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Sample records for california utility dsm

  1. A scoping study on energy-efficiency market transformation by California Utility DSM Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, J.; Prahl, R.; Schlegel, J.

    1996-07-01

    Market transformation has emerged as a central policy objective for future publicly-funded energy-efficiency programs in California. California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) Decision 95-12-063 calls for public funding to shift to activities designed to transform the energy-efficiency market. The CPUC envisions that funding {open_quotes}would only be needed for specific and limited periods of time to cause the market to be transformed{close_quotes}. At the same time, the CPUC also acknowledges that {open_quotes}there are many definitions of market transformation{close_quotes} ... and does {open_quotes}not attempt to refine those definitions today{close_quotes}. We argue that a definition of market transformation is essential. The literature is now replete with definitions, and an operational definition is needed for the CPUC to decide on which programs should be supported with public funds. The CPUC decision initially indicated a preference for programs that do not provide financial assistance 4-efficiency programs that rely on financial assistance to customers. However, energy customers have traditionally accounted for a substantial portion of California utility`s DSM programs, so the CPUC`s direction to use ratepayer funds to support programs that will transform the market raises critical questions about how to analyze what has happened in order to plan effectively for the future: Which utility energy-efficiency programs, including those that provide financial assistance to customers, have had market transforming effects? To what extent do current regulatory rules and practices encourage or discourage utilities from running programs that are designed to transform the market? Should the rules and programs be modified, and, if so, how, to promote market transformation?

  2. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  3. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs. [Demand-Side Management (DSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J. (eds.); Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility's portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to triangulate'' an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  4. DSM and electric utility competitiveness: An Illinois perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    A predominant theme in the current electric utility industry literature is that competitive forces have emerged and may become more prominent. The wholesale bulk power market is alreadly competitive, as non-utility energy service providers already have had a significant impact on that market; this trend was accelerated by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Although competition at the retail level is much less pervasive, electric utility customers increasingly have greater choice in selecting energy services. These choices may include, depending on the customer, the ability to self-generate, switch fuels, move to a new location, or rely more heavily on demand-side management as a means of controlling electric energy use. This paper explores the subject of how demand-side management (DSM) programs, which are often developed by a utility to satisfy resource requirements as a part of its least-cost planning process, can affect the utility`s ability to compete in the energy services marketplace. In this context, the term `DSM` is used in this paper to refer to those demand-side services and programs which provide resources to the utility`s system. Depending on one`s perspective, DSM programs (so defined) can be viewed either as an enhancement to the competitive position of a utility by enabling it to provide its customers with a broader menu of energy services, simultaneously satisfying the objectives of the utility as well as those of the customers, or as a detractor to a utility`s ability to compete. In the latter case, the concern is with respect to the potential for adverse rate impacts on customers who are not participants in DSM programs. The paper consists of an identification of the pros and cons of DSM as a competitive strategy, the tradeoff which can occur between the cost impacts and rate impacts of DSM, and an examination of alternative strategies for maximizing the utilization of DSM both as a resource and as a competitive strategy.

  5. Clinical Utility and "DSM-V"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The construction of the American Psychiatric Association's diagnostic manual has been guided primarily by concerns of construct validity rather than of clinical utility, despite claims by its authors that the highest priority has in fact been clinical utility. The purpose of this article was to further articulate the concept and importance of…

  6. Communications technologies for demand side management, DSM, and European utility communications architecture, EurUCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkkaeinen, S.; Kekkonen, V. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Rissanen, P. [Tietosavo Oy (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this project the main target is to develop and assess methods for DSM (Demand Side Management) and distribution automation planning from the utility`s point of view. The final goal is to integrate these methods for the strategic planning of electric utilities. In practice the project is divided into four main parts: The development and assessment of DSM/IRP planning methods and cost/benefit analysis as a part of international co-operation (IEA DSM Agreement: Annex IV, European Cost/Benefit analysis of DSM, EUBC, and Finnish SAVE-project started in 1995 in co-operation with SRC International and six electric utilities in Finland); Development of PC-based DSM planning and assessment tools at VTT; Development of a decision support system of distribution network planning including DSM options at Tietosavo Oy and Integration of DSM planning and network planning tools in co-operation with VTT Energy and Tietosavo Oy

  7. Alcohol Use Disorders: Translational Utility of DSM-IV Liabilities to the DSM-5 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselica, Andrew M; Cohn, Amy M; Hagman, Brett T

    2015-03-01

    Young adults have some of the highest rates of problem drinking and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) relative to any other age. However, recent evidence suggests that the DSM-IV hierarchical classification system of AUDs does not validly represent symptoms in the population; instead, it evinces a unitary, dimensional classification scheme. The DSM-5 has been altered to fit this changing, evidence-based conceptualization. Nevertheless, little is understood about the degree to which known risk factors for DSM-IV AUD diagnoses will transfer to the new DSM-5 guidelines in this group of high-risk drinkers. The current study built a coherent model of liabilities for DSM-IV AUDs in young adults and tested for transferability to DSM-5. N = 496 college students (51.10% male) were assessed on a variety of factors related to AUD risk, including demographics, substance use (past 90-days), and drinking motives. Liability models were created using all variables in Structural Equation Modeling to test direct and indirect effects on DSM diagnostic status. The best model under the DSM-IV was chosen based on fit and parsimony. This model was then applied to the DSM-5 system to test for transferability. The best the fitting model for DSM-IV included direct influences of drug use, quantity-frequency of alcohol consumption, and social and coping drinking motives. Improved model fit was found when the DSM-5 system was the outcome. Knowledge of risk factors for AUDs appear to transfer well to the new diagnostic system.

  8. Assessment of net lost revenue adjustment mechanisms for utility DSM programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-01-01

    Utility shareholders can lose money on demand-side management (DSM) investments between rate cases. Several industry analysts argue that the revenues lost from utility DSM programs are an important financial disincentive to utility DSM investment. A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenues incurred through successful operation of DSM programs. Explicitly defined net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states` preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This report examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The report has three objectives. First, we determine whether NLRA is a feasible and successful approach to removing the lost-revenue disincentive to utility operation of DSM programs. Second, we identify the conditions linked to successful implementation of NLRA mechanisms in different states and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior. Third, we suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. We first identify states with NLRA mechanisms where utilities are recovering lost revenues from DSM programs. We interview staff at regulatory agencies in all these states and utility staff in four states. These interviews focus on the status of NLRA, implementation issues, DSM measurement issues, and NLRA results. We also analyze regulatory agency orders on NLRA, as well as associated testimony, reports, and utility lost revenue recovery filings. Finally, we use qualitative and quantitative indicators to assess NLRA`s effectiveness. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach to the lost-revenue disincentive.

  9. Clinician judgments of clinical utility: A comparison of DSM-IV-TR personality disorders and the alternative model for DSM-5 personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Skodol, Andrew E; Oldham, John M

    2014-05-01

    This study compared the perceived clinical utility of DSM-IV-TR personality disorder diagnoses (retained in DSM-5) with the alternative model presented in DSM-5 Section III, using a national sample of clinicians applying both systems to their own patients. A sample of 337 mental health clinicians (26% psychiatrists, 63% psychologists, and 11% other professional disciplines) provided a complete assessment of all personality disorder features listed in DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Section III. After applying each diagnostic model, clinicians evaluated the clinical utility of that model with respect to communication with patients and with other professionals, comprehensiveness, descriptiveness, ease of use, and utility for treatment planning. These perceptions were compared across DSM-IV-TR and the 3 components of the DSM-5 Section III model, and between psychiatrists and nonpsychiatrists. Although DSM-IV-TR was seen as easy to use and useful for professional communication, in every other respect the DSM-5 Section III model was viewed as being equally or more clinically useful than DSM-IV-TR. In particular, the DSM-5 dimensional trait model was seen as more useful than DSM-IV-TR in 5 of 6 comparisons-by psychiatrists as well as other professionals. Although concerns were expressed about the clinical utility of the DSM-5 personality disorder system during its development, these criticisms were offered without data on the proposed system. The results of this study demonstrate that aside from the current familiarity of the DSM-IV-TR approach, it offers little advantage in perceived clinical utility over the DSM-5 Section III system, whereas the latter is viewed as being more useful in several respects.

  10. Communications technologies for demand side management, DSM, and European utility communications architecture, EurUCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uuspaeae, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The scope of this research is data communications for electric utilities. Demand Side Management (DSM) calls for communication between the Electric Utility and the Customer. The communication capacity needed will depend on the functions that are chosen for DSM, and on the number of customers. Some functions may be handled with one-way communications, some functions require two-way communication. Utility Communication Architecture looks for an overall view of the communications needs and communication systems in an electric utility. The objective is to define and specify suitable and compatible communications procedures within the Utility and also to outside parties. (27 refs.)

  11. Utility of DSM-5 section III personality traits in differentiating borderline personality disorder from comparison groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, B; Sellbom, M; Bo, S

    2016-01-01

    to determine how the alternative DSM-5 Section III personality trait dimensions differentiates such features in BPD patients versus comparison groups. To date, no study has attempted such validation. METHOD: The current study examined the utility of the DSM-5 trait dimensions in differentiating patients...... with the categorical DSM-IV/5 diagnosis of BPD (n=101) from systematically matched samples of other PD patients (n=101) and healthy controls (n=101). This was investigated using one-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Results indicated that Emotional Lability, Risk Taking...

