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Sample records for california utility dsm

  1. A scoping study on energy-efficiency market transformation by California Utility DSM Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, J.; Prahl, R.; Schlegel, J.

    1996-07-01

    Market transformation has emerged as a central policy objective for future publicly-funded energy-efficiency programs in California. California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) Decision 95-12-063 calls for public funding to shift to activities designed to transform the energy-efficiency market. The CPUC envisions that funding {open_quotes}would only be needed for specific and limited periods of time to cause the market to be transformed{close_quotes}. At the same time, the CPUC also acknowledges that {open_quotes}there are many definitions of market transformation{close_quotes} ... and does {open_quotes}not attempt to refine those definitions today{close_quotes}. We argue that a definition of market transformation is essential. The literature is now replete with definitions, and an operational definition is needed for the CPUC to decide on which programs should be supported with public funds. The CPUC decision initially indicated a preference for programs that do not provide financial assistance 4-efficiency programs that rely on financial assistance to customers. However, energy customers have traditionally accounted for a substantial portion of California utility`s DSM programs, so the CPUC`s direction to use ratepayer funds to support programs that will transform the market raises critical questions about how to analyze what has happened in order to plan effectively for the future: Which utility energy-efficiency programs, including those that provide financial assistance to customers, have had market transforming effects? To what extent do current regulatory rules and practices encourage or discourage utilities from running programs that are designed to transform the market? Should the rules and programs be modified, and, if so, how, to promote market transformation?

  2. Restructuring DSM: Moving beyond the utility monopoly on DSM resource acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.

    1998-07-01

    A number of states and regions are considering replacing or supplementing the monopoly, vertically-integrated utility as the principal provider of publicly-financed energy efficiency services. The motives for this change include new program objectives such as market transformation and privatization, and concerns about the abuse of market power by DSM providers in the future competitive market. Alternatives approaches in place or being considered include retention of DSM responsibilities by distribution utilities, creation of new entitles (both public and non-profit), and the transfer of administrative responsibilities for DSM through a competitive bid to potentially unregulated private companies. This paper summarizes the alternative administrative approaches that are under consideration or have been adopted in different states in light of the multiple goals policy makers are trying to achieve including administrative efficiency, program effectiveness, regulatory divestiture, and political support. Particular attention is paid to the shift from utility provision of DSM services to an independent administrator in California.

  3. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  4. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs. [Demand-Side Management (DSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J. (eds.); Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility's portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to triangulate'' an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  5. DSM and electric utility competitiveness: An Illinois perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    A predominant theme in the current electric utility industry literature is that competitive forces have emerged and may become more prominent. The wholesale bulk power market is alreadly competitive, as non-utility energy service providers already have had a significant impact on that market; this trend was accelerated by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Although competition at the retail level is much less pervasive, electric utility customers increasingly have greater choice in selecting energy services. These choices may include, depending on the customer, the ability to self-generate, switch fuels, move to a new location, or rely more heavily on demand-side management as a means of controlling electric energy use. This paper explores the subject of how demand-side management (DSM) programs, which are often developed by a utility to satisfy resource requirements as a part of its least-cost planning process, can affect the utility`s ability to compete in the energy services marketplace. In this context, the term `DSM` is used in this paper to refer to those demand-side services and programs which provide resources to the utility`s system. Depending on one`s perspective, DSM programs (so defined) can be viewed either as an enhancement to the competitive position of a utility by enabling it to provide its customers with a broader menu of energy services, simultaneously satisfying the objectives of the utility as well as those of the customers, or as a detractor to a utility`s ability to compete. In the latter case, the concern is with respect to the potential for adverse rate impacts on customers who are not participants in DSM programs. The paper consists of an identification of the pros and cons of DSM as a competitive strategy, the tradeoff which can occur between the cost impacts and rate impacts of DSM, and an examination of alternative strategies for maximizing the utilization of DSM both as a resource and as a competitive strategy.

  6. Electric-utility DSM programs in a competitive market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.

    1994-04-01

    During the past few years, the costs and effects of utility demand-side management (DSM) programs have grown sharply. In 1989, US electric utilities spent 0.5% of revenues on such programs and cut total electricity consumption by 0.6%. By 1992, these numbers had increased to 1.3% and 1.2%, respectively. Utility projections, as of early 1993, of DSM expenditures and energy savings for 1997 were 1.7% and 2.5%, respectively. Whether this projected growth comes to pass may depend on current debates about deregulation of, and increased competition in, the electric-utility industry. This report examines the factors likely to affect utility DSM programs in a more competitive environment. The electric-utility industry faces two forces that may conflict with each other. One is the pressure to open up both wholesale and retail markets for competition. The net effect of such competition, especially at the retail level, would have much greater emphasis on electricity prices and less emphasis on energy services. Such an outcome would force a sharp reduction in the scale of DSM programs that are funded by customers in general. The second force is increased concern about environmental quality and global warming. Because utilities are major contributors to US carbon dioxide emissions, the Administration`s Climate Change Action Plan calls on utilities to reduce such emissions. DSM programs are one key way to do that and, in the process, to cut customer electric bills and improve economic productivity. This report discusses the forms of competition and how they might affect DSM programs. It examines the important roles that state regulatory commissions could play to affect retail competition and utility DSM programs. The report also considers the effects of DSM programs on retail electricity prices.

  7. Clinical Utility and "DSM-V"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The construction of the American Psychiatric Association's diagnostic manual has been guided primarily by concerns of construct validity rather than of clinical utility, despite claims by its authors that the highest priority has in fact been clinical utility. The purpose of this article was to further articulate the concept and importance of…

  8. Communications technologies for demand side management, DSM, and European utility communications architecture, EurUCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkkaeinen, S.; Kekkonen, V. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Rissanen, P. [Tietosavo Oy (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this project the main target is to develop and assess methods for DSM (Demand Side Management) and distribution automation planning from the utility`s point of view. The final goal is to integrate these methods for the strategic planning of electric utilities. In practice the project is divided into four main parts: The development and assessment of DSM/IRP planning methods and cost/benefit analysis as a part of international co-operation (IEA DSM Agreement: Annex IV, European Cost/Benefit analysis of DSM, EUBC, and Finnish SAVE-project started in 1995 in co-operation with SRC International and six electric utilities in Finland); Development of PC-based DSM planning and assessment tools at VTT; Development of a decision support system of distribution network planning including DSM options at Tietosavo Oy and Integration of DSM planning and network planning tools in co-operation with VTT Energy and Tietosavo Oy

  9. Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.

    1993-05-01

    For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

  10. Clinician judgments of clinical utility: A comparison of DSM-IV-TR personality disorders and the alternative model for DSM-5 personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Skodol, Andrew E; Oldham, John M

    2014-05-01

    This study compared the perceived clinical utility of DSM-IV-TR personality disorder diagnoses (retained in DSM-5) with the alternative model presented in DSM-5 Section III, using a national sample of clinicians applying both systems to their own patients. A sample of 337 mental health clinicians (26% psychiatrists, 63% psychologists, and 11% other professional disciplines) provided a complete assessment of all personality disorder features listed in DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Section III. After applying each diagnostic model, clinicians evaluated the clinical utility of that model with respect to communication with patients and with other professionals, comprehensiveness, descriptiveness, ease of use, and utility for treatment planning. These perceptions were compared across DSM-IV-TR and the 3 components of the DSM-5 Section III model, and between psychiatrists and nonpsychiatrists. Although DSM-IV-TR was seen as easy to use and useful for professional communication, in every other respect the DSM-5 Section III model was viewed as being equally or more clinically useful than DSM-IV-TR. In particular, the DSM-5 dimensional trait model was seen as more useful than DSM-IV-TR in 5 of 6 comparisons-by psychiatrists as well as other professionals. Although concerns were expressed about the clinical utility of the DSM-5 personality disorder system during its development, these criticisms were offered without data on the proposed system. The results of this study demonstrate that aside from the current familiarity of the DSM-IV-TR approach, it offers little advantage in perceived clinical utility over the DSM-5 Section III system, whereas the latter is viewed as being more useful in several respects.

  11. Communications technologies for demand side management, DSM, and European utility communications architecture, EurUCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uuspaeae, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The scope of this research is data communications for electric utilities. Demand Side Management (DSM) calls for communication between the Electric Utility and the Customer. The communication capacity needed will depend on the functions that are chosen for DSM, and on the number of customers. Some functions may be handled with one-way communications, some functions require two-way communication. Utility Communication Architecture looks for an overall view of the communications needs and communication systems in an electric utility. The objective is to define and specify suitable and compatible communications procedures within the Utility and also to outside parties. (27 refs.)

  12. Utility of DSM-5 section III personality traits in differentiating borderline personality disorder from comparison groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, B; Sellbom, M; Bo, S

    2016-01-01

    to determine how the alternative DSM-5 Section III personality trait dimensions differentiates such features in BPD patients versus comparison groups. To date, no study has attempted such validation. METHOD: The current study examined the utility of the DSM-5 trait dimensions in differentiating patients...... with the categorical DSM-IV/5 diagnosis of BPD (n=101) from systematically matched samples of other PD patients (n=101) and healthy controls (n=101). This was investigated using one-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Results indicated that Emotional Lability, Risk Taking...

  13. Clinical Utility of the DSM-5 Alternative Model of Personality Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel...... (involving a comparison of presenting problems, history, and diagnoses) and used to formulate treatment considerations. We also considered 6 specific personality disorder types that could be derived from the profiles as defined in the DSM-5 Section III criteria. Results. Using the LPFS and PID-5, we were...... evaluation generally supported the utility for clinical purposes of the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders in Section III of the DSM-5, although it also identified some areas for refinement....

  14. Utility DSM Programs from 1989 Through 1998: Continuation or Cross-Roads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, S.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past five years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has been collecting data annually from US electric utilities on their demand-side management (DSM) programs, both current and projected. The latest data cover activities for 1993 and projections for 1994 and 1998. In 1993, 991 utilities operated DSM programs. That year, they spent $2.8 billion, a 13% increase over 1992 expenditures. These and earlier DSM programs saved 44,000 GWh of energy and reduced potential peak demand by 40,000 MW, 30% and 22% increases over the 1992 values, respectively. While some people predict the demise of electric-utility DSM programs, the data do not paint so bleak a picture. In most parts of the country, DSM programs grew in 1993 and utilities (as of Spring 1994) projected continued growth through 1998. Expenditures grew from 1.3% of revenues in 1992 to 1.5% in 1993, and are expected to grow 2.5% per year faster than inflation, which is equivalent to revenue growth. Thus, DSM spending is expected to stay constant at 1.5% of revenues through 1998. Because of the cumulative effect of DSM programs, energy savings are expected to grow from 1.2% of sales in 1992 to 1.6% in 1993 and 3.0% in 1998. Potential-peak reductions are expected to increase from 5.9% of peak demand in 1992 to 6.8% in 1993 and 8.9% in 1998. However, the growth in spending is not as rapid as the 8% annual real growth projected a year earlier. Actual expenditures in 1993 were 6.5% lower than projected early that year. Energy savings, on the other hand, were the same as projected earlier. Potential peak reductions were actually 9% higher than previously projected.

  15. The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.

    1991-11-01

    More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

  16. Clinical utility of the DSM-5 alternative model of personality disorders: six cases from practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel instruments assess level of personality impairment and pathological traits. Objective. A number of studies have supported the psychometric qualities of the LPFS and the PID-5, but the utility of these instruments in clinical assessment and treatment has not been extensively evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of this alternative model of personality disorders. Method. We administered the LPFS and the PID-5 to psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with personality disorders and other nonpsychotic disorders. The personality profiles of six characteristic patients were inspected (involving a comparison of presenting problems, history, and diagnoses) and used to formulate treatment considerations. We also considered 6 specific personality disorder types that could be derived from the profiles as defined in the DSM-5 Section III criteria. Results. Using the LPFS and PID-5, we were able to characterize the 6 cases in a meaningful and useful manner with regard to understanding and treatment of the individual patient and to match the cases with 6 relevant personality disorder types. Implications for ease of use, communication, and psychotherapy are discussed. Conclusion. Our evaluation generally supported the utility for clinical purposes of the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders in Section III of the DSM-5, although it also identified some areas for refinement. (Journal of Psychiatric Practice 2015;21:3-25).

  17. The Relationship Between the Childhood Autism Rating Scale: Second Edition and Clinical Diagnosis Utilizing the DSM-IV-TR and the DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Tamara; Meyer, Allison T; Van Bourgondien, Mary E

    2016-10-01

    The Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition (CARS2; 2010) includes two rating scales; the CARS2-Standard Version (CARS2-ST) and the newly developed CARS2-High Functioning Version (CARS2-HF). To assess the diagnostic agreement between the CARS2 and DSM-IV-TR versus DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), clinicians at community based centers of the University of North Carolina TEACCH Autism Program rated participants seen for a diagnostic evaluation on symptoms of autism using both the DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria and either the CARS2-HF or the CARS2-ST. Findings suggest that overall, the diagnostic agreement of the CARS2 remains high across DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for autism.

  18. Elastic Model Transitions: a Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, T. Jason; Ottander, John A.

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes both quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) algorithms to determine physical displacements. This approach is applicable to the simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize multiple LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data for discrete segments of the launch vehicle trajectory presents a problem of how to properly transition between models while preserving motion across the transition. In addition, energy may vary between flex models when using a truncated mode set. The LSQI-DSM algorithm can accommodate significant changes in energy between FEM models and carries elastic motion across FEM model transitions. Compared with previous approaches, the LSQI-DSM algorithm shows improvements ranging from a significant reduction to a complete removal of transients across FEM model transitions as well as maintaining elastic motion from the prior state.

  19. The Relationship between the "Childhood Autism Rating Scale: Second Edition" and Clinical Diagnosis Utilizing the DSM-IV-TR and the DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Tamara; Meyer, Allison T.; Van Bourgondien, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    "The Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition" (CARS2; 2010) includes two rating scales; the CARS2-Standard Version (CARS2-ST) and the newly developed CARS2-High Functioning Version (CARS2-HF). To assess the diagnostic agreement between the CARS2 and DSM-IV-TR versus DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), clinicians at…

  20. Poor Utility of the Age of Onset Criterion for DSM-IV Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Richard D.; Huang, Hongyan; Henderson, Cynthia A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: To test whether the retrospective reporting of the age of onset impairment criterion for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) required in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV" (DSM-IV) complicates identification of new and known child and adolescent cases later in life. Methods: A birth-records-based…

  1. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans.

  2. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  3. Compulsivity and Impulsivity in Pathological Gambling: Does a Dimensional-Transdiagnostic Approach Add Clinical Utility to DSM-5 Classification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottesi, Gioia; Ghisi, Marta; Ouimet, Allison J; Tira, Michael D; Sanavio, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Although the phenomenology of Pathological Gambling (PG) is clearly characterized by impulsive features, some of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (DSM-5) criteria for PG are similar to those of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Therefore, the compulsive-impulsive spectrum model may be a better (or complementary) fit with PG phenomenology. The present exploratory research was designed to further investigate the compulsive and impulsive features characterizing PG, by comparing PG individuals, alcohol dependents (ADs), OCD patients, and healthy controls (HCs) on both self-report and cognitive measures of compulsivity and impulsivity. A better understanding of the shared psychological and cognitive mechanisms underlying differently categorized compulsive and impulsive disorders may significantly impact on both clinical assessment and treatment strategies for PG patients. With respect to self-report measures, PG individuals reported more compulsive and impulsive features than did HCs. As regards motor inhibition ability indices, PG individuals and HCs performed similarly on the Go/No-go task and better than AD individuals and OCD patients. Results from the Iowa Gambling Task highlighted that PG, AD, and OCD participants performed worse than did HCs. An in-depth analysis of each group's learning profile revealed similar patterns of impairment between PG and AD individuals in decision-making processes. Current findings support the utility of adopting a dimensional-transdiagnostic approach to complement the DSM-5 classification when working with PG individuals in clinical practice. Indeed, clinicians are encouraged to assess both compulsivity and impulsivity to provide individualized case conceptualizations and treatment plans focusing on the specific phenomenological features characterizing each PG patient.

  4. Health services utilization by school going Omani adolescents and youths with DSM IV mental disorders and barriers to service use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsi Magdi M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent corpus of research suggests that psychiatric disorders amongst adolescents and youths are an emerging global challenge, but there is paucity of studies exploring health services utilization by this age group in Arab region. Aim This study focus on the health services utilization and the barriers among school going adolescents and youths with DSM IV disorders in the country Oman, whose population is predominantly youthful. Methods Representative sample of secondary school Omani adolescents and youths were concurrently interviewed for the (i presence of DSM IV mental disorders using the face-to-face interview, World Mental Health-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI, (ii tendency for health care utilization and (iii predictors of utilization with clinical and demographic background. Results The proportions of lifetime cases having ever made treatment contact are low, being 5.2% for any anxiety disorder and 13.2% for any mood disorder category. None of these anxiety cases made treatment contact in the year of onset of the disorder, and the median delay when they eventually made treatment contact is about 14 years. In any mood disorders category only 3.6% made contact within the 1st year of onset with the median delay in initial treatment contact is two years for the Bipolar disorder (broad, four years for Any Mood disorder and nine years for the Major Depressive Disorder group. Male gender is significantly associated with less likelihood of making treatment contact when suffering from Social phobia (p = 0.000, Major Depressive Disorder (p = 0.000 and Bipolar Disorder (p = 0.000. The younger cohorts of 14-16 years and 17-18 years of Social phobic made significantly less lifetime any treatment contact (p = 0.000. The 14-16 year olds were significantly less likely to make lifetime any treatment contact for Bipolar Mood disorder (p = 0.000, while the 17-18 group were 1.5 times more likely to do so. Over past

  5. California state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of California. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  6. A future Demand Side Management (DSM) opportunity for utility as variable renewable penetrate scale up using agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ines, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Modi, V.; Robertson, A. W.; Lall, U.; Kocaman Ayse, S.; Chaudhary, S.; Kumar, A.; Ganapathy, A.; Kumar, A.; Mishra, V.

    2015-12-01

    Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as smart metering, incentive based schemes, payments for turning off loads or rescheduling loads. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less power during periods of peak demand, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need for investments in networks and/or power plants for meeting peak demands. Electricity use can vary dramatically on short and medium time frames, and the pricing system may not reflect the instantaneous cost as additional higher-cost that are brought on-line. In addition, the capacity or willingness of electricity consumers to adjust to prices by altering elasticity of demand may be low, particularly over short time frames. In the scenario of Indian grid setup, the retail customers do not follow real-time pricing and it is difficult to incentivize the utility companies for continuing the peak demand supply. A question for the future is how deeper penetration of renewable will be handled? This is a challenging problem since one has to deal with high variability, while managing loss of load probabilities. In the case of managing the peak demand using agriculture, in the future as smart metering matures with automatic turn on/off for a pump, it will become possible to provide an ensured amount of water or energy to the farmer while keeping the grid energized for 24 hours. Supply scenarios will include the possibility of much larger penetration of solar and wind into the grid. While, in absolute terms these sources are small contributors, their role will inevitably grow but DSM using agriculture could help reduce the capital cost. The other option is of advancing or delaying pump operating cycle even by several hours, will still ensure

  7. DSM pocket guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    It has been estimated that if electricity were used more efficiently with commercially available end-use technologies, 24%--44% of the nation's current demand for electricity could be eliminated. Almost all major electric utilities in the west are investigated such demand-side management (DSM) opportunities. In some service territories, for example, improved efficiency could soon produce as much power as that from new coal-fired plants and produce it at a lower cost. Even utilities that currently have excess capacity are finding that DSM offers an opportunity to build efficient end-use stock to help them meet their future load shape objectives. Utility DSM programs typically consist of several measures designed to modify the utility's load shape (for example, innovative rate structures, direct utility control of loads, promotion of energy-efficient technologies, and customer education). The coordinated implementation of such measures requires planning, analysis of options, engineering, marketing, monitoring, and other coordination activities. This guidebook addresses one facet of an overall DSM program: selection of end-use technologies within the electrical utilities. This guidebook is intended to be a quick reference source both for utility field representatives in their customer interactions and for utility planners in the early stages of developing a DSM program. Finally, this guidebook is directed primarily at small municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives within the Western Area Power Administration (Western) service area.

  8. DSM pocket guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    It has been estimated that if electricity were used more efficiently with commercially available end-use technologies, 24%--44% of the nation's current demand for electricity could be eliminated. Almost all major electric utilities in the west are investigating such demand-side management (DSM) opportunities. In some service territories, for example, improved efficiency could soon produce as much power as that from new coal-fired plants and produce it at a lower cost. Even utilities that currently have excess capacity are finding that DSM offers an opportunity to build efficient end-use stock to help them meet their future load shape objectives. Utility DSM programs typically consist of several measures designed to modify the utility's load shape (for example, innovative rate structures, direct utility control of loads, promotion of energy-efficient technologies, and customer education). The coordinated implementation of such measures requires planning, analysis of options, engineering, marketing, monitoring, and other coordination activities. This guidebook addresses one facet of an overall DSM program: selection of end-use technologies within the electrical utilities. This guidebook is intended to be a quick reference source both for utility field representatives in their customer interactions and for utility planners in the early stages of developing a DSM program. Finally, this guidebook is directed primarily at small municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives within the Western Area Power Administration (Western) service area.

  9. The Clinical Utility of the Proposed DSM-5 Callous-Unemotional Subtype of Conduct Disorder in Young Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Dustin; Stepp, Stephanie; Hipwell, Alison; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda; Loeber, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A callous-unemotional (CU) subtype of conduct disorder (CD) has been proposed as an addition to the fifth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)." This study tested the hypothesis that young girls with the CU subtype of CD would exhibit more severe antisocial behavior and less severe internalizing…

  10. Utility of the 3Di Short Version for the Diagnostic Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Compatibility with DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slappendel, Geerte; Mandy, William; van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C.; van der Sijde, Ad; Duvekot, Jorieke; Skuse, David; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    The Developmental Diagnostic Dimensional Interview-short version (3Di-sv) provides a brief standardized parental interview for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study explored its validity, and compatibility with DSM-5 ASD. 3Di-sv classifications showed good sensitivity but low specificity when compared to ADOS-2-confirmed clinical…

  11. Comparing the utility of DSM-5 Section II and III antisocial personality disorder diagnostic approaches for capturing psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Maples, Jessica L; MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    The current study compares the 2 diagnostic approaches (Section II vs. Section III) included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) for diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in terms of their relations with psychopathic traits and externalizing behaviors (EBs). The Section III approach to ASPD, which is more explicitly trait-based than the Section II approach, also includes a psychopathy specifier (PS) that was created with the goal of making the diagnosis of ASPD more congruent with psychopathy. In a community sample of individuals currently receiving mental health treatment (N = 106), ratings of the 2 DSM-5 diagnostic approaches were compared in relation to measures of psychopathy, as well as indices of EBs. Both DSM-5 ASPD approaches were significantly related to the psychopathy scores, although the Section III approach accounted for almost twice the amount of variance when compared with the Section II approach. Relatively little of this predictive advantage, however, was due to the PS, as these traits manifested little evidence of incremental validity in relation to existing psychopathy measures and EBs, with the exception of a measure of fearless dominance. Overall, the DSM-5 Section III diagnostic approach for ASPD is more convergent with the construct of psychopathy, from which ASPD was originally derived. These improvements, however, are due primarily to the new trait-based focus in the Section III ASPD diagnosis rather than the assessment of personality dysfunction or the inclusion of additional "psychopathy-specific" traits.

  12. DSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Mikkel; Jónsson, Hjalti; Hougaard, Esben

    2013-01-01

    I maj måned i år udkom den længe ventede opdatering af diagnoselisten DSM-IV. Her følger en gennemgang af indholdet......I maj måned i år udkom den længe ventede opdatering af diagnoselisten DSM-IV. Her følger en gennemgang af indholdet...

  13. Standard practice: Estimating the cost-effectiveness of coordinated DSM programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, L.J.; Brown, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe and illustrate a methodology for estimating the cost-effectiveness of coordinated demand-side management (DSM) programs, extending California {open_quotes}standard practice{close_quotes} to address the special evaluation challenges arising from these programs. A coordinated DSM program is one that is co-administered by a state or local government agency and a gas or electric utility. Although the primary subject of this document is coordinated low-income programs, the principles are easily extended to estimating the cost-effectiveness of all coordinated programs.

  14. Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-07-01

    The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

  15. National Maglev initiative: California line electric utility power system requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Save, Phil

    1994-05-01

    The electrical utility power system requirements were determined for a Maglev line from San Diego to San Francisco and Sacramento with a maximum capacity of 12,000 passengers an hour in each direction at a speed of 300 miles per hour, or one train every 30 seconds in each direction. Basically the Maglev line requires one 50-MVA substation every 12.5 miles. The need for new power lines to serve these substations and their voltage levels are based not only on equipment loading criteria but also on limitations due to voltage flicker and harmonics created by the Maglev system. The resulting power system requirements and their costs depend mostly on the geographical area, urban or suburban with 'strong' power systems, or mountains and rural areas with 'weak' power systems. A reliability evaluation indicated that emergency power sources, such as a 10-MW battery at each substation, were not justified if sufficient redundancy is provided in the design of the substations and the power lines serving them. With a cost of $5.6 M per mile, the power system requirements, including the 12-kV DC cables and the inverters along the Maglev line, were found to be the second largest cost component of the Maglev system, after the cost of the guideway system ($9.1 M per mile), out of a total cost of $23 M per mile.

  16. Leadership skills for the California electric utility industry: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, Michael

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine the skills and knowledge necessary for leaders in the California electric utility industry in 2020. With rapid industry changes, skills to effectively lead and stay competitive are undetermined. Leaders must manage an increasingly hostile social and political environment, incorporate new technology, and deal with an aging workforce and infrastructure. Methodology. This study utilized a qualitative case study design to determine the factors that influence the skills leaders will require in 2020. It incorporated the perspectives of current electric utility leaders while looking with a future lens. Findings. Interviews were conducted with transmission and distribution (T&D) directors at 3 investor-owned public electric utilities headquartered in California. The questions followed an open-ended format to gather responses as perceived by electric utility leaders for each research question category: overall skills, aging workforce, regulation, technology, and leading younger generations. The research resulted in 18 major themes: 5 for overall skills, 3 for aging workforce, 4 for regulation, 3 for technology, and 3 for leading younger generations. Conclusions. The study identified leadership skills including the ability to embrace, leverage, and stay current with technology; understand and provide a clear vision for the future; increase creativity; manage the next set of workers; motivate during a time of great change; prepare for knowledge transfer and change in workforce culture; manage regulatory expectations; expand potential utility opportunities; leverage "big data"; allow worker collaboration; and understand what drives younger generations. Recommendations. California-based electric utility leaders can remain effective by implementing key strategies identified herein. Further research could examine perspectives of additional utility leaders who lead in organizational units outside of T&D, expand the research to

  17. Dental utilization by children in Hispanic agricultural worker families in California

    OpenAIRE

    Finlayson, TL; Gansky, SA; Shain, SG; Weintraub, JA

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural worker families encounter multiple barriers to accessing all needed dental care. This study investigated predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with children's past year dental utilization among Hispanic agricultural worker families in central California.Oral health survey and clinical data were collected from families participating in a larger, population-based study in 2006-7. Generalized estimating equation logit regression assessed effects on a dental visit among...

  18. Climate Change Challenges of Managing Quality of Drinking Water: Survey Results from Utilities in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrom, J.; Bedsworth, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists have established that climate change threatens sources of drinking water through many different pathways, both in terms of quantity and quality. Recognizing water utilities will face the brunt of these impacts, this study seeks to better understand the disconnect between the projections produced and the needs of utilities on-the-ground. As part of the first stage of the three-year study, this presentation reports results of a statewide survey evaluating how far along water utilities in California are along in preparing for the projected climate change impacts on water quality, the range in respondents' perspectives (and concerns) of climate change on water quality, and how the state's four-year drought is already presenting treatment challenges. On-going case studies are investigating the needs and capacity of utilities to prepare for and adapt to the projected water quality impacts from increasing extreme events and how or whether climate scientists can help meet these needs.

  19. Catatonia in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rajiv; Heckers, Stephan; Bustillo, Juan; Barch, Deanna M; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Gur, Raquel E; Malaspina, Dolores; Owen, Michael J; Schultz, Susan; Tsuang, Ming; van Os, Jim; Carpenter, William

    2013-10-01

    Although catatonia has historically been associated with schizophrenia and is listed as a subtype of the disorder, it can occur in patients with a primary mood disorder and in association with neurological diseases and other general medical conditions. Consequently, catatonia secondary to a general medical condition was included as a new condition and catatonia was added as an episode specifier of major mood disorders in DSM-IV. Different sets of criteria are utilized to diagnose catatonia in schizophrenia and primary mood disorders versus neurological/medical conditions in DSM-IV, however, and catatonia is a codable subtype of schizophrenia but a specifier for major mood disorders without coding. In part because of this discrepant treatment across the DSM-IV manual, catatonia is frequently not recognized by clinicians. Additionally, catatonia is known to occur in several conditions other than schizophrenia, major mood disorders, or secondary to a general medical condition. Four changes are therefore made in the treatment of catatonia in DSM-5. A single set of criteria will be utilized to diagnose catatonia across the diagnostic manual and catatonia will be a specifier for both schizophrenia and major mood disorders. Additionally, catatonia will also be a specifier for other psychotic disorders, including schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, brief psychotic disorder, and substance-induced psychotic disorder. A new residual category of catatonia not otherwise specified will be added to allow for the rapid diagnosis and specific treatment of catatonia in severely ill patients for whom the underlying diagnosis is not immediately available. These changes should improve the consistent recognition of catatonia across the range of psychiatric disorders and facilitate its specific treatment.

  20. Mental health treatment utilization in OIF/OEF National Guard and Reserve troops with and without DSM diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Jennifer M; Borsari, Brian; Benz, Madeline B; Reddy, Madhavi K; Shea, M Tracie

    2017-01-01

    Military service members have an increased risk of developing mental health (MH) problems following deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan, yet only a small percentage seek mental health treatment. The aim of the present study was to explore patterns of MH service utilization within the first 12 months following return from combat deployment. Participants were 169 service members who had returned from war-zone deployment in either Iraq or Afghanistan and had assessments covering a 12-month period following their homecoming. The authors first examined the prevalence of mental health diagnoses and engagement with mental health treatment (e.g., visits to the emergency room, inpatient hospitalization, individual therapy, group therapy, family or couple therapy, medication appointments, and self-help). Regression analyses explored whether distress, functioning, diagnoses, or social support predicted treatment use. Findings indicated that 28 of 50 military service members (56%) who met diagnostic criteria for a mental health disorder accessed services in the year following their return from deployment. Individual treatment was the most common modality, and those with major depressive disorder (MDD) reported the most treatment contacts. Social support was not associated with use of mental health services. Baseline functioning and psychiatric distress predicted entry into treatment whereas only psychiatric distress predicted amount of mental health service use in the 12-month postdeployment period. Findings highlight the need for enhanced strategies to link those reporting psychiatric distress with MH treatment services and increase community connectedness regardless of whether they meet full criteria for a mental health diagnosis. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Diel Production and Microheterotrophic Utilization of Dissolved Free Amino Acids in Waters Off Southern California

    OpenAIRE

    Carlucci, A. F.; Craven, D. B.; Henrichs, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Diel patterns of dissolved free amino acid (DFAA) concentration and microheterotrophic utilization were examined in the spring and fall of 1981 in euphotic waters from the base of the mixed layer off the southern California coast. The average depths of the isotherms sampled were 19.2 m for spring and 9.0 m for fall. Total DFAA levels were generally higher in the spring than in the fall, 18 to 66 nM and 14 to 20 nM, respectively. Two daily concentration maxima and minima were observed for tota...

  2. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Seven. California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of California governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  3. Barriers to Innovation in Urban Wastewater Utilities: Attitudes of Managers in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparsky, Michael; Thompson, Barton H.; Binz, Christian; Sedlak, David L.; Tummers, Lars; Truffer, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In many regions of the world, urban water systems will need to transition into fundamentally different forms to address current stressors and meet impending challenges—faster innovation will need to be part of these transitions. To assess the innovation deficit in urban water organizations and to identify means for supporting innovation, we surveyed wastewater utility managers in California. Our results reveal insights about the attitudes towards innovation among decision makers, and how perceptions at the level of individual managers might create disincentives for experimentation. Although managers reported feeling relatively unhindered organizationally, they also spend less time on innovation than they feel they should. The most frequently reported barriers to innovation included cost and financing; risk and risk aversion; and regulatory compliance. Considering these results in the context of prior research on innovation systems, we conclude that collective action may be required to address underinvestment in innovation.

  4. Golden Eagle mortality at a utility-scale wind energy facility near Palm Springs, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) mortality associated with wind energy turbines and infrastructure is under-reported and weakly substantiated in the published literature. I report two cases of mortality at a utility-scale renewable energy facility near Palm Springs, California. The facility has been in operation since 1984 and included 460 65KW turbines mounted on 24.4 m or 42.7 m lattice-style towers with 8 m rotor diameters. One mortality event involved a juvenile eagle that was struck and killed by a spinning turbine blade on 31 August, 1995. The tower was 24.4 m high. The other involved an immature female that was struck by a spinning blade on another 24.4 m tower on 17 April, 1997 and was later euthanized due to the extent of internal injuries. Other raptor mortalities incidentally observed at the site, and likely attributable to turbines, included three Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) found near turbines.

  5. Barriers to Innovation in Urban Wastewater Utilities: Attitudes of Managers in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparsky, Michael; Thompson, Barton H; Binz, Christian; Sedlak, David L; Tummers, Lars; Truffer, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In many regions of the world, urban water systems will need to transition into fundamentally different forms to address current stressors and meet impending challenges-faster innovation will need to be part of these transitions. To assess the innovation deficit in urban water organizations and to identify means for supporting innovation, we surveyed wastewater utility managers in California. Our results reveal insights about the attitudes towards innovation among decision makers, and how perceptions at the level of individual managers might create disincentives for experimentation. Although managers reported feeling relatively unhindered organizationally, they also spend less time on innovation than they feel they should. The most frequently reported barriers to innovation included cost and financing; risk and risk aversion; and regulatory compliance. Considering these results in the context of prior research on innovation systems, we conclude that collective action may be required to address underinvestment in innovation.

  6. DSM-5 field survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochner, Christine; Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania).......The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania)....

  7. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Utility Corridors at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    designates certain chemicals as “imminently hazardous;”  Clean Air Act which identifies toxic and hazardous pollutants and substances;  Clean Water ...Base, California SO4 Sulfates SR California State Route SSC California Species of Special Concern SWPPP Storm Water Pollution Prevention...106 3.9.2 Socioeconomic Setting for Each Corridor…..………..…………….…………..….109 3.10 WATER RESOURCES

  8. Affairs of power: Restructuring California's electric utility industry, 1968-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, William Allan

    This dissertation studies the process of change in the political economy of electric utilities. Following two decades of continual growth during the nation's post-World War Two economic and population boom, the electric power industry confronted increasing challenges to its traditional operating practices and cultural values, nowhere with greater intensity than in California. Pressure for change came from outside forces who opposed utilities' business practices, assailed their traditional vertically-integrated structure, questioned the political assumptions that sustained their monopoly status, and ultimately wrested away access to the once tightly controlled technology of electric generation and transmission. Because managers of both investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities continued to rely upon long-standing economic and technical assumptions derived from deeply held cultural values sustained by decades of business success, they were rendered unable to comprehend and unwilling to accommodate change. Persistent mistrust between the publicly-owned and privately-owned sectors further weakened the industry's ability to work cooperatively in the face of crucial challenges. Thus encumbered by endemic structural jealousy, technological path dependency, and organizational stasis, the industry did not respond with sufficient innovation to new social values and altering economic conditions, ultimately resulting in the discarding of the old political economy of regulated monopolism. Five precepts of economic history are identified as crucial elements of the process of change. First, the tension between protection and entry, and the related issue of access to technology, contributes to creation and modification of the political economy in which economic institutions function. Second, submission to governmental regulatory powers allows certain industries to control entry, restrict access, and protect themselves from the dynamics of competitive change. Third, an

  9. DSM-5 personality traits and DSM-IV personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Thomas, Katherine M; Markon, Kristian E; Wright, Aidan G C; Krueger, Robert F

    2012-05-01

    Two issues pertinent to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) proposal for personality pathology, the recovery of DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) by proposed DSM-5 traits and the validity of the proposed DSM-5 hybrid model, which incorporates both personality pathology symptoms and maladaptive traits, were evaluated in a large undergraduate sample (N = 808). Proposed DSM-5 traits as assessed with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 explained a substantial proportion of variance in DSM-IV PDs as assessed with the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+, and trait indicators of the 6 proposed DSM-5 PDs were mostly specific to those disorders with some exceptions. Regression analyses support the DSM-5 hybrid model in that pathological traits, and an indicator of general personality pathology severity provided incremental information about PDs. Findings are discussed in the context of broader issues around the proposed DSM-5 model of personality disorders.

  10. Beyond the DSM-IV: Assumptions, Alternatives, and Alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Shane J.; Edwards, Lisa M.; Pedrotti, Jennifer Teramoto; Prosser, Ellie C.; LaRue, Stephanie; Spalitto, Susan Vehige; Ulven, Jon C.

    2006-01-01

    Current diagnostic processes reflect the limitations and utility of the framework of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Clinical information in the DSM-IV's 5-axis system almost exclusively focuses on weaknesses and pathology and is summarized in a flawed…

  11. Convergent, discriminant, and criterion validity of DSM-5 traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalch, Matthew M; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Section III of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th edi.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) contains a system for diagnosing personality disorder based in part on assessing 25 maladaptive traits. Initial research suggests that this aspect of the system improves the validity and clinical utility of the Section II Model. The Computer Adaptive Test of Personality Disorder (CAT-PD; Simms et al., 2011) contains many similar traits as the DSM-5, as well as several additional traits seemingly not covered in the DSM-5. In this study we evaluate the convergent and discriminant validity between the DSM-5 traits, as assessed by the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger et al., 2012), and CAT-PD in an undergraduate sample, and test whether traits included in the CAT-PD but not the DSM-5 provide incremental validity in association with clinically relevant criterion variables. Results supported the convergent and discriminant validity of the PID-5 and CAT-PD scales in their assessment of 23 out of 25 DSM-5 traits. DSM-5 traits were consistently associated with 11 criterion variables, despite our having intentionally selected clinically relevant criterion constructs not directly assessed by DSM-5 traits. However, the additional CAT-PD traits provided incremental information above and beyond the DSM-5 traits for all criterion variables examined. These findings support the validity of pathological trait models in general and the DSM-5 and CAT-PD models in particular, while also suggesting that the CAT-PD may include additional traits for consideration in future iterations of the DSM-5 system. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. DSM-5 field survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochner, Christine; Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Pathologic skin picking (skin picking disorder [SPD]) is a prevalent and disabling condition, which has received increasing study. It is timely to consider including SPD in DSM-5. The aim of this field survey was to investigate possible diagnostic criteria for SPD.......Pathologic skin picking (skin picking disorder [SPD]) is a prevalent and disabling condition, which has received increasing study. It is timely to consider including SPD in DSM-5. The aim of this field survey was to investigate possible diagnostic criteria for SPD....

  13. California Women and the Strategies Utilized on the Path to the Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Anna-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify leadership strategies utilized and the barriers encountered by females in pursuit of the role of superintendent. This study also intended to identify the strategies women used to overcome these barriers. Methodology: This study utilized descriptive research. Descriptive research involves gathering…

  14. Explaining "DSM" to Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    "The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") is useful for children and families for three practical reasons: (1) It provides a way to communicate about emotional and behavioral problems of youth in a common language; (2) Parents can get an Individual Education Plan (IEP) for a child if that process…

  15. Antisocial personality disorder in DSM-5: missteps and missed opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Donald R; Vachon, David D

    2012-10-01

    This paper evaluates the proposal for antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fifth edition (DSM-5). Some aspects of the proposal are appealing: personality disorders will be assessed using trait criteria, and these criteria are similar to trait descriptions of DSM-IV ASPD. Other aspects of the proposal are less appealing. First, the DSM-5 will depend on a newly constructed personality trait system rather than relying on a well validated, widely studied one. Second, the trait profile of ASPD is incomplete; although this profile reflects the traits included in DSM-IV, it maps poorly onto the full personality profile of ASPD. Third, the DSM Workgroup missed an opportunity to finally unify ASPD and psychopathy; history and research suggest that these disorders have diverged mistakenly. Fourth, the newly proposed criteria of impairments in self- and interpersonal functioning are of questionable derivation and utility.

  16. Development of methods for DSM and distribution automation planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkkaeinen, S.; Kekkonen, V. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Rissanen, P. [Tietosavo Oy (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    Demand-Side Management (DSM) is usually an utility (or sometimes governmental) activity designed to influence energy demand of customers (both level and load variation). It includes basic options like strategic conservation or load growth, peak clipping. Load shifting and fuel switching. Typical ways to realize DSM are direct load control, innovative tariffs, different types of campaign etc. Restructuring of utility in Finland and increased competition in electricity market have had dramatic influence on the DSM. Traditional ways are impossible due to the conflicting interests of generation, network and supply business and increased competition between different actors in the market. Costs and benefits of DSM are divided to different companies, and different type of utilities are interested only in those activities which are beneficial to them. On the other hand, due to the increased competition the suppliers are diversifying to different types of products and increasing number of customer services partly based on DSM are available. The aim of this project was to develop and assess methods for DSM and distribution automation planning from the utility point of view. The methods were also applied to case studies at utilities

  17. Evaluating options for balancing the water-electricity nexus in California: Part 2--greenhouse gas and renewable energy utilization impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarroja, Brian; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sobhani, Reza; Feldman, David; Jiang, Sunny; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-11-01

    A study was conducted to compare the technical potential and effectiveness of different water supply options for securing water availability in a large-scale, interconnected water supply system under historical and climate-change augmented inflow and demand conditions. Part 2 of the study focused on determining the greenhouse gas and renewable energy utilization impacts of different pathways to stabilize major surface reservoir levels. Using a detailed electric grid model and taking into account impacts on the operation of the water supply infrastructure, the greenhouse gas emissions and effect on overall grid renewable penetration level was calculated for each water supply option portfolio that successfully secured water availability from Part 1. The effects on the energy signature of water supply infrastructure were found to be just as important as that of the fundamental processes for each option. Under historical (baseline) conditions, many option portfolios were capable of securing surface reservoir levels with a net neutral or negative effect on emissions and a benefit for renewable energy utilization. Under climate change augmented conditions, however, careful selection of the water supply option portfolio was required to prevent imposing major emissions increases for the system. Overall, this analysis provided quantitative insight into the tradeoffs associated with choosing different pathways for securing California's water supply.

  18. UPDATING LIDAR DSM USING HIGH RESOLUTION STEREO-BASED DSM FROM WORLDVIEW-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Arefi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the acquisition and processing techniques of high resolution Digital Surface Models (DSM have been rapidly improved. Airborne LiDAR production as a well-known and high quality DSM is still unbeatable in elevation accuracy and highly produced dense point clouds. In this paper, the objective is to update an old but high quality DSM produced by LiDAR data using a DSM generated from high resolution stereo satellite images. A classification-base algorithm is proposed to extract building changes between DSMs in two epochs. For image classification procedure, the DSM and Worldview-2 orthorectified images have been used as input data for a fuzzy-based classification method. Then, extracted buildings are classified into unchanged, destroyed, new, and changed classes. In this study a dataset related to Munich city, has been utilized to test the experimental investigation. The implemented qualitative and quantitative assessments demonstrate high quality as well as high feasibility of the proposed approach.

  19. Out of DSM: Depathologizing Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-12-04

    In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) removed the diagnosis of "homosexuality" from the second edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). This resulted after comparing competing theories, those that pathologized homosexuality and those that viewed it as normal. In an effort to explain how that decision came about, this paper reviews some historical scientific theories and arguments that first led to the placement of homosexuality in DSM-I and DSM-II as well as alternative theories that eventually led to its removal from DSM III and subsequent editions of the manual. The paper concludes with a discussion of the sociocultural aftermath of that 1973 decision.

  20. Network Fault Diagnosis Using DSM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Hao; Yan Pu-liu; Chen Xiao; Wu Jing

    2004-01-01

    Difference similitude matrix (DSM) is effective in reducing information system with its higher reduction rate and higher validity. We use DSM method to analyze the fault data of computer networks and obtain the fault diagnosis rules. Through discretizing the relative value of fault data, we get the information system of the fault data. DSM method reduces the information system and gets the diagnosis rules. The simulation with the actual scenario shows that the fault diagnosis based on DSM can obtain few and effective rules.

  1. Personality disorder in DSM-5: an oral history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachar, P; Krueger, R F; Kendler, K S

    2016-01-01

    As the revision process leading to DSM-5 began, the domain of personality disorder embodied the highest aspirations for major change. After an initial prototype-based proposal failed to gain acceptance, the Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group (P&PDWG) developed a hybrid model containing categorical and dimensional components. A clash of perspectives both within the P&PDWG and between the P&PDWG and DSM-5 oversight committees led to the rejection of this proposal from the main body of DSM-5. Major issues included conflicting ways of conceptualizing validation, differences of opinion from personality disorder experts outside the P&PDWG, divergent concepts of the magnitude of evidence needed to support substantial changes, and the disagreements about clinical utility of the hybrid model. Despite these setbacks, the 'Alternative DSM-5 Model of Personality Disorder' is presented in Section III of the DSM-5. Further research should clarify its performance relative to the DSM-IV criteria reprinted in the main DSM-5 text.

  2. Support for solar energy: Examining sense of place and utility-scale development in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juliet E. Carlisle; Stephanie L. Kane; David Solan; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2015-07-01

    As solar costs have declined PV systems have experienced considerable growth since 2003, especially in China, Japan, Germany, and the U.S. Thus, a more nuanced understanding of a particular public's attitudes toward utility-scale solar development, as it arrives in a market and region, is warranted and will likely be instructive for other areas in the world where this type of development will occur in the near future. Using data collected from a 2013 telephone survey (N = 594) from the six Southern Californian counties selected based on existing and proposed solar developments and available suitable land, we examine public attitudes toward solar energy and construction of large-scale solar facilities, testing whether attitudes toward such developments are the result of sense of place and attachment to place. Overall, we have mixed results. Place attachment and sense of place fail to produce significant effects except in terms of perceived positive benefits. That is, respondents interpret the change resulting from large-scale solar development in a positive way insofar as perceived positive economic impacts are positively related to support for nearby large-scale construction.

