular DNA and incorporate it into its genome. Maintaining natural transformation within a species requires that the benefits of transformation outweigh its costs. Although much is known about the distribution of natural transformation among bacterial species, little is known about the degree to which transformation frequencies vary within species. Here we find that there is significant variation in transformation frequency between strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from asymptomatic carriage, and that this variation is not concordant with isolate genetic relatedness. Polymorphism in the signalling system regulating competence is also not causally related to differences in transformation frequency, although this polymorphism does influence the degree of genetic admixture experienced by bacterial strains. These data suggest that bacteria can evolve new transformation frequencies over short evolutionary timescales. This facility may permit cells to balance the potential costs and benefits of transformation by regulating transformation frequency in response to environmental conditions. PMID:23303370

  10. Acoustic characteristics of the low-frequency nest call of discomfort of the house mouse ( Mus musculus) early ontogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, M. A.; Akimov, A. G.

    2010-05-01

    Acoustic characteristics of the low-frequency nest call signaling discomfort of mouse pups are considered. The spectral temporal analysis of the call is realized for house mouse pups. In the structure of some calls, the frequency modulation and components of the noise are established. Signal duration varies from 20 to 170 ms. A statistically significant decrease of call duration and its fundamental frequency is shown from the 6th to 29th day of the mouse pups’ lives. The most stable parameters of the call-the harmonic structure, low-frequency range (up to 20 kHz), and location of the fundamental frequency between 4 and 8 kHz are recognized.

  11. Variation between seated and standing/walking postures among male and female call centre operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomingas Allan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dose and time-pattern of sitting has been suggested in public health research to be an important determinant of risk for developing a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disorders and diabetes. The aim of the present study was to assess the time-pattern of seated and standing/walking postures amongst male and female call centre operators, on the basis of whole-shift posture recordings, analysed and described by a number of novel variables describing posture variation. Methods Seated vs. standing/walking was recorded using dichotomous inclinometers throughout an entire work shift for 43 male and 97 female call centre operators at 16 call centres. Data were analysed using an extensive set of variables describing occurrence of and switches between seated and standing/walking, posture similarity across the day, and compliance with standard recommendations for computer work. Results The majority of the operators, both male and female, spent more than 80% of the shift in a seated posture with an average of 10.4 switches/hour between seated and standing/walking or vice versa. Females spent, on average, 11% of the day in periods of sustained sitting longer than 1 hour; males 4.6% (p = 0.013. Only 38% and 11% of the operators complied with standard recommendations of getting an uninterrupted break from seated posture of at least 5 or 10 minutes, respectively, within each hour of work. Two thirds of all investigated variables showed coefficients of variation between subjects above 0.5. Since work tasks and contractual break schedules were observed to be essentially similar across operators and across days, this indicates that sedentary behaviours differed substantially between individuals. Conclusions The extensive occurrence of uninterrupted seated work indicates that efforts should be made at call centres - and probably in other settings in the office sector - to introduce more physical variation in terms of standing

  12. Hemidactylus frenatus (Squamata: Gekkonidae: call frequency, movement and condition of tail in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caty Frenkel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Call frequency and movements of the gecko Hemidactylus frenatus were studied in Punta Morales, Costa Rica from April 1999 through May 2000. Call activity of H. frenatus was positively related to air temperature at night and throughout the year. Higher activity was at dusk, dawn, and during the hottest months. Call frequency was related with gecko abundance per month, although not during the night. More males and females had a regenerated tail compared to juveniles, the last ones could have it complete or regenerated. Females moved longer distances than males and juveniles. Adults were found higher on walls. Males and females were recaptured more times than juveniles, and the period of time between their recaptures was longer. Members of this population do not seem to be as aggressive to other geckos as mentioned in the literature. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (4: 1125-1130. Epub 2006 Dec. 15Estudié la frecuencia de canto y el desplazamiento de la lagartija Hemidactylus frenatus en Punta Morales, CostaRica. La frecuencia de canto se corelaciona positivamente con la temperatura ambiental durante la noche y con la temperatura a lo largo del año. La mayor actividad fue al anochecer, al amanecer y durante los meses más calurosos. La abundancia mensual de lagartijas se relacionó con la frecuencia de canto, no así la abundancia por noche. Las colas regeneradas son más frecuentes en hembras y machos que en las lagartijas jóvenes. Las hembras se desplazaron mayores distancias que machos y jóvenes. Los adultos se encontraban más alto en las paredes de los edificios. Los machos y hembras se recapturaron más veces que los jóvenes, y el tiempo entre recapturas fue mayor. Esta población no parece ser tan agresiva como se menciona en la literatura

  13. Clutter Height Variation Effects on Frequency Dependen Path Loss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clutter Height Variation Effects on Frequency Dependen Path Loss Models at UHF Bands in Build-Up Areas. ... With the aforementioned, we believe the results and observations presented would provide guide to radio system engineers in making informed choices on the applicability and predictability of such models in the ...

  14. Fear conditioned discrimination of frequency modulated sweeps within species-specific calls of mustached bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ma

    Full Text Available Social and echolocation vocalizations of bats contain different patterns of frequency modulations. An adult bat's ability to discriminate between various FM parameters, however, is not well established. Using changes in heart rate (HR as a quantitative measure of associative learning, we demonstrate that mustached bats (Pteronotus parnellii can be fear conditioned to linear frequency modulated (FM sweeps typically centered at their acoustic fovea (approximately 60 kHz. We also show that HR is sensitive to a change in the direction of the conditional frequency modulation keeping all other parameters constant. In addition, a change in either depth or duration co-varied with FM rate is reflected in the change in HR. Finally, HR increases linearly with FM rate incremented by 0.1 kHz/ms from a pure tone to a target rate of 1.0 kHz/ms of the conditional stimulus. Learning is relatively rapid, occurring after a single training session. We also observed that fear conditioning enhances local field potential activity within the basolateral amygdala. Neural response enhancement coinciding with rapid learning and a fine scale cortical representation of FM sweeps shown earlier make FMs prime candidates for discriminating between different call types and possibly communicating socially relevant information within species-specific sounds.

  15. Significant variation in transformation frequency in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Benjamin A; Rozen, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The naturally transformable bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is able to take up extracellular DNA and incorporate it into its genome. Maintaining natural transformation within a species requires that the benefits of transformation outweigh its costs. Although much is known about the distribution of natural transformation among bacterial species, little is known about the degree to which transformation frequencies vary within species. Here we find that there is significant variation in trans...

  16. CNNdel: Calling Structural Variations on Low Coverage Data Based on Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many structural variations (SVs detection methods have been proposed due to the popularization of next-generation sequencing (NGS. These SV calling methods use different SV-property-dependent features; however, they all suffer from poor accuracy when running on low coverage sequences. The union of results from these tools achieves fairly high sensitivity but still produces low accuracy on low coverage sequence data. That is, these methods contain many false positives. In this paper, we present CNNdel, an approach for calling deletions from paired-end reads. CNNdel gathers SV candidates reported by multiple tools and then extracts features from aligned BAM files at the positions of candidates. With labeled feature-expressed candidates as a training set, CNNdel trains convolutional neural networks (CNNs to distinguish true unlabeled candidates from false ones. Results show that CNNdel works well with NGS reads from 26 low coverage genomes of the 1000 Genomes Project. The paper demonstrates that convolutional neural networks can automatically assign the priority of SV features and reduce the false positives efficaciously.

  17. Refractivity variations and propagation at Ultra High Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, I.; Najam-Ul-Islam, M.; Mujahid, U.; Shah, S. A. A.; Ul Haq, Rizwan

    Present framework is established to deal with the refractivity variations normally affected the radio waves propagation at different frequencies, ranges and different environments. To deal such kind of effects, many researchers proposed several methodologies. One method is to use the parameters from meteorology to investigate these effects of variations in refractivity on propagation. These variations are region specific and we have selected a region of one kilometer height over the English Channel. We have constructed different modified refractivity profiles based on the local meteorological data. We have recorded more than 48 million received signal strength from a communication links of 50 km operating at 2015 MHz in the Ultra High Frequency band giving path loss between transmitting and receiving stations of the experimental setup. We have used parabolic wave equation method to simulate an hourly value of signal strength and compared the obtained simulated loss to the experimental loss. The analysis is made to compute refractivity distribution of standard (STD) and ITU (International Telecommunication Union) refractivity profiles for various evaporation ducts. It is found that a standard refractivity profile is better than the ITU refractivity profiles for the region at 2015 MHz. Further, it is inferred from the analysis of results that 10 m evaporation duct height is the dominant among all evaporation duct heights considered in the research.

  18. Predator Perspective Drives Geographic Variation in Frequency-Dependent Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Iris A; Grundler, Maggie R; Davis Rabosky, Alison R

    2017-10-01

    Color polymorphism in natural populations can manifest as a striking patchwork of phenotypes in space, with neighboring populations characterized by dramatic differences in morph composition. These geographic mosaics can be challenging to explain in the absence of localized selection because they are unlikely to result from simple isolation-by-distance or clinal variation in selective regimes. To identify processes that can lead to the formation of geographic mosaics, we developed a simulation-based model to explore the influence of predator perspective, selection, migration, and genetic linkage of color loci on allele frequencies in polymorphic populations over space and time. Using simulated populations inspired by the biology of Heliconius longwing butterflies, Cepaea land snails, Oophaga poison frogs, and Sonora ground snakes, we found that the relative sizes of predator and prey home ranges can produce large differences in morph composition between neighboring populations under both positive and negative frequency-dependent selection. We also demonstrated the importance of the interaction of predator perspective with the type of frequency dependence and localized directional selection across migration and selection intensities. Our results show that regional-scale predation can promote the formation of phenotypic mosaics in prey species, without the need to invoke spatial variation in selective regimes. We suggest that predator behavior can play an important and underappreciated role in the formation and maintenance of geographic mosaics in polymorphic species.

  19. Prolonged response to calling songs by the L3 auditory interneuron in female crickets (Acheta domesticus): possible roles in regulating phonotactic threshold and selectiveness for call carrier frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsert, Michael; Bingol, Hilary; Atkins, Gordon; Stout, John

    2003-03-01

    L3, an auditory interneuron in the prothoracic ganglion of female crickets (Acheta domesticus) exhibited two kinds of responses to models of the male's calling song (CS): a previously described, phasically encoded immediate response; a more tonically encoded prolonged response. The onset of the prolonged response required 3-8 sec of stimulation to reach its maximum spiking rate and 6-20 sec to decay once the calling song ceased. It did not encode the syllables of the chirp. The prolonged response was sharply selective for the 4-5 kHz carrier frequency of the male's calling songs and its threshold tuning matched the threshold tuning of phonotaxis, while the immediate response of the same neuron was broadly tuned to a wide range of carrier frequencies. The thresholds for the prolonged response covaried with the changing phonotactic thresholds of 2- and 5-day-old females. Treatment of females with juvenile hormone reduced the thresholds for both phonotaxis and the prolonged response by equivalent amounts. Of the 3 types of responses to CSs provided by the ascending L1 and L3 auditory interneurons, the threshold for L3's prolonged response, on average, best matched the same females phonotactic threshold. The prolonged response was stimulated by inputs from both ears while L3's immediate response was driven only from its axon-ipsilateral ear. The prolonged response was not selective for either the CS's syllable period or chirp rate. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Catching hidden variation: systematic correction of reference minor allele annotation in clinical variant calling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbitoff, Yury A; Bezdvornykh, Igor V; Polev, Dmitrii E; Serebryakova, Elena A; Glotov, Andrey S; Glotov, Oleg S; Predeus, Alexander V

    2017-10-26

    PurposeWe comprehensively assessed the influence of reference minor alleles (RMAs), one of the inherent problems of the human reference genome sequence.MethodsThe variant call format (VCF) files provided by the 1000 Genomes and Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) consortia were used to identify RMA sites. All coding RMA sites were checked for concordance with UniProt and the presence of same codon variants. RMA-corrected predictions of functional effect were obtained with SIFT, PolyPhen-2, and PROVEAN standalone tools and compared with dbNSFP v2.9 for consistency.ResultsWe systematically characterized the problem of RMAs and identified several possible ways in which RMA could interfere with accurate variant discovery and annotation. We have discovered a systematic bias in the automated variant effect prediction at the RMA loci, as well as widespread switching of functional consequences for variants located in the same codon as the RMA. As a convenient way to address the problem of RMAs we have developed a simple bioinformatic tool that identifies variation at RMA sites and provides correct annotations for all such substitutions. The tool is available free of charge at http://rmahunter.bioinf.me.ConclusionCorrection of RMA annotation enhances the accuracy of next-generation sequencing-based methods in clinical practice.Genetics in Medicine advance online publication, 26 October 2017; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.168.

  1. An exception to the matched filter hypothesis: A mismatch of male call frequency and female best hearing frequency in a torrent frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longhui; Wang, Jichao; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Bicheng; Brauth, Steven E; Tang, Yezhong; Cui, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    The matched filter hypothesis proposes that the tuning of auditory sensitivity and the spectral character of calls will match in order to maximize auditory processing efficiency during courtship. In this study, we analyzed the acoustic structure of male calls and both male and female hearing sensitivities in the little torrent frog (Amolops torrentis), an anuran species who transmits acoustic signals across streams. The results were in striking contradiction to the matched filter hypothesis. Auditory brainstem response results showed that the best hearing range was 1.6-2 kHz consistent with the best sensitive frequency of most terrestrial lentic taxa, yet completely mismatched with the dominant frequency of conspecific calls (4.3 kHz). Moreover, phonotaxis tests show that females strongly prefer high-frequency (4.3 kHz) over low-frequency calls (1.6 kHz) regardless of ambient noise levels, although peripheral auditory sensitivity is highest in the 1.6-2 kHz range. These results are consistent with the idea that A. torrentis evolved from nonstreamside species and that high-frequency calls evolved under the pressure of stream noise. Our results also suggest that female preferences based on central auditory system characteristics may evolve independently of peripheral auditory system sensitivity in order to maximize communication effectiveness in noisy environments.

  2. Frequency and seasonal variation of ophthalmology-related internet searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Davenport, Byrd; Chan, Dana

    2010-06-01

    To use internet search activity to reveal the intensity of public interest and seasonal variation in ophthalmology-related diseases, symptoms, and treatments. Time-series analysis of internet search data. Google trend data for ophthalmology terms for the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia from 2004 through 2008 were studied. Mean population-weighted temperature and fraction of schools in session were estimated from databases, and relative potential sunlight intensity was calculated. Multivariable linear regression was used to predict search term frequency based on environmental variables. Relative to diabetes searches (100%), common US eye-related searches were: "glasses" (44%), "Lasik" (16%), "contact lenses" (12.4%), "pink eye" (9.5%), "glaucoma" (5.9%), "cataract" (4.1%), "dry eyes" (2.1%), "eye twitching" (1.9%), and "eye pain" (1.9%). Seasonal nature was high for "conjunctivitis" (r(2) = 0.37), "pink eye" (r(2) = 0.32), "eye floaters" (r2 = 0.26), and "stye" (r(2) = 0.19), moderate for "glaucoma" (r(2) = 0.09) and "eye twitching" (r(2) = 0.06), and low for "uveitis" (r(2) = 0.02) and "macular degeneration" (r(2) pink eye," "conjunctivitis," and "glaucoma" (all p eyes" and "eye floaters" (p eye twitching" (p >= 0.001) and negatively with "eyeglasses." "Eye allergy," "itchy eyes," and "watery eyes" were highly seasonal (r(2) = 0.75-0.38) and associated with "pollen" searches. Internet ophthalmology searches relate (in decreasing order) to refractive correction, eye diseases, and eye symptoms. Search study reveals the seasonality and environmental associations of interest in health terms.

  3. Variations in the Spatial Distribution of Gall Bladder Cancer: A Call ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [1] There is a marked variation on the geographic distribution of carcinoma gall bladder within this geographical region. GIS of cancer can identify key areas within a geographical region where the high AAR cannot be solely explained by known risk factors. AAR of gall bladder cancer ranges from 0.3 –7.4/100,000 population ...

  4. Mapping-free variant calling using haplotype reconstruction from k-mer frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audano, Peter; Ravishankar, Shashidhar; Vannberg, Fredrik

    2017-11-24

    The standard protocol for detecting variation in DNA is to map millions of short sequence reads to a known reference and find loci that differ. While this approach works well, it cannot be applied where the sample contains dense variants or is too distant from known references. De novo assembly or hybrid methods can recover genomic variation, but the cost of computation is often much higher. We developed a novel k-mer algorithm and software implementation, Kestrel, capable of characterizing densely-packed SNPs and large indels without mapping, assembly, or de Bruijn graphs. When applied to mosaic penicillin binding protein (PBP) genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae, we found near perfect concordance with assembled contigs at a fraction of the CPU time. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with this approach was able to bypass de novo assemblies. Kestrel has a very low false-positive rate when applied to the whole genome, and while Kestrel identified many variants missed by other methods, limitations of a purely k-mer based approach affect overall sensitivity. Source code and documentation for a Java implementation of Kestrel can be found at https://github.com/paudano/kestrel. All test code for this publication is located at https://github.com/paudano/kescases. paudano@gatech.edu, fredrik.vannberg@biology.gatech.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Does advertisement call variation coincide with genetic variation in the genetically diverse frog taxon currently known as Leptodactylus fuscus (Amphibia: Leptodactylidae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. RONALD HEYER

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The frog Leptodactylus fuscus is found throughout much of South America in open and disturbed habitats. Previous study of genetic differentiation in L. fuscus demonstrated that there was lack of genetic exchange among population units consistent with multiple species, rather than a single species. We examine advertisement vocalizations of L. fuscus to determine whether call variation coincides with genetic differentiation. Calls were analyzed for 32 individual frogs from 25 localities throughout the distributional range of L. fuscus. Although there is variation in calls among geographic samples, call variation is not concordant with genetic variation or geographic distance and the call variation observed is less than that typically found among other closely related species of Leptodactylus. This study is an example of the rare pattern of strong genetic differentiation unaccompanied by salient differences in advertisement calls. The relative infrequency of this pattern as currently understood may only reflect the lack of detailed analyses of genetic and acoustic differentiation within population systems currently understood as single species with substantial geographic distributions.A rã Leptodactylus fuscus é encontrada na maior parte da América do Sul em formações abertas ou em ambientes perturbados. Estudos anteriores de diferenciação genética mostraram ausência de fluxo gênico entre unidades populacionais, o que é compatível com a existência de diversas espécies em vez de uma única. Examinamos a vocalização de anúncio de L. fuscus com a finalidade de verificar se variações na vocalização coincidiam com a diferenciação genética. Foram analisadas vocalizações de 32 indivíduos provenientes de 25 localidades distribuídas em toda a área de distribuição da espécie. Embora exista variação geográfica na vocalização, essa diversificação não corresponde à diferenciação genética ou à distância geogr

  6. Transducer frequency response variations investigated by time reversal calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2016), A16-A16 ISSN 1213-3825. [Europen Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing /32./. 07.09.2016-09.09.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : calibration * time reversal * transducer * frequency response Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  7. Tectorial membrane morphological variation: effects upon stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergevin, Christopher; Velenovsky, David S; Bonine, Kevin E

    2010-08-09

    The tectorial membrane (TM) is widely believed to play an important role in determining the ear's ability to detect and resolve incoming acoustic information. While it is still unclear precisely what that role is, the TM has been hypothesized to help overcome viscous forces and thereby sharpen mechanical tuning of the sensory cells. Lizards present a unique opportunity to further study the role of the TM given the diverse inner-ear morphological differences across species. Furthermore, stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs), sounds emitted by the ear in response to a tone, noninvasively probe the frequency selectivity of the ear. We report estimates of auditory tuning derived from SFOAEs for 12 different species of lizards with widely varying TM morphology. Despite gross anatomical differences across the species examined herein, low-level SFOAEs were readily measurable in all ears tested, even in non-TM species whose basilar papilla contained as few as 50-60 hair cells. Our measurements generally support theoretical predictions: longer delays/sharper tuning features are found in species with a TM relative to those without. However, SFOAEs from at least one non-TM species (Anolis) with long delays suggest there are likely additional micromechanical factors at play that can directly affect tuning. Additionally, in the one species examined with a continuous TM (Aspidoscelis) where cell-to-cell coupling is presumably relatively stronger, delays were intermediate. This observation appears consistent with recent reports that suggest the TM may play a more complex macromechanical role in the mammalian cochlea via longitudinal energy distribution (and thereby affect tuning). Although significant differences exist between reptilian and mammalian auditory biophysics, understanding lizard OAE generation mechanisms yields significant insight into fundamental principles at work in all vertebrate ears. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Radial variation of refractive index, plasma frequency and phase velocity in laser induced air plasma

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathuthu, M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available induced air plasma to study the spatial variation of plasma parameters in the axial direction of the laser beam. In this paper, the authors report investigation on the radial variation of the refractive index, plasma frequency, and phase velocity of a...

  9. Effects of feeding frequency variation on the growth and survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 56-day experiment was conducted to consider the effects of feeding frequency variation on the growth and survival of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. The frequencies of feeding were once daily, twice daily, once in two days and once in three designated as G1, G2, G3 and G4 respectively. One hundred and twenty ...

  10. Doppler-shift compensation behavior in horseshoe bats revisited: auditory feedback controls both a decrease and an increase in call frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Shuyi; Smotherman, Michael

    2002-06-01

    Among mammals, echolocation in bats illustrates the vital role of proper audio-vocal feedback control particularly well. Bats adjust the temporal, spectral and intensity parameters of their echolocation calls depending on the characteristics of the returning echo signal. The mechanism of audio-vocal integration in both mammals and birds is, however, still largely unknown. Here, we present behavioral evidence suggesting a novel audio-vocal control mechanism in echolocating horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum). These bats compensate for even subtle frequency shifts in the echo caused by flight-induced Doppler effects by adjusting the frequency of their echolocation calls. Under natural conditions, when approaching background targets, the bats usually encounter only positive Doppler shifts. Hence, we commonly believed that, during this Doppler-shift compensation behavior, horseshoe bats use auditory feedback to compensate only for these increases in echo frequency (=positive shifts) by actively lowering their call frequency below the resting frequency (the call frequency emitted when not flying and not experiencing Doppler shifts). Re-investigation of the Doppler-shift compensation behavior, however, shows that decreasing echo frequencies (=negative shifts) are involved as well: auditory feedback from frequencies below the resting frequency, when presented at similar suprathreshold intensity levels as higher echo frequencies, cause the bat's call frequency to increase above the resting frequency. However, compensation for negative shifts is less complete than for positive shifts (22% versus 95%), probably because of biomechanical restrictions in the larynx of bats. Therefore, Doppler-shift compensation behavior involves a quite different neural substrate and audio-vocal control mechanism from those previously assumed. The behavioral results are no longer consistent with solely inhibitory feedback originating from frequencies above the resting frequency. Instead

  11. Performance Evaluation of Type-3 PLLs Under Wide Variation in Input Voltage and Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aravind, C. K.; Rani, B.Indu; Chakkarapani, M.

    2017-01-01

    bandwidth, both the single loop and dual loop Type-3 PLL exhibit similar dynamics provided the supply voltage is balanced. However, under voltage sag conditions, dual loop PLL shows improved dynamic response without affecting its stability. Further, the tracking time is reduced as the feed forward frequency......This paper presents a detailed analysis of Type-3 PLL under wide variation in input voltage and frequency. Using small signal modeling, the performance of both single loop and dual loop type-3 PLL for variation in input voltage and frequency is studied. The analysis shows that for the same...

  12. Investigation of switching frequency variations and EMI properties in self-oscillating class D amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Pfaffinger, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Class D audio amplifiers have gained significant influence in sound reproduction due to their high efficiency. One of the most commonly used control methods in these amplifiers is self-oscillation. A parameter of key interest in self-oscillating amplifiers is the switching frequency, which is known......, and the results are compared with measurements performed on a 50 W prototype amplifier. The switching frequency is tracked through accurate spectrum measurements, and very good compliance with simulation results are observed....... for its variation. Knowledge of switching frequency variations is of great importance with respect to electromagnetic interference (EMI). This paper will investigate, whether the switching frequency is depended on modulation index and audio reference frequency. Validation is done using simulations...

  13. No Effect of Body Size on the Frequency of Calling and Courtship Song in the Two-Spotted Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Miyashita

    Full Text Available The relationship between body size and vocalization parameters has been studied in many animal species. In insect species, however, the effect of body size on song frequency has remained unclear. Here we analyzed the effect of body size on the frequency spectra of mating songs produced by the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. We recorded the calling songs and courtship songs of male crickets of different body sizes. The calling songs contained a frequency component that peaked at 5.7 kHz. On the other hand, courtship songs contained two frequency components that peaked at 5.8 and 14.7 kHz. The dominant frequency of each component in both the calling and courtship songs was constant regardless of body size. The size of the harp and mirror regions in the cricket forewings, which are the acoustic sources of the songs, correlated positively with body size. These findings suggest that the frequency contents of both the calling and courtship songs of the cricket are unaffected by whole body, harp, or mirror size.

  14. Collective frequency variation in network synchronization and reverse PageRank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Taylor, Dane; Sun, Jie; Arenas, Alex

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of natural and engineered phenomena rely on large networks of interacting units to reach a dynamical consensus state where the system collectively operates. Here we study the dynamics of self-organizing systems and show that for generic directed networks the collective frequency of the ensemble is not the same as the mean of the individuals' natural frequencies. Specifically, we show that the collective frequency equals a weighted average of the natural frequencies, where the weights are given by an outflow centrality measure that is equivalent to a reverse PageRank centrality. Our findings uncover an intricate dependence of the collective frequency on both the structural directedness and dynamical heterogeneity of the network, and also reveal an unexplored connection between synchronization and PageRank, which opens the possibility of applying PageRank optimization to synchronization. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of collective frequency variation in real-world networks by considering the UK and Scandinavian power grids.

  15. Collective frequency variation in network synchronization and reverse PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Taylor, Dane; Sun, Jie; Arenas, Alex

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of natural and engineered phenomena rely on large networks of interacting units to reach a dynamical consensus state where the system collectively operates. Here we study the dynamics of self-organizing systems and show that for generic directed networks the collective frequency of the ensemble is not the same as the mean of the individuals' natural frequencies. Specifically, we show that the collective frequency equals a weighted average of the natural frequencies, where the weights are given by an outflow centrality measure that is equivalent to a reverse PageRank centrality. Our findings uncover an intricate dependence of the collective frequency on both the structural directedness and dynamical heterogeneity of the network, and also reveal an unexplored connection between synchronization and PageRank, which opens the possibility of applying PageRank optimization to synchronization. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of collective frequency variation in real-world networks by considering the UK and Scandinavian power grids.

  16. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janif, Zinnia J; Brooks, Robert C; Dixson, Barnaby J

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection.

  17. Effect of frequency variation on electromagnetic pulse interaction with charges and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of frequency variation (chirp) in an electromagnetic (EM) pulse on the pulse interaction with a charged particle and plasma is studied. Various types of chirp and pulse envelopes are considered. In vacuum, a charged particle receives a kick in the polarization direction after interaction

  18. Language Choices by Teachers in EFL Classrooms in Cyprus: Bidialectism Meets Bilingualism with a Call for Teacher Training Programmes in Linguistic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiakoumetti, Androula; Mina, Marina

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the interface between bidialectism and bilingualism and provides empirical support for the call for language educators to be trained in issues relating to linguistic variation. Drawing on the sociolinguistic setting of Cyprus, the study investigates the linguistic behaviour of bidialectal teachers in the English…

  19. Frequency variations of the earth's obliquity and the 100-kyr ice-age cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Shou

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the earth's climate are induced by variations in the earth's orbital parameters which modulate the seasonal distribution of solar radiation. Periodicities in the geological climate record with cycles of 100, 41, and 23 kyr have been linked with changes in obliquity, eccentricity, and precession of the equinoxes. The effect of variations of eccentricity during a 100 kyr period is weak relative to the signals from obliquity and precession variations and it may therefore be expected that the 100 kyr signal in the climate record would be of low intensity. However, this signal dominates the climate record and internal nonlinear processes within the climate system have previously been proposed to account for this fact. The author shows that variations in the frequency of the obliquity cycle can give rise to strong 100-kyr forcing of climate.

  20. Novel Complete Probabilistic Models of Random Variation in High Frequency Performance of Nanoscale MOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawid Banchuin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel probabilistic models of the random variations in nanoscale MOSFET's high frequency performance defined in terms of gate capacitance and transition frequency have been proposed. As the transition frequency variation has also been considered, the proposed models are considered as complete unlike the previous one which take only the gate capacitance variation into account. The proposed models have been found to be both analytic and physical level oriented as they are the precise mathematical expressions in terms of physical parameters. Since the up-to-date model of variation in MOSFET's characteristic induced by physical level fluctuation has been used, part of the proposed models for gate capacitance is more accurate and physical level oriented than its predecessor. The proposed models have been verified based on the 65 nm CMOS technology by using the Monte-Carlo SPICE simulations of benchmark circuits and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests as highly accurate since they fit the Monte-Carlo-based analysis results with 99% confidence. Hence, these novel models have been found to be versatile for the statistical/variability aware analysis/design of nanoscale MOSFET-based analog/mixed signal circuits and systems.

  1. Advertisement call and morphological variation of the poorly known and endemic Bokermannohyla juiju Faivovich, Lugli, Lourenço and Haddad, 2009 (Anura: Hylidae) from Central Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taucce, Pedro P G; Pinheiro, Paulo D P; Leite, Felipe S F; Garcia, Paulo C A

    2015-02-02

    Bokermannohyla juiju is a member of the B. martinsi species group and it was described based on one male specimen. In order to enhance the knowledge about the species, we describe its advertisement call and morphological variation, including for the first time data on females. We also provide additional comments about its natural history, geographic distribution, and conservation. The advertisement call of B. juiju consists of a single note, non-pulsed, harmonic structured call emitted several times in a row. Four out of five males were found calling in bromeliads. The female, as it is common in many Bokermannohyla species, presents some morphological features not shared with the males, like a non-hypertrophied forearm and less developed prepollex. 

  2. Frequency-independent approach to calculate physical optics radiations with the quadratic concave phase variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yu Mao, E-mail: yumaowu@fudan.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Information Science of Electromagnetic Waves (MoE), School of Information Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Teng, Si Jia, E-mail: sjteng12@fudan.edu.cn [School of Information Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop the numerical steepest descent path (NSDP) method to calculate the physical optics (PO) radiations with the quadratic concave phase variations. With the surface integral equation method, the physical optics (PO) scattered fields are formulated and further reduced to the surface integrals. The high frequency physical critical points contributions, including the stationary phase points, the boundary resonance points and the vertex points are comprehensively studied via the proposed NSDP method. The key contributions of this work are twofold. One is that together with the PO integrals taking the quadratic parabolic and hyperbolic phase terms, this work makes the NSDP theory be complete for treating the PO integrals with quadratic phase variations. Another is that, in order to illustrate the transition effect of the high frequency physical critical points, in this work, we consider and further extend the NSDP method to calculate the PO integrals with the coalescence of the high frequency critical points. Numerical results for the highly oscillatory PO integral with the coalescence of the critical points are given to verify the efficiency of the proposed NSDP method. The NSDP method could achieve the frequency independent computational workload and error controllable accuracy in all the numerical experiments, especially for the case of the coalescence of the high frequency critical points.

  3. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when a GW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal–GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  4. Effect of Temperature Variation on Modal Frequency of Reinforced Concrete Slab and Beam in Cold Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanbing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes of modal frequencies induced by temperature variation can be more obvious than those caused by structural damage, which will lead to the false damage identification results. Therefore, quantifying the temperature effect on modal frequencies is a critical step to eliminate its interference in damage detection. Due to the nonuniform and time-dependent characteristics of temperature distribution, it is insufficient to obtain the reliable relationships between temperatures and modal frequencies using temperatures in air or at surface. In this paper, correlations between measured temperatures (air temperature, surface temperature, mean temperature, etc. and modal frequencies for the slab and beam are comparatively analyzed. And the quantitative models are constructed considering nonuniform temperature distribution. Firstly, the reinforced concrete slab and beam were constructed and placed outside the laboratory to be monitored. Secondly, the correlation coefficients between modal frequencies and three kinds of temperatures are calculated, respectively. Thirdly, simple linear regression models between mean temperature and modal frequencies are established for the slab and beam. Finally, five temperature variables are selected to construct the multiple linear regression models. Prediction results reveal that the proposed multiple linear regression models possess favorable accuracy to quantify the temperature effect on modal frequencies considering nonuniform temperature distribution.

  5. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.M.; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F.; Huang, K.M.; Gan, Q.; Gong, Y. [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Y.H. [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). College of Hydrometeorolgy

    2013-11-01

    Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs) in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when aGW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative) accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases) with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal-GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  6. High Frequency Variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future. PMID:25635416

  7. High frequency variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-28

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future.

  8. Variational approach to low-frequency kinetic-MHD in the current coupling scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Burby, J W

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid kinetic-MHD models describe the interaction of an MHD bulk fluid with an ensemble of hot particles, which is described by a kinetic equation. When the Vlasov description is adopted for the energetic particles, different Vlasov-MHD models have been shown to lack an exact energy balance, which was recently recovered by the introduction of non-inertial force terms in the kinetic equation. These force terms arise from fundamental approaches based on Hamiltonian and variational methods. In this work we apply Hamilton's variational principle to formulate new current-coupling kinetic-MHD models in the low-frequency approximation (i.e. large Larmor frequency limit). More particularly, we formulate current-coupling hybrid schemes, in which energetic particle dynamics are expressed in either guiding-center or gyrocenter coordinates.

  9. The role of low-frequency variation in the manifestation of warming trend and ENSO amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sae-Rim; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Kim, Kwang-Yul; Kim, WonMoo

    2017-08-01

    Despite the increase in greenhouse gas concentration, the sea surface temperature (SST) over the tropical eastern Pacific during the period of 1999-2014 exhibits less warming trend compared to the earlier decades. It has been noted that this warming hiatus is accompanied by a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), which represents low-frequency variability over the Pacific. On the other hand, the 2015/2016 El Niño is among the strongest comparable to the 1997/1998 event, which coincides with the recently altered PDO phase from negative to positive. These observational evidences have generated substantial interest in the role of low-frequency variations in modulating El Niño-Southern Oscillation amplitude as well as manifestation of warming signal in the tropical Pacific. Therefore, it is necessary to appropriately separate low-frequency variability and global warming signal from SST records. Here, we present three primary modes of global SST that include secular warming trend, low-frequency variability, and biennial oscillation. Based on the independent behavior of these three modes, global warming is clearly continuing but its manifestation is enhanced (depressed) when the low-frequency variation is in the positive (negative) phase. Further, possibility of strong El Niño increases under the positive phase of the low-frequency mode, which amplifies warming over the tropical eastern Pacific. Indeed, the strong 2015/2016 El Niño is largely attributed to the positive phase of the low-frequency mode. In order to examine the climate models' ability to simulate the three SST modes as obtained in the observational record, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) datasets are also analyzed. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the three modes have been replicated closely by the selected CMIP5 models forced by the historical condition, which provides an analogy of the interplay of three modes in the observed tropical Pacific SST.

  10. CARIAA Call - Call Document

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CARIAA

    2013-02-19

    Feb 19, 2013 ... Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is pleased to announce a call for concept notes as part of the Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) program. Funded by IDRC and the United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID), ...

  11. Analysis and Comprehensive Analytical Modeling of Statistical Variations in Subthreshold MOSFET's High Frequency Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawid Banchuin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the analysis of statistical variations in subthreshold MOSFET's high frequency characteristics defined in terms of gate capacitance and transition frequency, have been shown and the resulting comprehensive analytical models of such variations in terms of their variances have been proposed. Major imperfection in the physical level properties including random dopant fluctuation and effects of variations in MOSFET's manufacturing process, have been taken into account in the proposed analysis and modeling. The up to dated comprehensive analytical model of statistical variation in MOSFET's parameter has been used as the basis of analysis and modeling. The resulting models have been found to be both analytic and comprehensive as they are the precise mathematical expressions in terms of physical level variables of MOSFET. Furthermore, they have been verified at the nanometer level by using 65~nm level BSIM4 based benchmarks and have been found to be very accurate with smaller than 5 % average percentages of errors. Hence, the performed analysis gives the resulting models which have been found to be the potential mathematical tool for the statistical and variability aware analysis and design of subthreshold MOSFET based VHF circuits, systems and applications.

  12. THE EVALUATION OF FREQUENCY AND SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF ACID PEPTIC DISEASE: A SEVEN YEARS STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Iftikhar Haider

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acid peptic disease (APD is a worldwide health problem. It includes a variety of inflammatory and ulcerative lesions involving esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The disease condition may persist with multiple symptoms, one of them being dyspepsia. The object of the present study was to determine the frequency and seasonal variations of APD in patients presenting with dyspeptic symptoms. This observational study was carried out at the endoscopy unit in Baqai Medical University from December 2003 to December 2010, over a period of seven years. The evolution of APD frequency remained equivocal throughout the study period. However, a decline was noted in the frequency of peptic ulcer disease (PUD especially for gastric and duodenal ulcer cases but a rise during autumn and winter seasons was also noted in duodenal ulcer cases.

  13. Long-Term Variations in PMC Frequency as a Function of Latitude from SBUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shettle, E. P.; Deland, M. T.; Thomas, G. E.; Olivero, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    An earlier analysis of the Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) measurements from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV & SBUV/2) satellite measurements found that there was a weak long-term increase in the frequency of occurrence of PMCs, which was not statistically significant [DeLand et al. 2003]. Since then, a new Version 3 data set has been developed using an improved PMC detection algorithm which produces more consistent results under all measurement conditions. DeLand et al. [2007] have used this new data set to examine the long-term variations in the PMC brightness. We have utilized this Version 3 data set to examine the corresponding long- term variations in the PMC frequency as a function of latitude. The occurrence frequency data are adjusted for local time effects before merging the overlapping data sets from different SBUV/2 instruments for trend calculations. Preliminary results indicate that while there is a positive trend in all latitude bins, the trend was only about 6% per decade in the lowest latitude bin (50° to 64°) in both hemispheres, and was not statistically significant. At higher latitudes (64° to 74°, and 74° to 82°) the trend was much stronger in both hemispheres (approximately 15% to 25% per decade), and statistically significant. There is also a strong anti-correlation with the long-term variation of solar Lyman-alpha flux, with a peak-to-peak solar cycle variation of approximately a factor of 2 for all latitudes. The weak long-term increase at 50° to 64° N is comparable with that found in the ground based Noctilucent Cloud (NLC) observations for Northern Europe recently updated by Kirkwood et al. [accepted by Ann. Geophys., 2007].

  14. Frequency of t(14;18) in follicular lymphoma patients: geographical or technical variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S I; Sughayer, M A; Al-Quadan, T F; Qaqish, B M; Tarawneh, M S

    2009-10-01

    The t(14;18) translocation is the most distinguishing molecular finding in follicular lymphoma (FL). However, the reported frequencies of t(14;18) in FL show significant variation, which is often attributed to geographical and/or methodological factors. The methods used to detect t(14;18) include Southern blotting, conventional cytogenetics, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and polymerized chain reaction (PCR). Because of its practicality and superior sensitivity, PCR is becoming the more commonly used method in clinical laboratories. The identification of the main breakpoint regions on chromosome 18, including the major breakpoint region (MBR), the minor cluster region (mcr), and the newly defined intermediate cluster region (icr), increased the detection frequency of PCR. In our study, using a highly sensitive nested PCR strategy with primers for MBR, mcr and icr regions, we were able to detect t(14;18) in 95% of FL patients, which is one of the highest reported frequencies using PCR. We screened 58 FL patient samples collected retrospectively from different hospitals in Jordan. DNA was extracted from archival paraffin-embedded samples, some of which were >10 years old. The respective breakpoint distributions were, 47 for MBR (81%), two for mcr (3.5%) and six for icr (10.3%). In this report, we analyze this high frequency of t(14;18) detection in a general review of the recent literature, in an attempt to assess the geographical vs. methodological influences on the reported frequencies.

  15. Low and high frequency Madden-Julian oscillations in austral summer: interannual variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumo, Takeshi [Research Institute For Global Change (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); LOCEAN, IRD-CNRS-UPMC, Paris (France); Masson, Sebastien; Vialard, Jerome; Madec, Gurvan [LOCEAN, IRD-CNRS-UPMC, Paris (France); Boyer Montegut, Clement de [IFREMER, Brest (France); Behera, Swadhin K. [Research Institute For Global Change (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); Takahashi, Keiko [Earth Simulator Center (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); Yamagata, Toshio [Research Institute For Global Change (JAMSTEC), Yokohama (Japan); University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the main component of intraseasonal variability of the tropical convection, with clear climatic impacts at an almost-global scale. Based on satellite observations, it is shown that there are two types of austral-summer MJO events (broadly defined as 30-120 days convective variability with eastward propagation of about 5 m/s). Equatorial MJO events have a period of 30-50 days and tend to be symmetric about the equator, whereas MJO events centered near 8 S tend to have a longer period of 55-100 days. The lower-frequency variability is associated with a strong upper-ocean response, having a clear signature in both sea surface temperature and its diurnal cycle. These two MJO types have different interannual variations, and are modulated by the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). Following a negative IOD event, the lower-frequency southern MJO variability increases, while the higher-frequency equatorial MJO strongly diminishes. We propose two possible explanations for this change in properties of the MJO. One possibility is that changes in the background atmospheric circulation after an IOD favour the development of the low-frequency MJO. The other possibility is that the shallower thermocline ridge and mixed layer depth, by enhancing SST intraseasonal variability and thus ocean-atmosphere coupling in the southwest Indian Ocean (the breeding ground of southern MJO onset), favour the lower-frequency southern MJO variability. (orig.)

  16. Frequency of sternal foramen evaluated by MDCT: a minor variation of great relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinski, Marcio A; de Lemos, Leandro; Babinski, Monique S D; Gonçalves, Marianna V T; De Paula, Rafael C; Fernandes, Rodrigo M P

    2015-04-01

    Due to inadvertent cardiac or great vessel injury, sternal foramina may pose as a great hazard during sternal puncture. They can also be misinterpreted as osteolytic lesions in cross-sectional imaging of the sternum. The distribution of these variations differs between populations, but data from Brazilians are scarcely reported. Therefore, this study aimed to verify the frequency of midline sternal foramen and double-ended xiphoid process, as developmental variations, in order to avoid fatal complications following sternal puncture of sternal acupuncture treatment. A total of 114 chest computed tomograms were evaluated. The frequency of midline sternal foramen in a complication risk bearing feature is of approximately 10.5%. The double-ended xiphoid process was present in 17.5%. We conclude that sternal acupuncture should be planned in the region of corpus-previous CT should be done to rule out this variation. Furthermore, we strongly recommend the acupuncture technique which prescribes a safe superficial-oblique approach to the sternum.

  17. Does infectious disease cause global variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Kenneth; Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Geographic and cross-national variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war is a subject of great interest. Previous theory on this variation has focused on the influence on human behaviour of climate, resource competition, national wealth, and cultural characteristics. We present the parasite-stress model of intrastate conflict, which unites previous work on the correlates of intrastate conflict by linking frequency of the outbreak of such conflict, including civil war, to the intensity of infectious disease across countries of the world. High intensity of infectious disease leads to the emergence of xenophobic and ethnocentric cultural norms. These cultures suffer greater poverty and deprivation due to the morbidity and mortality caused by disease, and as a result of decreased investment in public health and welfare. Resource competition among xenophobic and ethnocentric groups within a nation leads to increased frequency of civil war. We present support for the parasite-stress model with regression analyses. We find support for a direct effect of infectious disease on intrastate armed conflict, and support for an indirect effect of infectious disease on the incidence of civil war via its negative effect on national wealth. We consider the entanglements of feedback of conflict into further reduced wealth and increased incidence of disease, and discuss implications for international warfare and global patterns of wealth and imperialism.

  18. Ecological drivers of variation in tool-use frequency across sea otter populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Jessica; Ralls, Katherine; Tinker, M. Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sea otters are well-known tool users, employing objects such as rocks or shells to break open hard-shelled invertebrate prey. However, little is known about how the frequency of tool use varies among sea otter populations and the factors that drive these differences. We examined 17 years of observational data on prey capture and tool use from 8 sea otter populations ranging from southern California to the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. There were significant differences in the diets of these populations as well as variation in the frequency of tool use. Sea otters at Amchitka Island, Alaska, used tools on less than 1% of dives that resulted in the capture of prey compared with approximately 16% in Monterey, California. The percentage of individuals in the population that used tools ranged from 10% to 93%. In all populations, marine snails and thick-shelled bivalves were most likely to be associated with tool use, whereas soft-bodied prey items such as worms and sea stars were the least likely. The probability that a tool would be used on a given prey type varied across populations. The morphology of the prey item being handled and the prevalence of various types of prey in local diets were major ecological drivers of tool use: together they accounted for about 64% of the variation in tool-use frequency among populations. The remaining variation may be related to changes in the relative costs and benefits to an individual otter of learning to use tools effectively under differing ecological circumstances.

  19. Acoustic Emission and Modal Frequency Variation in Concrete Specimens under Four-Point Bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lacidogna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Acoustic Emission (AE and Dynamic Identification (DI techniques were applied simultaneously, in an original way, to examine the stress dependent damage progress in pre-notched concrete beams tested in four-point bending. The damage mechanisms were characterized by analyzing the AE signals registered during the tests, conducted by increasing the specimen’s vertical deflection. In particular, the dominant fracture mode was identified, and correlations between dissipated and emitted energies were investigated. Moreover, variations in the natural bending frequencies, produced by the crack advancement under loading, were detected and put in relation with the cumulated AE energy. Two different types of piezoelectric (PZT sensors, operating in well distinct frequency ranges, were used to measure AE and modal signals. This study may be of interest with an outlook on possible correlations between a multi-parameter structural monitoring and the solution of inverse problems by numerical models.

  20. Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbel Harpak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The site frequency spectrum (SFS has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the "phylogenetically-conditioned SFS" or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC, combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans.

  1. Search for the Variation in (mp/me) Using Two Vibrational Transition Frequencies of Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2017-12-01

    We propose a method to search for the variation in the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ = (mp/me) based on the precise measurement of Q(v') = [f(v') - f(2v')/2]/f(v'), where f(v') is the 16O2+ X2Π 1/2(v,J) = (0,1/2) \\to (v',1/2) transition frequency. Q(v') is proportional to μ-1/2, and it can be measured with an uncertainty of 10-18. This method is also applicable to other molecular transition frequencies (i) J = 0 → 0 or 1/2 → 1/2 transition, (ii) transition between stretched states, and (iii) the same sign for the light shift induced by the clock lasers in f(v') and f(2v').

  2. Tympanic membrane pressure buffering function at quasi-static and low-frequency pressure variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Wasil H M; Muyshondt, Pieter G G; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2017-09-01

    Deformation of the tympanic membrane is known to contribute to the pressure regulation processes in the middle ear cleft. In this paper we investigated pressure variations in the rabbit middle ear in response to sinusoidal varying pressures applied to the ear canal, with frequencies ranging from 0.5 Hz to 50 Hz and pressure amplitudes ranging between 0.25 kPa and 1 kPa. The transtympanic pressure difference was found to be smallest in the quasi-static range, and quickly increased as a function of frequency. The response curves showed asymmetry, with larger transtympanic pressures when positive pressures were applied in the ear canal. Normalized transtympanic pressure amplitudes remained fairly constant as a function of input pressure, with values in the range of 60%-70% relative to the applied pressure. The total harmonic distortion of the middle ear pressure signal was calculated and was found to be very small (≤2%) for low-pressure amplitudes and low frequencies. For pressure amplitudes in the order of 0.25 kPa-0.5 kPa, it increased to about 10% at 50 Hz. When a 1 kPa pressure amplitude was applied, variation between animals became large and distortion values up to 30% at 50 Hz were observed. The results showed that pressure buffering due to tympanic membrane displacement was most effective for compensating small transtympanic pressure loads at low frequencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Jump Variation Estimation with Noisy High Frequency Financial Data via Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a method to improve the estimation of jump variation using high frequency data with the existence of market microstructure noises. Accurate estimation of jump variation is in high demand, as it is an important component of volatility in finance for portfolio allocation, derivative pricing and risk management. The method has a two-step procedure with detection and estimation. In Step 1, we detect the jump locations by performing wavelet transformation on the observed noisy price processes. Since wavelet coefficients are significantly larger at the jump locations than the others, we calibrate the wavelet coefficients through a threshold and declare jump points if the absolute wavelet coefficients exceed the threshold. In Step 2 we estimate the jump variation by averaging noisy price processes at each side of a declared jump point and then taking the difference between the two averages of the jump point. Specifically, for each jump location detected in Step 1, we get two averages from the observed noisy price processes, one before the detected jump location and one after it, and then take their difference to estimate the jump variation. Theoretically, we show that the two-step procedure based on average realized volatility processes can achieve a convergence rate close to O P ( n − 4 / 9 , which is better than the convergence rate O P ( n − 1 / 4 for the procedure based on the original noisy process, where n is the sample size. Numerically, the method based on average realized volatility processes indeed performs better than that based on the price processes. Empirically, we study the distribution of jump variation using Dow Jones Industrial Average stocks and compare the results using the original price process and the average realized volatility processes.

  4. Variation in ultrasonic frequency and time as pre-treatments to air-drying of carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ekow Abano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable drying is an alternative method to curb post harvest decay of vegetables and a process to produce dried vegetables, which can be directly consumed or used as ingredients for the preparation of soups, stews, baby foods, cakes, puddings, and many other foods. In this study, the effect of ultrasound frequency and sonication time as pre-treatment prior to air drying at 70°C at an air velocity of 0.5 m/s, on carrot drying kinetics, flavour, colour, and non-enzymatic browning was investigated using a 3-level factorial response surface method. The result showed that an increase in sonication frequency and time did not significantly increase moisture diffusivity but in comparison with the control, water diffusivity increased after ultrasound application and the overall drying time was reduced. Application of the ultrasound pre-treatment in distilled water resulted in water gain and sugar loss, indicating that the ultrasonic pre-treatment can be an important step to produce low sugar content dried products. The brightness and redness to yellowness values of the ultrasonically pre-treated dried carrots were better than those without ultrasound application. In comparison with the flavour of the control, the ultrasound pre-treated samples recorded higher flavour response signals, indicating that the application of ultrasound improved the flavour of the dried carrot. The variation in sonication frequency and time did not significantly affect the non-enzymatic browning index of the dried products but were better than the control.

  5. Examining Spatio-Temporal Intensity-Frequency Variations in Extreme Monsoon Rainfall using High Resolution Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devak, M.; Rajendran, V.; C T, D.

    2015-12-01

    The study of extreme events has gained the attention of hydrologists in recent times. Though these events are rare, the effects are catastrophic. It is reported that the frequency of the occurrence of these events has increased in recent decades, and is attributed to the recent revelation of climate change. Numerous studies have pointed out significant changes in extremely heavy precipitation over India, using coarse resolution data. Though there are disagreements in the results and its spatial uniformity, all these studies emphasize the need of fine resolution analysis. Fine resolution analysis is necessary mainly due to the highly heterogeneous characteristics of Indian monsoon, and for the proper employment in flood hazard preparedness and water resources management. The present study aims to analyse the spatio-temporal variation and trends in the intensity and frequency of heavy precipitation during Indian monsoon using 0.25°×0.25° resolution gridded data for a period of 113 years (1901-2013). The exceedance threshold is fixed at 90th percentile of rainfall over 113 years and parameters are defined accordingly. The maximum intensity of each extreme rainfall episode of 30 year moving window has been modelled using Peak Over Threshold based Extreme Value Theory to compute return level (considered for intensity). In addition, the number of such episodes in a particular year has been termed as frequency. Non-parametric Mann-Kendall test has been carried out for both intensity and frequency, to compute the statistical trend. In addition, moving block bootstrap approach has been used to incorporate the serial correlation. The significance of the trend has been evaluated at different significance levels and finally, change in trend over last century has been examined.