  12. Utility DSM Programs from 1989 Through 1998: Continuation or Cross-Roads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, S.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past five years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has been collecting data annually from US electric utilities on their demand-side management (DSM) programs, both current and projected. The latest data cover activities for 1993 and projections for 1994 and 1998. In 1993, 991 utilities operated DSM programs. That year, they spent $2.8 billion, a 13% increase over 1992 expenditures. These and earlier DSM programs saved 44,000 GWh of energy and reduced potential peak demand by 40,000 MW, 30% and 22% increases over the 1992 values, respectively. While some people predict the demise of electric-utility DSM programs, the data do not paint so bleak a picture. In most parts of the country, DSM programs grew in 1993 and utilities (as of Spring 1994) projected continued growth through 1998. Expenditures grew from 1.3% of revenues in 1992 to 1.5% in 1993, and are expected to grow 2.5% per year faster than inflation, which is equivalent to revenue growth. Thus, DSM spending is expected to stay constant at 1.5% of revenues through 1998. Because of the cumulative effect of DSM programs, energy savings are expected to grow from 1.2% of sales in 1992 to 1.6% in 1993 and 3.0% in 1998. Potential-peak reductions are expected to increase from 5.9% of peak demand in 1992 to 6.8% in 1993 and 8.9% in 1998. However, the growth in spending is not as rapid as the 8% annual real growth projected a year earlier. Actual expenditures in 1993 were 6.5% lower than projected early that year. Energy savings, on the other hand, were the same as projected earlier. Potential peak reductions were actually 9% higher than previously projected.

  13. Clinical Utility of the DSM-5 Alternative Model of Personality Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    able to characterize the 6 cases in a meaningful and useful manner with regard to understanding and treatment of the individual patient and to match the cases with 6 relevant personality disorder types. Implications for ease of use, communication, and psychotherapy are discussed. Conclusion. Our......In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel...... was to evaluate the clinical utility of this alternative model of personality disorders. Method. We administered the LPFS and the PID-5 to psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with personality disorders and other nonpsychotic disorders. The personality profiles of six characteristic patients were inspected...

  14. Utility of DSM-5 section III personality traits in differentiating borderline personality disorder from comparison groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, B; Sellbom, M; Bo, S; Simonsen, E

    2016-09-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a highly prevalent diagnosis in mental health care and includes a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms. As the field of personality disorder (PD) research moves to emphasize dimensional traits in its operationalization, it is important to determine how the alternative DSM-5 Section III personality trait dimensions differentiates such features in BPD patients versus comparison groups. To date, no study has attempted such validation. The current study examined the utility of the DSM-5 trait dimensions in differentiating patients with the categorical DSM-IV/5 diagnosis of BPD (n=101) from systematically matched samples of other PD patients (n=101) and healthy controls (n=101). This was investigated using one-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results indicated that Emotional Lability, Risk Taking, and Suspiciousness uniquely differentiated BPD patients from other PD patients, whereas Emotional Lability, Depressivity, and Suspiciousness uniquely differentiated BPD patients from healthy controls. Emotional Lability is in particular a key BPD feature of the proposed Section III model, whereas Suspiciousness also augments essential BPD features. Provided that these findings are replicated cross-culturally in forthcoming research, a more parsimonious traits operationalization of BPD features is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The Relationship Between the Childhood Autism Rating Scale: Second Edition and Clinical Diagnosis Utilizing the DSM-IV-TR and the DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Tamara; Meyer, Allison T; Van Bourgondien, Mary E

    2016-10-01

    The Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition (CARS2; 2010) includes two rating scales; the CARS2-Standard Version (CARS2-ST) and the newly developed CARS2-High Functioning Version (CARS2-HF). To assess the diagnostic agreement between the CARS2 and DSM-IV-TR versus DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), clinicians at community based centers of the University of North Carolina TEACCH Autism Program rated participants seen for a diagnostic evaluation on symptoms of autism using both the DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria and either the CARS2-HF or the CARS2-ST. Findings suggest that overall, the diagnostic agreement of the CARS2 remains high across DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for autism.

  16. Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B. C.

    2004-10-01

    The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

  17. Elastic Model Transitions: a Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, T. Jason; Ottander, John A.

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes both quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) algorithms to determine physical displacements. This approach is applicable to the simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize multiple LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data for discrete segments of the launch vehicle trajectory presents a problem of how to properly transition between models while preserving motion across the transition. In addition, energy may vary between flex models when using a truncated mode set. The LSQI-DSM algorithm can accommodate significant changes in energy between FEM models and carries elastic motion across FEM model transitions. Compared with previous approaches, the LSQI-DSM algorithm shows improvements ranging from a significant reduction to a complete removal of transients across FEM model transitions as well as maintaining elastic motion from the prior state.

  18. Validity and utility of the DSM-5 severity specifier for binge-eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Colmegna, Fabrizia; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo

    2017-08-01

    To test both the concurrent and predictive significance of the new DSM-5 severity specifier for binge-eating disorder (BED) in adult outpatients. Existing data from 195 adults with DSM-5 BED who received evidence-based treatment (manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy) in an outpatient setting were re-analysed to examine whether these patients sub-grouped according to the DSM-5 severity levels, defined by the frequency of binge-eating (BE) episodes, would show meaningful differences in a range of variables of clinical interest assessed at pre-treatment and end-of treatment abstinence from BE. Participants categorized with mild (33.3% of the sample), moderate (35.4%), severe (15.9%), and extreme (15.4%) severity of BED, based on their pre-treatment clinician-rated frequency of BE episodes, differed significantly from each other in physical characteristics (body mass index) and another sixteen variables of clinical interest assessed at pre-treatment regarding eating disorder psychopathology and putative maintenance factors, lifetime and current psychiatric disorder comorbidity, general psychiatric distress, and psychosocial impairment. The four DSM-5 severity groups were statistically indistinguishable in demographics or age-of-BED onset. However, significant between-group differences were observed in the treatment outcome, i.e., abstinence from BE, achieved by 98.5%, 66.7%, 38.7% and 6.7% of participants categorized with mild, moderate, severe, and extreme severity respectively. The outcome analyses repeated in the completer sample (n = 187) yielded the same pattern of the aforementioned intent-to-treat (N = 195) results. The findings provide support for the severity specifier for BED introduced in the DSM-5 as a means of addressing within-group variability in severity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Relationship between the "Childhood Autism Rating Scale: Second Edition" and Clinical Diagnosis Utilizing the DSM-IV-TR and the DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Tamara; Meyer, Allison T.; Van Bourgondien, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    "The Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition" (CARS2; 2010) includes two rating scales; the CARS2-Standard Version (CARS2-ST) and the newly developed CARS2-High Functioning Version (CARS2-HF). To assess the diagnostic agreement between the CARS2 and DSM-IV-TR versus DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), clinicians at…

  20. Disqualified qualifiers: evaluating the utility of the revised DSM-5 definition of potentially traumatic events among area youth following the Boston marathon bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tommy; Carpenter, Aubrey L; Kerns, Caroline E; Elkins, R Meredith; Green, Jennifer Greif; Comer, Jonathan S

    2017-04-01

    The DSM-5 includes a revised definition of the experiences that qualify as potentially traumatic events. This revised definition now offers a clearer and more exclusive definition of what qualifies as a traumatic exposure, but little is known about the revision's applicability to youth populations. The present study evaluated the predictive utility of the revised DSM definitional boundaries of traumatic exposure in a sample of youth exposed to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing and related events METHODS: Caregivers (N = 460) completed surveys 2 to 6 months postbombing about youth experiences during the events and youth posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms RESULTS: Experiencing DSM-5 qualifying traumatic events (DSM-5 QTEs) significantly predicted child PTS symptoms (PTSS), whereas DSM-5 nonqualifying stressful experiences (DSM-5 non-QSEs) did not after accounting for DSM-5 QTEs. Importantly, child age moderated the relationship between DSM-5 QTEs and PTSS such that children 7 and older who experienced DSM-5 QTEs showed greater postbombing PTSS, whereas there was no such relationship in children ages 6 and below CONCLUSIONS: Data largely support the revised posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) definition of QTEs in older youth, and also highlight the need for further refinement of the QTE definition for children ages 6 and below. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. DSM-5 proposed diagnostic criteria for sexual paraphilias: tensions between diagnostic validity and forensic utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2011-01-01