  3. DISSOCIATIVE DISORDERS IN DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiegel, David; Loewenstein, Richard J.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Sar, Vedat; Simeon, Daphne; Vermetten, Eric; Cardena, Etzel; Dell, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: We present recommendations for revision of the diagnostic criteria for the Dissociative Disorders (DDs) for DSM-5. The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining

  4. Dissociative disorders in DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiegel, David; Loewenstein, Richard J.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Sar, Vedat; Simeon, Daphne; Vermetten, Eric; Cardena, Etzel; Dell, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: We present recommendations for revision of the diagnostic criteria for the Dissociative Disorders (DDs) for DSM-5. The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining

  5. DSM-IV Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) will become one of most frequently used reference documents in counseling profession. Describes progress being made in development of DSM-IV, scheduled for publication in 1994. Describes revision process and proposed organizational changes and new diagnostic…

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecalis Symbioflor 1 Clones DSM16430 and DSM16434

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Chakraborty, Anindita; Hain, Torsten; Zimmermann, Kurt; Domann, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Symbioflor 1 is a historical concoction of 10 isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two groups: one comprising eight identical clones (DSM16430, DSM16432, DSM16433, DSM16435 to DSM16439) and a further two isolates (DSM16431, DSM16434) with marginally different profiles. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the draft genome sequences of representative isolates.

  7. Convergence between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic models for personality disorder: evaluation of strategies for establishing diagnostic thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Skodol, Andrew E

    2013-05-01

    The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) recommended substantial revisions to the personality disorders (PDs) section of DSM-IV-TR, proposing a hybrid categorical-dimensional model that represented PDs as combinations of core personality dysfunctions and various configurations of maladaptive personality traits. Although the DSM-5 Task Force endorsed the proposal, the Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) did not, placing the Work Group's model in DSM-5 Section III ("Emerging Measures and Models") with other concepts thought to be in need of additional research. This paper documents the impact of using this alternative model in a national sample of 337 patients as described by clinicians familiar with their cases. In particular, the analyses focus on alternative strategies considered by the Work Group for deriving decision rules, or diagnostic thresholds, with which to assign categorical diagnoses. Results demonstrate that diagnostic rules could be derived that yielded appreciable correspondence between DSM-IV-TR and proposed DSM-5 PD diagnoses-correspondence greater than that observed in the transition between DSM-III and DSM-III-R PDs. The approach also represents the most comprehensive attempt to date to provide conceptual and empirical justification for diagnostic thresholds utilized within the DSM PDs.

  8. DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 eating disorders in adolescents: prevalence, stability, and psychosocial correlates in a population-based sample of male and female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Karina L; Byrne, Susan M; Oddy, Wendy H; Crosby, Ross D

    2013-08-01

    The current study aimed to compare the prevalence, stability, and psychosocial correlates of DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 eating disorders, in a population-based sample of male and female adolescents followed prospectively from 14 to 20 years of age. Participants (N = 1,383; 49% male) were drawn from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, a prospective, population-based cohort study that has followed participants from prebirth to young adulthood. Detailed self-report questionnaires were used to assess eating disorder symptoms when participants were aged 14, 17, and 20 years. Comparisons between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 were conducted using McNemar chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests. Changes in eating disorder prevalence over time were considered using generalized estimating equations. Eating disorder prevalence rates were significantly greater when using DSM-5 than DSM-IV-TR criteria, at all time points for females and at age 17 only for males. "Unspecified"/"other" eating disorder diagnoses were significantly less common when applying DSM-5 than DSM-IV-TR criteria, but still formed 15% to 30% of the DSM-5 cases. Diagnostic stability was low for all disorders, and DSM-5 binge eating disorder or purging disorder in early adolescence predicted DSM-5 bulimia nervosa in later adolescence. Cross-over from binge eating disorder to bulimia nervosa was particularly high. Regardless of the diagnostic classification system used, all eating disorder diagnoses were associated with depressive symptoms and poor mental health quality of life. These results provide further support for the clinical utility of DSM-5 eating disorder criteria, and for the significance of binge eating disorder and purging disorder.

  9. Alcoholgerelateerde cognitieve stoornissen in de DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walvoort, S.J.W.; Wester, A.J.; Doorakkers, M.C.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Achtergrond: Binnen de dsm-iv-tr zijn alcoholgerelateerde cognitieve stoornissen moeilijk onder te brengen, met als gevolg dat deze neurocognitieve stoornissen vaak over het hoofd worden gezien. De komst van de dsm-5 zou hierin uitkomst kunnen bieden. Doel: De dsm-5 vergelijken met de dsm-iv-tr voo

  10. Out of DSM: Depathologizing Homosexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Drescher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA removed the diagnosis of “homosexuality” from the second edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM. This resulted after comparing competing theories, those that pathologized homosexuality and those that viewed it as normal. In an effort to explain how that decision came about, this paper reviews some historical scientific theories and arguments that first led to the placement of homosexuality in DSM-I and DSM-II as well as alternative theories that eventually led to its removal from DSM III and subsequent editions of the manual. The paper concludes with a discussion of the sociocultural aftermath of that 1973 decision.

  11. DSM-5 Boom o esperanza

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    After fourteen years of review, the expected update of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has generated great controversy among psychiatrists and psychologists around the world. So far, it is known that the new version (DSM-5), officially presented for the first time in May 18 of this year as part of the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), will be available in Spanish language at the beginning of 2014. However, the reviews and comments fo...

  12. Business case for industrial DSM maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Groenewald, H.J.; Van Rensburg, J.F.; Marais, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of industrial DSM projects often deteriorates without proper maintenance. Underperforming DSM projects waste money and increase the demand for electricity from Eskom. A solution to this problem is dedicated maintenance on industrial DSM projects. This ensures maximum performance and maximum electricity cost savings. In this paper, the business case for industrial DSM maintenance is presented. Results show that the benefits significantly outweigh the cost of DSM maintenance ...

  13. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-06-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  14. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-05-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  15. Specific phobia: a review of DSM-IV specific phobia and preliminary recommendations for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Richard T; Glenn, Daniel; Liao, Betty; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Ollendick, Thomas; Craske, Michelle G

    2010-02-01

    The present review was conducted in order to evaluate the current diagnostic criteria for specific phobia (SP) in light of the empirical evidence gathered since DSM-IV and to propose changes to DSM-V where change is clearly and reliably indicated by the evidence. In response to questions put forth by the DSM-V Anxiety, OC Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorder Work Group, four primary areas were determined for this review: the accuracy and utility of the current SP type classification system, the validity of test anxiety as a type of SP, the boundary between agoraphobia and SP, and the reliability and utility of the diagnostic criteria for SP. Developmental issues are addressed within each area. Literature reviews examining academic findings published between 1994 and 2009 were carried out and the results are included herein. The review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. All of these recommendations should be considered tentative as they await the field trials and expert consensus necessary prior to their inclusion in the DSM-V. The present review also reveals a great need for future research in the area of SP and directions for such research is provided.

  16. Psychodiagnosis for Counselors: The DSM-IV. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    This digest notes that there has been an increase in the number of graduate community mental health counseling programs requiring course work in abnormal behavior, psychopathology, and psychodiagnosis and that, as a result of this increase, utilization of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) also has…

  17. Multicriteria evaluation of demand side management (DSM) implementation strategies in the Indian power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashishtha, Sanjay [Centre for Renewable Energy and Environmental Development (CREED), BITS, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Ramachandran, M. [BITS Pilani Dubai Centre, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2006-09-15

    In recent years, demand side management (DSM) has emerged as an efficient utility planning strategy for reducing capacity shortages and improving system load factors. The Indian government is adopting various policies to implement DSM programs. DSM implementation involves a variety of interests with conflicting objectives, and a range of possible implementation strategies with varying implications for effectiveness, cost, feasibility, efficiency and stakeholder acceptance. This necessitates a critical comparison of the strategies to determine a preferred strategy or combination of strategies from each specific stakeholder's point of view. The present study evaluates DSM implementation strategies from a multiobjective perspective using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). Eight strategies and six criteria were considered. Forty utility, regulator, and consumer stakeholders were surveyed. The most highly ranked strategies involved creating dedicated funds and providing technical support to end users for effective implementation of DSM. (author)

  18. Biological and Cultural Control of Olive Fruit Fly in California---Utilization of Parasitoids from USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parasitoid Psytallia cf. concolor (Szépligeti) was reared on sterile Mediterranean fruit fly larvae at the USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Petapa Quarantine Laboratory in Guatemala and shipped to the USDA-ARS, Parlier, for wide-spread release and biological control of olive fruit fly in California. As many as 3...

  19. The Validity and Utility of the California Family Risk Assessment under Practice Conditions in the Field: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Will L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of the validity and implementation of a child maltreatment actuarial risk assessment model, the California Family Risk Assessment (CFRA). Questions addressed: (1) Is there evidence of the validity of the CFRA under field operating conditions? (2) Do actuarial risk assessment results influence child welfare workers' service…

  20. D-Link DSM-320

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    在经过漫长的等待后.我们终于收到了D-Link公司的这款DSM-320。在这次我们所征集到的媒体接口设备中.DSM-320恐怕是外观最为家电化的一款产品。DSM-320看上去非常像现在流行的超薄DVD播放机.如果不是机身后的无线天线暴露身份.恐怕很多人都会因找不到这台“DVD”的放盘舱门而感困惑。

  1. DSM-5: problems and suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgegård, Andreas; Groß, Gaby; de Man Lapidoth, Joakim; Norring, Claes

    2013-01-01

    The upcoming DSM5 will impact clinical work and research substantially, and we here point to a few problems that may have been overlooked. These concern inconsistencies and lack of clarity, and the future "not elsewhere classified" atypical anorexia nervosa category. We propose solutions in the form of working definitions and operationalizations to facilitate clinical implementation as well as streamline research.

  2. Voedings- en eetstoornissen in de DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, H W; van Elburg, Annemarie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the DSM-5, feeding disorders and eating disorders have been integrated into one single category. AIM: To review the rationale for changes in the criteria for feeding and eating disorders in DSM-5. METHOD: The revised criteria were drafted and formulated by a DSM-5 workgroup. Next, pro

  3. Classification of mood disorders in DSM-V and DSM-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Peter R

    2008-10-01

    For any diagnostic system to be clinically useful, and go beyond description, it must provide an understanding that informs about aetiology and/or outcome. DSM-III and DSM-IV have provided reliability; the challenge for DSM-V and DSM-VI will be to provide validity. For DSM-V this will not be achieved. Believers in DSM-III and DSM-IV have impeded progress towards a valid classification system, so DSM-V needs to retain continuity with its predecessors to retain reliability and enhance research, but position itself to inform a valid diagnostic system by DSM-VI. This review examines the features of a diagnostic system and summarizes what is really known about mood disorders. The review also questions whether what are called mood disorders are primarily disorders of mood. Finally, it provides suggestions for DSM-VI.

  4. Triennial changes in groundwater quality in aquifers used for public supply in California: Utility as indicators of temporal trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Landon, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    From 2004 to 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey collected samples from 1686 wells across the State of California as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project (PBP). From 2007 to 2013, 224 of these wells were resampled to assess temporal trends in water quality. The samples were analyzed for 216 water-quality constituents, including inorganic and organic compounds as well as isotopic tracers. The resampled wells were grouped into five hydrogeologic zones. A nonparametric hypothesis test was used to test the differences between initial sampling and resampling results to evaluate possible step trends in water-quality, statewide, and within each hydrogeologic zone. The hypothesis tests were performed on the 79 constituents that were detected in more than 5 % of the samples collected during either sampling period in at least one hydrogeologic zone. Step trends were detected for 17 constituents. Increasing trends were detected for alkalinity, aluminum, beryllium, boron, lithium, orthophosphate, perchlorate, sodium, and specific conductance. Decreasing trends were detected for atrazine, cobalt, dissolved oxygen, lead, nickel, pH, simazine, and tritium. Tritium was expected to decrease due to decreasing values in precipitation, and the detection of decreases indicates that the method is capable of resolving temporal trends.

  5. [Specific learning disabilities - from DSM-IV to DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2014-09-01

    The publication of the DSM-5 means changes in the classification and recommendations for diagnosis of specific learning disabilities. Dyslexia and dyscalculia have been reintroduced into the DSM. Three specific learning disorders - impairment in reading, impairment in the written expression, and impairment in mathematics, described by subskills - are now part of the DSM-5. Three subcomponents of the reading disorder are expressly differentiated: word reading accuracy, reading rate, and fluency and reading comprehension. Impaired subskills of the specific learning disorder with impairment in written expression are spelling accuracy, grammar and punctuation accuracy, and clarity and organization of written expression. Four subskills are found in the mathematics disorder: number sense, memorization of arithmetic facts, accurate or fluent calculation, and accurate math reasoning. Each impaired academic domain and subskill should be recorded. A description of the severity degree was also included. The diagnosis is based on a variety of methods, including medical history, clinical interview, school report, teacher evaluation, rating scales, and psychometric tests. The IQ discrepancy criterion was abandoned, though that of age or class discrepancy criterion was retained. The application of a discrepancy is recommended by 1 to 2.5 SD. All three specific developmental disorders are common (prevalence 5 %-15 %), occur early during the first years of formal schooling, and persist into adulthood.

  6. Asignaturas pendientes del DSM-5

    OpenAIRE

    Artigas, Josep, 1948-; Paula Pérez, Isabel, 1970-

    2015-01-01

    El presente artículo analiza las críticas generadas a partir de la publicación del Manual diagnóstico y estadístico de los trastornos mentales, quinta edición (DSM-5), ya anunciadas parcialmente durante las últimas fases de su elaboración. Una parte de las críticas se ha centrado en los cambios de los criterios diagnósticos para determinados trastornos y en la incorporación al DSM de nuevas entidades. Sin embargo, otra vertiente crítica va dirigida a la falta de validez de los diagnósticos de...

  7. An Investigation of Adherence to Diagnostic Criteria, Revisited: Clinical Diagnosis of the DSM-IV/DSM-5 Section II Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Benson, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    In an initial investigation by Morey and Ochoa (1989), adherence to DSM-III personality disorder diagnostic criteria was examined as an agreement rate between clinician (global) diagnoses and diagnoses algorithmically generated from DSM-III criteria rules. Morey and Ochoa (1989) findings suggested significant clinician-criterion diagnostic incongruity, a result that cross-validated in a DSM-III-R replication performed by Blashfield and Herkov (1996). The current study examined such adherence, utilizing DSM-IV decision rules, in a national sample of 337 clinicians and their target patients. The results of the current study are largely consistent with the earlier findings, with clinician-criterion agreement rates comparable to those commonly reported for interdiagnostician reliability. Ramifications for the future of personality disorder diagnostic classification are discussed.

  8. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in California. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Constitution of the State of California grants to the Legislature control over persons and private corporations that own or operate a line, plant, or system for the production, generation, or transmission of heat, light, water, or power to be furnished either directly or indirectly to or for the public. The Constitution establishes the Public Utilities Commission and grants certain specific powers to the PUC, including the power to fix rates, establish rules and prescribe a uniform system of accounts. The Constitution also recognizes that the Legislature has plenary power to confer additional authority and jurisdiction upon the PUC. The Constitution prohibits regulation by a city, county, or other municipal body of matters over which the Legislature has granted regulatory power to the PUC. This provision does not, however, impair the right of any city to grant franchises for public utilities. The California legislature has enacted the California Public Utilities Code and has designated the PUC as the agency to implement the regulatory provisions of the Code. The Public Utilities Commission consists of five members appointed by the governor and approved by the senate, a majority of the membership concurring, for staggered 6-year terms. Certain limited powers over the conduct of public utilities may still be exercised by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  9. Rorschach correlates of the DSM-IV histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M A; Hilsenroth, M J; Fowler, J C

    1998-04-01

    Rorschach assessment data have long been rationally linked to the psychiatric condition of hysteria. This study represents the first empirical attempt to explore the associations among select Rorschach variables, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) Histrionic Personality Disorder (HPD) criteria, and two self-report measures of hysteria. We correlated four Rorschach variables with total symptom scores for DSM-IV Cluster B Personality Disorders (Borderline, Antisocial, Narcissistic, and Histrionic). We found two Rorschach variables, FC + CF + C and T (Exner, 1993), to be significantly and meaningfully correlated with both the DSM-IV HPD total score (number of criteria) and the individual HPD criteria. Although not significantly associated with the HPD total score, Denial (DEN; Lerner & Lerner, 1980) was associated with one individual HPD criterion. Furthermore, DEN was significantly correlated with the MMPI-2 Hysteria (Hy) scale. The results are reviewed in terms of their clinical utility and the insights they offer into the psychological characteristics of the DSM-IV HPD.

  10. Body dysmorphic disorder: some key issues for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Wilhelm, Sabine; Koran, Lorrin M; Didie, Elizabeth R; Fallon, Brian A; Feusner, Jamie; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance, has been described for more than a century and increasingly studied over the past several decades. This article provides a focused review of issues pertaining to BDD that are relevant to DSM-V. The review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V: (1) Criterion A may benefit from some rewording, without changing its focus or meaning; (2) There are both advantages and disadvantages to adding a new criterion to reflect compulsive BDD behaviors; this possible addition requires further consideration; (3) A clinical significance criterion seems necessary for BDD to differentiate it from normal appearance concerns; (4) BDD and eating disorders have some overlapping features and need to be differentiated; some minor changes to DSM-IV's criterion C are suggested; (5) BDD should not be broadened to include body integrity identity disorder (apotemnophilia) or olfactory reference syndrome; (6) There is no compelling evidence for including diagnostic features or subtypes that are specific to gender-related, age-related, or cultural manifestations of BDD; (7) Adding muscle dysmorphia as a specifier may have clinical utility; and (8) The ICD-10 criteria for hypochondriacal disorder are not suitable for BDD, and there is no empirical evidence that BDD and hypochondriasis are the same disorder. The issue of how BDD's delusional variant should be classified in DSM-V is briefly discussed and will be addressed more extensively in a separate article.

  11. Re-evaluating DSM-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R; Blashfield, R K

    2016-02-01

    The DSM-I is currently viewed as a psychoanalytic classification, and therefore unimportant. There are four reasons to challenge the belief that DSM-I was a psychoanalytic system. First, psychoanalysts were a minority on the committee that created DSM-I. Second, psychoanalysts of the time did not use DSM-I. Third, DSM-I was as infused with Kraepelinian concepts as it was with psychoanalytic concepts. Fourth, contemporary writers who commented on DSM-I did not perceive it as psychoanalytic. The first edition of the DSM arose from a blending of concepts from the Statistical Manual for the Use of Hospitals of Mental Diseases, the military psychiatric classifications developed during World War II, and the International Classification of Diseases (6th edition). As a consensual, clinically oriented classification, DSM-I was popular, leading to 20 printings and international recognition. From the perspective inherent in this paper, the continuities between classifications from the first half of the 20th century and the systems developed in the second half (e.g. DSM-III to DSM-5) become more visible.

  12. The impact of revised DSM-5 criteria on the relative distribution and inter-rater reliability of eating disorder diagnoses in a residential treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer J; Eddy, Kamryn T; Murray, Helen B; Tromp, Marilou D P; Hartmann, Andrea S; Stone, Melissa T; Levendusky, Philip G; Becker, Anne E

    2015-09-30

    This study evaluated the relative distribution and inter-rater reliability of revised DSM-5 criteria for eating disorders in a residential treatment program. Consecutive adolescent and young adult females (N=150) admitted to a residential eating disorder treatment facility were assigned both DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnoses by a clinician (n=14) via routine clinical interview and a research assessor (n=4) via structured interview. We compared the frequency of diagnostic assignments under each taxonomy and by type of assessor. We evaluated concordance between clinician and researcher assignment through inter-rater reliability kappa and percent agreement. Significantly fewer patients received either clinician or researcher diagnoses of a residual eating disorder under DSM-5 (clinician-12.0%; researcher-31.3%) versus DSM-IV (clinician-28.7%; researcher-59.3%), with the majority of reassigned DSM-IV residual cases reclassified as DSM-5 anorexia nervosa. Researcher and clinician diagnoses showed moderate inter-rater reliability under DSM-IV (κ=.48) and DSM-5 (κ=.57), though agreement for specific DSM-5 other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) presentations was poor (κ=.05). DSM-5 revisions were associated with significantly less frequent residual eating disorder diagnoses, but not with reduced inter-rater reliability. Findings support specific dimensions of clinical utility for revised DSM-5 criteria for eating disorders.

  13. Toward a firmer foundation for DSM-5.1: domains of impairment in DSM-IV/DSM-5 personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Robert F; Bianucci, Violeta; Fishman, Daniel P; Biars, Julia W

    2014-04-01

    In recent editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, personality disorders (PDs) have been conceptualized as reflecting impairments in four areas: cognition, affectivity, interpersonal functioning, and impulse control. However, there have been no systematic surveys of PD symptoms to assess the degree to which these four domains of impairment are actually represented in the DSM-IV/DSM-5 PD symptom criteria. Results of such a survey indicated that the most common domain of impairment for DSM-IV/DSM-5 PDs is interpersonal functioning (41% of all PD symptoms), followed by cognition (30%), and affectivity (18%), with relatively few PD symptoms reflecting difficulties in impulse control (6%). Comparison of the proportions of symptoms in different impairment domains in DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV/DSM-5 confirmed that these symptom distributions have been stable across revisions of the diagnostic manual. Implications of these results for the conceptualization of PDs in DSM-5.1 and beyond are discussed.

  14. Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using "DSM-IV-TR" and "DSM-5" Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Elizabeth B.; Fogler, Jason; Sideridis, Georgios; Weas, Sarah; Mauras, Carrie; Barbaresi, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the "DSM-5" criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the "DSM-5" model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and "DSM-IV-TR" sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70).…

  15. The discriminative capacity of CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales to identify disruptive and internalizing disorders in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Osa, Nuria; Granero, Roser; Trepat, Esther; Domenech, Josep Maria; Ezpeleta, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the discriminative capacity of CBCL/1½-5 (Manual for the ASEBA Preschool-Age Forms & Profiles, University of Vermont, Research Center for Children, Youth, & Families, Burlington, 2000) DSM5 scales attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), anxiety and depressive problems for detecting the presence of DSM5 (DSM5 diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, APA, Arlington, 2013) disorders, ADHD, ODD, Anxiety and Mood disorders, assessed through diagnostic interview, in children aged 3-5. Additionally, we compare the clinical utility of the CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales with respect to analogous CBCL/1½-5 syndrome scales. A large community sample of 616 preschool children was longitudinally assessed for the stated age group. Statistical analysis was based on ROC procedures and binary logistic regressions. ADHD and ODD CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales achieved good discriminative ability to identify ADHD and ODD interview's diagnoses, at any age. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 Anxiety scale discriminative capacity was fair for unspecific anxiety disorders in all age groups. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 depressive problems' scale showed the poorest discriminative capacity for mood disorders (including depressive episode with insufficient symptoms), oscillating into the poor-to-fair range. As a whole, DSM5-oriented scales generally did not provide evidence better for discriminative capacity than syndrome scales in identifying DSM5 diagnoses. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales discriminate externalizing disorders better than internalizing disorders for ages 3-5. Scores on the ADHD and ODD CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales can be used to screen for DSM5 ADHD and ODD disorders in general populations of preschool children.

  16. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Amy S; Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-15

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T) is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755(T) reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species.

  17. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755T is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755T reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species. PMID:25197485

  18. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

  19. Reconceptualizing personality pathology in DSM-5: limitations in evidence for eliminating dependent personality disorder and other DSM-IV syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Robert F

    2011-04-01

    The DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Workgroup proposed that five DSM-IV personality disorders be eliminated as formal diagnostic categories (paranoid, schizoid, histrionic, narcissistic, and dependent), because these syndromes purportedly have low clinical utility and minimal evidence for validity. Scrutiny of studies cited in support of this proposal reveals difficulties in three areas: (1) Inadequate information regarding parameters of the literature search; (2) Mixed empirical support for proposed changes; and (3) Selective attention to certain disorders and not others. Review of validity and clinical utility data related to dependent personality disorder indicates that evidence regarding this syndrome does not differ from that of syndromes proposed for retention in DSM-5. Limitations in the research base cited by the workgroup illuminates gaps in the personality disorder literature, and may serve as a starting point for systematic research on personality pathology so that adequate empirical data are available to decide which syndromes to retain, revise, or remove in future versions of the diagnostic manual.

  20. Twenty Years of Diagnosis and the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Linda

    1999-01-01

    The process of diagnosing mental disorders and the use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) have been increasingly important for counselors. This article provides information on the hallmarks of this shift. Reviews and discusses the changes form the third and fourth editions of the DSM. Offers predictions as to future…

  1. DSM-5-classificatie van persoonlijkheidsstoornissen bij ouderen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, S P J; Rossi, G; Dierckx, E; Oude Voshaar, R C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it is generally agreed that personality disorders are an important topic in old-age psychiatry, DSM-5 has paid relatively little attention to older persons affected with this severe mental disorder. AIM: To look closely and carefully at several aspects of the way in which DSM-5

  2. Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Elizabeth B; Fogler, Jason; Sideridis, Georgios; Weas, Sarah; Mauras, Carrie; Barbaresi, William J

    2015-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the DSM-5 criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and DSM-IV-TR sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70). DSM-5 was psychometrically superior to the DSM-IV-TR model (Comparative Fit Index of 0.970 vs 0.879, respectively). Measurement invariance revealed good model fit across gender and IQ. Younger children tended to meet fewer diagnostic criteria. Those with autistic disorder were more likely to meet social communication and repetitive behaviors criteria (p < .001) than those with PDD-NOS. DSM-5 is a robust model but will identify a different, albeit overlapping population of individuals compared to DSM-IV-TR.

  3. Influence of gender, sexual orientation, and need on treatment utilization for substance use and mental disorders: Findings from the California Quality of Life Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mays Vickie M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior research has shown a higher prevalence of substance use and mental disorders among sexual minorities, however, the influence of sexual orientation on treatment seeking has not been widely studied. We use a model of help-seeking for vulnerable populations to investigate factors related to treatment for alcohol or drug use disorders and mental health disorders, focusing on the contributions of gender, sexual orientation, and need. Methods Survey data were obtained from a population-based probability sample of California residents that oversampled for sexual minorities. Logistic regression was used to model the enabling, predisposing, and need-related factors associated with past-year mental health or substance abuse treatment utilization among adults aged 18–64 (N = 2,074. Results Compared with individuals without a diagnosed disorder, those with any disorder were more likely to receive treatment. After controlling for both presence of disorder and other factors, lesbians and bisexual women were most likely to receive treatment and heterosexual men were the least likely. Moreover, a considerable proportion of sexual orientation minorities without any diagnosable disorder, particularly lesbians and bisexual women, also reported receiving treatment. Conclusion The study highlights the need to better understand the factors beyond meeting diagnostic criteria that underlie treatment utilization among sexual minorities. Future research should also aim to ascertain the effects of treatment provided to sexual minorities with and without diagnosable disorders, including the possibility that the provision of such treatment may reduce the likelihood of their progression to greater severity of distress, disorders, or impairments in functioning.

  4. Manufacturers Shall Meet DSM Requirement Through New Products By Technical Renovation%制造企业要以科技创新产品满足DSM需求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学信; 郑小平; 曾辛

    2002-01-01

    DSM is a movement integrated with and accomplished by government, utilities, manufacturers and customers.As the main body, the nanufacture will function to take all responsibilities of providing timely, reliable and feasible technicalsupporting for the movement. A new product based on high technology is of a great significance in generalizing DSM. Oneimportant and effective measure to implement DSM is the flexible and practicable electrovalence policy, which heavily relieson advanced technology for its execution.

  5. [Anxiety disorders in DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the DSM-5 appeared officially in May 2013 during the development of the 166th Annual Meetingof the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in San Francisco. The drafting process was long and complex; much of the debate became public so that the expectations were great. And it must be said that the new edition did not disappoint, as many changes were made in relation to their predecessors. In Chapter of Anxiety Disorders, which is reviewed in this article, the changes were significant. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and Stress-related disorders were excluded and new clinical pictures, such as separation anxiety disorder and selective mutism, were included. And took place was the long awaited split between panic disorder and agoraphobia, now two separate disorders.

  6. DSM-5: ATTENUATED PSYCHOSIS SYNDROME?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychotic syndrome includes several devastating mental disorders characterized by a rupture of higher mental functions. The signs and symptoms of psychosis begin in adolescence or early adulthood and usually begin gradually and progress over time. Attenuated psychosis syndrome is a new DSM-5 diagnostic proposal which deals with identifying people at high-risk mental state (ARMS/UHR which may be a predictor of conversion to psychosis. The potential benefit would be that if psychotic disorder is treated more effectively in its early stages, it could produce a lasting beneficial effect that probably could not be achieved with later intervention. This syndrome has generated intense discussion in specialized scientific and professional forums, crisscrossing arguments in favor and against its inclusion. HRMS is preferentially evaluated in the adolescent or young adult population. HRMS evolution is associated with a higher rate of transition toward nonaffective psychosis, although it can evolve toward other mental disorders, remain stable or remit over time. Empirical evidence shows that early intervention seems to have a certain beneficial effect, although for now the results are still insufficient and contradictory. The lack of specificity of symptoms in predicting psychosis, presence of certain limitations (e.g., stigmatization, results found in early interventions and lack of empirical evidence, have led to include the attenuated psychosis syndrome in the DSM-5 Appendix III. The main benefits and limitations of including this supposed category, possible lessons learned from this type of study and future lines of action are discussed in the light of these findings.

  7. Synthesizing dimensional and categorical approaches to personality disorders: refining the research agenda for DSM-V Axis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Robert F; Skodol, Andrew E; Livesley, W John; Shrout, Patrick E; Huang, Yueqin

    2007-01-01

    Personality disorder researchers have long considered the utility of dimensional approaches to diagnosis, signaling the need to consider a dimensional approach for personality disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). Nevertheless, a dimensional approach to personality disorders in DSM-V is more likely to succeed if it represents an orderly and logical progression from the categorical system in DSM-IV. With these considerations and opportunities in mind, the authors sought to delineate ways of synthesizing categorical and dimensional approaches to personality disorders that could inform the construction of DSM-V. This discussion resulted in (1) the idea of having a set of core descriptive elements of personality for DSM-V, (2) an approach to rating those elements for specific patients, (3) a way of combining those elements into personality disorder prototypes, and (4) a revised conception of personality disorder as a construct separate from personality traits.

  8. DSM 5: Precedents, present and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi E. Obiols

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La próxima edición del DSM (DSM 5 aparecerá en Mayo de 2013. Los borradores publicados ya han generado diversas polémicas. Se ha criticado la posible inflación diagnóstica con una previsible epidemia de falsos positivos en nuevos diagnósticos como el "síndrome psicótico atenuado". La propuesta de otros nuevos diagnósticos como el «trastorno cognitivo leve", el "trastorno por atracones" o las "adicciones conductuales", entre otros, se suman a esta polémica. También se han criticado ciertos aspectos metodológicos del proceso, como la exigencia de confidencialidad y la falta de transparencia y los conflictos de intereses. El artículo repasa los antecedentes históricos del proceso DSM, con la revolución en la fiabilidad diagnóstica del DSM-III, los problemas de validez del DSM IV y las dudas que genera el DSM 5 en el supuesto cambio de "paradigma dimensional". Asimismo, se apunta a posibles vías futuras de solución, más allá del DSM 5, en el avance de las ciencias básicas del cerebro y de la conducta.

  9. The DSM-5: Classification and criteria changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Darrel A; Kuhl, Emily A; Kupfer, David J

    2013-06-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) marks the first significant revision of the publication since the DSM-IV in 1994. Changes to the DSM were largely informed by advancements in neuroscience, clinical and public health need, and identified problems with the classification system and criteria put forth in the DSM-IV. Much of the decision-making was also driven by a desire to ensure better alignment with the International Classification of Diseases and its upcoming 11th edition (ICD-11). In this paper, we describe select revisions in the DSM-5, with an emphasis on changes projected to have the greatest clinical impact and those that demonstrate efforts to enhance international compatibility, including integration of cultural context with diagnostic criteria and changes that facilitate DSM-ICD harmonization. It is anticipated that this collaborative spirit between the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) will continue as the DSM-5 is updated further, bringing the field of psychiatry even closer to a singular, cohesive nosology.

  10. Current viewpoints on DSM-5 in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Toshihide; Ishitobi, Makoto; Kamio, Yoko; Sugihara, Genichi; Murai, Toshiya; Motomura, Keisuke; Ogasawara, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Aleksic, Branko; Ozaki, Norio; Nakao, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kazuo; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Kiriike, Nobuo; Ishikawa, Toshio; Kubo, Chiharu; Matsunaga, Chiaki; Miyata, Hisatsugu; Asada, Takashi; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2016-09-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was published in 2013, and its official Japanese version was published in 2014. The Japanese Government uses classifications from the 10th revision of the I nternational C lassification of D iseases (ICD-10) to categorize disorders and determine treatment fees. However, since the publication of the DSM-III, the use of the DSM system has become prevalent in research and educational settings in Japan. In addition to traditional psychiatry, both the ICD and the DSM are taught by many Japanese medical schools, and virtually all clinical research and trials refer to the DSM to define targeted disorders. Amid the current backdrop in which the reputation of the DSM-5 is being established, the editorial board of P sychiatry and C linical N eurosciences has asked Japanese experts across 12 specialties to examine the structure of the DSM-5, including the following categories: Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders, Major Depression, Bipolar Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders, Somatic Symptom Disorder, Eating Disorders, Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders, Gender Dysphoria, and Neurocognitive Disorders. Although opinions were only obtained from these selected experts, we believe that we have succeeded, to a certain extent, in presenting views that are representative of each specialty.

  11. Time to choose – DSM-5, ICD-11 or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyrer, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DSM-5 was published in May 2013, and ICD 11 is not due to be published until the end of 2015 at the earliest. Nevertheless, it is possible to make a comparison at this early stage as much of the main decisions have been made with both classifications. DSM-5 aimed to make a paradigm shift by providing objective, independent measures of classification, but in this respect it clearly failed. It did respond to previous criticisms that there were too many diagnoses in the classification and that eliminated some conditions in favour of larger groupings (eg, autism spectrum disorder, but it has still come in for heavy criticism. ICD 11 deviates from DSM-5 in radically different classifications of personality and stress disorders and in general has pursued a different pathway, concentrating on clinical utility as the main guide to the classification. It is up to practitioners to choose which they prefer, but ICD 11 will be in a much stronger position than ICD 10 was when it was published in 1999.

  12. Should the DSM V drop Asperger syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2010-09-01

    The DSM IV defines Asperger syndrome (AS) as a pervasive developmental (autistic spectrum) disorder characterized by social deficits and rigid focused interests in the absence of language impairment and cognitive delay. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, there has been a dramatic increase in its recognition both in children and adults. However, because studies have generally failed to demonstrate a clear distinction between AS and autism, some researchers have called for its elimination from the forthcoming DSM V. This report argues for a modification of its diagnostic criteria and its continued retention in the diagnostic manual.

  13. Retention or deletion of personality disorder diagnoses for DSM-5: an expert consensus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Bernstein, David P; Widiger, Thomas A

    2012-10-01

    One of the official proposals for the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) diagnostic manual (DSM-5) is to delete half of the existing personality disorders (i.e., dependent, histrionic, narcissistic, paranoid, and schizoid). Within the APA guidelines for DSM-5 decisions, it is stated that there should be expert consensus agreement for the deletion of a diagnostic category. Additionally, categories to be deleted should have low clinical utility and/or minimal evidence for validity. The current study surveyed members of two personality disorder associations (n = 146) with respect to the utility, validity, and status of each DSM-IV-TR personality disorder diagnosis. Findings indicated that the proposal to delete five of the personality disorders lacks consensus support within the personality disorder community.

  14. DSM-5-classificatie van persoonlijkheidsstoornissen bij ouderen [DSM-5 classification of personality disorders in older persons

    OpenAIRE

    Alphen, S.P. van; Rossi, G.; Dierckx, E.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it is generally agreed that personality disorders are an important topic in old-age psychiatry, DSM-5 has paid relatively little attention to older persons affected with this severe mental disorder. AIM: To look closely and carefully at several aspects of the way in which DSM-5 defines personality disorders relating to older persons. METHOD: We make a critical evaluation of the description of personality disorders given in DSM-5. RESULTS: First of all, we question whether...

  15. ElevationOther_DSM1M2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Barre Montpelier 2009 1m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with the VT...

  16. ElevationOther_nDSM2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Bennington County 2012 2.0m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized...

  17. VT Lidar DSM (1 meter) - 2005 - Essex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Essex County 2005 1m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  18. ElevationOther_DSM1M2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Bennington Floodplain 2010 1m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with...

  19. ElevationOther_nDSM1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Essex County 2005 1m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized Digital...

  20. ElevationOther_DSM1M2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Essex County 2005 1m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with the VT...

  1. ElevationOther_DSM1M2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Bennington Floodplain 2007 1m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with...

  2. DSM Increases Chemicals Production in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ DSM, one of the world's leading chemicals companies,is expected to at least double its sales in China to 600 million euros (US$714 million) by 2008 to cash in on the fastgrowing market. To meet its target, the Dutch company will expand the capacity of existing plants in China, build new production bases, and also seek acquisition opportunities,said Stenfan Sommer, president of DSM (China) Ltd.

  3. Low-income DSM Programs: Methodological approach to determining the cost-effectiveness of coordinated partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Hill, L.J.

    1994-05-01

    As governments at all levels become increasingly budget-conscious, expenditures on low-income, demand-side management (DSM) programs are being evaluated more on the basis of efficiency at the expense of equity considerations. Budgetary pressures have also caused government agencies to emphasize resource leveraging and coordination with electric and gas utilities as a means of sharing the expenses of low-income programs. The increased involvement of electric and gas utilities in coordinated low-income DSM programs, in turn, has resulted in greater emphasis on estimating program cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study is to develop a methodological approach to estimate the cost- effectiveness of coordinated low-income DSM programs, given the special features that distinguish these programs from other utility-operated DSM programs. The general approach used in this study was to (1) select six coordinated low-income DSM programs from among those currently operating across the United States, (2) examine the main features of these programs, and (3) determine the conceptual and pragmatic problems associated with estimating their cost-effectiveness. Three types of coordination between government and utility cosponsors were identified. At one extreme, local agencies operate {open_quotes}parallel{close_quotes} programs, each of which is fully funded by a single sponsor (e.g., one funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the other by a utility). At the other extreme are highly {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} programs that capitalize on the unique capabilities and resources offered by each cosponsor. In these programs, agencies employ a combination of utility and government funds to deliver weatherization services as part of an integrated effort. In between are {open_quotes}supplemental{close_quotes} programs that utilize resources to supplement the agency`s government-funded weatherization, with no changes to the operation of that program.

  4. Autism Spectrum Disorders According to "DSM-IV-TR" and Comparison with "DSM-5" Draft Criteria: An Epidemiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Marja-Leena; Kielinen, Marko; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Jussila, Katja; Ebeling, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Joseph, Robert M.; Moilanen, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The latest definitions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were specified in "DSM-IV-TR" in 2000. "DSM-5" criteria are planned for 2013. Here, we estimated the prevalence of ASDs and autism according to "DSM-IV-TR," clarified confusion concerning diagnostic criteria, and evaluated "DSM-5" draft criteria for ASD posted by the American…

  5. Autism Spectrum Disorders According to "DSM-IV-TR" and Comparison with "DSM-5" Draft Criteria: An Epidemiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Marja-Leena; Kielinen, Marko; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Jussila, Katja; Ebeling, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Joseph, Robert M.; Moilanen, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The latest definitions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were specified in "DSM-IV-TR" in 2000. "DSM-5" criteria are planned for 2013. Here, we estimated the prevalence of ASDs and autism according to "DSM-IV-TR," clarified confusion concerning diagnostic criteria, and evaluated "DSM-5" draft…

  6. Structure of the DSM-IV personality disorders as revealed in clinician ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Mark A; Malone, Johanna C

    2013-05-01

    The revisions proposed for the DSM-5 would greatly alter how personality pathology is conceptualized, assessed, and diagnosed. One aspect of the proposed changes, elimination of four current personality disorders, has raised considerable controversy. The present study attempts to inform this debate by exploring clinicians' views of the structure of Personality Disorders using the current diagnostic system, the DSM-IV. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the DSM-IV Personality Disorder criteria using clinician ratings for 280 patients. The factor analysis revealed eight clear and meaningful factors. The eight factors contained all six personality disorders proposed for retention in DSM-5 but also contained clear representations of two disorders (Paranoid and Schizoid) identified for removal from the system. These conditions appear to have clinical utility and their removal may have unintended negative consequences in clinical practice. Dependent and Avoidant criteria also merged to form a new construct with interesting clinical implications. These findings provide new insights into the complex typologies clinicians employ when applying the DSM-IV system to personality disordered patients. Lastly we argue that successful refinement of clinically significant constructs, like diagnostic systems, requires a balanced appraisal of evidence for clinical utility as well as external and internal validity.

  7. A Comparison of DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Diagnostic Classifications in the Clinical Diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylaci, Ferhat; Miral, Suha

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare children diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) according to DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. One hundred fifty children aged between 3 and 15 years diagnosed with PDD by DSM-IV-TR were included. PDD symptoms were reviewed through psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria. Clinical severity was determined using Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC). A statistically significant decrease (19.3 %) was detected in the diagnostic ratio with DSM-5. Age and symptom severity differed significantly between those who were and were not diagnosed with PDD using DSM-5. B4 criteria in DSM-5 was most common criterion. Results indicate that individuals diagnosed with PDD by DSM-IV-TR criteria may not be diagnosed using DSM-5 criteria.

  8. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  9. US electric utility demand-side management, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-26

    The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

  10. Reliability of DSM-IV Symptom Ratings of ADHD: Implications for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanto, Mary V.; Alvir, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the intrarater reliability of "DSM-IV" ADHD symptoms. Method: Two-hundred-two children referred for attention problems and 49 comparison children (all 7-12 years) were rated by parents and teachers on the identical "DSM-IV" items presented in two different formats, the…

  11. Reliability of DSM-IV Symptom Ratings of ADHD: Implications for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanto, Mary V.; Alvir, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the intrarater reliability of "DSM-IV" ADHD symptoms. Method: Two-hundred-two children referred for attention problems and 49 comparison children (all 7-12 years) were rated by parents and teachers on the identical "DSM-IV" items presented in two different formats, the SNAP-IV and Conners'…

  12. DSM-5-classificatie van persoonlijkheidsstoornissen bij ouderen [DSM-5 classification of personality disorders in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alphen, S.P. van; Rossi, G.; Dierckx, E.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it is generally agreed that personality disorders are an important topic in old-age psychiatry, DSM-5 has paid relatively little attention to older persons affected with this severe mental disorder. AIM: To look closely and carefully at several aspects of the way in which DSM-5

  13. Autism Spectrum Disorders in the DSM-V: Better or Worse than the DSM-IV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Lorna; Gould, Judith; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The DSM-V-committee has recently published proposed diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorders. We examine these criteria in some detail. We believe that the DSM-committee has overlooked a number of important issues, including social imagination, diagnosis in infancy and adulthood, and the possibility that girls and women with autism may…

  14. Brief Report: Comparability of DSM-IV and DSM-5 ASD Research Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazefsky, C. A.; McPartland, J. C.; Gastgeb, H. Z.; Minshew, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) criteria for ASD have been criticized for being too restrictive, especially for more cognitively-able individuals. It is unclear, however, if high-functioning individuals deemed eligible for research via standardized diagnostic assessments would meet DSM-5 criteria. This study investigated the impact of…

  15. Narcissistic personality disorder in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodol, Andrew E; Bender, Donna S; Morey, Leslie C

    2014-10-01

    The criteria for personality disorders in Section II of DSM-5 have not changed from those in DSM-IV. Therefore, the diagnosis of Section II narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) will perpetuate all of the well-enumerated shortcomings associated with the diagnosis since DSM-III. In this article, we will briefly review problems associated with Section II NPD and then discuss the evolution of a new model of personality disorder and the place in the model of pathological narcissism and NPD. The new model was intended to be the official approach to the diagnosis of personality pathology in DSM-5, but was ultimately placed as an alternative in Section III for further study. The new model is a categorical-dimensional hybrid based on the assessment of core elements of personality functioning and of pathological personality traits. The specific criteria for NPD were intended to rectify some of the shortcomings of the DSM-IV representation by acknowledging both grandiose and vulnerable aspects, overt and covert presentations, and the dimensionality of narcissism. In addition, criteria were assigned and diagnostic thresholds set based on empirical data. The Section III representation of narcissistic phenomena using dimensions of self and interpersonal functioning and relevant traits offers a significant improvement over Section II NPD.

  16. Contributions from personality- and psychodynamically oriented assessment to the development of the DSM-5 personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Steven K

    2011-07-01

    Advances in personality assessment over the past 20 years have notably influenced the proposed assessment and classification of personality disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-5]). However, a considerable body of personality assessment and psychodynamically oriented assessment research has significant relevance to the way in which personality disorders are evaluated that appears to have gone unrecognized in the current proposals for DSM-5. In this article, I discuss the ways in which some of these 2 bodies of literature can and should inform the DSM-5 so that the diagnostic nomenclature can be more scientifically and comprehensively informed and consequently improve the clinical utility of a diagnostic system in need of considerable revision.

  17. Internet Gaming Disorder in the DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Rehbein, Florian; Ko, Chih-Hung; O'Brien, Charles P

    2015-09-01

    The fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes in its research appendix a potential new diagnosis-Internet gaming disorder. This article outlines the debate surrounding non-substance addictions and the rationale for including this condition in the "Conditions for Further Study" chapter in DSM-5 Section III. It also describes the diagnostic criteria that DSM-5 recommends and methods to assess Internet gaming disorder. The paper details international research related to prevalence rates, demographic, psychiatric, and neurobiological risk factors, the natural course of the condition, and promising treatment approaches. The paper concludes by describing important issues for research to address prior to official recognition of this condition as a mental disorder.