  6. High-Frequency Variation of Purine Biosynthesis Genes Is a Mechanism of Success in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Andrew; Huynh, Steven; Scott, Nichollas E; Frirdich, Emilisa; Apel, Dmitry; Foster, Leonard J; Parker, Craig T; Gaynor, Erin C

    2015-09-29

    Phenotypic variation is prevalent in the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the leading agent of enterocolitis in the developed world. Heterogeneity enhances the survival and adaptive malleability of bacterial populations because variable phenotypes may allow some cells to be protected against future stress. Exposure to hyperosmotic stress previously revealed prevalent differences in growth between C. jejuni strain 81-176 colonies due to resistant or sensitive phenotypes, and these isolated colonies continued to produce progeny with differential phenotypes. In this study, whole-genome sequencing of isolated colonies identified allelic variants of two purine biosynthesis genes, purF and apt, encoding phosphoribosyltransferases that utilize a shared substrate. Genetic analyses determined that purF was essential for fitness, while apt was critical. Traditional and high-depth amplicon-sequencing analyses confirmed extensive intrapopulation genetic variation of purF and apt that resulted in viable strains bearing alleles with in-frame insertion duplications, deletions, or missense polymorphisms. Different purF and apt alleles were associated with various stress survival capabilities under several niche-relevant conditions and contributed to differential intracellular survival in an epithelial cell infection model. Amplicon sequencing revealed that intracellular survival selected for stress-fit purF and apt alleles, as did exposure to oxygen and hyperosmotic stress. Putative protein recognition direct repeat sequences were identified in purF and apt, and a DNA-protein affinity screen captured a predicted exonuclease that promoted the global spontaneous mutation rate. This work illustrates the adaptive properties of high-frequency genetic variation in two housekeeping genes, which influences C. jejuni survival under stress and promotes its success as a pathogen. C. jejuni is an important cause of bacterial diarrheal illness. Bacterial populations have many

  7. Morphological variation, advertisement call, and tadpoles of Bokermannohyla nanuzae (Bokermann, 1973), and taxonomic status of B. feioi (Napoli & Caramaschi, 2004) (Anura, Hylidae, Cophomantini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Marina; Lourenço, Ana Carolina Calijorne; Pimenta, Bruno V S; Nascimento, Luciana Barreto

    2015-03-24

    Bokermannohyla nanuzae (Bokermann & Sazima 1973) and B. feioi (Napoli & Caramaschi 2004) belong to the B. cir-cumdata species group. The type locality of the former is Serra do Cipó, Espinhaço mountain range, and of the latter is Parque Estadual do Ibitipoca, Mantiqueira mountain range, both in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Differences on dorsal draw-ing pattern of adults, oral disc morphology of tadpoles, and temporal properties of calls were proposed to distinguish these two species. However, several specimens found between the two type localities remain unidentified because diagnostic characters and states occur in all of these populations. Thus, in order to assess these characters variations, we performed an analysis of the morphology and morphometry of adults, vocalization, and morphology of tadpoles. Specimens were divided into three operational taxonomic units (OTUs): B. nanuzae (Serra do Cipó and northwards, Espinhaço mountain range), B. cf. nanuzae (Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Espinhaço mountain range, south of Serra do Cipó), and B. feioi (Serra do Ibitipoca, Mantiqueira mountain range). Drawing patterns of the dorsum and limbs show clinal variation and the three units are morphometrically very similar. Temporal and spectral properties of calls overlap in these three units. The diagnostic differences originally proposed for tadpoles are intrapopulational variations and occur in specimens from all of the locations analyzed. We found that these three units are morphologically indistinguishable. Therefore, we designate Bok-ermannohyla feioi (Napoli & Caramaschi 2004) as a junior synonym of Bokermannohyla nanuzae (Bokermann & Sazima 1973), extending its geographical distribution to the Mantiqueira mountain range.

  8. Testing the Sensory Drive Hypothesis: Geographic variation in echolocation frequencies of Geoffroy's horseshoe bat (Rhinolophidae: Rhinolophus clivosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David S; Catto, Sarah; Mutumi, Gregory L; Finger, Nikita; Webala, Paul W

    2017-01-01

    Geographic variation in sensory traits is usually influenced by adaptive processes because these traits are involved in crucial life-history aspects including orientation, communication, lineage recognition and mate choice. Studying this variation can therefore provide insights into lineage diversification. According to the Sensory Drive Hypothesis, lineage diversification may be driven by adaptation of sensory systems to local environments. It predicts that acoustic signals vary in association with local climatic conditions so that atmospheric attenuation is minimized and transmission of the signals maximized. To test this prediction, we investigated the influence of climatic factors (specifically relative humidity and temperature) on geographic variation in the resting frequencies of the echolocation pulses of Geoffroy's horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus clivosus. If the evolution of phenotypic variation in this lineage tracks climate variation, human induced climate change may lead to decreases in detection volumes and a reduction in foraging efficiency. A complex non-linear interaction between relative humidity and temperature affects atmospheric attenuation of sound and principal components composed of these correlated variables were, therefore, used in a linear mixed effects model to assess their contribution to observed variation in resting frequencies. A principal component composed predominantly of mean annual temperature (factor loading of -0.8455) significantly explained a proportion of the variation in resting frequency across sites (P Hypothesis. The predicted future increase in temperature due to climate change is likely to decrease the detection volume in echolocating bats and adversely impact their foraging efficiency.

  9. Frequency of and variation in low-value care in primary care: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrith, Ciara; Bhatia, Meghan; Ivers, Noah M; Mecredy, Graham; Tu, Karen; Hawker, Gillian A; Jaglal, Susan B; Wilson, Lynn; Wintemute, Kimberly; Glazier, Richard H; Levinson, Wendy; Bhatia, R Sacha

    2017-01-01

    Low-value care, defined as care with a lack of benefit, can lead to higher health care costs, inconvenience to patients and, in some cases, harm to patients. The objectives of this study are to conduct exploratory analyses to understand how frequently selected low-value tests are ordered, to assess the degree of variation in ordering that exists across regions and practices, and to identify services that may warrant further investigation and targeted interventions. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using administrative health care databases from Ontario to identify rates of use of the following low-value services between fiscal years 2008/09 and 2012/13: computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after a diagnosis of low back pain, Papanicolaou testing in women less than 21 years of age or older than 69 years of age and repeated dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning within 2 years of an index scan. Regional and practice-level rates were calculated. Bivariate analyses were conducted to explore associations between patient factors and repeat DEXA scans. Repeated DEXA scans were the most common service (21.0%), whereas cervical cancer screening among women less than 21 years of age or older than 69 years of age (8.0%) and CT or MRI imaging for low back pain (4.5%) were less common. There was substantial variation across practices with rates of repeated DEXA scans, ranging from 4.0% to 54.9%, and cervical cancer screening, ranging from 0.9% to 35.2%. Patients with a high-risk index DEXA were more likely to receive a repeat scan (28.1%) than those with a baseline (8.9%) or low-risk (8.1%) scan. There is significant, practice-level variation in the frequency of low-value testing for DEXA scans, back imaging and cervical cancer screening. There is a particular need for interventions that aim to reduce unnecessary DEXA scans.

  10. School-Based Racial and Gender Discrimination among African American Adolescents: Exploring Gender Variation in Frequency and Implications for Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Cogburn, Courtney D.; Chavous, Tabbye M.; Griffin, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined school-based racial and gender discrimination experiences among African American adolescents in Grade 8 (n = 204 girls; n = 209 boys). A primary goal was exploring gender variation in frequency of both types of discrimination and associations of discrimination with academic and psychological functioning among girls and boys. Girls and boys did not vary in reported racial discrimination frequency, but boys reported more gender discrimination experiences. Multiple reg...

  11. Seasonal Variation and Frequency Distribution of Ectoparasites in Crossbreed Cattle in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Socorro Ferraz da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the seasonal variation and frequency distribution of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, Haematobia irritans, and Dermatobia hominis on crossbred heifers under field conditions in the northeast of Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil. From November 2007 to September 2009 (23 months, 40 heifers aged 16.6±2.4 months were divided into groups A (1/4 Holstein × 3/4 Gir and B (1/2 Holstein × 1/2 Gir and had the monthly infestation estimated along with the climatic conditions. The mean maximum and minimum temperatures were 28.5 and 19°C, respectively. The ectoparasites were present on animals in all months of the year. The levels of ticks on the animals were low (3.0±0.2 ticks/animal, with the highest density in midwinter. The temperature was the climatic factor that most influenced the tick levels. The population of H. irritans (13.9±0.3 flies/animal and D. hominis (1.5±0.2 larvae/animal on heifers was more influenced by rainfall and exhibited two population peaks during the year. 1/2 Holstein heifers harbored significantly more H. irritans and D. hominis than 1/4 Holstein heifers. The results are discussed considering the most appropriate periods to apply ectoparasiticides and the genetic make-up of the animals.

  12. Seasonal Variation and Frequency Distribution of Ectoparasites in Crossbreed Cattle in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz da Costa, Maria do Socorro; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Ferraz da Costa, Ana Julia; Facury Filho, Elias Jorge; Araujo, Ricardo Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the seasonal variation and frequency distribution of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Haematobia irritans, and Dermatobia hominis on crossbred heifers under field conditions in the northeast of Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil. From November 2007 to September 2009 (23 months), 40 heifers aged 16.6 ± 2.4 months were divided into groups A (1/4 Holstein × 3/4 Gir) and B (1/2 Holstein × 1/2 Gir) and had the monthly infestation estimated along with the climatic conditions. The mean maximum and minimum temperatures were 28.5 and 19°C, respectively. The ectoparasites were present on animals in all months of the year. The levels of ticks on the animals were low (3.0 ± 0.2 ticks/animal), with the highest density in midwinter. The temperature was the climatic factor that most influenced the tick levels. The population of H. irritans (13.9 ± 0.3 flies/animal) and D. hominis (1.5 ± 0.2 larvae/animal) on heifers was more influenced by rainfall and exhibited two population peaks during the year. 1/2 Holstein heifers harbored significantly more H. irritans and D. hominis than 1/4 Holstein heifers. The results are discussed considering the most appropriate periods to apply ectoparasiticides and the genetic make-up of the animals. PMID:26464941

  13. Progressive muscle relaxation reduces migraine frequency and normalizes amplitudes of contingent negative variation (CNV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bianca; Keller, Armin; Wöhlbier, Hans-Georg; Overath, Claudia Helene; Müller, Britta; Kropp, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Central information processing, visible in evoked potentials like the contingent negative variation (CNV) is altered in migraine patients who exhibit higher CNV amplitudes and a reduced habituation. Both characteristics were shown to be normalized under different prophylactic migraine treatment options whereas Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) has not yet been examined. We investigated the effect of PMR on clinical course and CNV in migraineurs in a quasi-randomized, controlled trial. Thirty-five migraine patients and 46 healthy controls were examined. Sixteen migraineurs and 21 healthy participants conducted a 6-week PMR-training with CNV-measures before and after as well as three months after PMR-training completion. The remaining participants served as controls. The clinical course was analyzed with two-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. Pre-treatment CNV differences between migraine patients and healthy controls were examined with t-tests for independent measures. The course of the CNV-parameters was examined with three-way ANOVAs with repeated measures. After PMR-training, migraine patients showed a significant reduction of migraine frequency. Preliminary to the PMR-training, migraine patients exhibited higher amplitudes in the early component of the CNV (iCNV) and the overall CNV (oCNV) than healthy controls, but no differences regarding habituation. After completion of the PMR-training, migraineurs showed a normalization of the iCNV amplitude, but neither of the oCNV nor of the habituation coefficient. The results confirm clinical efficacy of PMR for migraine prophylaxis. The pre-treatment measure confirms altered cortical information processing in migraine patients. Regarding the changes in the iCNV after PMR-training, central nervous mechanisms of the PMR-effect are supposed which may be mediated by the serotonin metabolism.

  14. A Study of the Effect of Emotional State upon the Variation of the Fundamental Frequency of a Speaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Vasile GHIURCAU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Telephone banking or brokering, building accesssystems or forensics are some of the areas in which speakerrecognition is continuously developing. Fundamental frequencyrepresents an important speech feature used in theseapplications. In this paper we present a study of the effect ofemotional state of a speaker upon the variation of thefundamental frequency of the speech signal. Human beings arequite frequently overwhelmed by various emotions and most ofthe time one can not really control these emotional states. Forthe purpose of our work we have used the Berlin emotionalspeech database which contains utterances of 10 speakers indifferent emotional situations: happy, angry, fearful, bored andneutral. The mean fundamental frequency and also the standarddeviation for every speaker in all the emotional states werecomputed. The results show a very strong influence of theemotional state upon frequency variation.

  15. Complex permeability and permittivity variation of carbonyl iron rubber in the frequency range of 2 to 18 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Medeiros Gama

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The complex dielectric permittivity (e and magnetic permeability (m of Radar Absorbing Materials (RAM based on metallic magnetic particles (carbonyl iron particles embedded in a dielectric matrix (silicon rubber have been studied in the frequency range of 2 to 18 GHz. The relative permeability and permittivity of carbonyl iron-silicon composites for various mass fractions are measured by the transmission/reflection method using a vector network analyzer. The concentration dependence of permittivity and permeability on the frequency is analyzed. In a general way, the results show that e´ parameter shows a more significant variation among the evaluated parameters (e”, m”, m’. The comparison of dielectric and magnetic loss tangents (e”/e” and m”/m’, respectively shows more clearly the variation of both parameters (e and m according to the frequency. It is also observed that higher carbonyl iron content fractions favor both dielectric and magnetic loss tangents.

  16. Coordinated frequency control from offshore wind power plants connected to multi terminal DC system considering wind speed variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakamuri, Jayachandra N.; Altin, Müfit; Hansen, Anca Daniela

    2017-01-01

    the active power support from OWPP with a ramp rate limiter and (iii) An alternative method for the wind turbine overloading considering rotor speed. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is demonstrated on a wind power plant integrated into a three terminal HVDC system developed in DIg......A coordinated fast primary frequency control scheme from offshore wind power plants (OWPPs) integrated to a three terminal high voltage DC (HVDC) system is proposed in this study. The impact of wind speed variation on the OWPP active power output and thus on the AC grid frequency and DC grid...... voltage is analysed. The removal of active power support from OWPP after the frequency control action may result in second frequency (and DC voltage) dips. Three different methods to mitigate these secondary effects are proposed, such as, (i) Varying the droop gains of the HVDC converter (ii) Releasing...

  17. SU-E-T-408: Evaluation of the Type and Frequency of Variations Discovered During Routine Secondary Patient Chart Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, M; Harrison, A; Lockamy, V; Li, J; Peng, C; Potrebko, P; Yu, Y; Doyle, L; Cao, J [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Desire to improve efficiency and throughput inspired a review of our physics chart check procedures. Departmental policy mandates plan checks pre-treatment, after first treatment and weekly every 3–5 days. This study examined the effectiveness of the “after first” check with respect to improving patient safety and clinical efficiency. Type and frequency of variations discovered during this redundant secondary review was examined over seven months. Methods: A community spreadsheet was created to record variations in care discovered during chart review following the first fraction of treatment and before the second fraction (each plan reviewed prior to treatment). Entries were recorded from August 2014 through February 2015, amounting to 43 recorded variations out of 906 reviewed charts. The variations were divided into categories and frequencies were assessed month-to-month. Results: Analysis of recorded variations indicates an overall variation rate of 4.7%. The initial rate was 13.5%; months 2–7 average 3.7%. The majority of variations related to discrepancies in documentation at 46.5%, followed by prescription, plan deficiency, and dose tracking related variations at 25.5%, 12.8%, and 12.8%, respectively. Minor variations (negligible consequence on patient treatment) outweighed major variations 3 to 1. Conclusion: This work indicates that this redundant secondary check is effective. The first month spike in rates could be due to the Hawthorne/observer effect, but the consistent 4% variation rate suggests the need for periodical re-training on variations noted as frequent to improve awareness and quality of the initial chart review process, which may lead to improved treatment quality, patient safety and increased clinical efficiency. Utilizing these results, a continuous quality improvement process following Deming’s Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology was generated. The first iteration of this PDSA was adding a specific dose tracking

  18. High frequency genetic variation of purine biosynthesis genes is a mechanism of success in Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenotypic variation is prevalent among progeny of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the leading agent of enterocolitis in the developed world. Heterogeneity bestows increased survival to bacterial populations because variable phenotypes ensure some cells will be protected against future s...

  19. The impact of variation in low-frequency interaural cross correlation on auditory spatial imagery in stereophonic loudspeaker reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, William

    2005-04-01

    Several attributes of auditory spatial imagery associated with stereophonic sound reproduction are strongly modulated by variation in interaural cross correlation (IACC) within low frequency bands. Nonetheless, a standard practice in bass management for two-channel and multichannel loudspeaker reproduction is to mix low-frequency musical content to a single channel for reproduction via a single driver (e.g., a subwoofer). This paper reviews the results of psychoacoustic studies which support the conclusion that reproduction via multiple drivers of decorrelated low-frequency signals significantly affects such important spatial attributes as auditory source width (ASW), auditory source distance (ASD), and listener envelopment (LEV). A variety of methods have been employed in these tests, including forced choice discrimination and identification, and direct ratings of both global dissimilarity and distinct attributes. Contrary to assumptions that underlie industrial standards established in 1994 by ITU-R. Recommendation BS.775-1, these findings imply that substantial stereophonic spatial information exists within audio signals at frequencies below the 80 to 120 Hz range of prescribed subwoofer cutoff frequencies, and that loudspeaker reproduction of decorrelated signals at frequencies as low as 50 Hz can have an impact upon auditory spatial imagery. [Work supported by VRQ.

  20. Investigation of switching frequency variations in self-oscillating class D amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Pfaffinger, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Class D audio amplifiers have gained significant influence in sound reproduction due to their high efficiency. One of the most commonly used control methods in class D amplifiers is known as self-oscillation. An parameter of key interest in self-oscillating class D amplifiers is the switching...... frequency, which can be directly related to the performance of the amplifier. This paper will clearify the myth of the switching frequency through investigation of its dependency on modulation index and reference frequency. Validation is done using simulations and an 50 W amplifier providing 0.......2 % of distortion. The switching frequency is tracked through accurate spectrum measurements, and very good compliance with simulation results are observed....

  1. Frequency response variation of two offshore wind park transformers with different tap changer positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arana Aristi, Iván; Holbøll, Joachim; Sørensen, T

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of several sweep frequency response analysis (SFRA) measurements performed on two identical offshore wind farm transformers. A comparison is made between the transformers based on different recommended measurements and procedures, different measurement systems...

  2. Variation in the frequency and extent of hybridization between Leucosceptrum japonicum and L. stellipilum (Lamiaceae) in the Central Japanese Mainland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Maki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the frequency and extent of hybridization among mixed populations located in the same contact zone provide natural laboratories for the study of extrinsic reproductive isolation maintaining species integrity. In this study, we examined the pattern of hybridization between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum among mixed populations in different localities of a contact zone. The genetic structures from three sympatric populations and six mixed populations in the hybrid zone, and five reference populations far from the contact zone, were characterized using 10 neutral nuclear microsatellite markers. Evidence from genetic distance-based clustering analysis, the frequency distribution of admixture proportion values, and the hybrid category assignment approaches indicated that the frequency and extent of hybridization varied considerably among populations in the contact zone between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum. One likely explanation is that variation in exogenous (ecological) selection among populations might contribute to differences in frequency and extent of hybridization. The present study will facilitate future research exploring the evolution of reproductive isolation between L. japonicum and L. stellipilum.

  3. Geographic Variation in Festuca rubra L. Ploidy Levels and Systemic Fungal Endophyte Frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Dirihan

    Full Text Available Polyploidy and symbiotic Epichloë fungal endophytes are common and heritable characteristics that can facilitate environmental range expansion in grasses. Here we examined geographic patterns of polyploidy and the frequency of fungal endophyte colonized plants in 29 Festuca rubra L. populations from eight geographic sites across latitudes from Spain to northernmost Finland and Greenland. Ploidy seemed to be positively and negatively correlated with latitude and productivity, respectively. However, the correlations were nonlinear; 84% of the plants were hexaploids (2n = 6x = 42, and the positive correlation between ploidy level and latitude is the result of only four populations skewing the data. In the southernmost end of the gradient 86% of the plants were tetraploids (2n = 4x = 28, whereas in the northernmost end of the gradient one population had only octoploid plants (2n = 8x = 56. Endophytes were detected in 22 out of the 29 populations. Endophyte frequencies varied among geographic sites, and populations and habitats within geographic sites irrespective of ploidy, latitude or productivity. The highest overall endophyte frequencies were found in the southernmost end of the gradient, Spain, where 69% of plants harbored endophytes. In northern Finland, endophytes were detected in 30% of grasses but endophyte frequencies varied among populations from 0% to 75%, being higher in meadows compared to riverbanks. The endophytes were detected in 36%, 30% and 27% of the plants in Faroe Islands, Iceland and Switzerland, respectively. Practically all examined plants collected from southern Finland and Greenland were endophyte-free, whereas in other geographic sites endophyte frequencies were highly variable among populations. Common to all populations with high endophyte frequencies is heavy vertebrate grazing. We propose that the detected endophyte frequencies and ploidy levels mirror past distribution history of F. rubra after the last glaciation

  4. Searches for high frequency variations in the 8-B neutrino flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seibert, Stanley R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stonehill, L C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wouters, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aharmim, B [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ahmed, S N [QUEEN' S UNIV; Anthony, A E [UNIV OF TEXAS; Barros, N [PORTUGAL; Beier, E W [UNIV OF PA; Bellerive, A [CARLETON UNIV; Belttran, B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Bergevin, M [LBNL; Biller, S D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Boudjemline, K [CARLETON UNIV; Burritt, T H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Cai, B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Chan, Y D [LBNL; Chauhan, D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Chen, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Cleveland, B T [UNIV OF OXFORD; Cox - Mobrand, G A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Dai, X [QUEEN' S UNIV; Deng, H [UNIV OF PA; Detwiler, J [LBNL; Dimarco, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Doe, P J [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Drouin, P - L [CARLTON UNIV; Duba, C A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Duncan, F A [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Dunford, M [UNIV OF PA; Earle, E D [QUEEN' S UNIV; Evans, H C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Ewan, G T [QUEEN' S UNIV; Farine, J [LAURENTTIAN UNIV; Fergani, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; Fleurot, F [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Ford, R J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Formaggilo, J A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Gagnon, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Goon, J Tm [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Guillian, E [QUEEN' S UNIV; Habib, S [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hahn, R L [BNL; Hallin, A L [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Hallman, E D [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Harvey, P J [QUEEN' S UNIV; Hazama, R [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Heintzelman, W J [UNIV OF PA; Heise, J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Helmer, R L [TRIUMF; Howard, C [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Howe, M A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Huang, M [UNIV OF TEXAS; Jamieson, B [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Jelley, N A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Keeter, K J [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Klein, J R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Kos, M [QUEEN' S UNIV; Kraus, C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Krauss, C B [UNIV OF ALBERTA; Kutter, T [LOUISIANA STATE UNIV; Kyba, C C M [UNIV OF PA; Law, J [UNIV OF GUELPH; Lawson, I T [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Lesko, K T [LBNL; Leslie, J R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Loach, J C [UNIV OF OXFORD; Maclellan, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Majerus, S [UNIV OF OXFORD; Mak, H B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Maneira, J [PORTUGAL; Martin, R [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mccauley, N [UNIV OF PA; Mc Donald, A B [QUEEN' S UNIV; Mcgee, S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Miffin, C [CARLETON UNIV; Miller, M L [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monreal, B [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Monroe, J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH; Morissette, B [SNOLAB, SUDBURY; Nickel, B G [UNIV OF GUELPH; Noble, A J [QUEEN' S UNIV; O' Keeffe, H M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oblath, N S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Orebi Gann, G D [UNIV OF OXFORD; Oser, S M [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Ott, R A [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Peeters, S J M [UNIV OF OXFORD; Poon, A W P [LBNL; Prior, G [LBNL; Reitzner, S D [UNIV OF GUELPH; Robertson, B C [QUEEN' S UNIV; Robertson, R G H [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Rollin, E [CARLETON UNIV; Schwendener, M H [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Secrest, J A [UNIV OF PA; Seibert, S R [UNIV OF TEXAS; Simard, O [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, D [CARLETON UNIV; Sinclair, L [CARLETON UNIV; Skensved, P [QUEEN' S UNIV; Sonley, T J [MASSACHUSETTS INST. OF TECH.; Tesic, G [CARLETON UNIV; Tolich, N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Tsui, T [UNIV OF BRITISH COLUMBIA; Tunnell, C D [UNIV OF TEXAS; Van Berg, R [UNIV OF PA; Van Devender, B A [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Virtue, C J [LAURENTIAN UNIV; Wall, B L [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Waller, D [CARLETON UNIV; Wan Chan Tseung, H [UNIV OF OXFORD; West, N [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wilkerson, J F [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wilson, J R [UNIV OF OXFORD; Wright, A [QUEEN' S UNIV; Yeh, M [BNL; Zhang, F [CARLETON UNIV; Zuber, K [UNIV OF OXFORD

    2009-01-01

    We have peformed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar g-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar {sup 8}B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range l/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which g-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

  5. High-Frequency EEG Variations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Human Faces Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina A. Reis Paula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the impairment in the social reciprocity, interaction/language, and behavior, with stereotypes and signs of sensory function deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG is a well-established and noninvasive tool for neurophysiological characterization and monitoring of the brain electrical activity, able to identify abnormalities related to frequency range, connectivity, and lateralization of brain functions. This research aims to evidence quantitative differences in the frequency spectrum pattern between EEG signals of children with and without ASD during visualization of human faces in three different expressions: neutral, happy, and angry. Quantitative clinical evaluations, neuropsychological evaluation, and EEG of children with and without ASD were analyzed paired by age and gender. The results showed stronger activation in higher frequencies (above 30 Hz in frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions in the ASD group. This pattern of activation may correlate with developmental characteristics in the children with ASD.

  6. High-Frequency EEG Variations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Human Faces Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Celina A Reis; Reategui, Camille; Costa, Bruna Karen de Sousa; da Fonseca, Caio Queiroz; da Silva, Luana; Morya, Edgard; Brasil, Fabricio Lima

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the impairment in the social reciprocity, interaction/language, and behavior, with stereotypes and signs of sensory function deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a well-established and noninvasive tool for neurophysiological characterization and monitoring of the brain electrical activity, able to identify abnormalities related to frequency range, connectivity, and lateralization of brain functions. This research aims to evidence quantitative differences in the frequency spectrum pattern between EEG signals of children with and without ASD during visualization of human faces in three different expressions: neutral, happy, and angry. Quantitative clinical evaluations, neuropsychological evaluation, and EEG of children with and without ASD were analyzed paired by age and gender. The results showed stronger activation in higher frequencies (above 30 Hz) in frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions in the ASD group. This pattern of activation may correlate with developmental characteristics in the children with ASD.

  7. Colorectal cancers from distinct ancestral populations show variations in BRAF mutation frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C Hanna

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated for some cancers that the frequency of somatic oncogenic mutations may vary in ancestral populations. To determine whether key driver alterations might occur at different frequencies in colorectal cancer, we applied a high-throughput genotyping platform (OncoMap to query 385 mutations across 33 known cancer genes in colorectal cancer DNA from 83 Asian, 149 Black and 195 White patients. We found that Asian patients had fewer canonical oncogenic mutations in the genes tested (60% vs Black 79% (P = 0.011 and White 77% (P = 0.015, and that BRAF mutations occurred at a higher frequency in White patients (17% vs Asian 4% (P = 0.004 and Black 7% (P = 0.014. These results suggest that the use of genomic approaches to elucidate the different ancestral determinants harbored by patient populations may help to more precisely and effectively treat colorectal cancer.

  8. The temporal variation of the frequency of high latitude field line resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, C.L.; Samson, J.C.; Donovan, E.F. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1995-05-01

    The authors report observations of ULF continuum field line resonance spectra using the Canadian Auroral Network for the OPEN Program Unified Study (CANOPUS) array. They use cross spectral procedures to analyze the data from magnetometer arrays. Observations are typically seen to start near dawn at frequencies near 2 mHz, to increase over several hours to 5 - 10 mHz, and then to slowly decrease back to 2 mHz over the remainder of the day. The waves are thought to be part of a resonant Alfven continuum. Using magnetic field models and a cold plasma magnetohydrodynamics model, the authors infer plasma densities from the resonant frequencies.

  9. Genome-wide analysis shows increased frequency of copy number variation deletions in dutch schizophrenia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buizer-Voskamp, J.E.; Muntjewerff, J.W.; Strengman, E.; Sabatti, C.; Stefansson, H.; Vorstman, J.A.; Ophoff, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 2008, multiple studies have reported on copy number variations (CNVs) in schizophrenia. However, many regions are unique events with minimal overlap between studies. This makes it difficult to gain a comprehensive overview of all CNVs involved in the etiology of schizophrenia. We

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis Shows Increased Frequency of Copy Number Variation Deletions in Dutch Schizophrenia Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Muntjewerff, Jan-Willem; Strengman, Eric; Sabatti, Chiara; Stefansson, Hreinn; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Ophoff, Roel A.; GROUP investigators, [No Value

    2011-01-01

    Background: Since 2008, multiple studies have reported on copy number variations (CNVs) in schizophrenia. However, many regions are unique events with minimal overlap between studies. This makes it difficult to gain a comprehensive overview of all CNVs involved in the etiology of schizophrenia. We

  11. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  12. Path loss variation of on-body UWB channel in the frequency bands of IEEE 802.15.6 standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Dayananda; Sarma, Kanak C; Mahanta, Anil

    2016-06-01

    The wireless body area network (WBAN) has gaining tremendous attention among researchers and academicians for its envisioned applications in healthcare service. Ultra wideband (UWB) radio technology is considered as excellent air interface for communication among body area network devices. Characterisation and modelling of channel parameters are utmost prerequisite for the development of reliable communication system. The path loss of on-body UWB channel for each frequency band defined in IEEE 802.15.6 standard is experimentally determined. The parameters of path loss model are statistically determined by analysing measurement data. Both the line-of-sight and non-line-of-sight channel conditions are considered in the measurement. Variations of parameter values with the size of human body are analysed along with the variation of parameter values with the surrounding environments. It is observed that the parameters of the path loss model vary with the frequency band as well as with the body size and surrounding environment. The derived parameter values are specific to the particular frequency bands of IEEE 802.15.6 standard, which will be useful for the development of efficient UWB WBAN system.

  13. Capturing temporal variation in phosphorus dynamics in groundwater dominated rivers using automated high-frequency sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieroza, M. Z.; Heathwaite, A. L.; Mullinger, N. J.; Keenan, P. O.

    2012-04-01

    High-frequency river water quality monitoring provides detailed hydrochemical information on the time scale of hydrologic response. Several studies (Kirchner et al., 2004; Johnes, 2007; Cassidy and Jordan, 2011) have shown previously that coarse sampling approaches fail to quantify nutrient and sediment loads and to capture the fine structure of water quality dynamics correctly. A robust analysis of high-frequency nutrient and water quality time series can present a complex conceptual, analytical and computational problem. High-frequency nutrient monitoring provides new evidence of processes and patterns that could not be observed previously using standard coarse resolution sampling schemes. However, to fully utilise the wealth of information contained in high-frequency nutrient data, we need to address the following questions: how to detect complex coupling patterns and processes in high-resolution flow-nutrients data, how do these patterns and processes change throughout the period of observation, and how to distinguish noise signals from an evidence of real processes (Harris and Heathwaite, 2005). Here, hourly measurements of total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and turbidity were carried out using bank side analysers to study the biogeochemical response of a 54 km2 catchment of the River Leith, a tributary of the River Eden (Cumbria, UK). A remote automated mobile lab facilitates real-time high-frequency nutrient and water quality monitoring, with no time delay between collection and analysis of the reactive elements. The objectives of this study were two-fold: first to investigate the intrinsic complexity of the temporal relationship between phosphorus fractions (SRP, TP), turbidity and continuous hydrometric time series and secondly to investigate the possibilities of missing high-frequency phosphorus data infilling using continuous hydrometric time series. Complex non-linear relationships between flow, TP and SRP, turbidity were observed

  14. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digester performance under variations in solids retention time and feeding frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Nathan D; Mihelcic, James R; Ergas, Sarina J

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the effect of solids retention time (SRT) and feeding frequency on the performance of anaerobic digesters used to recover bioenergy from swine waste. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digesters were operated at varying SRTs and feeding frequencies. Performance metrics included biogas and methane production rates, biomass robustness and functionality and removals of volatile solids, soluble chemical oxygen demand, the fecal-indicator bacteria Escherichia coli, and the human pathogen Salmonella. Biochemical methane formation potential and specific methanogenic activity assays were used to demonstrate biomass robustness and functionality. Results indicated that anaerobic digesters fed weekly had higher average methane yields (0.20 vs. 0.18m(3)CH4/kg-VSadded), specific methanogenic activities (40 vs. 35ml/day), and fecal indicator bacteria destruction (99.9% vs. 99.4%) than those fed every-other day. Salmonella, soluble COD, and VS destruction did not change with varied feeding frequency; however, higher removals were observed with longer SRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Switching Operation Simulations in a Large Offshore Wind Farm with Use of Parametric Variation and Frequency Domain Severity Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdyk, Andrzej; Holbøll, Joachim; Arana, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Transient voltages resulting from switching operations depend on an interaction between the breaker, the transformer, cables and a neighbourhood grid and imply a risk for the transformer and other components. In this paper the Frequency Domain Severity Factor (FDSF) is used to assess the severity...... of electrical stress imposed on wind turbine transformers by voltage waveforms produced during switching operations. The method is implemented in Matlab together with automatic and systematic variation of parameters. Simulations of a radial energization are performed on a 90MVA offshore wind farm model...... implemented in ATP-EMTP using standard component models and further validated against measurements. The results show the range of overvoltages on the transformer terminals as well as the corresponding FSDF for all turbines under a number of varying parameters. The maximum FDSF of 1.235 and frequency of 445 k...

  16. EMERGENCY CALLS

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  17. Size-related variation in arm damage frequency in the crown-of-thorns sea star, Acanthaster planci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Rivera-Posada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine variation in the frequency of arm damage in different sizes of Acanthaster planci (A. planci, assess how this damage is inflicted by fish predators, and infer the potential role of predation in population regulation. Methods: Diameters of A. planci collected from three sites in the Philippines were measured and arm damage frequency and severity was assessed. Frequency of arm damage was compared between sizes. Feeding behavior of fish predators was also observed in the laboratory. Results: This study demonstrates that sublethal predation by triggerfishes on A. planci result in extensive arm damage. Overall, 60% of A. planci sampled across all sites had sublethal injuries. The frequency of individuals with missing or regenerating arms was highest in medium-sized young adults (11-20 cm, which coincides with the phase where A. planci shift from cryptic to exposed daytime feeding. Conclusions: The high incidence of arm damage within intermediate-sized sea stars indicates that predators exercise some level of regulation on A. planci populations at a local scale. Identification and protection of putative predators that target the most vulnerable life history stages of A. planci are essential in developing population control strategies and reverse sustained declines in coral cover.

  18. Intradialytic hypotension: frequency, sources of variation and correlation with clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Jeffrey J; Usvyat, Len A; Sullivan, Terry; Segal, Jonathan H; Zabetakis, Paul; Kotanko, Peter; Maddux, Franklin W; Diaz-Buxo, Jose A

    2014-04-01

    Intradialytic hypotension (IH) is a frequent complication of hemodialysis (HD) and is associated with increased patient mortality and cardiovascular events. We studied IH to determine its variability, correlates, and clinical impact in 13 outpatient HD facilities. Blood pressure was captured by machine download. IH was defined as >30 mmHg decrease in systolic blood pressure to 20 HD treatments. We studied IH in 44,801 treatments (Tx) in 1137 patients. IH was frequent (17.2% of treatments) and highly variable by patient (0-100% Tx) and dialysis facility (11.1-25.8% Tx). 25.1% of patients had no IH (0% Tx) and 16.2% had IH on >35% Tx. Increased IH frequency was associated with age, female gender, diabetes, Hispanic origin, longer end stage renal disease vintage, higher body mass index, higher ultrafiltration volume, the second and third weekly Tx, lower pre-HD systolic blood pressure, higher difference between prescribed and achieved post-HD weight, and higher dialysate temperature. Dialysis facility was an independent predictor of IH frequency. Patients with >35% IH treatments had poorer survival (P = 0.036), and more frequent and longer hospitalization (P = 0.04, P = 0.002, respectively) than patients without IH. In conclusion, IH frequency was highly variable, associated with individual facilities, patient and treatment characteristics, and correlated with mortality and hospitalization. Identifying practice patterns associated with IH coupled with routine reporting of IH will facilitate medical management and may result in the prevention of IH, decreased mortality, and decreased hospitalization. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  19. Variations in dream recall frequency and dream theme diversity by age and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore eNielsen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We assessed dream recall frequency and dream theme diversity with an internet questionnaire among a cohort of 28,888 male and female participants aged 10 to 79 years in a cross-sectional design. Dream recall frequency increased from adolescence (ages 10-19 to early adulthood (20-29 and then decreased again for the next 20 years. The nature of this decrease differed for males and females. For males, it began earlier (30-39, proceeded more gradually, and reached a nadir earlier (40-49 than it did for females. For females, it began later (40-49, dropped more abruptly, and reached nadir later (50-59. Marked sex differences were observed for age strata 10-19 through 40-49 and year-by-year analyses estimated the window for these differences to be more precisely from 14-44 yrs. Dream theme diversity decreased linearly with age for both sexes up to 50-59 and then dropped even more sharply for 60-79. There was a sex difference favouring males on this measure but only for ages 10-19. Findings replicate, in a single sample, those from several previous studies showing an increase in dream recall frequency from adolescence to early adulthood, a subsequent decrease in dream recall frequency—primarily in early and middle adulthood, and different patterns of age-related decrease in the two sexes. Age-related changes in sleep structure, such as decreasing %REM sleep, parallel the observed dream recall changes but are much smaller and more gradual in nature. Changes in the phase and amplitude of circadian rhythms of REM propensity and generational differences in life experiences may also account for some part of the findings. However, that decreases in dream theme diversity parallel known age-related decreases in episodic and autobiographical memory may signify that the diversity measure indexes an aspect of autobiographical memory that is specific to dream recall.

  20. Improving the accuracy: volatility modeling and forecasting using high-frequency data and the variational component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we predict the daily volatility of the S&P CNX NIFTY market index of India using the basic ‘heterogeneous autoregressive’ (HAR and its variant. In doing so, we estimated several HAR and Log form of HAR models using different regressor. The different regressors were obtained by extracting the jump and continuous component and the threshold jump and continuous component from the realized volatility. We also tried to investigate whether dividing volatility into simple and threshold jumps and continuous variation yields a substantial improvement in volatility forecasting or not. The results provide the evidence that inclusion of realized bipower variance in the HAR models helps in predicting future volatility.

  1. Automated detection of Antarctic blue whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socheleau, Francois-Xavier; Leroy, Emmanuelle; Pecci, Andres Carvallo; Samaran, Flore; Bonnel, Julien; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated detection of Z-calls emitted by Antarctic blue whales (B. m. intermedia). The proposed solution is based on a subspace detector of sigmoidal-frequency signals with unknown time-varying amplitude. This detection strategy takes into account frequency variations of blue whale calls as well as the presence of other transient sounds that can interfere with Z-calls (such as airguns or other whale calls). The proposed method has been tested on more than 105 h of acoustic data containing about 2200 Z-calls (as found by an experienced human operator). This method is shown to have a correct-detection rate of up to more than 15% better than the extensible bioacoustic tool package, a spectrogram-based correlation detector commonly used to study blue whales. Because the proposed method relies on subspace detection, it does not suffer from some drawbacks of correlation-based detectors. In particular, it does not require the choice of an a priori fixed and subjective template. The analytic expression of the detection performance is also derived, which provides crucial information for higher level analyses such as animal density estimation from acoustic data. Finally, the detection threshold automatically adapts to the soundscape in order not to violate a user-specified false alarm rate.

  2. Experimental investigation on the effects of non-cyclical frequency and amplitude variation on dynamic stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Kyle C.

    An experimental study of a cambered airfoil undergoing non-cyclical, transient pitch trajectories and the resulting effects on the dynamic stall phenomenon is presented. Surface pressure measurements and airfoil incidence angle are acquired simultaneously to resolve instantaneous aerodynamic load coefficients at Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to 0.4. Derived from these coefficients are various formulations of the aerodynamic damping factor, referred to copiously throughout. Using a two-motor mechanism, each providing independent frequency and amplitude input to the airfoil, unique pitch motions can be implemented by actively controlling the phase between inputs. This work primarily focuses on three pitch motion schemas, the first of which is a "chirp" style trajectory featuring concurrent exponential frequency growth and amplitude decay. Second, these parameters are tested separately to determine their individual contributions. Lastly, a novel dual harmonic pitch motion is devised which rapidly traverses dynamic stall regimes on an inter-cycle basis by modulating the static-stall penetration angle. Throughout all results presented, there is evidence that for consecutive pitch-cycles, the process of dynamic stall is affected when prior oscillations prior have undergone deeper stall-penetration angles. In other words when stall-penetration is descending, retreating from a regime of light or deep stall, statistics of load coefficients, such as damping coefficient, maximum lift, minimum quarter-chord moment, and their phase relationships, do not match the values seen when stall-penetration was growing. The outcomes herein suggest that the airfoil retains some memory of previous flow separation which has the potential to change the influence of the dynamic stall vortex.

  3. Modeling of temporal variation of very low frequency radio waves over long paths as observed from Indian Antarctic stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Basak, Tamal; Chakraborty, Suman; Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2017-07-01

    Characteristics of very low frequency (VLF) signal depends on solar illumination across the propagation path. For a long path, solar zenith angle varies widely over the path and this has a significant influence on the propagation characteristics. To study the effect, Indian Centre for Space Physics participated in the 27th and 35th Scientific Expedition to Antarctica. VLF signals transmitted from the transmitters, namely, VTX (18.2 kHz), Vijayanarayanam, India, and NWC (19.8 kHz), North West Cape, Australia, were recorded simultaneously at Indian permanent stations Maitri and Bharati having respective geographic coordinates 70.75°S, 11.67°E, and 69.4°S, 76.17°E. A very stable diurnal variation of the signal has been obtained from both the stations. We reproduced the signal variations of VLF signal using solar zenith angle model coupled with long wavelength propagation capability (LWPC) code. We divided the whole path into several segments and computed the solar zenith angle (χ) profile. We assumed a linear relationship between the Wait's exponential model parameters effective reflection height (h'), steepness parameter (β), and solar zenith angle. The h' and β values were later used in the LWPC code to obtain the VLF signal amplitude at a particular time. The same procedure was repeated to obtain the whole day signal. Nature of the whole day signal variation from the theoretical modeling is also found to match with our observation to some extent.

  4. Alterations of hematological variations in rats exposed to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (50 Hz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Dilek Ulker; Yokus, Beran; Akdag, Mehmet Zulkuf; Sert, Cemil; Mete, Nuriye

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effects of in vivo exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on whole blood parameters (hematological parameters) in rats. Forty eight female Wistar rats, obtained from the Medical Science Application and Research Center, Dicle University, Turkey in 2004 were divided into four separate groups: two exposed groups (0.97 mT, 50 and 100 days, 3h/day) and two controls (sham). Eosinophil, hemoglobin and MPV levels significantly decreased in rats that were exposed to EMF for 50 days. When the data for rats exposed for 50 days and 100 days were compared, it was found that MPV levels in rats exposed for 100 days were significantly lower. There was no significant difference in total leukocyte, neutrofil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil and basophil counts, or in erythrocyte, Hct, MCH, MCHC, RDW, PLT and PDW levels between the exposed and sham-exposed groups. ELF-EMF exposure had no effect on body weight. Also, liver weight did not show any significant difference between groups. Our results indicate that the applied ELF-EMF exposure may induce slight but statistically significant alterations in some hematological parameters of rats, within the physiological range.

  5. Sensitivity of Storage Systems in India: Role of Human Behavior Responsive to Low Frequency Climate Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devineni, N.; Perveen, S.; Lall, U.

    2010-12-01

    India is facing a mounting water resources crisis under the midst growing concerns of persistent droughts and floods. These hydroclimatic extremes often result from reduced streamflow/precipitation potential, which could occur due to varying exogenous climatic conditions such as tropical sea surface temperature (SST). As water supply systems experience shortages in supply owing to inflows natural variability, resulting deficits are further exacerbated by increased demand resulting from urbanization and population growth in the region. Given that most of the water supply systems are multipurpose, operating these systems to meet the increased demand under reduced streamflow availability could be very challenging. In this study a low frequency climate variability assessment is presented that provides directions for existing storage systems to adapt to increased and persistent variability in recharge/inflow. Preliminary analysis shows that the sensitivity of reservoirs is high to structured periodic components and this further increases as the storage capacity of the reservoirs decrease. The study also shows that interaction with human behavior is very important in managing deficits from the reservoirs. Hence it is imperative to pursue strategic adaptation measures to increase and effectively manage the storage.

  6. Natural variation in life history and aging phenotypes is associated with mitochondrial DNA deletion frequency in Caenorhabditis briggsae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Samson W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations that impair mitochondrial functioning are associated with a variety of metabolic and age-related disorders. A barrier to rigorous tests of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in aging processes has been the lack of model systems with relevant, naturally occurring mitochondrial genetic variation. Toward the goal of developing such a model system, we studied natural variation in life history, metabolic, and aging phenotypes as it relates to levels of a naturally-occurring heteroplasmic mitochondrial ND5 deletion recently discovered to segregate among wild populations of the soil nematode, Caenorhabditis briggsae. The normal product of ND5 is a central component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and integral to cellular energy metabolism. Results We quantified significant variation among C. briggsae isolates for all phenotypes measured, only some of which was statistically associated with isolate-specific ND5 deletion frequency. We found that fecundity-related traits and pharyngeal pumping rate were strongly inversely related to ND5 deletion level and that C. briggsae isolates with high ND5 deletion levels experienced a tradeoff between early fecundity and lifespan. Conversely, oxidative stress resistance was only weakly associated with ND5 deletion level while ATP content was unrelated to deletion level. Finally, mean levels of reactive oxygen species measured in vivo showed a significant non-linear relationship with ND5 deletion level, a pattern that may be driven by among-isolate variation in antioxidant or other compensatory mechanisms. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ND5 deletion may adversely affect fitness and mitochondrial functioning while promoting aging in natural populations, and help to further establish this species as a useful model for explicit tests of hypotheses in aging biology and mitochondrial genetics.

  7. Variations in Dream Recall Frequency and Dream Theme Diversity by Age and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tore

    2012-01-01

    We assessed dream recall frequency (DRF) and dream theme diversity (DTD) with an internet questionnaire among a cohort of 28,888 male and female participants aged 10–79 years in a cross-sectional design. DRF increased from adolescence (ages 10–19) to early adulthood (20–29) and then decreased again for the next 20 years. The nature of this decrease differed for males and females. For males, it began earlier (30–39), proceeded more gradually, and reached a nadir earlier (40–49) than it did for females. For females, it began later (40–49), dropped more abruptly, and reached nadir later (50–59). Marked sex differences were observed for age strata 10–19 through 40–49 and year-by-year analyses estimated the window for these differences to be more precisely from 14 to 44 years. DTD decreased linearly with age for both sexes up to 50–59 and then dropped even more sharply for 60–79. There was a sex difference favoring males on this measure but only for ages 10–19. Findings replicate, in a single sample, those from several previous studies showing an increase in DRF from adolescence to early adulthood, a subsequent decrease primarily in early and middle adulthood, and different patterns of age-related decrease in the two sexes. Age-related changes in sleep structure, such as decreasing %REM sleep which parallel the observed dream recall changes, might help explain these findings, but these sleep changes are much smaller and more gradual in nature. Changes in the phase and amplitude of circadian rhythms of REM propensity and generational differences in life experiences may also account for some part of the findings. That decreases in DTD parallel known age-related decreases in episodic and autobiographical memory may signify that this new diversity measure indexes an aspect of autobiographical memory that also influences dream recall. PMID:22783222

  8. Wolbachia in the Drosophila yakuba Complex: Pervasive Frequency Variation and Weak Cytoplasmic Incompatibility, but No Apparent Effect on Reproductive Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brandon S; Ginsberg, Paul S; Turelli, Michael; Matute, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Three hybridizing species-the clade [(Drosophila yakuba, D. santomea), D. teissieri]-comprise the yakuba complex in the D. melanogaster subgroup. Their ranges overlap on Bioko and São Tomé, islands off west Africa. All three species are infected with Wolbachia-maternally inherited, endosymbiotic bacteria, best known for manipulating host reproduction to favor infected females. Previous analyses reported no cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) in these species. However, we discovered that Wolbachia from each species cause intraspecific and interspecific CI. In D teissieri, analyses of F1 and backcross genotypes show that both host genotype and Wolbachia variation modulate CI intensity. Wolbachia-infected females seem largely protected from intraspecific and interspecific CI, irrespective of Wolbachia and host genotypes. Wolbachia do not affect host mating behavior or female fecundity, within or between species. The latter suggests little apparent effect of Wolbachia on premating or gametic reproductive isolation (RI) between host species. In nature, Wolbachia frequencies varied spatially for D. yakuba in 2009, with 76% (N = 155) infected on São Tomé, and only 3% (N = 36) infected on Bioko; frequencies also varied temporally in D. yakuba and D. santomea on São Tomé between 2009 and 2015. These temporal frequency fluctuations could generate asymmetries in interspecific mating success, and contribute to postzygotic RI. However, the fluctuations in Wolbachia frequencies that we observe also suggest that asymmetries are unlikely to persist. Finally, we address theoretical questions that our empirical findings raise about Wolbachia persistence when conditions fluctuate, and about the stable coexistence of Wolbachia and host variants that modulate Wolbachia effects. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. 8p23 beta-defensin copy number determination by single-locus pseudogene-based paralog ratio tests risk bias due to low-frequency sequence variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianghong; Müller, Sebastian; Möller, Michael; Huse, Klaus; Taudien, Stefan; Book, Malte; Stuber, Frank; Platzer, Matthias; Groth, Marco

    2014-01-24

    The copy number variation (CNV) in beta-defensin genes (DEFB) on human chromosome 8p23 has been proposed to contribute to the phenotypic differences in inflammatory diseases. However, determination of exact DEFB CN is a major challenge in association studies. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), paralog ratio tests (PRT) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) have been extensively used to determine DEFB CN in different laboratories, but inter-method inconsistencies were observed frequently. In this study we asked which one is superior among the three methods for DEFB CN determination. We developed a clustering approach for MLPA and PRT to statistically correlate data from a single experiment. Then we compared qPCR, a newly designed PRT and MLPA for DEFB CN determination in 285 DNA samples. We found MLPA had the best convergence and clustering results of the raw data and the highest call rate. In addition, the concordance rates between MLPA or PRT and qPCR (32.12% and 37.99%, respectively) were unacceptably low with underestimated CN by qPCR. Concordance rate between MLPA and PRT (90.52%) was high but PRT systematically underestimated CN by one in a subset of samples. In these samples a sequence variant which caused complete PCR dropout of the respective DEFB cluster copies was found in one primer binding site of one of the targeted paralogous pseudogenes. MLPA is superior to PRT and even more to qPCR for DEFB CN determination. Although the applied PRT provides in most cases reliable results, such a test is particularly sensitive to low-frequency sequence variations preferably accumulating in loci like pseudogenes which are most likely not under selective pressure. In the light of the superior performance of multiplex assays, the drawbacks of such single PRTs could be overcome by combining more test markers.

  10. Assessment of protein intake during pregnancy using a food frequency questionnaire and the effect on postpartum body weight variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Beatriz Trindade de; Kac, Gilberto; Sichieri, Rosely

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of protein intake during pregnancy on postpartum weight variation. This was a prospective cohort study with 421 women interviewed at 15 days (baseline) and 2, 6, and 9 months postpartum. Data on diet were obtained using the food frequency questionnaire, focusing on the second and third trimesters. Protein intake was considered adequate when women consumed ≥ 1.2g of protein per kg body weight, and inadequate when weight loss of 0.409kg/month (±0.12) (p Women with adequate protein intake during pregnancy lost an additional 0.094kg/month (±0.04) during postpartum (p = 0.03) when compared to women with inadequate intake. The model was adjusted for energy, % body fat, stature, age, schooling, skin color, and smoking. Recommended protein intake during pregnancy favored postpartum weight reduction.