    In order to prevent sexual crimes, "sexual predator" laws now allow indefinite preventive civil commitment of criminals who have completed their prison sentences but are judged to have a paraphilic mental disorder that makes them likely to commit another crime. Such proceedings can bypass the usual protections of criminal law as long as the basis for incarceration is the attribution of a mental disorder. Thus, the difficult conceptual distinction between deviant sexual desires that are mental disorders versus those that are normal variations in sexual preference (even if they are eccentric, repugnant, or illegal if acted upon) has attained critical forensic significance. Yet, the concept of paraphilic disorders - called "perversions" in earlier times - is inherently fuzzy and controversial and thus open to conceptual abuse for social control purposes. Consequently, the criteria used in diagnosing paraphilic disorders deserve careful scrutiny. The DSM-5 sexual disorders work group is proposing substantial revisions to the paraphilia diagnostic criteria in the DSM-5 nosology. It is claimed that the new criteria provide a reconceptualization that clarifies the distinction between normal variation and paraphilic disorder in a way relevant to forensic settings. In this article, after considering the logic of the concept of a paraphilic disorder, I examine each of the proposed changes to the DSM-5 paraphilia criteria and assess their conceptual validity. I argue that the DSM-5 proposals, while containing a kernel of an advance in distinguishing paraphilias from paraphilic disorders, nonetheless would yield criteria for paraphilic disorders that are conceptually invalid in ways open to serious forensic abuse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Poor Utility of the Age of Onset Criterion for DSM-IV Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Recommendations for DSM-V and ICD-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Richard D.; Huang, Hongyan; Henderson, Cynthia A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: To test whether the retrospective reporting of the age of onset impairment criterion for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) required in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV" (DSM-IV) complicates identification of new and known child and adolescent cases later in life. Methods: A birth-records-based…

  3. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A summary of the California Public Utilities Commission`s two competing electric utility restructuring proposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, K

    1995-11-01

    In May 1995, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) released two proposals for restructuring the state`s electric power industry. The two proposals follow more than a year of testimony and public comment after the CPUC issued the ``Blue Book`` (CPUC 1994a) on April 20, 1994, which called for retail wheeling to be phased in to all customers over 5 years. The majority proposal, supported by three of the four CPUC commissioners (one seat was vacant when the proposals were released), calls for creating a central pool, or ``poolco``; setting electric prices to reflect true costs of service, or ``real-time pricing``; and allowing parties to negotiate ``contracts for differences`` between the pool price and the contract price. The minority proposal, sponsored by Commissioner Jesse Knight, calls for retail wheeling, or ``direct access,`` and for utilities to divest or spin off their generating assets. This paper presents a summary of the major provisions of the two CPUC proposals and the possible implications and issues associated with each. It is aimed at researchers who may be aware that various efforts to restructure the electric power industry are under way and want to known more about California`s proposals, as well as those who want to known the implications of certain restructuring proposals for renewable energy technologies. Presented at the end of the paper is a summary of alternative proposals promoted by various stakeholder in response to the two CPUC proposals.

  5. California state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of California. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  6. Utility of the 3Di Short Version for the Diagnostic Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Compatibility with DSM-5

    OpenAIRE

    Slappendel, Geerte; Mandy, Frank; Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank; van der Sijde, Ad; Duvekot, Jorieke; Skuse, David; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    The Developmental Diagnostic Dimensional Interview-short version (3Di-sv) provides a brief standardized parental interview for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study explored its validity, and compatibility with DSM-5 ASD. 3Di-sv classifications showed good sensitivity but low specificity when compared to ADOS-2-confirmed clinical diagnosis. Confirmatory factor analyses found a better fit against a DSM-5 model than a DSM-IV-TR model of ASD. Exploration of the content validity o...

  7. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  8. Health services utilization by school going Omani adolescents and youths with DSM IV mental disorders and barriers to service use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsi Magdi M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent corpus of research suggests that psychiatric disorders amongst adolescents and youths are an emerging global challenge, but there is paucity of studies exploring health services utilization by this age group in Arab region. Aim This study focus on the health services utilization and the barriers among school going adolescents and youths with DSM IV disorders in the country Oman, whose population is predominantly youthful. Methods Representative sample of secondary school Omani adolescents and youths were concurrently interviewed for the (i presence of DSM IV mental disorders using the face-to-face interview, World Mental Health-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI, (ii tendency for health care utilization and (iii predictors of utilization with clinical and demographic background. Results The proportions of lifetime cases having ever made treatment contact are low, being 5.2% for any anxiety disorder and 13.2% for any mood disorder category. None of these anxiety cases made treatment contact in the year of onset of the disorder, and the median delay when they eventually made treatment contact is about 14 years. In any mood disorders category only 3.6% made contact within the 1st year of onset with the median delay in initial treatment contact is two years for the Bipolar disorder (broad, four years for Any Mood disorder and nine years for the Major Depressive Disorder group. Male gender is significantly associated with less likelihood of making treatment contact when suffering from Social phobia (p = 0.000, Major Depressive Disorder (p = 0.000 and Bipolar Disorder (p = 0.000. The younger cohorts of 14-16 years and 17-18 years of Social phobic made significantly less lifetime any treatment contact (p = 0.000. The 14-16 year olds were significantly less likely to make lifetime any treatment contact for Bipolar Mood disorder (p = 0.000, while the 17-18 group were 1.5 times more likely to do so. Over past

  9. A future Demand Side Management (DSM) opportunity for utility as variable renewable penetrate scale up using agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ines, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Modi, V.; Robertson, A. W.; Lall, U.; Kocaman Ayse, S.; Chaudhary, S.; Kumar, A.; Ganapathy, A.; Kumar, A.; Mishra, V.

    2015-12-01

    Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as smart metering, incentive based schemes, payments for turning off loads or rescheduling loads. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less power during periods of peak demand, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need for investments in networks and/or power plants for meeting peak demands. Electricity use can vary dramatically on short and medium time frames, and the pricing system may not reflect the instantaneous cost as additional higher-cost that are brought on-line. In addition, the capacity or willingness of electricity consumers to adjust to prices by altering elasticity of demand may be low, particularly over short time frames. In the scenario of Indian grid setup, the retail customers do not follow real-time pricing and it is difficult to incentivize the utility companies for continuing the peak demand supply. A question for the future is how deeper penetration of renewable will be handled? This is a challenging problem since one has to deal with high variability, while managing loss of load probabilities. In the case of managing the peak demand using agriculture, in the future as smart metering matures with automatic turn on/off for a pump, it will become possible to provide an ensured amount of water or energy to the farmer while keeping the grid energized for 24 hours. Supply scenarios will include the possibility of much larger penetration of solar and wind into the grid. While, in absolute terms these sources are small contributors, their role will inevitably grow but DSM using agriculture could help reduce the capital cost. The other option is of advancing or delaying pump operating cycle even by several hours, will still ensure

  10. DSM pocket guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    It has been estimated that if electricity were used more efficiently with commercially available end-use technologies, 24%--44% of the nation's current demand for electricity could be eliminated. Almost all major electric utilities in the west are investigated such demand-side management (DSM) opportunities. In some service territories, for example, improved efficiency could soon produce as much power as that from new coal-fired plants and produce it at a lower cost. Even utilities that currently have excess capacity are finding that DSM offers an opportunity to build efficient end-use stock to help them meet their future load shape objectives. Utility DSM programs typically consist of several measures designed to modify the utility's load shape (for example, innovative rate structures, direct utility control of loads, promotion of energy-efficient technologies, and customer education). The coordinated implementation of such measures requires planning, analysis of options, engineering, marketing, monitoring, and other coordination activities. This guidebook addresses one facet of an overall DSM program: selection of end-use technologies within the electrical utilities. This guidebook is intended to be a quick reference source both for utility field representatives in their customer interactions and for utility planners in the early stages of developing a DSM program. Finally, this guidebook is directed primarily at small municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives within the Western Area Power Administration (Western) service area.

  11. DSM pocket guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    It has been estimated that if electricity were used more efficiently with commercially available end-use technologies, 24%--44% of the nation's current demand for electricity could be eliminated. Almost all major electric utilities in the west are investigating such demand-side management (DSM) opportunities. In some service territories, for example, improved efficiency could soon produce as much power as that from new coal-fired plants and produce it at a lower cost. Even utilities that currently have excess capacity are finding that DSM offers an opportunity to build efficient end-use stock to help them meet their future load shape objectives. Utility DSM programs typically consist of several measures designed to modify the utility's load shape (for example, innovative rate structures, direct utility control of loads, promotion of energy-efficient technologies, and customer education). The coordinated implementation of such measures requires planning, analysis of options, engineering, marketing, monitoring, and other coordination activities. This guidebook addresses one facet of an overall DSM program: selection of end-use technologies within the electrical utilities. This guidebook is intended to be a quick reference source both for utility field representatives in their customer interactions and for utility planners in the early stages of developing a DSM program. Finally, this guidebook is directed primarily at small municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives within the Western Area Power Administration (Western) service area.