  18. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Porgali Zayman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been some changes of the Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in DSM-V in terms of its classification and description. First of all, it has been suggested that the disorder should be out of a lower cap of the anxiety disorders and with DSM-5 a new heading has become an issue like obsessive compulsive disorder and related disorders. The ones that suggest the obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders fundamentally assume that the obsessive compulsive disorder and the disorders defined as related with the OCD come from the same etiologic origin unlike the other anxiety disorders. The purpose of this compilation is to mention on how OCD has been defined all along the history and what kind of conceptual changes it went through until DSM-5. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 360-362

  19. Assessment of DSM-5 Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiger, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an approach to defining, identifying, and assessing personality disorders, including the links between these definitions and personality assessment, with a particular reference to the proposed revisions to the personality disorders section of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-5]; American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). The article discusses measures of maladaptive variants of the Five-factor model (FFM) that are coordinated with both the traditional personality disorder syndromes as well as the DSM-5 dimensional trait model. Discussed as well is the assessment of the more psychodynamically oriented deficits in sense of self and interpersonal relatedness that are also included within the hybrid model proposed for DSM-5.

  20. Panic disorder and agoraphobia: an overview and commentary on DSM-5 changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Taylor, Steven; Smits, Jasper A J

    2014-06-01

    The recently published DSM-5 contains a number of changes pertinent to panic disorder and agoraphobia. These changes include separation of panic disorder and agoraphobia into separate diagnoses, the addition of criteria and guidelines for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobia, the addition of a 6-month duration requirement for agoraphobia, the addition of panic attacks as a specifier to any DSM-5 diagnosis, changes to descriptors of panic attack types, as well as various changes to the descriptive text. It is crucial that clinicians and researchers working with individuals presenting with panic attacks and panic-like symptoms understand these changes. The purpose of the current paper is to provide a summary of the main changes, to critique the changes in the context of available empirical evidence, and to highlight clinical implications and potential impact on mental health service utilization. Several of the changes have the potential to improve access to evidence-based treatment; yet, although certain changes appear justified in that they were based on converging evidence from different empirical sources, other changes appear questionable, at least based on the information presented in the DSM-5 text and related publications. Ongoing research of DSM-5 panic disorder and agoraphobia as well as application of the new diagnostic criteria in clinical contexts is needed to further inform the strengths and limitations of DSM-5 conceptualizations of panic disorder and agoraphobia.

  1. Method matters: Understanding diagnostic reliability in DSM-IV and DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Michael; Clark, Lee Anna; Bagby, R Michael; Watson, David

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic reliability is essential for the science and practice of psychology, in part because reliability is necessary for validity. Recently, the DSM-5 field trials documented lower diagnostic reliability than past field trials and the general research literature, resulting in substantial criticism of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Rather than indicating specific problems with DSM-5, however, the field trials may have revealed long-standing diagnostic issues that have been hidden due to a reliance on audio/video recordings for estimating reliability. We estimated the reliability of DSM-IV diagnoses using both the standard audio-recording method and the test-retest method used in the DSM-5 field trials, in which different clinicians conduct separate interviews. Psychiatric patients (N = 339) were diagnosed using the SCID-I/P; 218 were diagnosed a second time by an independent interviewer. Diagnostic reliability using the audio-recording method (N = 49) was "good" to "excellent" (M κ = .80) and comparable to the DSM-IV field trials estimates. Reliability using the test-retest method (N = 218) was "poor" to "fair" (M κ = .47) and similar to DSM-5 field-trials' estimates. Despite low test-retest diagnostic reliability, self-reported symptoms were highly stable. Moreover, there was no association between change in self-report and change in diagnostic status. These results demonstrate the influence of method on estimates of diagnostic reliability.

  2. District Allocation of Human Resources Utilizing the Evidence Based Model: A Study of One High Achieving School District in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amber Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study applies the Gap Analysis Framework to understand the gaps that exist in human resource allocation of one Southern California school district. Once identified, gaps are closed with the reallocation of human resources, according to the Evidenced Based Model, requiring the re-purposing of core classroom teachers, specialists, special…

  3. Layoff Time Training: A Key to Upgrading Workforce Utilization and EEOC Affirmative Action. A Case Study in the Northern California Canning Industry. R & D Monograph 61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Curtis C.; And Others

    An experimental and demonstration project was conducted over a five-year period in California to test the concept of lay-off time training to enable workers to qualify for promotion and increase their earnings. The canning industry was found to be a suitable area for this type of training since it had annual lay-offs followed by assured recalls to…

  4. Effective electrical energy policies in terms of DSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyunah

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates how well energy policies are adopted and operated. In terms of DSM or the Demand Side Management, ways of modifying energy demand are introduced. Also their effects are showed. Furthermore future plans of DSM are illustrated shortly.

  5. Should Relational Aggression Be Included in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Coyne, Claire; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines whether relational aggression should be included in DSM-V disruptive behavior disorders. The results conclude that some additional information is gathered from assessing relational aggression but not enough to be included in DSM-V.

  6. Bipolar and related disorders and depressive disorders in DSM-5

    OpenAIRE

    Łojko, Dorota; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, a version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), having number 5, was published. The DSM is a textbook which aims to present diagnostic criteria for each psychiatric disorder recognized by the U.S. healthcare system. The DSM-5 comprises the most updated diagnostic criteria of psychiatric disorders as well as their description, and provides a common language for clinicians to communicate about the patients. Diagnostic criteria of the DSM-5 have been popula...

  7. Personality disorder types proposed for DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skodol, A.E.; Bender, D.S.; Morey, L.C.; Clark, L.A.; Oldham, J.M.; Alarcon, R.D.; Krueger, R.F.; Verheul, R.; Bell, C.C.; Siever, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group has proposed five specific personality disorder (PD) types for DSM-5, to be rated on a dimension of fit: antisocial/psychopathic, avoidant, borderline, obsessive-compulsive, and schizotypal. Each type is identified by core impairments in personali

  8. Sex Bias, Diagnosis, and DSM-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Sandra; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-five clinical psycholgists independently diagnosed 18 written case histories on the basis of 110 DSM-III categories. Females were rated significantly more histrionic than males exhibiting identical histrionic symptoms, but males were not rated as more antisocial than females. The findings suggest that vague diagnostic descriptions promote…

  9. Meet the New (and Improved?) DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Shelly R.; Pate, Christine M.; Brock, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis is not a typical school psychologist activity. However, changes to the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM), the framework for diagnosis put forth by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), are important to consider. First published in 1952, major revisions are being proposed for this new edition…

  10. What is a mental/psychiatric disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, D J; Phillips, K A; Bolton, D; Fulford, K W M; Sadler, J Z; Kendler, K S

    2010-11-01

    The distinction between normality and psychopathology has long been subject to debate. DSM-III and DSM-IV provided a definition of mental disorder to help clinicians address this distinction. As part of the process of developing DSM-V, researchers have reviewed the concept of mental disorder and emphasized the need for additional work in this area. Here we review the DSM-IV definition of mental disorder and propose some changes. The approach taken here arguably takes a middle course through some of the relevant conceptual debates. We agree with the view that no definition perfectly specifies precise boundaries for the concept of mental/psychiatric disorder, but in line with a view that the nomenclature can improve over time, we aim here for a more scientifically valid and more clinically useful definition.

  11. Exploring the Proposed DSM-5 Criteria in a Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Azin; Perry, Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    The proposed DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) depart substantially from the previous DSM-IV criteria. In this file review study of 131 children aged 2-12, previously diagnosed with either Autistic Disorder or Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), 63% met the new DSM-5 ASD criteria, including 81%…

  12. Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia: Considerations for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Norr, Aaron M.; Korte, Kristina J.

    2014-01-01

    With the upcoming release of the fifth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-V) there has been a necessary critique of the DSM-IV including questions regarding how to best improve the next iteration of the DSM classification system. The aim of this article is to provide commentary on the probable…

  13. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V

    OpenAIRE

    A. Alciati; F. Atzeni; P. Sgiarovello; P. Sarzi-Puttini

    2014-01-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms are considered ‘somatoform disorders’ in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders’ biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic crite...

  14. Implementation mechanism and application of DSM-CC%DSM-CC实现机制及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵星; 宋建新

    2001-01-01

    DSM-CC(Digital Storage Media-Command and Contro1)是ISO/IEC标准,用于多媒体宽带服务,它提供了控制功能和操作规范来管理MPEG-1,MPEG-2码流.介绍了DSM-CC的实现机制、功能参考模型及应用.

  15. Reliability and validity of the DSM-IV-TR and proposed DSM-5 criteria for pedophilia: Implications for the ICD-11 and the next DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Michael C; Fedoroff, J Paul; Bradford, John M; Knack, Natasha; Rodrigues, Nicole C; Curry, Susan; Booth, Brad; Gray, Jonathan; Cameron, Colin; Bourget, Dominique; Messina, Sarina; James, Elizabeth; Watson, Diane; Gulati, Sanjiv; Balmaceda, Rufino; Ahmed, Adekunle G

    We tested the inter-rater reliability and criterion-related validity of the DSM-IV-TR pedophilia diagnosis and proposed DSM-5 pedohebephilia diagnosis in a sample of 79 men who had committed child pornography offenses, contact sexual offenses against children, or who were referred because of concerns about whether they had a sexual interest in children. Participants were evaluated by two independent psychiatrists with an interview and questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics, sexual history, and self-reported sexual interests; they also completed phallometric and visual reaction time testing. Kappa was .59 for ever meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for pedophilia and .52 for ever meeting the proposed DSM-5 criteria for pedohebephilia. Ever meeting DSM-IV-TR diagnosis was significantly related to self-reported index of sexual interest in children (highest AUC=.81, 95% CI=.70-.91, pDSM-5 "diagnosis" was similarly related to self-report (AUC=.84, 95% CI=.74-.94, pDSM-5 criteria, we believe these results suggest the revision of DSM-5 and development of ICD-11 could benefit from drawing on the current DSM-5 criteria, which are essentially the same as DSM-IV-TR except for a distinction between having a paraphilia (the interest) and a paraphilic disorder (the paraphilia plus clinically significant distress or impairment).

  16. Horizontal movements, vertical-habitat utilization and diet of the jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) in the Pacific Ocean off Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzino, Gastón; Gilly, William F.; Markaida, Unai; Salinas-Zavala, César A.; Ramos-Castillejos, Jorge

    2010-07-01

    We deployed four pop-up archival-transmitting (PAT) tags on jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) collected in the Pacific Ocean off the main entrance to Magdalena Bay on the Baja California peninsula in June 2005. This is the first successful deployment of PAT tags on jumbo squid in an area outside the Gulf of California. Summary data were obtained through the ARGOS satellite system for three of the tags; the fourth tag was physically recovered. All of the tagged squid tended to remain on the shallow continental shelf for several days after tagging and then moved offshore into deeper water. Three of the four squid appeared to migrate in a general southerly direction while the fourth remained offshore of Magdalena Bay. All of the squid spent most daylight hours at depths that were associated with the hypoxic oxygen minimum layer, and at night they spent a majority of time in the upper 50 m of the water column. Stomach content analysis and tag temperature-depth data during the first days after tagging revealed that the squid were feeding on pelagic red crabs ( Pleuroncodes planipes) and several larger, neritic fishes over the continental shelf off Magdalena Bay during a seasonal nearshore upwelling. Comparison of our results with those previously collected in the Gulf of California reveal that Dosidicus gigas can vary its behavior and diet to suit local environmental conditions. This adaptability is likely to be an important factor in the ability of D. gigas to invade and colonize new areas.

  17. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alciati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medically unexplained symptoms are considered ‘somatoform disorders’ in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV. The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders’ biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic criteria try to overcome the limitations of the DSM-IV definition, which was organised centrally around the concept of medically unexplained symptoms, by emphasising the extent to which a patient’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours concerning their somatic symptoms are disproportionate or excessive. This change is supported by a growing body of evidence showing that psychological and behavioural features play a major role in causing patient disability and maintaining high level of health care use. Pain disorders is the sub-category of DSM-IV somatoform disorders that most closely resembles fibromyalgia. Regardless of the diagnostic changes recently brought about by DSM-V, neuroimaging studies have identified important components of the mental processes associated with a DSM- IV diagnosis of pain disorder.

  18. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alciati, A; Atzeni, F; Sgiarovello, P; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2014-06-06

    Medically unexplained symptoms are considered 'somatoform disorders' in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders' biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic criteria try to overcome the limitations of the DSM-IV definition, which was organised centrally around the concept of medically unexplained symptoms, by emphasising the extent to which a patient's thoughts, feelings and behaviours concerning their somatic symptoms are disproportionate or excessive. This change is supported by a growing body of evidence showing that psychological and behavioural features play a major role in causing patient disability and maintaining high level of health care use. Pain disorders is the sub-category of DSM-IV somatoform disorders that most closely resembles fibromyalgia. Regardless of the diagnostic changes recently brought about by DSM-V, neuroimaging studies have identified important components of the mental processes associated with a DSM- IV diagnosis of pain disorder.

  19. Comparison of ICD-10R, DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 in an Adult Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. Ellie; Gillan, Nicola; Spain, Deborah; Robertson, Dene; Roberts, Gedeon; Murphy, Clodagh M.; Maltezos, Stefanos; Zinkstok, Janneke; Johnston, Katie; Dardani, Christina; Ohlsen, Chris; Deeley, P. Quinton; Craig, Michael; Mendez, Maria A.; Happé, Francesca; Murphy, Declan G. M.

    2013-01-01

    An Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is often used to access services. We investigated whether ASD diagnostic outcome varied when DSM-5 was used compared to ICD-10R and DSM-IV-TR in a clinical sample of 150 intellectually able adults. Of those diagnosed with an ASD using ICD-10R, 56% met DSM-5 ASD criteria. A further 19% met DSM-5 (draft)…

  20. sA Comparison of DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Diagnostic Classifications in the Clinical Diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylaci, Ferhat; Miral, Suha

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare children diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) according to DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. One hundred fifty children aged between 3 and 15 years diagnosed with PDD by DSM-IV-TR were included. PDD symptoms were reviewed through psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria.…

  1. Feasibility and acceptability of the DSM-5 Field Trial procedures in the Johns Hopkins Community Psychiatry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E; Wilcox, Holly C; Miller, Leslie; Cullen, Bernadette; Gerring, Joan; Greiner, Lisa H; Newcomer, Alison; McKitty, Mellisha V; Regier, Darrel A; Narrow, William E

    2014-06-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) contains criteria for psychiatric diagnoses that reflect advances in the science and conceptualization of mental disorders and address the needs of clinicians. DSM-5 also recommends research on dimensional measures of cross-cutting symptoms and diagnostic severity, which are expected to better capture patients' experiences with mental disorders. Prior to its May 2013 release, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) conducted field trials to examine the feasibility, clinical utility, reliability, and where possible, the validity of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and dimensional measures. The methods and measures proposed for the DSM-5 field trials were pilot tested in adult and child/adolescent clinical samples, with the goal to identify and correct design and procedural problems with the proposed methods before resources were expended for the larger DSM-5 Field Trials. Results allowed for the refinement of the protocols, procedures, and measures, which facilitated recruitment, implementation, and completion of the DSM-5 Field Trials. These results highlight the benefits of pilot studies in planning large multisite studies.

  2. ADSL Transceivers Applying DSM and Their Nonstationary Noise Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bostoen Tom

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic spectrum management (DSM comprises a new set of techniques for multiuser power allocation and/or detection in digital subscriber line (DSL networks. At the Alcatel Research and Innovation Labs, we have recently developed a DSM test bed, which allows the performance of DSM algorithms to be evaluated in practice. With this test bed, we have evaluated the performance of a DSM level-1 algorithm known as iterative water-filling in an ADSL scenario. This paper describes the results of, on the one hand, the performance gains achieved with iterative water-filling, and, on the other hand, the nonstationary noise robustness of DSM-enabled ADSL modems. It will be shown that DSM trades off nonstationary noise robustness for performance improvements. A new bit swap procedure is then introduced to increase the noise robustness when applying DSM.

  3. The DSM and Professional Practice: Research, Clinical, and Institutional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Michael

    2016-06-01

    How mental illnesses are defined has significant ramifications, given the substantial social and individual repercussions of these conditions. Using actor-network theory, I analyze how mental health professionals use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in their work. Drawing on observations of a neuropsychological laboratory and interviews with 27 professionals (i.e., psychiatrists, psychologists), I investigate how the DSM is used in research, clinical, and institutional work. In research, the DSM influences study design and exclusion/inclusion criteria. In the clinic, the DSM influences how disorders are conceptualized and diagnosed. Institutionally, the DSM aligns the patient-professional encounter to insurance and pharmaceutical interests. I conclude that the DSM operates as multiple, context-specific taxonomies that pervasively influence professional practices, such that all possible actions must orient to DSM criteria, with professionals both a source and an object of institutionalized gaze.

  4. Commentary: Problems with the sexual disorders sections of DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    There are a number of problems with the sexual disorders sections of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition. These problems must be understood in a historical context, namely the evolution of criteria for psychosexual disorders from DSM-II (1968) to DSM-5 (2013). There are many inconsistencies in the DSM-5 criteria for different sexual disorders. Given these inconsistencies--and the history of diagnostic criteria for homosexuality and gender identity disorder from DSM-II to DSM-5--it is possible that, like homosexuality, DSM-5 gender dysphoria could disappear from future editions of the manual. Even if that does not happen, there are numerous problems with the DSM-5 sexual disorders that require attention.

  5. Building application of solar energy. Study no. 4: Scenarios for the utilization of solar energy in southern California buildings, change 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. S.; French, R. L.; Hirshberg, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Plausible future market scenarios for solar heating and cooling systems into buildings in the area served by the Southern California Edison Company. A range of plausible estimates for the number of solar systems which might be installed and the electrical energy which might be displaced by energy from these systems are provided. The effect on peak electrical load was not explicitly calculated but preliminary conclusions concerning peak load can be inferred from the estimates presented. Two markets are investigated: the single family market and the large power commercial market.

  6. Quantitative investigations of geologic surfaces utilizing airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data for Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data were collected over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. These two data sets were used to quantitatively characterize both the mineralogy and surface structure of the valley floor. Field mapping and characterization of the salt flats across the valley identified 16 separate units. The AVIRIS data were calibrated using the 'empirical line' method, and spectra extracted for the 16 units. A water vapor map was generated from the AVIRIS data and showed spatial variations in its distribution due to evaporation of surface water. Unmixing of the 16 spectral units produced maps of endmember abundance.

  7. [Forensic assessment of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder: a commentary on the transition from DSM-IV-TR (I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A; Fabra, M

    2013-12-01

    In May 2013 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) has released the latest and fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5). Like its predecessor, the DSM-IV-TR, it will have considerable impact on the science of Psychiatry. The DSM-5 describes - actually available in English - the present medical knowledge about mental disorders. In the short run, German medical science and scientific medicolegal expertises will continue to rely on the German version of the DSM-IV-TR, however, they will be difficult to defend without bearing in mind the changes that DSM-5 brings about. This report discusses the transition from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 with regard to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and provides suggestions, how the criteria might be evaluated.

  8. Cognitive and Adaptive Skills in Toddlers Who Meet Criteria for Autism in DSM-IV but not DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jashar, Dasal Tenzin; Brennan, Laura A; Barton, Marianne L; Fein, Deborah

    2016-12-01

    The current study compared adaptive and cognitive skills, and autism severity of toddlers with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis under DSM-IV but not DSM-5 criteria (DSM-IV only group) to those who met autism criteria under both diagnostic systems (DSM-5 group) and to those without ASD (non-ASD group). The toddlers in the DSM-IV only group were less delayed on various domains of adaptive (Communication, Socialization) and cognitive (Expressive and Receptive language, Fine Motor, Visual Reception) skills, and had less severe symptoms of ASD than the DSM-5 group. Thus, they might have the best potential for successful intervention. The DSM-IV only group did not differ from the non-ASD group in any adaptive or cognitive skills except for socialization skills, the hallmark of ASD.

  9. Addiction and dependence in DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Charles

    2011-05-01

    As preparations for the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) are under way, this paper focuses upon changes proposed for the substance use disorders section. It briefly outlines the history behind the current nomenclature, and the selection of the term 'dependence' over 'addiction' in earlier versions of the DSM. The term 'dependence', while used in past decades to refer to uncontrolled drug-seeking behavior, has an alternative meaning--the physiological adaptation that occurs when medications acting on the central nervous system are ingested with rebound when the medication is abruptly discontinued. These dual meanings have led to confusion and may have propagated current clinical practices related to under-treatment of pain, as physicians fear creating an 'addiction' by prescribing opioids. In part to address this problem, a change proposed for DSM-V is to alter the chapter name to 'Addiction and Related Disorders', which will include disordered gambling. The specific substance use disorders may be referred to as 'alcohol use' or 'opioid use' disorders. The criteria for the disorders are likely to remain similar, with the exception of removal of the 'committing illegal acts' criterion and addition of a 'craving' criterion. The other major change relates to the elimination of the abuse/dependence dichotomy, given the lack of data supporting an intermediate stage. These changes are anticipated to improve clarification and diagnosis and treatment of substance use and related disorders.

  10. The DSM diagnostic criteria for fetishism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Martin P

    2010-04-01

    The historical definitions of sexual Fetishism are reviewed. Prior to the advent of DSM-III-R (American Psychiatric Association, 1987), Fetishism was typically operationally described as persistent preferential sexual arousal in association with non-living objects, an over-inclusive focus on (typically non-sexual) body parts (e.g., feet, hands) and body secretions. In the DSM-III-R, Partialism, an "exclusive focus on part of the body," was cleaved from Fetishism and added to the Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified category. The current literature reviewed suggests that Partialism and Fetishism are related, can be co-associated, and are non-exclusive domains of sexual behavior. The author suggests that since the advent and elaboration of the clinical significance criterion (Criterion B) for designating a psychiatric disorder in DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994), a diagnostic distinction between Partialism and Fetishism is no longer clinically meaningful or necessary. It is recommended that the diagnostic Criterion A for Fetishism be modified to reflect the reintegration of Partialism and that a fetishistic focus on non-sexual body parts be a specifier of Fetishism.

  11. Characterizing psychopathy using DSM-5 personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Casey M; Drislane, Laura E; Lucy, Megan; Krueger, Robert F; Patrick, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    Despite its importance historically and contemporarily, psychopathy is not recognized in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR). Its closest counterpart, antisocial personality disorder, includes strong representation of behavioral deviance symptoms but weak representation of affective-interpersonal features considered central to psychopathy. The current study evaluated the extent to which psychopathy and its distinctive facets, indexed by the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure, can be assessed effectively using traits from the dimensional model of personality pathology developed for DSM-5, operationalized by the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Results indicate that (a) facets of psychopathy entailing impulsive externalization and callous aggression are well-represented by traits from the PID-5 considered relevant to antisocial personality disorder, and (b) the boldness facet of psychopathy can be effectively captured using additional PID-5 traits. These findings provide evidence that the dimensional model of personality pathology embodied in the PID-5 provides effective trait-based coverage of psychopathy and its facets.

  12. Does DSM-5 nomenclature for inhalant use disorder improve upon DSM-IV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenour, Ty A; Halliburton, Amanda E; Bray, Bethany C

    2015-03-01

    Among drug classes, substance use disorder (SUD) consequent to using inhalants (SUD-I) has perhaps the smallest evidence base. This study compared DSM-IV versus DSM-5 nomenclatures, testing whether 4 traditional categories of inhalants (aerosols, gases, nitrites, solvents) are manifestations of a single pathology, obtaining item parameters of SUD-I criteria, and presenting evidence that SUD can result from using nitrites. An urban, Midwestern, community sample of 162 inhalant users was recruited. Participants were 2/3 male, nearly 85% White, and had a mean age of 20.3 years (SD = 2.4 years), spanning the ages of greatest incidence of SUD and slightly older than the primary ages of inhalants use initiation. Analyses consisted of bivariate associations, principle components analysis, and item response theory analysis. Validity was demonstrated for SUD-I consequent to each inhalant type as well as for aggregating all inhalant types into a single drug class. Results supported DSM-5 nomenclature over DSM-IV in multiple ways except that occurrence of diagnostic orphans was not statistically smaller using DSM-5. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. DSM generation using multiple radar data for relief change detection in North Peloponnese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Kyriou, Aggeliki; Sabatakakis, Nikolaos; Anastassopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-08-01

    Interferometry constitutes a technique of acquisition height information with a range of applications, such as Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation in order to monitoring the Earth's surface. This work is focused on interferometric DSM creation utilizing radar data of Sentinel-1 and TerraSAR-X missions, covering the wider area of Northern Peloponnese. This area is characterized of loose geological formations and intense active tectonics resulting in continuous and intense relief changes. In this context, the accuracy and the update of the DSMs is essential in order to detect and map any terrain change. The selection of Sentinel-1 and TerraSAR-X images was based on the fact that both missions provide timely, with short revisiting period and satisfactory spatial resolution data. In particular, two ranges of radar data from both missions were submitted in interferometric process aimed at DSM creation. The produced DSMs were compared both visually and statistically to a very accurate reference DSM produced from airphotos by the Greek Cadastral. Furthermore, in order to estimate the accuracy of the DSMs and detect variations of terrain's surface, points of known elevation have been used. 2D RMSE, correlation and the percentile value were computed and the results are presented.

  14. Panic disorder: a review of DSM-IV panic disorder and proposals for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Kircanski, Katharina; Epstein, Alyssa; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Pine, Danny S; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Hinton, Devon

    2010-02-01

    This review covers the literature since the publication of DSM-IV on the diagnostic criteria for panic attacks (PAs) and panic disorder (PD). Specific recommendations are made based on the evidence available. In particular, slight changes are proposed for the wording of the diagnostic criteria for PAs to ease the differentiation between panic and surrounding anxiety; simplification and clarification of the operationalization of types of PAs (expected vs. unexpected) is proposed; and consideration is given to the value of PAs as a specifier for all DSM diagnoses and to the cultural validity of certain symptom profiles. In addition, slight changes are proposed for the wording of the diagnostic criteria to increase clarity and parsimony of the criteria. Finally, based on the available evidence, no changes are proposed with regard to the developmental expression of PAs or PD. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V.

  15. Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: Effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, California landfill gas-recovery plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

  16. The social responsiveness scale in relation to DSM IV and DSM5 ASD in Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Keun-Ah; Park, Jee-In; Koh, Yun-Joo; Song, Jungeun; Hong, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Young-Kee; Lim, Eun-Chung; Kwon, Hojang; Ha, Mina; Lim, Myung-Ho; Paik, Ki-Chung; Constantino, John N; Leventhal, Bennett; Kim, Young Shin

    2016-09-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is an autism rating scales in widespread use, with over 20 official foreign language translations. It has proven highly feasible for quantitative ascertainment of autistic social impairment in public health settings, however, little is known about the validity of the reinforcement in Asia populations or in references to DSM5. The current study aims to evaluate psychometric properties and cross-cultural aspects of the SRS-Korean version (K-SRS).The study subjects were ascertained from three samples: a general sample from 3 regular education elementary schools (n=790), a clinical sample (n=154) of 6-12-year-olds from four psychiatric clinics, and an epidemiological sample of children with ASD, diagnosed using both DSM IV PDD, DSM5 ASD and SCD criteria (n=151). Their parents completed the K-SRS and the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire(ASSQ). Descriptive statistics, correlation analyses and principal components analysis (PCA) were performed on the total population. Mean total scores on the K-SRS differed significantly between the three samples. ASSQ scores were significantly correlated with the K-SRS T-scores. PCA suggested a one-factor solution for the total population.Our results indicate that the K-SRS exhibits adequate reliability and validity for measuring ASD symptoms in Korean children with DSM IV PDD and DSM5 ASD. Our findings further suggest that it is difficult to distinguish SCD from other child psychiatric conditions using the K-SRS.This is the first study to examine the relationship between the SRS subscales and DSM5-based clinical diagnoses. This study provides cross-cultural confirmation of the factor structure for ASD symptoms and traits measured by the SRS. Autism Res 2016, 9: 970-980. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dementia DSM-IV/ICD-10 or neurocognitive disorder DSM-5?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Pujol Domenech

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: According to existing data the term dementia was invented in the first century BC. It was introduced in the European literature in the 17th and 18th centuries AC. At the end of the 17th century, the French Encyclopedia points at ethiological implications which would later shape legal concepts. In the 19th century the Centroeuropean research develops specific nosologies until, in the 20th century, senile dementia is gradually discredited. Methods: Slightly over ten years ago, the Mild Cognitive Disorder (MCD conceptualization was introduced as an early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD, but the lack of coherence in relation to lesions sparked a still ongoing controversy, as the author of the MCD concept belongs to the Writing Board of DSM 5. Results: The DSM IV focuses on a categorical approach in spite of the difficulty in differentiating “normal” from “pathological” impairment at certain ages. On the other hand, the DSM 5 adopts the Dimensional System with a Mild or Severe Neurocognitive Disorder definition, which is necessarily arbitrary and imposes a statistical criterion. The widespread use of this classification would imply diagnosing a large proportion of the population with huge social and medical implications. This triggered a variety of reactions, such as the APA note which claims that DSM 5 and CIE-10 “virtually contain the same codes”. However a WHO study revealed that 70% of surveyed psychiatrists used CIE 10 criteria. Conclusions: The DSM 5 gives weight to cognitive aspects using as a severity criterion the number of standard deviations in relation to psychometric normality. It might be misleading if applied to some forms of dementia, for instance frontal dementias. The CIE-10 and DSM IV criteria are more operational.

  18. DSM-5 under-Identifies PDDNOS: Diagnostic Agreement between the DSM-5, DSM-IV, and Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Black, Amanda; Tierney, Cheryl D.

    2013-01-01

    Agreement between the DSM-5, DSM-IV, and Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder was assessed in 125 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which included high and low functioning autism (HFA and LFA) and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDDNOS), and children with other clinical disorders (e.g., ADHD, mental…

  19. Reliability, Validity, and Classification Accuracy of the DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for Gambling Disorder and Comparison to DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchfield, Randy; McCready, John; Turner, Nigel E; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Petry, Nancy M; Grant, Jon; Welte, John; Chapman, Heather; Winters, Ken C

    2016-09-01

    The DSM-5 was published in 2013 and it included two substantive revisions for gambling disorder (GD). These changes are the reduction in the threshold from five to four criteria and elimination of the illegal activities criterion. The purpose of this study was to twofold. First, to assess the reliability, validity and classification accuracy of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for GD. Second, to compare the DSM-5-DSM-IV on reliability, validity, and classification accuracy, including an examination of the effect of the elimination of the illegal acts criterion on diagnostic accuracy. To compare DSM-5 and DSM-IV, eight datasets from three different countries (Canada, USA, and Spain; total N = 3247) were used. All datasets were based on similar research methods. Participants were recruited from outpatient gambling treatment services to represent the group with a GD and from the community to represent the group without a GD. All participants were administered a standardized measure of diagnostic criteria. The DSM-5 yielded satisfactory reliability, validity and classification accuracy. In comparing the DSM-5 to the DSM-IV, most comparisons of reliability, validity and classification accuracy showed more similarities than differences. There was evidence of modest improvements in classification accuracy for DSM-5 over DSM-IV, particularly in reduction of false negative errors. This reduction in false negative errors was largely a function of lowering the cut score from five to four and this revision is an improvement over DSM-IV. From a statistical standpoint, eliminating the illegal acts criterion did not make a significant impact on diagnostic accuracy. From a clinical standpoint, illegal acts can still be addressed in the context of the DSM-5 criterion of lying to others.

  20. Is there adequate empirical justification for radically revising the personality disorders section for DSM-5?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark

    2012-10-01

    The DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders (PDs) Work Group has recommended a reformulation of the PD section. In the present review I examined the empirical support for the Work Group's criticisms of the DSM-IV approach that were central to the justification for radically changing the diagnostic criteria. The Work Group indicated that comorbidity among the DSM-IV PDs is excessive, and to reduce comorbidity they recommended deleting five PDs. The studies they cited demonstrating high levels of comorbidity were of samples of psychiatric patients. A review of the epidemiological literature shows that comorbidity rates are much lower than in patient samples, and this challenges the proposition that high comorbidity is due to the diagnostic criteria. Moreover, the empirical support for the exclusion of some disorders over others is lacking. The Work Group noted that the diagnostic stability of the PDs is modest. However, modest levels of diagnostic stability may be largely attributable to methodological factors such test-retest unreliability, state effects, regression to the mean, and measurement error due to repeated assessments, rather than a reflection of inadequacies of the diagnostic system. Thus, modest stability is likely to be found in any approach toward diagnosing PDs. The present review therefore suggests that several of the core problems linked to the DSM-IV approach toward diagnosing PDs are more likely due to methodological factors than inadequacies of the criteria themselves. The Work Group's recommendation to delete five PDs is inconsistent with the explicit guidelines established for making revisions for DSM-5 which specify that for a disorder to be deleted there should be a thorough review of that disorder's clinical utility and validity.

  1. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  2. National estimates of exposure to traumatic events and PTSD prevalence using DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Dean G; Resnick, Heidi S; Milanak, Melissa E; Miller, Mark W; Keyes, Katherine M; Friedman, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) defined according to the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5; 2013) and fourth edition (DSM-IV; 1994) was compared in a national sample of U.S. adults (N = 2,953) recruited from an online panel. Exposure to traumatic events, PTSD symptoms, and functional impairment were assessed online using a highly structured, self-administered survey. Traumatic event exposure using DSM-5 criteria was high (89.7%), and exposure to multiple traumatic event types was the norm. PTSD caseness was determined using Same Event (i.e., all symptom criteria met to the same event type) and Composite Event (i.e., symptom criteria met to a combination of event types) definitions. Lifetime, past-12-month, and past 6-month PTSD prevalence using the Same Event definition for DSM-5 was 8.3%, 4.7%, and 3.8% respectively. All 6 DSM-5 prevalence estimates were slightly lower than their DSM-IV counterparts, although only 2 of these differences were statistically significant. DSM-5 PTSD prevalence was higher among women than among men, and prevalence increased with greater traumatic event exposure. Major reasons individuals met DSM-IV criteria, but not DSM-5 criteria were the exclusion of nonaccidental, nonviolent deaths from Criterion A, and the new requirement of at least 1 active avoidance symptom.

  3. A Comparison of DSM-5 and DSM-IV Diagnostic Criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Traumatized Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Müller, Julia; Morina, Naser; Schick, Matthis; Bryant, Richard A; Nickerson, Angela

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence rate and factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on the diagnostic criteria of the fourth and fifth editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, , ) in traumatized refugees. There were 134 adult treatment-seeking, severely and multiply traumatized patients from various refugee backgrounds were assessed in their mother tongue using a computerized set of questionnaires consisting of a trauma list, the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, and the new PTSD items that had been suggested by the DSM-5 Task Force of the American Psychiatric Association. Using DSM-IV, 60.4% of participants met diagnostic criteria for PTSD; using DSM-5, only 49.3% fulfilled all criteria (p DSM-IV and DSM-5 items showed good and comparable model fits. Furthermore, classification functions in the DSM-5 were satisfactory. The new Cluster D symptoms showed relatively high sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive power, and negative predictive power. The DSM-5 symptom structure appears to be applicable to traumatized refugees. Negative alterations in cognitions and mood may be especially useful for clinicians, not only to determine the extent to which an individual refugee is likely to meet criteria for PTSD, but also in providing targets for clinical intervention.

  4. Psychopathy, DSM-5, and a caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crego, Cristina; Widiger, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    Recently developed models of psychopathy include such traits as fearlessness, boldness, and invulnerability. Section III of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes as well a psychopathy specifier that is modeled after these traits. The purpose of the current study was to test empirically the convergent and discriminant validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R), the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (TriPM), the Elemental Psychopathy Assessment (EPA), and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) with respect to their relationship to one another, with traditional measures of psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder, and with a measure of the 5-factor model. Participants were 2 samples of community adults (280 and 196) who indicated that they have engaged in criminal activities. The results indicated good convergent and discriminant validity for the PPI-R, TriPM, EPA, and the PID-5 psychopathy specifiers, as well as relationships with a measure of the 5 factor model that were quite distinct from the relationships obtained for traditional measures of antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy. However, concerns are raised with respect to a reliance on reverse-coded items for the assessment of components of psychopathy.

  5. [Personality disorders in the DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritárné Szabó, Ildikó

    2012-01-01

    Significant changes are proposed in the personality disorders section of the 5th. edition of the DSM. The article summarizes the historical background of the personality disorder classification, including personality-types theory, trait-theory, and clinical concepts based upon psychiatric and psychoanalytical traditions. After briefly summarizing concerns on current approach to diagnosing personality disorders in DSM-IV, we summarise the most important features of the newly developed personality disorders classification, including concepts have been modified during long years of investigation. The new system will have modified less than was originally intended, and will be a hybrid model of dimensional categorical approach to diagnosing personality disorders. The ten personality disorder types are reduced to six, and they will have new criteria based on maladaptive trait dimensions. The trait structure model was derived from existing personality and personality disorder trait models, and includes five broad higher-order trait domains, which are negative affectivity, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, and psychoticism. A new set of general criteria are developed for defining personality disorder. Self and interpersonal functioning represent the core impairment in personality functioning central to personality disorder, and the presence of maladaptive personality traits is also required. Severity continuum of personality pathology can be rated on the Levels of Personality Functioning Scale.

  6. Some comments on nomology, diagnostic process, and narcissistic personality disorder in the DSM-5 proposal for personality and personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Aaron L

    2011-01-01

    I comment on the DSM-5 proposal for personality disorders (PDs), including discussion of the proposal's nomological revisions and their implications, the development and prioritization of a set of general criteria for PD, the shift to prototype matching of narrative descriptions for assessment of personality impairments and prominent PD types, and the recommendation to delete five PD diagnoses. Although the general criteria for PD are promising, implementation of prototype ratings for both functional impairments and PD types remains psychometrically questionable. In addition, revising the format and content of the diagnostic criteria while simultaneously deleting five diagnoses confounds evaluation of the revisions for the purposes indicated in the proposal. Finally, the performance of prior DSM criteria sets should not be the primary basis for considering the ontological status of prominent types because of construct definition problems with the criteria sets and criterion problems with DSM-based PD research. These concerns were highlighted in the case of Narcissistic PD-a diagnosis slated for deletion despite significant evidence for its clinical utility and validity when data beyond DSM criteria is considered. Changes of this magnitude are needed, but rigorous scientific evaluation is necessary before evolving from a proposal to the officially published DSM-5.

  7. Poor Validity of the DSM-IV Schizoid Personality Disorder Construct as a Diagnostic Category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummelen, Benjamin; Pedersen, Geir; Wilberg, Theresa; Karterud, Sigmund

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to evaluate the construct validity of schizoid personality disorder (SZPD) by investigating a sample of 2,619 patients from the Norwegian Network of Personality-Focused Treatment Programs by a variety of statistical techniques. Nineteen patients (0.7%) reached the diagnostic threshold of SZPD. Results from the factor analyses indicated that SZPD consists of three factors: social detachment, withdrawal, and restricted affectivity/ anhedonia. Overall, internal consistency and diagnostic efficiency were poor and best for the criteria that belong to the social detachment factor. These findings pose serious questions about the clinical utility of SZPD as a diagnostic category. On the other hand, the three factors were in concordance with findings from previous studies and with the trait model for personality disorders in DSM-5, supporting the validity of SZPD as a dimensional construct. The authors recommend that SZPD should be deleted as a diagnostic category in future editions of DSM-5.

  8. Integrating normal and abnormal personality structure: a proposal for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiger, Thomas A

    2011-06-01

    The personality disorders section of the American Psychiatric Association's fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) is currently being developed. The purpose of the current paper is to encourage the authors of DSM-V to integrate normal and abnormal personality structure within a common, integrative model, and to suggest that the optimal choice for such an integration would be the five-factor model (FFM) of general personality structure. A proposal for the classification of personality disorder from the perspective of the FFM is provided. Discussed as well are implications and issues associated with an FFM of personality disorder, including validity, coverage, feasibility, clinical utility, and treatment implications.

  9. The Five-Factor Model of personality disorder and DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Five-Factor Model of personality disorders (FFMPD; Widiger & Mullins-Sweatt, ) developed from the recognition that the popular Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality could be used to describe and understand the official personality disorder (PD) constructs from the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) diagnostic manuals (e.g., DSM-IV-TR, APA, ). This article provides an overview of the FFM, highlighting its validity and utility in characterizing PDs as well as its ability to provide a comprehensive account of personality pathology in general. In 2013, DSM-5 is scheduled to appear, and the "hybrid" PD proposal will emphasize a 25-personality trait model. I present the current version of this new model, compare it to the FFMPD, and discuss issues related to the implementation of the FFMPD.

  10. Mathematical Model and Artificial Intelligent Techniques Applied to a Milk Industry through DSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, P. Ravi; Divya, V. P. Sree

    2011-08-01

    The resources for electrical energy are depleting and hence the gap between the supply and the demand is continuously increasing. Under such circumstances, the option left is optimal utilization of available energy resources. The main objective of this chapter is to discuss about the Peak load management and overcome the problems associated with it in processing industries such as Milk industry with the help of DSM techniques. The chapter presents a generalized mathematical model for minimizing the total operating cost of the industry subject to the constraints. The work presented in this chapter also deals with the results of application of Neural Network, Fuzzy Logic and Demand Side Management (DSM) techniques applied to a medium scale milk industrial consumer in India to achieve the improvement in load factor, reduction in Maximum Demand (MD) and also the consumer gets saving in the energy bill.

  11. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  13. Dimensional assessment of anxiety disorders in parents and children for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Eline L; Majdandžić, Mirjana; Craske, Michelle G; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-09-01

    The current shift in the DSM towards the inclusion of a dimensional component allows clinicians and researchers to demonstrate not only the presence or absence of psychopathology in an individual, but also the degree to which the disorder and its symptoms are manifested. This study evaluated the psychometric properties and utility of a set of brief dimensional scales that assess DSM-based core features of anxiety disorders, for children and their parents. The dimensional scales and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-71), a questionnaire to assess symptoms of all anxiety disorders, were administered to a community sample of children (n = 382), aged 8-13 years, and their mothers (n = 285) and fathers (n = 255). The dimensional scales assess six anxiety disorders: specific phobia, agoraphobia, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and separation anxiety disorder. Children rated their own anxiety and parents their child's anxiety. The dimensional scales demonstrated high internal consistency (α > 0.78, except for father reported child panic disorder, for reason of lack of variation), and moderate to high levels of convergent validity (rs  = 0.29-0.73). Children who exceeded the SCARED cutoffs scored higher on the dimensional scales than those who did not, providing preliminary support for the clinical sensitivity of the scales. Given their strong psychometric properties and utility for both child and parent report, addition of the dimensional scales to the DSM-5 might be an effective way to incorporate dimensional measurement into the categorical DSM-5 assessment of anxiety disorders in children.

  14. DSM-III and Norway. History, attitudes and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malt, U F

    1986-01-01

    The first Norwegian evaluation of the DSM-III system of classification occurred in 1980. A Norwegian translation of the diagnostic criteria was published as part of a textbook in psychiatry in 1984. The Mini DSM-III (Quick reference) was published in 1985. The DSM-III system has been generally well accepted in Norway and is currently used in most research projects besides the ICD system. Several training courses have been arranged for senior psychiatrists and psychologists. Introduction to the DSM-III system is also part of the obligatory training course for psychiatric residents in Norway. From 1987 Norway will use a clinical modification of the ICD-9 system of classification. This modification applies 5 digit coding and includes diagnostic categories found in the DSM-III system but not in the 4 digit ICD-9 version. The DSM-III system of classification represents a major step forward in psychiatric classification. However, revisions are necessary to increase clinical validity. Although Norwegian psychiatry has been inspired by the DSM-III system, Norway remains committed to the ICD systems. The goal must be to make further revisions of the DSM-III and ICD systems, and in the end unite the strengths of these two systems of psychiatric classification.

  15. Adult separation anxiety disorder in the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bögels, S.M.; Knappe, S.; Clark, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other DSM-IV anxiety disorders, separation anxiety disorder (SAD) has been considered a disorder that typically begins in childhood, and could be diagnosed only in adults "if onset is before 18." Moreover, SAD is the only DSM-IV anxiety disorder placed under "Disorders Usually First Diagnosed

  16. DSM-5 Further Inflates Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batstra, Laura; Frances, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) prevalence and medication use unexpectedly increased significantly. In this article, we explore the DSM-5 proposals for ADHD that are likely to further increase its prevalence. We also address the possible harmf

  17. Binge Eating Disorder: A Review of a New "DSM" Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Laura L.; Wiman, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    In 1994, binge eating disorder (BED) was introduced as a disorder requiring further study in the "American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", fourth edition ("DSM-IV"). It is now listed as a distinct eating disorder in the "DSM-5", along with bulimia nervosa and…

  18. Brief Report: Should the DSM V Drop Asperger Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The DSM IV defines Asperger syndrome (AS) as a pervasive developmental (autistic spectrum) disorder characterized by social deficits and rigid focused interests in the absence of language impairment and cognitive delay. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, there has been a dramatic increase in its recognition both in children and adults. However,…

  19. Dimensional and Cross-Cutting Assessment in the "DSM-5"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. Dayle

    2012-01-01

    A significant proposed change to the 5th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM-5") that will significantly affect the way counselors diagnose mental disorders is the addition of dimensional assessments to the categorical diagnoses. The author reviews the current "DSM"'s (4th ed., text rev.; American…

  20. Review of the Proposed "DSM-5" Substance Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. Dayle; Gill, Carman; Ray, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    The "DSM-5" Task Force has recommended a new substance use disorder to replace substance abuse and dependence. This article provides an overview of substance abuse and dependence, a description of the "DSM-5" substance use disorder, and implications and potential consequences of this change.

  1. Binge Eating Disorder: A Review of a New "DSM" Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Laura L.; Wiman, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    In 1994, binge eating disorder (BED) was introduced as a disorder requiring further study in the "American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", fourth edition ("DSM-IV"). It is now listed as a distinct eating disorder in the "DSM-5", along with bulimia nervosa and anorexia…

  2. [Critical evaluation of the first draft of DSM-V].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, A

    2011-02-16

    Critical evaluation of DSM-V first draft This is an evaluation of the first DSM-V (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V) draft from the DSM-IV chairman. First, a brief history of DSM is reported. Then, major reasons for present controversies and the threat they raise to APA leadership in the field are discussed. Third point is careful recollection of the several conflicting aspects of the DSM-V draft, paying attention to drawbacks and their implications for future clinical practice, research and forensic activity. Comment is finally provided about APA (American Psychiatric Association) decisions aimed at reaching more consensus about this basic instrument of American psychiatry.