  11. The frequency of eubacterium-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers shows significant cross-taxa variation within amoebozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Russell F; Gray, Michael W

    2006-12-01

    Single-celled bacterivorous eukaryotes offer excellent test cases for evaluation of the frequency of prey-to-predator lateral gene transfer (LGT). Here we use analysis of expressed sequence tag (EST) data sets to quantify the extent of LGT from eubacteria to two amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis. Stringent screening for LGT proceeded in several steps intended to enrich for authentic events while at the same time minimizing the incidence of false positives due to factors such as limitations in database coverage and ancient paralogy. The results were compared with data obtained when the same methodology was applied to EST libraries from a number of other eukaryotic taxa. Significant differences in the extent of apparent eubacterium-to-eukaryote LGT were found between taxa. Our results indicate that there may be substantial inter-taxon variation in the number of LGT events that become fixed even between amoebozoan species that have similar feeding modalities.

  12. So-called ‘relaxation’ mode located at 0.1 cm−1 in the low-frequency Raman spectra of ethylene glycol - acetone mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Amo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency Raman spectra of ethylene glycol(EG and acetone mixtures are investigated by high-resolution double monochrometer. A broad peak located at 0.1 cm−1 in susceptibility spectra is compared with the dielectric loss spectra. Both Raman relaxation time(τMRT1 and dielectric relaxation time(τD1 are determined by the model fitting method. The ratio τMRT1/τD1 does not depend on static dielectric constant of mixtures and is almost constant, ≈3.2, from 1.0 (pure EG to 0.3 mole fraction. This result indicates that both τMRT1 and τD1 are determined by the same molecular dynamics.

  13. CYP2D6 worldwide genetic variation shows high frequency of altered activity variants and no continental structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistonen, Johanna; Sajantila, Antti; Lao, Oscar; Corander, Jukka; Barbujani, Guido; Fuselli, Silvia

    2007-02-01

    CYP2D6, a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is responsible for the metabolism of about 25% of the commonly prescribed drugs. Its activity ranges from complete deficiency to excessive activity, potentially causing toxicity of medication or therapeutic failure with recommended drug dosages. This study aimed to describe the CYP2D6 diversity at the global level. A total of 1060 individuals belonging to 52 worldwide-distributed populations were genotyped at 12 highly informative variable sites, as well as for gene deletion and duplications. Phenotypes were predicted on the basis of haplotype combinations. Our study shows that (i) CYP2D6 diversity is far greater within than between populations and groups thereof, (ii) null or low-activity variants occur at high frequencies in various areas of the world, (iii) linkage disequilibrium is lowest in Africa and highest in the Americas. Patterns of variation, within and among populations, are similar to those observed for other autosomal markers (e.g. microsatellites and protein polymorphisms), suggesting that the diversity observed at the CYP2D6 locus reflects the same factors affecting variation at random genome markers.

  14. School-Based Racial and Gender Discrimination among African American Adolescents: Exploring Gender Variation in Frequency and Implications for Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavous, Tabbye M.; Griffin, Tiffany M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined school-based racial and gender discrimination experiences among African American adolescents in Grade 8 (n = 204 girls; n = 209 boys). A primary goal was exploring gender variation in frequency of both types of discrimination and associations of discrimination with academic and psychological functioning among girls and boys. Girls and boys did not vary in reported racial discrimination frequency, but boys reported more gender discrimination experiences. Multiple regression analyses within gender groups indicated that among girls and boys, racial discrimination and gender discrimination predicted higher depressive symptoms and school importance and racial discrimination predicted self-esteem. Racial and gender discrimination were also negatively associated with grade point average among boys but were not significantly associated in girls’ analyses. Significant gender discrimination X racial discrimination interactions resulted in the girls’ models predicting psychological outcomes and in boys’ models predicting academic achievement. Taken together, findings suggest the importance of considering gender- and race-related experiences in understanding academic and psychological adjustment among African American adolescents. PMID:22837794

  15. The variation in frequency locations in Doppler ultrasound spectra for maximum blood flow velocities in narrowed vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingyun; Zhang, Yufeng; Gao, Lian; Deng, Li; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Kexin; Li, Haiyan

    2017-11-01

    This study assessed the variation in the frequency locations in the Doppler ultrasound spectra for the maximum blood flow velocities of in vessels with different degrees of bilaterally axisymmetric stenosis. This was done by comparing the relationship between the velocity distributions and corresponding Doppler power spectra. First, a geometric vessel model with axisymmetric stenosis was established. This made it possible to obtain the blood flow velocity distributions for different degrees of stenosis from the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Then, the Doppler spectra were calculated for the entire segment of the vessel that was covered by the sound field. Finally, the maximum frequency locations for the spectra were determined based on the intersections of the maximum values chosen from the calculated blood flow velocity distributions and their corresponding spectra. The computational analysis showed that the maximum frequencies, which corresponded to the maximum blood flow velocities for different degrees of stenosis, were located at different positions along the spectral falling edges. The location for a normal (stenosis free) vessel was in the middle of the falling edge. For vessels with increasing degrees of stenosis, this location shifted approximately linearly downward along the falling edge. For 40% stenosis, the location reached a position at the falling edge of 0.32. Results obtained using the Field II simulation tool demonstrated the validity of the theoretical analysis and calculations, and may help to improve the maximum velocity estimation accuracy for Doppler blood flow spectra in stenosed vessels. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterizing and understanding the climatic determinism of high- to low-frequency variations in precipitation in northwestern France using a coupled wavelet multiresolution/statistical downscaling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massei, Nicolas; Dieppois, Bastien; Hannah, David; Lavers, David; Fossa, Manuel; Laignel, Benoit; Debret, Maxime

    2017-04-01

    Geophysical signals oscillate over several time-scales that explain different amount of their overall variability and may be related to different physical processes. Characterizing and understanding such variabilities in hydrological variations and investigating their determinism is one important issue in a context of climate change, as these variabilities can be occasionally superimposed to long-term trend possibly due to climate change. It is also important to refine our understanding of time-scale dependent linkages between large-scale climatic variations and hydrological responses on the regional or local-scale. Here we investigate such links by conducting a wavelet multiresolution statistical dowscaling approach of precipitation in northwestern France (Seine river catchment) over 1950-2016 using sea level pressure (SLP) and sea surface temperature (SST) as indicators of atmospheric and oceanic circulations, respectively. Previous results demonstrated that including multiresolution decomposition in a statistical downscaling model (within a so-called multiresolution ESD model) using SLP as large-scale predictor greatly improved simulation of low-frequency, i.e. interannual to interdecadal, fluctuations observed in precipitation. Building on these results, continuous wavelet transform of simulated precipiation using multiresolution ESD confirmed the good performance of the model to better explain variability at all time-scales. A sensitivity analysis of the model to the choice of the scale and wavelet function used was also tested. It appeared that whatever the wavelet used, the model performed similarly. The spatial patterns of SLP found as the best predictors for all time-scales, which resulted from the wavelet decomposition, revealed different structures according to time-scale, showing possible different determinisms. More particularly, some low-frequency components ( 3.2-yr and 19.3-yr) showed a much wide-spread spatial extentsion across the Atlantic

  17. High-frequency Quasi-periodic Light Variations from Arc-shaped Gas Clouds Falling onto a Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kotaro; Mineshige, Shin; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical and radiative properties of arc-shaped gas clouds falling onto a stellar-mass black hole based on the three-dimensional general relativistic radiation-magnetohydrodynamics (3D-GRRMHD) simulation data. Assuming that the gas clouds radiate mainly due to the free-free emission and/or optically thick, inverse Compton scattering, we calculate how the emissivity distributions develop with time. We find that (1) gas clouds, each of which has a ring-like or arc shape, are intermittently formed, and that (2) they slowly fall onto the black hole, keeping nearly the Keplerian orbital velocity. These features support the dynamical properties of the gas clouds assumed in the spin measurement method proposed by Moriyama & Mineshige, but the radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk is larger than that of the marginally stable orbit (ISCO). Next, we examine how each gas cloud is observed by a distant observer by calculating the photon trajectories in the black hole spacetime. The luminosity of the accretion flow exhibits significant time variations on different timescales, reflecting the time evolution of the gas density distributions. The relatively slow variations on the time durations of 0.08-0.10 s is due to the formation and fall of gas clouds, while quasi-periodic flux peaks with short time intervals (0.01 s) are due to the quasi-periodic enhancement of light from the non-axisymmetric arc-shaped clouds through the beaming effect. This may account for the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in black hole binaries. The observational implications and future issues are briefly discussed.

  18. Profitability Variations of a Solar System with an Evacuated Tube Collector According to Schedules and Frequency of Hot Water Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Porras-Prieto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of solar water heating systems with evacuated tube collectors has been experiencing a rapid growth in recent years. Times when there is demand for hot water, the days of use and the volumes demanded may determine the profitability of these systems, even within the same city. Therefore, this paper characterizes the behavior of a solar system with active circulation with the objective of determining the profitability variations according to the timing and schedule of demand. Through a simplified methodology based on regression equations, calculated for each hour of the day based on data from an experimental facility, the useful energy is estimated from the time and frequency of the demand for hot water at 60 °C. The analysis of the potential profitability of the system in more than 1000 scenarios analyzed shows huge differences depending on the number of days when the water is demanded, the time when demand occurs, the irradiation and the average price of energy. In cities with high irradiation and high energy prices, the system could be profitable even in homes where it is used only on weekends. The study of profitability in a building of 10 homes shows that by applying an average European household’s profile for hot water demand, levels close to full potential would be reached; for this, it is necessary to optimize the collection surface.

  19. Variation in size frequency distribution of coral populations under different fishing pressures in two contrasting locations in the Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsditch, G; Pisapia, C; Huck, M; Karisa, J; Obura, D; Sweet, M

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to assess how the size-frequency distributions of coral genera varied between reefs under different fishing pressures in two contrasting Indian Ocean locations (the Maldives and East Africa). Using generalized linear mixed models, we were able to demonstrate that complex interactions occurred between coral genera, coral size class and fishing pressure. In both locations, we found Acropora coral species to be more abundant in non-fished compared to fished sites (a pattern which was consistent for nearly all the assessed size classes). Coral genera classified as 'stress tolerant' showed a contrasting pattern i.e. were higher in abundance in fished compared to non-fished sites. Site specific variations were also observed. For example, Maldivian reefs exhibited a significantly higher abundance in all size classes of 'competitive' corals compared to East Africa. This possibly indicates that East African reefs have already been subjected to higher levels of stress and are therefore less suitable environments for 'competitive' corals. This study also highlights the potential structure and composition of reefs under future degradation scenarios, for example with a loss of Acropora corals and an increase in dominance of 'stress tolerant' and 'generalist' coral genera. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Possible association of the western Tibetan Plateau snow cover with the decadal to interdecadal variations of northern China heatwave frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhiwei [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China); Jiang, Zhihong; Zhong, Shanshan; Wang, Lijuan [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing (China); Li, Jianping [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Northern China has been subject to increased heatwave frequency (HWF) in recent decades, which deteriorates the local droughts and desertification. More than half a billion people face drinking water shortages and worsening ecological environment. In this study, the variability in the western Tibetan Plateau snow cover (TPSC) is observed to have an intimate linkage with the first empirical orthogonal function mode of the summer HWF across China. This distinct leading mode is dominated by the decadal to inter-decadal variability and features a mono-sign pattern with the extreme value center prevailing over northern China and high pressure anomalies at mid- and upper troposphere over Mongolia and the adjacent regions. A simplified general circulation model is utilized to examine the possible physical mechanism. A reduced TPSC anomaly can induce a positive geopotential height anomaly at the mid- and upper troposphere and subsequently enhance the climatological high pressure ridge over Mongolia and the adjacent regions. The subsidence associated with the high pressure anomalies tends to suppress the local cloud formation, which increases the net radiation budget, heats the surface, and favors more heatwaves. On the other hand, the surface heating can excite high pressure anomalies at mid- and upper troposphere. The latter further strengthens the upper troposphere high pressure anomalies over Mongolia and the adjacent regions. Through such positive feedback effect, the TPSC is tied to the interdecadal variations of the northern China HWF. (orig.)

  1. Learning to be different: Acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental variation can cause behaviourally mediated foraging specializations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, M.T.; Mangel, M.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    ) Offspring can learn foraging skills from their mothers (matrilineal social learning). (6) Food abundance is limited, such that average individual energy reserves are low Additionally, the following factors increase the likelihood of alternative specializations co-occurring in a predator population: (1) The predator exerts effective top-down control of prey abundance, resulting in frequency-dependent dynamics. (2) There is stochastic Variation in prey population dynamics, but this Variation is neither too extreme in magnitude nor too 'slow' with respect to the time required for an individual forager to learn new foraging skills. For a given predator population, we deduce that the degree of specialization will be highest for those prey types requiring complex capture or handling skills, while prey species that are both profitable and easy to capture and handle will be included in the diet of all individuals. Frequency-dependent benefits of selecting alternative prey types, combined with the ability of foragers to improve their foraging skills by learning, and transmit learned skills to offspring, can result in behaviourally mediated foraging specialization, and also lead to the co-existence of alternative specializations. The extent of such specialization is predicted to be a variable trait, increasing in locations or years when intra-specific competition is high relative to inter-specific competition. ?? 2009 M. Tim Tinker.

  2. Call Forecasting for Inbound Call Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vinje

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a scenario of inbound call center customer service, the ability to forecast calls is a key element and advantage. By forecasting the correct number of calls a company can predict staffing needs, meet service level requirements, improve customer satisfaction, and benefit from many other optimizations. This project will show how elementary statistics can be used to predict calls for a specific company, forecast the rate at which calls are increasing/decreasing, and determine if the calls may stop at some point.

  3. Influence of the auditory canal number of segments and radius variation on the outer ear frequency response

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thejane, T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available distortion in the frequency response. The results obtained when using the radius-length mapping function show that the response found closely correlates with other literature results. The optimum representation of the frequency response was found when four...

  4. Variation in the human lymphocyte sister chromatid exchange frequency as a function of time: results of daily and twice-weekly sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J.D.; Christensen, M.L.; Strout, C.L.; McGee, K.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    The variation in lymphocyte sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency was investigated in healthy nonsmokers who were not taking any medication. Two separate studies were undertaken. In the first, blood was drawn from four women twice a week for 8 weeks. These donors recorded the onset and termination of menstruation and times of illness. In the second study, blood was obtained from two women and two men for 5 consecutive days on two separate occasions initiated 14 days apart. Analysis of the mean SCE frequencies in each study indicated that significant temporal variation occurred in each donor, and that more variation occurred in the longer study. Some of the variation was found to be associated with the menstrual cycle. In the daily study, most of the variation appeared to be random, but occasional day-to-day changes occurred that were greater than those expected by chance. To determine how well a single SCE sample estimated the pooled mean for each donor in each study, the authors calculated the number of samples that encompassed that donor's pooled mean within 1 or more standard errors. For both studies, about 75% of the samples encompassed the pooled mean within 2 standard errors. An analysis of high-frequency cells (HFCs) was also undertaken. The results for each study indicate that the proportion of HFCs, compared with the use of Fisher's Exact test, is significantly more constant than the means, which were compared by using the t-test. These results coupled with our previous work suggest that HFC analysis may be the method of choice when analyzing data from human population studies.

  5. Photographic Records Showing the Variations of the Virtual Height of Reflection as a Function of the Radio Frequency

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standard (analog) ionosonde produces photographic records known as ionograms, which show the variations of the virtual height of reflection as a function of the...

  6. Frequency-dependent variation in reproductive success in Narcissus: implications for the maintenance of stigma-height dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John D; Barrett, Spencer C H; Baker, Angela M

    2003-05-07

    Negative frequency-dependent selection is a major selective force maintaining sexual polymorphisms. However, empirical demonstrations of frequency-dependent reproductive success are rare, particularly in plants. We investigate this problem by manipulating the frequencies of style morphs in a natural population of Narcissus assoanus, a self-incompatible herb with style-length dimorphism and intra-morph compatibility. We predicted that the reproductive success of morphs would vary negatively with their frequency because of the effects of morph-specific differences in sex-organ position on patterns of pollen transfer. This prediction was generally supported. The fruit and seed set of the two morphs did not differ significantly in plots with 1 : 1 morph ratios. However, short-styled plants produced significantly fewer seeds than long-styled plants in monomorphic plots, and significantly more seeds than long-styled plants in plots with 'long-biased' morph ratios. These patterns indicate that in the absence of physiological barriers to intra-morph mating, negative frequency-dependent selection contributes to the maintenance of stylar polymorphism through inter-morph pollen transfer. Our experimental results also provide insights into the mechanisms governing the biased style-morph ratios in populations of Narcissus species.

  7. Variations in clinical presentation, frequency of hemophagocytosis and clinical behavior of intravascular lymphoma diagnosed in different geographical regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreri, Andrés J M; Dognini, Giuseppina P; Campo, Elías; Willemze, Rein; Seymour, John F; Bairey, Osnat; Martelli, Maurizio; De Renz, Amalia O; Doglioni, Claudio; Montalbán, Carlos; Tedeschi, Alberto; Pavlovsky, Astrid; Morgan, Sue; Uziel, Lilj; Ferracci, Massimo; Ascani, Stefano; Gianelli, Umberto; Patriarca, Carlo; Facchetti, Fabio; Dalla Libera, Alessio; Pertoldi, Barbara; Horváth, Barbara; Szomor, Arpad; Zucca, Emanuele; Cavalli, Franco; Ponzoni, Maurilio

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study explored variations in the clinical manifestations of intravascular lymphoma (IVL) on the bases of the association with hemophagocytosis and the country where the diagnosis was made. DESIGN AND METHODS: The clinical features of 50 Western patients with IVL were

  8. [Bioacoustic of the advertisement call of Ceratophrys cranwelli (Anura: Ceratophryidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valetti, Julián Alonso; Salas, Nancy Edith; Martino, Adolfo Ludovico

    2013-03-01

    The advertisement call plays an important role in the life history of anuran amphibians, mainly during the breeding season. Call features represent an important character to discriminate species, and sound emissions are very effective to assure or reinforce genetic incompatibility, especially in the case of sibling species. Since frogs are ectotherms, acoustic properties of their calls will vary with temperature. In this study, we described the advertisement call of C. cranwelli, quantifying the temperature effect on its components. The acoustic emissions were recorded during 2007 using a DAT record Sony TCD-100 with stereo microphone ECM-MS907 Sony and tape TDK DAT-RGX 60. As males emit their calls floating in temporary ponds, water temperatures were registered after recording the advertisement calls with a digital thermometer TES 1300+/-0.1 degreeC. Altogether, 54 calls from 18 males were analyzed. The temporal variables of each advertisement call were measured using oscillograms and sonograms and the analyses of dominant frequency were performed using a spectrogram. Multiple correlation analysis was used to identify the temperature-dependent acoustic variables and the temperature effect on these variables was quantified using linear regression models. The advertisement call of C. cranwelli consists of a single pulse group. Call duration, Pulse duration and Pulse interval decreased with the temperature, whereas the Pulse rate increased with temperature. The temperature-dependent variables were standardized at 25 degreeC according to the linear regression model obtained. The acoustic variables that were correlated with the temperature are the variables which emissions depend on laryngeal muscles and the temperature constraints the contractile properties of muscles. Our results indicated that temperature explains an important fraction of the variability in some acoustic variables (79% in the Pulse rate), and demonstrated the importance of considering the effect of

  9. A CDI Study of Bilingual English-Hebrew Children--Frequency of Exposure as a Major Source of Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armon-Lotem, Sharon; Ohana, Odelya

    2017-01-01

    The present study explores the vocabulary development of bilingual children when neither of their languages has a minority language status. With both languages having high relative prestige, it is possible to address the impact of exposure variables: age of onset, length of exposure, and frequency of exposure (FoE) to both languages. Parents of 40…

  10. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Price, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  11. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna C G Smith

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  12. Call Cultures in Orang-Utans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wich, Serge A.; Nater, Alexander; Arora, Natasha; Bastian, Meredith L.; Meulman, Ellen; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen C.; Atmoko, S. Suci Utami; Pamungkas, Joko; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Hardus, Madeleine E.; van Noordwijk, Maria; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies suggested great ape cultures, arguing that human cumulative culture presumably evolved from such a foundation. These focused on conspicuous behaviours, and showed rich geographic variation, which could not be attributed to known ecological or genetic differences. Although geographic variation within call types (accents) has previously been reported for orang-utans and other primate species, we examine geographic variation in the presence/absence of discrete call types (dialects). Because orang-utans have been shown to have geographic variation that is not completely explicable by genetic or ecological factors we hypothesized that this will be similar in the call domain and predict that discrete call type variation between populations will be found. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined long-term behavioural data from five orang-utan populations and collected fecal samples for genetic analyses. We show that there is geographic variation in the presence of discrete types of calls. In exactly the same behavioural context (nest building and infant retrieval), individuals in different wild populations customarily emit either qualitatively different calls or calls in some but not in others. By comparing patterns in call-type and genetic similarity, we suggest that the observed variation is not likely to be explained by genetic or ecological differences. Conclusion/Significance These results are consistent with the potential presence of ‘call cultures’ and suggest that wild orang-utans possess the ability to invent arbitrary calls, which spread through social learning. These findings differ substantially from those that have been reported for primates before. First, the results reported here are on dialect and not on accent. Second, this study presents cases of production learning whereas most primate studies on vocal learning were cases of contextual learning. We conclude with speculating on how these findings might assist in bridging

  13. Call cultures in orang-utans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge A Wich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies suggested great ape cultures, arguing that human cumulative culture presumably evolved from such a foundation. These focused on conspicuous behaviours, and showed rich geographic variation, which could not be attributed to known ecological or genetic differences. Although geographic variation within call types (accents has previously been reported for orang-utans and other primate species, we examine geographic variation in the presence/absence of discrete call types (dialects. Because orang-utans have been shown to have geographic variation that is not completely explicable by genetic or ecological factors we hypothesized that this will be similar in the call domain and predict that discrete call type variation between populations will be found. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined long-term behavioural data from five orang-utan populations and collected fecal samples for genetic analyses. We show that there is geographic variation in the presence of discrete types of calls. In exactly the same behavioural context (nest building and infant retrieval, individuals in different wild populations customarily emit either qualitatively different calls or calls in some but not in others. By comparing patterns in call-type and genetic similarity, we suggest that the observed variation is not likely to be explained by genetic or ecological differences. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with the potential presence of 'call cultures' and suggest that wild orang-utans possess the ability to invent arbitrary calls, which spread through social learning. These findings differ substantially from those that have been reported for primates before. First, the results reported here are on dialect and not on accent. Second, this study presents cases of production learning whereas most primate studies on vocal learning were cases of contextual learning. We conclude with speculating on how these findings might

  14. Variation in the gene frequencies of three generations of humans from Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Garza-Chapa, R

    1989-04-01

    Allele frequencies for the ABO, Rh, MNSs, Duffy, Kidd, Lutheran, P and Lewis blood group systems in 207 persons whose 4 grandparents were born in the Monterrey Metropolitan area (MMA), grouped into 3 generations, were ascertained along with other related population from the MMA, Mestizos from Saltillo, Coahuila and Tlaxcala, and from the populations thought to have contributed to their genetic constitution (native Mexican Indians and Spanish). Genetic admixture and distance estimates were calculated. Gene frequencies of the three generations from MMA are intermediate to those of the ancestral populations, indicating that they are Mestizo but with a genetic structure different from Mestizos of Saltillo and Tlaxcala. Both genetic admixture and distance estimates indicate that the oldest generation exhibits the greatest Spanish influence which decreases in the youngest generation and in the other MMA populations as a result of the immigration from the central states of Mexico.

  15. Designing 2D Phononic Crystal Slabs with Transmission Gaps for Solid Angle as well as Frequency Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven M. Ivansson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals (PCs can be used as acoustic frequency selective insulators and filters. In a two-dimensional (2D PC, cylindrical scatterers with a common axis direction are located periodically in a host medium. In the present paper, the layer multiple-scattering (LMS computational method for wave propagation through 2D PC slabs is formulated and implemented for general 3D incident-wave directions and polarizations. Extensions are made to slabs with cylindrical scatterers of different types within each layer. As an application, the problem is considered to design such a slab with small sound transmittance within a given frequency band and solid angle region for the direction of the incident plane wave. The design problem, with variable parameters characterizing the scatterer geometry and material, is solved by differential evolution, a global optimization algorithm for efficiently navigating parameter landscapes. The efficacy of the procedure is illustrated by comparison to a direct Monte Carlo method.

  16. Switching Operation Simulations in a Large Offshore Wind Farm with Use of Parametric Variation and Frequency Domain Severity Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Holdyk, Andrzej; Holbøll, Joachim; Arana, Ivan; Jensen, Asger

    2012-01-01

    Transient voltages resulting from switching operations depend on an interaction between the breaker, the transformer, cables and a neighbourhood grid and imply a risk for the transformer and other components. In this paper the Frequency Domain Severity Factor (FDSF) is used to assess the severity of electrical stress imposed on wind turbine transformers by voltage waveforms produced during switching operations. The method is implemented in Matlab together with automatic and systematic variati...

  17. Frequency of rare mutations and common genetic variations in severe hypertriglyceridemia in the general population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Blanco-Torrecilla, Cristian; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2016-04-23

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a common complex metabolic trait that results of the accumulation of relatively common genetic variants in combination with other modifier genes and environmental factors resulting in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemias is diagnosed in adulthood and their molecular bases have not been fully defined yet. The prevalence of HTG is highly variable among populations, possibly caused by differences in environmental factors and genetic background. However, the prevalence of very high TG and the frequency of rare mutations causing HTG in a whole non-selected population have not been previously studied. The total of 23,310 subjects over 18 years from a primary care-district in a middle-class area of Zaragoza (Spain) with TG >500 mg/dL were selected to establish HTG prevalence. Those affected of primary HTG were considered for further genetic analysis. The promoters, coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, LMF1, APOC2, APOA5, APOE and GPIHBP1 genes were sequenced. The frequency of rare variants identified was studied in 90 controls. One hundred ninety-four subjects (1.04%) had HTG and 90 subjects (46.4%) met the inclusion criteria for primary HTG. In this subgroup, nine patients (12.3%) were carriers of 7 rare variants in LPL, LMF1, APOA5, GPIHBP1 or APOE genes. Three of these mutations are described for the first time in this work. The presence of a rare pathogenic mutation did not confer a differential phenotype or a higher family history of HTG. The prevalence of rare mutations in candidate genes in subjects with primary HTG is low. The low frequency of rare mutations, the absence of a more severe phenotype or the dominant transmission of the HTG would not suggest the use of genetic analysis in the clinical practice in this population.

  18. Solidago altissima differs with respect to ploidy frequency and clinal variation across the prairie-forest biome border in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etterson, Julie R; Toczydlowski, Rachel H; Winkler, Katharine J; Kirschbaum, Jessica A; McAulay, Tim S

    2016-01-01

    Although our awareness of ploidy diversity has expanded with the application of flow cytometry, we still know little about the extent to which cytotypes within mixed-ploidy populations are genetically differentiated across environmental gradients. To address this issue, we reared 14 populations of Solidago altissima spanning the prairie-forest ecotone in Minnesota in a common garden with a watering treatment. We assessed ploidy frequencies and measured survival, flowering phenology, and plant architectural traits for 4 years. All populations harbored multiple cytotypes; prairie populations were dominated by tetraploids, forest populations by hexaploids. Diploids and polyploids differed significantly for 84% of the traits. Beyond average differences, the slope of trait values covaried with latitude and longitude, but this relationship was stronger for diploids than the other two polyploid cytotypes as indicated by numerous ploidy × latitude and ploidy × longitude interactions. For example, the timing of flowering of the cytotypes overlapped in populations sampled from the northeastern hemiboreal forest but differed significantly between cytotypes sampled from populations in the southwestern prairie. The watering treatments had weak effects, and there were no ploidy differences for phenotypic plasticity. Our data show that diploids have diverged genetically to a greater extent than polyploids along the environmental clines sampled in this study. Moreover, different environments favor phenotypic convergence over divergence among cytotypes for some traits. Differences in ploidy frequency and phenotypic divergence among cytotypes across gradients of temperature and precipitation are important considerations for restoration in an age of climate change. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  19. Advertisement call of species of the genus Frostius Cannatella 1986 (Anura: Bufonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora A. Juncá

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Frostius pernambucensis and F. erythrophthalmus are cryptic bufonid species recognized mainly by the iris color: yellow in F. permambucensis and red in F. erythrophthalmus. However, field studies showed that the iris color of F. erythrophthalmus could vary between yellow and red. To improve the recognition of these species we described the advertisement call of Frostius pernambucensis and Frostius erythrophthalmus and we tested if call characteristics are influenced by temperature, male size and perch height. We also report on a physical interaction between two males of F. pernambucensis and the associated vocalization, suggesting that F. pernambucensis has not a territorial call or encounter call. Comparing the advertisement calls, the call of F. pernambucensis was lower, shorter and with a smaller number of notes than the call of F. erythrophthalmus. Dominant frequency and fundamental frequency variation of the F. pernambucensis advertisement call were related to the male’s size, while the call emission rate was related to air temperature. However, we could not find relationship among the acoustic characteristic of F. erythrophthalmus and male size or temperature.

  20. Source levels of foraging humpback whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournet, Michelle E H; Matthews, Leanna P; Gabriele, Christine M; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Holger

    2018-02-01

    Humpback whales produce a wide range of low- to mid-frequency vocalizations throughout their migratory range. Non-song "calls" dominate this species' vocal repertoire while on high-latitude foraging grounds. The source levels of 426 humpback whale calls in four vocal classes were estimated using a four-element planar array deployed in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Southeast Alaska. There was no significant difference in source levels between humpback whale vocal classes. The mean call source level was 137 dB RMS re 1 μPa @ 1 m in the bandwidth of the call (range 113-157 dB RMS re 1 μPa @ 1 m), where bandwidth is defined as the frequency range from the lowest to the highest frequency component of the call. These values represent a robust estimate of humpback whale source levels on foraging grounds and should append earlier estimates.

  1. Regional frequency analysis of short duration rainfall extremes using gridded daily rainfall data as co-variate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, H.; Gregersen, Ida Bülow; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2017-01-01

    increases and decreases are seen. A subsample analysis is conducted to evaluate the impacts of non-stationarities in the rainfall data. The regional model includes the nonstationarities as an additional source of uncertainty together with sampling uncertainty and uncertainty caused by spatial variability.......A regional partial duration series (PDS) model is applied for estimation of intensity duration frequency relationships of extreme rainfalls in Denmark. The model uses generalised least squares regression to relate the PDS parameters to gridded rainfall statistics from a dense network of rain gauges...... correlated to the mean extreme daily precipitation. A Generalised Pareto distribution with a regional constant shape parameter is adopted. Compared to previous regional studies in Denmark a general increase in extreme rainfall intensity for durations up to 1 hour is found, whereas for larger durations both...

  2. The Tracking Study: description of a randomized controlled trial of variations on weight tracking frequency in a behavioral weight loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Jennifer A; Jeffery, Robert W; Crow, Scott J; Brelje, Kerrin L; Pacanowski, Carly R; Gavin, Kara L; Smolenski, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Observational evidence from behavioral weight control trials and community studies suggests that greater frequency of weighing oneself, or tracking weight, is associated with better weight outcomes. Conversely, it has also been suggested that frequent weight tracking may have a negative impact on mental health and outcomes during weight loss, but there are minimal experimental data that address this concern in the context of an active weight loss program. To achieve the long-term goal of strengthening behavioral weight loss programs, the purpose of this randomized controlled trial (the Tracking Study) is to test variations on frequency of self-weighing during a behavioral weight loss program, and to examine psychosocial and mental health correlates of weight tracking and weight loss outcomes. This paper describes the study design, intervention features, recruitment, and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the Tracking Study. Three hundred thirty-nine overweight and obese adults were recruited and randomized to one of three variations on weight tracking frequency during a 12-month weight loss program with a 12-month follow-up: daily weight tracking, weekly weight tracking, or no weight tracking. The primary outcome is weight in kilograms at 24 months. The weight loss program integrates each weight tracking instruction with standard behavioral weight loss techniques (goal setting, self-monitoring, stimulus control, dietary and physical activity enhancements, lifestyle modifications); participants in weight tracking conditions were provided with wireless Internet technology (wi-fi-enabled digital scales and touchscreen personal devices) to facilitate weight tracking during the study. This study was successful in recruiting adult male and female participants and is positioned to enhance the standard of care with regard to weight tracking recommendations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimating KIR Haplotype Frequencies on a Cohort of 10,000 Individuals: A Comprehensive Study on Population Variations, Typing Resolutions, and Reference Haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierra-Green, Cynthia; Roe, David; Jayaraman, Jyothi; Trowsdale, John; Traherne, James; Kuang, Rui; Spellman, Stephen; Maiers, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) mediate human natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity via activating or inhibiting signals. Although informative and functional haplotype patterns have been reported, most genotyping has been performed at resolutions that are structurally ambiguous. In order to leverage structural information given low-resolution genotypes, we performed experiments to quantify the effects of population variations, reference haplotypes, and genotyping resolutions on population-level haplotype frequency estimations as well as predictions of individual haplotypes. We genotyped 10,157 unrelated individuals in 5 populations (518 African American[AFA], 258 Asian or Pacific Islander[API], 8,245 European[EUR], 1,073 Hispanic[HIS], and 63 Native American[NAM]) for KIR gene presence/absence (PA), and additionally half of the AFA samples for KIR gene copy number variation (CNV). A custom EM algorithm was used to estimate haplotype frequencies for each population by interpretation in the context of three sets of reference haplotypes. The algorithm also assigns each individual the haplotype pairs of maximum likelihood. Generally, our haplotype frequency estimates agree with similar previous publications to within haplotypes. The exception is that estimates for NAM from the U.S. showed higher frequency association of cB02 with tA01 (+14%) instead of tB01 (-8.5%) compared to a previous study of NAM from south of the U.S. The higher-resolution CNV genotyping on the AFA samples allowed unambiguous haplotype-pair assignments for the majority of individuals, resulting in a 22% higher median typing resolution score (TRS), which measures likelihood of self-match in the context of population-specific haplo- and geno-types. The use of TRS to quantify reduced ambiguity with CNV data clearly revealed the few individuals with ambiguous genotypes as outliers. It is observed that typing resolution and reference haplotype set influence haplotype frequency

  4. High frequency of the IVS2-2A>G DNA sequence variation in SLC26A5, encoding the cochlear motor protein prestin, precludes its involvement in hereditary hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Fred A

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cochlear outer hair cells change their length in response to variations in membrane potential. This capability, called electromotility, is believed to enable the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian cochlea. Prestin is a transmembrane protein required for electromotility. Homozygous prestin knockout mice are profoundly hearing impaired. In humans, a single nucleotide change in SLC26A5, encoding prestin, has been reported in association with hearing loss. This DNA sequence variation, IVS2-2A>G, occurs in the exon 3 splice acceptor site and is expected to abolish splicing of exon 3. Methods To further explore the relationship between hearing loss and the IVS2-2A>G transition, and assess allele frequency, genomic DNA from hearing impaired and control subjects was analyzed by DNA sequencing. SLC26A5 genomic DNA sequences from human, chimp, rat, mouse, zebrafish and fruit fly were aligned and compared for evolutionary conservation of the exon 3 splice acceptor site. Alternative splice acceptor sites within intron 2 of human SLC26A5 were sought using a splice site prediction program from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. Results The IVS2-2A>G variant was found in a heterozygous state in 4 of 74 hearing impaired subjects of Hispanic, Caucasian or uncertain ethnicity and 4 of 150 Hispanic or Caucasian controls (p = 0.45. The IVS2-2A>G variant was not found in 106 subjects of Asian or African American descent. No homozygous subjects were identified (n = 330. Sequence alignment of SLC26A5 orthologs demonstrated that the A nucleotide at position IVS2-2 is invariant among several eukaryotic species. Sequence analysis also revealed five potential alternative splice acceptor sites in intron 2 of human SLC26A5. Conclusion These data suggest that the IVS2-2A>G variant may not occur more frequently in hearing impaired subjects than in controls. The identification of five potential alternative splice acceptor sites in

  5. Higher frequency of social learning in China than in the West shows cultural variation in the dynamics of cultural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; Chang, Lei; Murray, Keelin; Lu, Hui Jing

    2015-01-01

    Cultural evolutionary models have identified a range of conditions under which social learning (copying others) is predicted to be adaptive relative to asocial learning (learning on one's own), particularly in humans where socially learned information can accumulate over successive generations. However, cultural evolution and behavioural economics experiments have consistently shown apparently maladaptive under-utilization of social information in Western populations. Here we provide experimental evidence of cultural variation in people's use of social learning, potentially explaining this mismatch. People in mainland China showed significantly more social learning than British people in an artefact-design task designed to assess the adaptiveness of social information use. People in Hong Kong, and Chinese immigrants in the UK, resembled British people in their social information use, suggesting a recent shift in these groups from social to asocial learning due to exposure to Western culture. Finally, Chinese mainland participants responded less than other participants to increased environmental change within the task. Our results suggest that learning strategies in humans are culturally variable and not genetically fixed, necessitating the study of the ‘social learning of social learning strategies' whereby the dynamics of cultural evolution are responsive to social processes, such as migration, education and globalization. PMID:25392473

  6. Higher frequency of social learning in China than in the West shows cultural variation in the dynamics of cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; Chang, Lei; Murray, Keelin; Lu, Hui Jing

    2015-01-07

    Cultural evolutionary models have identified a range of conditions under which social learning (copying others) is predicted to be adaptive relative to asocial learning (learning on one's own), particularly in humans where socially learned information can accumulate over successive generations. However, cultural evolution and behavioural economics experiments have consistently shown apparently maladaptive under-utilization of social information in Western populations. Here we provide experimental evidence of cultural variation in people's use of social learning, potentially explaining this mismatch. People in mainland China showed significantly more social learning than British people in an artefact-design task designed to assess the adaptiveness of social information use. People in Hong Kong, and Chinese immigrants in the UK, resembled British people in their social information use, suggesting a recent shift in these groups from social to asocial learning due to exposure to Western culture. Finally, Chinese mainland participants responded less than other participants to increased environmental change within the task. Our results suggest that learning strategies in humans are culturally variable and not genetically fixed, necessitating the study of the 'social learning of social learning strategies' whereby the dynamics of cultural evolution are responsive to social processes, such as migration, education and globalization.

  7. 76 FR 17934 - Infrastructure Protection Data Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... infrastructure and key resources (CIKR). At DHS, this responsibility is managed by IP within NPPD. Beginning in...: Infrastructure Protection Data Call. OMB Number: 1670-NEW. Frequency: On occasion. Affected Public: Federal... SECURITY Infrastructure Protection Data Call AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS...

  8. Spatial variation in the frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes under the tectonic framework in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S. Mostafa

    2017-10-01

    Spatial variations of seismic energy released and b-value over the Middle East region are investigated based on a seismicity catalog from 1995 to 2007. The goal is to use these seismic parameters and based on other geodetic and geophysical observations, such as GPS measurements, strain rate model, fault distribution, focal mechanism, crustal model, Q model, and gravity measurements, etc., to uncover spatial patterns that seem anomalous. Areas of high energy released (cumulative) seem to correspond to the areas of relatively high b-values. Areas of high energy released and high b-values seem to correspond very well with the location of continental collision where earthquake activities are high. The divergent boundary between Arabia and African plates and subduction zone at Makran seem to correspond to low to moderate energy release. Northern Pamir, Azerbaijan-Caucasus, the lower part of Zagros Mountains, eastern Turkey, Owen Fracture Zone, Strait of Bob-el-Mandeb, and south of the Sulaiman Shear Zone seem to correspond to high cumulative energy-released, high strain rate, high b-values, and high fault density. While, the central and eastern Iran, southern Zagros, northern Pakistan, Gulf of Aden, Alborz, southwest of the Caspian Sea, western Caucasus and Kopeh-Dagh seem to correspond with lower b-values. The cross-section map for Hindu-Kush shows general decreasing of the b-values with depth, however, a region of high b-value is observed underneath Pamir at depths from 170 to 230 km. This anomaly region can be due to dehydration of Pamir crustal slab at depth.

  9. Spontaneous low frequency BOLD signal variations from resting-state fMRI are decreased in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, Samaneh; Manning, Kathryn Y; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Gómez, Francisco A; Soddu, Andrea; Borrie, Michael J; Menon, Ravi S; Bartha, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated altered brain activity in Alzheimer's disease using task based functional MRI (fMRI), network based resting-state fMRI, and glucose metabolism from 18F fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET). Our goal was to define a novel indicator of neuronal activity based on a first-order textural feature of the resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI) signal. Furthermore, we examined the association between this neuronal activity metric and glucose metabolism from 18F FDG-PET. We studied 15 normal elderly controls (NEC) and 15 probable Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects from the AD Neuroimaging Initiative. An independent component analysis was applied to the RS-fMRI, followed by template matching to identify neuronal components (NC). A regional brain activity measurement was constructed based on the variation of the RS-fMRI signal of these NC. The standardized glucose uptake values of several brain regions relative to the cerebellum (SUVR) were measured from partial volume corrected FDG-PET images. Comparing the AD and NEC groups, the mean brain activity metric was significantly lower in the accumbens, while the glucose SUVR was significantly lower in the amygdala and hippocampus. The RS-fMRI brain activity metric was positively correlated with cognitive measures and amyloid β1-42 cerebral spinal fluid levels; however, these did not remain significant following Bonferroni correction. There was a significant linear correlation between the brain activity metric and the glucose SUVR measurements. This proof of concept study demonstrates that this novel and easy to implement RS-fMRI brain activity metric can differentiate a group of healthy elderly controls from a group of people with AD.

  10. Electrical energy saving in motors and frequency variators; Ahorro de energia electrica en motores y variadores de frecuencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Neri, Roger [Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The necessity of saving energy is urgent and undeniable. We must already begin with the rational use of energy. Which is obtaining the maximum benefit of the consumed energy and of the necessary facilities for its generation, transmission and use. Guaranteeing at the same time an operation free of interferences or interruptions for the users. The electricity in alternating current does not allow its storage, reason why it is necessary to generate and distribute it at the precise moment when it is required. This forces to determine the proportions of the generation facilities, to be able to feed the periods of maximum demand called {sup p}eaks{sup .} It is this very point where the problem of the inappropriate use of the electrical energy starts. The energy waste is self-evident during the periods of low demand because of the low efficiency of the sub-utilized facilities. Electrical motors of the induction type use approximately more than 60% of the energy in the industry. If we use high efficiency motors instead of standard motors, a better advantage of the energy demanded from Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) is obtained. [Spanish] Es impostergable e innegable la necesidad de ahorrar energia. Tenemos que empezar ya con el uso racional de la energia: Obtener el maximo beneficio de la energia consumida y de las instalaciones necesarias para su generacion, transmision y utilizacion. Garantizando a los usuarios un funcionamiento sin interferencias o interrupciones. La electricidad en corriente alterna no permite su almacenamiento, por lo que es necesario generarla y distribuirla en el momento preciso en que es requerida. Esto obliga a dimensionar las instalaciones de generacion, para poder alimentar los periodos de maxima demanda llamados pico. Desde esta parte inicia el problema de la mala utilizacion de la energia electrica. Ya que en los periodos de baja demanda, las instalaciones se encuentran subutilizadas y si su eficiencia es muy baja, el desperdicio de

  11. Celiac disease T-cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salentijn Elma MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes that mediate the stimulation of HLA-DQ2/8 restricted T-cells. Next to the thoroughly characterized major T-cell epitopes derived from the α-gliadin fraction of gluten, γ-gliadin peptides are also known to stimulate T-cells of celiac disease patients. To pinpoint CD-toxic γ-gliadins in hexaploid bread wheat, we examined the variation of T-cell epitopes involved in CD in γ-gliadin transcripts of developing bread wheat grains. Results A detailed analysis of the genetic variation present in γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (T. aestivum, allo-hexaploid, carrying the A, B and D genome, together with genomic γ-gliadin sequences from ancestrally related diploid wheat species, enabled the assignment of sequence variants to one of the three genomic γ-gliadin loci, Gli-A1, Gli-B1 or Gli-D1. Almost half of the γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (49% was assigned to locus Gli-D1. Transcripts from each locus differed in CD epitope content and composition. The Gli-D1 transcripts contained the highest frequency of canonical CD epitope cores (on average 10.1 per transcript followed by the Gli-A1 transcripts (8.6 and the Gli-B1 transcripts (5.4. The natural variants of the major CD epitope from γ-gliadins, DQ2-γ-I, showed variation in their capacity to induce in vitro proliferation of a DQ2-γ-I specific and HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell clone. Conclusions Evaluating the CD epitopes derived from γ-gliadins in their natural context of flanking protein variation, genome specificity and transcript frequency is a significant step towards accurate quantification of the CD toxicity of bread wheat. This approach can be used to predict relative levels of CD toxicity of

  12. Ultrasound call detection in capybara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene S.C. Nogueira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The vocal repertoire of some animal species has been considered a non-invasive tool to predict distress reactivity. In rats ultrasound emissions were reported as distress indicator. Capybaras[ vocal repertoire was reported recently and seems to have ultrasound calls, but this has not yet been confirmed. Thus, in order to check if a poor state of welfare was linked to ultrasound calls in the capybara vocal repertoire, the aim of this study was to track the presence of ultrasound emissions in 11 animals under three conditions: 1 unrestrained; 2 intermediately restrained, and 3 highly restrained. The ultrasound track identified frequencies in the range of 31.8±3.5 kHz in adults and 33.2±8.5 kHz in juveniles. These ultrasound frequencies occurred only when animals were highly restrained, physically restrained or injured during handling. We concluded that these calls with ultrasound components are related to pain and restraint because they did not occur when animals were free of restraint. Thus we suggest that this vocalization may be used as an additional tool to assess capybaras[ welfare.

  13. Real estate ads in Emei music frog vocalizations: female preference for calls emanating from burrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianguo; Tang, Yezhong; Narins, Peter M

    2012-06-23

    During female mate choice, both the male's phenotype and resources (e.g. his nest) contribute to the chooser's fitness. Animals other than humans are not known to advertise resource characteristics to potential mates through vocal communication; although in some species of anurans and birds, females do evaluate male qualities through vocal communication. Here, we demonstrate that calls of the male Emei music frog (Babina dauchina), vocalizing from male-built nests, reflect nest structure information that can be recognized by females. Inside-nest calls consisted of notes with energy concentrated at lower frequency ranges and longer note durations when compared with outside-nest calls. Centre frequencies and note durations of the inside calls positively correlate with the area of the burrow entrance and the depth of the burrow, respectively. When given a choice between outside and inside calls played back alternately, more than 70 per cent of the females (33/47) chose inside calls. These results demonstrate that males of this species faithfully advertise whether or not they possess a nest to potential mates by vocal communication, which probably facilitates optimal mate selection by females. These results revealed a novel function of advertisement calls, which is consistent with the wide variation in both call complexity and social behaviour within amphibians.

  14. Variation in the type and frequency of postoperative invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections according to type of surgical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deverick J; Arduino, Jean Marie; Reed, Shelby D; Sexton, Daniel J; Kaye, Keith S; Grussemeyer, Chelsea A; Peter, Senaka A; Hardy, Chantelle; Choi, Yong Il; Friedman, Joelle Y; Fowler, Vance G

    2010-07-01

    .50 infections per 100 procedures [95% CI, 0.42-0.59]; P < .001, compared with other procedure types), comprising 80% of invasive S.aureus infections after these procedures. The frequency and type of postoperative invasive S. aureus infection varied significantly across procedure types. The highest risk procedures, such as cardiothoracic procedures, should be targeted for ongoing preventative interventions.

  15. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructu...

  16. Call 1 FAQ (ENG)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Francine Sinzinkayo

    What is your definition of “improvement” in this Call for proposals? “Improvement” as used in this call implies all innovations that may be applied by research teams to ... perform their expected roles and to participate in the overall coordination of partnership activities (including monitoring, reporting, communication, etc.).

  17. Callings and Organizational Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, A. R.; Pinder, Craig C.; McLean, Murdith

    2010-01-01

    Current literature on careers, social identity and meaning in work tends to understate the multiplicity, historical significance, and nuances of the concept of calling(s). In this article, we trace the evolution of the concept from its religious roots into secular realms and develop a typology of interpretations using occupation and religious…

  18. Dimensioning large call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Mandelbaum; M.I. Reiman

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a framework for asymptotic optimization of a queueing system. The motivation is the staffing problem of call centers with 100's of agents (or more). Such a call center is modeled as an M/M/N queue, where the number of agents~$N$ is large. Within our framework, we determine the

  19. CALL FOR PROPOSALS

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Charles

    CALL FOR PROPOSALS. Research Project on: Gender and Enterprise Development in Africa: A Cross-Country Comparative Study. The Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research ... calling for research proposals from researchers based in Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique or ... For example, many more women work.

  20. Call 1 FAQ (ENG)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Francine Sinzinkayo

    What is your definition of “improvement” in this Call for proposals? “Improvement” as used in this call implies all innovations that may be applied by research teams to develop a vaccine that is superior to a current one. Examples of improvement are better adjuvant, vaccine delivery systems or formulations that present ...

  1. Correlated inter-regional variations in low frequency local field potentials and resting state BOLD signals within S1 cortex of monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, George H; Yang, Pai-Feng; Gore, John C; Chen, Li Min

    2016-08-01

    The hypothesis that specific frequency components of the spontaneous local field potentials (LFPs) underlie low frequency fluctuations of resting state fMRI (rsfMRI) signals was tested. The previous analyses of rsfMRI signals revealed differential inter-regional correlations among areas 3a, 3b, and 1 of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in anesthetized monkeys (Wang et al. [2013]: Neuron 78:1116-1126). Here LFP band(s) which correlated between S1 regions, and how these inter-regional correlation differences covaried with rsfMRI signals were examined. LFP signals were filtered into seven bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, gamma low, gamma high, and gamma very high), and then a Hilbert transformation was applied to obtain measures of instantaneous amplitudes and temporal lags between regions of interest (ROI) digit-digit pairs (areas 3b-area 1, area 3a-area 1, area 3a-area 3b) and digit-face pairs (area 3b-face, area 1-face, and area 3a-face). It was found that variations in the inter-regional correlation strengths between digit-digit and digit-face pairs in the delta (1-4 Hz), alpha (9-14 Hz), beta (15-30 Hz), and gamma (31-50 Hz) bands parallel those of rsfMRI signals to varying degrees. Temporal lags between digit-digit area pairs varied across LFP bands, with area 3a mostly leading areas 1/2 and 3b. In summary, the data demonstrates that the low and middle frequency range (1-50 Hz) of spontaneous LFP signals similarly covary with the low frequency fluctuations of rsfMRI signals within local circuits of S1, supporting a neuronal electrophysiological basis of rsfMRI signals. Inter-areal LFP temporal lag differences provided novel insights into the directionality of information flow among S1 areas at rest. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2755-2766, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Assessing call centers’ success:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham A. Baraka

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces a model to evaluate the performance of call centers based on the Delone and McLean Information Systems success model. A number of indicators are identified to track the call center’s performance. Mapping of the proposed indicators to the six dimensions of the D&M model is presented. A Weighted Call Center Performance Index is proposed to assess the call center performance; the index is used to analyze the effect of the identified indicators. Policy-Weighted approach was used to assume the weights with an analysis of different weights for each dimension. The analysis of the different weights cases gave priority to the User satisfaction and net Benefits dimension as the two outcomes from the system. For the input dimensions, higher priority was given to the system quality and the service quality dimension. Call centers decision makers can use the tool to tune the different weights in order to reach the objectives set by the organization. Multiple linear regression analysis was used in order to provide a linear formula for the User Satisfaction dimension and the Net Benefits dimension in order to be able to forecast the values for these two dimensions as function of the other dimensions

  3. Enhanced nurse call systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    This Evaluation focuses on high-end computerized nurse call systems--what we call enhanced systems. These are highly flexible systems that incorporate microprocessor and communications technologies to expand the capabilities of the nurse call function. Enhanced systems, which vary in configuration from one installation to the next, typically consist of a basic system that provides standard nurse call functionality and a combination of additional enhancements that provide the added functionality the facility desires. In this study, we examine the features that distinguish enhanced nurse call systems from nonenhanced systems, focusing on their application and benefit to healthcare facilities. We evaluated seven systems to determine how well they help (1) improve patient care, as well as increase satisfaction with the care provided, and (2) improve caregiver efficiency, as well as increase satisfaction with the work environment. We found that all systems meet these objectives, but not all systems perform equally well for all implementations. Our ratings will help facilities identify those systems that offer the most effective features for their intended use. The study also includes a Technology Management Guide to help readers (1) determine whether they'll benefit from the capabilities offered by enhanced systems and (2) target a system for purchase and equip the system for optimum performance and cost-effective operation.