  12. Utility of the 3Di Short Version for the Diagnostic Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Compatibility with DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Slappendel (Geerte); F. Mandy (Frank); J. van der Ende (Jan); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); A. van der Sijde (Ad); J. Duvekot (Jorieke); D. Skuse (David); K. Greaves-Lord (Kirstin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Developmental Diagnostic Dimensional Interview-short version (3Di-sv) provides a brief standardized parental interview for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study explored its validity, and compatibility with DSM-5 ASD. 3Di-sv classifications showed good sensitivity but

  13. The Clinical Utility of the Proposed DSM-5 Callous-Unemotional Subtype of Conduct Disorder in Young Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Dustin; Stepp, Stephanie; Hipwell, Alison; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda; Loeber, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A callous-unemotional (CU) subtype of conduct disorder (CD) has been proposed as an addition to the fifth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)." This study tested the hypothesis that young girls with the CU subtype of CD would exhibit more severe antisocial behavior and less severe internalizing…

  14. Utility of the 3Di Short Version for the Diagnostic Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Compatibility with DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slappendel, Geerte; Mandy, William; van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C.; van der Sijde, Ad; Duvekot, Jorieke; Skuse, David; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    The Developmental Diagnostic Dimensional Interview-short version (3Di-sv) provides a brief standardized parental interview for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study explored its validity, and compatibility with DSM-5 ASD. 3Di-sv classifications showed good sensitivity but low specificity when compared to ADOS-2-confirmed clinical…

  15. Sheltering patterns and utilization following the 2007 southern California wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Thomas D; Jenkins, J Lee; Sauer, Lauren M; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Calvello, Emilie; Hsu, Edbert

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 southern California wildfires resulted in over 500,000 residents being displaced. A team from Johns Hopkins University and the American Red Cross surveyed 163 families at shelters and local assistance centers during the disaster. The responses were used to evaluate the needs and movement patterns of a displaced population. The data were also used to determine the risk factors associated with needing sheltering. There is a lower than expected reliance on public shelters, and displaced persons move frequently.

  16. Comparing the utility of DSM-5 Section II and III antisocial personality disorder diagnostic approaches for capturing psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Maples, Jessica L; MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    The current study compares the 2 diagnostic approaches (Section II vs. Section III) included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) for diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in terms of their relations with psychopathic traits and externalizing behaviors (EBs). The Section III approach to ASPD, which is more explicitly trait-based than the Section II approach, also includes a psychopathy specifier (PS) that was created with the goal of making the diagnosis of ASPD more congruent with psychopathy. In a community sample of individuals currently receiving mental health treatment (N = 106), ratings of the 2 DSM-5 diagnostic approaches were compared in relation to measures of psychopathy, as well as indices of EBs. Both DSM-5 ASPD approaches were significantly related to the psychopathy scores, although the Section III approach accounted for almost twice the amount of variance when compared with the Section II approach. Relatively little of this predictive advantage, however, was due to the PS, as these traits manifested little evidence of incremental validity in relation to existing psychopathy measures and EBs, with the exception of a measure of fearless dominance. Overall, the DSM-5 Section III diagnostic approach for ASPD is more convergent with the construct of psychopathy, from which ASPD was originally derived. These improvements, however, are due primarily to the new trait-based focus in the Section III ASPD diagnosis rather than the assessment of personality dysfunction or the inclusion of additional "psychopathy-specific" traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. A dimensional approach to assessing personality functioning: examining personality trait domains utilizing DSM-IV personality disorder criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Fowler, J; Sharp, Carla; Kalpakci, Allison; Madan, Alok; Clapp, Joshua; Allen, Jon G; Christopher Frueh, B; Oldham, John M

    2015-01-01

    This study compared a dimensional, trait domain approach to characterizing personality pathology with the traditional polythetic approach with respect to their associations with interpersonal functioning and personality traits from the five factor model. Psychiatric inpatients (N=1476) were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II personality disorders. Dimensional representations of trait domains were derived from reorganizing DSM-IV criteria into personality trait domains from DSM-5 Alternative Model. Dimensional scores and personality disorder (PD) total criterion scores served as independent variables in predicting interpersonal profile clusters, as well as extraversion, agreeableness conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness from the five factor model traits. Trait domain scores and PD criteria totals were significantly correlated with submissive interpersonal style yet none proved significant in regression analyses. Avoidant and borderline PD total criteria were negatively associated with a normative interpersonal style. Combined trait domain of detachment and avoidant PD total criteria predicted a hostile/withdrawn interpersonal style. The trait domain of detachment was negatively associated with five factor traits of extroversion, whereas borderline PD total criteria were negatively associated with conscientiousness. Avoidant and borderline PD total criteria were positively associated with neuroticism. The cross-cutting dimensional approach provided useful information in predicting a hostile/withdrawn interpersonal style as well as extroversion. Importantly, PD criterion scores and dimensional trait scores combined to predict this interpersonal style providing support to the alternative model of personality diagnosis in DSM-5. Clinicians are encouraged to assess dimensions of personality traits as these are related to interpersonal problems frequently encountered in psychiatric settings. While potentially useful, the dimensional

  18. DSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Mikkel; Jónsson, Hjalti; Hougaard, Esben

    2013-01-01

    I maj måned i år udkom den længe ventede opdatering af diagnoselisten DSM-IV. Her følger en gennemgang af indholdet......I maj måned i år udkom den længe ventede opdatering af diagnoselisten DSM-IV. Her følger en gennemgang af indholdet...

  19. Construct validity and clinical utility of current research criteria of DSM-5 somatic symptom disorder diagnosis in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Bialas, Patric; Welsch, Katja; Wolfe, Frederick

    2015-06-01

    The validity and clinical utility of current research criteria of the DSM 5 category somatic symptom disorder (SSD) needs to be tested outside the setting of psychiatry. Consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) were evaluated by medical examination, psychiatric interview and self-report questionnaires in an outpatient pain medicine center. The diagnosis of SSD was established using published research criteria. The discriminative concurrent criterion validity of SSD was tested by comparing FMS-patients with and without SSD as to the amount of impairment and of health care seeking. Two clinicians blinded as to the purpose of the study, assessed the medical reports of patients after the evaluation for the determination of the need for psychotherapy based on the German FMS - guideline recommendations (clinical utility). 25.6% of 156 patients met the criteria of SSD. Patients meeting SSD criteria scored significantly higher in a self-report measure of disability. There were no significant differences in the number of patients on sick leave or applying for disability pension and in self-reported doctor visits and physiotherapy in the previous six months. 95.0% of patients with SSD and 71.6% of patients without SSD met the criteria of a current anxiety or depressive disorder as assessed by the psychiatric interview. 80.0% of patients with SSD and 66.7% of patients without SSD received a recommendation for psychotherapy. The construct validity and clinical utility of current research criteria of DSM 5 category SSD were limited in German patients with FMS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-07-01

    The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

  1. Leadership skills for the California electric utility industry: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, Michael

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine the skills and knowledge necessary for leaders in the California electric utility industry in 2020. With rapid industry changes, skills to effectively lead and stay competitive are undetermined. Leaders must manage an increasingly hostile social and political environment, incorporate new technology, and deal with an aging workforce and infrastructure. Methodology. This study utilized a qualitative case study design to determine the factors that influence the skills leaders will require in 2020. It incorporated the perspectives of current electric utility leaders while looking with a future lens. Findings. Interviews were conducted with transmission and distribution (T&D) directors at 3 investor-owned public electric utilities headquartered in California. The questions followed an open-ended format to gather responses as perceived by electric utility leaders for each research question category: overall skills, aging workforce, regulation, technology, and leading younger generations. The research resulted in 18 major themes: 5 for overall skills, 3 for aging workforce, 4 for regulation, 3 for technology, and 3 for leading younger generations. Conclusions. The study identified leadership skills including the ability to embrace, leverage, and stay current with technology; understand and provide a clear vision for the future; increase creativity; manage the next set of workers; motivate during a time of great change; prepare for knowledge transfer and change in workforce culture; manage regulatory expectations; expand potential utility opportunities; leverage "big data"; allow worker collaboration; and understand what drives younger generations. Recommendations. California-based electric utility leaders can remain effective by implementing key strategies identified herein. Further research could examine perspectives of additional utility leaders who lead in organizational units outside of T&D, expand the research to

  2. Comparability of DSM-IV and DSM-5 ASD Research Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazefsky, C.A.; McPartland, J.C.; Gastgeb, H.Z.; Minshew, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    DSM-5 criteria for ASD have been criticized for being too restrictive, especially for more cognitively-able individuals. It is unclear, however, if high-functioning individuals deemed eligible for research via standardized diagnostic assessments would meet DSM-5 criteria. This study investigated the impact of DSM-5 on the diagnostic status of 498 high-functioning participants with ASD research diagnoses. The percent of participants satisfying all DSM-5-requirements varied significantly with reliance on data from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS; 33%) versus Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R; 83%), highlighting the impact of diagnostic methodology on ability to document DSM-5 symptoms. Utilizing combined ADOS/ADI-R data, 93% of participants met DSM-5 criteria, which suggests likely continuity between DSM-IV and DSM-5 research samples characterized with these instruments in combination. PMID:23011251

  3. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Seven. California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of California governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  4. DSM-V from the perspective of the DSM-IV experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, B Timothy

    2007-11-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the development of the diagnostic criteria for eating disorders in DSM-IV. The process by which DSM-IV was developed is reviewed, including perspectives on what constitutes diagnostic validity and clinical utility, and their importance in assessing proposed changes in diagnostic criteria. The question of whether alterations in diagnostic criteria would clearly improve clinical utility was a major consideration in the DSM-IV process. Because of concerns that changes in diagnostic criteria would be disruptive and might entail loss of established knowledge, the DSM-IV Task Force assumed a generally conservative stance vis-à-vis change. The process of developing DSM-V is just beginning, and it is far from clear what alterations in diagnostic criteria for eating disorders will occur. However, the evolution of DSM-IV may provide a useful perspective on the development of DSM-V. (c) 2007 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Golden Eagle mortality at a utility-scale wind energy facility near Palm Springs, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) mortality associated with wind energy turbines and infrastructure is under-reported and weakly substantiated in the published literature. I report two cases of mortality at a utility-scale renewable energy facility near Palm Springs, California. The facility has been in operation since 1984 and included 460 65KW turbines mounted on 24.4 m or 42.7 m lattice-style towers with 8 m rotor diameters. One mortality event involved a juvenile eagle that was struck and killed by a spinning turbine blade on 31 August, 1995. The tower was 24.4 m high. The other involved an immature female that was struck by a spinning blade on another 24.4 m tower on 17 April, 1997 and was later euthanized due to the extent of internal injuries. Other raptor mortalities incidentally observed at the site, and likely attributable to turbines, included three Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) found near turbines.