  3. Do DSM-5 Eating Disorder Criteria Overpathologize Normative Eating Patterns among Individuals with Obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Jennifer J.; Koh, Katherine A.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Hartmann, Andrea S.; Murray, Helen B.; Gorman, Mark J.; Stephanie Sogg; Becker, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. DSM-5 revisions have been criticized in the popular press for overpathologizing normative eating patterns—particularly among individuals with obesity. To evaluate the evidence for this and other DSM-5 critiques, we compared the point prevalence and interrater reliability of DSM-IV versus DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs) among adults seeking weight-loss treatment. Method. Clinicians (n = 2) assigned DSM-IV and DSM-5 ED diagnoses to 100 participants via routine clinical interview. Resea...

  4. On the road to DSM-V and ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, David J; Regier, Darrel A; Kuhl, Emily A

    2008-11-01

    Development of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) has been ongoing since 1994, though official release will not occur for another 4 years. Potential revisions are being derived from multiple sources, including building on perceived limitations of DSM-IV; broad-based literature reviews; secondary and primary data analyses; and discussions between global members of the mental health community. The current focus on aligning DSM with the International Classification of Diseases-11 (ICD-11) speaks to the importance of creating a unified text that embraces cross-cutting issues of diagnostics, such as developmental, age-related, and cultural phenomena. International discourse is vital to this process and has been fostered by a National Institutes of Health-sponsored conference series on diagnosis-specific topics. From this series, the DSM-V Task Force developed the following set of revision principals to guide the efforts of the DSM-V Work Groups: grounding recommendations in empirical evidence; maintaining continuity with previous editions of DSM; removing a priori limitations on the amount of changes DSM-V may incur; and maintaining DSM's status as a living document. With work group formation complete, members are currently carrying out the research and revision recommendations proposed during the conference series. Ongoing activities include adding specialized advisors to each work group; completing literature reviews and planning data analyses; and forming study groups to discuss integration of cross-cutting issues (e.g., developmental lifespan factors; formation of diagnostic spectra). The road to DSM-V and ICD-11 has been challenging, but members continue to work diligently in their goal of constructing the most harmonious, scientifically sound, and clinically relevant DSM to date.

  5. An analysis of the factors influencing demand-side management activity in the electric utility industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Mark Joseph

    Demand-side management (DSM), defined as the "planning, implementation, and monitoring of utility activities designed to encourage consumers to modify their pattern of electricity usage, including the timing and level of electricity demand," is a relatively new concept in the U.S. electric power industry. Nevertheless, in twenty years since it was first introduced, utility expenditures on DSM programs, as well as the number of such programs, have grown rapidly. At first glance, it may seem peculiar that a firm would actively attempt to reduce demand for its primary product. There are two primary explanations as to why a utility might pursue DSM: regulatory mandate, and self-interest. The purpose of this dissertation is to determine the impact these influences have on the amount of DSM undertaken by utilities. This research is important for two reasons. First, it provides insight into whether DSM will continue to exist as competition becomes more prevalent in the industry. Secondly, it is important because no one has taken a comprehensive look at firm-level DSM activity on an industry-wide basis. The primary data set used in this dissertation is the U.S. Department of Energy's Annual Electric Utility Report, Form EIA-861, which represents the most comprehensive data set available for analyzing DSM activity in the U.S. There are four measures of DSM activity in this data set: (1) utility expenditures on DSM programs; (2) energy savings by DSM program participants; and (3) the actual and (4) the potential reductions in peak load resulting from utility DSM measures. Each is used as the dependent variable in an econometric analysis where independent variables include various utility characteristics, regulatory characteristics, and service territory and customer characteristics. In general, the results from the econometric analysis suggest that in 1993, DSM activity was primarily the result of regulatory pressure. All of the evidence suggests that if DSM continues to

  6. From CBCL to DSM: A Comparison of Two Methods to Screen for DSM-IV Diagnoses Using CBCL Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Nicole P. C. M.; De Bruyn, Eric E. J.; Coolen, Jolanda C.; van Aarle, Edward J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The screening efficiency of 2 methods to convert Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) assessment data into Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnoses was compared. The Machine-Aided Diagnosis (MAD) method converts CBCL input data directly into DSM-IV symptom criteria. The…

  7. Narcissistic pathology as core personality dysfunction: comparing the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 proposal for narcissistic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Stagner, Brian H

    2012-08-01

    Narcissistic personality disorder and related concepts have a complex history and have been subject to extensive theoretical discourse but relatively little empirical research. An initial proposal for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) that suggested eliminating this disorder as a discrete personality disorder type met with considerable controversy that ultimately led to its reinstatement in subsequent proposals. Nonetheless, the DSM-5 proposal for personality disorders as a whole would involve a significantly different formulation of narcissistic personality from that described in DSM-IV-one that places a greater emphasis on shared deficits among all personality disorders that tap elements thought to fall on the narcissistic spectrum, such as deficits in empathic capacity. This article describes this revised formulation, and presents a case study that illustrates the similarities and differences in the DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 portrayal of narcissistic issues and related clinical problems over the course of a particular treatment.

  8. Alcohol and Substance Use Disorders in DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcan Gulec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available When we compare the categories about alcohol, and substance-related disorders in DSM-IV and DSM-5, the new category, named addictive disorders is the most striking change. Only gambling disorder have been identified currently in this category. This may be the most remarkable change among the changes in the DSM-5. Because the expansion of the existing diagnostic criteria may cause the assessment of and lsquo;normal behavior' as a disorder. Additionally, withdrawal of caffeine and cannabis are defined in the DSM-5. Disorders collected under the title of substance-related disorders in the DSM-IV were collected under the name of substance-related and addictive disorders in the DSM-5. Specific criterias for substance abuse and substance addiction have been combined into the name of "substance use disorders". In substance abuse, "experienced legal problems" criteria was removed and "a strong desire or urge or craving for substance use" criteria has been introduced. Henceforth, substance abuse is defined as a mild form of substance use disorders in the DSM-5. A change in the prevalence of substance use disorders should be investigated by the new researches.

  9. Bipolar and related disorders and depressive disorders in DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łojko,Dorota

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM, having number 5, was published. The DSM is a textbook which aims to present diagnostic criteria for each psychiatric disorder recognized by the U.S. healthcare system. The DSM-5 comprises the most updated diagnostic criteria of psychiatric disorders as well as their description, and provides a common language for clinicians to communicate about the patients. Diagnostic criteria of the DSM-5 have been popular all over the world, including countries where the ICD-10 classification is obligatory, and are widely used for clinical and neurobiological research in psychiatry. In this article, two chapters of the DSM-5 pertained to mood (affective disorders are presented, such as “Bipolar and related disorders” and “Depressive disorders” replacing the chapter titled “Mood disorders” in the previous version of DSM-IV. The aim of this article is to discuss a structure of new classification, to point out differences compared with previous version (DSM-IV. New diagnostic categories, such as e.g. disruptive mood dysregulation disorder or premenstrual dysphoric disorder were depicted as well as some elements of dimensional approach to mood disorders were presented.

  10. Latent Factor Structure of DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentes, Emily; Dennis, Paul A; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Kirby, Angela C; Hair, Lauren P; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

    The current study examined the latent factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on DSM-5 criteria in a sample of participants (N = 374) recruited for studies on trauma and health. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were used to compare the fit of the previous 3-factor DSM-IV model of PTSD to the 4-factor model specified in DSM-5 as well as to a competing 4-factor "dysphoria" model (Simms, Watson, & Doebbeling, 2002) and a 5-factor (Elhai et al., 2011) model of PTSD. Results indicated that the Elhai 5-factor model (re-experiencing, active avoidance, emotional numbing, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal) provided the best fit to the data, although substantial support was demonstrated for the DSM-5 4-factor model. Low factor loadings were noted for two of the symptoms in the DSM-5 model (psychogenic amnesia and reckless/self-destructive behavior), which raises questions regarding the adequacy of fit of these symptoms with other core features of the disorder. Overall, the findings from the present research suggest the DSM-5 model of PTSD is a significant improvement over the previous DSM-IV model of PTSD.

  11. Should A2 be a diagnostic requirement for posttraumatic stress disorder in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Meaghan L; Creamer, Mark; McFarlane, Alexander C; Silove, Derrick; Bryant, Richard A

    2010-04-30

    The requirement that trauma survivors experience fear, helplessness or horror (Criterion A2) as a part of their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis was introduced into DSM-IV. The imminent re-definition of PTSD in DSM-V highlights the need for empirical studies to validate the utility of the A2 requirement. We aimed to identify (i) how often A2 was associated with PTSD (B-F criteria) at 3 months after trauma and (ii) what was the peritraumatic emotional experience for those who met PTSD criteria but were A2 negative. In a prospective design cohort study we assessed the peritraumatic emotional experience of 535 injury patients in four Australian hospitals. These patients were followed up 3 months later and assessed for PTSD using a structured clinical interview. The majority of those who developed PTSD (B-F criterion) at 3 months met A2 criteria. A substantial minority, however (23%), did not meet A2 criteria. Those PTSD patients who were A2 negative fell into three groups: (i) those who experienced subthreshold levels of A2; (ii) those who experienced intense peritrauma emotional responses other than fear, helplessness or horror; and (iii) those who were amnesic to their peritrauma emotional experience. These findings do not support the inclusion of A2 as diagnostic requirement for DSM-V.

  12. Epidemiology of DSM-5 Drug Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Bridget F.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Ruan, W. June; Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Smith, Sharon M.; Pickering, Roger P.; Huang, Boji; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current information on the prevalence and sociodemographic and clinical profiles of individuals in the general population with DSM-5 drug use disorder (DUD) is limited. Given the present societal and economic context in the United States and the new diagnostic system, up-to-date national information is needed from a single uniform data source. OBJECTIVE To present nationally representative findings on the prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability, and treatment of DSM-5 DUD diagnoses overall and by severity level. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In-person interviews were conducted with 36 309 adults in the 2012–2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III, a cross-sectional representative survey of the United States. The household response rate was 72%; person-level response rate, 84%; and overall response rate, 60.1%. Data were collected April 2012 through June 2013 and analyzed from February through March 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Twelve-month and lifetime DUD, based on amphetamine, cannabis, club drug, cocaine, hallucinogen, heroin, nonheroin opioid, sedative/tranquilizer, and/or solvent/inhalant use disorders. RESULTS Prevalences of 12-month and lifetime DUD were 3.9% and 9.9%, respectively. Drug use disorder was generally greater among men, white and Native American individuals, younger and previously or never married adults, those with lower education and income, and those residing in the West. Significant associations were found between 12-month and lifetime DUD and other substance use disorders. Significant associations were also found between any 12-month DUD and major depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% CI, 1.09–1.64), dysthymia (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09–2.02), bipolar I (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.06–2.05), posttraumatic stress disorder (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.27–2.10), and antisocial (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.11–1.75), borderline (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.41–2.24), and schizotypal (OR, 1

  13. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yourstone, N.E. [Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group`s functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities` views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  14. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yourstone, N.E. (Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group's functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities' views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  15. California Institute for Energy Efficiency: 1993 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    In 1988, a statewide partnership of California`s six largest electric and gas utilities, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Energy Commission, the University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) led to the creation of the California Institute for energy Efficiency. CIEE was specifically established to respond to California`s energy and environmental needs by developing new, energy-efficient technologies for buildings, industry, and transportation using the scientific and technological capabilities of the state`s universities, colleges, and university-affiliated laboratories. This 1993 Annual Report highlights the accomplishments of CIEE`s research and development program, which includes 11 major multiyear projects in the fields of Building Energy Efficiency and Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency as well as 21 ongoing exploratory projects. This report contains research highlights from seven of these programs.

  16. [Changes to the classification of Eating Disorders in DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Susanne; Föcker, Manuel; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-09-01

    The fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) resulted in substantial changes with regard to the classification of Eating Disorders. In DSM-5, Feeding and Eating Disorders are for the first time subsumed in a single category. The Binge Eating Disorder (BED) was established as the third classical eating disorder in addition to Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and Bulimia Nervosa (BN). The criteria for AN changed remarkably, whereas there were only minor changes to the BN criteria. The criteria for BED differ only marginally from the DSM-IV research criteria. There are now subtypes of AN, BN, and BED in the new category "Other Specific Feeding and Eating Disorders." The rest category "Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified" has been renamed to "Unspecified Feeding or Eating Disorders." The practicability of the DSM-5 criteria for Eating Disorders, and for AN in particular, for both clinical practice and research remains to be seen.

  17. ElevationOther_DSM3p2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Chittenden County 2004 3.2m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with the...

  18. ElevationOther_nDSM0p7M2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Rutland/GI Counties 2013 0.7m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized...

  19. ElevationOther_nDSM0p7M2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Windham County 2015 0.7m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized...

  20. ElevationOther_DSM1p4m

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — A Digital Surface Model (DSM) represents the earth's surface and all objects on it like buildings and tree canopy, was derived from the best available LiDAR "point...

  1. ElevationOther_DSM1p6M2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with the...

  2. ElevationOther_nDSM0p7M2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Eastern VT 2014 0.7m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized Digital...

  3. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  4. The DSM diagnostic criteria for female sexual arousal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Cynthia A

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews and critiques the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for Female Sexual Arousal Disorder (FSAD). An overview of how the diagnostic criteria for FSAD have evolved over previous editions of the DSM is presented and research on prevalence and etiology of FSAD is briefly reviewed. Problems with the essential feature of the DSM-IV-TR diagnosis-"an inability to attain, or to maintain...an adequate lubrication-swelling response of sexual excitement"-are identified. The significant overlap between "arousal" and "desire" disorders is highlighted. Finally, specific recommendations for revision of the criteria for DSM-V are made, including use of a polythetic approach to the diagnosis and the addition of duration and severity criteria.

  5. Subgrouping the autism "spectrum": reflections on DSM-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Lai

    Full Text Available DSM-5 has moved autism from the level of subgroups ("apples and oranges" to the prototypical level ("fruit". But making progress in research, and ultimately improving clinical practice, will require identifying subgroups within the autism spectrum.

  6. ElevationOther_nDSM1p6M2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized...

  7. ElevationOther_nDSM3p2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Chittenden County 2004 3.2m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized...

  8. ElevationOther_DSM1p6M2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with the VT...

  9. ElevationOther_DSM1p6M2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata complies with the...

  10. ElevationOther_nDSM1p6M2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Created "Normalized...

  11. Application of Dsm in Obstacle Clearance Surveying of Aerodrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, X.; Lv, S. H.; Li, L. L.; Zhou, X. J.; Wang, H. Y.; Li, D.; Liu, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Compared to the wide use of digital elevation model (DEM), digital surface model (DSM) receives less attention because that it is composed by not only terrain surface, but also vegetations and man-made objects which are usually regarded as useless information. Nevertheless, these objects are useful for the identification of obstacles around an aerodrome. The primary objective of the study was to determine the applicability of DSM in obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome. According to the requirements of obstacle clearance surveying at QT airport, aerial and satellite imagery were used to generate DSM, by means of photogrammetry, which was spatially analyzed with the hypothetical 3D obstacle limitation surfaces (OLS) to identify the potential obstacles. Field surveying was then carried out to retrieve the accurate horizontal position and height of the obstacles. The results proved that the application of DSM could make considerable improvement in the efficiency of obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome.

  12. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  13. APPLICATION OF DSM IN OBSTACLE CLEARANCE SURVEYING OF AERODROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the wide use of digital elevation model (DEM, digital surface model (DSM receives less attention because that it is composed by not only terrain surface, but also vegetations and man-made objects which are usually regarded as useless information. Nevertheless, these objects are useful for the identification of obstacles around an aerodrome. The primary objective of the study was to determine the applicability of DSM in obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome. According to the requirements of obstacle clearance surveying at QT airport, aerial and satellite imagery were used to generate DSM, by means of photogrammetry, which was spatially analyzed with the hypothetical 3D obstacle limitation surfaces (OLS to identify the potential obstacles. Field surveying was then carried out to retrieve the accurate horizontal position and height of the obstacles. The results proved that the application of DSM could make considerable improvement in the efficiency of obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome.

  14. Highly Efficient Thermostable DSM Cellulases: Why & How?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manoj [DSM Innovation, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2011-04-26

    These are the slides from this presentation. Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  15. Highly Efficient Thermostable DSM Cellulases: Why & How?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2011-04-26

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  16. Dsm Based Orientation of Large Stereo Satellite Image Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Angelo, P.; Reinartz, P.

    2012-07-01

    High resolution stereo satellite imagery is well suited for the creation of digital surface models (DSM). A system for highly automated and operational DSM and orthoimage generation based on CARTOSAT-1 imagery is presented, with emphasis on fully automated georeferencing. The proposed system processes level-1 stereo scenes using the rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) universal sensor model. The RPC are derived from orbit and attitude information and have a much lower accuracy than the ground resolution of approximately 2.5 m. In order to use the images for orthorectification or DSM generation, an affine RPC correction is required. In this paper, GCP are automatically derived from lower resolution reference datasets (Landsat ETM+ Geocover and SRTM DSM). The traditional method of collecting the lateral position from a reference image and interpolating the corresponding height from the DEM ignores the higher lateral accuracy of the SRTM dataset. Our method avoids this drawback by using a RPC correction based on DSM alignment, resulting in improved geolocation of both DSM and ortho images. Scene based method and a bundle block adjustment based correction are developed and evaluated for a test site covering the nothern part of Italy, for which 405 Cartosat-1 Stereopairs are available. Both methods are tested against independent ground truth. Checks against this ground truth indicate a lateral error of 10 meters.

  17. A Novel Prosumer-Based Energy Sharing and Management (PESM Approach for Cooperative Demand Side Management (DSM in Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Razzaq

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing population and modern lifestyle have raised energy demands globally. Demand Side Management (DSM is one important tool used to manage energy demands. It employs an advanced power infrastructure along with bi-directional information flow among utilities and users in order to achieve a balanced load curve and minimize demand-supply mismatch. Traditionally, this involves shifting the electricity demand from peak hours to other times of the day in an optimized manner. Multiple users equipped with renewable resources work in coordination with each other in order to achieve mutually beneficial energy management. This, in turn, has generated the concept of cooperative DSM. Such users, called prosumers, consume and produce energy using renewable resources (solar, wind etc.. Prosumers with surplus energy sell to the grid as well as to other consumers. In this paper, a novel Prosumer-based Energy Sharing and Management (PESM scheme for cooperative DSM has been proposed. A simulation model has been developed for testing the proposed method. Different variations of the proposed methodology have been experimented with different criteria. The results show that the proposed energy sharing scheme achieves DSM purposes in a useful manner.

  18. A review of somatoform disorders in DSM-IV and somatic symptom disorders in proposed DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Firoozabadi, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Psychiatric care providers should be trained to use current changes in the somatoform disorders criteria. New diagnostic criteria for Somatic Symptom disorders in the proposed DSM-V is discussed and compared with its older counterpart in DSM-IV. A new category called Somatic Syndrome Disorders is suggested. It includes new subcategories such as "Complex Somatic Symptom Disorder" (CSSD) and "Simple Somatic Symptom Disorder" (SSSD). Some of the subcategories of DSM-IV derived disorders are included in CSSD. While there are some changes in diagnostic criteria, there are concerns and limitations about the new classification needed to be more discussed before implementation. Functional somatic disturbance, the counterpart of converion disorder in DSM-IV, can be highly dependet on the developmental level of children. However, the role of developmental level needs to be considered.

  19. Hebephilia is not a mental disorder in DSM-IV-TR and should not become one in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, Allen; First, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    The paraphilia section of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) is being misinterpreted in the forensic evaluations of sexually violent offenders. The resulting misuse of the term paraphilia not otherwise specified, hebephilia, has justified the inappropriate involuntary commitment of individuals who do not in fact qualify for a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of mental disorder. This article has two purposes: to clarify what the DSM-IV-TR was meant to convey and how it has been twisted in translation within the legal system, and to warn that the DSM-5 proposal to include pedohebephilia threatens to make the current bad situation very much worse in the future.

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Type Strains Bacillus drentensis DSM 15600T and Bacillus novalis DSM 15603T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Zhu, Yu-Jing; Wang, Jie-Ping; Che, Jian-Mei; Chen, Qian-Qian; Chen, Zheng

    2016-12-15

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of Bacillus drentensis DSM 15600(T) and Bacillus novalis DSM 15603(T) with 5,305,306 bp and 5,667,584 bp, respectively, which will provide useful information for the functional gene mining and application of these two species. The average DNA G+C contents were 38.91% and 40.01%, respectively.

  1. Do DSM-5 Eating Disorder Criteria Overpathologize Normative Eating Patterns among Individuals with Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. DSM-5 revisions have been criticized in the popular press for overpathologizing normative eating patterns—particularly among individuals with obesity. To evaluate the evidence for this and other DSM-5 critiques, we compared the point prevalence and interrater reliability of DSM-IV versus DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs among adults seeking weight-loss treatment. Method. Clinicians (n=2 assigned DSM-IV and DSM-5 ED diagnoses to 100 participants via routine clinical interview. Research assessors (n=3 independently conferred ED diagnoses via Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and a DSM-5 checklist. Results. Research assessors diagnosed a similar proportion of participants with EDs under DSM-IV (29% versus DSM-5 (32%. DSM-5 research diagnoses included binge eating disorder (9%, bulimia nervosa (2%, subthreshold binge eating disorder (5%, subthreshold bulimia nervosa (2%, purging disorder (1%, night eating syndrome (6%, and other (7%. Interrater reliability between clinicians and research assessors was “substantial” for both DSM-IV (κ = 0.64, 84% agreement and DSM-5 (κ = 0.63, 83% agreement. Conclusion. DSM-5 ED criteria can be reliably applied in an obesity treatment setting and appear to yield an overall ED point prevalence comparable to DSM-IV.

  2. A Adaptive Integration Algorithms with DST and DSmT%DST与DSmT自适应融合算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯俊; 苗壮; 潘泉

    2006-01-01

    与DST相比,DSmT可以很好的解决证据矛盾时的证据组合问题,但是DSmT计算量过大,且在低冲突情况下融合结果次于DST.文章在DST和DSmT的基础上提出一种将两种融合方法结合使用的融合算法--DST与DSmT自适应融合算法.以冲突率作为判决依据,在冲突率较低情况下采取DST融合算法,当冲突率高于一定阈值时采用DSmT融合算法,并给出了DST和DSmT之间转化的方法.在进行三维飞机序列图像的目标类型识别中,采用本文提出的自适应算法进行迭代运算,可以快速准确地进行目标识别.

  3. Considering DSM-5: the personal experience of schizophrenia in relation to the DSM-IV-TR criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Solomon, Lesley Anne; Johnson, Amy; Ridgway, Priscilla; Strauss, John S; Davidson, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Previous analyses have suggested that the personal experience of schizophrenia might be different from its depiction in the DSM-IV-TR. In this study, 17 people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were interviewed about their experiences of the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. Descriptive phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the ways in which the personal experiences of the people in this study were similar to or different from the depiction of schizophrenia in the DSM-IV-TR. The personal experience of schizophrenia was similar in some way to each of the five diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. Participants' personal experiences also went beyond the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Specifically, participants described strong emotional reactions to their symptoms, including fear, sadness, embarrassment, and alienation. Also, participants described intense interest but severe disruptions in goal-directed behavior due to their hallucinations being engrossing, confusing, and distracting. Further, participants described not sharing their experiences in order to avoid social stigma. These findings suggest that the description of schizophrenia in DSM-5 may benefit from a change to DSM-IV-TR criteria to incorporate more of the personal experience of schizophrenia. Further research is needed to establish the representativeness, reliability, and validity of the qualitative findings described here.

  4. Cocaine use disorder prevalence: From current DSM-IV to proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria with both a two and three severity level classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Steven L; Kopak, Albert M; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2014-06-01

    This article presents a secondary analysis from a study investigating the compatibility of the current DSM-IV and previously proposed DSM-5 cocaine use disorder (CUD) criteria (S. L. Proctor, A. M. Kopak, & N. G. Hoffmann, 2012, Compatibility of current DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for cocaine use disorders. Addictive Behaviors, 37, 722-728). The current analyses examined the compatibility of the current DSM-IV and two sets of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for CUDs among adult male inmates (N = 6,871) recently admitted to the Minnesota Department of Corrections state prison system from 2000-2003. Initially proposed DSM-5 criteria (DSM-5.0) featured only two diagnostic designations (i.e., moderate and severe). A subsequent revision (DSM-5.1) included the addition of a mild designation and required a greater number of positive findings for the severe designation. A computer-prompted structured diagnostic interview was administered to all inmates as part of routine clinical assessments. The past 12-month prevalence of DSM-IV CUDs was 12.70% (Abuse, 3.78%, Dependence, 8.92%), while 10.98% met past 12-month DSM-5.1 criteria for a CUD (Mild [MiCUD], 1.72%; Moderate [MCUD], 1.12%; and Severe [SCUD], 8.14%). The vast majority of those with no diagnosis (99.6%) continued to have no diagnosis, and most of those with a dependence diagnosis (91.2%) met SCUD criteria of the proposed DSM-5.1. Most of the variation in DSM-5.1 diagnostic classifications was accounted for by those with a current abuse diagnosis. DSM-5.0 MCUD cases were most affected when DSM-5.1 criteria were applied. The proposed diagnostic changes might translate to reduced access to treatment for those individuals evincing symptoms consistent with DSM-IV cocaine abuse.

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099 Isolated from the Hydrothermal Vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Zhou, Zhi; Gao, Dahai; Wang, Lingling

    2016-08-25

    This report describes the draft genome sequences of two strains, Pseudoalteromonas telluritireducens DSM 16098 and P. spiralis DSM 16099, which were isolated from hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs with total sizes of 4.4 Mb and 4.1 Mb for DSM 16098 and DSM 16099, respectively.

  6. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be

  7. Tradable renewable energy credits in California: the struggle with implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, Seth D.; Marriott, Chad T.

    2010-07-15

    On Mar. 11, 2010, the California Public Utilities Commission authorized the use of tradable renewable energy credits to satisfy at least a portion of the obligations imposed by California's Renewables Portfolio Standard. The decision allows California's largest investor-owned utilities and other retail providers to purchase TRECs to meet up to 25 percent of their annual RPS compliance obligations, but implementation has raised a series of questions. (author)

  8. Are symptoms of spirit possessed patients covered by the DSM-IV or DSM-5 criteria for possession trance disorder? A mixed-method explorative study in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijl, M.; Kleyn, W.; de Jong, J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and aims As in many cultures, spirit possession is a common idiom of distress in Uganda. The DSM-IV contains experimental research criteria for dissociative and possession trance disorder (DTD and PTD), which are under review for the DSM-5. In the current proposed categories of the DSM-

  9. Brief Report: An Exploratory Study Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes for Autism Spectrum Disorders under DSM-IV-TR with the Proposed DSM-5 Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Vicki; Aldridge, Fiona; Chandler, Felicity; Witzlsperger, Ellen; Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The proposed revision for Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) represents a shift from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). As the proposed DSM-5 criteria require a higher minimum number of symptoms to be…

  10. Comparing polysaccharide decomposition between the type strains Gramella echinicola KMM 6050(T) (DSM 19838(T)) and Gramella portivictoriae UST040801-001(T) (DSM 23547(T)), and emended description of Gramella echinicola Nedashkovskaya et al. 2005 emend. Shahina et al. 2014 and Gramella portivictoriae Lau et al. 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panschin, Irina; Huang, Sixing; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Tindall, Brian J; Rohde, Manfred; Verbarg, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Trong, Stephan; Haynes, Matthew; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Hahnke, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the genus Gramella (family Flavobacteriacae, phylum Bacteroidetes) were isolated from marine habitats such as tidal flat sediments, coastal surface seawater and sea urchins. Flavobacteriaceae have been shown to be involved in the decomposition of plant and algal polysaccharides. However, the potential to decompose polysaccharides may differ tremendously even between species of the same genus. Gramella echinicola KMM 6050(T) (DSM 19838(T)) and Gramella portivictoriae UST040801-001(T) (DSM 23547(T)) have genomes of similar lengths, similar numbers of protein coding genes and RNA genes. Both genomes encode for a greater number of peptidases compared to 'G. forsetii'. In contrast to the genome of 'G. forsetii', both genomes comprised a smaller set of CAZymes. Seven polysaccharide utilization loci were identified in the genomes of DSM 19838(T) and DSM 23547(T). Both Gramella strains hydrolyzed starch, galactomannan, arabinoxylan and hydroxyethyl-cellulose, but not pectin, chitosan and cellulose (Avicel). Galactan and xylan were hydrolyzed by strain DSM 19838(T), whereas strain DSM 23547(T) hydrolyzed pachyman and carboxy-methyl cellulose. Conclusively, both Gramella type strains exhibit characteristic physiological, morphological and genomic differences that might be linked to their habitat. Furthermore, the identified enzymes mediating polysaccharide decomposition, are of biotechnological interest.

  11. Classifying Intersex in DSM-5: Critical Reflections on Gender Dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Cynthia

    2015-07-01

    The new diagnosis of Gender Dysphoria (GD) in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) defines intersex, renamed "Disorders of Sex Development" (DSD), as a specifier of GD. With this formulation, the status of intersex departs from prior editions, especially from the DSM-IV texts that defined intersex as an exclusion criterion for Gender Identity Disorder. Conversely, GD--with or without a DSD--can apply in the same manner to DSD and non-DSD individuals; it subsumes the physical condition under the mental "disorder." This conceptualization, I suggest, is unprecedented in the history of the DSM. In my view, it is the most significant change in the revised diagnosis, and it raises the question of the suitability of psychiatric diagnosis for individuals with intersex/DSD. Unfortunately, this fundamental question was not raised during the revision process. This article examines, historically and conceptually, the different terms provided for intersex/DSD in the DSM in order to capture the significance of the DSD specifier, and the reasons why the risk of stigma and misdiagnosis, I argue, is increased in DSM-5 compared to DSM-IV. The DSM-5 formulation is paradoxically at variance with the clinical literature, with intersex/DSD and transgender being conceived as incommensurable terms in their diagnostic and treatment aspects. In this light, the removal of intersex/DSD from the DSM would seem a better way to achieve the purpose behind the revised diagnosis, which was to reduce stigma and the risk of misdiagnosis, and to provide the persons concerned with healthcare that caters to their specific needs.

  12. Hoarding disorder: a new diagnosis for DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Frost, Randy O; Pertusa, Alberto; Clark, Lee Anna; Saxena, Sanjaya; Leckman, James F; Stein, Dan J; Matsunaga, Hisato; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2010-06-01

    This article provides a focused review of the literature on compulsive hoarding and presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. In DSM-IV-TR, hoarding is listed as one of the diagnostic criteria for obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). According to DSM-IV-TR, when hoarding is extreme, clinicians should consider a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and may diagnose both OCPD and OCD if the criteria for both are met. However, compulsive hoarding seems to frequently be independent from other neurological and psychiatric disorders, including OCD and OCPD. In this review, we first address whether hoarding should be considered a symptom of OCD and/or a criterion of OCPD. Second, we address whether compulsive hoarding should be classified as a separate disorder in DSM-V, weighing the advantages and disadvantages of doing so. Finally, we discuss where compulsive hoarding should be classified in DSM-V if included as a separate disorder. We conclude that there is sufficient evidence to recommend the creation of a new disorder, provisionally called hoarding disorder. Given the historical link between hoarding and OCD/OCPD, and the conservative approach adopted by DSM-V, it may make sense to provisionally list it as an obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder. An alternative to our recommendation would be to include it in an Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study. The creation of a new diagnosis in DSM-V would likely increase public awareness, improve identification of cases, and stimulate both research and the development of specific treatments for hoarding disorder.

  13. The ironic fate of the personality disorders in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodol, Andrew E; Morey, Leslie C; Bender, Donna S; Oldham, John M

    2013-10-01

    An alternative model for the diagnosis of personality disorders (PDs), based on assessments of impairments in personality functioning and of pathological personality traits, was intended for the official classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5), but was instead placed in Section III, "Emerging Measures and Models." This article attempts to describe forces in play during the development of DSM-5 that may have contributed to this outcome, from the perspectives of the Chair of the Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group (PPDWG) and three of its members. These include a failed imperative to shift away from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) categories toward a dimensional perspective on psychopathology, dynamics within the American Psychiatric Association DSM-5 Task Force and PPDWG and the roles and impact of individuals and groups in the PD community. From these considerations, we present some suggestions for how the field might move forward in the future. A new opportunity exists to use the proposed alternative model as a foundation for research. In the immediate future, with the existence of two different models of PDs in DSM-5, studies can be done comparing the models to each other and to other models with respect to reliability and antecedent, concurrent, and predictive validity. If the Section III model continues to perform as early studies suggest, it may migrate into Section II of a planned DSM-5.1. This valuable research, already underway, will shape future editions of the DSM, by providing data to articulate a clearer vision, with broader representation of reliable and valid models. Going forward, personal investments must be put aside for the benefit of the greater good.

  14. Significance of the criteria evolution from DSM-IV to DSM-5%DSM-IV到DSM-5早泄诊断标准演变意义的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶林; 刘捷; 王春华; 席晓慧

    2013-01-01

    本文是一篇有关美国精神疾病诊断系统中早泄诊断标准演变的综述,重点谈论DSM-IV到DSM-5的演变过程和临床意义,以及还存在哪些问题等,用来指导对早泄的研究和治疗.DSM-IV早泄诊断标准引进我国之后,对男科学界产生深远影响,而DSM-5的颁布也一定会掀起又一轮研究早泄的热潮.本文在DSM-5早泄诊断标准最后征求意见稿的发表过程中捷足先登,与同道进行交流,为今后引进早泄诊断标准起到铺路搭桥的作用,对早泄的进一步研究也不无裨益.

  15. Evaluation of the DSM-5 severity indicator for bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the DSM-5 severity criterion for bulimia nervosa (BN) based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. 199 community volunteers classified with BN were categorized using DSM-5 severity levels and compared on demographic and clinical variables. 77 (39%) participants were categorized as mild, 68 (34%) as moderate, 32 (16%) as severe, and 22 (11%) as extreme. The severity groups did not differ significantly in demographic variables or body mass index. Shape and Weight concerns did not differ significantly across severity groups. Binge eating differed with the extreme group having significantly higher frequency than the severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Restraint differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than the mild group. Eating concerns differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than moderate and mild groups. Depression differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Findings from this non-clinical group provide new, albeit modest, support for DSM-5 severity rating for BN based on frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. Statistical findings indicate that differences in collateral clinical variables associated with the DSM-5 severity ratings reflect small effect sizes. Further research is needed with treatment-seeking patient groups with BN to establish the validity of the DSM-5 severity specifier and should include broader clinical and functional validators.

  16. Deconstructing the DSM-IV-TR: a critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warelow, Philip; Holmes, Colin A

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines and offers a critique of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), underlying principles and assumptions, and the nature and consequences of its nosological framework. The reason for this critique is to look at the rationale for some of the diagnostic categories and also why some categories are retained, including some of the long-standing diagnostic groups, such as schizophrenia. It is not the intention here to rehearse the problems of biological psychiatric thinking, nor argue the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM-IV-TR in its definitions and descriptions of particular syndromes and illnesses. The ideas presented here derive from a range of previous research that argued that the DSM-IV-TR colludes in a system of psychiatric care in which all people, by virtue of characteristically human foibles and idiosyncrasies, are potentially classifiable into a variety of diagnostic mental health categories. In the present study, it was argued that because of resource constraints, professional dispute, and public concern, the major criterion for attracting a formal diagnosis is not classifiability according to the DSM-IV-TR, but rather, that of 'social risk', defined in terms of risk to oneself and/or others and embodying obvious social control functions. Here, we expand and develop some of these ideas, and relate them more specifically to insights offered by critical or deconstructive psychology and the development of the forthcoming the DSM-V.

  17. The DSM diagnostic criteria for paraphilia not otherwise specified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Martin P

    2010-04-01

    The category of "Not Otherwise Specified" (NOS) for DSM-based psychiatric diagnosis has typically retained diagnoses whose rarity, empirical criterion validation or symptomatic expression has been insufficient to be codified. This article reviews the literature on Telephone Scatologia, Necrophilia, Zoophilia, Urophilia, Coprophilia, and Partialism. Based on extant data, no changes are suggested except for the status of Partialism. Partialism, sexual arousal characterized by "an exclusive focus on part of the body," had historically been subsumed as a type of Fetishism until the advent of DSM-III-R. The rationale for considering the removal of Partialism from Paraphilia NOS and its reintegration as a specifier for Fetishism is discussed here and in a companion review on the DSM diagnostic criteria for fetishism (Kafka, 2009). In the DSM-IV and DSM-IV-TR, the essential features of a Paraphilia are recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges or behaviors generally involving nonhuman objects, the suffering or humiliation of oneself or one's partner, or children or other nonconsenting persons that occur over a period of at least 6 months (Criterion A). Given consideration for the erotic focus of Partialism and Autoerotic Asphyxia, amending the operational criteria for Paraphilia should be considered to include an atypical focus involving human subjects (self or others).

  18. Conceptions of narcissism and the DSM-5 pathological personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Aidan G C; Pincus, Aaron L; Thomas, Katherine M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Markon, Kristian E; Krueger, Robert F

    2013-06-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) features two conceptions of Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD), one based on the retained DSM-IV's categorical diagnosis and the other based on a model that blends impairments in personality functioning with a specific trait profile intended to recapture DSM-IV NPD. Nevertheless, the broader literature contains a richer array of potential conceptualizations of narcissism, including distinguishable perspectives from psychiatric nosology, clinical observation and theory, and social/personality psychology. This raises questions about the most advantageous pattern of traits to use to reflect various conceptions of narcissistic pathology via the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5). In this study, we examine the associations of the Personality Disorder Questionnaire-Narcissistic Personality Disorder scale, Narcissistic Personality Inventory-16, and the Pathological Narcissism Inventory and the PID-5 dimensions and facets in a large sample (N = 1,653) of undergraduate student participants. Results point to strong associations with PID-5 Antagonism scales across narcissism measures, consistent with the DSM-5's proposed representation of NPD. However, additional notable associations emerged with PID-5 Negative Affectivity and Psychoticism scales when considering more clinically relevant narcissism measures.

  19. Del DSM-IV-TR al DSM-5: análisis de algunos cambios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Rodríguez Testal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La publicación de la quinta edición del DSM ha avivado un debate iniciado tiempo atrás, desde el anuncio de los cambios en los criterios de diagnóstico propuestos por la APA. En este artículo se analizan algunas de estas modificaciones. Se plantean aspectos interesantes y acertados, como la inclusión de la dimensionalidad, tanto en las clases diagnósticas como en algunos trastornos, la incorporación de un espectro obsesivo-compulsivo o la desaparición de los subtipos de esquizofrenia. También se analizan otros aspectos más controvertidos como la consideración del síndrome de psicosis atenuada, la descripción de un trastorno depresivo persistente, la reordenación en trastornos de síntomas somáticos los clásicos trastornos somatoformes, o el mantenimiento de los tres grandes grupos de trastornos de la personalidad, siempre insatisfactorios, junto con un planteamiento anunciado, pero marginal, de la perspectiva dimensional de las alteraciones de la personalidad. La nueva clasificación del DSM-5 abre numerosos interrogantes acerca de la validez que se pretende mejorar en el diagnóstico, en esta ocasión, asumiendo un planteamiento más cercano a la neurología y la genética que a la psicopatología clínica.

  20. IRP/DSM在中国可持续发展中的作用%The Role of IRP/DSM in the Sustainable Development China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡兆光

    2002-01-01

    Since 1980s the development of China' s economy has gotten world famous achievement. Meanwhile, thedemand for energy resources especially for coal has increased greatly, which is not beneficial to the sustainable developmentof China' s economy. The solutions to the problem are to utilize IRP and DSM, saving energy, regulating energy consump-tion framework, heightening electrifying level, developing clean coal technology energetically, reducing the share of coal inend energy and lowering environment pollution. The paper shows that the IRP/DSM project can reduce omissions of 139million tons of CO2 and 4 million ton of SO2 and will greatly benefit China' s sustainable development. In addition, it alsosuggests how to apply IRP/DSM in China.

  1. An Introduction to DSmT in Information Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentin Smarandache

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The management and combination of uncertain, imprecise,
    fuzzy and even paradoxical or highly conflicting sources of information has always been, and still remains today, of primal importance for the development of reliable modern information systems involving artificial reasoning. In this introduction, we present a survey of our recent theory of plausible and para-
    doxical reasoning, known as Dezert-Smarandache Theory (DSmT, developed for dealing with imprecise, uncertain and conflicting sources of information. We focus our presentation on the foundations of DSmT and on its most important rules of combination, rather than on browsing specific applications of
    DSmT available in literature. Several simple examples are given throughout this presentation to show the e±ciency and the generality of this new theory.

  2. Psychotropic marketing practices and problems: implications for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Melissa; Parry, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The descriptive diagnostic model since DSM-III has often led to "cookbook" diagnosis and assumptions of "chemical imbalance" for psychiatric disorders. Pharmaceutical companies have exploited this in their marketing. This includes promoting self-diagnosis with online checklists. Significant overprescribing of psychotropics has resulted. DSM-5 will provide new disorders and broader diagnostic criteria that will likely exacerbate this. Most psychotropic prescribing is done by primary care physicians, who are problematically excluded from DSM-5 field trials and are influenced by industry funded key opinion leaders who may promote diagnosis of subthreshold cases. More lax criteria will increase diagnosis of subthreshold cases. Expansion of not otherwise specified (NOS) categories can be used to justify off-label promotion. Pediatric bipolar disorder, constructed within the bipolar disorder NOS category, became an "epidemic" in the United States, fuelled by diagnostic upcoding pressures. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder may similarly cause overdiagnosis and excessive prescribing, as will other new disorders and lower diagnostic thresholds.

  3. The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Maples-Keller, Jessica L; Bo, Sune

    2016-01-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Perso......The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured...... with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal...

  4. DSM-5 and personality disorders: where did axis II go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trestman, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has seen a period of extensive research into the etiology, pathophysiology, assessment, and treatment of personality disorders. Concomitantly, a group of experts in the field were brought together to form the Personality and Personality Disorder Work Group for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), charged with the responsibility of updating the diagnostic approach to personality disorders. This article is a review of some of the history of the American Psychiatry Association's approach to the recognition and diagnosis of personality disorders over the past half century, the process of developing the recommendations for a DSM-5 personality disorder diagnosis and the elimination of the multiaxial system, and how DSM-5 has left us with essentially no changes of relevance to the practice of forensic psychiatry in the process for diagnosing personality disorders or in the specific diagnoses of personality disorder.

  5. [An approach to DSM-5: a breakthrough in psychiatry?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerlein, Andrés L

    2014-01-01

    One of the main problems of current psychiatry is that its diagnostic classification systems are not precise and reliable, they do not help to identify with certainty a specific type of mental disorder and they frequently overlap two or more diagnoses. This may conduce to over diagnosis and overtreatment, which is the main criticism of the DSM system. The American Psychiatric Association (APA) launched recently the DSM-5, the fifth edition of its diagnostic manual, which provides diagnostic criteria for thousands of psychiatrist, psychologist and researchers and who will be using it in the next coming years. DSM-5, like the preceding editions, placed disorders in discrete categories such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The problem is that scientists have been unable to find yet a genetic or neurobiological evidence to support the theory of mental disorders as separate categories. Several authors wanted the latest DSM to move away from the category model towards a new "dimensional approach", where disorders can be measured and mental illnesses overlapping can be reduced. Recent findings supports this new dimensional strategy, suggesting that the disorders are a product of shared risk factors that lead to abnormalities in specific drives, which can be measured and used to place persons on one of several spectra. In some parts the DSM-5 entered changes aiming to achieve a greater objectivity. The door for new changes in each category, dimension or criteria has been opened, favoring an evidence-based development of the future versions. DSM-5 is presented as a "living document" that can be updated easily. However, the category model still remains for many disorders. The future research in psychiatric diagnostic systems requires more genetic-molecular and neurophysiological evidence and more objective multinational field trials, in order to confirm the existence of the new diagnostic entities, spectrums or dimensions. This approach may provide us reliable

  6. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  7. The Eating Disorder Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5): Development and Validation of a Structured Interview for Feeding and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysko, Robyn; Glasofer, Deborah R.; Hildebrandt, Tom; Klimek, Patrycja; Mitchell, James E.; Berg, Kelly C.; Peterson, Carol B.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objective Existing measures for DSM-IV eating disorder diagnoses have notable limitations, and there are important differences between DSM-IV and DSM-5 feeding and eating disorders. This study developed and validated a new semi-structured interview, the Eating Disorders Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5). Method Two studies evaluated the utility of the EDA-5. Study 1 compared the diagnostic validity of the EDA-5 to the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) and evaluated the test-retest reliability of the new measure. Study 2 compared the diagnostic validity of an EDA-5 electronic application (“app”) to clinician interview and self-report assessments. Results In Study 1, the kappa for EDE and EDA-5 eating disorder diagnoses was 0.74 across all diagnoses (n= 64), with a range of κ=0.65 for Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED)/Unspecified Feeding or Eating Disorder (USFED) to κ=0.90 for Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The EDA-5 test-retest kappa coefficient was 0.87 across diagnoses. For Study 2, clinical interview versus “app” conditions revealed a kappa of 0.83 for all eating disorder diagnoses (n=71). Across individual diagnostic categories, kappas ranged from 0.56 for OSFED/USFED to 0.94 for BN. Discussion High rates of agreement were found between diagnoses by EDA-5 and the EDE, and EDA-5 and clinical interviews. As this study supports the validity of the EDA-5 to generate DSM-5 eating disorders and the reliability of these diagnoses, the EDA-5 may be an option for the assessment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and BED. Additional research is needed to evaluate the utility of the EDA-5 in assessing DSM-5 feeding disorders. PMID:25639562

  8. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex.