  4. Redescription of the Advertisement Call of Five Species of Thoropa (Anura, Cycloramphidae), Including Recordings of Rare and Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-de-Almeida, Carlos H L; Assis, Clodoaldo L; Feio, Renato N; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Frogs of the genus Thoropa comprise six endemic Brazilian species on the Eastern side of the country. Little is known about their natural history, especially about their acoustic communication. Therefore, aiming to provide an overview of their vocalizations, we analyzed and redescribed male advertisement calls of three living and two possibly extinct species. The smaller species, T. petropolitana and T. lutzi, produce simple calls (one single note) with a higher frequency range than the remaining larger ones. On the other hand, the larger species present complex calls, with more than one note: T. megatympanum calls have three notes, T. taophora calls have four notes, and T. miliaris calls varies from three to six notes. Population snout-vent length negatively correlated with peak of dominant frequency as expected. However, highlighted differences between two populations of T. lutzi, which could indicate need of further taxonomic evaluation of those lineages. Peculiar morphology, such as the absence of vocal sacs and slits, may have contributed to their call variation and highly banded frequency structure. If the observed population differences reflect species-level differences, T. lutzi may be classified as a critically endangered species, as T. petropolitana. Furthermore, we provided a suggestion to an unusual behavior in frogs: calling with the mouth open in the smaller species of the genus.

  5. Redescription of the Advertisement Call of Five Species of Thoropa (Anura, Cycloramphidae, Including Recordings of Rare and Endangered Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H L Nunes-de-Almeida

    Full Text Available Frogs of the genus Thoropa comprise six endemic Brazilian species on the Eastern side of the country. Little is known about their natural history, especially about their acoustic communication. Therefore, aiming to provide an overview of their vocalizations, we analyzed and redescribed male advertisement calls of three living and two possibly extinct species. The smaller species, T. petropolitana and T. lutzi, produce simple calls (one single note with a higher frequency range than the remaining larger ones. On the other hand, the larger species present complex calls, with more than one note: T. megatympanum calls have three notes, T. taophora calls have four notes, and T. miliaris calls varies from three to six notes. Population snout-vent length negatively correlated with peak of dominant frequency as expected. However, highlighted differences between two populations of T. lutzi, which could indicate need of further taxonomic evaluation of those lineages. Peculiar morphology, such as the absence of vocal sacs and slits, may have contributed to their call variation and highly banded frequency structure. If the observed population differences reflect species-level differences, T. lutzi may be classified as a critically endangered species, as T. petropolitana. Furthermore, we provided a suggestion to an unusual behavior in frogs: calling with the mouth open in the smaller species of the genus.

  6. Redescription of the Advertisement Call of Five Species of Thoropa (Anura, Cycloramphidae), Including Recordings of Rare and Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Clodoaldo L.; Feio, Renato N.; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Frogs of the genus Thoropa comprise six endemic Brazilian species on the Eastern side of the country. Little is known about their natural history, especially about their acoustic communication. Therefore, aiming to provide an overview of their vocalizations, we analyzed and redescribed male advertisement calls of three living and two possibly extinct species. The smaller species, T. petropolitana and T. lutzi, produce simple calls (one single note) with a higher frequency range than the remaining larger ones. On the other hand, the larger species present complex calls, with more than one note: T. megatympanum calls have three notes, T. taophora calls have four notes, and T. miliaris calls varies from three to six notes. Population snout-vent length negatively correlated with peak of dominant frequency as expected. However, highlighted differences between two populations of T. lutzi, which could indicate need of further taxonomic evaluation of those lineages. Peculiar morphology, such as the absence of vocal sacs and slits, may have contributed to their call variation and highly banded frequency structure. If the observed population differences reflect species-level differences, T. lutzi may be classified as a critically endangered species, as T. petropolitana. Furthermore, we provided a suggestion to an unusual behavior in frogs: calling with the mouth open in the smaller species of the genus. PMID:27617833

  7. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) Å, b = 8.3158(3) Å, c = 8.6892(3) Å; α = 81.212(3)°, β = 73.799(3)°, γ = 67.599(3)°. Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-H···O (O-H···O = 2.648 Å and ∠OHO = 171.5°), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H···O (N-H···O = 2.965 Å and ∠NHO = 166.4°). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle

  8. Call Me Sisyphus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Gordon MacKenzie (au- thor of Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool’s Guide to Surviving with Grace) calls a “plum tree structure” and looked at...ghting.” Editor’s note: In Greek mythology , Sisyphus was condemned to an eternity of punishment in Hades that consisted of rolling a huge boulder to

  9. CALLING AQUARIUM LOVERS...

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN's anemones will soon be orphans. We are looking for someone willing to look after the aquarium in the main building, for one year. If you are interested, or if you would like more information, please call 73830. (The anemones living in the aquarium thank you in anticipation.)

  10. Post-call delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Although frequently diagnosed in hospital in-patients, delirium is often recognised but under-reported in the housestaff population. It is estimated that more than 90% of housestaff will experience regular episodes of post-call delirium. This paper identifies diagnostic criteria and discusses approaches to treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  11. A call for surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Philip A.; Jensen, Christian S.; Tan, Kian-Lee

    2012-01-01

    The database field is experiencing an increasing need for survey papers. We call on more researchers to set aside time for this important writing activity. The database field is growing in population, scope of topics covered, and the number of papers published. Each year, thousands of new papers ...

  12. CIFSRF 2015 Call Document

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    wmanchur

    2015-02-02

    Feb 2, 2015 ... Cross-cutting priorities. All proposals seeking funds from this call shall clearly speak to the three CIFSRF cross-cutting priorities: a. Gender equality. Proposals need to demonstrate how the project will include women as important players in the scaling up of innovations, as well as key clients and end users.

  13. A multi-variate statistical model integrating passive sampler and meteorology data to predict the frequency distributions of hourly ambient ozone (O3) concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, S; Nosal, M; Ferdinand, J A; Stevenson, R E; Skelly, J M

    2003-01-01

    A multi-variate, non-linear statistical model is described to simulate passive O3 sampler data to mimic the hourly frequency distributions of continuous measurements using climatologic O3 indicators and passive sampler measurements. The main meteorological parameters identified by the model were, air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation and wind speed, although other parameters were also considered. Together, air temperature, relative humidity and passive sampler data by themselves could explain 62.5-67.5% (R(2)) of the corresponding variability of the continuously measured O3 data. The final correlation coefficients (r) between the predicted hourly O3 concentrations from the passive sampler data and the true, continuous measurements were 0.819-0.854, with an accuracy of 92-94% for the predictive capability. With the addition of soil moisture data, the model can lead to the first order approximation of atmospheric O3 flux and plant stomatal uptake. Additionally, if such data are coupled to multi-point plant response measurements, meaningful cause-effect relationships can be derived in the future.

  14. Soft calls and broadcast calls in the corncrake as adaptations to short and long range communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ręk, Paweł

    2013-10-01

    Because birds' acoustic signals function in antagonistic interactions between males and in female attraction, a majority of vocalisations are loud. In contrast, some birds, additionally produce soft vocalisations in escalated agonistic and sexual contexts. Nevertheless, the relationship between the acoustic parameters of such signals and their function is not clear. Here I investigate the sound transmission degradation properties of soft and broadcast (loud) calls in the corncrake using calls with natural and changed amplitude. I show that, if played at the same amplitude, the maximum limit for communication distance with soft calls was significantly shorter than that of broadcast calls, indicating that frequency structure is important in determining the range of both signals independently of their amplitude. At the same time, the values of excess attenuation were lower for soft calls than for broadcast calls at most distances, which suggests that the short transmission of soft calls is achieved mostly due to their low and narrow frequency ranges, promoting their masking by ambient noise. Finally, contrary to soft calls, changes in the energy of tails of echoes in broadcast calls were associated with the distance of propagation, which might be useful in assessing the distance to senders. I suggest that the acoustic structure of soft vocalisations can be used to limit the range of the signal, which might be helpful in eavesdropping avoidance, whereas broadcast calls are designed for long-range transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Flight calls and orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Andersen, Bent Bach; Kropp, Wibke

    2008-01-01

    flight calls was simulated by sequential computer controlled activation of five loudspeakers placed in a linear array perpendicular to the bird's migration course. The bird responded to this stimulation by changing its migratory course in the direction of that of the ‘flying conspecifics' but after about...... 30 minutes it drifted back to its original migration course. The results suggest that songbirds migrating alone at night can use the flight calls from conspecifics as additional cues for orientation and that they may compare this information with other cues to decide what course to keep.......  In a pilot experiment a European Robin, Erithacus rubecula, expressing migratory restlessness with a stable orientation, was video filmed in the dark with an infrared camera and its directional migratory activity was recorded. The flight overhead of migrating conspecifics uttering nocturnal...

  16. A Call for Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Brahmachari, Debahuti

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new development can be identified within the civil society in Malaysia. A development that has resulted in a general call for justice, voiced through coalition groups that cut across categories of affiliation. This development is triggered by an increasing inculcation of Islamic values into the political system, which has interfered with the understanding of Malaysia as a country that can provide a framework for coexistence within a multicultural society. This thesis seeks ...

  17. Multimodality and CALL

    OpenAIRE

    Guichon, Nicolas; Cohen, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This chapter explores the issues pertaining to multimodality, which has always been considered as a defining characteristic of CALL (Chapelle 2009). The chapter begins by critically examining the various definitions of multimodality, especially in the field of second language acquisition and cognitive psychology and explores the distinction between mode, modality and channel. With reference to specific studies conducted in the field, we then investigate the potential o...

  18. The structure of stereotyped calls reflects kinship and social affiliation in resident killer whales ( Orcinus orca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deecke, Volker B.; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G.; Spong, Paul; Ford, John K. B.

    2010-05-01

    A few species of mammals produce group-specific vocalisations that are passed on by learning, but the function of learned vocal variation remains poorly understood. Resident killer whales live in stable matrilineal groups with repertoires of seven to 17 stereotyped call types. Some types are shared among matrilines, but their structure typically shows matriline-specific differences. Our objective was to analyse calls of nine killer whale matrilines in British Columbia to test whether call similarity primarily reflects social or genetic relationships. Recordings were made in 1985-1995 in the presence of focal matrilines that were either alone or with groups with non-overlapping repertoires. We used neural network discrimination performance to measure the similarity of call types produced by different matrilines and determined matriline association rates from 757 encounters with one or more focal matrilines. Relatedness was measured by comparing variation at 11 microsatellite loci for the oldest female in each group. Call similarity was positively correlated with association rates for two of the three call types analysed. Similarity of the N4 call type was also correlated with matriarch relatedness. No relationship between relatedness and association frequency was detected. These results show that call structure reflects relatedness and social affiliation, but not because related groups spend more time together. Instead, call structure appears to play a role in kin recognition and shapes the association behaviour of killer whale groups. Our results therefore support the hypothesis that increasing social complexity plays a role in the evolution of learned vocalisations in some mammalian species.

  19. To be called upon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    2015-01-01

    of the responses to the Arab spring among Danish Muslims, this paper will offer some preliminary reflections on how we can understand ‘the mass’ and an ‘intimacy of the mass’ when the mass is no longer a crowd. According to Marx the mass grows quantitatively from the local to the global, but what happens......When Danish Muslims explain what made them decide to travel to the Middle East and take up arms in the wake of the Arab Spring, they say that they were called upon. Displayed on videos on social media, women and sometimes children begged them to come to their rescue. In light of some...

  20. Alarm calls of Bronze Mannikins communicate predator size to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These groups were exposed to latex terrestrial snakes and mounted aerial raptors, and their alarm calls and predator response behaviours recorded. The Bronze Mannikins were able to discriminate between predators of different sizes, and increased their calling rate and decreased the end frequency of the alarm call in ...

  1. An Island Called Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Stubbs

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of: An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba. Ruth Behar, photographs by Humberto Mayol. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2007. xiii + 297 pp. (Cloth US$ 29.95 Fidel Castro: My Life: A Spoken Autobiography. Fidel Castro & Ignacio Ramonet. New York: Scribner/Simon & Schuster, 2008. vii + 724 pp. (Paper US$ 22.00, e-book US$ 14.99 Cuba: What Everyone Needs to Know. Julia E. Sweig. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. xiv + 279 pp. (Paper US$ 16.95 [First paragraph] These three ostensibly very different books tell a compelling story of each author’s approach, as much as the subject matter itself. Fidel Castro: My Life: A Spoken Autobiography is based on a series of long interviews granted by the then-president of Cuba, Fidel Castro, to Spanish-Franco journalist Ignacio Ramonet. Cuba: What Everyone Needs to Know, by U.S. political analyst Julia Sweig, is one of a set country series, and, like Ramonet’s, presented in question/answer format. An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba, with a narrative by Cuban-American anthropologist Ruth Behar and photographs by Cuban photographer Humberto Mayol, is a retrospective/introspective account of the Jewish presence in Cuba. While from Ramonet and Sweig we learn much about the revolutionary project, Behar and Mayol convey the lived experience of the small Jewish community against that backdrop.

  2. CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Jimenez M.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available TRIPLE HELIX VII 7TH BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON UNIVERSITY, INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT LINKAGES “THE ROLE OF TRIPLE HELIX IN THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR INNOVATION, COMPETITIVENESS AND SUSTAINABILITY” UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE, GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 17-19 JUNE 2009 CALL FOR PARTICIPATION CLOSING DATE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION – 14 NOVEMBER 2008 Triple Helix VII is an important occasion offering a major platform for the exchange of ideas and experiences - academics will share their insights into the dynamics of collaboration; business and industry will review their plans and indicate future directions; and for government decision makers, will explore new avenues for supporting developments, analysing innovation frameworks and their impact on national and regional economies. A Call for Papers is attached, and further details can be obtained from the Triple Helix VII website: http://www.triple-helix-7.org. We hope the Conference will be of interest to you and look forward to seeing you in Glasgow next year taking part in the Triple Helix VII proceedings. Sheila Forbes Conference Administrator Triple Helix VII

  3. MEDICAL SERVICE - URGENT CALLS

    CERN Document Server

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA: EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME: Open 24h/24h 748-49-50 AMG- Association Of Geneva Doctors: Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 CHILDREN'S EMERGENCIES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112   FRANCE: EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ...

  4. Call for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory for organizing the two exceptional Open days.CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory’s personnel to help with the organisation of these two exceptional Open Days, for the visits of CERN personnel and their families on the Saturday and above all for the major public Open Day on the Sunday. As for the 50th anniversary in 2004, the success of the Open Days will depend on a large number of volunteers. All those working for CERN as well as retired members of the personnel can contribute to making this event a success. Many guides will be needed at the LHC points, for the activities at the surface and to man the reception and information points. The aim of these major Open Days is to give the local populations the opportunity to discover the fruits of almost 20 years of work carried out at CERN. We are hoping for some 2000 volunteers for the two Open Days, on the Saturday from 9 a.m. to ...

  5. Stream noise, hybridization, and uncoupled evolution of call traits in two lineages of poison frogs: Oophaga histrionica and Oophaga lehmanni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vargas-Salinas

    Full Text Available According to the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, communication signals are evolutionary shaped in a way that minimizes its degradation and maximizes its contrast against the background noise. To compare the importance for call divergence of acoustic adaptation and hybridization, an evolutionary force allegedly promoting phenotypic variation, we compared the mate recognition signal of two species of poison frogs (Oophaga histrionica and O. lehmanni at five localities: two (one per species alongside noisy streams, two away from streams, and one interspecific hybrid. We recorded the calls of 47 males and characterized the microgeographic variation in their spectral and temporal features, measuring ambient noise level, body size, and body temperature as covariates. As predicted, frogs living in noisy habitats uttered high frequency calls and, in one species, were much smaller in size. These results support a previously unconsidered role of noise on streams as a selective force promoting an increase in call frequency and pleiotropic effects in body size. Regarding hybrid frogs, their calls overlapped in the signal space with the calls of one of the parental lineages. Our data support acoustic adaptation following two evolutionary routes but do not support the presumed role of hybridization in promoting phenotypic diversity.

  6. Meerkat close calling patterns are linked to sex, social category, season and wind, but not fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mausbach

    Full Text Available It is well established that animal vocalizations can encode information regarding a sender's identity, sex, age, body size, social rank and group membership. However, the association between physiological parameters, particularly stress hormone levels, and vocal behavior is still not well understood. The cooperatively breeding African meerkats (Suricata suricatta live in family groups with despotic social hierarchies. During foraging, individuals emit close calls that help maintain group cohesion. These contact calls are acoustically distinctive and variable in rate across individuals, yet, information on which factors influence close calling behavior is missing. The aim of this study was to identify proximate factors that influence variation in call rate and acoustic structure of meerkat close calls. Specifically, we investigated whether close calling behavior is associated with sex, age and rank, or stress hormone output (i.e., measured as fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM concentrations as individual traits of the caller, as well as with environmental conditions (weather and reproductive seasonality. To disentangle the effects of these factors on vocal behavior, we analyzed sound recordings and assessed fGCM concentrations in 64 wild but habituated meerkats from 9 groups during the reproductive and non-reproductive seasons. Dominant females and one-year old males called at significantly higher rates compared to other social categories during the reproductive season. Additionally, dominant females produced close calls with the lowest mean fundamental frequencies (F0 and the longest mean pulse durations. Windy conditions were associated with significantly higher call rates during the non-reproductive season. Fecal GCM concentrations were unrelated to close calling behavior. Our findings suggest that meerkat close calling behavior conveys information regarding the sex and social category of the caller, but shows no association with f

  7. Calling songs of some South African cicadas (Homoptera: Cicadidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-07-13

    Jul 13, 1987 ... frequency band width and emphasized frequency of the call were measured from the power spectra. Pulse rates were measured from wide band (300 Hz ... pulses. Narrow band sonagrams show a slight frequency modulation at a rate of 115 modulations/s, corresponding to groups of four double pulses in ...

  8. Influence of frequency variation in the load behaviour in electric power systems; Influencia da variacao da frequencia no comportamento da carga dos sistemas eletricos de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Sobrinho, Mauro de

    1994-11-01

    This work presents several models for the representation of load-frequency control systems and describes the main characteristics of the load. The composition of the load is described in details, divided by sectors. Finally, simulations of the load-frequency control system is performed. Conclusions are presented.

  9. Robust Two Degrees-of-freedom Single-current Control Strategy for LCL-type Grid-Connected DG System under Grid-Frequency Fluctuation and Grid-impedance Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Leming; Chen, Yandong; Luo, An

    2016-01-01

    For LCL-type grid-connected distributed generation(DG) system, the grid-frequency fluctuation and grid-impedance variation affect the active/reactive power control accuracy and resonance peak suppression respectively, which would reduce the system robustness. In this paper, a robust two degrees......, and regulate the instantaneous grid current without steady-state error regardless of the fundamental frequency fluctuation. Simultaneously, the proposed RGCFAD control effectively damps the LCL-resonance peak regardless of the grid-impedance variation, and further improves both transient and steady......-state performances. The stability margin and dynamic response of the overall system are analyzed in detail, and the proper parameters are selected without complicated trial. Finally, Simulation and experimental results verify the proposed control and design strategies....

  10. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  11. Behavior based adaptive call predictor

    OpenAIRE

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Dantu, Ram; Claxton, Rob; Eagle, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Predicting future calls can be the next advanced feature of the next-generation telecommunication networks as the service providers are looking to offer new services to their customers. Call prediction can be useful to many applications such as planning daily schedules, avoiding unwanted communications (e.g. voice spam), and resource planning in call centers. Predicting calls is a very challenging task. We believe that this is an emerging area of research in ambient intelligence where the ele...

  12. Cover/Frequency (CF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Caratti

    2006-01-01

    The FIREMON Cover/Frequency (CF) method is used to assess changes in plant species cover and frequency for a macroplot. This method uses multiple quadrats to sample within-plot variation and quantify statistically valid changes in plant species cover, height, and frequency over time. Because it is difficult to estimate cover in quadrats for larger plants, this method...

  13. Modeling and Frequency Tracking of Marine Mammal Whistle Calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Netherlands, 2002. [45] MATLAB. Signal Processing Toolbox User’s Guide. The MathWorks, Inc., 2008. [46] Robert J. McAulay and Thomas F. Quatieri...2000. [53] Thomas F. Quatieri and Robert J. McAulay. Speech transformations based on a sinusoidal representation. IEEE Transactions on Acoustics...Haesun Park, and John Glick . Total least norm formulation and solution for structured problems. SIAM JOl1rnal on Matrix Analysis and Applications

  14. Call Centre- Computer Telephone Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Kovačević

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Call centre largely came into being as a result of consumerneeds converging with enabling technology- and by the companiesrecognising the revenue opportunities generated by meetingthose needs thereby increasing customer satisfaction. Regardlessof the specific application or activity of a Call centre, customersatisfaction with the interaction is critical to the revenuegenerated or protected by the Call centre. Physical(v, Call centreset up is a place that includes computer, telephone and supervisorstation. Call centre can be available 24 hours a day - whenthe customer wants to make a purchase, needs information, orsimply wishes to register a complaint.

  15. Non-song social call bouts of migrating humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekdahl, Melinda L; Dunlop, Rebecca A; Goldizen, Anne W; Garland, Ellen C; Biassoni, Nicoletta; Miller, Patrick; Noad, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The use of stereotyped calls within structured bouts has been described for a number of species and may increase the information potential of call repertoires. Humpback whales produce a repertoire of social calls, although little is known about the complexity or function of these calls. In this study, digital acoustic tag recordings were used to investigate social call use within bouts, the use of bouts across different social contexts, and whether particular call type combinations were favored. Call order within bouts was investigated using call transition frequencies and information theory techniques. Call bouts were defined through analysis of inter-call intervals, as any calls within 3.9 s of each other. Bouts were produced significantly more when new whales joined a group compared to groups that did not change membership, and in groups containing multiple adults escorting a female and calf compared to adult only groups. Although social calls tended to be produced in bouts, there were few repeated bout types. However, the order in which most call types were produced within bouts was non-random and dependent on the preceding call type. These bouts appear to be at least partially governed by rules for how individual components are combined.

  16. Calling songs of some South African cicadas (Homoptera: Cicadidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-07-13

    Jul 13, 1987 ... The spectral and temporal characters of the calls of 12 species of cicada are illustrated and described. Variation within populations of conspecifics appears to be greater in temporal than in spectral properties. Conspecific calls recorded at widely separated localities have essentially the sarne characteristics.

  17. Orbital changes, variation in solar activity and increased anthropogenic activities: controls on the Holocene flood frequency in the Lake Ledro area, Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vannière

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Two lacustrine sediment cores from Lake Ledro in northern Italy were studied to produce chronologies of flood events for the past 10 000 yr. For this purpose, we have developed an automatic method that objectively identifies the sedimentary imprint of river floods in the downstream lake basin. The method was based on colour data extracted from processed core photographs, and the count data were analysed to capture the flood signal. Flood frequency and reconstructed sedimentary dynamics were compared with lake-level changes and pollen inferred vegetation dynamics. The results suggest a record marked by low flood frequency during the early and middle Holocene (10 000–4500 cal BP. Only modest increases during short intervals are recorded at ca. 8000, 7500, and 7100 cal BP. After 4500–4000 cal BP, the record shows a shift toward increased flood frequency. With the exception of two short intervals around 2900–2500 and 1800–1400 cal BP, which show a slightly reduced number of floods, the trend of increasing flood frequency prevailed until the 20th century, reaching a maximum between the 16th and the 19th centuries. Brief-flood frequency increases recorded during the early and middle Holocene can be attributed to cold climatic oscillations. On a centennial time scale, major changes in flood frequency, such as those observed after ca. 4500/4000 and 500 cal BP, can be attributed to large-scale climatic changes such as the Neo-glacial and Little Ice Age, which are under orbital and possibly solar control. However, in the Bronze Age and during the Middle Ages and modern times, forest clearing and land use probably partially control the flood activity.

  18. 47 CFR 90.241 - Radio call box operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter can be only manually reactivated. (9) Frequency selection must be made with regard to reception of... effective radiated power (ERP). (3) The height of a call box antenna may not exceed 6.1 meters (20 feet...

  19. Individual distinctiveness in call types of wild western female gorillas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Salmi

    Full Text Available Individually distinct vocalizations play an important role in animal communication, allowing call recipients to respond differentially based on caller identity. However, which of the many calls in a species' repertoire should have more acoustic variability and be more recognizable is less apparent. One proposed hypothesis is that calls used over long distances should be more distinct because visual cues are not available to identify the caller. An alternative hypothesis proposes that close calls should be more recognizable because of their importance in social interactions. To examine which hypothesis garners more support, the acoustic variation and individual distinctiveness of eight call types of six wild western gorilla (Gorilla gorilla females were investigated. Acoustic recordings of gorilla calls were collected at the Mondika Research Center (Republic of Congo. Acoustic variability was high in all gorilla calls. Similar high inter-individual variation and potential for identity coding (PIC was found for all call types. Discriminant function analyses confirmed that all call types were individually distinct (although for call types with lowest sample size - hum, grumble and scream - this result cannot be generalized, suggesting that neither the distance at which communication occurs nor the call social function alone can explain the evolution of identity signaling in western gorilla communication.

  20. Dielectric Properties of Marsh Vegetation in a Frequency Range of 0.1-18 GHz Under Variation of Temperature and Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, A. N.; Kochetkova, T. D.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Shcheglova, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Dielectric characteristics of some species of marsh vegetation: lichen Cladonia stellaris (Opiz) Pouzar, moss Sphagnum, and a representative of Bryidae mosses - Dicranum polysetum are studied in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 18 GHz. At a frequency of 1.41 GHz, the influence of temperature in the range from -12 to +20°C on the behavior of dielectric characteristics of mosses, lichens, and peat is studied. The dependences of the dielectric characteristics of vegetation on the volumetric wetness are established.

  1. Laboratory frequency metrology and the search for a temporal variation of the fine structure constant a on a cosmological time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salumbides, E.; Hannemann, S.; Reinhold, E.; Labazan, E.; Witte, S.; Zinkstok, R.; Eikema, K.; Ubachs, W.

    2005-01-01

    The issue of the possibility of a temporal variation of the fundamental constants has been put high on the agenda of modern physics, now that accurately calibrated spectra of quasars become available. Such data allow for a comparison between the physical constants underlying the spectra fo today and

  2. Evaluating variations of genotype calling: a potential source of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-04-01

    brlmm whitepaper.pdf. Arking D. E., Cutler D. J., Brune C. W., Teslovich T. M., West. K., Ikeda M. et al. 2008 A common genetic variant in the neurexin superfamily member CNTNAP2 increases familial risk of autism. Am. J. Hum.

  3. Evaluating variations of genotype calling: a potential source of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) examine the entire human genome with the goal of identifying genetic variants (usually single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) that are associated with phenotypic traits such as disease status and drug response. The discordance of significantly associated SNPs for the same ...

  4. Low-Frequency Synonymous Coding Variation in CYP2R1 Has Large Effects on Vitamin D Levels and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manousaki, Despoina; Dudding, Tom; Haworth, Simon; Hsu, Yi Hsiang; Liu, Ching Ti; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Voortman, Trudy; Velde, Van Der Nathalie; Melhus, Håkan; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Noordam, Raymond; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Greenwood, Celia M.T.; Biggs, Mary L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Zemel, Babette S.; Mitchell, Jonathan A.; Taylor, Bruce; Lorentzon, Mattias; Karlsson, Magnus; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Tiemeier, Henning; Campos-Obando, Natalia; Franco, Oscar H.; Utterlinden, Andre G.; Broer, Linda; Schoor, van Natasja M.; Ham, Annelies C.; Ikram, Arfan M.A.; Karasik, David; Mutsert, De Renée; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Heijer, den Martin; Wang, Thomas J.; Lind, Lars; Orwoll, Eric S.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Michaëlsson, Karl; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Ohlsson, Claes; Mellström, Dan; Groot, de Lisette C.P.G.M.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Zillikens, M.C.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sawcer, Stephen; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Richards, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is common, correctable, and influenced by genetic factors, and it has been associated with risk of several diseases. We sought to identify low-frequency genetic variants that strongly increase the risk of vitamin D insufficiency and tested their effect on risk of multiple

  5. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria eRuffini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: Heart Rate Variability (HRV indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS function. Objective: To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT on ANS activity through changes of High Frequency, a heart rate variability index indicating the parasympathetic activity, in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group.Methods: Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults, both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in 3 groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920.Main Outcomes Measures: HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 minutes.Results: OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency rate (p<0.001, and decrease of sympathetic activity, as revealed by Low Frequency rate (p<0.01; results also showed a reduction of Low Frequency/High Frequency ratio (p<0.001 and Detrended fluctuation scaling exponent (p<0.05. Conclusions: Findings suggested that OMT can influence ANS activity increasing parasympathetic function and decreasing sympathetic activity, compared to sham therapy and control group.

  6. Advertisement call and tadpole morphology of the clutch-guarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We provide the first descriptions of the tadpole and advertisement call of Mantidactylus argenteus. Calls consist of 6–15 short and rather melodious notes, with a dominant frequency at 4100–4400 Hz and are emitted from arboreal positions during the day. The larva is an Orton type IV tadpole, with oval body shape and ...

  7. Individually specific call feature is not used to neighbour-stranger discrimination: the corncrake case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Budka

    Full Text Available In various contexts, animals rely on acoustic signals to differentiate between conspecifics. Currently, studies examining vocal signatures use two main approaches. In the first approach, researchers search for acoustic characteristics that have the potential to be individual specific. This approach yields information on variation in signal parameters both within and between individuals and generates practical tools that can be used in population monitoring. In the second approach, playback experiments with natural calls are conducted to discern whether animals are capable of discriminating among the vocal signatures of different individuals. However, both approaches do not reveal the exact signal characteristics that are being used in the discrimination process. In this study, we tested whether an individual-specific call characteristic--namely the length of the intervals between successive maximal amplitude peaks within syllables (PPD--is crucial in neighbour-stranger discrimination by males of the nocturnal and highly secretive bird species, the corncrake (Crex crex. We conducted paired playback experiments in which corncrakes (n = 47 were exposed to artificial calls with PPD characteristics of neighbour and stranger birds. These artificial calls differed only in PPD structure. The calls were broadcast from a speaker, and we recorded the birds' behavioural responses. Although corncrakes have previously been experimentally shown to discriminate between neighbours and strangers, we found no difference in the responses to the artificial calls representing neighbours versus strangers. This finding demonstrates that even if vocal signatures are individual specific within a species, it does not automatically mean that said signatures are being crucial in discrimination among individuals. At the same time, the birds' aggressive responses to the artificial calls indicated that the information transmitted by PPDs is important in species

  8. Individually specific call feature is not used to neighbour-stranger discrimination: the corncrake case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budka, Michał; Osiejuk, Tomasz S

    2014-01-01

    In various contexts, animals rely on acoustic signals to differentiate between conspecifics. Currently, studies examining vocal signatures use two main approaches. In the first approach, researchers search for acoustic characteristics that have the potential to be individual specific. This approach yields information on variation in signal parameters both within and between individuals and generates practical tools that can be used in population monitoring. In the second approach, playback experiments with natural calls are conducted to discern whether animals are capable of discriminating among the vocal signatures of different individuals. However, both approaches do not reveal the exact signal characteristics that are being used in the discrimination process. In this study, we tested whether an individual-specific call characteristic--namely the length of the intervals between successive maximal amplitude peaks within syllables (PPD)--is crucial in neighbour-stranger discrimination by males of the nocturnal and highly secretive bird species, the corncrake (Crex crex). We conducted paired playback experiments in which corncrakes (n = 47) were exposed to artificial calls with PPD characteristics of neighbour and stranger birds. These artificial calls differed only in PPD structure. The calls were broadcast from a speaker, and we recorded the birds' behavioural responses. Although corncrakes have previously been experimentally shown to discriminate between neighbours and strangers, we found no difference in the responses to the artificial calls representing neighbours versus strangers. This finding demonstrates that even if vocal signatures are individual specific within a species, it does not automatically mean that said signatures are being crucial in discrimination among individuals. At the same time, the birds' aggressive responses to the artificial calls indicated that the information transmitted by PPDs is important in species-specific call recognition

  9. Galactosemia in the Turkish population with a high frequency of Q188R mutation and distribution of Duarte-1 and Duarte-2 variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgül, Rıza Köksal; Güzel-Ozantürk, Ayşegül; Dündar, Halil; Yücel-Yılmaz, Didem; Coşkun, Turgay; Sivri, Serap; Aydoǧdu, Sultan; Tokatlı, Ayşegül; Dursun, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Classical galactosemia is an inherited recessive disorder of galactose metabolism caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT), which is caused by mutations in the GALT gene. In this study, 56 Turkish patients diagnosed with galactosemia were screened for GALT gene mutations using Affymetrix resequencing microarrays. Eleven types of mutations were detected in these patients, including two novel mutations (R258G and G310fsX49) and nine recurrent mutations. We detected six patients who were homozygous for the E340* mutation and for N314D, L218L silent substitutions (Duarte-1 variant) in this study. The haplotype E340*, N314D and L218L has been reported only in Turkish patients, which suggests that the E340* mutation is specific for our population and might be spread by a Turk ancestor. In patients, the Duarte-1 allele was found with a frequency of 10.71%, whereas the Duarte-2 allele was not detected. Duarte-1 and Duarte-2 alleles were found to be present at a frequency of 2.3% and 1.4%, respectively, in the screening of 105 healthy individuals. Considering all detected mutations, it is a very important finding that exons 6 and 10 of the GALT gene account for 79% of all mutant alleles in the Turkish population. The most common mutation is Q188R, with a frequency of 55.35%.

  10. Frogs Call at a Higher Pitch in Traffic Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten M. Parris

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Male frogs call to attract females for mating and to defend territories from rival males. Female frogs of some species prefer lower-pitched calls, which indicate larger, more experienced males. Acoustic interference occurs when background noise reduces the active distance or the distance over which an acoustic signal can be detected. Birds are known to call at a higher pitch or frequency in urban noise, decreasing acoustic interference from low-frequency noise. Using Bayesian linear regression, we investigated the effect of traffic noise on the pitch of advertisement calls in two species of frogs, the southern brown tree frog (Litoria ewingii and the common eastern froglet (Crinia signifera. We found evidence that L. ewingii calls at a higher pitch in traffic noise, with an average increase in dominant frequency of 4.1 Hz/dB of traffic noise, and a total effect size of 123 Hz. This frequency shift is smaller than that observed in birds, but is still large enough to be detected by conspecific frogs and confer a significant benefit to the caller. Mathematical modelling predicted a 24% increase in the active distance of a L. ewingii call in traffic noise with a frequency shift of this size. Crinia signifera may also call at a higher pitch in traffic noise, but more data are required to be confident of this effect. Because frog calls are innate rather than learned, the frequency shift demonstrated by L. ewingii may represent an evolutionary adaptation to noisy conditions. The phenomenon of frogs calling at a higher pitch in traffic noise could therefore constitute an intriguing trade-off between audibility and attractiveness to potential mates.

  11. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Nuria; D'Alessandro, Giandomenico; Mariani, Nicolò; Pollastrelli, Alberto; Cardinali, Lucia; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Context: Heart Rate Variability (HRV) indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. Objective: To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group. Methods: Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults (26.7 ± 8.4 y, 51% male, BMI 18.5 ± 4.8), both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in three groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920. Main Outcomes Measures: HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 min and considering frequency domain as well as linear and non-linear methods as outcome measures. Results: OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency power (p < 0.001), expressed in normalized and absolute unit, and possibly decrease of sympathetic activity, as revealed by Low Frequency power (p < 0.01); results also showed a reduction of Low Frequency/High Frequency ratio (p < 0.001) and Detrended fluctuation scaling exponent (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Findings suggested that OMT can influence ANS activity increasing

  12. Low-Frequency Synonymous Coding Variation in CYP2R1 Has Large Effects on Vitamin D Levels and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousaki, Despoina; Dudding, Tom; Haworth, Simon; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Liu, Ching-Ti; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Voortman, Trudy; van der Velde, Nathalie; Melhus, Håkan; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Cousminer, Diana L; Nethander, Maria; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Noordam, Raymond; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Greenwood, Celia M T; Biggs, Mary L; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Zemel, Babette S; Mitchell, Jonathan A; Taylor, Bruce; Lorentzon, Mattias; Karlsson, Magnus; Jaddoe, Vincent V W; Tiemeier, Henning; Campos-Obando, Natalia; Franco, Oscar H; Utterlinden, Andre G; Broer, Linda; van Schoor, Natasja M; Ham, Annelies C; Ikram, M Arfan; Karasik, David; de Mutsert, Renée; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Heijer, Martin; Wang, Thomas J; Lind, Lars; Orwoll, Eric S; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Michaëlsson, Karl; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Ohlsson, Claes; Mellström, Dan; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Grant, Struan F A; Kiel, Douglas P; Zillikens, M Carola; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sawcer, Stephen; Timpson, Nicholas J; Richards, J Brent

    2017-08-03

    Vitamin D insufficiency is common, correctable, and influenced by genetic factors, and it has been associated with risk of several diseases. We sought to identify low-frequency genetic variants that strongly increase the risk of vitamin D insufficiency and tested their effect on risk of multiple sclerosis, a disease influenced by low vitamin D concentrations. We used whole-genome sequencing data from 2,619 individuals through the UK10K program and deep-imputation data from 39,655 individuals genotyped genome-wide. Meta-analysis of the summary statistics from 19 cohorts identified in CYP2R1 the low-frequency (minor allele frequency = 2.5%) synonymous coding variant g.14900931G>A (p.Asp120Asp) (rs117913124[A]), which conferred a large effect on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels (-0.43 SD of standardized natural log-transformed 25OHD per A allele; p value = 1.5 × 10-88). The effect on 25OHD was four times larger and independent of the effect of a previously described common variant near CYP2R1. By analyzing 8,711 individuals, we showed that heterozygote carriers of this low-frequency variant have an increased risk of vitamin D insufficiency (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.78-2.78, p = 1.26 × 10-12). Individuals carrying one copy of this variant also had increased odds of multiple sclerosis (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.19-1.64, p = 2.63 × 10-5) in a sample of 5,927 case and 5,599 control subjects. In conclusion, we describe a low-frequency CYP2R1 coding variant that exerts the largest effect upon 25OHD levels identified to date in the general European population and implicates vitamin D in the etiology of multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CARIAA Call - Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2013-03-28

    Mar 28, 2013 ... The call states that CARIAA will also collaborate with the consortia on programmatic functions that support the program as a whole, including communication, outreach and engagement, knowledge management, and monitoring and evaluation. What kind of activities are envisaged? 48). The call states that ...

  14. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories and the ...

  15. Evolution of advertisement calls in African clawed frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Martha L; Evans, Ben J; Kelley, Darcy B

    2011-01-01

    For most frogs, advertisement calls are essential for reproductive success, conveying information on species identity, male quality, sexual state and location. While the evolutionary divergence of call characters has been examined in a number of species, the relative impacts of genetic drift or natural and sexual selection remain unclear. Insights into the evolutionary trajectory of vocal signals can be gained by examining how advertisement calls vary in a phylogenetic context. Evolution by genetic drift would be supported if more closely related species express more similar songs. Conversely, a poor correlation between evolutionary history and song expression would suggest evolution shaped by natural or sexual selection. Here, we measure seven song characters in 20 described and two undescribed species of African clawed frogs (genera Xenopus and Silurana ) and four populations of X. laevis . We identify three call types - click, burst and trill - that can be distinguished by click number, call rate and intensity modulation. A fourth type is biphasic, consisting of two of the above. Call types vary in complexity from the simplest, a click, to the most complex, a biphasic call. Maximum parsimony analysis of variation in call type suggests that the ancestral type was of intermediate complexity. Each call type evolved independently more than once and call type is typically not shared by closely related species. These results indicate that call type is homoplasious and has low phylogenetic signal. We conclude that the evolution of call type is not due to genetic drift, but is under selective pressure.

  16. Evolution of advertisement calls in African clawed frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Martha L.; Evans, Ben J.; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary For most frogs, advertisement calls are essential for reproductive success, conveying information on species identity, male quality, sexual state and location. While the evolutionary divergence of call characters has been examined in a number of species, the relative impacts of genetic drift or natural and sexual selection remain unclear. Insights into the evolutionary trajectory of vocal signals can be gained by examining how advertisement calls vary in a phylogenetic context. Evolution by genetic drift would be supported if more closely related species express more similar songs. Conversely, a poor correlation between evolutionary history and song expression would suggest evolution shaped by natural or sexual selection. Here, we measure seven song characters in 20 described and two undescribed species of African clawed frogs (genera Xenopus and Silurana) and four populations of X. laevis. We identify three call types — click, burst and trill — that can be distinguished by click number, call rate and intensity modulation. A fourth type is biphasic, consisting of two of the above. Call types vary in complexity from the simplest, a click, to the most complex, a biphasic call. Maximum parsimony analysis of variation in call type suggests that the ancestral type was of intermediate complexity. Each call type evolved independently more than once and call type is typically not shared by closely related species. These results indicate that call type is homoplasious and has low phylogenetic signal. We conclude that the evolution of call type is not due to genetic drift, but is under selective pressure. PMID:24723737

  17. Acoustic structures in the alarm calls of Gunnison's prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodchikoff, C N; Placer, J

    2006-05-01

    Acoustic structures of sound in Gunnison's prairie dog alarm calls are described, showing how these acoustic structures may encode information about three different predator species (red-tailed hawk-Buteo jamaicensis; domestic dog-Canis familaris; and coyote-Canis latrans). By dividing each alarm call into 25 equal-sized partitions and using resonant frequencies within each partition, commonly occurring acoustic structures were identified as components of alarm calls for the three predators. Although most of the acoustic structures appeared in alarm calls elicited by all three predator species, the frequency of occurrence of these acoustic structures varied among the alarm calls for the different predators, suggesting that these structures encode identifying information for each of the predators. A classification analysis of alarm calls elicited by each of the three predators showed that acoustic structures could correctly classify 67% of the calls elicited by domestic dogs, 73% of the calls elicited by coyotes, and 99% of the calls elicited by red-tailed hawks. The different distributions of acoustic structures associated with alarm calls for the three predator species suggest a duality of function, one of the design elements of language listed by Hockett [in Animal Sounds and Communication, edited by W. E. Lanyon and W. N. Tavolga (American Institute of Biological Sciences, Washington, DC, 1960), pp. 392-430].

  18. On Data and Parameter Estimation Using the Variational Bayesian EM-algorithm for Block-fading Frequency-selective MIMO Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars P.B.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    A general Variational Bayesian framework for iterative data and parameter estimation for coherent detection is introduced as a generalization of the EM-algorithm. Explicit solutions are given for MIMO channel estimation with Gaussian prior and noise covariance estimation with inverse-Wishart prior....... Simulation of a GSM-like system provides empirical proof that the VBEM-algorithm is able to provide better performance than the EM-algorithm. However, if the posterior distribution is highly peaked, the VBEM-algorithm approaches the EM-algorithm and the gain disappears. The potential gain is therefore...

  19. Variations in voice level and fundamental frequency with changing background noise level and talker-to-listener distance while wearing hearing protectors: A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouserhal, Rachel E.; MacDonald, Ewen; Falk, Tiago H.

    2016-01-01

    while wearing HPDs. Such a model opens the door to radio communication systems that distinguish receivers and offer more efficient communication between persons wearing HPDs. Design: This paper presents the results of a pilot study aimed to investigate the effects of occluding the ear on changes...... in voice level and fundamental frequency in noise and with varying talker-to-listener distance. Study sample: Twelve participants with a mean age of 28 participated in this study. Results: Compared to existing data, results show a trend similar to the open ear condition with the exception of the occluded...

  20. The evolution of polyandry: patterns of genotypic variation in female mating frequency, male fertilization success and a test of the sexy-sperm hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, L W

    2003-07-01

    The sexy-sperm hypothesis predicts that females obtain indirect benefits for their offspring via polyandy, in the form of increased fertilization success for their sons. I use a quantitative genetic approach to test the sexy-sperm hypothesis using the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus. Previous studies of this species have shown considerable phenotypic variation in fertilization success when two or more males compete. There were high broad-sense heritabilities for both paternity and polyandry. Patterns of genotypic variance were consistent with X-linked inheritance and/or maternal effects on these traits. The genetic architecture therefore precludes the evolution of polyandry via a sexy-sperm process. Thus the positive genetic correlation between paternity in sons and polyandry in daughters predicted by the sexy-sperm hypothesis was absent. There was significant heritable variation in the investment by females in ovaries and by males in the accessory gland. Surprisingly there was a very strong genetic correlation between these two traits. The significance of this genetic correlation for the coevolution of male seminal products and polyandry is discussed.

  1. Effects of noise levels and call types on the source levels of killer whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Emmons, Candice K

    2011-11-01

    Accurate parameter estimates relevant to the vocal behavior of marine mammals are needed to assess potential effects of anthropogenic sound exposure including how masking noise reduces the active space of sounds used for communication. Information about how these animals modify their vocal behavior in response to noise exposure is also needed for such assessment. Prior studies have reported variations in the source levels of killer whale sounds, and a more recent study reported that killer whales compensate for vessel masking noise by increasing their call amplitude. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the source levels of a variety of call types in southern resident killer whales while also considering background noise level as a likely factor related to call source level variability. The source levels of 763 discrete calls along with corresponding background noise were measured over three summer field seasons in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands, WA. Both noise level and call type were significant factors on call source levels (1-40 kHz band, range of 135.0-175.7 dB(rms) re 1 [micro sign]Pa at 1 m). These factors should be considered in models that predict how anthropogenic masking noise reduces vocal communication space in marine mammals.

  2. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    The Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is found to be made of three major cycles with periods of about 9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 years. The side frequencies appear to be closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (range between 9.5 and 10.5 years, and median 9.93 years) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years). The central cycle may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle that appears to be approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns. The major beat periods occur at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima that occurred during 1900-1920 and 1960-1980 and the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005 and a secular upward trending during the 20th century: this modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature

  3. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories...... and the effect of categorization on mortality. METHODS: Register-based study in a 2-year period based on emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch center in Copenhagen combined with nationwide register data. Logistic regression analysis (N = 78,040 individuals) was used for identification...

  4. Harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, N.

    2012-12-01

    We show that the Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles that are closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (~9.93 year), to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years) and to a central cycle that may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle. The central harmonic is approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A harmonic model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals major beat periods occurring at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. Equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic solar proxy records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima around 1900-1920 and 1960-1980, the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005, and a secular upward trending during the 20th century. The latter modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which is produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts

  5. Variations in voice level and fundamental frequency with changing background noise level and talker-to-listener distance while wearing hearing protectors: A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouserhal, Rachel E.; MacDonald, Ewen; Falk, Tiago H.

    2016-01-01

    concern for people wearing hearing protection devices (HPD). Although practical, radio communication is cumbersome, as it does not distinguish designated receivers. A smarter radio communication protocol must be developed to alleviate this problem. Thus, it is necessary to model speech production in noise...... while wearing HPDs. Such a model opens the door to radio communication systems that distinguish receivers and offer more efficient communication between persons wearing HPDs. Design: This paper presents the results of a pilot study aimed to investigate the effects of occluding the ear on changes...... in voice level and fundamental frequency in noise and with varying talker-to-listener distance. Study sample: Twelve participants with a mean age of 28 participated in this study. Results: Compared to existing data, results show a trend similar to the open ear condition with the exception of the occluded...

  6. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Nuria; D'Alessandro, Giandomenico; Mariani, Nicolò; Pollastrelli, Alberto; Cardinali, Lucia; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group. Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults (26.7 ± 8.4 y, 51% male, BMI 18.5 ± 4.8), both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in three groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920. HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 min and considering frequency domain as well as linear and non-linear methods as outcome measures. OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency power (p ANS activity increasing parasympathetic function and decreasing sympathetic activity, compared to sham therapy and control group.

  7. Prefrontal activity during working memory is modulated by the interaction of variation in CB1 and COX2 coding genes and correlates with frequency of cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurisano, Paolo; Antonucci, Linda A; Fazio, Leonardo; Rampino, Antonio; Romano, Raffaella; Porcelli, Annamaria; Masellis, Rita; Colizzi, Marco; Quarto, Tiziana; Torretta, Silvia; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Pergola, Giulio; Bertolino, Alessandro; Blasi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is targeted in the brain by endocannabinoids under physiological conditions as well as by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol under cannabis use. Furthermore, its signaling appears to affect brain cognitive processing. Recent findings highlight a crucial role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the mechanism of intraneuronal CB1 signaling transduction, while others indicate that two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1406977 and rs20417) modulate expression of CB1 (CNR1) and COX-2 (PTGS2) coding genes, respectively. Here, our aim was to use fMRI to investigate in healthy humans whether these SNPs interact in modulating prefrontal activity during working memory processing and if this modulation is linked with cannabis use. We recruited 242 healthy subjects genotyped for CNR1 rs1406977 and PTGS2 rs20417 that performed the N-back working memory task during fMRI and were interviewed using the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire (CEQ). We found that the interaction between CNR1 rs1406977 and PTGS2 rs20417 is associated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity such that specific genotype configurations (CNR1 C carriers/PTGS2 C carriers and CNR1 TT/PTGS2 GG) predict lower cortical response versus others in spite of similar behavioral accuracy. Furthermore, DLPFC activity in the cluster associated with the CNR1 by PTGS2 interaction was negatively correlated with behavioral efficiency and positively correlated with frequency of cannabis use in cannabis users. These results suggest that a genetically modulated balancing of signaling within the CB1-COX-2 pathway may reflect on more or less efficient patterns of prefrontal activity during working memory. Frequency of cannabis use may be a factor for further modulation of CNR1/PTGS2-mediated cortical processing associated with this cognitive process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A three-parameter model for classifying anurans into four genera based on advertisement calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Fitch, William Tecumseh

    2013-01-01

    The vocalizations of anurans are innate in structure and may therefore contain indicators of phylogenetic history. Thus, advertisement calls of species which are more closely related phylogenetically are predicted to be more similar than those of distant species. This hypothesis was evaluated by comparing several widely used machine-learning algorithms. Recordings of advertisement calls from 142 species belonging to four genera were analyzed. A logistic regression model, using mean values for dominant frequency, coefficient of variation of root-mean square energy, and spectral flux, correctly classified advertisement calls with regard to genus with an accuracy above 70%. Similar accuracy rates were obtained using these parameters with a support vector machine model, a K-nearest neighbor algorithm, and a multivariate Gaussian distribution classifier, whereas a Gaussian mixture model performed slightly worse. In contrast, models based on mel-frequency cepstral coefficients did not fare as well. Comparable accuracy levels were obtained on out-of-sample recordings from 52 of the 142 original species. The results suggest that a combination of low-level acoustic attributes is sufficient to discriminate efficiently between the vocalizations of these four genera, thus supporting the initial premise and validating the use of high-throughput algorithms on animal vocalizations to evaluate phylogenetic hypotheses.

  9. Contrasting Propagation of Natural Calls of Two Anuran Species from the South American Temperate Forest

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penna, Mario; Moreno-Gómez, Felipe N

    2015-01-01

    .... emiliopugini in the austral temperate forest where they communicate and breed syntopically. The calls of E. calcaratus have higher frequency components and lower amplitude relative to calls of E...