  6. Utility of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5-Brief Form (PID-5-BF) in the Measurement of Maladaptive Personality and Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Salekin, Randall T

    2016-11-07

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth edition (DSM-5) Personality and Personality Disorders workgroup developed the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5) for the assessment of the alternative trait model for DSM-5 Along with this measure, the American Psychiatric Association published an abbreviated version, the PID-5-Brief form (PID-5-BF). Although this measure is available on the DSM-5 website for use, only two studies have evaluated its psychometric properties and validity and no studies have examined the U.S. version of this measure. The current study evaluated the reliability, factor structure, and construct validity of PID-5-BF scale scores. This included an evaluation of the scales' associations with Section II PDs, a well-validated dimensional measure of personality psychopathology, and broad externalizing and internalizing psychopathology measures. We found support for the reliability of PID-5-BF scales as well as for the factor structure of the measure. Furthermore, a series of correlation and regression analyses showed conceptually expected associations between PID-5-BF and external criterion variables. Finally, we compared the correlations with external criterion measures to those of the full-length PID-5 and PID-5-Short form. Intraclass correlation analyses revealed a comparable pattern of correlations across all three measures, thereby supporting the use of the PID-5-BF as a screening measure of dimensional maladaptive personality traits. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Validity and clinical utility of the DSM-5 severity specifier for bulimia nervosa: results from a multisite sample of patients who received evidence-based treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Bartoli, Francesco; Caslini, Manuela; Crocamo, Cristina; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    A new "severity specifier" for bulimia nervosa (BN), based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviours (IWCBs), was added to the DSM-5 as a means of documenting heterogeneity and variability in the severity of the disorder. Yet, evidence for its validity in clinical populations, including prognostic significance for treatment outcome, is currently lacking. Existing data from 281 treatment-seeking patients with DSM-5 BN, who received the best available treatment for their disorder (manual-based cognitive behavioural therapy; CBT) in an outpatient setting, were re-analysed to examine whether these patients subgrouped based on the DSM-5 severity levels would show meaningful and consistent differences on (a) a range of clinical variables assessed at pre-treatment and (b) post-treatment abstinence from IWCBs. Results highlight that the mild, moderate, severe, and extreme severity groups were statistically distinguishable on 22 variables assessed at pre-treatment regarding eating disorder pathological features, maintenance factors of BN, associated (current) and lifetime psychopathology, social maladjustment and illness-specific functional impairment, and abstinence outcome. Mood intolerance, a maintenance factor of BN but external to eating disorder pathological features (typically addressed within CBT), emerged as the primary clinical variable distinguishing the severity groups showing a differential treatment response. Overall, the findings speak to the concurrent and predictive validity of the new DSM-5 severity criterion for BN and are important because a common benchmark informing patients, clinicians, and researchers about severity of the disorder and allowing severity fluctuation and patient's progress to be tracked does not exist so far. Implications for future research are outlined.

  8. DSM-5 field survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochner, Christine; Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania).......The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania)....

  9. Affairs of power: Restructuring California's electric utility industry, 1968-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, William Allan

    This dissertation studies the process of change in the political economy of electric utilities. Following two decades of continual growth during the nation's post-World War Two economic and population boom, the electric power industry confronted increasing challenges to its traditional operating practices and cultural values, nowhere with greater intensity than in California. Pressure for change came from outside forces who opposed utilities' business practices, assailed their traditional vertically-integrated structure, questioned the political assumptions that sustained their monopoly status, and ultimately wrested away access to the once tightly controlled technology of electric generation and transmission. Because managers of both investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities continued to rely upon long-standing economic and technical assumptions derived from deeply held cultural values sustained by decades of business success, they were rendered unable to comprehend and unwilling to accommodate change. Persistent mistrust between the publicly-owned and privately-owned sectors further weakened the industry's ability to work cooperatively in the face of crucial challenges. Thus encumbered by endemic structural jealousy, technological path dependency, and organizational stasis, the industry did not respond with sufficient innovation to new social values and altering economic conditions, ultimately resulting in the discarding of the old political economy of regulated monopolism. Five precepts of economic history are identified as crucial elements of the process of change. First, the tension between protection and entry, and the related issue of access to technology, contributes to creation and modification of the political economy in which economic institutions function. Second, submission to governmental regulatory powers allows certain industries to control entry, restrict access, and protect themselves from the dynamics of competitive change. Third, an

  10. Industrial end-use forecasting that incorporates DSM and air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutt, T. [California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Flory, J. [Tabors Caramanis & Associates, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The California Energy Commission (CEC) and major enregy utilities in California have generally depended on simple aggregate intensity or economic models to forecast energy use in the process industry sector (which covers large industries employing basic processes to transform raw materials, such as paper mills, glass plants, and cement plants). Two recent trends suggests that the time has come to develop a more disaggregate process industry forecasting model. First, recent efforts to improve air quality, especially by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), could significantly affect energy use by the process industry by altering the technologies and processes employed in order to reduce emissions. Second, there is a renewed interest in Demand-Side Management (DSM), not only for utility least-cost planning, but also for improving the economic competitiveness and environmental compliance of the pro{minus}cess industries. A disaggregate forecasting model is critical to help the CEC and utilities evaluate both the air quality and DSM impacts on energy use. A crucial obstacle to the development and use of these detailed process industry forecasting models is the lack of good data about disaggregate energy use in the sector. The CEC is nearing completion of a project to begin to overcome this lack of data. The project is testing methds of developing detailed energy use data, collecting an initial database for a large portion of southern California, and providing recommendations and direction for further data collection efforts.

  11. [Sexual disorders in the DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethals, K; Cosyns, P

    2014-01-01

    In DSM-IV-TR, the subject of 'sexual and gender identity disorders' was dealt with in one chapter; in DSM-5, however, the subject is divided into three chapters, namely sexual dysfunctions , gender dysphoria, and paraphilic disorders. To discuss the above-mentioned changes. The one-chapter version in DSM-IV is compared with the three-chapter contribution in DSM-5 and the differing criteria are tested for their clinical utility. There are minor changes in the chapter 'sexual dysfunctions'. The content of the chapters on 'gender dysphoria' and 'paraphilic disorders' differs substantially from the content of the sections on these subjects in DSM-IV. In the section on gender dysphoria the term 'sex' has been replaced by 'gender' and the term 'identity disorder' has been dropped. With regard to paraphilias, a distinction is now made between a paraphilia and a paraphilic disorder. The DSM-5 makes a new distinction between pathology (paraphilic disorder) on the one hand and other unusual or unconventional non-pathological sexual behavior on the other hand. In the DSM-5 the highly relevant clinical concept 'hypersexuality' has still not been incorporated as a separate category. In the DSM-5 many parts of the chapters on sexual disorders have been substantially revised.

  12. Scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini, utilizes deep-water, hypoxic zone in the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, S J; Klimley, A P; Muhlia-Melo, A F

    2009-05-01

    A hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini tracked for 74 days revealed an expansion of the range of vertical distribution for the species to include the extreme hypoxic environment of the oxygen minimum layer in the Gulf of California.

  13. Compatibility of current DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for cocaine use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Steven L; Kopak, Albert M; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2012-06-01

    The present study examined the compatibility of the current DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for cocaine use disorders (CUD) among state prison inmates, and evaluated the diagnostic utility of the proposed criteria in accounting for DSM-IV "diagnostic orphans" (i.e., individuals who meet one or two of the diagnostic criteria for substance dependence yet fail to report indications of substance abuse). Data were derived from routine clinical assessments of adult male inmates (N=6871) recently admitted to the Minnesota Department of Corrections state prison system from 2000 to 2003. An automated (i.e., computer-prompted) version of the Substance Use Disorder Diagnostic Schedule-IV (SUDDS-IV; Hoffmann & Harrison, 1995) was administered to all inmates as part of routine assessments. DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria were coded using proposed guidelines. The past 12-month prevalence of DSM-IV CUDs was 12.7% (Abuse, 3.8%, Dependence, 8.9%), while 11.0% met past 12-month DSM-5 criteria for a CUD (Moderate [MCUD], 1.7%; Severe [SCUD], 9.3%). When DSM-5 criteria were applied, 11.8% of the DSM-IV diagnostic orphans received a MCUD diagnosis. The vast majority of those with no diagnosis (99.6%) continued to have no diagnosis, and a similar proportion who met dependence criteria (98.4%) met SCUD criteria of the proposed DSM-5. Most of the variation in diagnostic classifications was accounted for by those with a current abuse diagnosis. The proposed DSM-5 criteria perform similarly to DSM-IV criteria in terms of the observed past 12-month CUD prevalence and diagnostic classifications. The proposed criteria appear to account for diagnostic orphans that may warrant a diagnosis. DSM-IV abuse cases were most affected when DSM-5 criteria were applied. Additional criteria, beyond those included in the proposed DSM-5 changes, concerning use to relieve emotional stress and preoccupation with use were frequently endorsed by those with a proposed DSM-5 diagnosis. Copyright © 2012