  9. How should severity be determined for the DSM-5 proposed classification of Hypersexual Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Rory C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The concept of severity among providers working with hypersexual behavior is frequently used despite a lack of consensus about how severity should be operationalized. The paucity of dialogue about severity for hypersexual behavior is disconcerting given its relevance in determining level of care, risk, allocation of resources, and measuring treatment outcomes in clinical practice and research trials. The aim of the current article is to highlight several considerations for assessing severity based on the proposed DSM-5 criteria for hypersexual disorder. Methods A review of current conceptualizations for severity among substance-use disorders and gambling disorder in the DSM-5 were considered and challenged as lacking applicability or clinical utility for hypersexual behavior. Results and conclusions The current research in the field of hypersexual behavior is in its infancy. No concrete approach currently exists to assess severity in hypersexual populations. Several factors in operationalizing severity are discussed and alternative approaches to defining severity are offered for readers to consider. PMID:26690616

  10. Avolition and expressive deficits capture negative symptom phenomenology: implications for DSM-5 and schizophrenia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Julie W; Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Mendelsohn, Erika; Prudent, Vasthie; Stanford, Arielle D; Malaspina, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    The DSM-5 formulation presents an opportunity to refine the negative symptom assessments that are crucial for a schizophrenia diagnosis. This review traces the history of negative symptom constructs in neuropsychiatry from their earliest conceptualizations in the 19th century. It presents the relevant literature for distinguishing between different types of negative symptoms. Although a National Institute of Mental Health consensus initiative proposed that there are five separate negative symptom domains, our review of the individual items demonstrates no more than three negative symptom domains. Indeed, numerous factor analyses of separate negative symptom scales routinely identify only two domains: 1) expressive deficits, which include affective, linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and 2) avolition for daily life and social activities. We propose that a focus on expressive deficits and avolition will be of optimum utility for diagnosis, treatment-considerations, and research purposes compared to other negative symptom constructs. We recommend that these two domains should be assessed as separate dimensions in the DSM-5 criteria.

  11. The DSM-5 with limited prosocial emotions specifier for conduct disorder among detained girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colins, Olivier F; Andershed, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    The new DSM-5 specifier 'with Limited Prosocial Emotions' (LPE) is expected to provide greater information about impairment of children and adolescents with conduct disorder (CD). This study examined the clinical utility of the LPE specifier symptom threshold among female adolescents being detained in Belgium (n = 191 girls; ages 12-17). Standardized questionnaires and a structured diagnostic interview were used to assess the LPE specifier, CD, and variables of interest. Approximately 62% (n = 118) of the girls met criteria for CD. Depending on the instrument that was used to assess the LPE specifier criteria, 26% to 37% of the girls with CD met criteria for the LPE specifier symptom threshold (CD + LPE). Overall, CD + LPE girls were not significantly different from CD-only girls regarding psychiatric morbidity (i.e., attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, substance use disorder, major depression, and anxiety disorders). However, CD + LPE girls were more aggressive, rule-breaking, delinquent, and had higher levels of psychopathic traits than CD-only girls. This study supports the view that the LPE specifier identifies a group of seriously antisocial individuals, but could not replicate previous findings that the LPE specifier symptom threshold identifies CD individuals who exhibit more psychiatric morbidity than CD individuals who are without the specifier symptom threshold. These findings altogether suggest that the clinical usefulness of the DSM-5 specifier for the diagnosis of CD is restricted, at least in detained girls. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. DSM-5 personality traits discriminate between posttraumatic stress disorder and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lisa M; Anders, Samantha L; Peterson, Carly K; Engdahl, Brian E; Krueger, Robert F; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2015-07-01

    The relevance of personality traits to the study of psychopathology has long been recognized, particularly in terms of understanding patterns of comorbidity. In fact, a multidimensional personality trait model reflecting five higher-order personality dimensions-negative affect, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, and psychoticism-is included in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and represented in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). However, evaluation of these dimensions and underlying personality facets within clinical samples has been limited. In the present study, we utilized the PID-5 to evaluate the personality profile elevation and composition of 150 control veterans and 35 veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results indicated that veterans with PTSD endorsed significantly more personality pathology than control veterans, with scores on detachment and psychoticism domains most clearly discriminating between the two groups. When personality domain scores were considered as parts of each subject's personality profile, a slightly different picture emerged. Specifically, the PTSD composition was primarily characterized by detachment and negative affect, followed by disinhibition, psychoticism, and antagonism in that order of relative importance. The profile of the control group was significantly different, mostly accounted for differences in antagonism and psychoticism. Using these complementary analytic strategies, the findings demonstrate the relevance of personality pathology to PTSD, highlight internalizing features of PTSD, and pave the way for future research aimed at evaluating the role of shared maladaptive personality traits in underlying the comorbidity of PTSD and related disorders.

  13. A novel capsular polysaccharide from Rhizobium rubi strain DSM 30149.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castro, Cristina; Fregolino, Eleonora; Gargiulo, Valentina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2008-07-07

    Rhizobium rubi, strain DSM 30149, is a Gram negative phytopathogenic bacterium which produces a linear polysaccharide with the following repeating unit: This new structure was determined by spectroscopical and chemical methods. It presents similar lipophilic features reported for another strain of R. rubi. These contrast with features already known for capsular polysaccharide species from symbiontic members of the Rhizobiaceae family, namely highly anionic polymers.

  14. Textual standardization and the DSM-5 "common language".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patty A

    2014-06-01

    In February 2010, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) launched their DSM-5 website with details about the development of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The APA invited "the general public" to review the draft diagnostic criteria and provide written comments and suggestions. This revision marks the first time the APA has solicited public review of their diagnostic manual. This article analyzes reported speech on the DSM-5 draft diagnostic criteria for the classification Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. It demonstrates how textual standardization facilitates the cultural portability of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria such that a community of speakers beyond the borders of the APA come to be seen as exemplary speakers, writers, and revisers of the professional style. Furthermore, analysis shows how co-authoring practices recontextualize the "voice" and persona of putative patient reported speech on Criterion D2. As a consequence of textual standardization, spoken discourse becomes recontextualized as the product of scientific inquiry and the organization of psychiatric knowledge.

  15. DSM-5 and ADHD - an interview with Eric Taylor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Eric

    2013-09-12

    In this podcast we talk to Prof Eric Taylor about the changes to the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in DSM-5 and how these changes will affect clinical practice. The podcast for this interview is available at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/sites/2999/download/Taylor.mp3.

  16. Debating DSM-5: diagnosis and the sociology of critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickersgill, Martyn D

    2014-08-01

    The development of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-the DSM-5-has reenergised and driven further forward critical discourse about the place and role of diagnosis in mental health. The DSM-5 has attracted considerable criticism, not least about its role in processes of medicalisation. This paper suggests the need for a sociology of psychiatric critique. Sociological analysis can help map fields of contention, and cast fresh light on the assumptions and nuances of debate around the DSM-5; it underscores the importance of diagnosis to the governance of social and clinical life, as well as the wider discourses critical commentaries connect with and are activated by. More normatively, a sociology of critique can indicate which interests and values are structuring the dialogues being articulated, and just how diverse clinical opinion regarding the DSM can actually be. This has implications for the considerations of health services and policy decision-makers who might look to such debates for guidance.

  17. Comorbidity in "DSM" Childhood Mental Disorders: A Functional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipani, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I address the issue of comorbidity and its prevalence in the prior "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") classification systems. The focus on the topography or form of presenting problems as the venue for determining mental disorders is scrutinized as the possible cause. Addressing the…

  18. Food Addiction in the Light of DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Meule

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The idea that specific kind of foods may have an addiction potential and that some forms of overeating may represent an addicted behavior has been discussed for decades. In recent years, the interest in food addiction is growing and research on this topic lead to more precise definitions and assessment methods. For example, the Yale Food Addiction Scale has been developed for the measurement of addiction-like eating behavior based on the diagnostic criteria for substance dependence of the fourth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV. In 2013, diagnostic criteria for substance abuse and—dependence were merged, thereby increasing the number of symptoms for substance use disorders (SUDs in the DSM-5. Moreover, gambling disorder is now included along SUDs as a behavioral addiction. Although a plethora of review articles exist that discuss the applicability of the DSM-IV substance dependence criteria to eating behavior, the transferability of the newly added criteria to eating is unknown. Thus, the current article discusses if and how these new criteria may be translated to overeating. Furthermore, it is examined if the new SUD criteria will impact future research on food addiction, for example, if “diagnosing” food addiction should also be adapted by considering all of the new symptoms. Given the critical response to the revisions in DSM-5, we also discuss if the recent approach of Research Domain Criteria can be helpful in evaluating the concept of food addiction.

  19. DSM-5 ASD Moves Forward into the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Luke Y.; Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) (APA in diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Author, Washington, 2013) has decided to merge the subtypes of pervasive developmental disorders into a single category of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on the assumption that they cannot be…

  20. [Cultural components within DSM-5: achievements, hopes, and expectations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D

    2014-01-01

    Cultural Psychiatry deals with the description, definition, evaluation and management of psychiatric conditions as a clinical reflection of cultural factors within an integral context, and as an explanatory, interpretative, nosological, therapeutic and preventive attribute in professional practice. This article attempts to analyze that link in the context of the dominant classification in our era, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), with emphasis on the development of its latest version, DSM-5. The cultural content of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) of the World Health Organization (WHO) can be the subject of further analysis, even when it can be said that, in general, it seemingly has less reach than the American classification. The author's participation, work and reflections about the DSM-5 Committee, created by the APA at the beginning of this century, constitute the basis of the presentation and discussion of concrete achievements, more or less idealized hopes, and more or less realistic expectations with a view to the future. Conclusions will also try to cover implications of DSM-5 cultural components in the field of Latin American and spanish-speaking psychiatry.

  1. [Substance-related and addictive disorders in the DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasius, Rainer; Sack, Peter-Michael; Strittmatter, Esther; Kaess, Michael

    2014-03-01

    This paper concerns the revised classification of Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders in the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). In DSM-5, substance use disorders are diagnosed on a continuum of severity specified by explicit operationalized diagnostic criteria. "Gambling disorder" is the only behavioral addiction added to the DSM. Furthermore, preliminary criteria for "Caffeine Use Disorder" and "Internet Gaming Disorder" have now been defined in the manual. Adopting the DSM-5 criteria catalogue within the German treatment system for children and adolescents with substance use disorders or at risk for developing substance use disorders would be of great significance. Since the diagnostic threshold is lower, more patients would be eligible for treatment. Thus, early intervention in the area of substance use disorders should be strengthened, a development that appears to be highly desirable from the perspective of child and adolescent psychiatry. The current Section III diagnoses, with their now comprehensive diagnostic criteria, facilitate more internationally compatible research.

  2. [THE PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSIS GUIDE - DSM-5 - INNOVATIONS AND CRITICISM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Shmuel; Zemishlany, Zvi

    2015-05-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) as a guide for diagnosing psychiatric diseases and enables the alignment of psychiatric diagnoses with those of the psychologists, the social workers, the nursing staff and other mental health professionals. In addition, it helps bring cohesion to research, public health policy, education, the field of insurance and compensation and the legal system. After 14 years of hard work, the updated version of the DSM, the DSM-5, was published on May 2013. The current review aims to update the readers on the essence of the DSM and the methods of psychiatric diagnosing and to present the main changes in the field, as expressed in the 5th edition of the guide. In addition to details of those changes we included discussions of the criticisms brought against them. We hope that the review will contribute to broadening the readers' knowledge, broaden exposure and familiarity with the psychiatric lingo and to strengthening the professional ties between psychiatrists and professionals in other, tangential, medical fields.

  3. Counsellors Respond to the DSM-IV-TR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Tom; Gaete, Joaquin; Sametband, Ines N.; French, Jared; Eeson, Jen

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) is an administrative fact for many counsellors. This psychiatric approach to formulating client concerns runs counter to those used by counsellors of many approaches (e.g., systemic, feminist). Using an online survey of counsellors (N = 116), invited contributions to a website…

  4. Squibb academic lecture: Shakespeare and DSM-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, E A

    1986-03-01

    Modern literary criticism generally rejects the idea of off-stage lives for Shakespeare's characters. All we have is behaviour--the visible behaviour of 'Shakespeare's talking animals'. But a review of that behaviour in the light of DSM-III suggests a high degree of clinical accuracy in some of it. The depictions of Ophelia, Lear and Caius Martius Coriolanus supply examples.

  5. Should OCD be classified as an anxiety disorder in DSM-V?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Stein; N.A. Fineberg; O.J. Bienvenu; D. Denys; C. Lochner; G. Nestadt; J.F. Leckman; S.L. Rauch; K.A. Phillips

    2010-01-01

    In DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was classified as an anxiety disorder. In ICD-10, OCD is classified separately from the anxiety disorders, although within the same larger category as anxiety disorders (as one of the "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform dis

  6. Commentary on the Inclusion of Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder in DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group has proposed criteria for Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder (PCBRD) for inclusion in the appendix of DSM-5. The authors feel that it is important that dysfunctional grief will become a formal condition in DSM-5 because that would…

  7. 78 FR 77384 - DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that DSM Nutritional Products has filed a... that a food additive petition (FAP 2276) has been filed by DSM Nutritional Products, 45 Waterview...

  8. 77 FR 71750 - DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that DSM Nutritional Products has filed a... petition (FAP 2273) has been filed by DSM Nutritional Products, 45 Waterview Blvd., Parsippany, NJ...

  9. The New DSM-5 Impairment Criterion: A Challenge to Early Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Eric; Bölte, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The possible effect of the DSM-5 impairment criterion on diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in young children was examined in 127 children aged 20-47 months with a DSM-IV-TR clinical consensus diagnosis of ASD. The composite score of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) served as a proxy for the DSM-5 impairment criterion. When…

  10. Olfactory reference syndrome: issues for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feusner, Jamie D; Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    The published literature on olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) spans more than a century and provides consistent descriptions of its clinical features. The core symptom is preoccupation with the belief that one emits a foul or offensive body odor, which is not perceived by others. This syndrome is associated with substantial distress and disability. DSM-IV and ICD-10 do not explicitly mention ORS, but note convictions about emitting a foul body odor in their description of delusional disorder, somatic type. However, the fact that such symptoms can be nondelusional poses a diagnostic conundrum. Indeed, DSM-IV also mentions fears about the offensiveness of one's body odor in the social phobia text (as a symptom of taijin kyofusho). There also seems to be phenomenological overlap with body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and hypochondriasis. This article provides a focused review of the literature to address issues for DSM-V, including whether ORS should continue to be mentioned as an example of another disorder or should be included as a separate diagnosis. We present a number of options and preliminary recommendations for consideration for DSM-V. Because research is still very limited, it is unclear how ORS should best be classified. Nonetheless, classifying ORS as a type of delusional disorder seems problematic. Given this syndrome's consistent clinical description across cultures for more than a century, substantial morbidity and a small but growing research literature, we make the preliminary recommendation that ORS be included in DSM-Vs Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study, and we suggest diagnostic criteria.

  11. [Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders in DSM-5: summary of the changes compared to DSM-IV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulzen, M; Schneider, F

    2014-05-01

    With the introduction of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) numerous changes in the area of the schizophrenia spectrum and psychotic disorders have been implemented. Establishing a metastructure based on the characteristics of the spectrum of psychopathological disturbances should improve clarity. The classical subtypes of schizophrenia were eliminated and specific psychopathological dimensions for the assessment of disease severity were added. The special role of Schneiderian first rank symptoms was abandoned and a higher delineation towards schizoaffective disorders is made. The nosological status of catatonia is clarified and occurs together with a consistent use of catatonic disturbances over all chapters. The attenuated psychosis syndrome is added as a new condition for further study. The shared psychotic disorder in the sense of a folie à deux is no longer maintained. However, the initial goal to integrate more disorder-specific etiopathogenetic information into the reconceptualization could not be achieved. Contemporaneously to the development process of DSM-5 the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) carried out the research domain criteria project (RDoC) attempting to incorporate the current growth in knowledge of genetics, neurocognitive and cognitive sciences in future diagnostic systems. This article gives an overview of the changes that have been made within the revision process from DSM-IV to DSM-5.

  12. The psychometric properties of the personality inventory for DSM-5 in an APA DSM-5 field trial sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C; Ayearst, Lindsay; Chmielewski, Michael; Pollock, Bruce G; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-06-01

    Section 3 of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes a hybrid model of personality pathology, in which dimensional personality traits are used to derive one of seven categorical personality disorder diagnoses. The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) was developed by the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders workgroup and their consultants to produce a freely available instrument to assess the personality traits within this new system. To date, the psychometric properties of the PID-5 have been evaluated primarily in undergraduate student and community adult samples. In the current investigation, we extend this line of research to a psychiatric patient sample who participated in the APA DSM-5 Field Trial (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health site). A total of 201 psychiatric patients (102 men, 99 women) completed the PID-5 and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R). The internal consistencies of the PID-5 domain and facet trait scales were acceptable. Results supported the unidimensional structure of all trait scales but one, and the convergence between the PID-5 and analogous NEO PI-R scales. Evidence for discriminant validity was mixed. Overall, the current investigation provides support for the psychometric properties of this diagnostic instrument in psychiatric samples.

  13. Examining the Stability of "DSM-IV" and Empirically Derived Eating Disorder Classification: Implications for "DSM-5"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carol B.; Crow, Scott J.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.; Agras, W. Stewart; Halmi, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to derive an empirical classification of eating disorder symptoms in a heterogeneous eating disorder sample using latent class analysis (LCA) and to examine the longitudinal stability of these latent classes (LCs) and the stability of DSM-IV eating disorder (ED) diagnoses. Method: A total of 429…

  14. Redefining Autism Spectrum Disorder Using DSM-5: The Implications of the Proposed DSM-5 Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robyn L.; Rodi, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    A number of changes were made to pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) in the recently released diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (APA, "Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders," American Psychiatric Publishing, Arlington, VA, 2013). Of the 210 participants in the present study who met DSM-IV-TR…

  15. Residential end-use load research forecasting and DSM planning at Missouri Public Service: Objectives, design, and data issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, R.D.; Watkins, E.L. [Missouri Public Service, Kansas City, MO (United States); Baxter, T.A. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The development of end-use energy consumption and load shape data is important for end-use load forecasting and demand-side management (DSM) planning applications. This paper discusses the objectives, sample design data issues and applications of residential end-use load research and customer survey data at Missouri Public Service (MPS); a combination electric and natural gas utility division of UtiliCorp United Inc. Multiple objectives including rate design, market research, end-use load forecasting and DSM planning, determined that an integrated end-use load research sample design would be the most cost-effective approach. Comprehensive end-use customer survey data was collected and analyzed using XENERGY`s RECAP bill disaggregation program in conjunction with and end-use load research project in 1992 to calibrate EPRI`s REEPS forecasts. The resulting end-use load shapes and UEC`s provide consistent inputs to SRC`s COMPASS model and EPRI`s DSManager model for DSM Planning

  16. Genome sequencing and annotation of Amycolatopsis vancoresmycina strain DSM 44592T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Kaur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 9.0-Mb draft genome of Amycolatopsis vancoresmycina strain DSM 44592T, isolated from Indian soil sample; produces antibiotic vancoresmycin. Draft genome of strain DSM44592T consists of 9,037,069 bp with a G+C content of 71.79% and 8340 predicted protein coding genes and 57 RNAs. RAST annotation indicates that strains Streptomyces sp. AA4 (score 521, Saccharomonospora viridis DSM 43017 (score 400 and Actinosynnema mirum DSM 43827 (score 372 are the closest neighbors of the strain DSM 44592T.

  17. Progress in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gipe, P.

    1990-01-01

    Though the wind energy continues to take it on the chin in the rough and tumble of California's celebrity politics, several indicators are pointing toward a modest revival. First several new reports laud wind energy at good sites as now competitive with conventional sources. Second, utility subsidiaries are signaling their approval by cautiously venturing into the technology. Also, technological refinements and reorganizations continue while a demand for new generating capacity may be developing in the state. Three new reports all paint a picture of wind energy finally coming of age. The California Energy Commission's most recent Energy Technology Status report says that wind-generated electricity is competitive with coal, oil, gas, and most other technologies. Similarly, a staff report found that after tallying the economic, social, and environmental costs, wind was one of the least cost sources of new generation. Most recently the Electric Power Research Institute's Journal reported the wind energy, at about 8 cents/k Wh, is equivalent to generation from conventional sources.

  18. Impulsivity and Stillness: NADA, Pharmaceuticals, and Psychotherapy in Substance Use and Other DSM 5 Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kenneth; Olshan-Perlmutter, Michelle

    2015-11-26

    Pharmaceuticals and psychotherapy are commonly used in the management of impulsivity.  The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol is an adjunctive therapy that involves the bilateral insertion of 1 to 5 predetermined ear needle points. One of the main benefits reported by patients, providers, and programs utilizing NADA is the sense of stillness, centering, and well-being. The induction of this attitude is seen as contributing to improved clinical outcomes including engagement and retention.  The attitude of stillness is also suggestive of a pathway to mitigating impulsivity. Impulsivity is associated with substance use disorders and other DSM 5 diagnoses.  Impulsivity has characteristics that are manifested clinically in behaviors such as disinhibition, poor self-control, lack of deliberation, thrill seeking, risk-taking. NADA holds promise as a useful treatment adjunct in the comprehensive management of disorders for which impulsivity is a prominent component.

  19. How Voting and Consensus Created the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines how Task Force votes were central to the development of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III and DSM-III-R). Data were obtained through a literature review, investigation of DSM archival material housed at the American Psychiatric Association (APA), and interviews with key Task Force members of DSM-III and DSM-III-R. Such data indicate that Task Force votes played a central role in the making of DSM-III, from establishing diagnostic criteria and diagnostic definitions to settling questions about the inclusion or removal of diagnostic categories. The paper concludes that while the APA represented DSM-III, and the return to descriptive psychiatry it inaugurated, as a triumph of empirically based decision-making, the evidence presented here fails to support that view. Since the DSM is a cumulative project, and as DSM-III lives on through subsequent editions, this paper calls for a more socio-historically informed understanding of DSM's construction to be deployed in how the DSM is taught and implemented in training and clinical settings.

  20. How should we revise diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders in the DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher S; Chung, Tammy; Langenbucher, James W

    2008-08-01

    This article reviews literature on the validity and performance characteristics of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders (SUDs) and recommends changes in these criteria that should be considered for the next edition of the DSM (DSM-V). Substantial data indicate that DSM-IV substance abuse and substance dependence are not distinct categories and that SUD criteria are best modeled as reflecting a unidimensional continuum of substance-problem severity. The conceptually and empirically problematic substance abuse diagnosis should be abandoned in the DSM-V, with substance dependence defined by a single set of criteria. Data also indicate that various individual SUD criteria should be revised, dropped, or considered for inclusion in the DSM-V. The DSM-V should provide a framework that allows the integration of categorical and dimensional approaches to diagnosis. Important areas for further research are noted.

  1. Tourette's: syndrome, disorder or spectrum? Classificatory challenges and an appraisal of the DSM criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary May; Eapen, Valsamma

    2014-10-01

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) was released in May 2013 after 14 years of development and almost two decades after the last edition DSM-IV was published in 1994. We review the DSM journey with regards to Tourette Syndrome from the original publication of DSM 1 in 1952 till date. In terms of changes in DSM 5, the major shift has come in the placement of Tourette Syndrome under the 'Neurodevelopmental Disorders' alongside other disorders with a developmental origin. This review provides an overview of the changes in DSM-5 highlighting key points for clinical practice and research along with a snap shot of the current use of DSM as a classificatory system in different parts of the world and suggestions for improving the subtyping and the diagnostic confidence.

  2. Crisis DSM Generation To Support Refugee Camp Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gstaiger, Veronika; d'Angelo, Pablo; Schneiderhan, Tobais; Krauss, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The extraction of high resolution surface information from satellite data has become an important area of research. One of the numerous fields of application is disaster management. Detailed information about the affected terrain is not only needed for analyses during the emergency relief phase, but also for reconstruction and prevention activities. In this paper the authors present the generation of a Digital Surface Model (DSM) based on three very high resolution optical satellite images. The DSM was produced to supplement a flood mapping activity in Jordan and serves as example for the implementation of scientific results during an emergency request. The flood affected the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan and was mapped by the Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information (ZKI) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in January 2013 under emergency mapping conditions.

  3. DSM-V and the stigma of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Young, Michael A; Corrigan, Patrick W

    2010-08-01

    Stigma associated with mental illness has been shown to have devastating effects on the lives of people with psychiatric disorders, their families, and those who care for them. In the current article, the relationship between diagnostic labels and stigma is examined in the context of the forthcoming DSM-V. Three types of negative outcomes are reviewed in detail - public stigma, self-stigma, and label avoidance. The article illustrates how a clinical diagnosis may exacerbate these forms of stigma through socio-cognitive processes of groupness, homogeneity, and stability. Initial draft revisions recently proposed by the DSM-V work groups are presented, and their possible future implications for stigma associated with mental illness are discussed.

  4. The puzzling unidimensionality of DSM-5 substance use disorder diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J MacCoun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a perennial expert debate about the criteria to be included or excluded for the DSM diagnoses of substance use dependence. Yet analysts routinely report evidence for the unidimensionality of the resulting checklist. If in fact the checklist is unidimensional, the experts are wrong that the criteria are distinct, so either the experts are mistaken or the reported unidimensionality is spurious. I argue for the latter position, and suggest that the traditional reflexive measurement model is inappropriate for the DSM; a formative measurement model would be a more accurate characterization of the institutional process by which the checklist is created, and a network or causal model would be a more appropriate foundation for a scientifically grounded diagnostic system.

  5. California energy flow in 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, I. Y.; Briggs, C. K.

    1995-04-01

    Energy consumption in the state of California decreased about 3% in 1993 reflecting continuation of the recession that was manifest in a moribund construction industry and a high state unemployment that ran counter to national recovery trends. Residential/commercial use decreased slightly reflecting a mild winter in the populous southern portion of the state, a decrease that was offset to some extent by an increase in the state population. Industrial consumption of purchased energy declined substantially as did production of self-generated electricity for in-house use. Consumption in the transportation sector decreased slightly. The amount of power transmitted by the utilities was at 1992 levels; however a smaller proportion was produced by the utilities themselves. Generation of electricity by nonutilities, primarily cogenerators and small power producers, was the largest of any state in the US. The growth in the number of private power producers combined with increased amounts of electricity sold to the public utilities set the stage for the sweeping proposals before the California Public Utility Commission to permit direct sales from the nonutilities to retail customers. California production of both oil and natural gas declined; however, to meet demand only the imports of natural gas increased. A break in the decade-long drought during the 1992-1993 season resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of hydroelectricity generated during the year. Geothermal energy's contribution increased substantially because of the development of new resources by small power producers. Decline in steam production continued at The Geysers, the state's largest field, principally owned and managed by a public utility. Increases in windpower constituted 1-1/2% of the total electric supply, up slightly from 1992. Several solar photovoltaic demonstration plants were in operation, but their contribution remained small.

  6. California energy flow in 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-04-01

    Energy consumption in the state of California decreased about 3% in 1993 reflecting continuation of the recession that was manifest in a moribund construction industry and a high state unemployment that ran counter to national recovery trends. Residential/commercial use decreased slightly reflecting a mild winter in the populous southern portion of the state, a decrease that was offset to some extent by an increase in the state population. Industrial consumption of purchased energy declined substantially as did production of self-generated electricity for in-house use. Consumption in the transportation sector decreased slightly. The amount of power transmitted by the utilities was at 1992 levels; however a smaller proportion was produced by the utilities themselves. Generation of electricity by nonutilities, primarily cogenerators and small power producers, was the largest of any state in the US. The growth in the number of private power producers combined with increased amounts of electricity sold to the public utilities set the stage for the sweeping proposals before the California Public Utility Commission to permit direct sales from the nonutilities to retail customers. California production of both oil and natural gas declined; however, to meet demand only the imports of natural gas increased. A break in the decade-long drought during the 1992--1993 season resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of hydroelectricity generated during the year. Geothermal energy`s contribution increased substantially because of the development of new resources by small power producers. Decline in steam production continued at The Geysers, the state`s largest field, principally owned and managed by a public utility. Increases in windpower constituted 1--1/2% of the total electric supply--up slightly from 1992. Several solar photo voltaic demonstration plants were in operation, but their contribution remained small.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  8. Somatic symptom disorder: an important change in DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimsdale, Joel E; Creed, Francis; Escobar, Javier; Sharpe, Michael; Wulsin, Lawson; Barsky, Arthur; Lee, Sing; Irwin, Michael R; Levenson, James

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the rationale for the new diagnosis of somatic symptom disorder (SSD) within DSM5. SSD represents a consolidation of a number of previously listed diagnoses. It deemphasizes the centrality of medically unexplained symptoms and defines the disorder on the basis of persistent somatic symptoms associated with disproportionate thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to these symptoms. Data are presented concerning reliability, validity, and prevalence of SSD, as well as tasks for future research, education, and clinical practice.

  9. Validation of Proposed "DSM-5" Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Speer, Leslie; Embacher, Rebecca; Law, Paul; Constantino, John; Findling, Robert L.; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Eng, Charis

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the validity of proposed "DSM-5" criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method: We analyzed symptoms from 14,744 siblings (8,911 ASD and 5,863 non-ASD) included in a national registry, the Interactive Autism Network. Youth 2 through 18 years of age were included if at least one…

  10. Clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis in the DSM-5

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Modica

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Personality disorders represent psychopathological conditions hard to be diagnosed. The Author highlights the clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis according to the criteria of the DSM-5. In this study, some of the numerous definitions of personality are mentioned; afterwards, some of the theories on the development of personality shall be. Later on, concepts of temperament, character and personality get analysed. Then, the current approach to personality disorders acco...

  11. Clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis in the DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Modica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Personality disorders represent psychopathological conditions hard to be diagnosed. The Author highlights the clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis according to the criteria of the DSM-5. In this study, some of the numerous definitions of personality are mentioned; afterwards, some of the theories on the development of personality shall be. Later on, concepts of temperament, character and personality get analysed. Then, the current approach to personality disorders according to the two models of DSM-5 is reported. The first model is included in the Section II of DSM-5; while in the Section III there exists a proposal for a so-called alternate model. The first one suggests a qualitative or categorical kind of approach to personality disorders, whereas the alternate model proposes a dimensional or quantitative kind of approach and aims to formulate, as well as a diagnosis for general alterations of the personological functioning, even a trait-based personality disorder diagnosis, which can be formulated when a personality disorder is there but doesn't fit criteria for a specific disorder. Ultimately, it can be so claimed: 1 diagnostic criteria of the first model are similar to those of DSM-IV with its respective strenghts and weaknesses, and namely high probability in diagnosis, where  there, of personality disorder, yet insufficient sensitivity in the specification of the disorder; 2 the alternate model, despite criticism, thanks to the possibility of delivering a trait-based personality disorder diagnosis, seems to be more equipped both in the identification of the personality disorder and further specifications.

  12. Morphological operation based dense houses extraction from DSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zhu, L.; Tachibana, K.; Shimamura, H.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a method of reshaping and extraction of markers and masks of the dense houses from the DSM based on mathematical morphology (MM). Houses in a digital surface model (DSM) are almost joined together in high-density housing areas, and most segmentation methods cannot completely separate them. We propose to label the markers of the buildings firstly and segment them into masks by watershed then. To avoid detecting more than one marker for a house or no marker at all due to its higher neighbour, the DSM is morphologically reshaped. It is carried out by a MM operation using the certain disk shape SE of the similar size to the houses. The sizes of the houses need to be estimated before reshaping. A granulometry generated by opening-by-reconstruction to the NDSM is proposed to detect the scales of the off-terrain objects. It is a histogram of the global volume of the top hats of the convex objects in the continuous scales. The obvious step change in the profile means that there are many objects of similar sizes occur at this scale. In reshaping procedure, the slices of the object are derived by morphological filtering at the detected continuous scales and reconstructed in pile as the dome. The markers are detected on the basis of the domes.

  13. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  14. 77 FR 40878 - Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey, v. California Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc., Michael E. Boyd, Robert M. Sarvey, v. California Public Utilities Commission, California Department of Water Resources, Pacific Gas...

  15. Implications of "DSM"-IV to "DSM"-5 Substance Use Disorder Diagnostic Changes in Adolescents Enrolled in a School-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David G.; Arlt, Virginia K.; Siebert, Erin C.; Chapman, Meredith K.; Hu, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine (a) the impact of the change in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") from a categorical to dimensional classification of substance use diagnoses, (b) the elimination of the legal criterion, and (c) the inclusion of a craving criterion in the "DSM"-5.…

  16. Meting van DSM-III persoonlijkheidspathologie : betrouwbaarheid en validiteit van de SIDP-R en as II van de DSM-III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Willem van den

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Structured Interview for DSM-III Personality Disorders Revised Version (SIDP-R) and some explorations regarding the validity of the taxonomic structure and predictive validity of DSM-III Axis II ... Zie: Summary

  17. Pathological personality traits can capture DSM-IV personality disorder types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua D; Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; MacKillop, James

    2015-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) includes an alternative diagnostic approach to the assessment of personality disorders (PDs) in Section III with the aim of stimulating further research. Diagnosis of a PD using this approach is predicated on the presence of personality impairment and pathological personality traits. The types of traits present (e.g., callousness vs. emotional lability) are used to derive DSM-IV PD scores. Concerns have been raised, however, that such a trait-based approach will yield PD constructs that differ substantially from those generated using the approaches articulated in previous iterations of the DSM. We empirically examined this issue in a sample of 109 adults who were currently receiving mental health treatment. More specifically, we examined the correlations between interview-based PD scores derived from DSM-IV to DSM-5 PD trait counts, and tested them in relation to the 30 specific facets of the five-factor model, as well as internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Overall, the DSM-IV PD scores and DSM-5 PD trait counts correlated significantly with one another (Mr = .63), demonstrated similar patterns of interrelations among the PDs, and manifested highly similar patterns of correlations with general personality traits and symptoms of psychopathology. These results indicate that the DSM-5 PD trait counts specified in the alternative DSM-5 PD diagnostic approach capture the same constructs as those measured using the more traditional DSM-IV diagnostic system.

  18. An alternative hierarchical organization of the mental disorders of the DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Keeley, Jared; Blashfield, Roger K

    2008-08-01

    With the approaching publication of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), alternative organizations of the DSM (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) categories have been proposed. This article compares several published alternative organizations to clinicians' organization of the DSM-IV categories. As demonstrations of their organization of DSM-IV categories, psychologists and psychiatrists sorted 66 DSM-IV diagnostic categories into groups of similar diagnoses and then made progressively larger and smaller groups of diagnoses or placed similar groups next to each other on a table. Hierarchical agglomerative data analysis of clinicians' individual sortings showed that clinicians retained many lower level DSM-IV categories (e.g., anxiety disorders, mood disorders), but not the higher level DSM-IV categories (e.g., Axis I vs. Axis II). Instead, at the highest hierarchical level, clinicians' categories resembled the structure of the first edition of the DSM (American Psychiatric Association, 1952), which followed clinicians' diagnostic decision-making scheme, dividing mental disorders into organic versus nonorganic and then psychotic versus neurotic disorders. At minimum, these data suggest a DSM organization that makes sense to clinicians.

  19. DSM-5 changes enhance parent identification of symptoms in adolescents with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Margaret H; Kuriyan, Aparajita B

    2016-08-30

    This study evaluates the impact of the DSM-5 ADHD symptom wording changes on symptom endorsement among adolescents with ADHD. Parents of adolescents with systematically diagnosed DSM-IV-TR ADHD (N=78) completed counterbalanced DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 ADHD symptom checklists in a single sitting. General linear models were conducted to evaluate whether the new DSM-5 symptom descriptors influenced the total number of ADHD symptoms and overall ADHD symptom severity endorsed by parents, how demographic factors were associated with noted changes in symptom endorsement when moving to the DSM-5, and which DSM ADHD items displayed notable changes in endorsement rates under the new wording. On average, parents identified 1.15 additional symptoms of ADHD in adolescents when moving from the DSM-IV-TR to the DSM-5. Increased symptom identification was not specific to age, sex, ethnicity, race, or socioeconomic status. Over half of the sample experienced increased symptom endorsement when changing texts (59.0%). Under the new DSM-5 wording, four symptoms had statistically significant endorsement increases (range: 11.2-16.7%): difficulty sustaining attention, easily distracted, difficulty organizing tasks and activities, and does not seem to listen.

  20. A systematic literature review of PTSD's latent structure in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV to DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Műllerová, Jana; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    The factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been widely researched, but consensus regarding the exact number and nature of factors is yet to be reached. The aim of the current study was to systematically review the extant literature on PTSD's latent structure in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in order to identify the best-fitting model. One hundred and twelve research papers published after 1994 using confirmatory factor analysis and DSM-based measures of PTSD were included in the review. In the DSM-IV literature, four-factor models received substantial support, but the five-factor Dysphoric arousal model demonstrated the best fit, regardless of gender, measurement instrument or trauma type. The recently proposed DSM-5 PTSD model was found to be a good representation of PTSD's latent structure, but studies analysing the six- and seven-factor models suggest that the DSM-5 PTSD factor structure may need further alterations.

  1. Personality disorders are the vanguard of the post-DSM-5.0 era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The process of constructing the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) has concluded, with the manual published in May 2013. In this article, I review the evolution of personality disorders (PDs) in DSM-5 from my perspective as a participating workgroup member, and as an observer of the DSM-5 construction process. I emphasize well-documented shortcomings of the fourth edition of the DSM (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), the diversity of potential changes to PD conceptualization and diagnosis that were proposed during the construction of DSM-5, and the final outcome, which consists of reproducing DSM-IV PD criteria in Section II of DSM-5 (diagnostic criteria and codes), while also printing a complete parallel PD system in Section III (emerging measures and models), with the idea of moving elements of the Section III material to Section II as DSM evolves (e.g., in DSM-5.1). Perhaps the PD field is too fractious to arrive at a consensus approach at this juncture, but, in addition, the current situation shows how the PD field is arguably the most forward-thinking area in contemporary psychopathology. This is because many PD scholars do not accept the inadequate polythetic-categorical approach to psychopathology classification of DSM-IV (which, owing to conservative political forces, also frames Section II of DSM-5). PD research is therefore at the vanguard in conceptualizing, studying, and treating psychopathology because it is not slavishly tethered to the DSM, and its approach to defining mental disorder through political processes.

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder according to DSM-5 and DSM-IV diagnostic criteria: a comparison in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schaal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Compared to DSM-IV, the criteria for diagnosing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD have been modified in DSM-5. Objective: The first aim of this study was to examine how these modifications impact rates of PTSD in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants. The second goal of this study was to investigate whether PTSD symptoms were associated with perpetrator-related acts or victim-related traumatic events. Method: Ninety-five male ex-combatants in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were interviewed. Both the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 PTSD symptom criteria were assessed. Results: The DSM-5 symptom criteria yielded a PTSD rate of 50% (n=47, whereas the DSM-IV symptom criteria were met by 44% (n=42. If the DSM-5 would be set as the current “gold standard,” then DSM-IV would have produced more false negatives (8% than false positives (3%. A minority of participants (19%, n=18 indicated an event during which they were involved as a perpetrator as their most stressful event. Results of a regression analysis (R 2=0.40 showed that, after accounting for the number of types of traumatic events, perpetrated violent acts were not associated with the symptom severity of PTSD. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that more diagnostic cases were produced with the DSM-5 diagnostic rules than were dropped resulting in an increase in PTSD rates compared to the DSM-IV system. The missing association between PTSD symptoms and perpetrated violent acts might be explained by a potential fascinating and excited perception of these acts.

  3. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  4. Utilization of reducing power in light-limited cultures of Chromatium vinosum DSM 185

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, O; Van Gemerden, H; Mas, J

    1998-01-01

    This study describes how the phototrophic organism Chromatium vinosum, when grown under different degrees of light limitation, distributes the reducing power initially present in the medium as hydrogen sulfide. Under all the conditions of illumination tested, sulfur was the major store of reducing p

  5. Evaluating the Utility of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Discriminating among "DSM-IV" ADHD Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kelly M.; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate how the inclusion of 3 Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) symptoms in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) diagnostic criteria influences the external validity of the ADHD subtypes. The sample comprised 228 children (166 boys, 62 girls) ranging in age from 5-18 years who were referred to…

  6. The past, present, and future of U.S. utility demand-side management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.

    1996-12-01

    Demand-side management or DSM refers to active efforts by electric and gas utilities to modify customers` energy use patterns. The experience in the US shows that utilities, when provided with appropriate incentives, can provide a powerful stimulus to energy efficiency in the private sector. This paper describes the range and history of DSM programs offered by US electric utilities, with a focus on the political, economic, and regulatory events that have shaped their evolution. It also describes the changes these programs are undergoing as a result of US electricity industry restructuring. DSM programs began modestly in the 1970s in response to growing concerns about dependence on foreign sources of oil and environmental consequences of electricity generation, especially nuclear power. The foundation for the unique US partnership between government and utility interests can be traced first to the private-ownership structure of the vertically integrated electricity industry and second to the monopoly franchise granted by state regulators. Electricity industry restructuring calls into question both of these basic conditions, and thus the future of utility DSM programs for the public interest. Future policies guiding ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency DSM programs will need to pay close attention to the specific market objectives of the programs and to the balance between public and private interests.

  7. A proposal for including nomophobia in the new DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Del Puente, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is considered to be the gold standard manual for assessing the psychiatric diseases and is currently in its fourth version (DSM-IV), while a fifth (DSM-V) has just been released in May 2013. The DSM-V Anxiety Work Group has put forward recommendations to modify the criteria for diagnosing specific phobias. In this manuscript, we propose to consider the inclusion of nomophobia in the DSM-V, and we make a comprehensive overview of the existing literature, discussing the clinical relevance of this pathology, its epidemiological features, the available psychometric scales, and the proposed treatment. Even though nomophobia has not been included in the DSM-V, much more attention is paid to the psychopathological effects of the new media, and the interest in this topic will increase in the near future, together with the attention and caution not to hypercodify as pathological normal behaviors.

  8. DSM-III DIAGNOSTIC CATEGORIES FOR ICD-9 HYSTERIA: A STUDY ON 103 CASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shekhar; Pachauri, Ravindra; Wig, Narendra N.

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY Rediagnosing 103 ICD-9 Hysteria cases on DSM-III, the authors found Conversion Disorder and Atypical Dissociative Disorder to be the most common diagnosis. Somatization Disorder was diagnosed only in 8.7 per ant of cases. Twenty-nine per cent cases received double diagnoses. Limitations of using DSM-III on Hysteria patients are mentioned and a suggestion is made to include a new category of ‘Simple Dissociative Disorder’ in the DSM-III. PMID:21927140

  9. Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment as a Traumatic Stressor in DSM-IV and DSM-5: Prevalence and Relationship to Mental Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrykowski, Michael A; Steffens, Rachel F; Bush, Heather M; Tucker, Thomas C

    2015-06-01

    Little research has examined how lung cancer survivors whose cancer experience met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) traumatic stressor criterion differ with regard to posttreatment mental health status from survivors whose cancer experience did not. No research of which we are aware has examined the impact of the revised DSM-5 traumatic stressor criterion on this question. Non-small-cell (NSC) lung cancer survivors (N = 189) completed a telephone interview and questionnaire assessing distress and growth/benefit-finding. Survivors were categorized into Trauma and No Trauma groups using both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 stressor criterion. Using the DSM-IV criterion, the Trauma group (n = 70) reported poorer status than the No Trauma group (n = 119) on 10 of 10 distress indices (mean ES = 0.57 SD) and better status on all 7 growth/benefit-finding indices (mean ES = 0.30 SD). Using the DSM-5 stressor criterion, differences between the Trauma (n = 108) and No Trauma (n = 81) groups for indices of distress (mean ES = 0.26 SD) and growth/benefit-finding (mean ES = 0.17 SD) were less pronounced. Those who experience cancer as a traumatic stressor show greater distress and growth/benefit-finding, particularly when the more restrictive DSM-IV stressor criterion defines trauma exposure.

  10. Concordance between gambling disorder diagnoses in the DSM-IV and DSM-5: Results from the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Blanco, Carlos; Jin, Chelsea; Grant, Bridget F

    2014-06-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) eliminates the committing illegal acts criterion and reduces the threshold for a diagnosis of gambling disorder to 4 of 9 criteria. This study compared the DSM-5 "4 of 9" classification system to the "5 of 10" DSM-IV system, as well as other permutations (i.e., just lowing the threshold to 4 criteria or just eliminating the illegal acts criterion) in 43,093 respondents to the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Subgroups were analyzed to ascertain whether changes will impact differentially diagnoses based on gender, age, or race/ethnicity. In the full sample and each subpopulation, prevalence rates were higher when the DSM-5 classification system was employed relative to the DSM-IV system, but the hit rate between the two systems ranged from 99.80% to 99.96%. Across all gender, age, and racial/ethnic subgroups, specificity was greater than 99% when the DSM-5 system was employed relative to the DSM-IV system, and sensitivity was 100%. Results from this study suggest that eliminating the illegal acts criterion has little impact on diagnosis of gambling disorder, but lowering the threshold for diagnosis does increase the base rate in the general population and each subgroup, even though overall rates remain low and sensitivity and specificity are high.

  11. An assessment of the compatibility of DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 criteria in the diagnosis of cannabis use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopak, Albert M; Proctor, Steven Lee; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2012-10-01

    The current study used an automated version of the substance use disorder diagnostic schedule-IV (SUDDS-IV) to assess DSM-IV (fourth edition of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders) and two sets of proposed DSM-5 (fifth edition of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders) cannabis use disorder criteria among adult prison inmates in the Minnesota Department of Corrections state prison system from 2000 to 2003. Initially proposed DSM-5 criteria had only two diagnostic designations (moderate and severe). A subsequent revision added a mild designation and required a greater number of positive findings for the severe diagnosis. The sample was composed of 7,672 (89.6% male) inmates. Inmates with no DSM-IV diagnoses and most who currently received a cannabis dependence diagnosis according to the DSM-IV guidelines will fit into corresponding DSM-5 categories (i.e., no diagnosis and severe cannabis use disorder, respectively). Some diagnostic criteria, in addition to those proposed for the DSM-5, emerged as cardinal indicators of moderate cannabis use disorder. The study's limitations are noted.

  12. The MMPI-2 Restructured Form Personality Psychopathology Five Scales: bridging DSM-5 Section 2 personality disorders and DSM-5 Section 3 personality trait dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Jacob A; Arbisi, Paul A; Erbes, Christopher R; Polusny, Melissa A; Thuras, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This study examined in a college sample and a sample of non-treatment-seeking, trauma-exposed veterans the association between the MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) Scales and DSM-5 Section 2 personality disorder (PD) criteria, the same system used in DSM-IV-TR, and the proposed broad personality trait dimensions contained in Section 3 of DSM-5. DSM-5 Section 2 PD symptoms were assessed using the SCID-II-PQ, and applying a replicated rational selection procedure to the SCID-II-PQ item pool, proxies for the DSM-5 Section 3 dimensions and select facets were constructed. The MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 scales demonstrated appropriate convergent and discriminant associations with both Section 2 PDs and Section 3 dimensions in both samples. These findings suggest the MMPI-2-RF PSY-5 scales can serve both conceptually and practically as a bridge between the DSM-5 Section 2 PD criteria and the DSM-5 Section 3 personality features.