  10. Occurrence, Plasticity, and Evolution of the vpma Gene Family, a Genetic System Devoted to High-Frequency Surface Variation in Mycoplasma agalactiae▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Laurent-Xavier; Marenda, Marc; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Sagné, Eveline; Glew, Michelle; Mangenot, Sophie; Barbe, Valérie; Barré, Aurélien; Claverol, Stéphane; Citti, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae, an important pathogen of small ruminants, exhibits a very versatile surface architecture by switching multiple, related lipoproteins (Vpmas) on and off. In the type strain, PG2, Vpma phase variation is generated by a cluster of six vpma genes that undergo frequent DNA rearrangements via site-specific recombination. To further comprehend the degree of diversity that can be generated at the M. agalactiae surface, the vpma gene repertoire of a field strain, 5632, was analyzed and shown to contain an extended repertoire of 23 vpma genes distributed between two loci located 250 kbp apart. Loci I and II include 16 and 7 vpma genes, respectively, with all vpma genes of locus II being duplicated at locus I. Several Vpmas displayed a chimeric structure suggestive of homologous recombination, and a global proteomic analysis further indicated that at least 13 of the 16 Vpmas can be expressed by the 5632 strain. Because a single promoter is present in each vpma locus, concomitant Vpma expression can occur in a strain with duplicated loci. Consequently, the number of possible surface combinations is much higher for strain 5632 than for the type strain. Finally, our data suggested that insertion sequences are likely to be involved in 5632 vpma locus duplication at a remote chromosomal position. The role of such mobile genetic elements in chromosomal shuffling of genes encoding major surface components may have important evolutionary and epidemiological consequences for pathogens, such as mycoplasmas, that have a reduced genome and no cell wall. PMID:19376859

  11. Occurrence, plasticity, and evolution of the vpma gene family, a genetic system devoted to high-frequency surface variation in Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Laurent-Xavier; Marenda, Marc; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Sagné, Eveline; Glew, Michelle; Mangenot, Sophie; Barbe, Valérie; Barré, Aurélien; Claverol, Stéphane; Citti, Christine

    2009-07-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae, an important pathogen of small ruminants, exhibits a very versatile surface architecture by switching multiple, related lipoproteins (Vpmas) on and off. In the type strain, PG2, Vpma phase variation is generated by a cluster of six vpma genes that undergo frequent DNA rearrangements via site-specific recombination. To further comprehend the degree of diversity that can be generated at the M. agalactiae surface, the vpma gene repertoire of a field strain, 5632, was analyzed and shown to contain an extended repertoire of 23 vpma genes distributed between two loci located 250 kbp apart. Loci I and II include 16 and 7 vpma genes, respectively, with all vpma genes of locus II being duplicated at locus I. Several Vpmas displayed a chimeric structure suggestive of homologous recombination, and a global proteomic analysis further indicated that at least 13 of the 16 Vpmas can be expressed by the 5632 strain. Because a single promoter is present in each vpma locus, concomitant Vpma expression can occur in a strain with duplicated loci. Consequently, the number of possible surface combinations is much higher for strain 5632 than for the type strain. Finally, our data suggested that insertion sequences are likely to be involved in 5632 vpma locus duplication at a remote chromosomal position. The role of such mobile genetic elements in chromosomal shuffling of genes encoding major surface components may have important evolutionary and epidemiological consequences for pathogens, such as mycoplasmas, that have a reduced genome and no cell wall.

  12. Modeling synchronized calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu

    2009-07-01

    We experimentally observed synchronized calling behavior of male Japanese tree frogs Hyla japonica; namely, while isolated single frogs called nearly periodically, a pair of interacting frogs called synchronously almost in antiphase or inphase. In this study, we propose two types of phase-oscillator models on different degrees of approximations, which can quantitatively explain the phase and frequency properties in the experiment. Moreover, it should be noted that, although the second model is obtained by fitting to the experimental data of the two synchronized states, the model can also explain the transitory dynamics in the interactive calling behavior, namely, the shift from a transient inphase state to a stable antiphase state. We also discuss the biological relevance of the estimated parameter values to calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs and the possible biological meanings of the synchronized calling behavior.

  13. Variation within categories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.; Swart, de J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Two aspects of variation within categories, relating to different models of categorization, were investigated - frequency of dimensional values and typicality differences within values. The influence of range of typicality experienced during learning and of informational value of feedback was also

  14. Quantifying uncertainty in genotype calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Benilton S; Louis, Thomas A; Irizarry, Rafael A

    2010-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are used to discover genes underlying complex, heritable disorders for which less powerful study designs have failed in the past. The number of GWAS has skyrocketed recently with findings reported in top journals and the mainstream media. Microarrays are the genotype calling technology of choice in GWAS as they permit exploration of more than a million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) simultaneously. The starting point for the statistical analyses used by GWAS to determine association between loci and disease is making genotype calls (AA, AB or BB). However, the raw data, microarray probe intensities, are heavily processed before arriving at these calls. Various sophisticated statistical procedures have been proposed for transforming raw data into genotype calls. We find that variability in microarray output quality across different SNPs, different arrays and different sample batches have substantial influence on the accuracy of genotype calls made by existing algorithms. Failure to account for these sources of variability can adversely affect the quality of findings reported by the GWAS. We developed a method based on an enhanced version of the multi-level model used by CRLMM version 1. Two key differences are that we now account for variability across batches and improve the call-specific assessment of each call. The new model permits the development of quality metrics for SNPs, samples and batches of samples. Using three independent datasets, we demonstrate that the CRLMM version 2 outperforms CRLMM version 1 and the algorithm provided by Affymetrix, Birdseed. The main advantage of the new approach is that it enables the identification of low-quality SNPs, samples and batches. Software implementing of the method described in this article is available as free and open source code in the crlmm R/BioConductor package. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Determination of the sputter rate variation pattern of a silicon carbide target for radio frequency magnetron sputtering using optical transmission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez de la Puente, G. [Departamento de Ciencias, Seccion Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima 32 (Peru); Department of Materials Science 6, University of Erlangen, Martensstrasse 7, 91058-Erlangen (Germany); Guerra Torres, J.A. [Departamento de Ciencias, Seccion Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima 32 (Peru); Erlenbach, O. [Departamento de Ciencias, Seccion Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima 32 (Peru); Department of Materials Science 6, University of Erlangen, Martensstrasse 7, 91058-Erlangen (Germany); Steidl, M. [Department of Materials Science 6, University of Erlangen, Martensstrasse 7, 91058-Erlangen (Germany); Weingaertner, R., E-mail: rolandw@fisica.pucp.edu.pe [Departamento de Ciencias, Seccion Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima 32 (Peru); Department of Materials Science 6, University of Erlangen, Martensstrasse 7, 91058-Erlangen (Germany); De Zela, F. [Departamento de Ciencias, Seccion Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima 32 (Peru); Winnacker, A. [Department of Materials Science 6, University of Erlangen, Martensstrasse 7, 91058-Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-10-25

    We produce amorphous silicon carbide thin films (a-SiC) by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering from SiC bulk target. We present the emission pattern of the rf magnetron with SiC target as a function of process parameters, like target sample distance, rf power, sputtering rate and process gas pressure. The emission pattern is determined by means of thickness distribution of the deposited a-SiC films obtained from optical transmission measurements using a slightly improved method of Swanepoel concerning the determination of construction of the envelopes in the interference pattern of the transmission spectra. A calibration curve is presented which allows the conversion of integrated transmission to film thickness. Holding constant a set of process parameters and only varying the target sample distance the emission pattern of the rf magnetron with SiC target was determined, which allowed us to predict the deposition rate distribution for a wide range of process parameters and target geometry. In addition, we have found that the transmission spectra of the a-SiC films change with time and saturate after approximately 10 days. Within this process no change in thickness is involved, so that the determination of thickness using transmission data is justified.

  16. A discussion on the variations of MST/ST radar echo power with an atmospheric layer resolved by frequency domain interferometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. S.; Chu, Y. H.

    2000-11-01

    The relationship between an atmospheric layer and its VHF backscatter resolved by the frequency domain interferometry (FDI) technique is investigated in this article. A theoretical expression connecting the radar echo power with the thickness and position of an atmospheric layer and the range weighting function of a matched filter is derived. It shows that the farther the layer locates from the central height of the radar volume, the weaker the echo power will be. This feature is attributed to the range weighting effect of the radar system. FDI observations also show that the echo power from the atmospheric layer located close to the central height of the radar volume is usually greater than that from the layer located at the edge of the volume, which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Moreover, the correlation between the echo power and layer position is negative (positive) if the layer locates in the upper (lower) part of the radar volume. This behavior is consistent with the theoretical prediction and can also be interpreted by the range weighting effect. It is also suggested that the power-position relation is capable of indicating the system bias causing the systematic error of FDI-estimated layer position. In addition, numerical simulation is performed in this article to examine the difference between the range weighting functions resulting from rectangular and nonrectangular radar pulses for a given receiver impulse response.

  17. Dosimetry of infant exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields: variation of 99th percentile induced electric field value by posture and skin-to-skin contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Congsheng; Wu, Tongning

    2015-04-01

    Infant exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields from power lines was numerically analyzed in this study. Dosimetric variability due to posture and skin-to-skin contact was evaluated using human anatomical models including a recently developed model of a 12-months-old infant. As proposed by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the induced E-field strength (99th percentile value, E99 ) for the central nerve systems (E99_CNS ) and peripheral nerve system (E99_PNS ), were used as metrics. Results showed that the single (free of contact with others) infant model has lower E99 (E99_CNS and E99_PNS inclusive) compared with single adult and child models when exposed to the same power-frequency magnetic field. Also, studied postures of sitting, standing, or arm-up, would not change E99 _PNS . However, skin-to-skin contact with other models could significantly raise induced E-field strength in the infant (e.g., contact on 0.93% of the infant's total surface increased E99_PNS by 213%). Simulations with canonical models were conducted to assess different factors contributing to the E99 enhancement. Results indicated the importance of thoroughly investigating the conservativeness of current safety guidelines in the case of skin-to-skin contact, especially with infants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Wireless Nursing Call System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight into the cha......This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight...

  19. CALL and the Speaking Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Using common technologies listed in the conversation class, the article suggests a computer-aided language learning (CALL) speaking methodology that is interaction rather than machine centered and outlines ways to ensure the success of speaking activities at the computer. (31 references) (Author/CK)

  20. Calling to Nursing: Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Christie

    The aims of this article are (a) to analyze the concept of a calling as it relates nursing and (b) to develop a definition of calling to nursing with the detail and clarity needed to guide reliable and valid research. The classic steps described by Walker and Avant are used for the analysis. Literature from several disciplines is reviewed including vocational psychology, Christian career counseling, sociology, organizational management, and nursing. The analysis provides an operational definition of a calling to nursing and establishes 3 defining attributes of the concept: (a) a passionate intrinsic motivation or desire (perhaps with a religious component), (b) an aspiration to engage in nursing practice, as a means of fulfilling one's purpose in life, and (c) the desire to help others as one's purpose in life. Antecedents to the concept are personal introspection and cognitive awareness. Positive consequences to the concept are improved work meaningfulness, work engagement, career commitment, personal well-being, and satisfaction. Negative consequences of having a calling might include willingness to sacrifice well-being for work and problems with work-life balance. Following the concept analysis, philosophical assumptions, contextual factors, interdisciplinary work, research opportunities, and practice implications are discussed.

  1. An Evaluation Framework for CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Benjamin L.; Williams, David Dwayne; Rich, Peter J.; Hartshorn, K. James

    2016-01-01

    Searching prestigious Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) journals for references to key publications and authors in the field of evaluation yields a short list. The "American Journal of Evaluation"--the flagship journal of the American Evaluation Association--is only cited once in both the "CALICO Journal and Language…

  2. SVAMP: Sequence variation analysis, maps and phylogeny

    KAUST Repository

    Naeem, Raeece

    2014-04-03

    Summary: SVAMP is a stand-alone desktop application to visualize genomic variants (in variant call format) in the context of geographical metadata. Users of SVAMP are able to generate phylogenetic trees and perform principal coordinate analysis in real time from variant call format (VCF) and associated metadata files. Allele frequency map, geographical map of isolates, Tajima\\'s D metric, single nucleotide polymorphism density, GC and variation density are also available for visualization in real time. We demonstrate the utility of SVAMP in tracking a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreak from published next-generation sequencing data across 15 countries. We also demonstrate the scalability and accuracy of our software on 245 Plasmodium falciparum malaria isolates from three continents. Availability and implementation: The Qt/C++ software code, binaries, user manual and example datasets are available at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/svamp. © The Author 2014.

  3. Can a gray seal (Halichoerus grypus) generalize call classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Amanda L; de Freitas, Mafalda; Wu, Gi-Mick; Janik, Vincent M

    2015-11-01

    Past researchers have found that gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) are capable of classifying vocal signals by call type using a trained set, but were unable to generalize to novel exemplars (Shapiro, Slater, & Janik, 2004). Given the importance of auditory categorization in communication, it would be surprising if the animals were unable to generalize acoustically similar calls into classes. Here, we trained a juvenile gray seal to discriminate novel calls into 2 classes, "growls" and "moans," by vocally matching call types (i.e., the seal moaned when played a moan and growled when played a growl). Our method differed from the previous study as we trained the animal using a comparatively large set of exemplars with standardized durations, consisting of both the seal's own calls and those of 2 other seals. The seal successfully discriminated growls and moans for both her own (94% correct choices) and the other seals' (87% correct choices) calls. We used a generalized linear model (GLM) and found that the seal's performance significantly improved across test sessions, and that accuracy was higher during the first presentation of a sound from her own repertoire but decreased after multiple exposures. This pattern was not found for calls from unknown seals. Factor analysis for mixed data (FAMD) identified acoustic parameters that could be used to discriminate between call types and individuals. Growls and moans differed in noise, duration and frequency parameters, whereas individuals differed only in frequency. These data suggest that the seal could have gained information about both call type and caller identity using frequency cues. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The Influence of Judgment Calls on Meta-Analytic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrahi, Farid; Eisend, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that judgment calls (i.e., methodological choices made in the process of conducting a meta-analysis) have a strong influence on meta-analytic findings and question their robustness. However, prior research applies case study comparison or reanalysis of a few meta-analyses with a focus on a few selected judgment calls. These studies neglect the fact that different judgment calls are related to each other and simultaneously influence the outcomes of a meta-analysis, and that meta-analytic findings can vary due to non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses (e.g., variations of effects over time). The current study analyzes the influence of 13 judgment calls in 176 meta-analyses in marketing research by applying a multivariate, multilevel meta-meta-analysis. The analysis considers simultaneous influences from different judgment calls on meta-analytic effect sizes and controls for alternative explanations based on non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses. The findings suggest that judgment calls have only a minor influence on meta-analytic findings, whereas non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses are more likely to explain differences in meta-analytic findings. The findings support the robustness of meta-analytic results and conclusions.

  5. Expression of Emotional Arousal in Two Different Piglet Call Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Pavel; Ratcliffe, Victoria F; Reby, David; Špinka, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Humans as well as many animal species reveal their emotional state in their voice. Vocal features show strikingly similar correlation patterns with emotional states across mammalian species, suggesting that the vocal expression of emotion follows highly conserved signalling rules. To fully understand the principles of emotional signalling in mammals it is, however, necessary to also account for any inconsistencies in the way that they are acoustically encoded. Here we investigate whether the expression of emotions differs between call types produced by the same species. We compare the acoustic structure of two common piglet calls-the scream (a distress call) and the grunt (a contact call)-across three levels of arousal in a negative situation. We find that while the central frequency of calls increases with arousal in both call types, the amplitude and tonal quality (harmonic-to-noise ratio) show contrasting patterns: as arousal increased, the intensity also increased in screams, but not in grunts, while the harmonicity increased in screams but decreased in grunts. Our results suggest that the expression of arousal depends on the function and acoustic specificity of the call type. The fact that more vocal features varied with arousal in scream calls than in grunts is consistent with the idea that distress calls have evolved to convey information about emotional arousal.

  6. Expression of Emotional Arousal in Two Different Piglet Call Types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Linhart

    Full Text Available Humans as well as many animal species reveal their emotional state in their voice. Vocal features show strikingly similar correlation patterns with emotional states across mammalian species, suggesting that the vocal expression of emotion follows highly conserved signalling rules. To fully understand the principles of emotional signalling in mammals it is, however, necessary to also account for any inconsistencies in the way that they are acoustically encoded. Here we investigate whether the expression of emotions differs between call types produced by the same species. We compare the acoustic structure of two common piglet calls-the scream (a distress call and the grunt (a contact call-across three levels of arousal in a negative situation. We find that while the central frequency of calls increases with arousal in both call types, the amplitude and tonal quality (harmonic-to-noise ratio show contrasting patterns: as arousal increased, the intensity also increased in screams, but not in grunts, while the harmonicity increased in screams but decreased in grunts. Our results suggest that the expression of arousal depends on the function and acoustic specificity of the call type. The fact that more vocal features varied with arousal in scream calls than in grunts is consistent with the idea that distress calls have evolved to convey information about emotional arousal.

  7. impact of queuing on call c queuing on call c queuing on call ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    work resource reduces the probability that a call arriving at the base sta formance evaluation plays an important role in modelling and network resource. network resource. This objective is achieved by an accurate traffic characte. This objective is achieved by an accurate traffic characte rformance metrics in terms of traffic ...

  8. Calle y Saberes en Movimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Daniela Aguirre Aguilar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available En México el rezago, el ausentismo, la deserción escolar, el trabajo a temprana edad y el inicio de una vida en la calle, en repetidas ocasiones son consecuencia de un núcleo familiar desarticulado o de una débil relación intrafamiliar, así como de una condición socioeconómica en desventaja. Ante esta problemática, la Secretaría de Educación Pública, instancia gubernamental encargada de garantizar una educación de calidad para la población, trabaja coordinadamente con organizaciones de la sociedad civil e instancias públicas, para la reintegración a los espacios educativos de los niños, niñas y jóvenes en situación de calle.

  9. Calle y Saberes en Movimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Daniela Aguirre Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En México el rezago, el ausentismo, la deserción escolar, el trabajo a temprana edad y el inicio de una vida en la calle, en repetidas ocasiones son consecuencia de un núcleo familiar desarticulado o de una débil relación intrafamiliar, así como de una condición socioeconómica en desventaja. Ante esta problemática, la Secretaría de Educación Pública, instancia gubernamental encargada de garantizar una educación de calidad para la población, trabaja coordinadamente con organizaciones de la sociedad civil e instancias públicas, para la reintegración a los espacios educativos de los niños, niñas y jóvenes en situación de calle.

  10. Acoustic classification of alarm calls by vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) and humans (Homo sapiens): I. Natural calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owren, M J

    1990-03-01

    A 2-choice, operant-conditioning-based classification procedure was developed in which vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) categorized species-typical snake and eagle alarm calls recorded from individually identified free-ranging animals. After preliminary training with a pair of calls from a single animal, 2 vervets were tested with novel exemplars produced by a variety of callers. Experiment 1 combined testing with continued training in routine classification of 14 new calls. In Experiment 2, the subjects were tested with 48 novel calls in rapid succession. Human (Homo sapiens) control subjects participated in the first study without extended preliminary training. Monkey and human subjects both showed immediate transfer to classification of unfamiliar alarm calls, despite variations both in voice characteristics and reproduction quality.

  11. Armed calling for sur plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Limberto Leite

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The most recent work by researcher José Luiz Aidar Prado, Convocações biopolíticas dos dispositivos comunicacionais (freely translated as Biopolitic convoking of communicational dispositives puts the reader straight in the face of the calling to enter circulating discourses. They are directed to all subjects and also accomodate the discourses with urgence for consumption. 

  12. 78 FR 76257 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... such service offers the capability to place calls to or receive calls from the PSTN. 6. In addition... traffic in response to continued complaints about rural call completion issues from rural associations... Project offering providers the opportunity to test call completion issues identified on calls destined to...

  13. Allozyme frequencies indicate little geographic variation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon is an important component of prawn fisheries in the south-west Indian Ocean and the species of choice in prawn mariculture over much of the Indo-Pacific. Allozyme analysis of specimens collected between December 1996 and June 1997 from the Thukela Banks off KwaZulu-Natal, ...

  14. A community-based resource for automatic exome variant-calling and annotation in Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutarelli, Margherita; Marwah, Veer; Rispoli, Rossella; Carrella, Diego; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Oliva, Gennaro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian disorders are mostly caused by single mutations in the DNA sequence of a gene, leading to a phenotype with pathologic consequences. Whole Exome Sequencing of patients can be a cost-effective alternative to standard genetic screenings to find causative mutations of genetic diseases, especially when the number of cases is limited. Analyzing exome sequencing data requires specific expertise, high computational resources and a reference variant database to identify pathogenic variants. We developed a database of variations collected from patients with Mendelian disorders, which is automatically populated thanks to an associated exome-sequencing pipeline. The pipeline is able to automatically identify, annotate and store insertions, deletions and mutations in the database. The resource is freely available online http://exome.tigem.it. The exome sequencing pipeline automates the analysis workflow (quality control and read trimming, mapping on reference genome, post-alignment processing, variation calling and annotation) using state-of-the-art software tools. The exome-sequencing pipeline has been designed to run on a computing cluster in order to analyse several samples simultaneously. The detected variants are annotated by the pipeline not only with the standard variant annotations (e.g. allele frequency in the general population, the predicted effect on gene product activity, etc.) but, more importantly, with allele frequencies across samples progressively collected in the database itself, stratified by Mendelian disorder. We aim at providing a resource for the genetic disease community to automatically analyse whole exome-sequencing samples with a standard and uniform analysis pipeline, thus collecting variant allele frequencies by disorder. This resource may become a valuable tool to help dissecting the genotype underlying the disease phenotype through an improved selection of putative patient-specific causative or phenotype-associated variations.

  15. Atypical calling by a blue whale in the Gulf of Alaska (L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Kathleen M.; Moore, Sue E.

    2005-05-01

    Worldwide, calls from blue whales share the characteristics of being long (>20 s), low-frequency (blue whales recorded in different ocean basins are distinct from one another, leading to the suggestion that populations and/or subspecies may be identified based on call characteristics. An example of anomalous calling behavior by a blue whale in the Gulf of Alaska is reported that may complicate this approach, and that suggests that blue whales can mimic each other's calls. .

  16. 78 FR 76218 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ..., to the extent such service offers the capability to place calls to or receive calls from the PSTN. 6... restricting telephone traffic in response to continued complaints about rural call completion issues from.... In August 2013, ATIS and NECA announced a voluntary Joint National Call Testing Project offering...

  17. 47 CFR 2.302 - Call signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Call signs. 2.302 Section 2.302... RULES AND REGULATIONS Call Signs and Other Forms of Identifying Radio Transmissions § 2.302 Call signs. The table which follows indicates the composition and blocks of international call signs available for...

  18. Geographic variation in the acoustic traits of greater horseshoe bats: testing the importance of drift and ecological selection in evolutionary processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Keping; Luo, Li; Kimball, Rebecca T; Wei, Xuewen; Jin, Longru; Jiang, Tinglei; Li, Guohong; Feng, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of intraspecific geographic variation of signaling systems provide insight into the microevolutionary processes driving phenotypic divergence. The acoustic calls of bats are sensitive to diverse evolutionary forces, but processes that shape call variation are largely unexplored. In China, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum displays a diverse call frequency and inhabits a heterogeneous landscape, presenting an excellent opportunity for this kind of research. We quantified geographic variation in resting frequency (RF) of echolocation calls, estimated genetic structure and phylogeny of R. ferrumequinum populations, and combined this with climatic factors to test three hypotheses to explain acoustic variation: genetic drift, cultural drift, and local adaptation. Our results demonstrated significant regional divergence in frequency and phylogeny among the bat populations in China's northeast (NE), central-east (CE) and southwest (SW) regions. The CE region had higher frequencies than the NE and SW regions. Drivers of RF divergence were estimated in the entire range and just the CE/NE region (since these two regions form a clade). In both cases, RF divergence was not correlated with mtDNA or nDNA genetic distance, but was significantly correlated with geographic distance and mean annual temperature, indicating cultural drift and ecological selection pressures are likely important in shaping RF divergence among different regions in China.

  19. Geographic variation in the acoustic traits of greater horseshoe bats: testing the importance of drift and ecological selection in evolutionary processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keping Sun

    Full Text Available Patterns of intraspecific geographic variation of signaling systems provide insight into the microevolutionary processes driving phenotypic divergence. The acoustic calls of bats are sensitive to diverse evolutionary forces, but processes that shape call variation are largely unexplored. In China, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum displays a diverse call frequency and inhabits a heterogeneous landscape, presenting an excellent opportunity for this kind of research. We quantified geographic variation in resting frequency (RF of echolocation calls, estimated genetic structure and phylogeny of R. ferrumequinum populations, and combined this with climatic factors to test three hypotheses to explain acoustic variation: genetic drift, cultural drift, and local adaptation. Our results demonstrated significant regional divergence in frequency and phylogeny among the bat populations in China's northeast (NE, central-east (CE and southwest (SW regions. The CE region had higher frequencies than the NE and SW regions. Drivers of RF divergence were estimated in the entire range and just the CE/NE region (since these two regions form a clade. In both cases, RF divergence was not correlated with mtDNA or nDNA genetic distance, but was significantly correlated with geographic distance and mean annual temperature, indicating cultural drift and ecological selection pressures are likely important in shaping RF divergence among different regions in China.

  20. Genotype Calling from Population-Genomic Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruki, Takahiro; Lynch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Genotype calling plays important roles in population-genomic studies, which have been greatly accelerated by sequencing technologies. To take full advantage of the resultant information, we have developed maximum-likelihood (ML) methods for calling genotypes from high-throughput sequencing data. As the statistical uncertainties associated with sequencing data depend on depths of coverage, we have developed two types of genotype callers. One approach is appropriate for low-coverage sequencing data, and incorporates population-level information on genotype frequencies and error rates pre-estimated by an ML method. Performance evaluation using computer simulations and human data shows that the proposed framework yields less biased estimates of allele frequencies and more accurate genotype calls than current widely used methods. Another type of genotype caller applies to high-coverage sequencing data, requires no prior genotype-frequency estimates, and makes no assumption on the number of alleles at a polymorphic site. Using computer simulations, we determine the depth of coverage necessary to accurately characterize polymorphisms using this second method. We applied the proposed method to high-coverage (mean 18×) sequencing data of 83 clones from a population of Daphnia pulex. The results show that the proposed method enables conservative and reasonably powerful detection of polymorphisms with arbitrary numbers of alleles. We have extended the proposed method to the analysis of genomic data for polyploid organisms, showing that calling accurate polyploid genotypes requires much higher coverage than diploid genotypes. PMID:28108551

  1. Passive acoustic monitoring, development of disturbance calls and differentiation of disturbance and advertisement calls in the Argentine croaker Umbrina canosai (Sciaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, J S; Fine, M L; Norbis, W

    2017-04-01

    Disturbance and advertisement calls of the Argentine croaker Umbrina canosai were recorded from coastal Uruguayan waters. Dissections indicate typical sciaenid extrinsic swimbladder muscles present exclusively in males. Disturbance calls were produced when captive U. canosai were startled, chased with a net or grabbed by the tail. Calls were unusual for sciaenids because each pulse consisted of multiple cycles. The number of cycles per pulse and dominant frequency did not change with U. canosai size, but pulse duration and interpulse interval increased. Advertisement calls were recorded from unseen choruses in the field and confirmed with captive individuals in a large tank. Advertisement calls were recorded throughout the known range of the species in Uruguay indicating a continuous belt of spawning populations. Tank recordings of the same individuals permitted explicit comparisons between the two calls. Advertisement call pulses averaged 2·4 more cycles (11·0-8·6) although pulses of both calls were basically similar as were durations and dominant frequencies. Pulse number, however, differed markedly, averaging 13·6 and 3·4 pulses for disturbance and advertisement calls respectively. Furthermore, disturbance calls were produced as a rapid series with an interpulse interval of 26-31 ms whereas advertisement call patterns were less stereotyped and ranged from <100 to 450 ms. Multicycle pulses distinguished U. canosai from other sympatric sciaenids. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Missing call bias in high-throughput genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Rong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high-throughput and cost-effective genotyping platforms made genome-wide association (GWA studies a reality. While the primary focus has been invested upon the improvement of reducing genotyping error, the problems associated with missing calls are largely overlooked. Results To probe into the effect of missing calls on GWAs, we demonstrated experimentally the prevalence and severity of the problem of missing call bias (MCB in four genotyping technologies (Affymetrix 500 K SNP array, SNPstream, TaqMan, and Illumina Beadlab. Subsequently, we showed theoretically that MCB leads to biased conclusions in the subsequent analyses, including estimation of allele/genotype frequencies, the measurement of HWE and association tests under various modes of inheritance relationships. We showed that MCB usually leads to power loss in association tests, and such power change is greater than what could be achieved by equivalent reduction of sample size unbiasedly. We also compared the bias in allele frequency estimation and in association tests introduced by MCB with those by genotyping errors. Our results illustrated that in most cases, the bias can be greatly reduced by increasing the call-rate at the cost of genotyping error rate. Conclusion The commonly used 'no-call' procedure for the observations of borderline quality should be modified. If the objective is to minimize the bias, the cut-off for call-rate and that for genotyping error rate should be properly coupled in GWA. We suggested that the ongoing QC cut-off for call-rate should be increased, while the cut-off for genotyping error rate can be reduced properly.

  3. Rare disease registries: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Paul; Millis, Nicole; Fookes, Megan; Zurynski, Yvonne; Jaffe, Adam; Bellgard, Matthew; Winship, Ingrid; McNeil, John; Bittles, Alan H

    2017-09-01

    When registries collect accurate clinical data over time, they can act as fundamental support structures for patients and their families and powerful cost-effective instruments to support clinical trials and translational research to improve quality of care, quality of life and survival. Registries are critical for rare diseases (RD) with low prevalence and propensity for variation in treatment and outcomes. Rare Voices Australia is leading a call for action to the research and clinical community to prioritise RD data collection and develop an integrated RD Registry strategy for Australia. Financial, operational and governance challenges exist for establishing and maintaining RD registries. As a multidisciplinary team whose interests converge on RD, we highlight the need for the establishment of an Australian RD Registry Alliance. This 'umbrella' organisation will: (i) bring together existing RD registries across Australia; (ii) establish National RD Registry Standards to support interoperability and cohesion across registries; (iii) develop strategies to attract sustainable funding from government and other sources to maximise the utility of existing RD registries and support the development of new RD registries. The most important role for the Alliance would be to use the RD registries for translational research to address current knowledge gaps about RD and to improve the care for the over 1.4 million Australians estimated to live with RD. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Seasonal and diurnal calling patterns of Ross and leopards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tracey L.; Rowney, Gayle A.; Ciaglia, Michaela B.; Cato, Douglas H.

    2005-09-01

    The temporal calling patterns of two Antarctic pack ice seals, the leopard and Ross seal, were examined. This included seasonal onset and decline of calling (coinciding with their breeding season) as well as diurnal changes. Understanding of calling behavior has important implications for acoustic surveying, since this allows the number of calls to be related to an index of the number of animals present and to estimate abundance. The monthly changes in diurnal calling and haul-out patterns (measured via satellite telemetry) were compared. Underwater acoustic recordings were made between 14 October 2003 and 10 January 2004 off Mawson, Eastern Antarctica (660 44.243S and 690 48.748E). Recordings were made using an Acoustics Recording Package (ARP by Dr. John Hildebrand, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA) which is designed to sit on the seafloor and passively record acoustic signals. The package was deployed at a depth of 1320.7 m. The sampling rate was 500 Hz and the effective bandwidth from 10 to 250 Hz, covering the bandwidth of only the low-frequency calls of the Ross and leopard seal.

  5. Fluency Variation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim; Martins, Vanessa De Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    The Speech Fluency Profile of fluent adolescent speakers of Brazilian Portuguese, were examined with respect to gender and neurolinguistic variations. Speech samples of 130 male and female adolescents, aged between 12;0 and 17;11 years were gathered. They were analysed according to type of speech disruption; speech rate; and frequency of speech…

  6. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  7. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Call for Abstracts

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to define and open a call for abstracts. When defining a call for abstracts, you will be able to define settings related to the type of questions asked during a review of an abstract, select the users who will review the abstracts, decide when to open the call for abstracts, and more.

  8. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  9. How to call the Fire Brigade

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The telephone numbers for the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from "wired" telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  10. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.  

  11. Do market participants learn from conference calls?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, E.; Verbeeten, F.; Mertens, G.

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether market participants learn from the information that is disseminated during the Q-and-A section of conference calls. Specifically, we investigate whether stock prices react to information on intangible assets provided during conference calls, and whether conference calls

  12. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note: the number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  13. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  14. ICALL's Relevance to CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Monica

    2017-01-01

    The term Intelligent Computer Assisted Language Learning (ICALL) covers many different aspects of CALL that add something extra to a CALL resource. This could be with the use of computational linguistics or Artificial Intelligence (AI). ICALL tends to be not very well understood within the CALL community. There may also be the slight fear factor…

  15. Conformable variational iteration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Acan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce the conformable variational iteration method based on new defined fractional derivative called conformable fractional derivative. This new method is applied two fractional order ordinary differential equations. To see how the solutions of this method, linear homogeneous and non-linear non-homogeneous fractional ordinary differential equations are selected. Obtained results are compared the exact solutions and their graphics are plotted to demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the method.

  16. Frequency synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, S.; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus Martinus Wilhelmus; Breems, Lucien Johannes; Nauta, Bram

    2010-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  17. Bonobos extract meaning from call sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanna Clay

    Full Text Available Studies on language-trained bonobos have revealed their remarkable abilities in representational and communication tasks. Surprisingly, however, corresponding research into their natural communication has largely been neglected. We address this issue with a first playback study on the natural vocal behaviour of bonobos. Bonobos produce five acoustically distinct call types when finding food, which they regularly mix together into longer call sequences. We found that individual call types were relatively poor indicators of food quality, while context specificity was much greater at the call sequence level. We therefore investigated whether receivers could extract meaning about the quality of food encountered by the caller by integrating across different call sequences. We first trained four captive individuals to find two types of foods, kiwi (preferred and apples (less preferred at two different locations. We then conducted naturalistic playback experiments during which we broadcasted sequences of four calls, originally produced by a familiar individual responding to either kiwi or apples. All sequences contained the same number of calls but varied in the composition of call types. Following playbacks, we found that subjects devoted significantly more search effort to the field indicated by the call sequence. Rather than attending to individual calls, bonobos attended to the entire sequences to make inferences about the food encountered by a caller. These results provide the first empirical evidence that bonobos are able to extract information about external events by attending to vocal sequences of other individuals and highlight the importance of call combinations in their natural communication system.

  18. Time/Frequency Analysis of Terrestrial Impack Crater Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Chang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial impact cratering record recently has been examined in the time domain by Chang & Moon (2005. It was found that the ˜ 26 Myr periodicity in the impact cratering rate exists over the last ˜ 250 Myrs. Such a periodicity can be found regardless of the lower limit of the diameter up to D ˜ 35 km. It immediately called pros and cons. The aim of this paper is two-fold: (1 to test if reported periodicities can be obtained with an independent method, (2 to see, as attempted earlier, if the phase is modulated. To achieve these goals we employ the time/frequency analysis and for the first time apply this method to the terrestrial impact cratering records. We have confirmed that without exceptions noticeable peaks appear around ˜ 25 Myr, corresponding to a frequency of ˜ 0.04 (Myr^{-1}. We also find periodicities in the data base including small impact craters, which are longer. Though the time/frequency analysis allows us to observe directly phase variations, we cannot find any indications of such changes. Instead, modes display slow variations of power in time. The time/frequency analysis shows a nonstationary behavior of the modes. The power can grow from just above the noise level and then decrease back to its initial level in a time of order of 10 Myrs.

  19. Temporal stability and change in the social call repertoire of migrating humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekdahl, Melinda L; Dunlop, Rebecca A; Noad, Michael J; Goldizen, Anne W

    2013-03-01

    Quantifying the stability of a species vocal repertoire is fundamental for further investigations into repertoire function and geographic variation. Changes to the repertoire of sounds used in the song displays of male humpback whales have been well studied. In contrast, little is known about the stability of this species' non-song vocal calls. The stability of the social call repertoire of east Australian humpback whales was investigated from 1997, 2003-2004, and 2008. Out of 46 qualitatively defined call types, 19 were classified as "song-unit calls" that tended to change with the song, and 15 were "inconsistent" and only found in one or two years. Twelve call types were "stable" and present in all years and were commonly produced (64.2% of calls). Stable calls tended to vary in some of the measured call parameters but there was no clear trend between years. This result could indicate that minor changes to calls are not permanent, but reflect individual differences in call production or the graded nature of calls within different social environments. This research has clearly identified stable calls in the call repertoire of humpback whales and while their function is not well understood, their stability suggests an important role in social interactions.

  20. Territorial calls in the Little Owl (Athene noctua): spatial dispersion and social interplay of mates and neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lars Bo; Sunde, Peter; Rahbek, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of quantifying spatio-temporal and social factors affecting territorial calls in LittleOwls,we collected data on the calling behaviour of radio tracked individuals from a low-density population in Northern Jutland, Denmark. There was considerable seasonal variation in calling activity...

  1. Educación de calle

    OpenAIRE

    Aguado Alonso, Carmen María

    2014-01-01

    Los cambios que está sufriendo nuestra sociedad generan nuevas realidades sociales y nuevos métodos de socialización modificando nuestro entorno. Uno de los principales lugares donde ocurre esto es en la calle. La Calle tiene un potencial educativo muy valioso. En ocasiones puede ser utilizado para “des - educar”, olvidado por instituciones sociales, políticas y educativas. Es importante que la Calle se convierta en un espacio de socialización educativa. La Calle tiene un pa...

  2. Call Duration Characteristics based on Customers Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žvinys Karolis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays a lot of different researches are performed based on call duration distributions (CDD analysis. However, the majority of studies are linked with social relationships between the people. Therefore the scarcity of information, how the call duration is associated with a user's location, is appreciable. The goal of this paper is to reveal the ties between user's voice call duration and the location of call. For this reason we analyzed more than 5 million calls from real mobile network, which were made over the base stations located in rural areas, roads, small towns, business and entertainment centers, residential districts. According to these site types CDD’s and characteristic features for call durations are given and discussed. Submitted analysis presents the users habits and behavior as a group (not an individual. The research showed that CDD’s of customers being them in different locations are not equal. It has been found that users at entertainment, business centers are tend to talk much shortly, than people being at home. Even more CDD can be distorted strongly, when machinery calls are evaluated. Hence to apply a common CDD for a whole network it is not recommended. The study also deals with specific parameters of call duration for distinguished user groups, the influence of network technology for call duration is considered.

  3. Time series modeling of daily abandoned calls in a call centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Models for evaluating and predicting the short periodic time series in daily abandoned calls in a call center are developed. Abandonment of calls due to impatient is an identified problem among most call centers. The two competing models were derived using Fourier series and the Box and Jenkins modeling approaches.

  4. Phylogenetic signal in the acoustic parameters of the advertisement calls of four clades of anurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Mohandesan, Elmira; Boko, Drasko; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2013-07-01

    Anuran vocalizations, especially their advertisement calls, are largely species-specific and can be used to identify taxonomic affiliations. Because anurans are not vocal learners, their vocalizations are generally assumed to have a strong genetic component. This suggests that the degree of similarity between advertisement calls may be related to large-scale phylogenetic relationships. To test this hypothesis, advertisement calls from 90 species belonging to four large clades (Bufo, Hylinae, Leptodactylus, and Rana) were analyzed. Phylogenetic distances were estimated based on the DNA sequences of the 12S mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene, and, for a subset of 49 species, on the rhodopsin gene. Mean values for five acoustic parameters (coefficient of variation of root-mean-square amplitude, dominant frequency, spectral flux, spectral irregularity, and spectral flatness) were computed for each species. We then tested for phylogenetic signal on the body-size-corrected residuals of these five parameters, using three statistical tests (Moran's I, Mantel, and Blomberg's K) and three models of genetic distance (pairwise distances, Abouheif's proximities, and the variance-covariance matrix derived from the phylogenetic tree). A significant phylogenetic signal was detected for most acoustic parameters on the 12S dataset, across statistical tests and genetic distance models, both for the entire sample of 90 species and within clades in several cases. A further analysis on a subset of 49 species using genetic distances derived from rhodopsin and from 12S broadly confirmed the results obtained on the larger sample, indicating that the phylogenetic signals observed in these acoustic parameters can be detected using a variety of genetic distance models derived either from a variable mitochondrial sequence or from a conserved nuclear gene. We found a robust relationship, in a large number of species, between anuran phylogenetic relatedness and acoustic similarity in the

  5. Tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy: call of the day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Majid; Mithani, Shoaib

    2007-02-01

    We challenge the routine placement of nephrostomy tube after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) without taking into consideration the size, burden, and multiplicity of the stones; the degree of obstruction of the pelvicaliceal system, or any anatomic variations of the kidney in shape or position. Between January 2005 to March 2006, 110 patients underwent PCNL, 77% of whom had multiple stones. The mean size of the single stones was 4.3 cm (range 2.8-6.5 cm), and the mean single-stone burden was 7.2 cm2 (range 5.6-14.3 cm2). The mean burden of multiple stones was 11.4 cm2 (range 8-23 cm2). Among the patients, 18 had had previous renal surgery, 12 had renal insufficiency, and 7 had a solitary functioning kidney. One patient each had horseshoe kidney and malrotated kidney. In 106 patients, no nephrostomy drain was placed, only an externalized 5F ureteral catheter for 16 to 20 hours. Two patients had simultaneous bilateral tubeless PCNL. The outcome was evaluated prospectively. The frequency of complications, length of hospital stay, and stone-free status were assessed. A stone-free rate of 80% was achieved using PCNL as monotherapy. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 16 to 20 hours. Three patients required placement of a nephrostomy tube because of significant bleeding and one because of purulent renal discharge. In four patients, a ureteral catheter was replaced by a stent because of significant residual stone burdens. The initial 18 patients underwent ultrasound examination on the first postoperative day, and none demonstrated any extrarenal collection, so routine ultrasound examination was omitted in succeeding patients. One patient required exploration because of a retroperitoneal hematoma. Omission of a nephrostomy tube after PCNL while retaining an externalized ureteral catheter for 16 to 20 hours is sufficient and safe irrespective of the stone characteristics. Shape, position, and function of the kidneys are also irrelevant with regard to tubeless PCNL.

  6. Individual killer whale vocal variation during intra-group behavioral dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebner, Dawn M.

    The scientific goal of this dissertation was to carefully study the signal structure of killer whale communications and vocal complexity and link them to behavioral circumstances. The overall objective of this research sought to provide insight into killer whale call content and usage which may be conveying information to conspecifics in order to maintain group cohesion. Data were collected in the summers of 2006 and 2007 in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia. For both individuals and small groups, vocalizations were isolated using a triangular hydrophone array and the behavioral movement patterns were captured by a theodolite and video camera positioned on a cliff overlooking the hyrophone locations. This dissertation is divided into four analysis chapters. In Chapter 3, discriminant analysis was used to validate the four N04 call subtypes which were originally parsed due to variations in slope segments. The first two functions of the discriminant analysis explained 97% of the variability. Most of the variability for the N04 call was found in the front convex and the terminal portions of the call, while very little variability was found in the center region of the call. This research revealed that individual killer whales produced multiple subtypes of the N04 call. No correlations of behaviors to acoustic parameters obtained were found. The aim of the Chapter 4 was to determine if killer whale calling behavior varied prior to and after the animals had joined. Pulsed call rates were found to be greater pre- compared to post-joining events. Two-way vocal exchanges were more common occurring 74% of the time during pre-joining events. In Chapter 5, initiated and first response to calls varied between age/sex class groups when mothers were separated from an offspring. Solo mothers and calves initiated pulsed calls more often than they responded. Most of the no vocal responses were due to mothers who were foraging. Finally, observations of the frequency split in N04

  7. Answering the "Call of the Mountain"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaves Villegas, Martha

    2016-01-01

    In response to the age of the ‘anthropocene,’ as some authors are calling this epoch in which one single species is disrupting major natural systems (Steffen et al 2011), there are calls for more radical, learning-based sustainability that generates deep transformations in individuals

  8. Kindness Curbs Kids' Name-Calling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, Rebekah

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the impact of name-calling towards the student's academic performance and emotions and cites some measures on how should teachers address this problem in order to facilitate effective learning among students. Psychologists recognize that name-calling and other forms of verbal bullying and harassment are more…

  9. 17 CFR 31.18 - Margin calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Margin calls. 31.18 Section 31....18 Margin calls. (a) No leverage transaction merchant shall liquidate a leverage contract because of a margin deficiency without effecting personal contact with the leverage customer. If a leverage...

  10. Help Options in CALL: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of research investigating help options in the different language skills in computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this review, emerging themes along with is-sues affecting help option research are identified and discussed. We argue that help options in CALL are application resources that do not only seem…

  11. Monitoring method call sequences using annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Nobakht (Behrooz); F.S. de Boer (Frank); M.M. Bonsangue (Marcello); C.P.T. de Gouw (Stijn); M.M. Jaghouri (MohammadMahdi)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we introduce JMSeq, a Java-based tool for monitoring sequences of method calls. JMSeq provides a simple but expressive language to specify the observables of a Java program in terms of sequences of possibly nested method calls. Similar to many monitoring-oriented

  12. 78 FR 21891 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... one of two proposed safe harbor provisions. We also propose to prohibit both originating and... these proposed rules, particularly for originating providers whose call-routing practices do not appear... in presentations at the Commission's October 18, 2011 workshop on rural call routing and termination...

  13. Thirty-minutes' exposure to smartphone call triggers neutrophil activation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Brocco, Giorgio; Benati, Marco; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Franchini, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    Despite accumulating evidence about the negative health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones, no information is available on the potential impact of radiofrequency (RF) waves on polymorphonuclear leukocytes biology. Two sequential whole blood tubes were collected from 16 ostensibly healthy volunteers. After placing the former tube of each subject in a plastic rack, 1 cm from a commercial smartphone (carrier frequency, 900 MHz), a call was placed on the smartphone and a communication lasting 30 min was manually activated. The latter blood tube of each volunteer was placed in another plastic rack, for an identical period of time, avoiding close contact with sources of RF waves. A complete blood count was then assessed in all whole blood samples, using Advia 2120. The 30-min exposure of blood to RF waves did not induce significant variations of total and differential leukocyte counts. A significant decrease was however observed for many neutrophils parameters, with median percentage variation of -3.9% for the lobularity index (LI), -29.8% for the myeloperoxidase index (MPXI), -0.6% for the neutrophil cluster mean x (NEUTx) and -0.7% for the neutrophil cluster mean y (NEUTy), respectively. The percentage of blood samples with reduced values after exposure to RF waves was 81% for LI, 88% for NEUTx and 100% for both MPXI and NEUTy. The results of this study show that exposure to smartphone RF waves triggers activation of neutrophils in vitro, as mirrored by the significant variations observed in many activation parameters in Advia 2120.

  14. Ensembl variation resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin-Garcia Pablo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maturing field of genomics is rapidly increasing the number of sequenced genomes and producing more information from those previously sequenced. Much of this additional information is variation data derived from sampling multiple individuals of a given species with the goal of discovering new variants and characterising the population frequencies of the variants that are already known. These data have immense value for many studies, including those designed to understand evolution and connect genotype to phenotype. Maximising the utility of the data requires that it be stored in an accessible manner that facilitates the integration of variation data with other genome resources such as gene annotation and comparative genomics. Description The Ensembl project provides comprehensive and integrated variation resources for a wide variety of chordate genomes. This paper provides a detailed description of the sources of data and the methods for creating the Ensembl variation databases. It also explores the utility of the information by explaining the range of query options available, from using interactive web displays, to online data mining tools and connecting directly to the data servers programmatically. It gives a good overview of the variation resources and future plans for expanding the variation data within Ensembl. Conclusions Variation data is an important key to understanding the functional and phenotypic differences between individuals. The development of new sequencing and genotyping technologies is greatly increasing the amount of variation data known for almost all genomes. The Ensembl variation resources are integrated into the Ensembl genome browser and provide a comprehensive way to access this data in the context of a widely used genome bioinformatics system. All Ensembl data is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org and from the public MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org.

  15. Echolocation Call Structure of Fourteen Bat Species in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukui, Dai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The echolocation calls of bats can provide useful information about species that are generally difficult to observe in the field. In many cases characteristics of call structure can be used to identify species and also to obtain information about aspects of the bat's ecology. We describe and compare the echolocation call structure of 14 of the 21 bat species found in Korea, for most of which the ecology and behavior are poorly understood. In total, 1,129 pulses were analyzed from 93 echolocation call sequences of 14 species. Analyzed pulses could be classified into three types according to the pulse shape: FM/CF/FM type, FM type and FM/QCF type. Pulse structures of all species were consistent with previous studies, although geographic variation may be indicated in some species. Overall classification rate provided by the canonical discriminant analysis was relatively low. Especially in the genera Myotis and Murina, there are large overlaps in spectral and temporal parameters between species. On the other hand, classification rates for the FM/QCF type species were relatively high. The results show that acoustic monitoring could be a powerful tool for assessing bat activity and distribution in Korea, at least for FM/QCF and FM/CF/FM species.

  16. Call Admission Control in Mobile Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sanchita

    2013-01-01

    Call Admission Control (CAC) and Dynamic Channel Assignments (DCA) are important decision-making problems in mobile cellular communication systems. Current research in mobile communication considers them as two independent problems, although the former greatly depends on the resulting free channels obtained as the outcome of the latter. This book provides a solution to the CAC problem, considering DCA as an integral part of decision-making for call admission. Further, current technical resources ignore movement issues of mobile stations and fluctuation in network load (incoming calls) in the control strategy used for call admission. In addition, the present techniques on call admission offers solution globally for the entire network, instead of considering the cells independently.      CAC here has been formulated by two alternative approaches. The first approach aimed at handling the uncertainty in the CAC problem by employing fuzzy comparators.  The second approach is concerned with formulation of CAC ...

  17. BBCAnalyzer: a visual approach to facilitate variant calling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Sarah; de Graaf, Aniek O; Dugas, Martin

    2017-02-28

    Deriving valid variant calling results from raw next-generation sequencing data is a particularly challenging task, especially with respect to clinical diagnostics and personalized medicine. However, when using classic variant calling software, the user usually obtains nothing more than a list of variants that pass the corresponding caller's internal filters. Any expected mutations (e.g. hotspot mutations), that have not been called by the software, need to be investigated manually. BBCAnalyzer (Bases By CIGAR Analyzer) provides a novel visual approach to facilitate this step of time-consuming, manual inspection of common mutation sites. BBCAnalyzer is able to visualize base counts at predefined positions or regions in any sequence alignment data that are available as BAM files. Thereby, the tool provides a straightforward solution for evaluating any list of expected mutations like hotspot mutations, or even whole regions of interest. In addition to an ordinary textual report, BBCAnalyzer reports highly customizable plots. Information on the counted number of bases, the reference bases, known mutations or polymorphisms, called mutations and base qualities is summarized in a single plot. By uniting this information in a graphical way, the user may easily decide on a variant being present or not - completely independent of any internal filters or frequency thresholds. BBCAnalyzer provides a unique, novel approach to facilitate variant calling where classical tools frequently fail to call. The R package is freely available at http://bioconductor.org . The local web application is available at Additional file 2. A documentation of the R package (Additional file 1) as well as the web application (Additional file 2) with detailed descriptions, examples of all input- and output elements, exemplary code as well as exemplary data are included. A video demonstrates the exemplary usage of the local web application (Additional file 3). Additional file 3: Supplement_3. Video

  18. The peripheral auditory characteristics of noctuid moths: responses to the search-phase echolocation calls of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters; Jones

    1996-01-01

    The noctuid moths Agrotis segetum and Noctua pronuba show peak auditory sensitivity between 15 and 25 kHz, and a maximum sensitivity of 35 dB SPL. A. segetum shows a temporal integration time of 69 ms. It is predicted that bats using high-frequency and short-duration calls will be acoustically less apparent to these moths. Short-duration frequency-modulated (FM) calls of Plecotus auritus are not significantly less acoustically apparent than those of other FM bats with slightly longer call durations, based on their combined frequency and temporal structure alone. Long-duration, high-frequency, constant-frequency (CF) calls of Rhinolophus hipposideros at 113 kHz are significantly less apparent than those of the FM bats tested. The predicted low call apparency of the 83 kHz CF calls of R. ferrumequinum appears to be counteracted by their long duration. It is proposed that two separate mechanisms are exploited by bats to reduce their call apparency, low intensity in FM bats and high frequency in CF bats. Within the FM bats tested, shorter-duration calls do not significantly reduce the apparency of the call at the peripheral level, though they may limit the amount of information available to the central nervous system.

  19. External GSM phone calls now made simpler

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    On 2 July, the IT/CS Telecom Service introduced a new service making external calls from CERN GSM phones easier. A specific prefix is no longer needed for calls outside CERN. External calls from CERN GSM phones are to be simplified. It is no longer necessary to use a special prefix to call an external number from the CERN GSM network.The Telecom Section of the IT/CS Group is introducing a new system that will make life easier for GSM users. It is no longer necessary to use a special prefix (333) to call an external number from the CERN GSM network. Simply dial the number directly like any other Swiss GSM customer. CERN currently has its own private GSM network with the Swiss mobile operator, Sunrise, covering the whole of Switzerland. This network was initially intended exclusively for calls between CERN numbers (replacing the old beeper system). A special system was later introduced for external calls, allowing them to pass thr...