  14. Predicting Trophic Interactions and Habitat Utilization in the California Current Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Figure 4. Sea surface temperature (°C; top), phytoplankton concentration (mmolN m-3; middle) and zooplankton concentration (mmolN m-3; bottom...which the integrated ecosystem model reproduces environmental variability in the California Current (e.g., temperature , phytoplankton ). The 4D-Var 6...considering patterns of covariability between environmental variables (e.g., temperature , primary production) and foraging patterns and success of

  15. Predicting Trophic Interactions and Habitat Utilization in the California Current Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    pelagic species (sardines and anchovies), with growth based on bioenergetics, temperature and prey generated from the ROMS and NEMURO models. The IBM for...on field data on male CSL from central California). For simplicity, any changes in body mass are ultimately due to changes in the fat and protein...mass only, while at-sea, field metabolic rate is modeled as a function of the total distance traveled by the individual sea lion in one day. The

  16. Achieving Land, Energy, and Environmental Compatibility: Utility-Scale Solar Energy Potential and Land-Use in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffacker, M. K.; Hernandez, R. R.; Field, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Solar energy is an archetype renewable energy technology with great potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions when substituted for carbon-intensive energy. Utility-scale solar energy (USSE; i.e., > 1 MW) necessitates large quantities of space making the efficient use of land for USSE development critical to realizing its full potential. However, studies elucidating the interaction between land-use and utility-scale solar energy (USSE) are limited. In this study, we assessed 1) the theoretical and technical potential of terrestrial-based USSE systems, and 2) land-use and land-cover change impacts from actual USSE installations (> 20 MW; planned, under construction, operating), using California as a case study due to its early adoption of renewable energy systems, unique constraints on land availability, immense energy demand, and vast natural resources. We used topo-climatic (e.g., slope, irradiance), infrastructural (e.g., proximity to transmission lines), and ecological constraints (e.g., threatened and endangered species) to determine highly favorable, favorable, and unfavorable locations for USSE and to assess its technical potential. We found that the theoretical potential of photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) in California is 26,097 and 29,422 kWh/m2/day, respectively. We identified over 150 planned, under construction, and operating USSE installations in California, ranging in size from 20 to 1,000 MW. Currently, 29% are located on shrub- and scrublands, 23% on cultivated crop land, 13% on pasture/hay areas, 11% on grassland/herbaceous and developed open space, and 7% in the built environment. Understanding current land-use decisions of USSE systems and assessing its future potential can be instructive for achieving land, energy, and environmental compatibility, especially for other global regions that share similar resource demands and limitations.

  17. DSM-5 Personality Traits and DSM-IV Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Thomas, Katherine M.; Markon, Kristian E.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Krueger, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Two issues pertinent to the DSM-5 proposal for personality pathology, the recovery of DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) by proposed DSM-5 traits and the validity of the proposed DSM-5 hybrid model which incorporates both personality pathology symptoms and maladaptive traits, were evaluated in a large undergraduate sample (N = 808). Proposed DSM-5 traits as assessed with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 explained a substantial proportion of variance in DSM-IV PDs as assessed with the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+, and trait indicators of the six proposed DSM-5 PDs were mostly specific to those disorders with some exceptions. Regression analyses support the DSM-5 hybrid model in that pathological traits and an indicator of general personality pathology severity provided incremental information about PDs. Findings are discussed in the context of broader issues around the proposed DSM-5 model of personality disorders. PMID:22250660

  18. Understanding Factors that Influence Health Care Utilization Among Mixtec and Zapotec Women in a Farmworker Community in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Annette E; Young, Sandra; Moe, Emily; Bastani, Roshan; Wentzell, Emily

    2017-10-03

    This paper examines health care utilization among indigenous immigrants from Oaxaca, Mexico, who have settled in a farmworker community in southern California. In 2016, two trained Spanish-Mixteco and Spanish-Zapoteco bi-lingual interviewers conducted in-depth interviews with 44 indigenous women residing in Oxnard, California on issues that affect health care utilization. Interviews were conducted in Mixteco, Zapoteco and Spanish and were coded to identify structural, cultural, and provider-related barriers to health care utilization. Five bi-lingual Spanish-Mixteco indigenous interpreters employed at local clinics were also interviewed. Many women reported lack of health insurance, inability to pay, language barriers, long waiting times, rushed encounters with providers, and seeking western medical care only after home remedies did not work. However, several women were able to access routine health care services, often with support from indigenous interpreters employed at clinics. Interviews with five interpreters found that they provided assistance with interpretation during medical encounters and appointment making. They also educated patients about upcoming exams, identified low-cost services and insurance programs available to patients, assisted with paperwork and occasionally educated physicians on behalf of their patients. In addition to addressing barriers to health care access our findings suggest the importance of identifying and leveraging community assets, such as indigenous navigators, when developing programs for such underserved communities. Our findings can inform best practice in settings that provide health care to indigenous populations and may also apply to settings that provide health care to other immigrant communities that have very limited familiarity and contact with western health care.

  19. California Women and the Strategies Utilized on the Path to the Superintendency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Anna-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify leadership strategies utilized and the barriers encountered by females in pursuit of the role of superintendent. This study also intended to identify the strategies women used to overcome these barriers. Methodology: This study utilized descriptive research. Descriptive research involves gathering…

  20. [DSM-5 and culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, J T V M

    2012-01-01

    The leading diagnostic classification system used in the Dutch mental health care system is the DSM-IV(Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). The next version, DSM-5, will probably be published in 2013. The new version aims to pay more attention to cultural diversity; this will have implications for treatment and research. To discuss the most important aspects of DSM-5 that have culture relevance. A Medline search was conducted for the period 1990- 2011 on the basis of the search terms 'DSM', 'ICD', 'DSM-classification, 'psychiatric classification', 'psychiatric diagnosis', 'culture' and 'diversity'. Taking the example of depression and anxiety, one must conclude that the diagnostic system does not achieve its aims. It might be possible to compensate for this shortcoming by introducing a dimensional-categorical system. Such a system would be particularly important for cultural psychiatry and psychology in relation to matters such as subsyndromal symptom categories, experience of illness, behaviour during illness, the transition from normality to deviancy, culturally responsive research, and links to cultural neuroscience. It looks as if such a major paradigm shift will not occur until DSM-6.

  1. Power Flow Simulations of a More Renewable California Grid Utilizing Wind and Solar Insolation Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, E. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Dvorak, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Time series power flow analyses of the California electricity grid are performed with extensive addition of intermittent renewable power. The study focuses on the effects of replacing non-renewable and imported (out-of-state) electricity with wind and solar power on the reliability of the transmission grid. Simulations are performed for specific days chosen throughout the year to capture seasonal fluctuations in load, wind, and insolation. Wind farm expansions and new wind farms are proposed based on regional wind resources and time-dependent wind power output is calculated using a meteorological model and the power curves of specific wind turbines. Solar power is incorporated both as centralized and distributed generation. Concentrating solar thermal plants are modeled using local insolation data and the efficiencies of pre-existing plants. Distributed generation from rooftop PV systems is included using regional insolation data, efficiencies of common PV systems, and census data. The additional power output of these technologies offsets power from large natural gas plants and is balanced for the purposes of load matching largely with hydroelectric power and by curtailment when necessary. A quantitative analysis of the effects of this significant shift in the electricity portfolio of the state of California on power availability and transmission line congestion, using a transmission load-flow model, is presented. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to determine the effects of forecasting errors in wind and insolation on load-matching and transmission line congestion.

  2. Beyond the DSM-IV: Assumptions, Alternatives, and Alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Shane J.; Edwards, Lisa M.; Pedrotti, Jennifer Teramoto; Prosser, Ellie C.; LaRue, Stephanie; Spalitto, Susan Vehige; Ulven, Jon C.

    2006-01-01

    Current diagnostic processes reflect the limitations and utility of the framework of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Clinical information in the DSM-IV's 5-axis system almost exclusively focuses on weaknesses and pathology and is summarized in a flawed…

  3. Strengthening the DSM: incorporating resilience and cultural competence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, Betty; Petrovich, Anne

    2011-01-01

    ... with which to communicate, however, its focus remained on psychopathology- what was wrong with the organism. DSMIII and its followers, DSM-III-R and DSM-IV, did not discuss the other side of the coin- how to recognize and utilize an individual's resilience in the treatment of their mental disorder. With this book, Drs. Garcia and Petrovich ...