  13. An invisible college view of the DSM-5 personality disorder classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashfield, Roger K; Reynolds, Shannon M

    2012-12-01

    The DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group released the final proposed changes for the upcoming manual in May 2012. The proposal, located at www.dsm5.org , included a hybrid dimensional/categorical method of diagnosing personality disorders. This brief article examines the reference section of the DSM-5 personality disorder proposal rationale (American Psychiatric Association, 2012). The authors counted the number of authors and the coauthorships; coauthorship patterns were then examined and diagramed. The data suggested that a group of researchers involved with the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (CLPS) were central to the hybrid classification created by the DSM-5 work group.

  14. [Classification of enuresis/encopresis according to DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Elimination disorders are common in childhood and adolescence. Enuresis is traditionally defined as wetting from the age of 5 years and encopresis as soiling from 4 years onwards - after all organic causes have been excluded. In the past decades, many subtypes of elimination disorders have been identified with different symptoms, etiologies, and specific treatment options. Unfortunately, the DSM-5 criteria did not integrate these new approaches. In contrast, classification systems of the International Children's Incontinence Society (ICCS) for enuresis and urinary incontinence as well as the ROME-III criteria for fecal incontinence offer new and relevant suggestions for both clinical and research purposes.

  15. DSM-5 ¿Qué modificaciones nos esperan?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    La Asociación Americana de Psiquiatría (APA), antes de la publicación definitiva del Manual DSM-5, abrió un periodo de participación donde investigadores, clínicos, pacientes y familias pudieron aportar comentarios sobre la futura clasificación. En este periodo se recibieron más de 15.000 comentarios que han sido tenidos en cuenta por los grupos de trabajo encargados de la elaboración del manual. En este artículo queremos exponer algunos de los cambios propuestos en la nueva ve...

  16. The six most essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis: a pluralogue part 3: issues of utility and alternative approaches in psychiatric diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips James

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1 the nature of a mental disorder; 2 the definition of mental disorder; 3 the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4 the role of pragmatic considerations in the construction of DSM-5; 5 the issue of utility of the DSM – whether DSM-III and IV have been designed more for clinicians or researchers, and how this conflict should be dealt with in the new manual; and 6 the possibility and advisability, given all the problems with DSM-III and IV, of designing a different diagnostic system. Part 1 of this article took up the first two questions. Part 2 took up the second two questions. Part 3 now deals with Questions 5 & 6. Question 5 confronts the issue of utility, whether the manual design of DSM-III and IV favors clinicians or researchers, and what that means for DSM-5. Our final question, Question 6, takes up a concluding issue, whether the acknowledged problems with the earlier DSMs warrants a significant overhaul of DSM-5 and future manuals. As in Parts 1 & 2 of this article, the general introduction, as well as the introductions and conclusions for the specific questions, are written by James Phillips, and the responses to commentaries are written by Allen Frances.

  17. Demonstrating a small utility approach to demand-side program implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The US DOE awarded a grant to the Burlington Electric Department (B.E.D.) to test a demand-side management (DSM) demonstration program designed to quickly save a significant amount of power with little disruption to the utility's customers or its normal operations. B.E.D. is a small municipal utility located in northern Vermont, with a lengthy history of successful DSM involvement. In our grant application, we proposed to develop a replicable program and approach to DSM that might be useful to other small utilities and to write a report to enable such replication. We believe that this DSM program and/or individual program components are replicable. This report is designed to allow other utilities interested in DSM to replicate this program or specific program design features to meet their DSM goals. We also wanted to use the opportunity of this grant to test the waters of residential heating fuel-switching. We hoped to test the application of one fuel-switching technology, and to benefit from the lessons learned in developing a full-scale DSM program for this end- use. To this end the pilot effort has been very successful. In the pilot pressure we installed direct-vent gas fired space heaters sized as supplemental heating units in 44 residences heated solely by electric resistance heat. We installed the gas space heating units at no cost to the owners or residents. We surveyed participating customers. The results of those surveys are included in this report and preliminary estimates of winter peak capacity load reductions are also noted in this report.

  18. DISCOURSE REPRESENTATION OF HOMOSEXUALITY IN THE SYSTEM DSM IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Téllez Vega

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to highlight the construction and discursive significance that the DSM IV system gives to the homosexuality, considering that the meaning alludes to the internal content of the speech and the significance concerns the external (visible content of the speech. Research methodology focuses on the analysis of contents: discussion, critiques and description of the construction method of the diagnosis manual of mental illnesses in its fourth review. The technique applied was the analysis of contents: identification of the dominant speech, style forms and evaluation of significants. The results showed that the dominant form of the speech is institutional, by the non-discursive neosexual forms. In addition, there is no evidence of changes in the psychiatric speech because its method of construction is circular feedback, that is to say, in any place of the process, homosexuality will be considered as a disorder or as a topic of psychiatric review. The research reveals that the DSM IV system fits to the discursive construction being able-knowing, widely documented by Foucault in which dominant speech exerts power on the neo-sexualities and defines them in an exercise of knowing, registering them in a diagnosis manual.

  19. Hypersexual disorder: a proposed diagnosis for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Martin P

    2010-04-01

    Hypersexual Disorder is proposed as a new psychiatric disorder for consideration in the Sexual Disorders section for DSM-V. Historical precedents describing hypersexual behaviors as well as the antecedent representations and proposals for inclusion of such a condition in the previous DSM manuals are reviewed. Epidemiological as well as clinical evidence is presented suggesting that non-paraphilic "excesses" of sexual behavior (i.e., hypersexual behaviors and disorders) can be accompanied by both clinically significant personal distress and social and medical morbidity. The research literature describing comorbid Axis I and Axis II psychiatric disorders and a purported relationship between Axis I disorders and Hypersexual Disorder is discussed. Based on an extensive review of the literature, Hypersexual Disorder is conceptualized as primarily a nonparaphilic sexual desire disorder with an impulsivity component. Specific polythetic diagnostic criteria, as well as behavioral specifiers, are proposed, intended to integrate empirically based contributions from various putative pathophysiological perspectives, including dysregulation of sexual arousal and desire, sexual impulsivity, sexual addiction, and sexual compulsivity.

  20. Psychotic disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Falko; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) was published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 2013, and the Work Group on the Classification of Psychotic disorders (WGPD), installed by the World Health Organization (WHO), is expected to publish the new chapter about schizophrenia and other primary psychotic disorders in 2017. We reviewed the available literature to summarize the major changes, innovations, and developments of both manuals. If available and possible, we outline the theoretical background behind these changes. Due to the fact that the development of ICD-11 has not yet been completed, the details about ICD-11 are still proposals under ongoing revision. In this ongoing process, they may be revised and therefore have to be seen as proposals. DSM-5 has eliminated schizophrenia subtypes and replaced them with a dimensional approach based on symptom assessments. ICD-11 will most likely go in a similar direction, as both manuals are planned to be more harmonized, although some differences will remain in details and the conceptual orientation. Next to these modifications, ICD-11 will provide a transsectional diagnostic criterion for schizoaffective disorders and a reorganization of acute and transient psychotic and delusional disorders. In this manuscript, we will compare the 2 classification systems.

  1. DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder: factor structure and rates of diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentes, Emily L; Dennis, Paul A; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Rissling, Michelle B; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

    2014-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a significant problem among Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans. To date, however, there has been only limited research on how the recent changes in DSM-5 influence the prevalence and factor structure of PTSD. To address this key issue, the present research used a modified version of a gold-standard clinical interview to assess PTSD among a large sample of Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans (N = 414). Thirty-seven percent of the sample met DSM-5 criteria for PTSD compared to a rate of 38% when DSM-IV diagnostic criteria were used. Differences in rates of diagnosis between DSM-IV and DSM-5 were primarily attributable to changes to Criterion A and the separation of the "avoidance" and "numbing" symptoms into separate clusters. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to compare the fit of the previous 3-factor DSM-IV model of PTSD to the 4-factor model specified in DSM-5, a 4-factor "dysphoria" model, and a 5-factor model. CFA demonstrated that the 5-factor model (re-experiencing, active avoidance, emotional numbing, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal) provided the best overall fit to the data, although substantial support was also found for the 4-factor DSM-5 model. Low factor loadings were noted for two of the symptoms in the DSM-5 model (psychogenic amnesia and reckless/self-destructive behavior), raising questions regarding the adequacy of fit between these symptoms and the other core features of PTSD. Overall, findings suggest the DSM-5 model of PTSD is an improvement over the previous DSM-IV model of PTSD, but still may not represent the true underlying factor structure of PTSD.

  2. The Phenomenology of Major Depression and the Representativeness and Nature of DSM Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-08-01

    How should DSM criteria relate to the disorders they are designed to assess? To address this question empirically, the author examines how well DSM-5 symptomatic criteria for major depression capture the descriptions of clinical depression in the post-Kraepelin Western psychiatric tradition as described in textbooks published between 1900 and 1960. Eighteen symptoms and signs of depression were described, 10 of which are covered by the DSM criteria for major depression or melancholia. For two symptoms (mood and cognitive content), DSM criteria are considerably narrower than those described in the textbooks. Five symptoms and signs (changes in volition/motivation, slowing of speech, anxiety, other physical symptoms, and depersonalization/derealization) are not present in the DSM criteria. Compared with the DSM criteria, these authors gave greater emphasis to cognitive, physical, and psychomotor changes, and less to neurovegetative symptoms. These results suggest that important features of major depression are not captured by DSM criteria. This is unproblematic as long as DSM criteria are understood to index rather than constitute psychiatric disorders. However, since DSM-III, our field has moved toward a reification of DSM that implicitly assumes that psychiatric disorders are actually just the DSM criteria. That is, we have taken an index of something for the thing itself. For example, good diagnostic criteria should be succinct and require minimal inference, but some critical clinical phenomena are subtle, difficult to assess, and experienced in widely varying ways. This conceptual error has contributed to the impoverishment of psychopathology and has affected our research, clinical work, and teaching in some undesirable ways.

  3. The DSM revision process: needing to keep an eye on the empirical ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, M B

    2017-01-01

    From DSM-III onward, successive DSM editions have strived to ground the diagnostic definitions in empirical evidence. DSM-IV established a three-stage process of empirical review, consisting of comprehensive and systematic literature reviews, secondary analyses of datasets, and field trials to provide reliability and validity data for the most substantial or controversial proposals. DSM-IV Work Group members were required to review the empirical literature to document explicitly the evidence supporting the text and criteria published in DSM-IV. As noted by Kendler and Solomon (2016), in contrast to the emphasis on systematic reviews in medicine which is a manifestation of the evidence-based medicine movement, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of DSM-5, raising questions about empirical rigor underlying the DSM-5 revision. It is likely that this regression in terms of anchoring the revision process in a comprehensive review of empirical data stemmed from the emphasis during the DSM-5 revision process on trying to move DSM-5 from its categorical descriptive approach towards a more etiological dimensional approach. Although such a shift ultimately did not occur, the effort spent on trying to achieve a paradigm shift likely came at the expense of the hard work of conducting systematic empirical reviews. For the DSM to continue to remain credible in the current era of evidence-based medicine, it is essential that the developers of future editions of the DSM avoid taking their eye off the empirical ball and insure that the manual remains grounded in solid empirical evidence.

  4. Revising the personality disorder diagnostic criteria for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-V): consider the later life context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsis, Steve; Segal, Daniel L; Donahue, Cailin

    2009-10-01

    The categorical measurement approach implemented by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) personality disorder (PD) diagnostic system is theoretically and pragmatically limited. As a result, many prominent psychologists now advocate for a shift away from this approach in favor of more conceptually sound dimensional measurement. This shift is expected to improve the psychometric properties of the personality disorder (PD) diagnostic system and make it more useful for clinicians and researchers. The current article suggests that despite the probable benefits of such a change, several limitations will remain if the new diagnostic system does not closely consider the context of later life. A failure to address the unique challenges associated with the assessment of personality in older adults likely will result in the continued limited validity, reliability, and utility of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) system for this growing population. This article discusses these limitations and their possible implications.

  5. Competitive ancillary service procurement in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Khavkin, Mark

    2000-01-01

    California has undertaken a major restructuring of its electricity utility sector. Most electricity is now sold in open markets operated by the PX and other entities. Bilateral contracting among some market participants is also permitted. A group of independent generating companies bids into these markets together with out of state resources. In addition to these markets, CAISO operates markets for both imbalance energy and AS, a quite unusual feature of the California system. These markets were initially quite chaotic and were rife with market power problems. However, various reforms have now created a system that functions well. During the restructuring process, special provisions were made to protect public purpose programs, including renewable generation.

  6. Geothermal energy in California: Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citron, O.; Davis, C.; Fredrickson, C.; Granit, R.; Kerrisk, D.; Leibowitz, L.; Schulkin, B.; Wornack, J.

    1976-06-30

    The potential for electric energy from geothermal resources in California is currently estimated to be equivalent to the output from 14 to 21 large (1000 MW) central station power plants. In addition, since over 30 California cities are located near potential geothermal resources, the non-electric applications of geothermal heat (industrial, agriculture, space heating, etc.) could be enormous. Therefore, the full-scale utilization of geothermal resources would have a major impact upon the energy picture of the state. This report presents a summary of the existing status of geothermal energy development in the state of California as of the early part of 1976. The report provides data on the extent of the resource base of the state and the present outlook for its utilization. It identifies the existing local, state, and federal laws, rules and regulations governing geothermal energy development and the responsibilities of each of the regulatory agencies involved. It also presents the differences in the development requirements among several counties and between California and its neighboring states. Finally, it describes on-going and planned activities in resource assessment and exploration, utilization, and research and development. Separate abstracts are prepared for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) for Sections II--VI and the three Appendixes.

  7. Study on the Threshold of Combining DST and DSmT%DST与DSmT自适应融合门限研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周宪英

    2009-01-01

    DSmT是一种有用的不确定推理方法,较DST能更好解决强冲突情况下的信息融合问题.本文在研究DST和DSmT的基础上提出一种将两种综合使用的方法.该方法以冲突率作为判决依据,在冲突率较低情况下采取DST证据理论,当冲突率高于一定阈值时采用DSmT融合算法,给出了DST和DSmT之间转化的规则.并通过仿真确定了这种自适应方法中的转换门限.仿真实验验证了方法的有效性和可行性.

  8. Study on the Adaptive Integration Algorithms with DST and DSmT%DST与DSmT自适应融合算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于小红; 周庆军; 李艳丽; 刘志成

    2013-01-01

    To solve the problem of fusion, both DST and DSmT have their own pros and cons under different conflicting situation. Based on the conclusion, an adaptive integration algorithm with DST and DSmT is proposed. By analyzing different algorithms, it is put forward that part of the conflicting information is redistributed according to DSmT, and the rest is normalized according to DST. Controlling factor is used to control the quantity of information which is dealt by two different ways adaptively. It's a new method which avo:.ds setting for threshold. The simulation results indicate that the new adaptive integration algorithm with DST and DSmT can deal with any conflicting situation efficiently. It converges quickly and costs less amount of calculation.%针对DST与DSmT在不同的冲突情况下,融合效果各有优劣,提出综合利用DST与DSmT进行信息融合.在对不同融合算法进行分析之后,提出将部分冲突信息根据DSmT进行重新分配,剩下的冲突信息根据DST进行归一化,并采用证据相似度作为控制因子,自适应地对两种冲突信息量进行控制,避免了对冲突阈值的预先设置.数值算例表明,文中提出的基于DST与DSmT的自适应融合算法可有效处理各种冲突情况,且收敛速度快,计算量小.

  9. Validation of DSM-IV Model of Psychiatric Syndromes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecavalier, Luc; Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Edwards, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the internal construct validity of the DSM-IV as a conceptual model for characterizing behavioral syndromes in children with ASD. Parent and teachers completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4, a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale, for 6-to-12 year old clinic referrals with an ASD (N = 498). Ratings were…

  10. The multiaxial assessment and the DSM-III: a conceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronschtein, Eitan

    2015-12-01

    With the release of the DSM-III, multiaxial assessment, which was a new concept, was introduced to daily clinical practice. This article will review the history and the development of the concept of multiaxial assessment and will focus on the its relationship to the DSM-III. In conclusion I will discuss different critiques of the concept.

  11. The Bulimia Test--Revised: Validation with "DSM-IV" Criteria for Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Bulimia Test--Revised (BULIT-R) was given to 23 female subjects who met the criteria for bulimia in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-IV) and 124 female controls. The BULIT-R appears to be a valid instruction for identifying individuals who meet DSM-IV criteria for bulimia. (SLD)

  12. Research Review: DSM-V Conduct Disorder--Research Needs for an Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R.; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C.; Odgers, Candice L.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Viding, Essi

    2008-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to…

  13. Autism Spectrum Disorder in the DSM-5: Diagnostic Sensitivity and Specificity in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansz, Jessica A.; Gray, Kylie M.; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    Changes to the DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) criteria raised concerns among parents and practitioners that the criteria may exclude some children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). Few studies have examined DSM-5 sensitivity and specificity in children less than 5 years of age. This study evaluated 185 children aged 20-55 months…

  14. What happened to harmonization of the PTSD diagnosis? The divergence of ICD11 and DSM5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, J I

    2013-09-01

    The development of ICD11 and DSM5 was seen as an opportunity to harmonize the two major classification systems for mental disorders. The proposed ICD11 and DSM5 diagnostic criteria for PTSD are markedly different. The implications of this remain to be seen, but have the potential to cause confusion to PTSD sufferers, clinicians, researchers and others impacted on by the condition.

  15. The Use of DSM-IV in Family Counseling: Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Patricia M.

    This paper describes the ethical dilemmas encountered by family counselors using the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM). Numerous authors have emphasized that the DSM system does not contribute in an effective or efficient manner in the conduct of family therapy. The ethical issues of misrepresentation; trust; malfeasance;…

  16. The New Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders: Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeffrey S.; Risler, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the new alternative "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", fifth edition (DSM-5) model for personality disorders (PDs) as it is seen by its creators and critics. Method: Follow the DSM revision process by monitoring the American Psychiatric Association website and the publication of pertinent journal…

  17. Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder: Who Will Get a DSM-5 Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Rachel G.; Carrington, Sarah J.; Le Couteur, Ann; Gould, Judith; Wing, Lorna; Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina; Leekam, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Introduction of proposed criteria for DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has raised concerns that some individuals currently meeting diagnostic criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD; DSM-IV-TR/ICD- 10) will not qualify for a diagnosis under the proposed changes. To date, reports of sensitivity and specificity of the new…

  18. Testing the Construct Validity of Proposed Criteria for "DSM-5" Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, William P. L.; Charman, Tony; Skuse, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To use confirmatory factor analysis to test the construct validity of the proposed "DSM-5" symptom model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), in comparison to alternative models, including that described in "DSM-IV-TR." Method: Participants were 708 verbal children and young persons (mean age, 9.5 years) with mild to severe autistic…

  19. Giving Voice to the Trans Community on GID Reform in the "DSM-5": A Saskatchewan Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jai T.

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of the diagnosis of gender identity disorder (GID) within the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") is a contentious issue. A summary of the arguments for retention, removal, or reform of the diagnosis in the "DSM-5" is presented. A qualitative study with 7 individuals from…

  20. How Will DSM-5 Affect Autism Diagnosis? A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M.; Smaldone, Arlene M.; Cohn, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-5 on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and explore policy implications. We identified 418 studies; 14 met inclusion criteria. Studies consistently reported decreases in ASD diagnosis (range 7.3-68.4%) using DSM-5…

  1. Sensitivity and Specificity of Proposed "DSM-5" Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James C.; Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the potential impact of proposed "DSM-5" diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method: The study focused on a sample of 933 participants evaluated during the "DSM-IV" field trial; 657 carried a clinical diagnosis of an ASD, and 276 were diagnosed with a non-autistic disorder. Sensitivity and…

  2. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Do Not Help Support DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Janssen, Joost; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aims to determine whether or not structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data support the DSM-5 proposal of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic category, and whether or not classical DSM-IV autistic disorder (AD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) categories should be subsumed into it. The most replicated sMRI findings…

  3. An Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelhorn, Heather; Hartman, Christie; Sakai, Joseph; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan; Rhee, Soo; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John; Hopfer, Christian; Crowley, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Interviews with over 3,000 adolescents were made to evaluate the extent to which DSM-IV criteria characterizes the range of severity of adolescent antisocial behavior within and across sex. The DSM-IV conduct disorder (CD) criteria are a useful indicator of severe adolescent antisocial behavior but some CD criteria display sex bias.

  4. A genetic perspective on the proposed inclusion of cannabis withdrawal in DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.; Agrawal, A.; Nat, N.O.; Creemers, H.E.; Huizink, A.C.; Martin, N.G.; Lynskey, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Various studies support the inclusion of cannabis withdrawal in the diagnosis of cannabis use disorder (CUD) in the upcoming DSM-5. The aims of the current study were to (1) estimate the prevalence of DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal (criterion B), (2) estimate the role of genetic and environmen

  5. Water use in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Justin; Sneed, Michelle; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Metzger, Loren F.; Rewis, Diane; House, Sally F.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the USGS National Water Use Compilation, the California Water Science Center works in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies as well as academic and private organizations to collect and report total water withdrawals for California. The 2010 California water use data are aggregated here, in this website, for the first time. The California Water Science Center released these data ahead of the online USGS National Water Use Compilation circular report, in response to increased interest associated with current drought conditions. The national report is expected to be released late in 2014. The data on this website represents the most current California water use data available in the USGS National Water Use Compilation. It contains a section on water use in California for 2010. Water-use estimates are compiled by withdrawal source type, use category, and county. Withdrawal source types include groundwater, both fresh and saline,

  6. The Clinical Features of Paranoia in the 20th Century and Their Representation in Diagnostic Criteria From DSM-III Through DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-12-21

    This review traces, through psychiatric textbooks, the history of the Kraepelinian concept of paranoia in the 20th century and then relates the common reported symptoms and signs to the diagnostic criteria for paranoia/delusional disorder in DSM-III through DSM-5. Clinical descriptions of paranoia appearing in 10 textbooks, published 1899 to 1970, revealed 11 prominent symptoms and signs reported by 5 or more authors. Three symptoms (systematized delusions, minimal hallucinations, and prominent ideas of reference) and 2 signs (chronic course and minimal affective deterioration) were reported by 8 or 9 of the authors. Four textbook authors rejected the Kraepelinian concept of paranoia. A weak relationship was seen between the frequency with which the clinical features were reported and the likelihood of their inclusion in modern DSM manuals. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for paranoia/delusional disorder shifted substantially from DSM-III to DSM-5. The modern operationalized criteria for paranoia/delusional disorder do not well reflect the symptoms and signs frequently reported by historical experts. In contrast to results of similar reviews for depression, schizophrenia and mania, the clinical construct of paranoia/delusional disorder has been somewhat unstable in Western Psychiatry since the turn of the 20th century as reflected in both textbooks and the DSM editions.

  7. Alcohol use disorder diagnoses in the criminal justice system: an analysis of the compatibility of current DSM-IV, proposed DSM-5.0, and DSM-5.1 diagnostic criteria in a correctional sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopak, Albert M; Metze, Amanda V; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2014-06-01

    This study explored the compatibility between the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence with the initial (DSM-5.0) and most recent (DSM-5.1) proposed diagnostic criteria. Data drawn from a structured clinical interview used in the assessment of 6,871 male and 801 female state prison inmates were analyzed according to the existing and proposed diagnostic formulations. The greatest congruence was observed in cases that received no diagnosis according to the DSM-IV-TR because these also received no diagnosis in the DSM-5.1. Most cases with a current dependence diagnosis received a severe designation according to the proposed criteria. However, those with an abuse diagnosis were divided across various DSM-5.1 severity levels. Some diagnostic criteria were nearly universally endorsed among those classified with the highest severity levels, which indicated that some criteria may serve as cardinal indicators of a severe alcohol use disorder (SAUD). Additional diagnostic criteria not yet suggested for inclusion in the DSM (i.e., preoccupation with alcohol use and alcohol use to relieve emotional distress) were also evaluated. Evidence demonstrated these two criteria served as functional indicators of alcohol use disorder (AUD). This assessment approach can be used to establish appropriate treatment objectives based on the severity of diagnosed AUDs. Meeting these treatment objectives, especially in a correctional population, may have important implications for future offending. Recommendations are made for prospective research in this area.

  8. [Impact of DSM-5: Application and Problems Based on Clinical and Research Viewpoints on Anxiety Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioiri, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the impact of DSM-5 has been greater than we had imagined. The Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology organized a group for translation and the members spent many hours in this volunteer effort over a 2-year period. This highlights the significance of and expectations for DSM-5 in clinical practice in Japan. Regarding anxiety disorders, the highlights of changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 are as follows. Firstly, the DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorder no longer includes obsessive-compulsive disorder (which is included with obsessive-compulsive and related disorders) or posttraumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder(which are included with trauma- and stressor-related disorders). However, the sequential order of these chapters in DSM-5 reflects the close relationships among them. Secondly, in DSM-IV, selective mutism and separation anxiety disorder were classified in the section "Disorders Usually First Diagnosed in Infancy, Childhood, or Adolescence." They are now classified as an anxiety disorder. Through these two changes, at the beginning of the chapter, it can be clearly noted that anxiety disorders include disorders that share features of excessive fear and anxiety and related behavioral disturbances. Thirdly, panic disorder and agoraphobia are not associated in DSM-5. Thus, the former DSM-IV diagnoses of panic disorder with agoraphobia, panic disorder without agoraphobia, and agoraphobia without a history of panic disorder are now replaced by two diagnoses, panic disorder and agoraphobia, each with separate criteria. The co-occurrence of panic disorder and agoraphobia is now coded with two diagnoses. This change recognizes that a marked number of individuals with agoraphobia do not experience panic symptoms. For the present, this change ends the. controversy over the hierarchy between panic disorder and agoraphobia. The diagnostic criteria for agoraphobia are derived from the DSM-IV descriptors for agoraphobia, although the clarification

  9. How Do DSM-5 Personality Traits Align With Schema Therapy Constructs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Bo; Lee, Christopher; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Simonsen, Erik

    2016-08-01

    DSM-5 offers an alternative model of personality pathology that includes 25 traits. Although personality disorders are mostly treated with psychotherapy, the correspondence between DSM-5 traits and concepts in evidence-based psychotherapy has not yet been evaluated adequately. Suitably, schema therapy was developed for treating personality disorders, and it has achieved promising evidence. The authors examined associations between DSM-5 traits and schema therapy constructs in a mixed sample of 662 adults, including 312 clinical participants. Associations were investigated in terms of factor loadings and regression coefficients in relation to five domains, followed by specific correlations among all constructs. The results indicated conceptually coherent associations, and 15 of 25 traits were strongly related to relevant schema therapy constructs. Conclusively, DSM-5 traits may be considered expressions of schema therapy constructs, which psychotherapists might take advantage of in terms of case formulation and targets of treatment. In turn, schema therapy constructs add theoretical understanding to DSM-5 traits.

  10. Reliability and Hierarchical Structure of DSM-5 Pathological Traits in a Danish Mixed Sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Sune; Bach, Bo; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2016-01-01

    In this study we assessed the DSM-5 trait model in a large Danish sample (n = 1,119) with respect to reliability of the applied Danish version of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) self-report form by means of internal consistency and item discrimination. In addition, we tested whether...... the five-factor structure of the DSM-5 trait model can be replicated in a Danish independent sample using the PID-5 self-report form. Finally, we examined the hierarchical structure of DSM-5 traits. In terms of internal consistency and item discrimination, the applied PID-5 scales were generally found...... reliable and functional; our data resembled the five-factor structure of previous findings, and we identified a hierarchical structure from one to five factors that was conceptually reasonable and corresponded with existing findings. These results support the new DSM-5 trait model and suggest that it can...

  11. Some suggestions for the DSM-5 schizotypal personality disorder construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummelen, Benjamin; Pedersen, Geir; Karterud, Sigmund

    2012-05-01

    This study relates to the schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) proposal of the upcoming fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) by investigating the construct validity of SPD as defined by DSM-IV in a large sample of patients from the Norwegian Network of Personality-Focused Treatment Programs (N = 2619), assessed by structured diagnostic interviews and the Longitudinal, Expert All Data standard. We investigated factor structure and psychometric properties of the SPD criteria, as well as co-occurrence patterns between SPD and other PDs. Thirty-six patients were diagnosed with SPD and 513 patients (21%) endorsed at least 2 schizotypal criteria. We found that 2 factors were specific for SPD, a cognitive-perceptual factor (ideas of reference, magical thinking, and unusual perceptual experiences) and an oddness factor (odd thinking and speech, constricted affect, and odd appearance or behavior). The criteria belonging to these factors had appropriate psychometric properties. The criteria of the cognitive-perceptual factor were more strongly associated with borderline personality disorder (PD) than with the other PDs. We did not find support for a consistent factor that reflected interpersonal problems. The criteria that used to be part of this factor (suspiciousness, lack of friends or confidants, and excessive social anxiety) performed poorly as specific SPD criteria. SPD was more strongly associated with antisocial PD and paranoid PD than with the other PDs. We suggest that ideas of reference should be included explicitly under the schizotypal facet of cognitive dysregulation in DSM-5, with less emphasis on the social phobic aspects of this feature. Furthermore, there should be more emphasis on the cognitive aspects of suspiciousness in SPD, and it should be considered to split up the affectivity criterion into constricted affect and inappropriate affect, with the latter type of affect being the expression of problems with

  12. Utility-scale system preventive and failure-related maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, C.; Hutchinson, P.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance background on PVUSA utility-scale systems at Davis and Kerman, California, and reports on a preventative and failure-related maintenance approach and costs.

  13. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  14. Demand-Side Management and Integrated Resource Planning: Findings from a Survey of 24 Electric Utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated resource planning differs from traditional utility planning practices primarily in its increased attention to demand-side management (DSM) programs and its integration of supply- and demand-side resources into a combined resource portfolio. This report details the findings from an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) survey of 24 electric utilities that have well-developed integrated planning processes. These utilities account for roughly one-third of total capacity, electricity generation, and DSM-program expenditures nationwide. The ORNL survey was designed to obtain descriptive data on a national sample of utilities and to test a number of hypothesized relationships between selected utility characteristics and the mix of resources selected for the integrated plan, with an emphasis on the use of DSM resources and the processes by which they are chosen. The survey solicited information on each utility's current and projected resource mix, operating environment, procedures used to screen potential DSM resources, techniques used to obtain public input and to integrate supply- and demand-side options into a unified plan, and procedures used in the final selection of resources for the plan.

  15. Burr Utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    This note proposes the Burr utility function. Burr utility is a flexible two-parameter family that behaves approximately power-like (CRRA) remote from the origin, while exhibiting exponential-like (CARA) features near the origin. It thus avoids the extreme behavior of the power family near the origi

  16. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially......, with the current approach tending to systematically overestimate (underestimate) poverty in urban (rural) zones....

  17. [Autism Spectrum Disorder in DSM-5 - concept, validity, and reliability, impact on clinical care and future research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christine M

    2014-05-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in DSM-5 comprises the former DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of Autistic Disorder, Asperger's Disorder and PDD-nos. The criteria for ASD in DSM-5 were considerably revised from those of ICD-10 and DSM-IV-TR. The present article compares the diagnostic criteria, presents studies on the validity and reliability of ASD, and discusses open questions. It ends with a clinical and research perspective.

  18. Integrating theory-driven and empirically-derived models of personality development and psychopathology: a proposal for DSM V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Patrick; Blatt, Sidney J

    2011-02-01

    Although there is growing consensus that the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) should replace the categorical view of mental disorders with a dimensional approach rooted in personality theory, no consensus has emerged about the dimensions that should be the basis of the new classification system. Moreover, recent attempts to bridge the gap between psychiatric nosology and personality theories have primarily relied on empirically-derived dimensional personality models. While this focus on empirically-derived personality theories may result in a psychometrically valid classification system, it may create a classification system that lacks theoretical and empirical comprehensiveness and has limited clinical utility. In this paper, we first argue that research findings increasingly suggest that an integration of theory-driven and empirically-derived models of personality development is not only possible, but also has the potential to provide a more comprehensive and clinically-relevant approach to classification and diagnosis than either approach alone. Next, we propose a comprehensive model of personality development and psychopathology based on an integration of contemporary theory-driven and empirically-derived models of personality. Finally, we outline the implications of this approach for the future development of DSM, and especially its potential for developing research that addresses the interactions between psychosocial and neurobiological processes implicated in personality development and psychopathology.

  19. Genome sequencing and annotation of Amycolatopsis azurea DSM 43854T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Khatri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 9.2 Mb genome of the azureomycin A and B antibiotic producing strain Amycolatopsis azurea isolated from a Japanese soil sample. The draft genome of strain DSM 43854T consists of 9,223,451 bp with a G + C content of 69.0% and the genome contains 3 rRNA genes (5S–23S–16S and 58 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. The homology searches revealed that the PKS gene clusters are supposed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of naptomycin, macbecin, rifamycin, mitomycin, maduropeptin enediyne, neocarzinostatin enediyne, C-1027 enediyne, calicheamicin enediyne, landomycin, simocyclinone, medermycin, granaticin, polyketomycin, teicoplanin, balhimycin, vancomycin, staurosporine, rubradirin and complestatin.

  20. Structural approach for building reconstruction from a single DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, Florent; Descombes, Xavier; Zerubia, Josiane; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    2010-01-01

    We present a new approach for building reconstruction from a single Digital Surface Model (DSM). It treats buildings as an assemblage of simple urban structures extracted from a library of 3D parametric blocks (like a LEGO set). First, the 2D-supports of the urban structures are extracted either interactively or automatically. Then, 3D-blocks are placed on the 2D-supports using a Gibbs model which controls both the block assemblage and the fitting to data. A Bayesian decision finds the optimal configuration of 3D-blocks using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler associated with original proposition kernels. This method has been validated on multiple data set in a wide-resolution interval such as 0.7 m satellite and 0.1 m aerial DSMs, and provides 3D representations on complex buildings and dense urban areas with various levels of detail.

  1. A DSM-based framework for integrated function modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisenbart, Boris; Gericke, Kilian; Blessing, Lucienne T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Function modelling is proposed in the literature from different disciplines, in interdisciplinary approaches, and used in practice with the intention of facilitating system conceptualisation. However, function models across disciplines are largely diverse addressing different function modelling...... an integrated function modelling framework, which specifically aims at relating between the different function modelling perspectives prominently addressed in different disciplines. It uses interlinked matrices based on the concept of DSM and MDM in order to facilitate cross-disciplinary modelling and analysis...... perspectives and using different structures and forms for representing the contained information. This hampers the exchange of information between the models and poses particular challenges to joint modelling and shared comprehension between designers from different disciplines. This article proposes...

  2. [Historical perspective of PTSD and future revision in DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    One of prototypes of PTSD is a fright neurosis conceptualized by Kraepelin and is on the line of traditional psychogenic reaction category defined by Sommers in so far as the re-experience symptoms reflects the content of a traumatic experience. Other key components of PTSD, such as avoidance of traumatic memory and hyperarousal, overlap respectively with dissociative disorders and the somatoform autonomic dysfunction (ICD-10), which may consist, together with comorbid mood and anxiety disorders of PTSD, a spectrum of posttraumatic mental disorders. The DSM-5 draft of PTSD restricts the category in terms of the event and re-experience criterion, put an emphasis upon dissociation and enlarges numbing symptom in that it is re-categorized as a cognitive and affective alterations to be separated from avoidance symptom. This change partly reflects insight into the nature of the disorder brought by CBT-based clinical experience.

  3. Building Extraction from DSM Acquired by Airborne 3D Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Hongjian; LI Shukai

    2003-01-01

    Segmentation and edge regulation are studied deeply to extract buildings from DSM data produced in this paper. Building segmentation is the first step to extract buildings, and a new segmentation method-adaptive iterative segmentation considering ratio mean square-is proposed to extract the contour of buildings effectively. A sub-image (such as 50× 50 pixels )of the image is processed in sequence,the average gray level and its ratio mean square are calculated first, then threshold of the sub-image is selected by using iterative threshold segmentation. The current pixel is segmented according to the threshold, the aver-age gray level and the ratio mean square of the sub-image. The edge points of the building are grouped according to the azimuth of neighbor points, and then the optimal azimuth of the points that belong to the same group can be calculated by using line interpolation.

  4. [Autism Spectrum Disorder and DSM-5: Spectrum or Cluster?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Xaver; Freiberger, Verena; Greulich, Heide; Blank, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Within the new DSM-5, the currently differentiated subgroups of "Autistic Disorder" (299.0), "Asperger's Disorder" (299.80) and "Pervasive Developmental Disorder" (299.80) are replaced by the more general "Autism Spectrum Disorder". With regard to a patient-oriented and expedient advising therapy planning, however, the issue of an empirically reproducible and clinically feasible differentiation into subgroups must still be raised. Based on two Autism-rating-scales (ASDS and FSK), an exploratory two-step cluster analysis was conducted with N=103 children (age: 5-18) seen in our social-pediatric health care centre to examine potentially autistic symptoms. In the two-cluster solution of both rating scales, mainly the problems in social communication grouped the children into a cluster "with communication problems" (51 % and 41 %), and a cluster "without communication problems". Within the three-cluster solution of the ASDS, sensory hypersensitivity, cleaving to routines and social-communicative problems generated an "autistic" subgroup (22%). The children of the second cluster ("communication problems", 35%) were only described by social-communicative problems, and the third group did not show any problems (38%). In the three-cluster solution of the FSK, the "autistic cluster" of the two-cluster solution differentiated in a subgroup with mainly social-communicative problems (cluster 1) and a second subgroup described by restrictive, repetitive behavior. The different cluster solutions will be discussed with a view to the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, for following studies a further specification of some of the ASDS and FSK items could be helpful.

  5. The Effects of DSM-5 Criteria on Number of Individuals Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Isaac C.; Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research has raised concerns about the number of individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to DSM-IV-TR who may no longer qualify for diagnoses under the new DSM-5 criteria, published in May 2013. The current study systematically reviews 25 articles evaluating samples according to both DSM-IV-TR and…

  6. Concurrent validity of the DSM-IV scales Affective Problems and Anxiety Problems of the Youth Self-Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lang, NDJ; Ferdinand, RF; Oldehinkel, AJ; Ormel, J; Verhulst, FC

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the concurrent validity of the DSM-IV scales Anxiety Problems and Affective Problems of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) in a community sample of Dutch young adolescents aged 10-12 years. We first examined the extent to which the YSR/DSM-IV scales reflect symptoms of DSM-IV anxiet

  7. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-05-17

    Building energy benchmarking is a useful starting point for commercial building owners and operators to target energy savings opportunities. There are a number of tools and methods for benchmarking energy use. Benchmarking based on regional data can provides more relevant information for California buildings than national tools such as Energy Star. This paper discusses issues related to benchmarking commercial building energy use and the development of Cal-Arch, a building energy benchmarking database for California. Currently Cal-Arch uses existing survey data from California's Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), a largely underutilized wealth of information collected by California's major utilities. Doe's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is used by a similar tool, Arch, and by a number of other benchmarking tools. Future versions of Arch/Cal-Arch will utilize additional data sources including modeled data and individual buildings to expand the database.

  8. Authentic Assessment in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Leadership, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes the teacher-developed California Assessment Program (CAP) writing measure, designed to support California's reform curriculum and based on matrix sampling techniques. This program will be supplemented by literature and mathematics assessments. The greatest challenge is designing an assessment to match the state's new history and social…

  9. Two New Xylanases with Different Substrate Specificities from the Human Gut Bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-01-24

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut.

  10. Assessing the clinical utility of agoraphobia in the context of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B; Cromer, Kiara R

    2008-01-01

    In the DSM-IV, a panic disorder (PD) diagnosis includes specification of agoraphobia, which is primarily an index of situational avoidance due to fear of panic. No other anxiety diagnosis requires specification of level of avoidance. This raises the question as to whether agoraphobia provides unique information beyond the core features of PD (i.e., panic attacks and panic-related worry). The incremental validity of agoraphobia, defined using DSM-IV specifiers versus level of situational avoidance, was examined in relation to the expression and treatment of PD (N=146). Analyses indicate that agoraphobia status adds uniquely to the prediction of PD symptoms, impairment, and response to treatment. However, level of situational avoidance, defined either as a continuous or dichotomous variable, appears to have greater utility compared to the DSM-IV method of classifying agoraphobia. In summary, the agoraphobia specifier seems to have clinical utility but this could be improved by focusing on a dimensional assessment of situational avoidance.

  11. Should DSM-V include dimensional diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helzer, John E; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Bierut, Laura Jean; Regier, Darrel A; Schuckit, Marc A; Guth, Sarah E

    2006-02-01

    This program calls attention to the upcoming timetable for the revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-IV and the publication of DSM-V. It is vitally important for Research Society of Alcoholism members to be aware of the current discussions of the important scientific questions related to the next DSM revision and to use the opportunity for input. The title of the symposium highlights 1 key question, i.e., whether the DSM definitions should remain strictly categorical as in the past or whether a dimensional component should be included in this revision. Two substantive and 1 conceptual paper are included in this portion of the symposium. The fourth and final presentation detailing the revision timetable and the opportunities for input is by Dr. Darrel Regier. Dr. Regier is the director of American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education the research and education branch of the American Psychiatric Association and the organization within the APA that will oversee the DSM revision. The discussion is by Marc Schuckit, who was chair of the Substance Use disorders (SUD) Committee for DSM-IV and cochair of the international group of experts reviewing the SUD definitions for DSM-V.

  12. The Impact of DSM-5 A-Criteria Changes on Parent Ratings of ADHD in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Margaret H; Yeguez, Carlos E

    2014-03-13

    Objective: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) A-criteria for ADHD were expanded to include new descriptors referencing adolescent and adult symptom manifestations. This study examines the effect of these changes on symptom endorsement in a sample of adolescents with ADHD (N = 259; age range = 10.72-16.70). Method: Parent ratings were collected and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) and DSM-5 endorsement of ADHD symptoms were compared. Results: Under the DSM-5, there were significant increases in reported inattention, but not hyperactivity/impulsivity (H/I) symptoms, with specific elevations for certain symptoms. The average adolescent met criteria for less than one additional symptom under the DSM-5, but the correlation between ADHD symptoms and impairment was attenuated when using the DSM-5 items. Impulsivity items appeared to represent adolescent deficits better than hyperactivity items. Results were not moderated by demographic factors. Conclusion: In a sample of adolescents with well-diagnosed DSM-IV-TR ADHD, developmental symptom descriptors led parents to endorse slightly more symptoms of inattention, but this elevation is unlikely to be clinically meaningful.

  13. Automated Verification of Memory Consistencies of DSM System on Unified Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Pankaj Kumar , Durgesh Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The consistency model of a DSM system specifies the ordering constraints on concurrent memory accesses by multiple processors, and hence has fundamental impact on DSM systems’ programming convenience and implementation efficiency. We have proposed the structural model for automated verification of memory consistencies of DSM System. DSM allows processes to assume a globally shared virtual memory even though they execute on nodes that do not physically share memory. The DSM software provide the abstraction of a globally shared memory in which each processor can access any data item without the programmer having to worry about where the data is or how to obtain its value In contrast in the native programming model on networks of workstations message passing the programmer must decide when a processor needs to communicate with whom to communicate and what data to be send. On a DSM system the programmer can focus on algorithmic development rather than on managing partitioned data sets and communicating values. The programming interfaces to DSM systems may differ in a variety of respects. The memory model refers to how updates to distributed shared memory are rejected to the processes in the system. The most intuitive model of distributed shared memory is that a read should always return the last value written unfortunately the notion of the last value written is not well defined in a distributed system.

  14. Disorders related to use of psychoactive substances in DSM-5: Changes and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Bhad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the most recent edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM that is DSM-5 many modifications have been made in substance use disorder section. These include changes in terminology; sections and categories; diagnostic criteria; threshold for diagnosis; severity; and specifier. Additionally, there have been certain additions and omissions from the earlier version. Critical evaluation of the changes made to the section on disorders related to use of psychoactive substances in India context has not been published so far. The current paper presents a critique of the changes made to the substance use disorder section in DSM-5. The rationale for these changes put forth by DSM-5 work group on substance related disorders have been discussed. Additionally, attempt has been made to highlight the possible future challenges consequent to the current nosological revision for substance use disorder category. Overall DSM-5 seems to be promising in fulfilling its goal of DSM-ICD harmonisation and movement towards an internationally compatible and practical diagnostic system for mental health disorders. It has increased the scope of addiction by inclusion of behavioural addiction. It has also tried to balance the categorical and dimensional approach to diagnosis. However, the real test of this newer edition of one of the most commonly used nosological systems will be during clinical care and research. This will help address the debatable issues regarding the changes that DSM-5 brings with it.

  15. [The present and future of anxiety disorders: a view and problems to DSM-5: panic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioiri, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare shows that the estimated number of all patients with any anxiety disorders is more than ten million, while the number of all depressive patients is about six million. Thus, anxiety disorders are very important in daily clinical situation of psychiatry. Recently, DSM-5 draft posted online (http://www.dsm5.org). Many of the disorders that were previously listed in the anxiety disorders chapter in DSM-IV have been distributed throughout this chapter as well as separate chapters on obsessive-compulsive and related disorders and trauma-and stressor-related disorders. As for panic disorder that was one of the new concepts of psychiatric disorder in DSM-III, there are some changes in the criteria, for instance subcategory according to with/without agoraphobia are discontinued since agoraphobia is proposed to be a codable disorder in DSM-5. In this paper, we will review the history and pathogenesis of panic disorder and the relationships between DSM and ICD, and then discuss the present and future of panic disorder viewed in DSM-5 draft.

  16. Disorders Related to Use of Psychoactive Substances in DSM-5: Changes and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhad, Roshan; Lal, Rakesh; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    In the most recent edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) that is DSM-5 many modifications have been made in substance use disorder section. These include changes in terminology; sections and categories; diagnostic criteria; threshold for diagnosis; severity; and specifier. Additionally, there have been certain additions and omissions from the earlier version. Critical evaluation of the changes made to the section on disorders related to use of psychoactive substances in India context has not been published so far. The current paper presents a critique of the changes made to the substance use disorder section in DSM-5. The rationale for these changes put forth by DSM-5 work group on substance related disorders have been discussed. Additionally, attempt has been made to highlight the possible future challenges consequent to the current nosological revision for substance use disorder category. Overall DSM-5 seems to be promising in fulfilling its goal of DSM-ICD harmonisation and movement towards an internationally compatible and practical diagnostic system for mental health disorders. It has increased the scope of addiction by inclusion of behavioural addiction. It has also tried to balance the categorical and dimensional approach to diagnosis. However, the real test of this newer edition of one of the most commonly used nosological systems will be during clinical care and research. This will help address the debatable issues regarding the changes that DSM-5 brings with it.