  20. Attitude of Farmers towards Kisan Call Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shely Mary Koshy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to measure the attitude of farmers in Kerala, India towards Kisan Call Centre (KCC. Kisan Call Centre provides free agricultural advisory services to every citizen involved in agriculture through a toll free number. One hundred and fifty farmers who have utilized the Kisan Call Centre service were selected from the database of KCC. The results showed that the respondents had moderately favourable attitude towards KCC followed by highly favourable attitude. The variables digital divide, temporal awareness on KCC, satisfaction towards KCC and utilization of KCC were found to have a positive correlation with the attitude of respondents towards KCC.

  1. Experiencing variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Berge, Maria; Grout, Brian William Wilson

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes towards a better understanding of learning dynamics in doctoral supervision by analysing how learning opportunities are created in the interaction between supervisors and PhD students, using the notion of experiencing variation as a key to learning. Empirically, we have bas...... were discussed, created more complex patterns of variation. Both PhD students and supervisors can learn from this. Understanding of this mechanism that creates learning opportunities can help supervisors develop their competences in supervisory pedagogy....

  2. Multi-species call-broadcast improved detection of endangered Yuma clapper rail compared to single-species call-broadcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Christopher P.; Conway, Courtney J.; Piest, Linden; Burger, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Broadcasting calls of marsh birds during point-count surveys increases their detection probability and decreases variation in the number of birds detected across replicate surveys. However, multi-species monitoring using call-broadcast may reduce these benefits if birds are reluctant to call once they hear broadcasted calls of other species. We compared a protocol that uses call-broadcast for only one species (Yuma clapper rail [Rallus longirostris yumanensis]) to a protocol that uses call-broadcast for multiple species. We detected more of each of the following species using the multi-species protocol: 25 % more pied-billed grebes, 160 % more American bitterns, 52 % more least bitterns, 388 % more California black rails, 12 % more Yuma clapper rails, 156 % more Virginia rails, 214 % more soras, and 19 % more common gallinules. Moreover, the coefficient of variation was smaller when using the multi-species protocol: 10 % smaller for pied-billed grebes, 38 % smaller for American bitterns, 19 % smaller for least bitterns, 55 % smaller for California black rails, 5 % smaller for Yuma clapper rails, 38 % smaller for Virginia rails, 44 % smaller for soras, and 8 % smaller for common gallinules. Our results suggest that multi-species monitoring approaches may be more effective and more efficient than single-species approaches even when using call-broadcast.

  3. SVAMP: sequence variation analysis, maps and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Raeece; Hidayah, Lailatul; Preston, Mark D; Clark, Taane G; Pain, Arnab

    2014-08-01

    SVAMP is a stand-alone desktop application to visualize genomic variants (in variant call format) in the context of geographical metadata. Users of SVAMP are able to generate phylogenetic trees and perform principal coordinate analysis in real time from variant call format (VCF) and associated metadata files. Allele frequency map, geographical map of isolates, Tajima's D metric, single nucleotide polymorphism density, GC and variation density are also available for visualization in real time. We demonstrate the utility of SVAMP in tracking a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreak from published next-generation sequencing data across 15 countries. We also demonstrate the scalability and accuracy of our software on 245 Plasmodium falciparum malaria isolates from three continents. The Qt/C++ software code, binaries, user manual and example datasets are available at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/svamp arnab.pain@kaust.edu.sa or arnab.pain@cantab.net Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

  5. Mourning Dove Call-count Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) Call-Count Survey was developed to provide an index to population size and to detect annual changes in mourning dove breeding...

  6. Evaluating erroneous offside calls in soccer

    OpenAIRE

    H?ttermann, Stefanie; No?l, Benjamin; Memmert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously attend to multiple objects declines with increases in the visual angle separating distant objects. We explored whether these laboratory-measured limits on visual attentional spread generalize to a real life context: offside calls by soccer assistant referees. We coded all offside calls from a full year of first division German soccer matches. By determining the x-y coordinates of the relevant players and assistant referee on the soccer field we were able to calcu...

  7. Non-specific alarm calls trigger mobbing behavior in Hainan gibbons (Nomascus hainanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huaiqing; Gao, Kai; Zhou, Jiang

    2016-09-30

    Alarm calls are important defensive behaviors. Here, we report the acoustic spectrum characteristics of alarm calls produced by Hainan gibbons (Nomascus hainanus) inhabiting Bawangling National Nature Reserve in Hainan, China. Analysis of call data collected from 2002-2014 shows that alarm calls are emitted by all family group members, except infants. Alarm behavior included simple short alarming calls (7-10 min) followed by longer variable-frequency mobbing calls lasting 5-12 min. The duration of individual alarming and mobbing calls was 0.078 ± 0.014 s and 0.154 ± 0.041 s at frequency ranges of 520-1000 Hz and 690-3920 Hz, respectively. Alarming call duration was positively associated with group size. The alarm calls can trigger mobbing behavior in Hainan gibbons; this is a defense way of social animals, and first report among the primates' species. The system of vocal alarm behavior described in this critically endangered species is simple and effective.

  8. Temporal separation of two fin whale call types across the eastern North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirović, Ana; Williams, Lauren N; Kerosky, Sara M; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-01-01

    Fin whales ( Balaenoptera physalus ) produce a variety of low-frequency, short-duration, frequency-modulated calls. The differences in temporal patterns between two fin whale call types are described from long-term passive acoustic data collected intermittently between 2005 and 2011 at three locations across the eastern North Pacific: the Bering Sea, off Southern California, and in Canal de Ballenas in the northern Gulf of California. Fin whale calls were detected at all sites year-round, during all periods with recordings. At all three locations, 40-Hz calls peaked in June, preceding a peak in 20-Hz calls by 3-5 months. Monitoring both call types may provide a more accurate insight into the seasonal presence of fin whales across the eastern North Pacific than can be obtained from a single call type. The 40-Hz call may be associated with a foraging function, and temporal separation between 40- and 20-Hz calls may indicate the separation between predominately feeding behavior and other social interactions.

  9. Partition Decomposition for Roll Call Data

    CERN Document Server

    Leibon, Greg; Rockmore, Daniel N; Savell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we bring to bear some new tools from statistical learning on the analysis of roll call data. We present a new data-driven model for roll call voting that is geometric in nature. We construct the model by adapting the "Partition Decoupling Method," an unsupervised learning technique originally developed for the analysis of families of time series, to produce a multiscale geometric description of a weighted network associated to a set of roll call votes. Central to this approach is the quantitative notion of a "motivation," a cluster-based and learned basis element that serves as a building block in the representation of roll call data. Motivations enable the formulation of a quantitative description of ideology and their data-dependent nature makes possible a quantitative analysis of the evolution of ideological factors. This approach is generally applicable to roll call data and we apply it in particular to the historical roll call voting of the U.S. House and Senate. This methodology provides a...

  10. Changes in acoustic startle reflex in rats induced by playback of 22-kHz calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    In aversive or dangerous situations, adult rats emit long characteristic ultrasonic calls, often termed "22-kHz calls," which have been suggested to play a role of alarm calls. Although the playback experiment is one of the most effective ways to investigate the alarming properties of 22-kHz calls, clear behavioral evidence showing the anxiogenic effects of these playback stimuli has not been directly obtained to date. In this study, we investigated whether playback of 22-kHz calls or synthesized sine tones could change the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), enhancement of which is widely considered to be a reliable index of anxiety-related negative affective states in rats. Playback of 22-kHz calls significantly enhanced the ASR in rats. Enhancement effects caused by playback of 22-kHz calls from young rats were relatively weak compared to those after calls from adult rats. Playback of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones enhanced ASR in subjects, but not synthesized 60-kHz tones. Further, shortening the individual call duration of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones also enhanced the ASR. Accordingly, it is suggested that 22-kHz calls induce anxiety by socially communicated alarming signals in rats. The results also demonstrated that call frequency, i.e., of 22kHz, appears important for ultrasonic alarm-signal communication in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Advertisement call of Scinax littoralis and S. angrensis (Amphibia: Anura: Hylidae, with notes on the reproductive activity of S. littoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel V. Garey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scinax littoralis and S. angrensis are poorly known Atlantic forest endemic species from the Scinax catharinae group, which is known from southern and southeastern Brazil. Herein, we describe the advertisement calls of these two species and compare them to other species within the S. catharinae group. Additionally, we provide information on breeding sites, and calling activity in S. littoralis. Advertisement calls of S. angrensis and S. littoralis are composed of multi-pulsed notes with multiple frequency bands and frequency modulation. Scinax littoralis has a higher minimum and maximum frequency, and lower dominant frequency than S. angrensis, while Scinax littoralis has a longer call. Scinax littoralis appears to be a habitat generalist, occurring from secondary to mature forests, and breeding both in temporary and in permanent ponds. Male S. littoralis were usually observed calling perched on shrub stems, and displayed satellite behavior when the male density was high.

  12. Variational analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rockafellar, R Tyrrell

    1998-01-01

    From its origins in the minimization of integral functionals, the notion of 'variations' has evolved greatly in connection with applications in optimization, equilibrium, and control. It refers not only to constrained movement away from a point, but also to modes of perturbation and approximation that are best describable by 'set convergence', variational convergence of functions and the like. This book develops a unified framework and, in finite dimension, provides a detailed exposition of variational geometry and subdifferential calculus in their current forms beyond classical and convex analysis. Also covered are set-convergence, set-valued mappings, epi-convergence, duality, maximal monotone mappings, second-order subderivatives, measurable selections and normal integrands. The changes in this 3rd printing mainly concern various typographical corrections, and reference omissions that came to light in the previous printings. Many of these reached the authors' notice through their own re-reading, that of th...

  13. Reinterpreting features of the advertisement call of Dermatonotus muelleri (Boettger, 1885; Anura, Microhylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaretta, Ariovaldo Antonio; Vo, Pacific; Herche, Jesse; Tang, Justine Nicole; Gridi-Papp, Marcos

    2015-06-13

    The advertisement call of Dermatonotus muelleri was originally described by Nelson (1973) in a brief section of a review on the mating calls of the Microhylinae. He used two calls from São Leopoldo, state of Minas Gerais, in Brazil to determine that they have i) dominant frequency between 1.500-2.200 kHz (mean 1.854 + 0.216 kHz), and ii) harmonic intervals between 0.140 and 0.150 kHz (0.146 +/- 0.005 kHz). Nelson (1973) based his description on an audiospectrogram produced with high frequency resolution and did not quantify the pulse structure of the calls. More recently, Giaretta and colleagues (2013) expanded on the original description using a larger set of calls recorded from Gurinhat, state of Minas Gerais, in Brazil. They quantified the temporal structure of the call and confirmed that the dominant frequency is around 1.8 kHz. In addition, they identified a secondary low frequency band at 667 Hz.

  14. Variational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2004-01-01

    This graduate-level text's primary objective is to demonstrate the expression of the equations of the various branches of mathematical physics in the succinct and elegant form of variational principles (and thereby illuminate their interrelationship). Its related intentions are to show how variational principles may be employed to determine the discrete eigenvalues for stationary state problems and to illustrate how to find the values of quantities (such as the phase shifts) that arise in the theory of scattering. Chapter-by-chapter treatment consists of analytical dynamics; optics, wave mecha

  15. SeqArray-a storage-efficient high-performance data format for WGS variant calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Lawrence, Michael; Stilp, Adrienne; Conomos, Matthew P; Weir, Bruce S; Laurie, Cathy; Levine, David

    2017-08-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data are being generated at an unprecedented rate. Analysis of WGS data requires a flexible data format to store the different types of DNA variation. Variant call format (VCF) is a general text-based format developed to store variant genotypes and their annotations. However, VCF files are large and data retrieval is relatively slow. Here we introduce a new WGS variant data format implemented in the R/Bioconductor package 'SeqArray' for storing variant calls in an array-oriented manner which provides the same capabilities as VCF, but with multiple high compression options and data access using high-performance parallel computing. Benchmarks using 1000 Genomes Phase 3 data show file sizes are 14.0 Gb (VCF), 12.3 Gb (BCF, binary VCF), 3.5 Gb (BGT) and 2.6 Gb (SeqArray) respectively. Reading genotypes in the SeqArray package are two to three times faster compared with the htslib C library using BCF files. For the allele frequency calculation, the implementation in the SeqArray package is over 5 times faster than PLINK v1.9 with VCF and BCF files, and over 16 times faster than vcftools. When used in conjunction with R/Bioconductor packages, the SeqArray package provides users a flexible, feature-rich, high-performance programming environment for analysis of WGS variant data. http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/SeqArray. zhengx@u.washington.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Hourly associations between heat and ambulance calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    The response speed of ambulance calls is very crucial to rescue patients suffering immediately life threatening conditions. The serious health outcomes might be caused by exposing to extreme heat only several hours before. However, limited evidence is available on this topic. This study aims to examine the hourly association between heat and ambulance calls, to improve the ambulance services and to better protect health. Hourly data on ambulance calls for non-accidental causes, temperature and air pollutants (PM10, NO2, and O3) were collected from Brisbane, Australia, during 2001 and 2007. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to examine the associations between hourly ambulance calls and temperature during warm season (Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb, and Mar), while adjusting for potential confounders. Stratified analyses were performed for sex and age groups. Ambulance calls peaked at 10am for all groups, except those aged 27 °C) increase the demands of ambulance. This information is helpful to increase the efficiency of ambulance service then save lives, for example, preparing more ambulance before appearance of extremely hot temperature in combination with weather forecast. Also, people should better arrange their time for outdoor activities to avoid exposing to extreme hot temperatures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatial Variation of Seismic B-Values of the Empirical Law of the Magnitude-Frequency Distribution from a Bayesian Approach Based On Spline (B-Spline) Function in the North Anatolian Fault Zone, North of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Tugba; Bayrak, Yusuf

    2017-12-01

    In this study, A Bayesian approach based on Spline (B-spline) function is used to estimate the spatial variations of the seismic b-values of the empirical law (G-R law) in the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ), North of Turkey. B-spline function method developed for estimation and interpolation of b-values. Spatial variations in b-values are known to reflect the stress field and can be used in earthquake hazard analysis. We proposed that b-values combined with seismicity and tectonic background. β=b*ln(10) function (the derivation of the G-R law) based on a Bayesian approach is used to estimate the b values and their standard deviations. A homogeneous instrumental catalog is used during the period 1900-2017. We divided into ten different seismic source regions based on epicenter distribution, tectonic, seismicity, faults in NAFZ. Three historical earthquakes (1343, MS = 7. 5, 1766, Ms=7.3, 1894, MS = 7. 0) are included in region 2 (Marmara Sea (Tekirdağ-Merkez-Kumburgaz-Çmarcik Basins)) where a large earthquake is expected in the near future because of a large earthquake hasn’t been observed for the instrumental period. The spatial variations in ten different seismogenic regions are estimated in NAFZ. In accordance with estimates, b-values are changed between 0.52±0.07 and 0.86±0.13. The high b values are estimated the Southern Branch of NAFZ (Edremit Fault Zones, Yenice-Gönen, Mustafa Kemal Paşa, Ulubat Faults) region, so it is related low stress. The low b values are estimated between Tokat-Erzincan region, so it is related high stress. The maps of 2D and 3D spatial variations (2D contour maps, classed post maps (a group the data into discrete classes), image maps (raster maps based on grid files), 3D wireframe (three-dimensional representations of grid files) and 3D surface) are plotted to the b-values. The spatial variations b-values can be used earthquake hazard analysis for NAFZ.

  18. Audience effects, but not environmental influences, explain variation in gorilla close distance vocalizations-A test of the acoustic adaptation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedwig, Daniela; Mundry, Roger; Robbins, Martha M; Boesch, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Close distance vocalizations are an integral part of primate vocal communication. They exhibit large acoustic variation which has been suggested to constitute flexible responses to the highly variable social setting of group living animals. However, a recent study suggested that acoustic variation in close distance calls of baboons may also arise from acoustic adaptations to environmental factors in order to counteract sound degradation. We tested whether the variation in calling rate and acoustic structure of gorilla close distance vocalizations may serve to counteract distorting effects of vegetation during sound propagation. Using focal animal sampling we recorded the vocal behavior of 15 adult individuals living in two groups: one group of western lowland gorillas Gorilla gorilla gorilla and one group of mountain gorillas Gorilla beringei beringei. We considered the distance between the caller and its nearest neighbor as the minimum transmission distance of calls; while vegetation density was quantified through measures of visibility. Our analysis revealed vocal plasticity in gorilla close calls in relation to changes in visibility and nearest neighbor distance. However, the observed changes in fundamental frequency and calling rate are unlikely to counteract degrading effects of vegetation, but rather seem to reflect reactions to variation in spatial and visual separation from other group members, similar to the audience effects demonstrated in a range of other species. We propose that vocal plasticity to counteract distorting environmental effects may not be prevalent across taxa and perhaps confined to species living in heterogeneous habitats with highly variable transmission conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Echolocation calls and communication calls are controlled differentially in the brainstem of the bat Phyllostomus discolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuller Gerd

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echolocating bats emit vocalizations that can be classified either as echolocation calls or communication calls. Neural control of both types of calls must govern the same pool of motoneurons responsible for vocalizations. Electrical microstimulation in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG elicits both communication and echolocation calls, whereas stimulation of the paralemniscal area (PLA induces only echolocation calls. In both the PAG and the PLA, the current thresholds for triggering natural vocalizations do not habituate to stimuli and remain low even for long stimulation periods, indicating that these structures have relative direct access to the final common pathway for vocalization. This study intended to clarify whether echolocation calls and communication calls are controlled differentially below the level of the PAG via separate vocal pathways before converging on the motoneurons used in vocalization. Results Both structures were probed simultaneously in a single experimental approach. Two stimulation electrodes were chronically implanted within the PAG in order to elicit either echolocation or communication calls. Blockade of the ipsilateral PLA site with iontophoretically application of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid did not impede either echolocation or communication calls elicited from the PAG. However, blockade of the contralateral PLA suppresses PAG-elicited echolocation calls but not communication calls. In both cases the blockade was reversible. Conclusion The neural control of echolocation and communication calls seems to be differentially organized below the level of the PAG. The PLA is an essential functional unit for echolocation call control before the descending pathways share again the final common pathway for vocalization.

  20. Intra- and interspecific responses to Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) social calls.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeb, Susan, C.; Britzke, Eric, R.

    2010-07-01

    Bats respond to the calls of conspecifics as well as to calls of other species; however, few studies have attempted to quantify these responses or understand the functions of these calls. We tested the response of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) to social calls as a possible method to increase capture success and to understand the function of social calls. We also tested if calls of bats within the range of the previously designated subspecies differed, if the responses of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats varied with geographic origin of the calls, and if other species responded to the calls of C. rafinesquii. We recorded calls of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats at two colony roost sites in South Carolina, USA. Calls were recorded while bats were in the roosts and as they exited. Playback sequences for each site were created by copying typical pulses into the playback file. Two mist nets were placed approximately 50–500 m from known roost sites; the net with the playback equipment served as the Experimental net and the one without the equipment served as the Control net. Call structures differed significantly between the Mountain and Coastal Plains populations with calls from the Mountains being of higher frequency and longer duration. Ten of 11 Rafinesque’s big-eared bats were caught in the Control nets and, 13 of 19 bats of other species were captured at Experimental nets even though overall bat activity did not differ significantly between Control and Experimental nets. Our results suggest that Rafinesque’s big-eared bats are not attracted to conspecifics’ calls and that these calls may act as an intraspecific spacing mechanism during foraging.

  1. Breeding biology and advertisement call of the horned leaf-frog, Proceratophrys appendiculata (Amphibia: Anura: Odontophrynidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique dos Santos Dias

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe the breeding biology and the advertisement call of the horned leaf-frog, Proceratophrys appendiculata (Günther, 1873 in the Parque Nacional da Serra dos Órgãos, municipality of Teresópolis. The reproductive period of P. appendiculata is short and is associated with the end of the winter and the beginning of the spring, when males call night and day under large rocks in sandy bottom rock streams. The amplexus is axillary and one female laid about 656 viscous eggs. The advertisement call of P. appendiculata is unique among congeners. The call lasts approximately two seconds, with about 85 pulses/call at a rate of 45 pulses/s and frequency around 0.620 kHz. It is one of the longest calls and lowest in dominant frequency. Moreover, the call of P. appendiculata is characterized by the greatest number of pulses so far registered, reaching 129 pulses in a single call.

  2. The effect of predation on begging-call evolution in nestling wood warblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell

    1999-04-01

    I combined a comparative study of begging in ground- and tree-nesting wood warblers (Parulidae) with experimental measures of the predation costs of warbler begging calls. Throughout their development, ground-nesting warbler nestlings had significantly higher-frequency begging calls than did tree-nesting warblers. There was also a trend for ground-nesting birds to have less rapidly modulated calls. There were no consistent associations between nesting site and the amplitude of the calls. Using miniature walkie-talkies hidden inside artificial nests, I reciprocally transplanted the begging calls of 5- and 8-day-old black-throated blue warblers, Dendroica caerulescens (tree-nesting) and ovenbirds, Seiurus aurocapillus (ground-nesting) and measured the corresponding changes in rates of nest predation. For the begging calls of 8-day-old nestlings, but not those of 5-day-olds, the calls of the tree-nesting species coming from ground nests incurred greater costs than did the calls of ground nesters. The reciprocal transplant had little effect on the rate of predation. Tooth imprints on clay eggs placed in artificial nests indicated that eastern chipmunks, Tamias striatus, were responsible for the increased cost of begging for black-throated blue calls coming from the ground. These data suggest that nest predation may be responsible for maintaining some of the interspecific differences in the acoustic structure of begging calls. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  3. Discrete frequency slice wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhonghong; Tao, Ting; Jiang, Zhongwei; Wang, Haibin

    2017-11-01

    This paper introduces a new kind of Time-Frequency Representation (TFR) method called Discrete Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform (DFSWT). It is an improved version of Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform (FSWT). The previous researches on FSWT show that it is a new efficient TFR in an easy way without strict limitation as traditional wavelet theory. DFSWT as well as FSWT are defined directly in frequency domain, and still keep its properties in time-frequency domain as FSWT decomposition, reconstruction and filter design, etc. However, the original signal is decomposed and reconstructed on a Chosen Frequency Domains (CFD) as need of application. CFD means that the decomposition and reconstruction are not completed on all frequency components. At first, it is important to discuss the necessary condition of CFD to reconstruct the original signal. And then based on norm l2, an optimization algorithm is introduced to reconstruct the original signal even accurately. Finally, for a test example, the TFR analysis of a real life signal is shown. Some conclusions are drawn that the concept of CFD is very useful to application, and the DFSWT can become a simple and easy tool of TFR method, and also provide a new idea of low speed sampling of high frequency signal in applications.

  4. The ecology and evolution of avian alarm call signaling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Alexis Chandon

    Communication is often set up as a simple dyadic exchange between one sender and one receiver. However, in reality, signaling systems have evolved and are used with many forms and types of information bombarding multiple senders, who in turn send multiple signals of different modalities, through various environmental spaces, finally reaching multiple receivers. In order to understand both the ecology and evolution of a signaling system, we must examine all the facets of the signaling system. My dissertation focused on the alarm call signaling system in birds. Alarm calls are acoustic signals given in response to danger or predators. My first two chapters examine how information about predators alters alarm calls. In chapter one I found that chickadees make distinctions between predators of different hunting strategies and appear to encode information about predators differently if they are heard instead of seen. In my second chapter, I test these findings more robustly in a non-model bird, the Steller's jay. I again found that predator species matters, but that how Steller's jays respond if they saw or heard the predator depends on the predator species. In my third chapter, I tested how habitat has influenced the evolution of mobbing call acoustic structure. I found that habitat is not a major contributor to the variation in acoustic structure seen across species and that other selective pressures such as body size may be more important. In my fourth chapter I present a new framework to understand the evolution of multimodal communication across species. I identify a unique constraint, the need for overlapping sensory systems, thresholds and cognitive abilities between sender and receiver in order for different forms of interspecific communication to evolve. Taken together, these chapters attempt to understand a signaling system from both an ecological and evolutionary perspective by examining each piece of the communication scheme.

  5. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  6. Call for Implementation Research Proposals: Health Information ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Chaitali Sinha

    2017-04-10

    Apr 10, 2017 ... Introduction. Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is pleased to announce a call for implementation research proposals to contribute to national and regional efforts to improve health systems responsiveness in West Africa (WA). Two separate but complementary thematic areas of ...

  7. Inhibitors of calling behavior of Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Akinori; Shigeta, Yoko; Eiraku, Tomohiko; Kuwano, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Some octopamine agonists were found to suppress the calling behavior of the stored product Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. Compounds were screened using a calling behavior bioassay using female P. interpunctella. Four active derivatives, with inhibitory activity at the nanomolar range, were identified in order of decreasing activity: 2-(1-phenylethylamino)-2-oxazoline > 2-(2-ethyl,6-methylanilino)oxazolidine > 2-(2-methyl benzylamino)-2-thiazoline > 2-(2,6-diethylanilino)thiazolidine. Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 15 compounds. Among the ten common-featured models generated by the program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, a hydrophobic aromatic and two hydrophobic aliphatic features was considered to be essential for inhibitory activity in the calling behavior. Active compounds mapped well onto all the hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, hydrophobic aromatic and hydrophobic aliphatic features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown not to achieve the energetically favorable conformation that is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3D common-feature pharmacophore models. The present studies demonstrate that inhibition of calling behavior is via an octopamine receptor.

  8. Inhibitors of calling behavior of Plodia interpunctella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hirashima

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Some octopamine agonists were found to suppress the calling behavior of the stored product Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. Compounds were screened using a calling behavior bioassay using female P. interpunctella. Four active derivatives, with inhibitory activity at the nanomolar range, were identified in order of decreasing activity: 2-(1-phenylethylamino-2-oxazoline > 2-(2-ethyl,6-methylanilinooxazolidine > 2-(2-methyl benzylamino-2-thiazoline > 2-(2,6-diethylanilinothiazolidine. Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 15 compounds. Among the ten common-featured models generated by the program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, a hydrophobic aromatic and two hydrophobic aliphatic features was considered to be essential for inhibitory activity in the calling behavior. Active compounds mapped well onto all the hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, hydrophobic aromatic and hydrophobic aliphatic features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown not to achieve the energetically favorable conformation that is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3D common-feature pharmacophore models. The present studies demonstrate that inhibition of calling behavior is via an octopamine receptor.

  9. Make a 21st century phone call

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Want to avoid roaming charges? Click to call anyone at CERN? How about merging your CERN landline with your existing smartphone? That's all easily done with Lync, CERN's new opt-in service that can take your calls to the next level.   The Lync application on Windows (left) and iPhone (right). Lync unites CERN's traditional telephone service with the digital sphere. "Lync gives you the gift of mobility, by letting you access your CERN landline on the go," explains Pawel Grzywaczewski, service manager of the Lync system. "Once you've registered your CERN telephone with the service, you can run the Lync application and make calls from a range of supported devices. No matter where you are in the world - be it simply out to lunch or off at an international conference - you can make a CERN call as though you were in the office. All you need is an Internet connection!" Following a recent upgrade, CERN's Lync service now has...

  10. Optimization of Overflow Policies in Call Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koole, G.M.; Nielsen, B.F.; Nielsen, T.B.

    2015-01-01

    We examine how overflow policies in a multi-skill call center should be designed to accommodate performance measures that depend on waiting time percentiles such as service level. This is done using a discrete Markovian approximation of the waiting time of the first customers waiting in line...... and customers are treated in a FCFS order....

  11. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Software: Evaluation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the nature and extent of the influence of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) on the quality of language learning is highly problematic. This is owing to the number and complexity of interacting variables involved in setting the items for teaching and learning languages. This paper identified and ...

  12. Reflections … they called it 'restructuring'[1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HMPG, and indeed publishing globally) was financial,[4] reflecting tough economic times and declining revenues from advertising. JA found herself accepting so-called 'native' advertising (the practice ... online, a change that has been welcomed by CPD participants) and with CME. Merged with SAMJ, the print CME carries ...

  13. Calling, is there anything special about it?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-15

    Jul 15, 2016 ... Christian frequently meant a break from family and a previous way of life. The decision to follow. Christ made the Christians outsiders to many facets of society, ..... reflected on these 'quantum changes in Christian ministry' and leadership. In a sense, this implies that the calling of a pastor has to be.

  14. Educational Use of Databases in CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the idea that databases are very useful tools for teaching languages over the Internet. Databases in Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) are commonly used in three ways: for reference sources such as dictionaries, in the management of large websites, and for data processing such as language tests and learners'…

  15. School-Turnaround Call Points Up Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. secretary of education's call to "turn around" the nation's 5,000 worst-performing schools has found a warm welcome among educators and policymakers who see that focus as long overdue. But it has also sparked debate about how--and whether--such an enormous leadership and management challenge can be accomplished. Secretary of…

  16. Don't Call it Poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    The IPJP is a joint project of Rhodes University in South Africa and Edith Cowan University in Australia. This document is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or in part via any medium (print, electronic or otherwise) without the express permission of the publishers. Invited Paper. Don't Call it Poetry.

  17. The function of migratory bird calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichl, Thomas; Andersen, Bent Bach; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    migration and to stimulate migratory restlessness in conspecifics. We wished to test if conspecific flight calls influence the flight direction of a nocturnal migrant, the European Robin (Erithacus rubecula), i.e. if flight calls help migrants keeping course. Wild caught birds showing migratory restlessness...... the experimental bird could be activated successively to simulate a migrating Robin cruising E-W, W-E, S-N or N-S at a chosen height (mostly about 40 m), at 10 m/s and emitting Robin flight calls of 80 dB(A) at 1 m. The simulated flight of a "ding" sound served as a control. During an experiment the bird was first...... allowed to settle and express migratory restlessness for at least 30 minutes. Secondly, the flight simulation axis (e.g. E-W or N-S) with the largest angle relative to the bird's migration course was chosen and "flights" of simulated calling conspecifics or the "ding" sound along this axis continued...

  18. A History of Commitment in CALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Joan

    The evolution of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is examined, focusing on what has changed and what has not changed much during that time. A variety of changes are noted: the development of multimedia capabilities, color, animation, and technical improvement of audio and video quality; availability of databases, better fit between…

  19. Web-Based CALL to Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Zhang, Ruiming

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated effectiveness of Web-based CALL on listening comprehension. Both students' academic performance and attitudes were examined. T-tests were used to analyze the results of students' academic performance. Descriptive statistics interpreted students' attitudes toward this learning. Students' participation was also recorded.…

  20. Bridging CALL & HCI: Input from Participatory Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Participatory design (PD), or the collaboration between software engineers and end users throughout the design process, may help improve CALL design practices. In this case study, four ESL learners, a software designer, and a language teacher created and evaluated a series of paper prototypes concerning help options in computer-based second…

  1. The TATL Framework for CALL Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Chiaráin, Neasa; Ni Chasaide, Ailbhe

    2015-01-01

    The Theory Actions Technology Learner context (TATL) framework provides an initial analysis tool to guide Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) development. It entails joint consideration of four key factors that need to be considered prior and during development activities: (1) the underlying pedagogical theory; (2) the learning tasks…

  2. Calling on Students without Fear and Loathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Terry

    1989-01-01

    One teacher adopted a language teacher's method of calling on students without causing embarrassment by moving quickly from one student to the next, not penalizing students who were unable to respond, praising freely, and using humor. The technique encourages participation and self-confidence. (MSE)

  3. A new device for step-down inhibitory avoidance task--effects of low and high frequency in a novel device for passive inhibitory avoidance task that avoids bioimpedance variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba Filho, Gilvan Luiz; Zenki, Kamila Cagliari; Kalinine, Eduardo; Baggio, Suelen; Pettenuzzo, Letícia; Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Weis, Simone Nardin; Calcagnotto, Maria Elisa; Onofre de Souza, Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Step-down inhibitory avoidance task has been widely used to evaluate aversive memory, but crucial parameters inherent to traditional devices that may influence the behavior analysis (as stimulus frequency, animal's bioimpedance) are frequently neglected. We developed a new device for step-down inhibitory avoidance task by modifying the shape and distribution of the stainless steel bars in the box floor where the stimuli are applied. The bars are 2 mm wide, with rectangular shape, arranged in pairs at intervals of 1cm from the next pairs. Each pair makes an electrical dipole where the polarity inverts after each pulse. This device also presents a component that acquires and records the exact current received by the animal foot and precisely controls the frequency of stimulus applied during the entire experiment. Different from conventional devices, this new apparatus increases the contact surface with bars and animal's paws, allowing the electric current pass through the animal's paws only, drastically reducing the influence of animal's bioimpedance. The analysis of recorded data showed that the current received by the animal was practically the same as applied, independent of the animal's body composition. Importantly, the aversive memory was observed at specific stimuli intensity and frequency (0.35 or 0.5 mA at 62 and 125 Hz but not at 0.20 mA or 20 Hz). Moreover, with this device it was possible to observe the well-known step-down inhibitory avoidance task memory impairment induced by guanosine. This new device offers a substantial improvement for behavioral analysis in step-down inhibitory avoidance task and allows us to precisely compare data from different animals with distinct body composition.

  4. A new device for step-down inhibitory avoidance task--effects of low and high frequency in a novel device for passive inhibitory avoidance task that avoids bioimpedance variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvan Luiz Borba Filho

    Full Text Available Step-down inhibitory avoidance task has been widely used to evaluate aversive memory, but crucial parameters inherent to traditional devices that may influence the behavior analysis (as stimulus frequency, animal's bioimpedance are frequently neglected.We developed a new device for step-down inhibitory avoidance task by modifying the shape and distribution of the stainless steel bars in the box floor where the stimuli are applied. The bars are 2 mm wide, with rectangular shape, arranged in pairs at intervals of 1cm from the next pairs. Each pair makes an electrical dipole where the polarity inverts after each pulse. This device also presents a component that acquires and records the exact current received by the animal foot and precisely controls the frequency of stimulus applied during the entire experiment.Different from conventional devices, this new apparatus increases the contact surface with bars and animal's paws, allowing the electric current pass through the animal's paws only, drastically reducing the influence of animal's bioimpedance. The analysis of recorded data showed that the current received by the animal was practically the same as applied, independent of the animal's body composition. Importantly, the aversive memory was observed at specific stimuli intensity and frequency (0.35 or 0.5 mA at 62 and 125 Hz but not at 0.20 mA or 20 Hz. Moreover, with this device it was possible to observe the well-known step-down inhibitory avoidance task memory impairment induced by guanosine.This new device offers a substantial improvement for behavioral analysis in step-down inhibitory avoidance task and allows us to precisely compare data from different animals with distinct body composition.

  5. Frequency primary regulation (FPR). Implications of the down stream flow variations. Operation methodology; Regulacion primaria de frecuencia (RPF). Implicancia por las variaciones del caudal aguas abajo. Metodologia de operacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morandi, Hector Enrique; Martelli, Jose Francisco [Ente Ejecutivo Presa Embalse Casa de Piedra, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: cdpba@impsat1.com.br

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the Frequency Primary Regulation - FPR, determining that the operator running of a hydroelectric power plant must observe a set of norms, actions, etc, aiming to reduce as much as possible the environmental impact following the important modifications introduced. The regulation of the water flux downstream is one of the priority imposed to the project of a hydroelectric power plant. The regulation also allows other benefits as follows: the use of potentially or effectively flooded increasing the productive area; the efficient operation of water influx for various uses; the elimination of crop losses due to lack of irrigation water during certain seasons.

  6. Long-distance calls in Neotropical primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilmar A.G. Oliveira

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance calls are widespread among primates. Several studies concentrate on such calls in just one or in few species, while few studies have treated more general trends within the order. The common features that usually characterize these vocalizations are related to long-distance propagation of sounds. The proposed functions of primate long-distance calls can be divided into extragroup and intragroup ones. Extragroup functions relate to mate defense, mate attraction or resource defense, while intragroup functions involve group coordination or alarm. Among Neotropical primates, several species perform long-distance calls that seem more related to intragroup coordination, markedly in atelines. Callitrichids present long-distance calls that are employed both in intragroup coordination and intergroup contests or spacing. Examples of extragroup directed long-distance calls are the duets of titi monkeys and the roars and barks of howler monkeys. Considerable complexity and gradation exist in the long-distance call repertoires of some Neotropical primates, and female long-distance calls are probably more important in non-duetting species than usually thought. Future research must focus on larger trends in the evolution of primate long-distance calls, including the phylogeny of calling repertoires and the relationships between form and function in these signals.Chamados de longo alcance são comuns em primatas. Muitas pesquisas enfocaram tais vocalizações em uma única ou em poucas espécies, enquanto poucos estudos lidaram com padrões mais gerais dentro da ordem. As características comuns que geralmente distinguem estas vocalizações são relacionadas com a transmissão de sons a longa distância. As funções propostas para estas vocalizações podem ser divididas entre intragrupais e extragrupais. Funções extragrupais se relacionam com a defesa e atração de parceiros sexuais ou com a defesa de recursos, enquanto as fun

  7. Peer support telephone calls for improving health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jeremy; Caramlau, Isabela O; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Williams, Susan M

    2008-10-08

    Peer support telephone calls have been used for a wide range of health-related concerns. However, little is known about their effects. To assess the effects of peer support telephone calls in terms of physical (e.g. blood pressure), psychological (e.g. depressive symptoms), and behavioural health outcomes (e.g. uptake of mammography) and other outcomes. We searched: The Cochrane Library databases (CENTRAL, DARE, CDSR) (issue 4 2007); MEDLINE (OVID) (January 1966 to December 2007); EMBASE (OVID) (January 1985 to December 2007); CINAHL (Athens) (January 1966 to December 2007), trials registers and reference lists of articles, with no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials of peer support interventions delivered by telephone call. Two review authors independently extracted data. We present results narratively and in tabular format. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity between studies. We included seven studies involving 2492 participants.Peer support telephone calls were associated with an increase in mammography screening, with 49% of women in the intervention group and 34% of women in the control group receiving a mammogram since the start of the intervention (P peer telephone support calls were found to maintain mammography screening uptake for baseline adherent women (P = 0.029).Peer support telephone calls for post myocardial infarction patients were associated at six months with a change in diet in the intervention and usual care groups of 54% and 44% respectively (P = 0.03). In another study for post myocardial infarction patients there were no significant differences between groups for self-efficacy, health status and mental health outcomes.Peer support telephone calls were associated with greater continuation of breastfeeding in mothers at 3 months post partum (P = 0.01).Peer support telephone calls were associated with reduced depressive symptoms in mothers with postnatal depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS

  8. Effects of traffic noise on the calling behavior of two Neotropical hylid frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechin, Sonia; Antunes, Rógger; Borges-Martins, Márcio

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance has been pointed to as one of the major causes of the world´s biodiversity crisis. Among them, noise pollution is a potential underestimated threat, projected to increase in the next decades accompanying urban expansion. Rising levels of noise pollution may result in negative impacts on species highly dependent on acoustic communication. Amphibians have long served as model organisms for investigating animal acoustic communication because their reproduction depends on transmitting and receiving acoustic signals. A few studies have investigated the effects of anthropogenic noise on anurans, but there is still limited knowledge on how it affects them. In this study, we test the effect of two intensities of traffic noise on calling males of two Neotropical treefrogs species. We expect to record more changes in call parameters, to avoid masking effect, at higher intensity noise treatments, and in the species with higher call/noise frequency overlap. We performed a set of field playback experiments exposing male frogs to road noise at two different intensities (65dB and 75dB). Focal species are Boana bischoffi (high call/noise frequency overlap) and B. leptolineata (low call/noise frequency overlap). Both species changed acoustic parameters during or after the exposure to traffic noise. Advertisement call rate of B. bischoffi decreased during road noise, and dominant frequency decreased over time. Call length of B. leptolineata increased or decreased, depending on the order of noise intensity. We also observed spatial displacement in both species, which moved away from the noise source. Our results provide evidence that traffic noise affects anuran calling behavior, and noise intensity is an important factor affecting how species respond. PMID:28854253

  9. Effects of traffic noise on the calling behavior of two Neotropical hylid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caorsi, Valentina Zaffaroni; Both, Camila; Cechin, Sonia; Antunes, Rógger; Borges-Martins, Márcio

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance has been pointed to as one of the major causes of the world´s biodiversity crisis. Among them, noise pollution is a potential underestimated threat, projected to increase in the next decades accompanying urban expansion. Rising levels of noise pollution may result in negative impacts on species highly dependent on acoustic communication. Amphibians have long served as model organisms for investigating animal acoustic communication because their reproduction depends on transmitting and receiving acoustic signals. A few studies have investigated the effects of anthropogenic noise on anurans, but there is still limited knowledge on how it affects them. In this study, we test the effect of two intensities of traffic noise on calling males of two Neotropical treefrogs species. We expect to record more changes in call parameters, to avoid masking effect, at higher intensity noise treatments, and in the species with higher call/noise frequency overlap. We performed a set of field playback experiments exposing male frogs to road noise at two different intensities (65dB and 75dB). Focal species are Boana bischoffi (high call/noise frequency overlap) and B. leptolineata (low call/noise frequency overlap). Both species changed acoustic parameters during or after the exposure to traffic noise. Advertisement call rate of B. bischoffi decreased during road noise, and dominant frequency decreased over time. Call length of B. leptolineata increased or decreased, depending on the order of noise intensity. We also observed spatial displacement in both species, which moved away from the noise source. Our results provide evidence that traffic noise affects anuran calling behavior, and noise intensity is an important factor affecting how species respond.

  10. Detection and Classification of Baleen Whale Foraging Calls Combining Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    of these elements should decrease in time if the contour is a foraging call. Two nearby elements in the ridge represent a segment . A ridge needs to... segment must be less than 7 Hz since a dramatic frequency discontinuity is most likely due to two sound sources accidentally connected by the bridges...ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) A three- step approach has been developed for detecting and classifying the foraging calls of the blue whale

  11. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  12. Voltage, Temperature, Frequency Margin Test Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the tests is to establish the camera functionality when it is exposed to an extreme environment for prolonged periods, thus simulating the end of life performance. This environment covers temperature, input clock frequency and supply voltage variation......The purpose of the tests is to establish the camera functionality when it is exposed to an extreme environment for prolonged periods, thus simulating the end of life performance. This environment covers temperature, input clock frequency and supply voltage variation...

  13. Patterns of acoustic variation in Cicada barbara Stål (Hemiptera, Cicadoidea) from the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Juma, G A; Seabra, S G; Quartau, J A

    2008-02-01

    Field recordings of the calling song and of an amplitude modulated signal produced by males of Cicada barbara from North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula were analysed in order to assess the geographical acoustic variation and the potential usefulness of acoustic data in the discrimination of subspecies and populations. Sound recordings were digitized and the frequency and temporal properties of the calls of each cicada were analysed. In all regions studied, peak frequency, quartiles 25, 50 and 75% and syllable rate showed low coefficients of variation suggesting inherent static properties. All frequency variables were correlated with the latitude, decreasing from south to north. In addition, most acoustic variables of the calling song showed significant differences between regions, and PCA and DFA analyses supported a partitioning within this species between Iberian Peninsula+Ceuta and Morocco, corroborating mtDNA data on the same species. Therefore, the subspecific division of C. barbara into C. barbara barbara from Morocco and C. barbara lusitanica from Portugal, Spain and Ceuta finds support from the present acoustic analyses, a result which is also reinforced by molecular markers.

  14. Time-frequency learning machines

    OpenAIRE

    Honeiné, Paul; Richard, Cédric; Flandrin, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    12 pages, 5 figures. To appear in IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing; Over the last decade, the theory of reproducing kernels has made a major breakthrough in the field of pattern recognition. It has led to new algorithms, with improved performance and lower computational cost, for non-linear analysis in high dimensional feature spaces. Our paper is a further contribution which extends the framework of the so-called kernel learning machines to time-frequency analysis, showing that some sp...

  15. 47 CFR 22.921 - 911 call processing procedures; 911-only calling mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... calling mode. 22.921 Section 22.921 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON... procedures; 911-only calling mode. Mobile telephones manufactured after February 13, 2000 that are capable of operating in the analog mode described in the standard document ANSI TIA/EIA-553-A-1999 Mobile Station—Base...

  16. Cross-sectional analysis of patient phone calls to an inflammatory bowel disease clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Juan E.; Yarur, Andres J.; Diaz, Liege; Simmons, Okeefe L.; Sussman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) require close follow up and frequently utilize healthcare services. We aimed to identify the main reasons that prompted patient calls to gastroenterology providers and further characterize the “frequent callers”. Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study included all phone calls registered in medical records of IBD patients during 2012. Predictive variables included demographics, psychiatric history, IBD phenotype, disease complications and medical therapies. Primary outcome was the reason for call (symptoms, medication refill, procedures and appointment issues). Secondary outcome was the frequency of changes in management prompted by the call. Results 209 patients participated in 526 calls. The mean number of calls per patient was 2.5 (range 0-27); 49 (23.4%) patients met the criterion of “frequent caller”. Frequent callers made or received 75.9% of all calls. Crohn’s disease, anxiety, extra-intestinal manifestations and high sedimentation rate were significantly associated with higher call volume. 85.7% of frequent callers had at least one call that prompted a therapeutic intervention, compared to 18.9% of non-frequent callers (Pchange in management may improve healthcare delivery. PMID:26126710

  17. BUSINESS MODELS FOR EXTENDING OF 112 EMERGENCY CALL CENTER CAPABILITIES WITH E-CALL FUNCTION INSERTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Dragos Paul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article concerns present status of implementation in Romania and Europe of eCall service and the proposed business models regarding eCall function implementation in Romania. eCall system is used for reliable transmission in case of crush between In Vehicle System and Public Service Answering Point, via the voice channel of cellular and Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN. eCall service could be initiated automatically or manual the driver. All data presented in this article are part of researches made by authors in the Sectorial Contract Implementation study regarding eCall system, having as partners ITS Romania and Electronic Solution, with the Romanian Ministry of Communication and Information Technology as beneficiary.

  18. Bat calls while preying: A method for reconstructing the signal emitted by a directional sound source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guarato, Francesco; Hallam, John

    2010-01-01

    directivity affects recordings and not all bat species are able to carry such a device. Instead, remote microphone recordings of the bat calls could be processed by means of a mathematical method that estimates bat head orientation as a first step before calculating the amplitudes of each call for each...... frequency. This approach considers bat position with respect to each microphone, directivity, and head orientation for compensating microphone recordings of bat calls. The method has been tested in a laboratory environment using data from a Polaroid transducer as sound source: results are presented...... and discussed. A further improvement of the method is necessary as its performance for call reconstruction strongly depends on correct choice of the sample at which the recorded call is thought to start in each microphone data set....

  19. What is that Thing Called Computer Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Nadya Schokosva; Irina Buskova

    2013-01-01

    XXI century society, called Knowledge Society, has a direct dependency of the software products, considered by many as the most important development of modern technology. This dependence generates the need of scientists and professionals who research and develop products that meet social demands. This article describes the computer science area as one of the most demanded professions in this reality, and in order to make it known to more people.

  20. What is that Thing Called Computer Science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya Schokosva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available XXI century society, called Knowledge Society, has a direct dependency of the software products, considered by many as the most important development of modern technology. This dependence generates the need of scientists and professionals who research and develop products that meet social demands. This article describes the computer science area as one of the most demanded professions in this reality, and in order to make it known to more people.

  1. Sleep Inertia and On-Call Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    effects of polyphasic & M.J. Colligan (Eds.), New York, and ultrashort sleep schedules. In: Why Spectrum, pp. 553-580. we nap, Evolution, Chronobiology...and Naitoh, P., Kelly, T., & Babkoff, H. (1993) Functions of Polyphasic and Ultrashort Sleep inertia, best time not to wake up? Sleep , C. Stampi Editor...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010467 TITLE: Sleep Inertia and On-Call Readiness DISTRIBUTION: Approved

  2. Sophie Calle: entre imagens e palavras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annateresa Fabris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A relação de Sophie Calle com dois textos ficcionais, de autoria de Hervé Guibert e Paul Auster, permite discutir um ponto central de sua poética: a atuação como performer, colocada por alguns críticos sob o signo do situacionismo. Como suas performances envolvem uma narrativa, foram analisados seus aspectos fotográficos e verbais, tendo como epicentro Suíte veneziana (1980. Qual o papel da fotografia nas narrativas de Calle, nas quais ela é personagem de si mesma? A fotografia é vestígio de acontecimentos reais e seu aspecto documental corrobora a neutralidade dos relatos escritos. É, ao mesmo tempo, fruto de um gesto performático, o qual, ao designar determinados fatos, converte a realidade em imagem.Sophie Calle's relation to two fictional texts, by Hervé Guibert and Paul Auster, allows us to discuss a central issue in her poetics: the acting as a performer, set by some critics under the sign of Situationism. As her performances comprise a narrative, both their verbal and photographic aspects were analyzed, taking as an epicenter the Venetian suite (1980. What role does photography play in Calle's narratives, in which she is a character of herself? Photography is a trace of real happenings and its documental aspect supports the neutrality of written reports. It is, at the same time, the result of a performative gesture, which, while designating certain facts, converts reality into image.

  3. Managing Capacity at Sparsh Call Centre

    OpenAIRE

    T. T. Niranjan; Samir K. Srivastava

    2008-01-01

    Bangalore based Sparsh Call Centre was set up as a subsidiary of the major telecom software company IP-Trinity, with ambitious plans of becoming a significant player in the booming BPO (business process outsourcing) space. Its strategy, in line with that of its parent group, was to focus on telecom related services. Sparsh began its operations in 2002 with its first client Alfa, a US based VOIP telephone service provider and had three other accounts and employed over 400 people. Financial per...

  4. [Work-family conflict in call center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Ricotta, Simona; Colombo, Lara

    2012-01-01

    The working environment of call centers, which have seen a significant growth in recent years, has been the subject of several studies aiming at understanding its specific dynamics, with particular attention to the possible causes of stress and discomfort. Despite the fact that the work-family conflict is considered a source of stress responsible for undermining workers' well-being, and as such has been explored in many work environments, there is still very little research specific to call centers. This study had the following aims: to explore work-family conflict perceived by call-center operators taking account of any differences related to respondents'professional and personal characteristics; to understand which demands and resources can have an impact on work-family conflict in this context. The study was carried out on a sample of 898 call center operators in a telecommunications company through the administration of a self-reporting questionnaire. Data analysis included: t-test, one-way analysis of variance, linear correlations and multiple regressions. A higher perception of work-family conflict among workers having a full-time contract was observed compared to those having part-time contracts. Multiple regression analysis identified as sources of influence on work-family conflict: emotional dissonance, uneasiness due customer dissatisfaction, workload, avoidance coping and working hours. Work-family conflict in the context studied is not particularly critical: it is in part influenced by professional and personal characteristics of respondents and primarily caused by work demands. Managerial implications are discussed, especially referred to training activities.

  5. Workshop on Alcohol Use and Health Disparities 2002: a call to arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Denise; Purohit, Vishnudutt; Foudin, Laurie; Salin, Marvin

    2004-01-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored a "Workshop on Alcohol Use and Health Disparities 2002: A Call to Arms," on December 5, 2002, in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. This workshop was part of the NIAAA/NIH comprehensive strategic plan to reduce, and ultimately eliminate, health disparities. Eleven topics were addressed: (1). biomedical risk factors that may contribute to disparities in the toxic effects of alcohol; (2). alcohol and gene-environment interactions that affect the health of diverse groups; (3). alcohol pharmacogenetics in Mexican-Americans; (4). determinants of risk for alcoholism in minority populations; (5). consideration of population groups in linkage-disequilibrium studies to identify genes associated with alcohol dependence; (6). interaction between alcohol dependence and African-American ethnicity in disordered sleep, nocturnal cytokines, and immunity; (7). disparities of brain functional reserve capacity affecting brain morbidity related to substance abuse; (8). alcohol and pregnancy disparities; (9). role of alcohol in cancer risk disparities; (10). ethnic diversity in alcoholic cardiomyopathy; and (11). postmenopausal health disparities. On the basis of these presentations, seven conclusions emerged: (1). Genetic variations in alcohol-metabolizing enzymes exist in various populations. (2). These enzymes play a role in the variation in health effect outcomes seen in different populations, owing to alcohol consumption. (3). Differences between and among population groups can be critically important for the design and interpretation of studies in genetics. These include differences in expression of phenotype, in locus heterogeneity, in risk alleles, and in population structure. (4). Incidence rates for fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are greater in African-Americans and Native-Americans than in Caucasians. Genetic polymorphisms, nutrition, and

  6. Evaluating erroneous offside calls in soccer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hüttermann

    Full Text Available The ability to simultaneously attend to multiple objects declines with increases in the visual angle separating distant objects. We explored whether these laboratory-measured limits on visual attentional spread generalize to a real life context: offside calls by soccer assistant referees. We coded all offside calls from a full year of first division German soccer matches. By determining the x-y coordinates of the relevant players and assistant referee on the soccer field we were able to calculate how far assistant referees had to spread their visual attention to perform well. Counterintuitively, assistant referees made fewer errors when they were farther away from the action due to an advantageous (smaller visual angle on the game action. The pattern held even when we accounted for individual differences in a laboratory-based attentional spread measure of ten of the assistant referees. Our finding that errors are linked to smaller visual angles may explain the complaints of fans in some situations: Those seated directly behind the assistant referee, further from the players, might actually have it easier to make the right call because the relevant players would form a smaller visual angle.