  4. Photogrammetric DSM denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nex, F.; Gerke, M.

    2014-08-01

    Image matching techniques can nowadays provide very dense point clouds and they are often considered a valid alternative to LiDAR point cloud. However, photogrammetric point clouds are often characterized by a higher level of random noise compared to LiDAR data and by the presence of large outliers. These problems constitute a limitation in the practical use of photogrammetric data for many applications but an effective way to enhance the generated point cloud has still to be found. In this paper we concentrate on the restoration of Digital Surface Models (DSM), computed from dense image matching point clouds. A photogrammetric DSM, i.e. a 2.5D representation of the surface is still one of the major products derived from point clouds. Four different algorithms devoted to DSM denoising are presented: a standard median filter approach, a bilateral filter, a variational approach (TGV: Total Generalized Variation), as well as a newly developed algorithm, which is embedded into a Markov Random Field (MRF) framework and optimized through graph-cuts. The ability of each algorithm to recover the original DSM has been quantitatively evaluated. To do that, a synthetic DSM has been generated and different typologies of noise have been added to mimic the typical errors of photogrammetric DSMs. The evaluation reveals that standard filters like median and edge preserving smoothing through a bilateral filter approach cannot sufficiently remove typical errors occurring in a photogrammetric DSM. The TGV-based approach much better removes random noise, but large areas with outliers still remain. Our own method which explicitly models the degradation properties of those DSM outperforms the others in all aspects.

  5. [Addictive behaviours from DSM-IV to DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, W

    2014-01-01

    The 5th edition of the DSM was published in May, 2013. The new edition incorporates important changes in the classification of addiction. To compare the classification of addictive behaviours presented in DSM-IV with the classification presented in DSM-5 and to comment on the changes introduced into the new version. First of all, the historical developments of the concept of addiction and the classification of addictive behaviours up to DSM-IV are summarised. Then the changes that have been incorporated into DSM-5 are described. The main changes are: (1) DSM-IV substance related disorders and DSM-IV pathological gambling have been combined into one new DSM-5 category, namely 'Substance Related and Addictive Disorders'; (2) DSM-IV abuse and dependence have been combined into one new DSM-5 diagnosis, namely 'Substance Use Disorder'; (2a) the DSM-IV abuse criterion 'recurrent substance-related legal problems' and the DSM-5 criterion 'craving' has been introduced; and (2b) the criteria for (partial) remission have been sharpened. DSM-5 is an improvement on DSM-IV, but for the diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder and the treatment of a psychiatric patient, classification needs to be complemented with staging and profiling.

  6. DSM-5 field survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochner, Christine; Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Pathologic skin picking (skin picking disorder [SPD]) is a prevalent and disabling condition, which has received increasing study. It is timely to consider including SPD in DSM-5. The aim of this field survey was to investigate possible diagnostic criteria for SPD.......Pathologic skin picking (skin picking disorder [SPD]) is a prevalent and disabling condition, which has received increasing study. It is timely to consider including SPD in DSM-5. The aim of this field survey was to investigate possible diagnostic criteria for SPD....

  7. Evaluating options for balancing the water-electricity nexus in California: Part 2--greenhouse gas and renewable energy utilization impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarroja, Brian; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sobhani, Reza; Feldman, David; Jiang, Sunny; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-11-01

    A study was conducted to compare the technical potential and effectiveness of different water supply options for securing water availability in a large-scale, interconnected water supply system under historical and climate-change augmented inflow and demand conditions. Part 2 of the study focused on determining the greenhouse gas and renewable energy utilization impacts of different pathways to stabilize major surface reservoir levels. Using a detailed electric grid model and taking into account impacts on the operation of the water supply infrastructure, the greenhouse gas emissions and effect on overall grid renewable penetration level was calculated for each water supply option portfolio that successfully secured water availability from Part 1. The effects on the energy signature of water supply infrastructure were found to be just as important as that of the fundamental processes for each option. Under historical (baseline) conditions, many option portfolios were capable of securing surface reservoir levels with a net neutral or negative effect on emissions and a benefit for renewable energy utilization. Under climate change augmented conditions, however, careful selection of the water supply option portfolio was required to prevent imposing major emissions increases for the system. Overall, this analysis provided quantitative insight into the tradeoffs associated with choosing different pathways for securing California's water supply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors Affecting Mental Health Service Utilization Among California Public College and University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Woodbridge, Michelle W; Mendelsohn, Joshua; D'Amico, Elizabeth J; Osilla, Karen Chan; Jaycox, Lisa H; Eberhart, Nicole K; Burnam, Audrey M; Stein, Bradley D

    2016-08-01

    Unmet need for mental health treatment among college students is a significant public health issue. Despite having access to campus mental health providers and insurance to cover services, many college students do not receive necessary services. This study examined factors influencing college students' use of mental health services. Online survey data for 33,943 students and 14,018 staff and faculty at 39 college campuses in California were analyzed by using logistic regressions examining the association between students' use of mental health services and student characteristics, campus environment, and the presence of a formal network of campus mental health clinics. Nineteen percent of students reported current serious psychological distress in the past 30 days, and 11% reported significant mental health-related academic impairment in the past year. Twenty percent reported using mental health services while at their current college, 10% by using campus services and 10% off-campus services. Students on campuses with a formal network of mental health clinics were more likely than students at community colleges to receive mental health services (odds ratio [OR] range=1.68-1.69), particularly campus services (OR=3.47-5.72). Students on campuses that are supportive of mental health issues were more likely to receive mental health services (OR=1.22), particularly on campus (OR=1.65). Students with active (versus low) coping skills were consistently more likely to use mental health services. Establishing more campus mental health clinics, fostering supportive campus environments, and increasing students' coping skills may reduce unmet need for mental health services among college students.

  9. Convergent, discriminant, and criterion validity of DSM-5 traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalch, Matthew M; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Section III of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th edi.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) contains a system for diagnosing personality disorder based in part on assessing 25 maladaptive traits. Initial research suggests that this aspect of the system improves the validity and clinical utility of the Section II Model. The Computer Adaptive Test of Personality Disorder (CAT-PD; Simms et al., 2011) contains many similar traits as the DSM-5, as well as several additional traits seemingly not covered in the DSM-5. In this study we evaluate the convergent and discriminant validity between the DSM-5 traits, as assessed by the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger et al., 2012), and CAT-PD in an undergraduate sample, and test whether traits included in the CAT-PD but not the DSM-5 provide incremental validity in association with clinically relevant criterion variables. Results supported the convergent and discriminant validity of the PID-5 and CAT-PD scales in their assessment of 23 out of 25 DSM-5 traits. DSM-5 traits were consistently associated with 11 criterion variables, despite our having intentionally selected clinically relevant criterion constructs not directly assessed by DSM-5 traits. However, the additional CAT-PD traits provided incremental information above and beyond the DSM-5 traits for all criterion variables examined. These findings support the validity of pathological trait models in general and the DSM-5 and CAT-PD models in particular, while also suggesting that the CAT-PD may include additional traits for consideration in future iterations of the DSM-5 system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Development of methods for DSM and distribution automation planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkkaeinen, S.; Kekkonen, V. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Rissanen, P. [Tietosavo Oy (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    Demand-Side Management (DSM) is usually an utility (or sometimes governmental) activity designed to influence energy demand of customers (both level and load variation). It includes basic options like strategic conservation or load growth, peak clipping. Load shifting and fuel switching. Typical ways to realize DSM are direct load control, innovative tariffs, different types of campaign etc. Restructuring of utility in Finland and increased competition in electricity market have had dramatic influence on the DSM. Traditional ways are impossible due to the conflicting interests of generation, network and supply business and increased competition between different actors in the market. Costs and benefits of DSM are divided to different companies, and different type of utilities are interested only in those activities which are beneficial to them. On the other hand, due to the increased competition the suppliers are diversifying to different types of products and increasing number of customer services partly based on DSM are available. The aim of this project was to develop and assess methods for DSM and distribution automation planning from the utility point of view. The methods were also applied to case studies at utilities

  11. Nesting ecology of a population of Gopherus agassizii at a utility-scale wind energy facility in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, Joshua R.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Meyer, Katherin P.; Bjurlin, Curtis; Arundel, Terence R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the annual nesting ecology of a population of Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) inhabiting a utility-scale renewable energy (USRE) facility in southern California and compared our results with populations inhabiting relatively undisturbed sites. In 2000, 15 radio-tracked females produced 29 clutches, and 24 nests were monitored to examine nest-site selection, nest predation, hatching success, date of emergence of hatchlings, and hatchling mass and carapace length. Overall, the nesting ecology of the population inhabiting the USRE facility was very similar to other populations of Desert Tortoises inhabiting relatively undisturbed habitats. Oviposition occurred from 12 May to 8 July, which was similar to other sites. Nest depths (11.1 cm), nest predation (12%), hatchling emergence date (7 August and 29 September), and hatchling morphometrics (i.e., MCL: 44.5 mm; mass: 23 g) were all within ranges reported in other populations. Unlike within other populations, we observed no relationship between hatchling size and either maternal body size or egg width. We found no evidence of females selecting for a particular burrow for oviposition of eggs based on environmental or anthropogenic variables. Most nests were located in or near burrows, and nest depth was greater for nests near the entrance than those deeper in the burrow. Although this study suggests that the nesting ecology of the Desert Tortoise population we studied was not adversely affected by the USRE facility, this relationship is only correlative because our study was not a before-after-control-impact (BACI) study, which would establish a cause and effect relationship. As pointed out in a recent review, BACI studies are critically needed to address the wildlife impacts of utility-scale renewable energy development.