  17. Automatic Extraction of DTM from Low Resolution Dsm by Twosteps Semi-Global Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Automatically extracting DTM from DSM or LiDAR data by distinguishing non-ground points from ground points is an important issue. Many algorithms for this issue are developed, however, most of them are targeted at processing dense LiDAR data, and lack the ability of getting DTM from low resolution DSM. This is caused by the decrease of distinction on elevation variation between steep terrains and surface objects. In this paper, a method called two-steps semi-global filtering (TSGF) is proposed to extract DTM from low resolution DSM. Firstly, the DSM slope map is calculated and smoothed by SGF (semi-global filtering), which is then binarized and used as the mask of flat terrains. Secondly, the DSM is segmented with the restriction of the flat terrains mask. Lastly, each segment is filtered with semi-global algorithm in order to remove non-ground points, which will produce the final DTM. The first SGF is based on global distribution characteristic of large slope, which distinguishes steep terrains and flat terrains. The second SGF is used to filter non-ground points on DSM within flat terrain segments. Therefore, by two steps SGF non-ground points are removed robustly, while shape of steep terrains is kept. Experiments on DSM generated by ZY3 imagery with resolution of 10-30m demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. External validation of bifactor model of ADHD: explaining heterogeneity in psychiatric comorbidity, cognitive control, and personality trait profiles within DSM-IV ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Michelle M; Roberts, Bethan; Gremillion, Monica; von Eye, Alexander; Nigg, Joel T

    2011-11-01

    The current paper provides external validation of the bifactor model of ADHD by examining associations between ADHD latent factor/profile scores and external validation indices. 548 children (321 boys; 302 with ADHD), 6 to 18 years old, recruited from the community participated in a comprehensive diagnostic procedure. Mothers completed the Child Behavior Checklist, Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire, and California Q-Sort. Children completed the Stop and Trail-Making Task. Specific inattention was associated with depression/withdrawal, slower cognitive task performance, introversion, agreeableness, and high reactive control; specific hyperactivity-impulsivity was associated with rule-breaking/aggressive behavior, social problems, errors during set-shifting, extraversion, disagreeableness, and low reactive control. It is concluded that the bifactor model provides better explanation of heterogeneity within ADHD than DSM-IV ADHD symptom counts or subtypes.

  19. Recent advances in autism research as reflected in DSM-5 criteria for autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Catherine; Bishop, Somer L

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a selective review of advances in scientific knowledge about autism spectrum disorder (ASD), using DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition) diagnostic criteria as a framework for the discussion. We review literature that prompted changes to the organization of ASD symptoms and diagnostic subtypes in DSM-IV, and we examine the rationale for new DSM-5 specifiers, modifiers, and severity ratings as well as the introduction of the diagnosis of social (pragmatic) communication disorder. Our goal is to summarize and critically consider the contribution of clinical psychology research, along with that of other disciplines, to the current conceptualization of ASD.

  20. DSM-V and the future diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James M; Wigal, Timothy; Lakes, Kimberley

    2009-10-01

    In general, recommendations for the DSM-V and future diagnoses of psychiatric disorders include a dimensional approach to complement the standard categorical approach. For the assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dimensional approaches to supplement the rigid categorical approach of the DSM-IV abound. Historically, dimensions based on severity of symptoms of ADHD and severity of general psychopathology have been used. General dimensional approaches described by a workgroup organized by the American Psychiatric Association are reviewed to provide background and context for a discussion of old and new dimensional approaches to complement future categorical diagnosis of ADHD in the DSM-V.

  1. [Psychoses of physical origin--traditional interpretation and DSM III nomenclature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, A

    1986-10-01

    Classification of organic psychoses according to the revised version of DSM III and in accordance with the terminology used in traditional German psychopathology, are compared. In DSM III, organic Psychoses are presented as a heterogeneous group divided into psychoses of known or suspected origin and in psychoses of unknown aetiology. Relevant differences in the use of diagnostic terms such as delir are noticeable, whereas known syndromes such as Korsakoff's syndrome (Korsakoff's psychosis or alcoholic psychosis) are not considered and incorporated into larger categories in DSM nomenclature.

  2. Analyzing Distributed Processing For Electric Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stanley A.; Kirkham, Harold; Beardmore, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Distributed Processing Trade-Off Model for Electric Utility Operation computer program based upon study performed at California Institute of Technology for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Study presented technique addressing question of tradeoffs between expanding communications network or expanding capacity of distributed computers in energy-management systems (EMS) of electric utility. Gives EMS planners macroscopic tool for evaluation of architectures of distributed-processing systems and major technical and economic tradeoffs as well as interactions within systems.

  3. The clinical inadequacy of the DSM-5 classification of somatic symptom and related disorders: an alternative trans-diagnostic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Fava, Giovanni A

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) somatic symptom and related disorders chapter has a limited clinical utility. In addition to the problems that the single diagnostic rubrics and the deletion of the diagnosis of hypochondriasis entail, there are 2 major ambiguities: (1) the use of the term "somatic symptoms" reflects an ill-defined concept of somatization and (2) abnormal illness behavior is included in all diagnostic rubrics, but it is never conceptually defined. In the present review of the literature, we will attempt to approach the clinical issue from a different angle, by introducing the trans-diagnostic viewpoint of illness behavior and propose an alternative clinimetric classification system, based on the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research.

  4. The structure and correlates of self-reported DSM-5 maladaptive personality traits: findings from two German-speaking samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Johannes; Altenstein, David; Krieger, Tobias; Holtforth, Martin Grosse; Pretsch, Johanna; Alexopoulos, Johanna; Spitzer, Carsten; Benecke, Cord; Krueger, Robert F; Markon, Kristian E; Leising, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    The authors investigated the structure and correlates of DSM-5 maladaptive personality traits in two samples of 577 students and 212 inpatients using the German self-report form of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5. They found that (a) the factor structure of DSM-5 trait facets is largely in line with the proposed trait domains of Negative Affectivity, Detachment, Antagonism, Disinhibition, and Psychoticism; (b) all DSM-5 trait domains except Psychoticism are highly related to the respective domains of the Five-Factor Model of personality; (c) the trait facets are positively associated with a self-report measure of general personality dysfunction; and (d) the DSM-5 trait facets show differential associations with a range of self-reported DSM-IV Axis I disorders. These findings give further support to the new DSM-5 trait model and suggest that it may generalize to other languages and cultures.

  5. The cost and performance of utility commercial lighting programs. A report from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, J.; Vine, E.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.; Payne, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) is to document the measured cost and performance of utility-sponsored, energy-efficiency, demand-side management (DSM) programs. Consistent documentation of DSM programs is a challenging goal because of problems with data consistency, evaluation methodologies, and data reporting formats that continue to limit the usefulness and comparability of individual program results. This first DEEP report investigates the results of 20 recent commercial lighting DSM programs. The report, unlike previous reports of its kind, compares the DSM definitions and methodologies that each utility uses to compute costs and energy savings and then makes adjustments to standardize reported program results. All 20 programs were judged cost-effective when compared to avoided costs in their local areas. At an average cost of 3.9{cents}/kWh, however, utility-sponsored energy efficiency programs are not ``too cheap to meter.`` While it is generally agreed upon that utilities must take active measures to minimize the costs and rate impacts of DSM programs, the authors believe that these activities will be facilitated by industry adoption of standard definitions and reporting formats, so that the best program designs can be readily identified and adopted.

  6. DSM-5: ¿SÍNDROME DE PSICOSIS ATENUADA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome psicótico aglutina un conjunto de trastornos mentales devastadores que se caracterizan por una ruptura de las funciones mentales superiores. Los signos y síntomas de psicosis comienzan en la adolescencia o temprana adultez y suelen tener un inicio gradual y progresivo en el tiempo. El Síndrome de psicosis atenuada es una nueva propuesta diagnóstica del DSM-V que trata de identificar a personas con un estado mental de alto riesgo (EMAR que pueda ser predictor de transición a la psicosis. El beneficio potencial sería que si el trastorno psicótico es tratado con más eficacia en sus fases iniciales se podría producir un efecto beneficioso duradero que probablemente no se alcanzaría con intervenciones más tardías. Dicho síndrome ha generado un intenso debate en los foros científicos y profesionales especializados, esgrimiéndose argumentos a favor y en contra de su inclusión. La evaluación de los EMARs se realiza preferentemente en población de adolescentes o adultos jóvenes. La evolución de los EMARs se asocia a una mayor tasa de transición hacia psicosis no afectivas, si bien puede evolucionar hacia otro trastorno mental, mantenerse estable o remitir con el tiempo. La evidencia empírica indica que una intervención temprana parece tener un cierto efecto beneficioso, aunque los resultados son por el momento insuficientes y contradictorios. La falta de especificidad de los síntomas en la predicción de la psicosis, la presencia de ciertas limitaciones (p. ej., estigmatización, los resultados encontrados en las intervenciones tempranas y la falta de evidencia empírica, han llevado a incluir el Síndrome de psicosis atenuada en el apéndice III del DSM-V. A la luz de los hallazgos encontrados se comentan los principales beneficios y limitaciones de la inclusión de esta supuesta categoría, las posibles lecciones aprendidas de este tipo de estudios así como futuras líneas de actuación.

  7. California renewable energy policy and implementation issues: An overview of recent regulatory and legislative action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.; Goldman, C.

    1996-09-01

    This paper has three primary goals: (1) to provide a brief account of recent events in California renewables policy; (2) to outline the California State Legislature`s ultimate decision on renewable energy policy; and (3) to aid other states in their efforts with renewables policy by summarizing some of the key implementation issues and political conflicts that may occur when crafting some of the potential threats and opportunities that electricity restructuring presents to the development of renewable energy. We then outline the renewables policy debate in California since the California Public Utility Commission`s ``Blue Book``, including both regulatory and legislative developments. We also provide some insight into the minimum renewables purchase requirement (MRPR) versus surcharge-based renewables policy debate in California. Finally, we identify and discuss key renewables policy implementation issues that have driven the dialogue and recent decisions in California`s renewables policy.

  8. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the DSM-5: Controversy, Change, and Conceptual Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushka Pai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder PTSD have changed considerably with the newest edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5. Changes to the diagnostic criteria from the DSM-IV to DSM-5 include: the relocation of PTSD from the anxiety disorders category to a new diagnostic category named “Trauma and Stressor-related Disorders”, the elimination of the subjective component to the definition of trauma, the explication and tightening of the definitions of trauma and exposure to it, the increase and rearrangement of the symptoms criteria, and changes in additional criteria and specifiers. This article will explore the nosology of the current diagnosis of PTSD by reviewing the changes made to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD in the DSM-5 and discuss how these changes influence the conceptualization of PTSD.

  9. DSM-IV Diagnoses and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children Before and 1 Year after Adenotonsillectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, James E.; Blunden, Sarah; Ruzicka, Deborah L.; Guire, Kenneth E.; Champine, Donna; Weatherly, Robert A.; Hodges, Elise K.; Giordani, Bruno J.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    DSM-IV criteria-based psychiatric diagnoses done in children before and one year after adenotonsillectomy are assessed to record any improvement in behavior. It is found that surgery might be associated with reduced behavioral morbidity.

  10. Design Structure Matrix (DSM) Methods and Applications for Naval Ship Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    publication) • Continued DSM research projects pertaining to software architecture and project management applications (see below for related...ESSENCIAL EM PROJETOS DE LARGA ESCALA Entrevista com Dr. Mike Jackson - Professor Emerito da Universidade de Hull (Reino Unido) Tackling Project

  11. VT Lidar nDSM (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM)....

  12. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2010 - East Franklin/West Orleans

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Upper 2010 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  13. Common and unique factors associated with DSM-IV-TR internalizing disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Smith, Rita L; Chorpita, Bruce F; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2008-11-01

    With the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders DSM-IV Fourth Edition-Text Revision. Author, Washington, DC. 2000) ahead, decisions will be made about the future of taxonomic conceptualizations. This study examined the factor structure of items from three internalizing disorders (Social Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Depression) on the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV-Child Version (Silverman, W. K., & Albano, A. M. Anxiety disorders interview schedule for children for DSM-IV, child and parent versions. Psychological Corporation, San Antonio, 1996). Two-, three-, and four-factor models emerged in an exploratory factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis provided additional empirical support for the four-factor model over the two- or three-factor models. Implications for the structure of the DSM-V taxonomy in children and adolescents are discussed.

  14. The structure of DSM-IV-TR personality disorder diagnoses in NESARC: a reanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Timothy J; Vergés, Alvaro; Wood, Phillip K; Sher, Kenneth J

    2013-12-01

    Cox, Clara, Worobec, and Grant (2012) recently presented results from a series of analyses aimed at identifying the factor structure underlying the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2000) personality diagnoses assessed in the large NESARC study. Cox et al. (2012) concluded that the best fitting model was one that modeled three lower-order factors (the three clusters of PDs as outlined by DSM-IV-TR), which in turn loaded on a single PD higher-order factor. Our reanalyses of the NESARC Wave 1 and Wave 2 data for personality disorder diagnoses revealed that the best fitting model was that of a general PD factor that spans each of the ten DSM-IV PD diagnoses, and our reanalyses do not support the three-cluster hierarchical structure outlined by Cox et al. (2012) and DSM-IV-TR. Finally, we note the importance of modeling the Wave 2 assessment method factor in analyses of NESARC PD data.

  15. The DSM-5 dimensional trait model and five-factor models of general personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Whitney L; Widiger, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    The current study tests empirically the relationship of the dimensional trait model proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) with five-factor models of general personality. The DSM-5 maladaptive trait dimensional model proposal included 25 traits organized within five broad domains (i.e., negative affectivity, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, and psychoticism). Consistent with the authors of the proposal, it was predicted that negative affectivity would align with five-factor model (FFM) neuroticism, detachment with FFM introversion, antagonism with FFM antagonism, disinhibition with low FFM conscientiousness and, contrary to the proposal; psychoticism would align with FFM openness. Three measures of alternative five-factor models of general personality were administered to 445 undergraduates along with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5. The results provided support for the hypothesis that all five domains of the DSM-5 dimensional trait model are maladaptive variants of general personality structure, including the domain of psychoticism.

  16. How Do DSM-5 Personality Traits Align With Schema Therapy Constructs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Lee, Christopher; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2015-01-01

    DSM-5 offers an alternative model of personality pathology that includes 25 traits. Although personality disorders are mostly treated with psychotherapy, the correspondence between DSM-5 traits and concepts in evidence-based psychotherapy has not yet been evaluated adequately. Suitably, schema...... therapy was developed for treating personality disorders, and it has achieved promising evidence. The authors examined associations between DSM-5 traits and schema therapy constructs in a mixed sample of 662 adults, including 312 clinical participants. Associations were investigated in terms of factor...... loadings and regression coefficients in relation to five domains, followed by specific correlations among all constructs. The results indicated conceptually coherent associations, and 15 of 25 traits were strongly related to relevant schema therapy constructs. Conclusively, DSM-5 traits may be considered...

  17. Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Cannabis Abuse and Dependence Criteria in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christie A.; Gelhorn, Heather; Crowley, Thomas J.; Sakai, Joseph T.; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan E.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.

    2008-01-01

    A study to examine the DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse and dependence among adolescents is conducted. Results conclude that abuse and dependence criteria were not found to affect the different levels of severity in cannabis use.

  18. A history of anxiety: from Hippocrates to DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2015-09-01

    This article describes the history of the nosology of anxiety disorders. Greek and Latin physicians and philosophers distinguished anxiety from other types of negative affect, and identified it as a medical disorder. Ancient Epicurean and Stoic philosophers suggested techniques to reach an anxiety-free state of mind that are reminiscent of modern cognitive psychology. Between classical antiquity and the late 19(th) century there was a long interval during which anxiety was not classified as a separate illness. However, typical cases of anxiety disorders kept being reported, even if under different names. In the 17(th) century, Robert Burton described anxiety in The Anatomy of Melancholy. Panic attacks and generalized anxiety disorder may be recognized in the "panophobias" in the nosology published by Boissier de Sauvages in the 18(th) century. Also, anxiety symptoms were an important component of new disease constructs, culminating in neurasthenia in the 19(th) century. Emil Kraepelin devoted much attention to the possible presence of severe anxiety in manic-depressive illness, thereby anticipating the "anxious distress" specifier of bipolar disorders in DSM-5. A pitfall to consider is that the meaning of common medical terms, such as melancholia, evolves according to places and epochs.

  19. Multi-image matching for DSM generation from IKONOS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Gruen, Armin

    High-resolution satellite images at sub-5-m footprint, such as IKONOS and SPOT5 HRG/HRS images, are becoming increasingly available to the earth observation community and their respective clients. The related cameras all use linear array CCD technology for image sensing. The processing of these kinds of images provides a challenge for algorithmic redesign and this offers the possibility of reconsidering and improving many photogrammetric processing components. This contribution presents an advanced matching approach for automatic DSM generation from high-resolution satellite images. It can provide dense, precise and reliable results. The method matches multiple (more than two) images simultaneously and it uses a coarse-to-fine hierarchical solution with an effective combination of several image matching algorithms and automatic quality control. The DSMs are generated by a combination of matching results of feature points, grid points and edges. The proposed approach has been applied to IKONOS images over a testfield in Thun, Switzerland with accurate ground control points, a 1600-m height range and variable land cover, but with sub-optimal imaging conditions (snow, long shadows). The accuracy tests are based on the comparison between the reference data from an airborne laser scanner and the automatically extracted DSMs. The RMS errors for the whole area, excluding trees and bushes, are 2-3 m, while for bare ground the accuracy is about 1 m or even better.

  20. Hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 under intense irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krujatz, Felix; Härtel, Paul; Helbig, Karsten; Haufe, Nora; Thierfelder, Simone; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal hydrogen production conditions using growing cultures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 the effects of varying the reactor's volumetric power input (0.01-1.4kWm(-3)) and irradiation intensity (5-2500Wm(-2)) were investigated in batch and continuous production modes. Irradiation intensity had a greater effect on hydrogen production than volumetric power input. Hydrogen production and photofermentative biomass formation were maximized by irradiation at 2250Wm(-2) with a volumetric power input of 0.55kWm(-3). The bacterial dry weight (2.64gL(-1)) and rate of hydrogen production (195mLL(-1)h(-1)) achieved under these conditions were greater than any that have previously been reported for batch-mode hydrogen production by R. sphaeroides. Continuous mode experiments (D=0.1h(-1)) yielded a bacterial dry weight, hydrogen production rate, productivity and hydrogen yield of 2.35±0.18gL(-1), 165±6.2mLL(-1)h(-1), 3.96LL(-1)d(-1) and 36.6%, respectively.

  1. Knowledge assisted diagnosis of mood disorders using DSM-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an Expert Systems class at the University of Houston Clear Lake, a system has been developed using CLIPS to allow a clinical psychologist or psychiatrist to diagnose mood disturbances by providing answers to questions corresponding to branches of a DSM-III criteria tree. Experienced clinicians may assert indications of the client's behavior in order to circumvent multiple levels of the tree, thus speeding diagnosis. An explanation facility was developed for validation of the diagnosis . It also allows for 'what if' scenarios by allowing the clinician to move backwards from the diagnosis to any decision branch and alter the answer previously provided. The system was implemented with a limited vocabulary of symptoms associated primarily with depressive disorders. However, the design supports the addition of vocabulary modules and knowledge bases for other types of disorders. The system currently has applicability in an instructional setting. With the addition of a more complete vocabulary, it could have applicability in a clinical setting. The overall design will support any application where determinations are made via a decision tree.

  2. Road Network Extraction from Dsm by Mathematical Morphology and Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Jianliang; Zhu, Lin; Tachibana, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is the automatic extraction of the road network in a scene of the urban area from a high resolution digital surface model (DSM). Automatic road extraction and modeling from remote sensed data has been studied for more than one decade. The methods vary greatly due to the differences of data types, regions, resolutions et al. An advanced automatic road network extraction scheme is proposed to address the issues of tedium steps on segmentation, recognition and grouping. It is on the basis of a geometric road model which describes a multiple-level structure. The 0-dimension element is intersection. The 1-dimension elements are central line and side. The 2-dimension element is plane, which is generated from the 1-dimension elements. The key feature of the presented approach is the cross validation for the three road elements which goes through the entire procedure of their extraction. The advantage of our model and method is that linear elements of the road can be derived directly, without any complex, non-robust connection hypothesis. An example of Japanese scene is presented to display the procedure and the performance of the approach.

  3. Multiattribute Utility Theory without Expected Utility Foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Stiggelbout; P.P. Wakker

    1995-01-01

    Methods for determining the form of utilities are needed for the implementation of utility theory in specific decisions. An important step forward was achieved when utility theorists characterized useful parametric families of utilities, and simplifying decompositions of multiattribute utilities. Th

  4. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenson, P.; Greene, B.; Kahn, E.; Krieg, B.; Lasater, I.; Ritschard, R.; Ruderman, H.; Sathaye, J.; Sextro, R.; Siri, W.; Vincent, L.

    1977-06-01

    At the end of the driest year on record, California faces water shortages whose impacts will be felt with progressive severity through the summer and fall of 1977. Electric power is not entirely exempt from these impacts and could, if severly affected, compound the direct distresses of the drought. Each of the major California electric utility companies has forecasted the short-term effects on electricity supply and demand in its service area. The study reported here undertook an independent analysis to provide a statewide assessment of impacts and remedial actions and to develop additional analytical tools and data for these purposes. The study examined various aspects of the drought as it relates to electricity supply and demand, reliability of supply to meet summer peak loads, the efficacy of conservation measures, and probable increases in power plant emissions and cost of generating electricity. The results of the study, based in part on the 1977 electricity supply and demand projections submitted by the four utilities to the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (CERCDC), support the utilities' conclusions that the three southern California utilities have sufficient reserve capacity and fuel to meet their own needs and to assist PG and E in meeting its load demand with little loss of reliability. However, to achieve this the utilities in their submissions have had to assume: 1) full coordination among the utilities; and 2) no air pollution limitations on electricity generation in the South Coast Air Basin. 32 references.

  5. The relation between the patient health questionnaire-15 and DSM somatic diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Cheng Liao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15 in Taiwan, and to explore its relation to somatoform disorders (DSM-IV and to somatic symptom and related disorders (DSM-5. Methods We recruited 471 individuals, 151 with somatoform disorders and 200 with somatic symptom and related disorders. Subjects completed the Chinese version of the PHQ-15, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and received a DSM-IV- and DSM-5-based diagnostic interview. We performed exploratory factor analysis and assessed test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and correlation with BDI-II/BAI to confirm reliability and validity, and carried out ROC curve analysis to determine suitability for evaluation or screening purposes. PHQ-15 scores were compared between patients with various DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses (such as DSM-IV somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other anxiety/depressive disorders or no DSM-IV diagnosis and patients with DSM-5 somatic symptom and related disorders or no DSM-5 diagnosis. Results The Chinese version identified cardiopulmonary, pain-fatigue, and gastrointestinal as major factors and had good reliability (0.803–0.930, internal consistency (0.637–0.861, and correlation coefficients with BDI-II/BAI (0.407–0.619, 0.536–0.721, respectively. The PHQ-15 scores were similar in patients with somatoform disorders and patients with panic disorder; higher in patients with somatoform disorders and panic disorder than in patients with other anxiety/depressive disorders; and significantly higher in patients with somatic symptom and related disorders than in patients without this diagnosis. The AUC of the PHQ-15 was 0.678 (cutoff 6/7 for screening somatoform disorders (DSM-IV and 0.725 (cutoff 4/5 for screening somatic symptom and related disorders (DSM-5. Conclusions The Chinese version of the PHQ-15 is suitable for

  6. Characterization of Microbulbifer strain CMC-5, a new biochemical variant of Microbulbifer elongatus type strain DSM6810T isolated from decomposing seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnadula, RaviChand; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ghadi, Sanjeev C

    2009-12-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore forming, non-motile and moderate halophilic bacteria designated as strain CMC-5 was isolated from decomposing seaweeds by enrichment culture. The growth of strain CMC-5 was assessed in synthetic seawater-based medium containing polysaccharide. The bacterium degraded and utilized agar, alginate, carrageenan, xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose and chitin. The strain was characterized using a polyphasic approach for taxonomic identification. Cellular fatty acid analysis showed the presence of iso-C(15:0) as major fatty acid and significant amounts of iso-C(17:1x9c) and C(18:1x7c). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence indicated that strain CMC-5 is phylogenetically related to Microbulbifer genus and 99% similar to type strain Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T. However in contrast to Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T, strain CMC-5 is non-motile, utilizes glucose, galactose, inositol and xylan, does not utilize fructose and succinate nor does it produce H2S. Further growth of bacterial strain CMC-5 was observed when inoculated in seawater-based medium containing sterile pieces of Gracilaria corticata thalli. The bacterial growth was associated with release of reducing sugar in the broth suggesting its role in carbon recycling of polysaccharides from seaweeds in marine ecosystem.

  7. 建筑物边界约束的航空影像 DSM 优化%Optimization of Aerial DSM with Building Boundary Constraint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵翠晓; 陈曦; 杨辽; 秦修功; 段永超

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem that building boundary of DSM interpolated from points cloud generated by dense matching of aerial images was indistinct,this paper proposed a new method with the nestification between vectorial boundary based on depth-image of DSM and D-triangulation of DEM to generate Building DSM(BDSM).Depth-image of experimental area DSM was built through point by point interpolation of DSM.Building boundary in it was extracted by edge detector in field of computer vision.Then nest it into constrained D-triangulation of DEM as hard edge.Finally,combine building with DEM D-triangulation and get a building DSM with clear boundary.Experimental results show that there is no loss of accuracy comparing with before and after optimization in terms of height and plain information.%针对航空影像密集匹配生成点云数据边界模糊的问题,提出了一种基于 DSM 灰度影像矢量边界与DEM 无约束 D-三角网嵌套生成具有精确边界的建筑物表面模型的方法。通过逐点内插法建立实验区点云数据的 DSM 深度影像图;根据计算机视觉中的边缘检测算子,提取深度影像中建筑物的准确边界;建立 DEM 的无约束 D-三角网,将准确建筑物边界作为硬边界嵌入三角网中,最终将建筑物三角网和地面点三角网拼合,生成“纯净”建筑物表面模型。实验结果表明,优化后的建筑物高度和平面信息无精度损失,该方法有较强实用性。

  8. DSM-V: modifying the postpartum-onset specifier to include hypomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Verinder; Burt, Vivien K

    2011-02-01

    By failing to include it under the rubric of the postpartum-onset specifier, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR has ignored the clinical reality that childbirth is a potent trigger of hypomania. Given the serious and occasionally tragic consequences of misdiagnosis of bipolar II depression as unipolar depression in the postpartum period, it is argued that DSM-V should consider modifying the postpartum-onset specifier to include episodes of hypomania.

  9. DSM-V: modifying the postpartum-onset specifier to include hypomania

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Verinder; Burt, Vivien K.

    2011-01-01

    By failing to include it under the rubric of the postpartum-onset specifier, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR has ignored the clinical reality that childbirth is a potent trigger of hypomania. Given the serious and occasionally tragic consequences of misdiagnosis of bipolar II depression as unipolar depression in the postpartum period, it is argued that DSM-V should consider modifying the postpartum-onset specifier to include episodes of hypomania.

  10. Transition from Pervasive Developmental Disorders to Autism Spectrum Disorder: Proposed Changes for the Upcoming DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Tortamis Ozkaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American Psychiatry Assosiation has scheduled to release The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5 in May 2013. According to the main changes being proposed about autism, there will be one unified Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosis in the DSM-5 classification. This unified diagnosis will eliminate the distinct diagnostic categories under Pervasive Developmental Disorders in the DSM-IV-TR, namely autistic disorder, asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified, and childhood disintegrative disorder. Rett syndrome will be excluded from autism spectrum disorder due to its genetic basis. In addition, severity of symptoms will be measured among individuals with autism spectrum disorder based on the support level required due to the impairment in their lives. The basic rationale behind this revision is that it is better to conceptualize autism as a spectrum including various individuals whose symptoms in different developmental areas range from mild to severe. It is aimed to increase the specificity of autism diagnosis by using one single diagnostic category with its specified severity rather than differentiating several subtypes. The major concern raised over the DSM-5 proposal has been the possibility that some of the individuals who were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder according to the DSM-IV-TR might not get a diagnosis in this new system. After the DSM-5 is released, clinical, legal, and educational rearrengements regarding the use of new autism spectrum disorder diagnostic criteria are expected to accelerate worldwide and in Turkey. This paper aims to review briefly the upcoming autism spectrum disorder diagnosis planned to appear in the DSM-5, the rationale of the proposed revision, main critics to the DSM-5 draft that has been publicized, and some of the regulations expected to occur in practice after the changes.

  11. 10 Aspects of the Big Five in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5

    OpenAIRE

    Colin G DeYoung; Carey, Bridget E.; Krueger, Robert F; Ross, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    DSM-5 includes a dimensional model of personality pathology, operationalized in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), with 25 facets grouped into five higher-order factors resembling the Big Five personality dimensions. The present study tested how well these 25 facets could be integrated with the 10-factor structure of traits within the Big Five that is operationalized by the Big Five Aspect Scales (BFAS). In two healthy adult samples, 10-factor solutions largely confirmed our hypothe...

  12. The relationship between the Five-Factor Model and latent DSM-IV personality disorder dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Nestadt, Gerald; Costa, Paul T.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Samuels, Jack; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Eaton, William W.

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the latent structure of the DSM-IV personality disorders to the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of general personality dimensions. The subjects in the study were 742 community-residing individuals who participated in the Hopkins Epidemiology of Personality Disorder Study. DSM-IV personality disorder traits were assessed by psychologists using the International Personality Disorder Examination, and personality disorder dimensions were derived previously using dichotomous factor ana...

  13. Evaluation of diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for diagnosis of internet addiction disorder

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: The latest version of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorder (DSM-IV-TR), classified internet addiction disorder under "impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified". This study evaluates diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for diagnosis of IAD correspondence with Iranian society and culture.Materials and Method: This is a descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional research. For these purpose 400 students of Isfahan universities were entered into the study. Sampli...

  14. California Harpoon Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vessel logbook and landings data from harpoon vessels that fish within 200 miles of the California coast, from 1974 to present. The harpoon...

  15. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  16. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  17. California Data Exchange Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make July &28;Water Smart Month.&29; &28;Conserving ... Remote sensors today indicate that statewide, snowpack water content is 54 percent of ... California ranked first, along with Texas, on ...

  18. University of Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The focus of the University of Southern California (USC) Children''s Environmental Health Center is to develop a better understanding of how host susceptibility and...

  19. Earthquakes in Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There have been many earthquake occurrences in Southern California. This set of slides shows earthquake damage from the following events: Imperial Valley, 1979,...

  20. California Watershed Hydrologic Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is intended to be used as a tool for water-resource management and planning activities, particularly for site-specific and localized studies requiring a...

  1. Queer diagnoses revisited: The past and future of homosexuality and gender diagnoses in DSM and ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) recently completed a several year process of revising the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). During that time, there were objections raised to retaining DSM's gender identity disorder diagnoses and calls to remove them, just as homosexuality had been removed from DSM-II in 1973. At the conclusion of the DSM-5 revision process, the gender diagnoses were retained, albeit in altered form and bearing the new name of 'gender dysphoria'. The author of this paper was a member of the DSM-5 Workgroup on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders and presently serves on the WHO Working Group on Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health. Both groups faced similar tasks: reconciling patients' needs for access to care with the stigma of being given a psychiatric diagnosis. The differing nature of the two diagnostic manuals led to two different outcomes. As background, this paper updates the history of homosexuality and the gender diagnoses in the DSM and in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) as well as what is expected to happen to the homosexuality and gender diagnoses following the current ICD-11 revision process.

  2. Should OCD be classified as an anxiety disorder in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Fineberg, Naomi A; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Denys, Damiaan; Lochner, Christine; Nestadt, Gerald; Leckman, James F; Rauch, Scott L; Phillips, Katharine A

    2010-06-01

    In DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was classified as an anxiety disorder. In ICD-10, OCD is classified separately from the anxiety disorders, although within the same larger category as anxiety disorders (as one of the "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders"). Ongoing advances in our understanding of OCD and other anxiety disorders have raised the question of whether OCD should continue to be classified with the anxiety disorders in DSM-V. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. Evidence is reviewed for retaining OCD in the category of anxiety disorders, and for moving OCD to a separate category of obsessive-compulsive (OC)-spectrum disorders, if such a category is included in DSM-V. Our preliminary recommendation is that OCD be retained in the category of anxiety disorders but that this category also includes OC-spectrum disorders along with OCD. If this change is made, the name of this category should be changed to reflect this proposed change.

  3. a New Algorithm for Void Filling in a Dsm from Stereo Satellite Images in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib Bafghi, Z.; Tian, J.; d'Angelo, P.; Reinartz, P.

    2016-06-01

    Digital Surface Models (DSM) derived from stereo-pair satellite images are the main sources for many Geo-Informatics applications like 3D change detection, object classification and recognition. However since occlusion especially in urban scenes result in some deficiencies in the stereo matching phase, these DSMs contain some voids. In order to fill the voids a range of algorithms have been proposed, mainly including interpolation alone or along with auxiliary DSM. In this paper an algorithm for void filling in DSM from stereo satellite images has been developed. Unlike common previous approaches we didn't use any external DSM to fill the voids. Our proposed algorithm uses only the original images and the unfilled DSM itself. First a neighborhood around every void in the unfilled DSM and its corresponding area in multispectral image is defined. Then it is analysed to extract both spectral and geometric texture and accordingly to assign labels to each cell in the voids. This step contains three phases comprising shadow detection, height thresholding and image segmentation. Thus every cell in void has a label and is filled by the median value of its co-labelled neighbors. The results for datasets from WorldView-2 and IKONOS are shown and discussed.

  4. A NEW ALGORITHM FOR VOID FILLING IN A DSM FROM STEREO SATELLITE IMAGES IN URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gharib Bafghi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Surface Models (DSM derived from stereo-pair satellite images are the main sources for many Geo-Informatics applications like 3D change detection, object classification and recognition. However since occlusion especially in urban scenes result in some deficiencies in the stereo matching phase, these DSMs contain some voids. In order to fill the voids a range of algorithms have been proposed, mainly including interpolation alone or along with auxiliary DSM. In this paper an algorithm for void filling in DSM from stereo satellite images has been developed. Unlike common previous approaches we didn’t use any external DSM to fill the voids. Our proposed algorithm uses only the original images and the unfilled DSM itself. First a neighborhood around every void in the unfilled DSM and its corresponding area in multispectral image is defined. Then it is analysed to extract both spectral and geometric texture and accordingly to assign labels to each cell in the voids. This step contains three phases comprising shadow detection, height thresholding and image segmentation. Thus every cell in void has a label and is filled by the median value of its co-labelled neighbors. The results for datasets from WorldView-2 and IKONOS are shown and discussed.

  5. A proposal for including nomophobia in the new DSM-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragazzi NL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Luigi Bragazzi,1,2 Giovanni Del Puente21School of Public Health, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 2DINOGMI, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, Genoa, ItalyAbstract: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM is considered to be the gold standard manual for assessing the psychiatric diseases and is currently in its fourth version (DSM-IV, while a fifth (DSM-V has just been released in May 2013. The DSM-V Anxiety Work Group has put forward recommendations to modify the criteria for diagnosing specific phobias. In this manuscript, we propose to consider the inclusion of nomophobia in the DSM-V, and we make a comprehensive overview of the existing literature, discussing the clinical relevance of this pathology, its epidemiological features, the available psychometric scales, and the proposed treatment. Even though nomophobia has not been included in the DSM-V, much more attention is paid to the psychopathological effects of the new media, and the interest in this topic will increase in the near future, together with the attention and caution not to hypercodify as pathological normal behaviors.Keywords: behavioral dependence, mobile phone, social phobia, specific phobia

  6. Developmental trauma, complex PTSD, and the current proposal of DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Sar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates representation of clinical consequences of developmental psychological trauma in the current proposal of DSM-5. Despite intensive efforts by its proponents for two decades, it is not known yet if Complex PTSD will take a place in the final version of DSM-5. Recognition of dissociative character of several symptom dimensions and introduction of items about negative affects such as shame and guilt imply an indirect improvement toward better coverage of the consequences of developmental trauma in the existing category of PTSD. As disorders with highest prevalence of chronic traumatization in early years of life, dissociative disorders and personality disorder of borderline type are maintained as DSM-5 categories; however, recognition of a separate type of trauma-related personality disorder is unlikely. While a preschooler age variant of PTSD is under consideration, the proposed diagnosis of Developmental Trauma Disorder (child version of Complex PTSD has not secured a place in the DSM-5 yet. We welcome considerations of subsuming Adjustment Disorders, Acute Stress Disorder, PTSD, and Dissociative Disorders under one rubric, i.e., Section of Trauma, Stress, or Event Related Disorders. Given the current conceptualization of DSM-5, this paper proposes Complex PTSD to be a subtype of the DSM-5 PTSD. Composition of a trauma-related disorders section would facilitate integration of knowledge and expertise about interrelated and overlapping consequences of trauma.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online

  7. Measures of Narcissism and Their Relations to DSM-5 Pathological Traits: A Critical Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua D; Lynam, Donald R; Campbell, W Keith

    2016-02-01

    There exists substantial debate about how to best assess pathological narcissism with a variety of measures designed to assess grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, as well as the DSM-IV and DSM-5 based conceptualizations of narcissistic personality disorder (NPD). Wright and colleagues published correlations between several narcissism measures (Narcissistic Personality Inventory [NPI]; Pathological Narcissism Inventory [PNI]; Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire [PDQ] NPD) with the traits comprising the DSM-5 Section III personality trait model. In the current study, we examine the agreement manifested by Wright and colleagues' narcissism-DSM-5 trait profiles with expert ratings of the DSM-5 traits most relevant to descriptions of DSM-IV NPD. Despite concerns regarding the NPI's ability to measure pathological narcissism, its trait profile was strongly correlated with expert ratings, as was PDQ NPD's profile. Conversely, the trait profiles associated with the PNI were primarily uncorrelated with the expert rated NPD profile. The implications of these findings with regard to the assessment of narcissism are discussed.

  8. Impulsivity-related traits and their relation to DSM-5 section II and III personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Difficulties with impulse control are considered a core feature of personality disorders (PDs) as assessed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th edition [DSM-5]; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Despite this, there has been relatively little examination of the manner in which DSM-5 PDs are characterized by multidimensional models of impulsivity that parse this broad umbrella construct into smaller, more unidimensional constructs. Using the UPPS model and measure of impulsivity (Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), the relations between 4 impulsivity-related traits and interview-rated scores on both DSM-5 Section II and III PDs and PD traits were examined in a community sample of individuals currently receiving psychological or psychiatric care (N = 106). As expected, the UPPS traits manifested correlations with the new Section III trait model that were generally consistent with the assertion that this new DSM-5 trait model reflects a pathological variant of the Five-Factor Model (FFM; e.g., UPPS traits associated with FFM conscientiousness were most strongly related to DSM-5 disinhibition traits). Overall, the UPPS traits accounted best for variance in DSM-5 Section II and III Cluster B PDs, consistent with these PDs being characterized, in part, by emotionally and cognitively based forms of impulsivity.

  9. Permanent draft genome sequence of Desulfurococcus mobilis type strain DSM 2161, a thermoacidophilic sulfur-reducing crenarchaeon isolated from acidic hot springs of Hveravellir, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, Dwi; Johnson, Eric F; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Reddy, T B K; Pilay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia N; Markowitz, Victor M; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the permanent draft genome sequence of Desulfurococcus mobilis type strain DSM 2161, an obligate anaerobic hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon that was isolated from acidic hot springs in Hveravellir, Iceland. D. mobilis utilizes peptides as carbon and energy sources and reduces elemental sulfur to H2S. A metabolic construction derived from the draft genome identified putative pathways for peptide degradation and sulfur respiration in this archaeon. Existence of several hydrogenase genes in the genome supported previous findings that H2 is produced during the growth of D. mobilis in the absence of sulfur. Interestingly, genes encoding glucose transport and utilization systems also exist in the D. mobilis genome though this archaeon does not utilize carbohydrate for growth. The draft genome of D. mobilis provides an additional mean for comparative genomic analysis of desulfurococci. In addition, our analysis on the Average Nucleotide Identity between D. mobilis and Desulfurococcus mucosus suggested that these two desulfurococci are two different strains of the same species.

  10. Seventy years autism:from Kanner to DSM-V%孤独症70年:从Kanner到DSM-V

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文雄

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for autism was revised in the 5th edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-Ⅴ) in 2013. This year also marks the 70th anniversary of psychiatrist Leo Kanner’s ifrst clinical description of autism. The great changes in the diagnostic criteria within the 70 years relfect the challenge and dififculty of the diagnostics of autism. In DSM-Ⅴ, autism spectrum disorder is under the category of neurodevelopmental disorder, with the cancellation of the deifnition of pervasive developmental disorder;“persistent impairment in social communication and social interaction”plus“restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior”;the symptoms have to be present in the early development period. Compared with DSM-Ⅳ, DSM-Ⅴis justiifed to remove the“discrete”sub-categories including autistic disorder, Asperger disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified in DSM-Ⅳ, and the deleted ones are absorbed into a single category, autism spectrum disorder;the numbers of general items of diagnostic criteria are reduced to 7, while the number of minimal items for diagnostics are decreased to 5. The concept of DSM-Ⅴdeifning autism spectrum disorder as a single category will profoundly result in changes of prevalence, diagnostics, intervention, prognosis, and other related regions of autism.%2013年美国精神疾病诊断标准(DSM-V)的孤独症诊断标准再次修订,同时今年也是Kanner首次临床描述孤独症的70周年。70年来孤独症诊断标准的变迁折射出孤独症诊断的困难性与挑战性。最新修订的DSM-Ⅴ将孤独症谱系障碍(Autism spectrum disorder)归到神经发育障碍(Nuerodevelopmental disorders)范畴,取消广泛性发育障碍概念;强调其具有持续的社会沟通及社会交往缺失,以及限制性的、重复的行为模式;症候必须发生在早期发育时期。相比DSM-Ⅳ,DSM-

  11. California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

  12. Dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptoms: support for a hybrid Anhedonia and Externalizing Behaviors model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Tsai, Jack; Durham, Tory A; Charak, Ruby; Biehn, Tracey L; Elhai, Jon D; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Several revisions to the symptom clusters of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been made in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Central to the focus of this study was the revision of PTSD's tripartite structure in DSM-IV into four symptom clusters in DSM-5. Emerging confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies have suggested that DSM-5 PTSD symptoms may be best represented by one of two 6-factor models: (1) an Externalizing Behaviors model characterized by a factor which combines the irritability/anger and self-destructive/reckless behavior items; and (2) an Anhedonia model characterized by items of loss of interest, detachment, and restricted affect. The current study conducted CFAs of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms assessed using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) in two independent and diverse trauma-exposed samples of a nationally representative sample of 1484 U.S. veterans and a sample of 497 Midwestern U.S. university undergraduate students. Relative fits of the DSM-5 model, the DSM-5 Dysphoria model, the DSM-5 Dysphoric Arousal model, the two 6-factor models, and a newly proposed 7-factor Hybrid model, which consolidates the two 6-factor models, were evaluated. Results revealed that, in both samples, both 6-factor models provided significantly better fit than the 4-factor DSM-5 model, the DSM-5 Dysphoria model and the DSM-5 Dysphoric Arousal model. Further, the 7-factor Hybrid model, which incorporates key features of both 6-factor models and is comprised of re-experiencing, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, and anxious and dysphoric arousal symptom clusters, provided superior fit to the data in both samples. Results are discussed in light of theoretical and empirical support for the latent structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms.

  13. Dsm Extraction and Evaluation from GEOEYE-1 Stereo Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, M. M.; Aguilar, M. A.; Aguilar, F. J.; Fernández, I.

    2012-07-01

    The newest very high resolution (VHR) commercial satellites, such as GeoEye-1 or WorldView-2, open new possibilities for cartographic applications, orthoimages generation and extraction of Digital Surface Models (DSMs). These DSMs are generated by image matching strategies from VHR satellite stereopairs imagery, reconstructing the 3D surface corresponding to the first surface view of the earth containing both microrelief (buildings, trees and so on) and bare terrain. The main aim of this work is to carry out an accuracy assessment test on the DSMs extracted from a GeoEye-1 stereopair captured in August 2011. A LiDAR derived DSM taken at the same month that the satellite imagery was used as ground truth. The influence of factors such as number of Ground Control Points (GCPs), sensor models tested and the geoid employed to transform the ellipsoid to orthometric heights were going to be evaluated. In this way, different sets of GCPs ranging from 7 to 45, two sensor models and two geoids (EGM96 and EGM08, the last adapted for Spain vertical network by the Spanish's National Geographic Institute) were tested in this work. The photogrammetric software package used was OrthoEngine from PCI Geomatica v. 10.3.2. OrthoEngine implements both sensor models tested: (i) the physical model developed by Toutin (CCRS) and, (ii) the rational function model using rational polynomial coefficients supplied by the vendor and later refined by means of the zero order linear functions (RPC0). When high accurate and well-distributed GCPs were used, the planimetric and vertical accuracies of DSMs generated from the GeoEye-1 Geo stereopair were always better than 0.5 m. Using only 7 GCPs and RPC0, a vertical accuracy around 0.43 m measured as standard deviation was attained. The geoid used by OrthoEngine (EGM96) produced similar results that the EGM08 adapted for Spain vertical network.