  7. “Computer Assisted Language Learning” (CALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlı Gündüz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will provide an overview of computers; an overview of the history of CALL, itspros and cons, the internet, World Wide Web, Multimedia, and research related to the uses of computers in the language classroom. Also, it also aims to provide some background for the beginnerson using the Internet in language classes today. It discusses some of the common types of Internetactivities that are being used today, what the minimum requirements are for using the Internet forlanguage learning, and some easy activities you can adapt for your classes. Some special terminology related to computers will also be used in this paper. For example, computer assisted language learning(CALL refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work in the language classroom. It should be borne in mind that CALL does not refer to the use of acomputer by a teacher to type out a worksheet or a class list or preparing his/her own teaching alone.Hardware refers to any computer equipment used, including the computer itself, the keyboard, screen (or the monitor, the disc-drive, and the printer. Software (computer programs refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work.

  8. Evaluating erroneous offside calls in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttermann, Stefanie; Noël, Benjamin; Memmert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously attend to multiple objects declines with increases in the visual angle separating distant objects. We explored whether these laboratory-measured limits on visual attentional spread generalize to a real life context: offside calls by soccer assistant referees. We coded all offside calls from a full year of first division German soccer matches. By determining the x-y coordinates of the relevant players and assistant referee on the soccer field we were able to calculate how far assistant referees had to spread their visual attention to perform well. Counterintuitively, assistant referees made fewer errors when they were farther away from the action due to an advantageous (smaller) visual angle on the game action. The pattern held even when we accounted for individual differences in a laboratory-based attentional spread measure of ten of the assistant referees. Our finding that errors are linked to smaller visual angles may explain the complaints of fans in some situations: Those seated directly behind the assistant referee, further from the players, might actually have it easier to make the right call because the relevant players would form a smaller visual angle.

  9. Research study on call centres in Malta & Gozo

    OpenAIRE

    Gatt & Partners;

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the Call Centre sector in Malta. A Call Centre is a centralized office used for the purpose of receiving and transmitting a large volume of requests, mainly by telephone. Types of calls are often divided into Outbound & Inbound. Inbound calls are calls that are initiated by the customer to obtain information, report a malfunction or ask for help. This is substantially different from outbound calls where the agent initiates the call to a customer mostly wit...

  10. Study protocol of the YOU CALL - WE CALL TRIAL: impact of a multimodal support intervention after a "mild" stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo Gina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 60% of new strokes each year are "mild" in severity and this proportion is expected to rise in the years to come. Within our current health care system those with "mild" stroke are typically discharged home within days, without further referral to health or rehabilitation services other than advice to see their family physician. Those with mild stroke often have limited access to support from health professionals with stroke-specific knowledge who would typically provide critical information on topics such as secondary stroke prevention, community reintegration, medication counselling and problem solving with regard to specific concerns that arise. Isolation and lack of knowledge may lead to a worsening of health problems including stroke recurrence and unnecessary and costly health care utilization. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness, for individuals who experience a first "mild" stroke, of a sustainable, low cost, multimodal support intervention (comprising information, education and telephone support - "WE CALL" compared to a passive intervention (providing the name and phone number of a resource person available if they feel the need to - "YOU CALL", on two primary outcomes: unplanned-use of health services for negative events and quality of life. Method/Design We will recruit 384 adults who meet inclusion criteria for a first mild stroke across six Canadian sites. Baseline measures will be taken within the first month after stroke onset. Participants will be stratified according to comorbidity level and randomised to one of two groups: YOU CALL or WE CALL. Both interventions will be offered over a six months period. Primary outcomes include unplanned use of heath services for negative event (frequency calendar and quality of life (EQ-5D and Quality of Life Index. Secondary outcomes include participation level (LIFE-H, depression (Beck Depression Inventory II and use of health services for

  11. Analysis of the Variation Potential Induced by Wounding in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    G., Roblin; Universite de Poitiers, Station Biologique de Beau-Site

    1985-01-01

    Following burning of a leaf portion, a bioelectrical wave called "variation potential" spread throughout the whole plant. Bioelectrical variations are recorded by two types of electrodes (platinum wires and Ag/AgCl nonpolarizable electrodes) in the stem of Vicia faba and in the petiole of Lycopersicon esculentum and Mimosa pudica. The time course of the variation potential thus recorded can be divided into two components respectrvely called components "A" and "B". Component A looks like a neg...

  12. Population characteristics may reduce the levels of individual call identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Delgado

    Full Text Available Individual variability influences the demographic and evolutionary dynamics of spatially structured populations, and conversely ecological and evolutionary dynamics provide the context under which variations at the individual level occur. Therefore, it is essential to identify and characterize the importance of the different factors that may promote or hinder individual variability. Animal signaling is a prime example of a type of behavior that is largely dependent on both the features of individuals and the characteristics of the population to which they belong. After 10 years studying the dynamics of a population of a long-lived species, the eagle owl (Bubo bubo, we investigated the emergence and maintenance of traits that reveal individual identity by focusing on vocal features. We found that individuals inhabiting a high density population characterized by a relative lack of heterogeneity (in terms of prey availability and breeding success among breeding sites might be selected for reducing the levels of identity. Two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses may explain the structural call patterns we detected: (1 similarity in calls may be principally a consequence of the particular characteristics of the population; and (2 high density may encourage individuals to mimic each other's vocalizations in a cascade effect, leading to a widespread and unique communication network.

  13. Changes in How Students Use and Are Called Homophobic Epithets over Time: Patterns Predicted by Gender, Bullying, and Victimization Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; O'Dwyer, Laura M.; Mereish, Ethan H.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study tested for changes in how students used and were called homophobic epithets as they progressed through high school. Boys used and were called these epithets with increased frequency over time, whereas girls reported decreases on both. Distinct gender socialization processes may contribute to these different patterns for…

  14. Applying the new method of time-frequency transforms to the analysis of the characteristics of geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinsky, N. R.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Gromova, L. I.

    2017-09-01

    This study considers the possibility of using the new methods of time-frequency transforms, such as chirplet and warblet transforms, to analyze the digital observational data of geomagnetic pulsations of Pc5 type. For this purpose, necessary algorithms of calculation and appropriate software were developed. The chirplet transform method (CT) is used to analyze signals with a linear frequency modulation. A chirplet variation, the so-called warblet transform, is used to analyze signals with a nonlinear frequency modulation. Since, in studying geomagnetic pulsations, it is difficult to make assumptions on the character of the behavior of the instantaneous frequency of the signal, the special generalized warblet transform (GWT) was used for the analysis. The GWT has a high spatiotemporal resolution and was developed to analyze oscillations both with a periodic and nonperiodic change of the instantaneous frequency. The software developed for GWT calculation was used to study daytime geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations with durations of several hours that were detected via the network of ground-based magnetometers of the Scandinavian IMAGE profile during the magnetic storm of May 29-30, 2003. For the first time, temporal variations of the instantaneous frequency of geomagnetic pulsations are determined and their possible use in studying the fine spatial structure of Pc5 waves is shown.

  15. Classification of large acoustic datasets using machine learning and crowdsourcing: Application to whale calls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamir, L.; Carol Yerby, C.; Simpson, R.; Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von; Tyack, P.; Samarra, F.; Miller, P.; Wallin, J.

    2014-01-01

    Vocal communication is a primary communication method of killer and pilot whales, and is used for transmitting a broad range of messages and information for short and long distance. The large variation in call types of these species makes it challenging to categorize them. In this study, sounds

  16. Sharing programming resources between Bio* projects through remote procedure call and native call stack strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prins, Pjotr; Goto, Naohisa; Yates, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    , and languages sharing the Java Virtual Machine stack. This functionality provides strategies for sharing of software between Bio* projects, which can be exploited more often. Here, we present cross-language examples for sequence translation, and measure throughput of the different options. We compare calling...... into R through native R, RSOAP, Rserve, and RPy interfaces, with the performance of native BioPerl, Biopython, BioJava, and BioRuby implementations, and with call stack bindings to BioJava and the European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite. In general, call stack approaches outperform native Bio...

  17. Chick Begging Calls Reflect Degree of Hunger in Three Auk Species (Charadriiformes: Alcidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V Klenova

    Full Text Available Begging behaviour is an important element in the parent-offspring conflict; it has been studied in many avian species. However, the majority of the studies have been entirely based on the call counts, and they agreed that vocal activity was a good indicator of chick's nutritional need and/or condition. Fewer researches were dedicated to the temporal-frequency variables of the begging calls themselves and they showed contrary results. Here begging behaviour in three burrow nested, uniparous species of auks (Alcidae was studied. These objects provide an opportunity to study the signalling value of begging calls in the absence of important confounding factors such as nestling competition and predation pressure. I recorded calls of individual chicks in two conditions: during natural feeding and after experimental four-hour food deprivation. I found that almost all measured acoustic variables contain information about the chick's state in all studied species. The hungry chicks produced calls higher in fundamental frequency and power variables and at higher calling rate compared to naturally feeding chicks. The effect of food deprivation on most acoustic variables exceeded both the effects of individuality and species. In all studied species, the frequency variables were stronger affected by hunger than the calling rate and call durations. I suppose that such strong change of acoustic variables after food deprivation can be explained by absence of vocal individual identification in these birds. As parents do not need to check individuality of the chick in the burrow, which they find visually during the day time, the chicks could use all of the acoustic variables to communicate about their nutritional needs.

  18. Time-frequency Representations Application in Psychological Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REIZ Romulus

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A psychological test is a test that is designed to measure one aspect of human behavior. These tests are usually designed to evaluate a person’s ability to complete tasks that were individual's performance on certain tasks that have usually been requested in advance. Usually a test score is used to compare with other results to measure the individual’s performance regarding cognitive ability, aptitude, personality, etc. One such test is the so called “finger tapping” test, designed to measure the integrity of the neuromuscular system and examine motor control. There are several ways to perform such a test. The purpose of this paper isn’t to study the finger tapping test which is well documented in the literature, but to develop if possible a simple way of performing such a test. Using the method presented in the paper a nonstationary signal was obtained and it was analyzed using the Short-time Fourier time frequency representation to obtain the signals frequency and its variation in time. The results presented in the paper show that this method can be used to perform the test and the frequency and spatial amplitude of the obtained tapping signal can be determined easily.

  19. Early Breast Cancer Diagnosis Using Microwave Imaging via Space-Frequency Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Spandana

    The conventional breast cancer detection methods have limitations ranging from ionizing radiations, low specificity to high cost. These limitations make way for a suitable alternative called Microwave Imaging, as a screening technique in the detection of breast cancer. The discernible differences between the benign, malignant and healthy breast tissues and the ability to overcome the harmful effects of ionizing radiations make microwave imaging, a feasible breast cancer detection technique. Earlier studies have shown the variation of electrical properties of healthy and malignant tissues as a function of frequency and hence stimulates high bandwidth requirement. A Ultrawideband, Wideband and Narrowband arrays have been designed, simulated and optimized for high (44%), medium (33%) and low (7%) bandwidths respectively, using the EM (electromagnetic software) called FEKO. These arrays are then used to illuminate the breast model (phantom) and the received backscattered signals are obtained in the near field for each case. The Microwave Imaging via Space-Time (MIST) beamforming algorithm in the frequency domain, is next applied to these near field backscattered monostatic frequency response signals for the image reconstruction of the breast model. The main purpose of this investigation is to access the impact of bandwidth and implement a novel imaging technique for use in the early detection of breast cancer. Earlier studies show the implementation of the MIST imaging algorithm on the time domain signals via a frequency domain beamformer. The performance evaluation of the imaging algorithm on the frequency response signals has been carried out in the frequency domain. The energy profile of the breast in the spatial domain is created via the frequency domain Parseval's theorem. The beamformer weights calculated using these the MIST algorithm (not including the effect of the skin) has been calculated for Ultrawideband, Wideband and Narrowband arrays, respectively

  20. Calling patterns in human communication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-29

    Modern technologies not only provide a variety of communication modes (e.g., texting, cell phone conversation, and online instant messaging), but also detailed electronic traces of these communications between individuals. These electronic traces indicate that the interactions occur in temporal bursts. Here, we study intercall duration of communications of the 100,000 most active cell phone users of a Chinese mobile phone operator. We confirm that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution with an exponential cutoff at the population level but find differences when focusing on individual users. We apply statistical tests at the individual level and find that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution for only 3,460 individuals (3.46%). The intercall durations for the majority (73.34%) follow a Weibull distribution. We quantify individual users using three measures: out-degree, percentage of outgoing calls, and communication diversity. We find that the cell phone users with a power-law duration distribution fall into three anomalous clusters: robot-based callers, telecom fraud, and telephone sales. This information is of interest to both academics and practitioners, mobile telecom operators in particular. In contrast, the individual users with a Weibull duration distribution form the fourth cluster of ordinary cell phone users. We also discover more information about the calling patterns of these four clusters (e.g., the probability that a user will call the c(r)-th most contact and the probability distribution of burst sizes). Our findings may enable a more detailed analysis of the huge body of data contained in the logs of massive users.

  1. First Class Call Stacks: Exploring Head Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Johnson-Freyd

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weak-head normalization is inconsistent with functional extensionality in the call-by-name λ-calculus. We explore this problem from a new angle via the conflict between extensionality and effects. Leveraging ideas from work on the λ-calculus with control, we derive and justify alternative operational semantics and a sequence of abstract machines for performing head reduction. Head reduction avoids the problems with weak-head reduction and extensionality, while our operational semantics and associated abstract machines show us how to retain weak-head reduction's ease of implementation.

  2. SEE: improving nurse-patient communications and preventing software piracy in nurse call applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2012-06-01

    Nurse call system is an electrically functioning system by which patients can call upon from a bedside station or from a duty station. An intermittent tone shall be heard and a corridor lamp located outside the room starts blinking with a slow or a faster rate depending on the call origination. It is essential to alert nurses on time so that they can offer care and comfort without any delay. There are currently many devices available for a nurse call system to improve communication between nurses and patients such as pagers, RFID (radio frequency identification) badges, wireless phones and so on. To integrate all these devices into an existing nurse call system and make they communicate with each other, we propose software client applications called bridges in this paper. We also propose a window server application called SEE (Supervised Event Executive) that delivers messages among these devices. A single hardware dongle is utilized for authentication and copy protection for SEE. Protecting SEE with securities provided by dongle only is a weak defense against hackers. In this paper, we develop some defense patterns for hackers such as calculating checksums in runtime, making calls to dongle from multiple places in code and handling errors properly by logging them into database.

  3. Efficient frequency response analysis of structures with viscoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Eric Dexter

    Noise and vibration levels in structures like automobiles and aircraft have been reduced through the application of viscoelastic materials (VEMs) as damping treatments for many years [18, 34, 37]. Adding a VEM to a structure makes accurate prediction of a structure's response to harmonic excitations challenging. This is because the VEM's properties, including the Young's modulus, damping coefficient, and shear modulus, vary significantly as functions of both frequency of excitation and temperature [34]. The solution algorithm presented in this research takes advantage of the fact that the VEM properties typically vary smoothly with frequency by interpolating VEM property variations between known values at perhaps a half dozen frequencies. The typical finite element (FE) discretization targeted by this work has millions of FE degrees of freedom in order to obtain acceptable accuracy over the frequency range of interest and is typically solved at hundreds of frequencies for tens to hundreds of load cases. Accurate approximate solutions to this large frequency response problem (FRP) can be computed efficiently on an approximating subspace. To decrease the cost of factoring the resulting reduced FRP at every frequency, the dimension of the approximating subspace is minimized by replacing hundreds to thousands of eigenvectors with a significantly smaller number of enrichment vectors called residual flexibility vectors (RFVs), damping deformation vectors (DDVs), and dynamic response vectors (DRVs). The RFVs and DDVs represent quasistatic response to loads and to dashpot forces, respectively, and including RFVs and DDVs in the approximating subspace is a common industrial practice. The use of DRVs, which are corrections to approximate solutions of the FRP at select frequencies, is new. Because computing DRVs is very expensive on the FE subspace, we accurately approximate DRVs in a reduced subspace associated with the automated multilevel substructuring (AMLS) method. Also

  4. Red shift, blue shift: investigating Doppler shifts, blubber thickness, and migration as explanations of seasonal variation in the tonality of Antarctic blue whale song.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S Miller

    Full Text Available The song of Antarctic blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia comprises repeated, stereotyped, low-frequency calls. Measurements of these calls from recordings spanning many years have revealed a long-term linear decline as well as an intra-annual pattern in tonal frequency. While a number of hypotheses for this long-term decline have been investigated, including changes in population structure, changes in the physical environment, and changes in the behaviour of the whales, there have been relatively few attempts to explain the intra-annual pattern. An additional hypothesis that has not yet been investigated is that differences in the observed frequency from each call are due to the Doppler effect. The assumptions and implications of the Doppler effect on whale song are investigated using 1 vessel-based acoustic recordings of Antarctic blue whales with simultaneous observation of whale movement and 2 long-term acoustic recordings from both the subtropics and Antarctic. Results from vessel-based recordings of Antarctic blue whales indicate that variation in peak-frequency between calls produced by an individual whale was greater than would be expected by the movement of the whale alone. Furthermore, analysis of intra-annual frequency shift at Antarctic recording stations indicates that the Doppler effect is unlikely to fully explain the observations of intra-annual pattern in the frequency of Antarctic blue whale song. However, data do show cyclical changes in frequency in conjunction with season, thus suggesting that there might be a relationship among tonal frequency, body condition, and migration to and from Antarctic feeding grounds.

  5. Red shift, blue shift: investigating Doppler shifts, blubber thickness, and migration as explanations of seasonal variation in the tonality of Antarctic blue whale song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian S; Leaper, Russell; Calderan, Susannah; Gedamke, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The song of Antarctic blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) comprises repeated, stereotyped, low-frequency calls. Measurements of these calls from recordings spanning many years have revealed a long-term linear decline as well as an intra-annual pattern in tonal frequency. While a number of hypotheses for this long-term decline have been investigated, including changes in population structure, changes in the physical environment, and changes in the behaviour of the whales, there have been relatively few attempts to explain the intra-annual pattern. An additional hypothesis that has not yet been investigated is that differences in the observed frequency from each call are due to the Doppler effect. The assumptions and implications of the Doppler effect on whale song are investigated using 1) vessel-based acoustic recordings of Antarctic blue whales with simultaneous observation of whale movement and 2) long-term acoustic recordings from both the subtropics and Antarctic. Results from vessel-based recordings of Antarctic blue whales indicate that variation in peak-frequency between calls produced by an individual whale was greater than would be expected by the movement of the whale alone. Furthermore, analysis of intra-annual frequency shift at Antarctic recording stations indicates that the Doppler effect is unlikely to fully explain the observations of intra-annual pattern in the frequency of Antarctic blue whale song. However, data do show cyclical changes in frequency in conjunction with season, thus suggesting that there might be a relationship among tonal frequency, body condition, and migration to and from Antarctic feeding grounds.

  6. Courtship food-calling in Burmese red junglefowl : III. Factors influencing the male's behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, HS; Hogan, JA

    Food-calling is a display performed by male fowl during courtship. Tn a series of experiments with adult male junglefowl, we manipulated food deprivation. variety of food available, sexual experience, familiarity with a female, and familiarity with the environment. We measured the frequency and

  7. Probabilistic base calling of Solexa sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iseli Christian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solexa/Illumina short-read ultra-high throughput DNA sequencing technology produces millions of short tags (up to 36 bases by parallel sequencing-by-synthesis of DNA colonies. The processing and statistical analysis of such high-throughput data poses new challenges; currently a fair proportion of the tags are routinely discarded due to an inability to match them to a reference sequence, thereby reducing the effective throughput of the technology. Results We propose a novel base calling algorithm using model-based clustering and probability theory to identify ambiguous bases and code them with IUPAC symbols. We also select optimal sub-tags using a score based on information content to remove uncertain bases towards the ends of the reads. Conclusion We show that the method improves genome coverage and number of usable tags as compared with Solexa's data processing pipeline by an average of 15%. An R package is provided which allows fast and accurate base calling of Solexa's fluorescence intensity files and the production of informative diagnostic plots.

  8. Electronic Cigarette Exposure: Calls to Wisconsin Poison Control Centers, 2010–2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Debora; Tomasallo, Carrie D; Meiman, Jon G; Creswell, Paul D; Melstrom, Paul C; Gummin, David D; Patel, Disa J; Michaud, Nancy T; Sebero, Heather A; Anderson, Henry A

    2016-12-01

    E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine and flavorings by aerosol and have been marketed in the United States since 2007. Because e-cigarettes have increased in popularity, toxicity potential from device misuse and malfunction also has increased. National data indicate that during 2010–2014, exposure calls to US poison control centers increased only 0.3% for conventional cigarette exposures, whereas calls increased 41.7% for e-cigarette exposures. We characterized cigarette and e-cigarette exposure calls to the Wisconsin Poison Center January 1, 2010 through October 10, 2015. We compared cigarette and e-cigarette exposure calls by exposure year, demographic characteristics, caller site, exposure site, exposure route, exposure reason, medical outcome, management site, and level of care at a health care facility. During January 2010 to October 2015, a total of 98 e-cigarette exposure calls were reported, and annual exposure calls increased approximately 17-fold, from 2 to 35. During the same period, 671 single-exposure cigarette calls with stable annual call volumes were reported. E-cigarette exposure calls were associated with children aged ≤5 years (57/98, 58.2%) and adults aged ≥20 years (30/98, 30.6%). Cigarette exposure calls predominated among children aged ≤5 years (643/671, 95.8%). The frequency of e-cigarette exposure calls to the Wisconsin Poison Center has increased and is highest among children aged ≤5 years and adults. Strategies are warranted to prevent future poisonings from these devices, including nicotine warning labels and public advisories to keep e-cigarettes away from children.

  9. Determinants of cruise passengers’ expenditures in the port of call

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maršenka Marksel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cruise tourism generates different types of cruise consumption and related indirect, direct and induced expenditure effects, in homeports as well as in ports of call. Cruise passengers’ expenditures produce positive economic effects for destinations, from increasing the incomes and employment, to tax incomes, duties, etc. Therefore, it is no doubt that cruise stakeholders and local economies can benefit from increased cruise passenger consumption. To stimulate higher consumption and passengers’ satisfaction, it is necessary to design the supportive policy framework and build appropriate quality of products and services. Identifying influential variables of cruise passengers’ expenditures in this sense enables the design of appropriate policies and measures. In the current research, based on a survey of 357 cruise passengers, several variables included in a new theoretical model of the expenditures determinants, such as gender, nationality, frequency of cruising and frequency of visits, were found to be statistically significantly associated with cruise passengers’ expenditures. Several conclusions and suggestions to stimulate cruise passenger expenditures based on research findings are provided.

  10. Cumulative frequency distribution of past species extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of Sepkoski's compendium of the time ranges of 30,000+ taxa yields a mean duration of 28.4 ma for genera of fossil invertebrates. This converts to an average extinction rate of 3.5 percent per million years or about one percent every 286,000 years. Using survivorship techniques, these estimates can be converted to the species level, yielding a Phanerozoic average of one percent species extinction every 40,000 years. Variation in extinction rates through time is far greater than the null expectation of a homogeneous birth-death model and this reflects the well-known episodicity of extinction ranging from a few large mass extinctions to so-called background extinction. The observed variation in rates can be used to construct a cumulative frequency distribution of extinction intensity, and this distribution, in the form of a kill curve for species, shows the expected waiting times between extinction events of a given intensity. The kill curve is an average description of the extinction events of a given intensity. The kill curve is an average description of the extinction record and does not imply any cause or causes of extinction. The kill curve shows, among other things, that only about five percent of total species extinctions in the Phanerozoic were involved in the five largest mass extinctions. The other 95 percent were distributed among large and small events not normally called mass extinctions. As an exploration of the possibly absurd proposition that most past extinctions were produced by the effects of large-body impact, the kill curve for species was mapped on the comparable distribution for comet and asteroid impacts. The result is a curve predicting the species kill for a given size of impacting object (expressed as crater size). The results are reasonable in that impacts producing craters less than 30 km (diameter) cause negligible extinction but those producing craters 100-150 km (diameter) cause extinction of species in the range of 45

  11. Assay Variation Confounds the Diagnosis of Hypovitaminosis D: A Call for Standardization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binkley, N; Krueger, D; Cowgill, C. S; Plum, L; Lake, E; Hansen, K. E; DeLuca, H. F; Drezner, M. K

    2004-01-01

    ...) measurement is reported and confounds the diagnosis of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency. This report emphasizes the marked variability observed in serum 25OHD measurements between laboratories...

  12. Variations in the spatial distribution of gall bladder cancer: a call for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ArcGIS 10.0 used for the present analysis and the population density map of the District was prepared by using LandScan, 2008™. Results: There were isolated areas with very high density of cases and low population density termed as “hot spots”. Alternatively there were areas with very high population density and ...

  13. Gauging Variational Inference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahn, Sungsoo [Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jinwoo [Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-25

    Computing partition function is the most important statistical inference task arising in applications of Graphical Models (GM). Since it is computationally intractable, approximate methods have been used to resolve the issue in practice, where meanfield (MF) and belief propagation (BP) are arguably the most popular and successful approaches of a variational type. In this paper, we propose two new variational schemes, coined Gauged-MF (G-MF) and Gauged-BP (G-BP), improving MF and BP, respectively. Both provide lower bounds for the partition function by utilizing the so-called gauge transformation which modifies factors of GM while keeping the partition function invariant. Moreover, we prove that both G-MF and G-BP are exact for GMs with a single loop of a special structure, even though the bare MF and BP perform badly in this case. Our extensive experiments, on complete GMs of relatively small size and on large GM (up-to 300 variables) confirm that the newly proposed algorithms outperform and generalize MF and BP.

  14. Advertisement and release calls of Phyllomedusa ayeaye (Anura: Hylidae with comments on the social context of emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato C. Nali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Male calls play different roles in anuran social organization, such as spacing, territoriality and female attraction. However, calls and associated behaviors remain poorly described for many anuran species. Here we describe the advertisement and release calls of the tree frog Phyllomedusa ayeaye (Lutz, 1966 and report on the social context of emissions and a physical combat. Approximately 35 minutes of digital recordings were obtained from 34 hours of observations at one breeding site in the state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil. Bioacoustic analysis showed that males emitted two types of advertisement calls: 1 simple call (a sequence of short pulsed notes and 2 composite call (a sequence of short pulsed notes followed by a long pulsed note. Composite calls were emitted more frequently during more intense chorus activity, with various active males at the breeding site. The release call was also composed by short pulsed notes, with a wider spectrum of frequencies and emitted more rapidly than the advertisement calls. Our results suggest that the composite call of P. ayeaye may represent a mixed advertisement call. Long notes might be the aggressive part directed to males, whereas short notes directed to females. Our description of call types, their functions, and male physical interactions will be useful for studies investigating the systematics and behavior of Phyllomedusa species.

  15. Learner Attitudes towards CALL Applications at YADIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal OKAN & Pınar TORUN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of educational technology to assist learners in their language studies has become agreat concern for scholars over the past decade. YADIM (School for Foreign Languages at ÇukurovaUniversity in Turkey has invested substantially to introduce students to computer-based languagelearning materials and to integrate technology into existing curriculum. This paper reports on attitudesof YADİM students towards the use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL and theirperceptions on CALL’s relevancy to their regular classroom work. Surveys and follow-up interviewsexplored how learners see the role of the instructor and the accessibility of the labs. The paper alsolooks at how students assess the impact of technology on their language learning process.

  16. Comprometimento organizacional de trabalhadores de call center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kely César Martins Paiva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOO Neste artigo, analisa-se como se apresenta o comprometimento organizacional de trabalhadores de um call center, localizado em Belo (A Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brasil. Após o delineamento conceitual UJ do tema central, são expostos os resultados de um estudo de caso descritivo, realizado com abordagens quantitativa e qualitativa. Os dados de 399 questionários e 22 entrevistas são, respectivamente, tratados estatisticamente e submetidos à análise de conteúdo. A base de comprometimento que predominou entre esses infoproletários foi "obrigação pelo desempenho" e, em menor grau, "afetiva". Foi observado que quanto maior é o seu tempo de experiência nesse tipo de organização, menores são os níveis de comprometimento de modo geral, fatos esclarecidos, parcialmente, por meio das entrevistas.

  17. [The so-called "fox tapeworm"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, J; Ammann, R

    1990-01-01

    The so-called "fox tapeworm" (Echinococcus multilocularis), the causative agent of a severe disease in man (alveolar echinococcosis), is presently under public discussion in Switzerland. Therefore, actual information is provided on the life cycle of the parasite, epidemiology, disease in humans, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapy and prophylaxis. It is recommended that in endemic regions hunters handling foxes should wear protective gloves, dead foxes should be transported in plastic bags and wild fruits, berries and vegetables should be carefully washed and--if possible--heated to more than 70 degrees C for some minutes prior to consumption. After contact with foxes or other final hosts (dogs, cats) infected with E. multilocularis, persons should be monitored with the highly sensitive and specific Em2-ELISA for serum antibodies aiming at an early diagnosis and treatment of a potential infection.

  18. Oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau boatwhistle call detection and patterns within a large-scale oyster restoration site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon W Ricci

    Full Text Available During May 2015, passive acoustic recorders were deployed at eight subtidal oyster reefs within Harris Creek Oyster Sanctuary in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland USA. These sites were selected to represent both restored and unrestored habitats having a range of oyster densities. Throughout the survey, the soundscape within Harris Creek was dominated by the boatwhistle calls of the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. A novel, multi-kernel spectral correlation approach was developed to automatically detect these boatwhistle calls using their two lowest harmonic bands. The results provided quantitative information on how call rate and call frequency varied in space and time. Toadfish boatwhistle fundamental frequency ranged from 140 Hz to 260 Hz and was well correlated (r = 0.94 with changes in water temperature, with the fundamental frequency increasing by ~11 Hz for every 1°C increase in temperature. The boatwhistle call rate increased from just a few calls per minute at the start of monitoring on May 7th to ~100 calls/min on May 10th and remained elevated throughout the survey. As male toadfish are known to generate boatwhistles to attract mates, this rapid increase in call rate was interpreted to mark the onset of spring spawning behavior. Call rate was not modulated by water temperature, but showed a consistent diurnal pattern, with a sharp decrease in rate just before sunrise and a peak just after sunset. There was a significant difference in call rate between restored and unrestored reefs, with restored sites having nearly twice the call rate as unrestored sites. This work highlights the benefits of using automated detection techniques that provide quantitative information on species-specific call characteristics and patterns. This type of non-invasive acoustic monitoring provides long-term, semi-continuous information on animal behavior and abundance, and operates effectively in settings that are otherwise difficult to sample.

  19. Time based room correction system for low frequencies using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2007-01-01

      Improving sound from loudspeakers in a room is a big issue. We are facing a rather complicated and serious problem, as one can experience very big variations in sound pressure level - up to 30 dB - in a room, especially at low frequencies. An innovative way of looking at the problem in the time......-domain by the construction of a finite-difference time-domain approximation program (FDTD) has lead to a novel and simple solution also working in the time-domain called Controlled Acoustically Bass System (CABS). Working in the time-domain CABS includes additional cancelling loudspeakers at the back wall in order to remove...... the back wall reflection. The system has first been simulated with surprisingly good results and later implemented maintaining good performance. CABS is able to give a homogeneous sound pressure level in the whole room at low frequencies. A DSP system consisting of both hardware and software has been made...

  20. Automatic recognition of fin and blue whale calls for real-time monitoring in the St. Lawrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouy, Xavier; Bahoura, Mohammed; Simard, Yvan

    2009-12-01

    Monitoring blue and fin whales summering in the St. Lawrence Estuary with passive acoustics requires call recognition algorithms that can cope with the heavy shipping noise of the St. Lawrence Seaway and with multipath propagation characteristics that generate overlapping copies of the calls. In this paper, the performance of three time-frequency methods aiming at such automatic detection and classification is tested on more than 2000 calls and compared at several levels of signal-to-noise ratio using typical recordings collected in this area. For all methods, image processing techniques are used to reduce the noise in the spectrogram. The first approach consists in matching the spectrogram with binary time-frequency templates of the calls (coincidence of spectrograms). The second approach is based on the extraction of the frequency contours of the calls and their classification using dynamic time warping (DTW) and the vector quantization (VQ) algorithms. The coincidence of spectrograms was the fastest method and performed better for blue whale A and B calls. VQ detected more 20 Hz fin whale calls but with a higher false alarm rate. DTW and VQ outperformed for the more variable blue whale D calls.

  1. Habitat of calling blue and fin whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirovic, A.; Chou, E.; Roch, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Northeast Pacific blue whale B calls and fin whale 20 Hz calls were detected from passive acoustic data collected over seven years at 16 sites in the Southern California Bight (SCB). Calling blue whales were most common in the coastal areas, during the summer and fall months. Fin whales began calling in fall and continued through winter, in the southcentral SCB. These data were used to develop habitat models of calling blue and fin whales in areas of high and low abundance in the SCB, using remotely sensed variables such as sea surface temperature, sea surface height, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity as model covariates. A random forest framework was used for variable selection and generalized additive models were developed to explain functional relationships, evaluate relative contribution of each significant variable, and investigate predictive abilities of models of calling whales. Seasonal component was an important feature of all models. Additionally, areas of high calling blue and fin whale abundance both had a positive relationship with the sea surface temperature. In areas of lower abundance, chlorophyll a concentration and primary productivity were important variables for blue whale models and sea surface height and primary productivity were significant covariates in fin whale models. Predictive models were generally better for predicting general trends than absolute values, but there was a large degree of variation in year-to-year predictability across different sites.

  2. Staffing to Maximize Profit for Call Centers with Impatient and Repeat-Calling Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by call center practice, we study the optimal staffing of many-server queues with impatient and repeat-calling customers. A call center is modeled as an M/M/s+M queue, which is developed to a behavioral queuing model in which customers come and go based on their satisfaction with waiting time. We explicitly take into account customer repeat behavior, which implies that satisfied customers might return and have an impact on the arrival rate. Optimality is defined as the number of agents that maximize revenues net of staffing costs, and we account for the characteristic that revenues are a direct function of staffing. Finally, we use numerical experiments to make certain comparisons with traditional models that do not consider customer repeat behavior. Furthermore, we indicate how managers might allocate staffing optimally with various customer behavior mechanisms.

  3. Sharing programming resources between Bio* projects through remote procedure call and native call stack strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Pjotr; Goto, Naohisa; Yates, Andrew; Gautier, Laurent; Willis, Scooter; Fields, Christopher; Katayama, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Open-source software (OSS) encourages computer programmers to reuse software components written by others. In evolutionary bioinformatics, OSS comes in a broad range of programming languages, including C/C++, Perl, Python, Ruby, Java, and R. To avoid writing the same functionality multiple times for different languages, it is possible to share components by bridging computer languages and Bio* projects, such as BioPerl, Biopython, BioRuby, BioJava, and R/Bioconductor. In this chapter, we compare the two principal approaches for sharing software between different programming languages: either by remote procedure call (RPC) or by sharing a local call stack. RPC provides a language-independent protocol over a network interface; examples are RSOAP and Rserve. The local call stack provides a between-language mapping not over the network interface, but directly in computer memory; examples are R bindings, RPy, and languages sharing the Java Virtual Machine stack. This functionality provides strategies for sharing of software between Bio* projects, which can be exploited more often. Here, we present cross-language examples for sequence translation, and measure throughput of the different options. We compare calling into R through native R, RSOAP, Rserve, and RPy interfaces, with the performance of native BioPerl, Biopython, BioJava, and BioRuby implementations, and with call stack bindings to BioJava and the European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite. In general, call stack approaches outperform native Bio* implementations and these, in turn, outperform RPC-based approaches. To test and compare strategies, we provide a downloadable BioNode image with all examples, tools, and libraries included. The BioNode image can be run on VirtualBox-supported operating systems, including Windows, OSX, and Linux.

  4. Blue and fin whale call source levels and propagation range in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M

    2007-08-01

    Blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin whales (B. physalus) produce high-intensity, low-frequency calls, which probably function for communication during mating and feeding. The source levels of blue and fin whale calls off the Western Antarctic Peninsula were calculated using recordings made with calibrated, bottom-moored hydrophones. Blue whales were located up to a range of 200 km using hyperbolic localization and time difference of arrival. The distance to fin whales, estimated using multipath arrivals of their calls, was up to 56 km. The error in range measurements was 3.8 km using hyperbolic localization, and 3.4 km using multipath arrivals. Both species produced high-intensity calls; the average blue whale call source level was 189+/-3 dB re:1 microPa-1 m over 25-29 Hz, and the average fin whale call source level was 189+/-4 dB re:1 microPa-1 m over 15-28 Hz. Blue and fin whale populations in the Southern Ocean have remained at low numbers for decades since they became protected; using source level and detection range from passive acoustic recordings can help in calculating the relative density of calling whales.

  5. Preliminary comparison of calls of the hybridizing fur seals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five call types were compared: barking, guttural challenges and territorial calls emitted by adult males; the pup attraction call used by adult females and the response: ... Since many of the differences in male calls are audible to the human ear, female seals can presumably also hear these differences and we suggest that ...

  6. Linking Calling Orientations to Organizational Attachment via Organizational Instrumentality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, M. Teresa; Dane, Erik; Pratt, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite an emerging interest in callings, researchers know little about whether calling orientations matter in the workplace. We explore the under-examined relationship between a calling orientation and employees' attachment to their organizations. Although some theory suggests that callings may be negatively related to organizational attachment,…

  7. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto...

  8. Round-Trip System Available to Measure Path Length Variation in Korea VLBI System for Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hongjong; Kondo, Tetsuro; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Tuhwan; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Ju, Hyunhee

    2010-01-01

    The construction project of Korea Geodetic VLBI officially started in October 2008. The construction of all systems will be completed by the end of 2011. The project was named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG), and its main purpose is to maintain the Korea Geodetic Datum. In case of the KVG system, an observation room with an H-maser frequency standard is located in a building separated from the antenna by several tens of meters. Therefore KVG system will adopt a so-called round-trip system to transmit reference signals to the antenna with reduction of the effect of path length variations. KVG s round-trip system is designed not only to use either metal or optical fiber cables, but also to measure path length variations directly. We present this unique round trip system for KVG.

  9. Moribund Ants Do Not Call for Help.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Miler

    Full Text Available When an antlion captures a foraging ant, the victim's nestmates may display rescue behaviour. This study tested the hypothesis that the expression of rescue behaviour depends on the life expectancy of the captured ant. This hypothesis predicts that the expression of rescue behaviour will be less frequent when the captured ant has a lower life expectancy than when it has a higher life expectancy because such a response would be adaptive at the colony level. Indeed, significant differences were found in the frequency of rescue behaviours in response to antlion victims with differing life expectancies. In agreement with prediction, victims with lower life expectancies were rescued less frequently, and those rescues had a longer latency and shorter duration. There was also a qualitative difference in the behaviour of rescuers to victims from the low and high life expectancy groups. Several explanations for these findings are proposed.

  10. Moribund Ants Do Not Call for Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miler, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    When an antlion captures a foraging ant, the victim's nestmates may display rescue behaviour. This study tested the hypothesis that the expression of rescue behaviour depends on the life expectancy of the captured ant. This hypothesis predicts that the expression of rescue behaviour will be less frequent when the captured ant has a lower life expectancy than when it has a higher life expectancy because such a response would be adaptive at the colony level. Indeed, significant differences were found in the frequency of rescue behaviours in response to antlion victims with differing life expectancies. In agreement with prediction, victims with lower life expectancies were rescued less frequently, and those rescues had a longer latency and shorter duration. There was also a qualitative difference in the behaviour of rescuers to victims from the low and high life expectancy groups. Several explanations for these findings are proposed.

  11. REMINDER: In a medical emergency call 74444

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    What happened? A CERN colleague, complaining of pains that might indicate serious heart problem, went to the ?infirmary' on the Prévessin site for medical aid. He was unaware that the ?infirmary' was in fact no such thing, but the office of the French contractors' medical practitioner, and, on top of that, it was closed. He therefore took his own car and went to the CERN Fire Station on the Meyrin Site (Building 65). The firemen and the CERN medical team took care of him and requested helicopter transport to the Geneva cantonal hospital, where he responded well to medical treatment. What do we learn from this event? You must call the CERN internal number 74444 in the event of serious and acute illness, and do not have to present yourself in person or get somebody to go with you. This number is not reserved exclusively for accident, pollution, fire etc. The Firemen can prodice professional assistance at all times as required: first aid on the spot, amulance transport and medical assistance as necessary. ...

  12. DOCSS: doctors on-call smartphone study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, M K; Nason, G J; Liddy, S; Fitzgerald, C W; Kelly, M E; Shields, C

    2014-12-01

    Smartphones have revolutionised our demands for constant access to information. The usage of smartphones in the clinical setting is becoming widespread. The aim of our study was to assess smartphone ownership and usage across a cohort of interns. A voluntary novel questionnaire was distributed to interns in two university hospitals. Details regarding smartphone ownership and usage were assessed. Likert scales were utilised for analysis. Sixty-one (74.4 %) interns responded to the survey. Sixty (98.4 %) owned a smartphone with iPhone(®) being the most popular (76.7 %). Fifty-five (91.6 %) interns have downloaded medical applications ('apps'), while 29 (52.3 %) reported paying for them. Regarding smartphone use on-call, 30 (50 %) interns agreed it aids diagnoses, 26 (43 %) agree it helped in interpreting laboratory values, 31 (51.7 %) agreed it helped in dosing of medication and 33 (55 %) agreed it was of assistance in medical emergency protocols. Forty-two (70 %), 42 (70 %) and 46 (76.7 %) interns agreed or strongly agreed smartphones have a positive influence on them in terms of levels of stress, confidence and level of knowledge, respectively. Smartphone usage is widespread among our intern cohort. The introduction of hospital applications with local guidelines would be welcomed; however, this may require informed patient consent regarding their use.

  13. From Systematic Review to Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Erika Metzler; Sobel, Linda L; Annan, Sandra L; Schminkey, Donna L

    2017-06-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health and criminal justice concern with significant impacts; especially high rates are seen among rural Hispanic American (HA) communities, the fastest growing population in the United States. They experience additional barriers to care including extreme poverty, lesser education, gender norms, and language and immigration issues. A systematic literature review was conducted using Cooper's framework to identify evidence supporting associations between interventions and prevention, reduction, and elimination of IPV among rural HA women. Searches conducted on databases including CINAHL, PubMed, Medline, Women's Studies International, MedicLatina, and JSTOR used the MeSH terms Hispanic Americans (Latino/a and Hispanic), domestic violence, and intimate partner violence. Selected studies were published between January 1, 2000, and January 1, 2014. Of the 617 yielded articles, only 6 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, none closely examined rurality or provided valid and reliable measures of outcomes, instead reporting program descriptions and suggested interventions. We identify key findings to guide program, screening, and tool development. Our study identifies a gap in knowledge, research, and effective practices and issues a call for action to create evidence-based tools to prevent, reduce, and eliminate IPV in these underserved populations.

  14. McNamara calls for action now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Robert McNamara outlined a 6 point global family planning (FP) program he designed to expand FP services to answer unmet need. The plan calls for Fp spending to increase to US$8 billion by 2000. For the US this would mean an increase from US$800 million to US$3.5 billion. This amount is very, very small compared to the total amount spent on official development assistance projected for Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. It is easily within the capabilities of OECD countries to meet this goal. The plan would develop a system in which the World Bank and the UNFPA would work together with each developing country to establish population target levels. The World Bank would assume responsibility for organizing external financing and serve as a last resort source of financing. Japan must also begin to take a leadership role more in line with its economic power. Currently it spends only .32% of its GNP to aid developing countries, despite the fact that its per capita income is 20% larger than any other OECD member. This means raising spending form US$9 billion to US$14.5 billion. This could be done easily by raising it US$500 million/year and planning to increase this US$1 billion by 2000.

  15. Another call to increase STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-07-01

    As science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education becomes increasingly important, U.S. students are lagging behind other nations on international assessments, according to a recent Trends in International Mathematics and Science study. A 22 June report from the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) calls for increasing the focus on STEM education in the United States. “To make progress in improving STEM education for all students, policy makers at the national, state, and local levels should elevate science to the same level of importance as reading and mathematics,” states the report, “Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.” It outlines several goals: expand the number of students who pursue advanced degrees and careers in STEM fields; expand the STEM-capable workforce, while also broadening the participation of women and minorities; and increase STEM literacy for all students, whether or not they pursue STEM-related careers or additional study in those areas.

  16. Mitigating Handoff Call Dropping in Wireless Cellular Networks: A Call Admission Control Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Moses Effiong; Udoh, Victoria Idia; Bassey, Udoma James

    2016-06-01

    Handoff management has been an important but challenging issue in the field of wireless communication. It seeks to maintain seamless connectivity of mobile users changing their points of attachment from one base station to another. This paper derives a call admission control model and establishes an optimal step-size coefficient (k) that regulates the admission probability of handoff calls. An operational CDMA network carrier was investigated through the analysis of empirical data collected over a period of 1 month, to verify the performance of the network. Our findings revealed that approximately 23 % of calls in the existing system were lost, while 40 % of the calls (on the average) were successfully admitted. A simulation of the proposed model was then carried out under ideal network conditions to study the relationship between the various network parameters and validate our claim. Simulation results showed that increasing the step-size coefficient degrades the network performance. Even at optimum step-size (k), the network could still be compromised in the presence of severe network crises, but our model was able to recover from these problems and still functions normally.

  17. Genomic effects on advertisement call structure in diploid and triploid hybrid waterfrogs (Anura, Pelophylax esculentus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In anurans, differences in male mating calls have intensively been studied with respect to taxonomic classification, phylogeographic comparisons among different populations and sexual selection. Although overall successful, there is often much unexplained variation in these studies. Potential causes for such variation include differences among genotypes and breeding systems, as well as differences between populations. We investigated how these three factors affect call properties in male water frogs of Pelophylax lessonae (genotype LL), P. ridibundus (RR) and their interspecific hybrid P. esculentus which comes in diploid (LR) and triploid types (LLR, LRR). Results We investigated five call parameters that all showed a genomic dosage effect, i.e. they either decreased or increased with the L/R ratio in the order LL-LLR-LR-LRR-RR. Not all parameters differentiated equally well between the five genotypes, but combined they provided a good separation. Two of the five call parameters were also affected by the breeding system. Calls of diploid LR males varied, depending on whether these males mated with one or both of the parental species (diploid systems) or triploid hybrids (mixed ploidy systems). With the exception of the northernmost mixed-ploidy population, call differences were not related to the geographic location of the population and they were not correlated with genetic distances in the R and L genomes. Conclusions We found an influence of all three tested factors on call parameters, with the effect size decreasing from genotype through breeding system to geographic location of the population. Overall, results were in line with predictions from a dosage effect in L/R ratios, but in three call parameters all three hybrid types were more similar to one or the other parental species. Also calls of diploid hybrids varied between breeding systems in agreement with the sexual host required for successful reproduction. The lack of hybrid call differences

  18. Genomic effects on advertisement call structure in diploid and triploid hybrid waterfrogs (Anura, Pelophylax esculentus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Alexandra; Reyer, Heinz-Ulrich

    2013-12-04

    In anurans, differences in male mating calls have intensively been studied with respect to taxonomic classification, phylogeographic comparisons among different populations and sexual selection. Although overall successful, there is often much unexplained variation in these studies. Potential causes for such variation include differences among genotypes and breeding systems, as well as differences between populations. We investigated how these three factors affect call properties in male water frogs of Pelophylax lessonae (genotype LL), P. ridibundus (RR) and their interspecific hybrid P. esculentus which comes in diploid (LR) and triploid types (LLR, LRR). We investigated five call parameters that all showed a genomic dosage effect, i.e. they either decreased or increased with the L/R ratio in the order LL-LLR-LR-LRR-RR. Not all parameters differentiated equally well between the five genotypes, but combined they provided a good separation. Two of the five call parameters were also affected by the breeding system. Calls of diploid LR males varied, depending on whether these males mated with one or both of the parental species (diploid systems) or triploid hybrids (mixed ploidy systems). With the exception of the northernmost mixed-ploidy population, call differences were not related to the geographic location of the population and they were not correlated with genetic distances in the R and L genomes. We found an influence of all three tested factors on call parameters, with the effect size decreasing from genotype through breeding system to geographic location of the population. Overall, results were in line with predictions from a dosage effect in L/R ratios, but in three call parameters all three hybrid types were more similar to one or the other parental species. Also calls of diploid hybrids varied between breeding systems in agreement with the sexual host required for successful reproduction. The lack of hybrid call differences in a mixed-ploidy population at

  19. Optimal temporal placement of the call in beach volleyball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Künzell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The call is a tactical component in beach volleyball attacks. Through the call, the setter indicates to his or her teammate an open spot in the opponent’s court. In two experimental conditions, we investigated the interval between the call and the ball-hand contact (“call shot interval”, CSI of top-level athletes. We show that the probability that a given call is followed is dependent on the duration of the CSI and the number of call options. Longer CSIs result in an increased probability that the given call will be followed, whilst increasing the call options results in a decrease in probability. On average, there is a 50% probability that the call will be followed if the call precedes the shot by 460 ms and if a single call option (“line” is expected. If the attacker has to choose between three call options (“line”, “cut”, “no-one” a 50% probability that the call will be followed is observed at an CSI of 542 ms. It did not appear that gender influenced the ability to follow a call. We recommend that in practice and in competition, players and coaches should consider the proper duration of the CSI for effective calling.

  20. Isomorphic semantic mapping of variant call format (VCF2RDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penha, Emanuel Diego S; Iriabho, Egiebade; Dussaq, Alex; de Oliveira, Diana Magalhães; Almeida, Jonas S

    2017-02-15

    The move of computational genomics workflows to Cloud Computing platforms is associated with a new level of integration and interoperability that challenges existing data representation formats. The Variant Calling Format (VCF) is in a particularly sensitive position in that regard, with both clinical and consumer-facing analysis tools relying on this self-contained description of genomic variation in Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) results. In this report we identify an isomorphic map between VCF and the reference Resource Description Framework. RDF is advanced by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to enable representations of linked data that are both distributed and discoverable. The resulting ability to decompose VCF reports of genomic variation without loss of context addresses the need to modularize and govern NGS pipelines for Precision Medicine. Specifically, it provides the flexibility (i.e. the indexing) needed to support the wide variety of clinical scenarios and patient-facing governance where only part of the VCF data is fitting. Software libraries with a claim to be both domain-facing and consumer-facing have to pass the test of portability across the variety of devices that those consumers in fact adopt. That is, ideally the implementation should itself take place within the space defined by web technologies. Consequently, the isomorphic mapping function was implemented in JavaScript, and was tested in a variety of environments and devices, client and server side alike. These range from web browsers in mobile phones to the most popular micro service platform, NodeJS. The code is publicly available at https://github.com/ibl/VCFr , with a live deployment at: http://ibl.github.io/VCFr/ . jonas.almeida@stonybrookmedicine.edu.