  14. Brief Report: Interrater Reliability of Clinical Diagnosis and DSM-IV Criteria for Autistic Disorder: Results of the DSM-IV Autism Field Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klin, Ami; Lang, Jason; Cicchetti, Domenic V.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the inter-rater reliability of clinician-assigned diagnosis of autism using or not using the criteria specified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV). For experienced raters there was little difference in reliability in the two conditions. However, a clinically significant improvement in diagnostic reliability…

  15. Reliability and validity of the personality inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5): predicting DSM-IV personality disorders and psychopathy in community-dwelling Italian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Andrea; Krueger, Robert F; Markon, Kristian E; Borroni, Serena; Maffei, Cesare

    2013-12-01

    In order to assess the internal consistency, factor structure, and ability to recover DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) scales, 710 Italian adult community dwelling volunteers were administered the Italian translation of the PID-5, as well as the Italian translation of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+ (PDQ-4+). Cronbach's alpha values were >.70 for all PID-5 facet scales and greater than .90 for all PID-5 domain scales. Parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analysis supported the theoretical five-factor model of the PID-5 trait scales. Regression analyses showed that both PID-5 trait and domain scales explained a substantial amount of variance in the PDQ-4+ PD scales, with the exception of the Passive-Aggressive PD scale. When the PID-5 was administered to a second independent sample of 389 Italian adult community dwelling volunteers, the basic psychometric properties of the scale were replicated. In this second sample, the PID-5 trait and domain scales proved to be significant predictors of psychopathy measures. As a whole, the results of the present study support the hypothesis that the PID-5 is a reliable instrument which is able to recover DSM-IV PDs, as well as to capture personality pathology that is not included in the DSM-IV (namely, psychopathy).

  16. Brief Report: The Impact of Changing from DSM-IV "Asperger's" to DSM-5 "Autistic Spectrum Disorder" Diagnostic Labels on Stigma and Treatment Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohan, Jeneva L.; Ellefson, Sarah E.; Corrigan, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    In the DSM-5, "Asperger's Disorder" was incorporated into "Autistic Spectrum Disorder" (ASD). One key concern in this change has been that the ASD label will increase negative attitudes relative to the Asperger's label. To test this, we asked 465 American adults to read a vignette describing a child with autistic symptoms that…

  17. "Diagnostic shift" from eating disorder not otherwise specified to bulimia nervosa using DSM-5 criteria: a clinical comparison with DSM-IV bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Danielle E; McFarlane, Traci L; Olmsted, Marion P

    2014-01-01

    In the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the diagnostic threshold for binging and compensation in bulimia nervosa (BN) decreased from twice to once weekly for 3 months. This study investigates the validity of this change by examining whether BN patients and those whose diagnoses "shift" to BN with DSM-5 are similar in their psychological functioning. EDNOS patients whose symptoms met DSM-5 BN criteria (n=25) were compared to DSM-IV BN patients (n=146) on clinically relevant variables. No differences were found on: BMI; weight-based self-evaluation; perfectionism; depression and anxiety symptoms; or readiness for change. Differences were found on one Eating Disorder Inventory subscale (i.e., bulimia), with the BN group reporting higher scores, consistent with group definitions. These findings support the modified criteria, suggesting that psychopathology both directly and indirectly related to eating disorders is comparable between those with once weekly versus more frequent bulimic episodes.

  18. Toward DSM-V: An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Diagnostic Process for DSM-IV Alcohol Abuse and Dependence in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelhorn, Heather; Hartman, Christie; Sakai, Joseph; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan; Rhee, So Hyun; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John; Hopger, Christian; Crowley, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical interviews of approximately 5,587 adolescents revealed that DSM-IV diagnostic categories were found to be different in terms of the severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). However, a substantial inconsistency and overlap was found in severity of AUDs across categories. The need for an alternative diagnostic algorithm which considers all…

  19. DSM-5 antisocial personality disorder: predictive validity in a prison sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, John F; Kelley, Shannon E; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Skeem, Jennifer L; Douglas, Kevin S

    2015-04-01

    Symptoms of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), particularly remorselessness, are frequently introduced in legal settings as a risk factor for future violence in prison, despite a paucity of research on the predictive validity of this disorder. We examined whether an ASPD diagnosis or symptom-criteria counts could prospectively predict any form of institutional misconduct, as well as aggressive and violent infractions among newly admitted prisoners. Adult male (n = 298) and female (n = 55) offenders were recruited from 4 prison systems across the United States. At the time of study enrollment, diagnostic information was collected using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; APA, 1994) Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II; First, Gibbon, Spitzer, Williams, & Benjamin, 1997) supplemented by a detailed review of official records. Disciplinary records were obtained from inmates' respective prisons covering a 1-year period following study enrollment and misconduct was categorized hierarchically as any (general), aggressive (verbal/physical), or violent (physical). Dichotomous ASPD diagnoses and adult symptom-criteria counts did not significantly predict institutional misconduct across our 3 outcome variables, with effect sizes being close to 0 in magnitude. The symptom of remorselessness in particular showed no relation to future misconduct in prison. Childhood symptom counts of conduct disorder demonstrated modest predictive utility. Our results offer essentially no support for the claim that ASPD diagnoses can predict institutional misconduct in prison, regardless of the number of adult symptoms present. In forensic contexts, testimony that an ASPD diagnosis identifies defendants who will pose a serious threat while incarcerated in prison presently lacks any substantial scientific foundation.

  20. Are all the 18 DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria equally useful for diagnosing ADHD and predicting comorbid conduct problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Rosales, Alexandra; Vitoratou, Silia; Banaschewski, Tobias; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Oades, Robert D; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V; Chen, Wai

    2015-11-01

    In view of ICD-11 revision, we evaluate whether the 18 DSM-IV diagnostic items retained by DSM-5 could be further improved (i) in predicting ADHD 'caseness' and 'impairment' and (ii) discriminating ADHD without CD (ADHD - CD) cases from ADHD with CD (ADHD + CD) cases. In a multi-centre study sample consisting of 1497 ADHD probands and 291 unaffected subjects, 18 diagnostic items were examined for redundancy; then each item was evaluated for association with caseness, impairment and CD status using Classical Test Theory, Item-Response Theory and logistic regression methods. First, all 18 DSM-IV items contributed significantly and independently to the clinical diagnosis of ADHD. Second, not all the DSM-IV items carried equal weighting. "Often loses things", "forgetfulness" and "difficulty sustaining attention" mark severity for Inattentiveness (IA) items and "often unduly noisy", "exhibits a persistent pattern of restlessness", "leaves seat in class" and "often blurts out answers" for Hyperactivity/Impulsivity (HI) items. "Easily distracted", "inattentive to careless mistakes", "often interrupts" and "often fidgets" are associated with milder presentations. In the IA domain, "distracted" yields most information in the low-severity range of the latent trait, "careless" in the mid-severity range and "loses" in the high-severity range. In the HI domains, "interrupts" yields most information in the low-severity range and "motor" in the high-severity range. Third, all 18 items predicted impairment. Fourth, specific ADHD items are associated with ADHD + CD status. The DSM-IV diagnostic items were valid and not redundant; however, some carried more weight than others. All items were associated with impairment.

  1. DSM Nosology Changes in Neuropsychological Diagnoses through the Years: A Look at ADHD and Mild Neurocognitive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlew, Anne R.; Zartman, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the evolution of modern neuropsychology as a field and the concomitant changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Themes in neuropsychology through the years will be highlighted alongside discussion of how neuropsychologists and neuropsychological research have influenced and have been influenced by the DSM. The DSM 5 attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and mild neurocognitive disorder will be used as examples to reflect the evolution of the disorders in relation to neuropsychology and the DSM. In particular, recent criticism and research regarding the nosology of both disorders and future directions will be presented in the context of neuropsychology and DSM. Finally, influence regarding changes to the DSM 5 on neuropsychology in clinical decision making, test selection, and diagnosis will be discussed. PMID:28036066

  2. Behavior genetics of personality disorders: informing classification and conceptualization in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Susan C; DeYoung, Nathaniel J

    2013-07-01

    Personality pathology is currently captured in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual through 10 categorical personality disorder (PD) diagnoses grouped into three descriptive clusters. This classification system has been criticized by many for using discrete categories and arbitrary thresholds when making clinical decisions. To address these critiques, the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group has put forth a proposal that significantly alters the structure and content of the DSM-IV PD section. If this DSM-5 Work Group has conducted its own systematic review of the empirical literature, this review has not been released or made widely available. As such, it is up to the psychology community at large to determine how well the suggested changes align with findings from extant PD research. The current article joins this effort by addressing the contribution of behavior genetic findings to the revision process for classification of PDs in DSM-5. First, we provide a brief review of the history of PD classification in the DSM. Next, we present an overview and rationale for each of the five major suggested changes to PD diagnoses. For each suggested change, we outline the available evidence from behavior genetics and interpretations of these findings. Finally, we offer a summary of considerations for PD classification as the DSM-5 moves forward. Review of the behavior genetics literature suggests that several features of the DSM-5 proposal, including the elimination of 4 PDs, merging clinical disorders and PDs on a single axis, and the implementation of a trait rating system, require significantly greater explication before a product is finalized.

  3. The Story of California = La Historia de California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nick

    "The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into comfortable use of…

  4. The Story of California = La Historia de California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nick

    "The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into…

  5. Scientific Forum on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V)-An Invitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboraya, Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    The publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V) is anticipated in May 2013 with many new additions and changes. In this article, the author summarizes the phases of psychiatric classification from the turn of the 20th century until today. Psychiatry 2010 offers a DSM-V Scientific Forum and invites readers to submit comments, recommendations, and articles to Psychiatry 2010 and DSM-V Task Force.

  6. Scientific Forum on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V)—An Invitation

    OpenAIRE

    Aboraya, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V) is anticipated in May 2013 with many new additions and changes. In this article, the author summarizes the phases of psychiatric classification from the turn of the 20th century until today. Psychiatry 2010 offers a DSM-V Scientific Forum and invites readers to submit comments, recommendations, and articles to Psychiatry 2010 and DSM-V Task Force.

  7. Symptom severity scale of the DSM5 for schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders: diagnostic validity and clinical feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsner, Michael S; Mar, Maria; Arbitman, Marina; Grinshpoon, Alexander

    2013-06-30

    Innovations in DSM5 include dimensional diagnosis of schizophrenia (SZ) and other psychotic (OP) disorders using the symptom severity scale (SS-DSM5). We evaluated the psychometric properties and diagnostic validity of the SS-DSM5 scale using a cross-sectional design and an unselected convenience unselected sample of 314 inpatients and outpatients with SZ/OP and mood disorders who received standard care in routine clinical practice. The SS-DSM5 scale, the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale (CGI-S), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Scale (BRMS) were administered. Factor structure, reliability, internal consistency, convergent and diagnostic ability of the DSM5-SS were evaluated. Factor analysis indicated two latent factors underlying the SS-DSM5 (Psychotic and Deficit sub-scales). Cronbach's alpha was >0.70. Convergent validity of the SS-DSM5 was highly significant. Patients with SZ/PO disorders were correctly diagnosed (77.9%) using the SS-DSM5 scale (72% using PANSS). The agreement of the diagnostic decisions between the SS-DSM5 and PANSS was substantial for SZ/PO disorders (Kappa=0.75). Classifying participants with SZ/PO versus mood disorders using SS-DSM5 provided a sensitivity of 95%, and specificity of 34%. Thus, this study suggests that the SS-DSM5 has acceptable psychometric properties and that its use in clinical practice and research is feasible in clinical settings. The dimensional option for the diagnosis of schizophrenia and related disorders using SS-DSM5 is discussed.

  8. DSM disorders and their criteria: how should they inter-relate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S

    2017-04-04

    While the changes in psychiatric diagnosis introduced by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual third edition (DSM-III) have had major benefits to the field of psychiatry, the reification of its diagnostic criteria and the widespread adoption of diagnostic literalism have been problematic. I argue that, at root, these developments can be best understood by contrasting two approaches to the relationship between DSM disorders and their criteria. In a constitutive relationship, criteria definitively define the disorder. Having a disorder is nothing more than meeting the criteria. In an indexical relationship, the criteria are fallible indices of a disorder understood as a hypothetical, tentative diagnostic construct. I trace the origins of the constitutive model to the philosophical theory of operationalism. I then examine a range of historical and empirical results that favor the indexical over the constitutive position including (i) evidence that individual criteria for DSM-III were selected from a broader pool of possible symptoms/signs, (ii) revisions of DSM have implicitly assumed an indexical criteria-disorder relationship, (iii) the indexical position allows DSM criteria to be wrong and misdiagnose patients while such a result is incoherent for a constitutive model, an implausible position, (iv) we assume an indexical criteria-scale relationships for many personality and symptom measures commonly used in psychiatric practice and research, and (v) empirical studies suggesting similar performance for DSM and non-DSM symptoms for major depression. I then review four reasons for the rise of the constitutive position: (i) the 'official' nature of the DSM criteria, (ii) the strong investment psychiatry has had in the DSM manual and its widespread use and success, iii) lack of a clear pathophysiology for our disorders, and (iv) the absence of informative diagnostic signs of minimal clinical importance. I conclude that the constitutive position is premature and reflects a

  9. Using Confidence Interval to Summarize the Evaluating Results of DSM Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Weisong; TANG Zhimin; SHI Jinsong

    2000-01-01

    Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) systems have gained popular acceptance by combining the scalability and low cost of distributed system with the ease of use of single address space. Many new hardware DSM and software DSM systems have been proposed in recent years. In general, benchmarking is widely used to demonstrate the performance advantages of new systems. However, the common method used to summarize the measured results is the arithmetic mean of ratios,which is incorrect in some cases. Furthermore, many published papers list a lot of data only, and do not summarize them effectively, which confuse users greatly. In fact, many users want to get a single number as conclusion, which is not provided in old summarizing techniques. Therefore, a new data-summarizing technique based on confidence interval is proposed in this paper. The new technique includes two data-summarizing methods: (1) paired confidence interval method; (2) unpaired confidence interval method. With this new technique, it is concluded that at some confidence one system is better than others. Four examples are shown to demonstrate the advantages of this new technique. Furthermore, with the help of confidence level,it is proposed to standardize the benchmarks used for evaluating DSM systems so that a convincing result can be got. In addition, the new summarizing technique fits not only for evaluating DSM systems, but also for evaluating other systems, such as memory system and communication systems.

  10. Dural sinus malformation (DSM) in fetuses. Diagnostic value of prenatal MRI and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzoug, Valerie; Drissi, Cyrine; Adamsbaum, Catherine [Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, Service de Radiopediatrie, Paris (France); Flunker, Sabrina; Couture, Alain [Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Service de Radiopediatrie, Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Eurin, Danielle [Hopital Charles Nicolle, Service de Radiopediatrie, Rouen (France); Grange, Gilles [Hopital Cochin, Service de Gyneco-Obstetrique, Maternite Port-Royal, Paris (France); Garel, Catherine [Hopital Armand Trousseau, Service de Radiopediatrie, Paris (France); Richter, Brigitte [Hopital Clemenceau, Service de Radiopediatrie, Caen (France); Geissler, Frederic [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Radiopediatrie, Clermont Ferrand (France)

    2008-04-15

    Dural sinus malformations (DSM) are rare malformations mainly reported after birth. The objectives of this study are to describe their prenatal patterns and to focus on their possible favorable outcome. This multicenter retrospective study reported 13 cases of DSM prenatally diagnosed. The admission criterion was a dural mass posterior to the vermis. In 12 patients, MRI was performed after US. Follow-up in 10 born babies (mean: 8 months) and three neuropathological examinations were available. In all fetuses, DSM presented as a well-delimited round mass involving the torcular. The follow-up examinations (n = 10) revealed progressive thrombosis of the DSM marked by a heterogeneous pattern (US and MRI) with concentric rings. The volume of the mass decreased, with complete regression in seven patients (five before and two after birth). One child died at the age of 5 months in the context of major hydrocephalus and another developed atrophy of the frontal lobes. The eight other babies were doing well (5 days to 3 years) without any treatment (n = 6) or following treatment for hydrocephalus (n = 2). Prenatal DSM may have a typical MR pattern, and the prognosis might not be as bad as has previously been reported. In the absence of criterion to predict the hydrovenous cerebral imbalance, it is mandatory to check the parenchyma and the ventricles during the pregnancy. (orig.)

  11. Diagnosing DSM-IV--Part II: Eysenck (1986) and the essentialist fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, J C

    1997-07-01

    In Part I (Wakefield, 1997, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 35, 633-649) of this two-article series, I used the harmful dysfunction analysis of the concept of disorder (Wakefield, 1992a, American Psychologist, 47, 373-388) to 'diagnose' a problem with DSM-IV. I argued that DSM-IV diagnostic criteria often violate the 'dysfunction' requirement by invalidity classifying harms not caused by dysfunctions as disorders. In Part II, I examine Eysenck's (Eysenck, 1986, Contemporary directions in psychopathology: Toward the DSM-IV) argument that DSM commits a 'categorical fallacy' and should be replaced by dimensional diagnoses based on Eysenckian personality traits. I argue that Eysenck's proposed diagnostic criteria violate the 'harm' requirement by invalidly classifying symptomless conditions as disorders. Eysenck commits an 'essentialist fallacy'; he misconstrues 'disorder' as an essentialist theoretical concept when in fact it is a hybrid theoretical-practical or 'cause-effect' concept. He thus ignores the harmful effects essential to disorder that are captured in DSM's symptom-based categories.

  12. Predictive validity of childhood oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder: implications for the DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jeffrey D; Waldman, Irwin; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2010-11-01

    Data are presented from 3 studies of children and adolescents to evaluate the predictive validity of childhood oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) and the International Classification of Diseases, Version 10 (ICD-10; World Health Organization, 1992). The present analyses strongly support the predictive validity of these diagnoses by showing that they predict both future psychopathology and enduring functional impairment. Furthermore, the present findings generally support the hierarchical developmental hypothesis in DSM-IV that some children with ODD progress to childhood-onset CD, and some youth with CD progress to antisocial personality disorder (APD). Nonetheless, they reveal that CD does not always co-occur with ODD, particularly during adolescence. Importantly, the present findings suggest that ICD-10 diagnostic criteria for ODD, which treat CD symptoms as ODD symptoms when diagnostic criteria for CD are not met, identify more functionally impaired children than the more restrictive DSM-IV definition of ODD. Filling this "hole" in the DSM-IV criteria for ODD should be a priority for the DSM-V. In addition, the present findings suggest that although the psychopathic trait of interpersonal callousness in childhood independently predicts future APD, these findings do not confirm the hypothesis that callousness distinguishes a subset of children with CD with an elevated risk for APD.

  13. Dimensional indicators of generalized anxiety disorder severity for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Lebeau, Richard T; Liao, Betty; Glenn, Daniel E; Craske, Michelle G

    2012-03-01

    For DSM-V, simple dimensional measures of disorder severity will accompany diagnostic criteria. The current studies examine convergent validity and test-retest reliability of two potential dimensional indicators of worry severity for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): percent of the day worried and number of worry domains. In study 1, archival data from diagnostic interviews from a community sample of individuals diagnosed with one or more anxiety disorders (n = 233) were used to assess correlations between percent of the day worried and number of worry domains with other measures of worry severity (clinical severity rating (CSR), age of onset, number of comorbid disorders, Penn state worry questionnaire (PSWQ)) and DSM-IV criteria (excessiveness, uncontrollability and number of physical symptoms). Both measures were significantly correlated with CSR and number of comorbid disorders, and with all three DSM-IV criteria. In study 2, test-retest reliability of percent of the day worried and number of worry domains were compared to test-retest reliability of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria in a non-clinical sample of undergraduate students (n = 97) at a large west coast university. All measures had low test-retest reliability except percent of the day worried, which had moderate test-retest reliability. Findings suggest that these two indicators capture worry severity, and percent of the day worried may be the most reliable existing indicator. These measures may be useful as dimensional measures for DSM-V.

  14. Should an obsessive-compulsive spectrum grouping of disorders be included in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J; Rauch, Scott L; Hollander, Eric; Fallon, Brian A; Barsky, Arthur; Fineberg, Naomi; Mataix-Cols, David; Ferrão, Ygor Arzeno; Saxena, Sanjaya; Wilhelm, Sabine; Kelly, Megan M; Clark, Lee Anna; Pinto, Anthony; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Farrow, Joanne; Leckman, James

    2010-06-01

    The obsessive-compulsive (OC) spectrum has been discussed in the literature for two decades. Proponents of this concept propose that certain disorders characterized by repetitive thoughts and/or behaviors are related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and suggest that such disorders be grouped together in the same category (i.e. grouping, or "chapter") in DSM. This article addresses this topic and presents options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. The article builds upon and extends prior reviews of this topic that were prepared for and discussed at a DSM-V Research Planning Conference on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders held in 2006. Our preliminary recommendation is that an OC-spectrum grouping of disorders be included in DSM-V. Furthermore, we preliminarily recommend that consideration be given to including this group of disorders within a larger supraordinate category of "Anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders." These preliminary recommendations must be evaluated in light of recommendations for, and constraints upon, the overall structure of DSM-V.

  15. Proposals for DSM-5: introduction to special section of Journal of Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiger, Thomas A; Huprich, Steven; Clarkin, John

    2011-04-01

    On February 10, 2010, the official proposals for the personality disorders section of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) were posted (see www.dsm5.org ). The posting by the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group has been helpful in informing the field of the possible changes that may occur with DSM-5. Their presence allows for and encourages persons to provide their suggestions and concerns. The extent of the proposals is considerable. As expressed on the website, "the work group recommends a major reconceptualization of personality psychopathology" (Skodol, 2010, "Reformulation of personality disorders in DSM-5," para. 1). The proposals have generated some controversy. The Journal of Personality Disorders has always sought to be a participant in the crucial debates in our field. The purpose of this special issue is to provide members of the Work Group the opportunity to further articulate the rationale for the proposals, and to provide others an opportunity to articulate their concerns. Copies of this special issue were distributed to interested persons when the complete set of final papers were received (October of 2010).

  16. The State of the Art of the DSM-5 “with Mixed Features” Specifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Verdolini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The new DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (MFS has renewed the interest of the scientific community in mixed states, leading not only to new clinical studies but also to new criticisms of the current nosology. Consequently, in our paper we have reviewed the latest literature, trying to understand the reactions of psychiatrists to the new nosology and its epidemiological, prognostic, and clinical consequences. It seems that the most widespread major criticism is the exclusion from the DSM-5 MFS of overlapping symptoms (such as psychomotor agitation, irritability, and distractibility, with a consequent reduction in diagnostic power. On the other hand, undoubtedly the new DSM-5 classification has helped to identify more patients suffering from a mixed state by broadening the narrow DSM-IV-TR criteria. As for the clinical presentation, the epidemiological data, and the therapeutic outcomes, the latest literature does not point out a univocal point of view and further research is needed to fully assess the implications of the new DSM-5 MFS. It is our view that a diagnostic category should be preferred to a specifier and mixed states should be better considered as a spectrum of states, according to what was stated many years ago by Kraepelin.

  17. Clinical trial: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (DSM 9843) improves symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe Ducrotté; Prabha Sawant; Venkataraman Jayanthi

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the symptomatic efficacy of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (L.plantarum 299v) (DSM 9843) for the relief of abdominal symptoms in a large subset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients fulfilling the Rome Ⅲ criteria.METHODS:In this double blind,placebo-controlled,parallel-designed study,subjects were randomized to daily receive either one capsule of L.plantarum 299v (DSM 9843) or placebo for 4 wk.Frequency and intensity of abdominal pain,bloating and feeling of incomplete rectal emptying were assessed weekly on a visual analogue scale while stool frequency was calculated.RESULTS:Two hundred and fourteen IBS patients were recruited.After 4 wk,both pain severity (0.68+ 0.53 vs 0.92 + 0.57,P < 0.05) and daily frequency (1.01 + 0.77 vs 1.71 + 0.93,P < 0.05) were lower with L.plantarum 299v (DSM 9843) than with placebo.Similar results were obtained for bloating.At week 4,78.1% of the patients scored the L.plantarum 299v (DSM 9843) symptomatic effect as excellent or good vs only 8.1% for placebo (P < 0.01).CONCLUSION:A 4-wk treatment with L.plantarum 299v (DSM 9843) provided effective symptom relief,particularly of abdominal pain and bloating,in IBS patients fulfilling the Rome Ⅲ criteria.

  18. The DSM diagnostic criteria for hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotto, Lori A

    2010-04-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) is one of two sexual desire disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and is defined by the monosymptomatic criterion "persistently or recurrently deficient (or absent) sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity" that causes "marked distress or interpersonal difficulty." This article reviews the diagnosis of HSDD in prior and current (DSM-IV-TR) editions of the DSM, critiques the existing criteria, and proposes criteria for consideration in DSM-V. Problems in coming to a clear operational definition of desire, the fact that sexual activity often occurs in the absence of desire for women, conceptual issues in understanding untriggered versus responsive desire, the relative infrequency of unprovoked sexual fantasies in women, and the significant overlap between desire and arousal are reviewed and highlight the need for revised DSM criteria for HSDD that accurately reflect women's experiences. The article concludes with the recommendation that desire and arousal be combined into one disorder with polythetic criteria.

  19. Insights into soil-landscape evolution when DSM doesn't work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Jacqueline; Mayr, Thomas; Zawadzka, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    DSM relies on relationships between environmental covariates and soil to predict how soil changes in the landscape. Many applications focus on the success of the spatial predictions using validation data. However when DSM performs poorly the reasons behind this are commonly put down to data scarcity, quality or applicability rather than exploring potential pedological explanations. We present several different DSM studies applied at national scales and where aspects of the process have been unsuccessful. In some cases this can be explained to some extent by the efficacy of the training data and a mis-match between the feature space in the training data and the predicted areas. Areas where these issues are taken into account offer insight into the co-evolution of soil and landscape but where the classic relationship of CLORPT is challenged or where processes are operating at scales that are not represented by the co-variates. Examples include poor prediction of podzolic soils that have evolved due to temporal changes in vegetation and land use. By including temporally varying co-variates in the DSM process we may begin to improve our DSM predictions but more importantly identify how soil environments evolve and respond to temporal perturbations. This could also be used to ascertain how soils will change and evolve in the future at landscape scales as a consequence of climate or land use change.

  20. Examining the dimensional structure models of secondary traumatic stress based on DSM-5 symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordeno, Imelu G; Go, Geraldine P; Yangson-Serondo, April

    2017-02-01

    Latent factor structure of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) has been examined using Diagnostic Statistic Manual-IV (DSM-IV)'s Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) nomenclature. With the advent of Diagnostic Statistic Manual-5 (DSM-5), there is an impending need to reexamine STS using DSM-5 symptoms in light of the most updated PTSD models in the literature. The study investigated and determined the best fitted PTSD models using DSM-5 PTSD criteria symptoms. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine model fit using the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale in 241 registered and practicing Filipino nurses (166 females and 75 males) who worked in the Philippines and gave direct nursing services to patients. Based on multiple fit indices, the results showed the 7-factor hybrid model, comprising of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behavior, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal factors has excellent fit to STS. This model asserts that: (1) hyperarousal criterion needs to be divided into anxious and dysphoric arousal factors; (2) symptoms characterizing negative and positive affect need to be separated to two separate factors, and; (3) a new factor would categorize externalized, self-initiated impulse and control-deficit behaviors. Comparison of nested and non-nested models showed Hybrid model to have superior fit over other models. The specificity of the symptom structure of STS based on DSM-5 PTSD criteria suggests having more specific interventions addressing the more elaborate symptom-groupings that would alleviate the condition of nurses exposed to STS on a daily basis.

  1. Acceleration of Topographic Map Production Using Semi-Automatic DTM from Dsm Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizaldy, Aldino; Mayasari, Ratna

    2016-06-01

    Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) is government institution in Indonesia which is responsible to provide Topographic Map at several map scale. For medium map scale, e.g. 1:25.000 or 1:50.000, DSM from Radar data is very good solution since Radar is able to penetrate cloud that usually covering tropical area in Indonesia. DSM Radar is produced using Radargrammetry and Interferrometry technique. The conventional method of DTM production is using "stereo-mate", the stereo image created from DSM Radar and ORRI (Ortho Rectified Radar Image), and human operator will digitizing masspoint and breakline manually using digital stereoplotter workstation. This technique is accurate but very costly and time consuming, also needs large resource of human operator. Since DSMs are already generated, it is possible to filter DSM to DTM using several techniques. This paper will study the possibility of DSM to DTM filtering using technique that usually used in point cloud LIDAR filtering. Accuracy of this method will also be calculated using enough numbers of check points. If the accuracy meets the requirement, this method is very potential to accelerate the production of Topographic Map in Indonesia.

  2. Comparing factor analytic models of the DSM-IV personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Steven K; Schmitt, Thomas A; Richard, David C S; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    There is little agreement about the latent factor structure of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) personality disorders (PDs). Factor analytic studies over the past 2 decades have yielded different results, in part reflecting differences in factor analytic technique, the measure used to assess the PDs, and the changing DSM criteria. In this study, we explore the latent factor structure of the DSM (4th ed.; IV) PDs in a sample of 1200 psychiatric outpatients evaluated with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV PDs (B. Pfohl, N. Blum, & M. Zimmerman, 1997). We first evaluated 2 a priori models of the PDs with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), reflecting their inherent organization in the DSM-IV: a 3-factor model and a 10-factor model. Fit statistics did not suggest that these models yielded an adequate fit. We then evaluated the latent structure with exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Multiple solutions produced more statistically and theoretically reasonable results, as well as providing clinically useful findings. On the basis of fit statistics and theory, 3 models were evaluated further--the 4-, 5-, and 10-factor models. The 10-factor model, which did not resemble the 10-factor model of the CFA, was determined to be the strongest of all 3 models. Future research should use contemporary methods of evaluating factor analytic results in order to more thoroughly compare various factor solutions.

  3. Comorbilidades psiquiátricas en los trastornos del espectro autista: estudio comparativo entre los criterios DSM-IV-TR y DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Romero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes/Objetivo: Los Trastornos del Espectro Autista (TEA incluyen un grupo heterogéneo en cuanto a su presentación clínica, lo que supone un desafío a nivel de caracterización diagnóstica. Por consiguiente, el objetivo principal de la clasificación DSM-5 debería de ser identificar subgrupos de ASD que incluyan severidad y comorbilidades psiquiátricas. El objetivo principal de este estudio es explorar las comorbilidades diagnósticas que pueden ser relevantes como descriptores de fenotipos autistas así como la severidad de los síntomas de autismo y comparar los resultados de las diferentes criterios de clasificación entre el DSM-IV-TR y el DSM-5. Método: Se realiza un estudio comparati - vo de severidad y comorbilidades psiquiátricas entre una muestra con diagnóstico de Trastorno Generalizado del Desarrollo, según criterios DSM-IV-TR, y una muestra que cumplía también criterios para TEA según la clasificación DSM-5. La muestra fue obtenida en centros educativos ( n =123. Las comorbilidades psiquiátricas y la severidad de los síntomas se evaluaron a través del The Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form , entrevista clínica y el Inventario de Trastorno del Espectro Autista, respectivamente. Las comorbi - lidades estudiadas fueron ansiedad, alteraciones de la conducta alimentaria, auto-agre - sividad, hetero-agresividad, autolesiones, trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo y déficit de atención e hiperactividad. Resultados: Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente sig - nificativas entre ambos grupos para trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo , alteraciones de la conducta alimentaria y severidad . Conclusiones: Se apoya la hipótesis de que los indivi - duos que cumplen criterios diagnósticos según DSM-5 tienen mayor severidad sintomáti - ca, no sólo con respecto a los síntomas autistas centrales, sino también en relación con comorbilidades psiquiátricas.

  4. The DSM-V initiative "deconstructing psychosis" in the context of Kraepelin's concept on nosology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zielasek, Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    The revision process of the international psychiatric classification systems has started and is expected to result in new versions of the International Classification of Disorders (then ICD-11) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (then DSM-V) in approximately 2014 and 2012, respectively. In the process of developing DSM-V, several research conferences jointly sponsored by the American Psychiatric Association, the National Institutes of Health, and the World Health Organization, are currently taking place. We will here focus on the impact that the DSM-V initiative "Deconstructing Psychosis" will have on the future of diagnosing a psychotic state, and how this may be viewed from a European context of Kraepelin's nosology of psychiatric disorders.

  5. Catatonia in DSM 5: controversies regarding its psychopathology, clinical presentation and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Gabor S

    2014-12-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an upsurge of interest in catatonia, which is reflected in the attention it received in DSM 5, where it appears as a separate subsection of the Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders (APA, 2013). This commentary argues that due to the lack of solid scientific evidence, the extended coverage of catatonia in DSM 5 was a premature, and consequently, a necessarily ambiguous decision. The psychopathological foundations of the modern catatonia concept are lacking therefore its boundaries are fuzzy. There are only a few, methodologically sound clinical, treatment response and small-scale neurobiological studies. The widely recommended use of benzodiazepines for the treatment of catatonia is based on case reports and open-label studies instead of placebo-controlled, randomized trials. In conclusion, the catatonic concept espoused by DSM 5 is necessarily vague reflecting the current state of knowledge.

  6. Personality disorders in DSM-5: emerging research on the alternative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Benson, Kathryn T; Busch, Alexander J; Skodol, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    The current categorical classification of personality disorders, originally introduced in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III), has been found to suffer from numerous shortcomings that hamper its usefulness for research and for clinical application. The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group for DSM-5 was charged with developing an alternative model that would address many of these concerns. The developed model involved a hybrid dimensional/categorical model that represented personality disorders as combinations of core impairments in personality functioning with specific configurations of problematic personality traits. The Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association did not accept the Task Force recommendation to implement this novel approach, and thus this alternative model was included in Sect. III of the DSM-5 among concepts requiring additional study. This review provides an overview of the emerging research on this alternative model, addressing each of the primary components of the model.

  7. Study on DSM-based task planning of product cooperative development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Zengqiang; Liu Mingzhou; Zhao Han; Ge Maogen; Guo Jia

    2008-01-01

    The results of analyzing the managerial characteristics and complexity of product cooperative development suggest that task planning is an important aspect for process management of product cooperative development and the method for planning tasks should be able to model the dependency between tasks and iterations during the development process. In this paper, a DSM-based method and its corresponding optimization algorithms are developed. At first the coupled task sets and uncoupled task sets are identified, and the tasks are then optimized by the corresponding algorithms. The optimal tasks plan will reduce the development time and cost. Considering the practical requirements in real world, a Multilayer DSM is proposed, and its information communication techniques between DSM and traversing principle are described in details.

  8. Women-specific mental disorders in DSM-V: are we failing again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-02-01

    Despite a wealth of studies on differences regarding the biobehavioral and social-psychological bases of mental disorders in men and women and repeated calls for increased attention, women-specific issues have so far not been comprehensively addressed in past diagnostic classification systems of mental disorders. There is also increasing evidence that this situation will not change significantly in the upcoming revisions of ICD-11 and DSM-V. This paper explores reasons for this continued failure, highlighting three major barriers: the fragmentation of the field of women's mental health research, lack of emphasis on diagnostic classificatory issues beyond a few selected clinical conditions, and finally, the "current rules of game" used by the current DSM-V Task Forces in the revision process of DSM-V. The paper calls for concerted efforts of researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders within a more coherent and comprehensive framework aiming at broader coverage of women-specific diagnostic classificatory issues in future diagnostic systems.

  9. The DSM-IV-TR 'Glossary of Technical Terms': a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howsepian, A A

    2008-01-01

    Many of the entries in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition - Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) are problematic along multiple axes, including, but not limited to, clarity, logical coherence, factual content, redundancy, and ambiguity. These problems pose multiple barriers to clear, efficient, and accurate communication among those who work in clinical contexts or among those involved in psychological or psychiatric research. These barriers to communication, accurate concept formation, and clinical clarity affect diagnostic validity and reliability in a manner that imperils progress in psychiatry and psychology on a grand scale. This essay focuses on some of the most egregious problematic entries in the DSM-IV-TR's 'Glossary of Technical Terms'. It is meant to be a prolegomenon to a thorough revision of the Glossary in preparation for the projected 5th edition of the DSM.

  10. DSM-5 Borderline personality disorder: At the border between a dimensional and a categorical view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Timothy J; Distel, Marijn A; Carpenter, Ryan W

    2011-02-01

    Recently, the DSM-5 Personality Disorders Workgroup offered its proposed revision for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other personality disorder types ( http://www.dsm5.org ). According to the workgroup, this revision reflects an attempt to address excessive comorbidity among personality disorders, place personality pathology on continua, and replace individual behavioral criteria with personality traits. Essentially, the committee proposes a hybrid model of BPD (ie, categorical and dimensional)-one that combines the notion of a borderline "type" with supplemental dimensional ratings of relevant personality traits. In this article, we review recent findings on the dimensionality of BPD from phenotypic, genetic, and endophenotypic perspectives. Finally, we evaluate the current DSM-5 proposal for diagnosing BPD-one that ostensibly combines a categorical and dimensional perspective-in light of these findings.

  11. Hoarding's place in the DSM-5: another symptom, or a newly listed disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Shoshana; Phillips McEnany, Geoffry

    2012-09-01

    Hoarding behavior, long considered a symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000), has recently garnered significant attention and has only begun to be more carefully studied and understood. Recent research reveals that hoarding is frequently comorbid with anxiety, depression, and other diagnoses, including OCD. The DSM-5 Working Group on Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders is currently working to determine appropriate placement of hoarding in the DSM-5 (APA, 2010), and has tentatively proposed the term Hoarding Disorder to be used as a new and unique diagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to provide some insight into the evidence base that has prompted this change and to familiarize clinicians with research and best practices in the emerging field of diagnosing and treating hoarding behaviors.

  12. Metabolic effects of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 in people with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mobini, Reza; Tremaroli, Valentina; Ståhlman, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the metabolic effects of 12-week oral supplementation with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a double-blind trial, we randomized 46 people with type 2 diabetes to placebo or a low (10(8)  CFU....../d) or high dose (10(10)  CFU/d) of L. reuteri DSM 17938 for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the effect of supplementation on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary endpoints were insulin sensitivity (assessed by glucose clamp), liver fat content, body composition, body fat distribution, faecal microbiota...... composition and serum bile acids. RESULTS: Supplementation with L. reuteri DSM 17938 for 12 weeks did not affect HbA1c, liver steatosis, adiposity or microbiota composition. Participants who received the highest dose of L. reuteri exhibited increases in insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and serum levels...

  13. Trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), skin picking disorder, and stereotypic movement disorder: toward DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Grant, Jon E; Franklin, Martin E; Keuthen, Nancy; Lochner, Christine; Singer, Harvey S; Woods, Douglas W

    2010-06-01

    In DSM-IV-TR, trichotillomania (TTM) is classified as an impulse control disorder (not classified elsewhere), skin picking lacks its own diagnostic category (but might be diagnosed as an impulse control disorder not otherwise specified), and stereotypic movement disorder is classified as a disorder usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence. ICD-10 classifies TTM as a habit and impulse disorder, and includes stereotyped movement disorders in a section on other behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence. This article provides a focused review of nosological issues relevant to DSM-V, given recent empirical findings. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V: (1) Although TTM fits optimally into a category of body-focused repetitive behavioral disorders, in a nosology comprised of relatively few major categories it fits best within a category of motoric obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, (2) available evidence does not support continuing to include (current) diagnostic criteria B and C for TTM in DSM-V, (3) the text for TTM should be updated to describe subtypes and forms of hair pulling, (4) there are persuasive reasons for referring to TTM as "hair pulling disorder (trichotillomania)," (5) diagnostic criteria for skin picking disorder should be included in DSM-V or in DSM-Vs Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study, and (6) the diagnostic criteria for stereotypic movement disorder should be clarified and simplified, bringing them in line with those for hair pulling and skin picking disorder.

  14. Validity of DSM-IV attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptom dimensions and subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcutt, Erik G; Nigg, Joel T; Pennington, Bruce F; Solanto, Mary V; Rohde, Luis A; Tannock, Rosemary; Loo, Sandra K; Carlson, Caryn L; McBurnett, Keith; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2012-11-01

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) specify two dimensions of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms that are used to define three nominal subtypes: predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type (ADHD-H), predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-I), and combined type (ADHD-C). To aid decision making for DSM-5 and other future diagnostic systems, a comprehensive literature review and meta-analysis of 546 studies was completed to evaluate the validity of the DSM-IV model of ADHD. Results indicated that DSM-IV criteria identify individuals with significant and persistent impairment in social, academic, occupational, and adaptive functioning when intelligence, demographic factors, and concurrent psychopathology are controlled. Available data overwhelmingly support the concurrent, predictive, and discriminant validity of the distinction between inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms, and indicate that nearly all differences among the nominal subtypes are consistent with the relative levels of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms that define the subtypes. In contrast, the DSM-IV subtype model is compromised by weak evidence for the validity of ADHD-H after first grade, minimal support for the distinction between ADHD-I and ADHD-C in studies of etiological influences, academic and cognitive functioning, and treatment response, and the marked longitudinal instability of all three subtypes. Overall, we conclude that the DSM-IV ADHD subtypes provide a convenient clinical shorthand to describe the functional and behavioral correlates of current levels of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms, but do not identify discrete subgroups with sufficient long-term stability to justify the classification of distinct forms of the disorder. Empirical support is stronger for an alternative model that would replace the subtypes with dimensional

  15. Neurodevelopmental Disorders (ASD and ADHD): DSM-5, ICD-10, and ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doernberg, Ellen; Hollander, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders, specifically autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have undergone considerable diagnostic evolution in the past decade. In the United States, the current system in place is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), whereas worldwide, the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) serves as a general medical system. This review will examine the differences in neurodevelopmental disorders between these two systems. First, we will review the important revisions made from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) to the DSM-5, with respect to ASD and ADHD. Next, we will cover the similarities and differences between ASD and ADHD classification in the DSM-5 and the ICD-10, and how these differences may have an effect on neurodevelopmental disorder diagnostics and classification. By examining the changes made for the DSM-5 in 2013, and critiquing the current ICD-10 system, we can help to anticipate and advise on the upcoming ICD-11, due to come online in 2017. Overall, this review serves to highlight the importance of progress towards complementary diagnostic classification systems, keeping in mind the difference in tradition and purpose of the DSM and the ICD, and that these systems are dynamic and changing as more is learned about neurodevelopmental disorders and their underlying etiology. Finally this review will discuss alternative diagnostic approaches, such as the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative, which links symptom domains to underlying biological and neurological mechanisms. The incorporation of new diagnostic directions could have a great effect on treatment development and insurance coverage for neurodevelopmental disorders worldwide.

  16. High Performance Computing for Dsm Extraction from ZY-3 Tri-Stereo Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuning; Huang, Shicun; Pan, Zhiqiang; Deng, Huawu; Stanley, David; Xin, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    ZY-3 has been acquiring high quality imagery since its launch in 2012 and its tri-stereo (three-view or three-line-array) imagery has become one of the top choices for extracting DSM (Digital Surface Model) products in China over the past few years. The ZY-3 tri-stereo sensors offer users the ability to capture imagery over large regions including an entire territory of a country, such as China, resulting in a large volume of ZY-3 tri-stereo scenes which require timely (e.g., near real time) processing, something that is not currently possible using traditional photogrammetry workstations. This paper presents a high performance computing solution which can efficiently and automatically extract DSM products from ZY-3 tri-stereo imagery. The high performance computing solution leverages certain parallel computing technologies to accelerate computation within an individual scene and then deploys a distributed computing technology to increase the overall data throughput in a robust and efficient manner. By taking advantage of the inherent efficiencies within the high performance computing environment, the DSM extraction process can exploit all combinations offered from a set of tri-stereo images (forward-backword, forward-nadir and backword-nadir). The DSM results merged from all of the potential combinations can minimize blunders (e.g., incorrect matches) and also offer the ability to remove potential occlusions which may exist in a single stereo pair, resulting in improved accuracy and quality versus those that are not merged. Accelerated performance is inherent within each of the individual steps of the DSM extraction workflow, including the collection of ground control points and tie points, image bundle adjustment, the creation of epipolar images, and computing elevations. Preliminary experiments over a large area in China have proven that the high performance computing system can generate high quality and accurate DSM products in a rapid manner.

  17. Expert consensus v. evidence-based approaches in the revision of the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Solomon, M

    2016-08-01

    The development of DSM-III through DSM-5 has relied heavily on expert consensus. In this essay, we provide an historical and critical perspective on this process. Over the last 40 years, medicine has struggled to find appropriate methods for summarizing research results and making clinical recommendations. When such recommendations are issued by authorized organizations, they can have widespread influence (i.e. DSM-III and its successors). In the 1970s, expert consensus conferences, led by the NIH, reviewed research about controversial medical issues and successfully disseminated results. However, these consensus conferences struggled with aggregating the complex available evidence. In the 1990s, the rise of evidence-based medicine cast doubt on the reliability of expert consensus. Since then, medicine has increasingly relied on systematic reviews, as developed by the evidence-based medicine movement, and advocated for their early incorporation in expert consensus efforts. With the partial exception of DSM-IV, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of the DSMs, leaving their development out of step with the larger medical field. Like the recommendations made for the NIH consensus conferences, we argue that the DSM process should be modified to require systematic evidence-based reviews before Work Groups make their assessments. Our suggestions - which would require leadership and additional resources to set standards for appropriate evidence hierarchies, carry out systematic reviews, and upgrade the group process - should improve the objectivity of the DSM, increase the validity of its results, and improve the reception of any changes in nosology.

  18. Higher Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Policy Institute of California, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Higher education enhances Californians' lives and contributes to the state's economic growth. But population and education trends suggest that California is facing a large shortfall of college graduates. Addressing this short­fall will require strong gains for groups that have been historically under­represented in higher education. Substantial…

  19. Women of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harry

    This publication points out the achievements of women who contributed to the development and history of California from the 16th century, when the Spanish Conquistadores moved westward into the San Francisco Bay area, to the gold rush of 1848, and during the following period when women helped stabilize society on the rugged frontier. Women not…

  20. Variability in the prevalence of adult ADHD in treatment seeking substance use disorder patients : Results from an international multi-center study exploring DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Glind, Geurt; Konstenius, Maija; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; Kaye, Sharlene; Degenhardt, Louisa; Skutle, Arvid; Franck, Johan; Bu, Eli-Torild; Moggi, Franz; Dom, Geert; Verspreet, Sofie; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Kapitany-Foveny, Mate; Fatseas, Melina; Auriacombe, Marc; Schillinger, Arild; Moller, Merete; Johnson, Brian; Farone, Stephen V.; Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, J.; Casas, Miguel; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Schoevers, Robert A.; Wallhed, Sara; Barta, Csaba; Alleman, Peter; Levin, Frances R.; van den Brink, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Available studies vary in their estimated prevalence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in substance use disorder (SUD) patients, ranging from 2 to 83%. A better understanding of the possible reasons for this variability and the effect of the change from DSM-IV to DSM-5 i