  1. Frequency of KLK3 gene deletions in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Al-Ghamdi, Osama A; Guthrie, Philip Ai; Shihab, Hashem A; McArdle, Wendy; Gaunt, Tom; Alharbi, Khalid K; Day, Ian Nm

    2017-07-01

    Background One of the kallikrein genes ( KLK3) encodes prostate-specific antigen, a key biomarker for prostate cancer. A number of factors, both genetic and non-genetic, determine variation of serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations in the population. We have recently found three KLK3 deletions in individuals with very low prostate-specific antigen concentrations, suggesting a link between abnormally reduced KLK3 expression and deletions of KLK3. Here, we aim to determine the frequency of kallikrein gene 3 deletions in the general population. Methods The frequency of KLK3 deletions in the general population was estimated from the 1958 Birth Cohort sample ( n = 3815) using amplification ratiometry control system. In silico analyses using PennCNV were carried out in the same cohort and in NBS-WTCCC2 in order to provide an independent estimation of the frequency of KLK3 deletions in the general population. Results Amplification ratiometry control system results from the 1958 cohort indicated a frequency of KLK3 deletions of 0.81% (3.98% following a less stringent calling criterion). From in silico analyses, we found that potential deletions harbouring the KLK3 gene occurred at rates of 2.13% (1958 Cohort, n = 2867) and 0.99% (NBS-WTCCC2, n = 2737), respectively. These results are in good agreement with our in vitro experiments. All deletions found were in heterozygosis. Conclusions We conclude that a number of individuals from the general population present KLK3 deletions in heterozygosis. Further studies are required in order to know if interpretation of low serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations in individuals with KLK3 deletions may offer false-negative assurances with consequences for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and monitoring.

  2. Variational integrators for electric circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ober-Blöbaum, Sina, E-mail: sinaob@math.upb.de [Computational Dynamics and Optimal Control, University of Paderborn (Germany); Tao, Molei [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Cheng, Mulin [Applied and Computational Mathematics, California Institute of Technology (United States); Owhadi, Houman; Marsden, Jerrold E. [Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology (United States); Applied and Computational Mathematics, California Institute of Technology (United States)

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, we develop a variational integrator for the simulation of (stochastic and multiscale) electric circuits. When considering the dynamics of an electric circuit, one is faced with three special situations: 1. The system involves external (control) forcing through external (controlled) voltage sources and resistors. 2. The system is constrained via the Kirchhoff current (KCL) and voltage laws (KVL). 3. The Lagrangian is degenerate. Based on a geometric setting, an appropriate variational formulation is presented to model the circuit from which the equations of motion are derived. A time-discrete variational formulation provides an iteration scheme for the simulation of the electric circuit. Dependent on the discretization, the intrinsic degeneracy of the system can be canceled for the discrete variational scheme. In this way, a variational integrator is constructed that gains several advantages compared to standard integration tools for circuits; in particular, a comparison to BDF methods (which are usually the method of choice for the simulation of electric circuits) shows that even for simple LCR circuits, a better energy behavior and frequency spectrum preservation can be observed using the developed variational integrator.

  3. Variability in Echolocation Call Intensity in a Community of Horseshoe Bats: A Role for Resource Partitioning or Communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Maike; Siemers, Björn M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Only recently data on bat echolocation call intensities is starting to accumulate. Yet, intensity is an ecologically crucial parameter, as it determines the extent of the bats' perceptual space and, specifically, prey detection distance. Interspecifically, we thus asked whether sympatric, congeneric bat species differ in call intensities and whether differences play a role for niche differentiation. Specifically, we investigated whether R. mehelyi that calls at a frequency clearly above what is predicted by allometry, compensates for frequency-dependent loss in detection distance by using elevated call intensity. Maximum echolocation call intensities might depend on body size or condition and thus be used as an honest signal of quality for intraspecific communication. We for the first time investigated whether a size-intensity relation is present in echolocating bats. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured maximum call intensities and frequencies for all five European horseshoe bat species. Maximum intensity differed among species largely due to R. euryale. Furthermore, we found no compensation for frequency-dependent loss in detection distance in R. mehelyi. Intraspecifically, there is a negative correlation between forearm lengths and intensity in R. euryale and a trend for a negative correlation between body condition index and intensity in R. ferrumequinum. In R. hipposideros, females had 8 dB higher intensities than males. There were no correlations with body size or sex differences and intensity for the other species. Conclusions/Significance Based on call intensity and frequency measurements, we estimated echolocation ranges for our study community. These suggest that intensity differences result in different prey detection distances and thus likely play some role for resource access. It is interesting and at first glance counter-intuitive that, where a correlation was found, smaller bats called louder than large individuals. Such negative

  4. Identification of stroke during the emergency call: a descriptive study of callers' presentation of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Annika; von Euler, Mia; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Castrén, Maaret; Bohm, Katarina

    2015-04-28

    To evaluate symptoms presented by the caller during emergency calls regarding stroke, and to assess if symptoms in the Face-Arm-Speech-Time Test (FAST) are related to identification of stroke. Emergency calls to the Emergency Medical Communication Center (EMCC) concerning patients discharged with stroke diagnosis in a large teaching hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, in January-June 2011. The emergency calls of 179 patients who arrived at hospital by ambulance, and who were discharged with a stroke diagnosis and consented to participate were included in the study. Frequencies of stroke symptoms presented and a comparison of symptoms presented in calls with dispatch code stroke or other dispatch code. Of the 179 emergency calls analysed, 64% were dispatched as 'Stroke'. FAST symptoms, that is, facial or arm weakness or speech disturbances, were presented in 64% of the calls and were spontaneously revealed in 90%. Speech disturbance was the most common problem (54%) in all calls, followed by fall/lying position (38%) and altered mental status (27%). For patients with dispatch codes other than stroke, the dominating problem presented was a fall or being in a lying position (66%), followed by speech disturbance (31%) and altered mental status (25%). Stroke-specific symptoms were more common in patients dispatched as stroke. FAST symptoms were reported in 80% of patients dispatched as stroke compared with 35% in those dispatched as something else. This study implicates that fall/lying position and altered mental status could be considered as possible symptoms of stroke during an emergency call. Checking for FAST symptoms in these patients might uncover stroke symptoms. Future studies are needed to evaluate if actively asking for FAST symptoms in emergency calls presenting falls or a lying position can improve the identification of stroke. Stroke2010/703-31/2. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  5. Effectiveness of the call in beach volleyball attacking play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzell, Stefan; Schweikart, Florian; Köhn, Daniel; Schläppi-Lienhard, Olivia

    2014-12-09

    In beach volleyball the setter has the opportunity to give her or his hitter a "call". The call intends that the setter suggests to her or his partner where to place the attack in the opponent's court. The effectiveness of a call is still unknown. We investigated the women's and men's Swiss National Beach Volleyball Championships in 2011 and analyzed 2185 attacks. We found large differences between female and male players. While men called in only 38.4% of attacks, women used calls in 85.5% of attacks. If the male players followed a given call, 63% of the attacks were successful. The success rate of attacks without any call was 55.8% and 47.6% when the call was ignored. These differences were not significant (χ(2)(2) = 4.55, p = 0.103). In women's beach volleyball, the rate of successful attacks was 61.5% when a call was followed, 35% for attacks without a call, and 42.6% when a call was ignored. The differences were highly significant (χ(2)(2) = 23.42, p call was effective in women's beach volleyball, while its effect in men's game was unclear. Considering the quality of calls we indicate that there is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of a call.

  6. Pharmacology of Ultrasonic Vocalizations in adult Rats: Significance, Call Classification and Neural Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzynski, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological studies of emotional arousal and initiation of emotional states in rats measured by their ultrasonic vocalizations are reviewed. It is postulated that emission of vocalizations is an inseparable feature of emotional states and it evolved from mother-infant interaction. Positive emotional states are associated with emission of 50 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by rewarding situations and dopaminergic activation of the nucleus accumbens and are mediated by D1, D2, and partially D3 dopamine receptors. Three biologically significant subtypes of 50 kHz vocalizations have been identified, all expressing positive emotional states: (1) flat calls without frequency modulation that serve as contact calls during social interactions; (2) frequencymodulated calls without trills that signal rewarding and significantly motivated situation; and (3) frequency-modulated calls with trills or trills themselves that are emitted in highly emotional situations associated with intensive affective state. Negative emotional states are associated with emission of 22 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by aversive situations, muscarinic cholinergic activation of limbic areas of medial diencephalon and forebrain, and are mediated by M2 muscarinic receptors. Two biologically significant subtypes of 22 kHz vocalizations have been identified, both expressing negative emotional sates: (1) long calls that serve as alarm calls and signal external danger; and (2) short calls that express a state of discomfort without external danger. The positive and negative states with emission of vocalizations are initiated by two ascending reticular activating subsystems: the mesolimbic dopaminergic subsystem as a specific positive arousal system, and the mesolimbic cholinergic subsystem as a specific negative arousal system.

  7. The advertisement call, color patterns and distribution of Ischnocnema izecksohni (Caramaschi and Kisteumacher, 1989 (Anura, Brachycephalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P. G. Taucce

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischnocnema izecksohni inhabits the gallery forests from the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Southern Espinhaço range, state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, and it is considered endemic to this region. Its closest related species is I. nasuta according to the original description. We describe the advertisement call of I. izecksohni based on specimens recorded and collected at the municipality of Nova Lima, state of Minas Gerais, distant about 10 km straight line from its type locality. The advertisement call consists of a group of notes emitted sporadically without a regular interval between the calls. Call duration (n = 36 calls in four individuals ranged from 1.03 to 1.85 s (= 1.52 ± 0.21 s and the call rise time from 0.66 to 1.52 s (= 1.16 ± 0.25 s, with 34-57 notes per call (= 47.42 ± 6.03. Peak frequency ranged from 2250 to 2625 Hz, the dominant frequency from 1317.8 to 3128.0 Hz and interval between notes from 22.00 to 41.00 ms (= 28.63 ± 0.03 ms. From the examination of herpetological collections, morphological and bioacoustical data we extended the species known distribution ca. 200 km eastward, to ten new localities, all of them outside the Quadrilátero Ferrífero region, at the Mantiqueira mountain range. We analyzed color patterns and we find some dorsal patterns not described at the original description of I. izecksohni. We also make some comments concerning the taxonomic status of I. izecksohni and I. nasuta.

  8. Calling under pressure: Short-finned pilot whales make social calls during deep foraging dives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frants Havmand; Marrero Perez, Jacobo; Johnson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Toothed whales rely on sound to echolocate prey and communicate with conspecifics, but little is known about how extreme pressure affects pneumatic sound production in deep-diving species with a limited air supply. The short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) is a highly social species...... among the deep-diving toothed whales, in which individuals socialize at the surface but leave their social group in pursuit of prey at depths of up to 1000 m. To investigate if these animals communicate acoustically at depth and test whether hydrostatic pressure affects communication signals, acoustic...... DTAGs logging sound, depth and orientation were attached to 12 pilot whales. Tagged whales produced tonal calls during deep foraging dives at depths of up to 800 m. Mean call output and duration decreased with depth despite the increased distance to conspecifics at the surface. This shows...

  9. INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE FREQUENCY OF SPERM ANEUPLOIDY IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To examine interindividual differences in sperm chromosome aneuploidy, repeated semen specimens were obtained from a group of ten healthy men, aged 20-21 at the start of the study, and analyzed by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis to determine the fre...

  10. Climatic Variations, Trends and Drought Frequency in Dejen District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-31

    Dec 31, 2017 ... The trends in temperature and rainfall over the period 1979-. 2014 were computed and tested for statistical significance. Results indicated a significant increase in temperature consistent with global temperature pattern. The decreasing trend in rainfall is contrary to the projections of a climate model for East ...

  11. Climatic variations, trends and drought frequency in Dejen District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The trends in temperature and rainfall over the period 1979- 2014 were computed and tested for statistical significance. Results indicated a significant increase in temperature consistent with global temperature pattern. The decreasing trend in rainfall is contrary to the projections of a climate model for East Africa.The results ...

  12. Cluster analysis of word frequency dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikova, Yu S.; Bochkarev, V. V.; Belashova, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and modelling of word usage frequency time series. During one of previous studies, an assumption was put forward that all word usage frequencies have uniform dynamics approaching the shape of a Gaussian function. This assumption can be checked using the frequency dictionaries of the Google Books Ngram database. This database includes 5.2 million books published between 1500 and 2008. The corpus contains over 500 billion words in American English, British English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Hebrew, and Chinese. We clustered time series of word usage frequencies using a Kohonen neural network. The similarity between input vectors was estimated using several algorithms. As a result of the neural network training procedure, more than ten different forms of time series were found. They describe the dynamics of word usage frequencies from birth to death of individual words. Different groups of word forms were found to have different dynamics of word usage frequency variations.

  13. Demand as frequency controlled reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Togeby, M.; OEstergaard, J.

    2008-09-15

    Using demand as frequency controlled reserve (DFR) is an emerging technology which allow demand to participate actively in maintaining the system operation without reducing the energy service delivered to the customer and without need of user interaction. The basic premise is that traditional frequency controlled reserves from power plants and interconnections with neighbouring systems can be costly, slow and not fulfil the need for future power grids with a high share of wind power and fewer central power plants, and an intention to perform flexible operation such as is landing. Electricity demands, on the other hand, have advantages as frequency reserve including fast activation speed, smooth linear activation, low expected costs, and well-dispersed in the distribution grid. The main challenge of DFR is new methods for monitoring the available capacity. This project has investigated the technology of using electricity demands for providing frequency reserve to power systems. Within the project the potential and economy of DFR compatible loads in Denmark has been investigated, control logic has been designed, power system impact has been investigated, potential business models has been evaluated and an implementation strategy has been suggested. The tasks and goals of the project have been successfully accomplished based on which the conclusion and future recommendation are made. This project has developed the DFR technology that enables electricity demands to autonomously disconnect or reconnect to the grid in response to system frequency variations. The developed DFR technology is proved to be a promising technology from several perspectives. Technically, using DFR is feasible to provide reserves and enhance power system frequency control, while fulfilling technical requirements such as linear activation (or reconnection) according to frequency (or time). Environmentally, the DFR technology is pollution free in contrast to traditional reserves from generation

  14. El discurso de la calle: una mirada psicoanalitica al denominado habitante de la calle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Baez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de investigación del proyecto: “El lugar del sujeto en condición de habitante de la calle de la localidad de Suba”. Una propuesta de investigación-intervención, dirigida por el interrogante: ¿Cómo se sitúa un sujeto frente al otro, el otro y su mismidad para llegar a la configuración de su ser, decir y hacer desde el habitar en la calle? Metodológicamente, se desarrolló un trabajo de escucha de carácter analítico, con habitantes de la calle y funcionarios de dicha localidad. El sujeto se halla inscrito en el discurso de la calle, donde, a partir de su posicionamiento ha configurado su ser, decir y hacer, así como el establecimiento del lazo social. Abstract This research paper shows the results of a project named: “The place of the subject as a street in habitant in Suba”. It is a research and intervention proposal, guided by the questions: How does a subject consider himself in relation with another subject? How does a subject and his uniqueness to come to his own being? Does it take into account their living in the street? A listening exercise using an analytical method was developed with street in habitants and officials of the above-mentioned locality. The subject is enrolled in the test, their speech sampled via a series of questions, and the subject is asked why the subject has set his being, why the subject gives these answers, as well as their establishment in the social ties in their networks.

  15. Partial differential equation transform — Variational formulation and Fourier analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) models are established approaches for image/signal processing, data analysis and surface construction. Most previous geometric PDEs are utilized as low-pass filters which give rise to image trend information. In an earlier work, we introduced mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs), which behave like high-pass filters and are able to systematically provide intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of signals and images. Due to their tunable time-frequency localization and perfect reconstruction, the operation of MoDEEs is called a PDE transform. By appropriate selection of PDE transform parameters, we can tune IMFs into trends, edges, textures, noise etc., which can be further utilized in the secondary processing for various purposes. This work introduces the variational formulation, performs the Fourier analysis, and conducts biomedical and biological applications of the proposed PDE transform. The variational formulation offers an algorithm to incorporate two image functions and two sets of low-pass PDE operators in the total energy functional. Two low-pass PDE operators have different signs, leading to energy disparity, while a coupling term, acting as a relative fidelity of two image functions, is introduced to reduce the disparity of two energy components. We construct variational PDE transforms by using Euler-Lagrange equation and artificial time propagation. Fourier analysis of a simplified PDE transform is presented to shed light on the filter properties of high order PDE transforms. Such an analysis also offers insight on the parameter selection of the PDE transform. The proposed PDE transform algorithm is validated by numerous benchmark tests. In one selected challenging example, we illustrate the ability of PDE transform to separate two adjacent frequencies of sin(x) and sin(1.1x). Such an ability is due to PDE transform’s controllable frequency localization obtained by adjusting the order of PDEs. The

  16. Digital repetitive control under varying frequency conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Germán A; Olm, Josep M

    2013-01-01

    The tracking/rejection of periodic signals constitutes a wide field of research in the control theory and applications area. Repetitive Control has proven to be an efficient way to face this topic. However, in some applications the frequency of the reference/disturbance signal is time-varying or uncertain. This causes an important performance degradation in the standard Repetitive Control scheme. This book presents some solutions to apply Repetitive Control in varying frequency conditions without loosing steady-state performance. It also includes a complete theoretical development and experimental results in two representative systems. The presented solutions are organized in two complementary branches: varying sampling period Repetitive Control and High Order Repetitive Control. The first approach allows dealing with large range frequency variations while the second allows dealing with small range frequency variations. The book also presents applications of the described techniques to a Roto-magnet plant and...

  17. No Call for Action? Why There Is No Union (Yet in Philippine Call Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Reese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents findings from a qualitative study which focused on young urban professionals in the Philippines who work(ed in international call centers – workplaces usually characterized by job insecurity and other forms of precarity, factory-like working conditions, and disembeddedness. Nevertheless, trade unions in these centers have not come into existence. Why collective action is not chosen by call center agents as an option to tackle the above mentioned problems – this is what the research project this article is based on tried to understand. After outlining some workrelated problems identified by Filipino call center agents, the article will focus on the strategies the agents employ to counter these problems (mainly accommodation and everyday resistance. By highlighting five objective and five subjective reasons (or reasons by circumstances and reasons by framing, we conclude that it is not repressive regulation policies, but rather the formative power and the internalization of discourses of rule within individual life strategies that are preventing the establishment of unions and other collective action structures.

  18. Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE) Technique for Frequency Domain Electromagnetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1996-01-01

    The Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE) technique is applied to a generalized frequency domain electromagnetic problem. Most of the frequency domain techniques in computational electromagnetics result in a matrix equation, which is solved at a single frequency. In the AWE technique, the Taylor series expansion around that frequency is applied to the matrix equation. The coefficients of the Taylor's series are obtained in terms of the frequency derivatives of the matrices evaluated at the expansion frequency. The coefficients hence obtained will be used to predict the frequency response of the system over a frequency range. The detailed derivation of the coefficients (called 'moments') is given along with an illustration for electric field integral equation (or Method of Moments) technique. The radar cross section (RCS) frequency response of a square plate is presented using the AWE technique and is compared with the exact solution at various frequencies.

  19. A class frequency mixture model that adjusts for site-specific amino acid frequencies and improves inference of protein phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Karen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widely used substitution models for proteins, such as the Jones-Taylor-Thornton (JTT or Whelan and Goldman (WAG models, are based on empirical amino acid interchange matrices estimated from databases of protein alignments that incorporate the average amino acid frequencies of the data set under examination (e.g JTT + F. Variation in the evolutionary process between sites is typically modelled by a rates-across-sites distribution such as the gamma (Γ distribution. However, sites in proteins also vary in the kinds of amino acid interchanges that are favoured, a feature that is ignored by standard empirical substitution matrices. Here we examine the degree to which the pattern of evolution at sites differs from that expected based on empirical amino acid substitution models and evaluate the impact of these deviations on phylogenetic estimation. Results We analyzed 21 large protein alignments with two statistical tests designed to detect deviation of site-specific amino acid distributions from data simulated under the standard empirical substitution model: JTT+ F + Γ. We found that the number of states at a given site is, on average, smaller and the frequencies of these states are less uniform than expected based on a JTT + F + Γ substitution model. With a four-taxon example, we show that phylogenetic estimation under the JTT + F + Γ model is seriously biased by a long-branch attraction artefact if the data are simulated under a model utilizing the observed site-specific amino acid frequencies from an alignment. Principal components analyses indicate the existence of at least four major site-specific frequency classes in these 21 protein alignments. Using a mixture model with these four separate classes of site-specific state frequencies plus a fifth class of global frequencies (the JTT + cF + Γ model, significant improvements in model fit for real data sets can be achieved. This simple mixture model also reduces the long

  20. Effectiveness of the Call in Beach Volleyball Attacking Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Künzell Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In beach volleyball the setter has the opportunity to give her or his hitter a “call”. The call intends that the setter suggests to her or his partner where to place the attack in the opponent’s court. The effectiveness of a call is still unknown. We investigated the women’s and men’s Swiss National Beach Volleyball Championships in 2011 and analyzed 2185 attacks. We found large differences between female and male players. While men called in only 38.4% of attacks, women used calls in 85.5% of attacks. If the male players followed a given call, 63% of the attacks were successful. The success rate of attacks without any call was 55.8% and 47.6% when the call was ignored. These differences were not significant (χ2(2 = 4.55, p = 0.103. In women’s beach volleyball, the rate of successful attacks was 61.5% when a call was followed, 35% for attacks without a call, and 42.6% when a call was ignored. The differences were highly significant (χ2(2 = 23.42, p < 0.0005. Taking into account the findings of the present study, we suggested that the call was effective in women’s beach volleyball, while its effect in men’s game was unclear. Considering the quality of calls we indicate that there is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of a call.

  1. Simple Syllabic Calls Accompany Discrete Behavior Patterns in Captive Pteronotus parnellii: An Illustration of the Motivation-Structure Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Clement

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mustached bats, Pteronotus parnellii, are highly social and vocal. Individuals of this species roost in tight clusters, and emit an acoustically rich repertoire of calls whose behavioral significance is largely unknown. We recorded their social and vocal behaviors within a colony housed under semi-natural conditions. We also quantified the spatial spread of each bat’s roosting location and discovered that this was relatively fixed and roughly confined to an individual’s body width. The spatial precision in roosting was accompanied by an equally remarkable match between specific vocalizations and well-timed, discrete, identifiable postures/behaviors, as revealed by logistic regression analysis. The bodily behaviors included crouching, marking, yawning, nipping, flicking, fighting, kissing, inspecting, and fly-bys. Two echolocation-like calls were used to maintain spacing in the colony, two noisy broadband calls were emitted during fights, two tonal calls conveyed fear, and another tonal call signaled appeasement. Overall, the results establish that mustached bats exhibit complex social interactions common to other social mammals. The correspondence of relatively low frequency and noisy, broadband calls with aggression, and of tonal, high frequency calls with fear supports Morton’s Motivation-Structure hypothesis, and establishes a link between motivation and the acoustic structure of social calls emitted by mustached bats.

  2. Simple syllabic calls accompany discrete behavior patterns in captive Pteronotus parnellii: an illustration of the motivation-structure hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Matthew J; Kanwal, Jagmeet S

    2012-01-01

    Mustached bats, Pteronotus parnellii, are highly social and vocal. Individuals of this species roost in tight clusters, and emit an acoustically rich repertoire of calls whose behavioral significance is largely unknown. We recorded their social and vocal behaviors within a colony housed under semi-natural conditions. We also quantified the spatial spread of each bat's roosting location and discovered that this was relatively fixed and roughly confined to an individual's body width. The spatial precision in roosting was accompanied by an equally remarkable match between specific vocalizations and well-timed, discrete, identifiable postures/behaviors, as revealed by logistic regression analysis. The bodily behaviors included crouching, marking, yawning, nipping, flicking, fighting, kissing, inspecting, and fly-bys. Two echolocation-like calls were used to maintain spacing in the colony, two noisy broadband calls were emitted during fights, two tonal calls conveyed fear, and another tonal call signaled appeasement. Overall, the results establish that mustached bats exhibit complex social interactions common to other social mammals. The correspondence of relatively low frequency and noisy, broadband calls with aggression, and of tonal, high frequency calls with fear supports Morton's Motivation-Structure hypothesis, and establishes a link between motivation and the acoustic structure of social calls emitted by mustached bats.

  3. Simple Syllabic Calls Accompany Discrete Behavior Patterns in Captive Pteronotus parnellii: An Illustration of the Motivation-Structure Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Matthew J.; Kanwal, Jagmeet S.

    2012-01-01

    Mustached bats, Pteronotus parnellii, are highly social and vocal. Individuals of this species roost in tight clusters, and emit an acoustically rich repertoire of calls whose behavioral significance is largely unknown. We recorded their social and vocal behaviors within a colony housed under semi-natural conditions. We also quantified the spatial spread of each bat's roosting location and discovered that this was relatively fixed and roughly confined to an individual's body width. The spatial precision in roosting was accompanied by an equally remarkable match between specific vocalizations and well-timed, discrete, identifiable postures/behaviors, as revealed by logistic regression analysis. The bodily behaviors included crouching, marking, yawning, nipping, flicking, fighting, kissing, inspecting, and fly-bys. Two echolocation-like calls were used to maintain spacing in the colony, two noisy broadband calls were emitted during fights, two tonal calls conveyed fear, and another tonal call signaled appeasement. Overall, the results establish that mustached bats exhibit complex social interactions common to other social mammals. The correspondence of relatively low frequency and noisy, broadband calls with aggression, and of tonal, high frequency calls with fear supports Morton's Motivation-Structure hypothesis, and establishes a link between motivation and the acoustic structure of social calls emitted by mustached bats. PMID:22693429

  4. Integrating mapping-, assembly- and haplotype-based approaches for calling variants in clinical sequencing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Andy; Phan, Hang; Mathieson, Iain; Iqbal, Zamin; Twigg, Stephen R F; Wilkie, Andrew O M; McVean, Gil; Lunter, Gerton

    2014-08-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technology has transformed genetic research and is starting to make an impact on clinical practice. However, analyzing high-throughput sequencing data remains challenging, particularly in clinical settings where accuracy and turnaround times are critical. We present a new approach to this problem, implemented in a software package called Platypus. Platypus achieves high sensitivity and specificity for SNPs, indels and complex polymorphisms by using local de novo assembly to generate candidate variants, followed by local realignment and probabilistic haplotype estimation. It is an order of magnitude faster than existing tools and generates calls from raw aligned read data without preprocessing. We demonstrate the performance of Platypus in clinically relevant experimental designs by comparing with SAMtools and GATK on whole-genome and exome-capture data, by identifying de novo variation in 15 parent-offspring trios with high sensitivity and specificity, and by estimating human leukocyte antigen genotypes directly from variant calls.

  5. Effect of the number of request calls on the time from call to hospital arrival: a cross-sectional study of an ambulance record database in Nara prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaki, Nao; Yamashita, Kazuto; Kunisawa, Susumu; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-12-09

    In Japan, ambulance staff sometimes must make request calls to find hospitals that can accept patients because of an inadequate information sharing system. This study aimed to quantify effects of the number of request calls on the time interval between an emergency call and hospital arrival. A cross-sectional study of an ambulance records database in Nara prefecture, Japan. A total of 43 663 patients (50% women; 31.2% aged 80 years and over): (1) transported by ambulance from April 2013 to March 2014, (2) aged 15 years and over, and (3) with suspected major illness. The time from call to hospital arrival, defined as the time interval from receipt of an emergency call to ambulance arrival at a hospital. The mean time interval from emergency call to hospital arrival was 44.5 min, and the mean number of requests was 1.8. Multilevel linear regression analysis showed that ∼43.8% of variations in transportation times were explained by patient age, sex, season, day of the week, time, category of suspected illness, person calling for the ambulance, emergency status at request call, area and number of request calls. A higher number of request calls was associated with longer time intervals to hospital arrival (addition of 6.3 min per request call; ptime for diseases needing cardiologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons and orthopaedists. The study revealed 6.3 additional minutes needed in transportation time for every refusal of a request call, and also revealed disease-specific delays among specific areas. An effective system should be collaboratively established by policymakers and physicians to ensure the rapid identification of an available hospital for patient transportation in order to reduce the time from the initial emergency call to hospital arrival. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. ASR performance analysis of an experimental call routing system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modipa, T

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Call routing is an important application of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology. In this paper the authors discuss the main issues affecting the performance of a call routing system and describe the ASR component of the "Auto...

  7. Purpose, Mission, and Context: The Call for Educating Future Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunoo, Vivechkanand; Osteen, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This chapter calls on higher education to reclaim its role in leadership education. Specifically it examines higher education's purpose, context, and mission as clarion calls to embed leadership education throughout higher education institutions and focuses on why this is important.

  8. Phonotaxis in flying crickets. I. Attraction to the calling song and avoidance of bat-like ultrasound are discrete behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, T G; Hoy, R R

    1986-10-01

    The steering responses of three species of field crickets, Teleogryllus oceanicus, T. commodus, and Gryllus bimaculatus, were characterized during tethered flight using single tone-pulses (rather than model calling song) presented at carrier frequencies from 3-100 kHz. This range of frequencies encompasses the natural songs of crickets (4-20 kHz, Fig. 1) as well as the echolocation cries of insectivorous bats (12-100 kHz). The single-pulse stimulus paradigm was necessary to assess the aversive nature of high carrier frequencies without introducing complications due to the attractive properties of repeated pulse stimuli such as model calling songs. Unlike the natural calling song, single tone-pulses were not attractive and did not elicit positive phonotactic steering even when presented at the calling song carrier frequency (Figs. 2, 3, and 9). In addition to temporal pattern, phonotactic steering was sensitive to carrier frequency as well as sound intensity. Three discrete flight steering behaviors positive phonotaxis, negative phonotaxis and evasion, were elicited by appropriate combinations of frequency, temporal pattern and sound intensity (Fig. 12). Positive phonotactic steering required a model calling song temporal pattern, was tuned to 5 kHz and was restricted to frequencies below 9 kHz. Negative phonotactic steering, similar to the 'early warning' bat-avoidance behavior of moths, was produced by low intensity (55 dB SPL) tone-pulses at frequencies between 12 and 100 kHz (Figs. 2, 3, and 9). In contrast to model calling song, single tone-pulses of high intensity 5-10 kHz elicited negative phonotactic steering; low intensity ultrasound (20-100 kHz) produced only negative phonotactic steering, regardless of pulse repetition pattern. 'Evasive', side-to-side steering, similar to the 'last-chance' bat-evasion behavior of moths was produced in response to high intensity (greater than 90 dB) ultrasound (20-100 kHz). Since the demonstration of negative phonotactic

  9. Multiple Frequency Parametric Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    300003 1 MULTIPLE FREQUENCY PARAMETRIC SONAR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...a method for increasing the bandwidth of a parametric sonar system by using multiple primary frequencies rather than only two primary frequencies...2) Description of Prior Art [0004] Parametric sonar generates narrow beams at low frequencies by projecting sound at two distinct primary

  10. No male identity information loss during call propagation through dense vegetation: the case of the corncrake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ręk, Paweł; Osiejuk, Tomasz S

    2011-03-01

    Individually specific acoustic signals in birds are used in territorial defence. These signals enable a reduction of energy expenditure due to individual recognition between rivals and the associated threat levels. Mechanisms and acoustic cues used for individual recognition seem to be versatile among birds. However, most studies so far have been conducted on oscine species. Few studies have focused on exactly how the potential for individual recognition changes with distance between the signaller and receiver. We studied a nocturnally active rail species, the corncrake, which utters a seemingly simple disyllabic call. The inner call structure, however, is quite complex and expressed as intervals between maximal amplitude peaks, called pulse-to-pulse durations (PPD). The inner call is characterized by very low within-individual variation and high between-individuals difference. These variations and differences enable recognition of individuals. We conducted our propagation experiments in a natural corncrake habitat. We found that PPD was not affected by transmission. Correct individual identification was possible regardless of the distance and position of the microphone which was above the ground. The results for sounds from the extreme distance propagated through the vegetation compared to those transmitted above the vegetation were even better. These results support the idea that PPD structure has evolved under selection favouring individual recognition in a species signalling at night, in a dense environment and close to the ground. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequency dependence of lung volume changes during superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation and high-frequency jet ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, R; Priori, R; Larsson, A; LoMauro, A; Frykholm, P; Aliverti, A

    2014-01-01

    Superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation (SHFJV) has proved to be safe and effective in clinical practice. However, it is unclear which frequency range optimizes ventilation and gas exchange. The aim of this study was to systematically compare high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) with HFJV by assessing chest wall volume variations (ΔEEV(CW)) and gas exchange in relation to variable high frequency. SHFJV or HFJV were used alternatively to ventilate the lungs of 10 anaesthetized pigs (21-25 kg). The low-frequency component was kept at 16 min(-1) in SHFJV. In both modes, high frequencies ranging from 100 to 1000 min(-1) were applied in random order and ventilation was maintained for 5 min in all modalities. Chest wall volume variations were obtained using opto-electronic plethysmography. Airway pressures and arterial blood gases were measured repeatedly. SHFJV increased ΔEEV(CW) compared with HFJV; the difference ranged from 43 to 68 ml. Tidal volume (V(T)) was always >240 ml during SHFJV whereas during HFJV ranged from 92 ml at the ventilation frequency of 100 min(-1) to negligible values at frequencies >300 min(-1). We observed similar patterns for Pa(O₂) and Pa(CO₂). SHFJV provided generally higher, frequency-independent oxygenation (Pa(O₂) at least 32.0 kPa) and CO₂ removal (Pa(CO₂) ∼5.5 kPa), whereas HFJV led to hypoxia and hypercarbia at higher rates (Pa(O₂) 10 kPa at f(HF)>300 min(-1)). In a porcine model, SHFJV was more effective in increasing end-expiratory volume than single-frequency HFJV, but both modes may provide adequate ventilation in the absence of airway obstruction and respiratory disease, except for HFJV at frequencies ≥300 min(-1).

  12. Modeling and measuring sound propagation of hooded crow calls in open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    , an optimal frequency range between approximately 500 Hz and 2 kHz. The hearing system of crows enables the most sensitive detection of signals in noise within this range. From modeling, noise measurements, and hearing data we estimate hooded crow active space to be roughly 1 km, but with great variance...... In a study of territorial communication distance of hooded crows we find an excellent correspondence between model predicted crow call transmission and re-recorded crow calls. Modeling average transmission characteristics within a spatial matrix of sender/receiver distances and heights...... representative of crow territorial communication and taking into account ground effect and air turbulence, we predict an optimal transmission frequency range between 0,5-1.6 kHz. In a natural open field crow habitat we measure, with sender and receiver heights of 2.8 m and transmission distances up to 320 m...

  13. Measurements and predictions of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) call propagation over open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    2008-01-01

    In a study of hooded crow communication over open fields an excellent correspondence is found between the attenuation spectra predicted by a "turbulence-modified ground effect plus atmospheric absorption" model, and crow call attenuation data. Sound propagation predictions and background noise...... measurements are used to predict an optimal frequency range for communication ("sound communication window") from an average of crow call spectra predicted for every possible combination of the sender/receiver separations 300, 600, 900, and 1200  m and heights 3,6,9  m thereby creating a matrix assumed...... relevant to crow interterritorial communication. These predictions indicate an optimal frequency range for sound communication between 500  Hz and 2  kHz. Since this corresponds to the frequency range in which crow calls have their main energy and crow hearing in noise is particularly sensitive...

  14. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  15. Linguistics, Procedure and Technique in CALL Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsani, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Research in CALL education has identified a series of goals and constraints for technology in language education that need to be taken into account when designing a CALL syllabus. This article presents a theoretical framework for syllabus design based on the identification of three areas of expertise within CALL: linguistic knowledge, procedural…

  16. 47 CFR 74.791 - Digital call signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital call signs. 74.791 Section 74.791..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.791 Digital call signs. (a) Digital low power stations. Call signs for digital low...

  17. The Role of Analyst Conference Calls in Capital Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Roelofsen (Erik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMany firms conduct a conference call with analysts shortly after the quarterly earnings announcement. In these calls, management discusses the completed quarter, and analysts can ask questions. Due to SEC requirements, conference calls in the United States are virtually always live

  18. Design considerations for CALL based upon evaluation criteria for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents a rubric for the evaluation of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) software based on international recommendations for effective CALL. After a brief overview of the pedagogical and implementation fundamentals of CALL, and a discussion of what should be included in a needs analysis for ...

  19. Power-law scaling of calling dynamics in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shouwen; Maat, Andries Ter; Gahr, Manfred

    2017-08-21

    Social mammals and birds have a rich repertoire of communication calls. Some call types are uttered rarely but in specific contexts while others are produced in large numbers but are not linked to a specific context. An example for the latter is the "stack" call that zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) utter thousands of times per day in a seemingly erratic manner. We quantified this calling activity of captive zebra finches by using on-bird telemetric microphones that permitted a precise temporal resolution. We separated the calling interactions into the reactive and the self-contained calls. Despite a large dynamic range in the succession of calling events, the temporal distribution of the reactive and the self-contained callings was characterized by a power-law with exponents ranging between 2 and 3, which implies that all calls in that scale have similar dynamic patterns. As birds underwent physiological (water availability) and social (separation from the reproductive partner) changes, their calling dynamics changed. Power-law scaling provided an accurate description of these changes, such that the calling dynamics may inform about an individual's physiological and/or social situations state, even though a single "stack" call has no predetermined meaning.

  20. CALL and the Responsibilities of Teachers and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeremy F.

    2001-01-01

    Probes reasons why many teachers remain uncommitted to computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and proposes some remedies. In particular, it is argued that CALL should not be too closely associated with self-access or autonomy, and that teachers are needed to drive the CALL process. (Author/VWL)

  1. 46 CFR 169.750 - Radio call sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio call sign. 169.750 Section 169.750 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.750 Radio call sign. Each vessel certificated for exposed or partially protected water service must have its radio call sign permanently displayed...

  2. Short communications: Calls of three species of arthroleptid frogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We also provide numerical information about the spectral and temporal features of the calls. The calls are compared with previously published descriptions from other parts of their distribution. A new call type is described for Leptodactylodon albiventris. Key words: Amphibia, Arthroleptidae, audiospectrograms.

  3. Design considerations for CALL based upon evaluation criteria for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... be included in a needs analysis for CALL evaluation, the rubric is presented. The author then illustrates how the evaluation criteria in the rubric can be used in the design of a new CALL system. Keywords: Software evaluation, CALL, language laboratory, MarkWrite, writing across the curriculum, software development ...

  4. Listening for bats: the hearing range of the bushcricket Phaneroptera falcata for bat echolocation calls measured in the field.

    OpenAIRE

    Schul, J.; Matt, F; von Helversen, O

    2000-01-01

    The hearing range of the tettigoniid Phaneropterafalcata for the echolocation calls of freely flying mouseeared bats (Myotis myotis) was determined in the field. The hearing of the insect was monitored using hook electrode recordings from an auditory interneuron, which is as sensitive as the hearing organ for frequencies above 16 kHz. The flight path of the bat relative to the insect's position was tracked by recording the echolocation calls with two microphone arrays, and calculating the bat...

  5. The So-Called 'Face on Mars'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 April 2002) The Science The so called 'Face on Mars' can be seen slightly above center and to the right in this THEMIS visible image. This 3-km long knob, located near 10o N, 40o W (320o E), was first imaged by the Viking spacecraft in the 1970's and was seen by some to resemble a face carved into the rocks of Mars. Since that time the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has provided detailed views of this hill that clearly show that it is a normal geologic feature with slopes and ridges carved by eons of wind and downslope motion due to gravity. A similar-size hill in Phoenix, Arizona resembles a camel lying on the ground, and Phoenicians whimsically refer to it as Camelback Mountain. Like the hills and knobs of Mars, however, Camelback Mountain was carved into its unusual shape by thousands of years of erosion. The THEMIS image provides a broad perspective of the landscape in this region, showing numerous knobs and hills that have been eroded into a remarkable array of different shapes. Many of these knobs, including the 'Face', have several flat ledges partway up the hill slopes. These ledges are made of more resistant layers of rock and are the last remnants of layers that once were continuous across this entire region. Erosion has completely removed these layers in most places, leaving behind only the small isolated hills and knobs seen today. Many of the hills and ridges in this area also show unusual deposits of material that occur preferentially on the cold, north-facing slopes. It has been suggested that these deposits were 'pasted' on the slopes, with the distinct, rounded boundary on their upslope edges being the highest remaining point of this pasted-on layer. In several locations, such as in the large knob directly south of the 'Face', these deposits occur at several different heights on the hill. This observation suggests the layer once draped the entire knob and has since been removed from all but the north

  6. Calling vs Receiving Party Pays: Market Penetration and the Importance of the Call Externality

    OpenAIRE

    Majer, Tommaso; Pistollato, Michele

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study how the access price affects the choice of the tariff regime taken by the network operators. We show that for high values of the access price, that is taken as a parameter by the firms, networks decide to charge only the callers. Otherwise, for low values of the access charge, networks charge also the receivers. Moreover, we compare market penetration and total welfare between the two price regimes. Our model suggests that, for high values of call externality, market pe...

  7. Caller sex and orientation influence spectral characteristics of "two-voice" stereotyped calls produced by free-ranging killer whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patrick J O; Samarra, Filipa I P; Perthuison, Aurélie D

    2007-06-01

    This study investigates how particular received spectral characteristics of stereotyped calls of sexually dimorphic adult killer whales may be influenced by caller sex, orientation, and range. Calls were ascribed to individuals during natural behavior using a towed beamforming array. The fundamental frequency of both high-frequency and low-frequency components did not differ consistently by sex. The ratio of peak energy within the fundamental of the high-frequency component relative to summed peak energy in the first two low-frequency component harmonics, and the number of modulation bands off the high-frequency component, were significantly greater when whales were oriented towards the array, while range and adult sex had little effect. In contrast, the ratio of peak energy in the first versus second harmonics of the low-frequency component was greater in calls produced by adult females than adult males, while orientation and range had little effect. The dispersion of energy across harmonics has been shown to relate to body size or sex in terrestrial species, but pressure effects during diving are thought to make such a signal unreliable in diving animals. The observed spectral differences by signaler sex and orientation suggest that these types of information may be transmitted acoustically by freely diving killer whales.

  8. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  9. A synthetic operational account of call-by-need evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerny, Ian; Danvy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We present the first operational account of call by need that connects syntactic theory and implementation practice. Syntactic theory: the storeless operational semantics using syntax rewriting to account for demand-driven computation and for caching intermediate results. Implementational practice...... is that the theory of call by need agrees with the theory of call by name, and that the practice of call by need optimizes the practice of call by name. Our operational account takes the form of three new calculi for lazy evaluation of lambda-terms and our synthesis takes the form of three lock-step equivalences...

  10. Promoting calls to a quitline: quantifying the influence of message theme, strong negative emotions and graphic images in television advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Matthew C; Davis, Kevin C; Nonnemaker, James M; Kamyab, Kian; Jackson, Christine

    2011-07-01

    To understand the relative effectiveness of television advertisements that differ in their thematic focus and portrayals of negative emotions and/or graphic images in promoting calls to a smokers' quitline. Regression analysis is used to explain variation in quarterly media market-level per smoker calls to the New York State Smokers' Quitline from 2001 to 2009. The primary independent variable is quarterly market-level delivery of television advertisements measured by target audience rating points (TARPs). Advertisements were characterised by their overall objective--promoting cessation, highlighting the dangers of secondhand smoke (SHS) or other--and by their portrayals of strong negative emotions and graphic images. Per smoker call volume is positively correlated with total TARPs (pgraphic images only or neither strong negative emotions nor graphic images are associated with higher call volume with similar effect sizes. Call volume was not significantly associated with the number of TARPs for advertisements with strong negative emotions only (p=0.71) or with both graphic images and strong emotions (p=0.09). Exposure to television advertisements is strongly associated with quitline call volume, and both cessation and SHS advertisements can be effective. The use of strong negative emotions in advertisements may be effective in promoting smoking cessation in the population but does not appear to influence quitline call volume. Further research is needed to understand the role of negative emotions in promoting calls to quitlines and cessation more broadly among the majority of smokers who do not call quitlines.

  11. In- and Out-of-the-Money Convertible Bond Calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechman, Ken; Lunde, Asger; Zebedee, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Convertible bond calls typically cause significant reactions in equity prices. The empirical research largely finds negative and positive announcement effects for the in-the-money and the out-of-the-money calls respectively. However, this research has difficulty distinguishing between the two mai...... convertible bond; and the stock market's reaction is almost immediate, which is consistent with the signaling effect.......Convertible bond calls typically cause significant reactions in equity prices. The empirical research largely finds negative and positive announcement effects for the in-the-money and the out-of-the-money calls respectively. However, this research has difficulty distinguishing between the two main......-the-money call is predominantly explained by the subsequent order imbalances; and the stock market's reaction is spread over an entire trading day, which is consistent with the price pressure effect. In contrast, the announcement effect for the out-of-the-money call is driven by the size of the called...

  12. Cyclone frequency in east asia and double-cyclones

    OpenAIRE

    Umemoto, Tohru

    1982-01-01

    Japanese meteorologists call a certain type of cyclone "Futatsudama-teikiatsu" (Double-cyclone). The relationships between frequencies of extratropical cyclones and Double-cyclones were studied. Using a 2° latitude/longitude grid covering East Asia, three high frequency belts were found. Double-cyclones were classified into three types. Features of occurrence of these three types were discussed.

  13. Modeling Cyclic Variation of Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    demonstrates a cyclic low-frequency variation in the baseline corresponding to the ventilation . As a result, the ICP recording is not similar to the...dilation must be determined. The cyclic variation of intrathoracic pressure during positive pressure ventilation is considered a major causal... mechanism (s) that controls the dynamic characteristics of the ICP recording over the ventilation cycle are up-stream from the pial veins at vascular

  14. Inexpensive and Highly Reproducible Cloud-Based Variant Calling of 2,535 Human Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash S Shringarpure

    Full Text Available Population scale sequencing of whole human genomes is becoming economically feasible; however, data management and analysis remains a formidable challenge for many research groups. Large sequencing studies, like the 1000 Genomes Project, have improved our understanding of human demography and the effect of rare genetic variation in disease. Variant calling on datasets of hundreds or thousands of genomes is time-consuming, expensive, and not easily reproducible given the myriad components of a variant calling pipeline. Here, we describe a cloud-based pipeline for joint variant calling in large samples using the Real Time Genomics population caller. We deployed the population caller on the Amazon cloud with the DNAnexus platform in order to achieve low-cost variant calling. Using our pipeline, we were able to identify 68.3 million variants in 2,535 samples from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. By performing the variant calling in a parallel manner, the data was processed within 5 days at a compute cost of $7.33 per sample (a total cost of $18,590 for completed jobs and $21,805 for all jobs. Analysis of cost dependence and running time on the data size suggests that, given near linear scalability, cloud computing can be a cheap and efficient platform for analyzing even larger sequencing studies in the future.

  15. Pan-cancer analysis reveals technical artifacts in TCGA germline variant calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Alexandra R; Standish, Kristopher A; Bhutani, Kunal; Ideker, Trey; Lasken, Roger S; Carter, Hannah; Harismendy, Olivier; Schork, Nicholas J

    2017-06-12

    Cancer research to date has largely focused on somatically acquired genetic aberrations. In contrast, the degree to which germline, or inherited, variation contributes to tumorigenesis remains unclear, possibly due to a lack of accessible germline variant data. Here we called germline variants on 9618 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database representing 31 cancer types. We identified batch effects affecting loss of function (LOF) variant calls that can be traced back to differences in the way the sequence data were generated both within and across cancer types. Overall, LOF indel calls were more sensitive to technical artifacts than LOF Single Nucleotide Variant (SNV) calls. In particular, whole genome amplification of DNA prior to sequencing led to an artificially increased burden of LOF indel calls, which confounded association analyses relating germline variants to tumor type despite stringent indel filtering strategies. The samples affected by these technical artifacts include all acute myeloid leukemia and practically all ovarian cancer samples. We demonstrate how technical artifacts induced by whole genome amplification of DNA can lead to false positive germline-tumor type associations and suggest TCGA whole genome amplified samples be used with caution. This study draws attention to the need to be sensitive to problems associated with a lack of uniformity in data generation in TCGA data.

  16. Meaning attribution in the West African green monkey: influence of call type and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Tabitha; Fischer, Julia

    2014-03-01

    The search for the evolutionary roots of human language has fuelled much research into the cognitive mechanisms underlying communication in nonhuman animals. One core issue has been whether the context-specific calls of nonhuman animals are meaningful, with call meaning inferred from recipients' responses in the absence of supporting contextual cues. This direct inference may well offer an oversimplified view of how vocalisations are perceived, however, as responses under natural conditions are likely guided by contextual cues as well as by the signal. In this study, we investigate how the anti-predator responses of green monkeys, Chlorocebus sabaeus, are affected by alarm call structure and by context. We first simulated the presence of leopards and snakes to elicit alarm vocalisations and to identify predator-typical response behaviours. In both contexts, the monkeys produced chirp calls that revealed only graded variation in relation to predator type. We then carried out playback experiments to explore whether green monkeys would respond with predator-typical behaviour to leopard and snake chirps, and whether contextual cues, in the form of pre-exposure to a leopard or snake model, would modify these responses. Irrespective of context, subjects were more likely to respond to leopard chirps with a leopard-typical response. Predator priming did not have a significant effect on the type of response, but, together with call type, did affect response duration. This suggests that the immediate attribution of meaning was influenced by acoustic cues, whilst receiver's prior knowledge was incorporated to guide subsequent behaviour.

  17. Frequency selectivity at very low centre frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    measurements based on OAE suppression techniques and notched-noise masking data psychophysically measured for centre frequencies in the range 50-125 Hz, this study examines how individual differences in frequency selectivity, as well as in masking, may occur at very low CFs due to individual differences...... in the shape of the METFs, thought to be affected by the helicotrema impedance. Preliminary analysis indicates that individual differences in the METFs might underlay the observed individual differences in frequency selectivity. Main effects predicted by the calculations are a pronounced flattening off...

  18. Confidence bounds for normal and lognormal distribution coefficients of variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Verrill

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares the so-called exact approach for obtaining confidence intervals on normal distribution coefficients of variation to approximate methods. Approximate approaches were found to perform less well than the exact approach for large coefficients of variation and small sample sizes. Web-based computer programs are described for calculating confidence...

  19. Falls prevention revisited: a call for a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Jennifer

    2004-05-01

    Patient falls constitute a major threat to health services' ability to provide care. Previous studies confirm that nurses can identify patients at risk and that a preventative programme can reduce the rate of falls but few studies have been evaluated over time. A study was undertaken to test a Falls Prevention Programme in an acute medical area that was re-evaluated 5 years later to determine if the effects were sustainable. The design included two groups of patients admitted before and after the programme. Variables such as staffing, equipment, environment and routines were controlled. However, because of ethical approval constraints, some variables such as age, mental status, mobility and gender were not. The programme included a risk assessment tool, a choice of interventions, a graphic that alerted others to 'at risk patients' and simple patient and staff education. Data were collected using incident forms and a formula was used to calculate a rate of falls. A non-paired t-test compared rates and anova examined the relationship of age, gender, mobility and mental status on the incidence of falls. Control graphs determined the stability of the process. The falls rate was significantly reduced. Control graphs demonstrate that the process achieved greater control with less variation. In the next 5 years the falls rate increased to preprogramme levels and control graphs demonstrated that the process was no longer controlled. Compliance with the programme had deteriorated. The practice review considered skill mix, patient activity and acuity but provided no definitive answers to explain non-compliance. The implications to nursing are discussed. Clinicians are called to conduct more rigorous research into falls prevention but it may be more useful to direct research towards examining nursing work and increasing nurse autonomy in falls prevention.

  20. Economic evaluation of the differential benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; So, Ching; Chau, June; Law, Antony Kwan Pui; Tam, Stanley Ku Fu; McGhee, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    home visits and telephone calls are two often used approaches in transitional care, but their differential economic effects are unknown. to examine the differential economic benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support. cost-effectiveness analysis conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial (RCT). patients discharged from medical units randomly assigned to control (control, N = 210), home visits with calls (home, N = 196) and calls only (call, N = 204). cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted from the societal perspective comparing monetary benefits and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. the home arm was less costly but less effective at 28 days and was dominating (less costly and more effective) at 84 days. The call arm was dominating at both 28 and 84 days. The incremental QALY for the home arm was -0.0002/0.0008 (28/84 days), and the call arm was 0.0022/0.0104 (28/84 days). When the three groups were compared, the call arm had a higher probability being cost-effective at 84 days but not at 28 days (home: 53%, call: 35% (28 days) versus home: 22%, call: 73% (84 days)) measuring against the NICE threshold of £20,000. the original RCT showed that the bundled intervention involving home visits and calls was more effective than calls only in the reduction of hospital readmissions. This study adds a cost perspective to inform policymakers that both home visits and calls only are cost-effective for transitional care support, but calls only have a higher chance of being cost-effective for a sustained period after intervention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.