  12. Net lost revenue from DSM: State policies that work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-07-01

    A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenue incurred through successful operation of demand-side management (DSM) programs. Net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This paper examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The paper has three objectives: (1) determine whether NLRA is a feasible and effective approach to the lost-revenue disincentive for utility DSM programs, (2) identify the conditions linked to effective implementation of NLRA mechanisms and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior, and (3) suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach. Seven of the ten states we studied report no substantial problems with their approach. We observe several conditions linked to effective NLRA implementation. Observed changes in utility investment behavior occur after implementation of DSM rate reforms, which include deployment of NLRA mechanisms. Utilities in states with lost revenue recovery invest more than twice as much in DSM as do utilities in other states.

  13. Schizoaffective Disorder in the DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Dolores; Owen, Michael J; Heckers, Stephan; Tandon, Rajiv; Bustillo, Juan; Schultz, Susan; Barch, Deanna M; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Gur, Raquel E; Tsuang, Ming; Van Os, Jim; Carpenter, William

    2013-10-01

    Characterization of patients with both psychotic and mood symptoms, either concurrently or at different points during their illness, has always posed a nosological challenge and this is reflected in the poor reliability, low diagnostic stability, and questionable validity of DSM-IV Schizoaffective Disorder. The clinical reality of the frequent co-occurrence of psychosis and Mood Episodes has also resulted in over-utilization of a diagnostic category that was originally intended to only rarely be needed. In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, an effort is made to improve reliability of this condition by providing more specific criteria and the concept of Schizoaffective Disorder shifts from an episode diagnosis in DSM-IV to a life-course of the illness in DSM-5. When psychotic symptoms occur exclusively during a Mood Episode, DSM-5 indicates that the diagnosis is the appropriate Mood Disorder with Psychotic Features, but when such a psychotic condition includes at least a two-week period of psychosis without prominent mood symptoms, the diagnosis may be either Schizoaffective Disorder or Schizophrenia. In the DSM-5, the diagnosis of Schizoaffective Disorder can be made only if full Mood Disorder episodes have been present for the majority of the total active and residual course of illness, from the onset of psychotic symptoms up until the current diagnosis. In earlier DSM versions the boundary between Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder was only qualitatively defined, leading to poor reliability. This change will provide a clearer separation between Schizophrenia with mood symptoms from Schizoaffective Disorder and will also likely reduce rates of diagnosis of Schizoaffective Disorder while increasing the stability of this diagnosis once made. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical value of DSM IV and DSM 5 criteria for diagnosing the most prevalent somatoform disorders in patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dessel, Nikki Claassen-; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Dekker, Joost; van der Horst, Henriette E

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed (1) to describe frequencies of DSM IV somatisation disorder, undifferentiated somatoform disorder and pain disorder versus DSM 5 somatic symptom disorder (SSD) in a multi-setting population of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS), (2) to investigate differences in sociodemographic and (psycho)pathological characteristics between these diagnostic groups and (3) to explore the clinical relevance of the distinction between mild and moderate DSM 5 SSD. We used baseline data of a cohort of 325 MUPS patients. Measurements included questionnaires about symptom severity, physical functioning, anxiety, depression, health anxiety and illness perceptions. These questionnaires were used as proxy measures for operationalization of DSM IV and DSM 5 diagnostic criteria. 92.9% of participants fulfilled criteria of a DSM IV somatoform disorder, while 45.5% fulfilled criteria of DSM 5 SSD. Participants fulfilling criteria of DSM 5 SSD suffered from more severe symptoms than those only fulfilling criteria of a DSM IV somatoform disorder(mean PHQ-15 score of 13.98 (SD 5.17) versus 11.23 (SD 4.71), P-valueDSM 5 SSD criteria are more restrictive than DSM IV criteria for somatoform disorders. They are associated with higher symptom severity and lower physical functioning. However, further specification of the positive psychological criteria of DSM 5 SSD may improve utility in research and practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. UPDATING LIDAR DSM USING HIGH RESOLUTION STEREO-BASED DSM FROM WORLDVIEW-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Arefi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the acquisition and processing techniques of high resolution Digital Surface Models (DSM have been rapidly improved. Airborne LiDAR production as a well-known and high quality DSM is still unbeatable in elevation accuracy and highly produced dense point clouds. In this paper, the objective is to update an old but high quality DSM produced by LiDAR data using a DSM generated from high resolution stereo satellite images. A classification-base algorithm is proposed to extract building changes between DSMs in two epochs. For image classification procedure, the DSM and Worldview-2 orthorectified images have been used as input data for a fuzzy-based classification method. Then, extracted buildings are classified into unchanged, destroyed, new, and changed classes. In this study a dataset related to Munich city, has been utilized to test the experimental investigation. The implemented qualitative and quantitative assessments demonstrate high quality as well as high feasibility of the proposed approach.

  16. Out of DSM: Depathologizing Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) removed the diagnosis of “homosexuality” from the second edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). This resulted after comparing competing theories, those that pathologized homosexuality and those that viewed it as normal. In an effort to explain how that decision came about, this paper reviews some historical scientific theories and arguments that first led to the placement of homosexuality in DSM-I and DSM-II as well as alternative theories that eventually led to its removal from DSM III and subsequent editions of the manual. The paper concludes with a discussion of the sociocultural aftermath of that 1973 decision. PMID:26690228

  17. Out of DSM: Depathologizing Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-12-04

    In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) removed the diagnosis of "homosexuality" from the second edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). This resulted after comparing competing theories, those that pathologized homosexuality and those that viewed it as normal. In an effort to explain how that decision came about, this paper reviews some historical scientific theories and arguments that first led to the placement of homosexuality in DSM-I and DSM-II as well as alternative theories that eventually led to its removal from DSM III and subsequent editions of the manual. The paper concludes with a discussion of the sociocultural aftermath of that 1973 decision.

  18. DISSOCIATIVE DISORDERS IN DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiegel, David; Loewenstein, Richard J.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Sar, Vedat; Simeon, Daphne; Vermetten, Eric; Cardena, Etzel; Dell, Paul F.

    Background: We present recommendations for revision of the diagnostic criteria for the Dissociative Disorders (DDs) for DSM-5. The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining

  19. A technical analysis for cogeneration systems with potential applications in twelve California industrial plants. [energy saving heat-electricity utility systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, V. C.; Davis, H. S.; Slonski, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    In a study sponsored by the State of California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, 12 industrial plants in five utility districts were surveyed to assess the potential applications of the cogeneration of heat and electricity in California industry. Thermodynamic calculations were made for each plant in determining the energy required to meet the existing electrical and steam demands. The present systems were then compared to conceptual cogeneration systems specified for each plant. Overall energy savings were determined for the cogeneration applications. Steam and gas turbine topping cycle systems were considered as well as bottoming cycle systems. Types of industries studied were: pulp and paper, timber, cement, petroleum refining, enhanced oil recovery, foods processing, steel and glass

  20. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-05-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  1. What can marketers learn from DSM information systems?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabo, C.A.; Collins, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    A comprehensive information system can support a number of DSM functions simultaneously, including DSM resource planning, program planning and development, program administration, and evaluation. In addition, related functions such as load forecasting, market research, market planning, load research, system planning, system operations, customer service, and load research can contribute to and benefit from systematic collection. analysis, and reporting of customer information. Further, these DSM information systems can evolve into full-service information systems to meet today`s changing needs for more information to support marketing efforts. DSM programs, like any other offerings, require a thorough understanding of the market and the most effective ways to reach that market. Today, many utilities have committed to meeting significant portions of their future load growth with demand-side resources. Meanwhile, many customers, particularly large industrials, have become very sensitive to the cost of DSM programs and their impacts on utilities` rates. Consequently, many utilities have undertaken large-scale market research projects to learn more about their customers` energy use patterns, needs, desires, characteristics, future plans, and financial requirements. This information can be used for a variety of purposes, but the overriding concern in recent years has become, {open_quotes}How can we gain more customer participation at the lowest possible marketing cost?{close_quotes} The industry is now bracing for a much more competitive future. Competitive wholesale markets prompted by the National Energy Policy Act (NEPACT), the prospect of retail wheeling, traditional competition from other fuels, and well-funded providers of energy services or DSM services have all become sources of concern for utility management. Knowledge about customers gained from implementing DSM programs can provide a tremendous boost to developing competitive strategies for the future.

  2. Biological and Cultural Control of Olive Fruit Fly in California---Utilization of Parasitoids from USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parasitoid Psytallia cf. concolor (Szépligeti) was reared on sterile Mediterranean fruit fly larvae at the USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Petapa Quarantine Laboratory in Guatemala and shipped to the USDA-ARS, Parlier, for wide-spread release and biological control of olive fruit fly in California. As many as 3...

  3. Prevalence of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol, Cocaine, Opioid, and Cannabis Use Disorders in a Largely Substance Dependent Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kyle; Rennert, Lior; Lynch, Kevin G.; Farrer, Lindsay; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) will soon replace the DSM-IV, which has existed for nearly two decades. The changes in diagnostic criteria have important implications for research and for the clinical care of individuals with Substance Use Disorders (SUDs). METHODS We used the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism to evaluate the lifetime presence of DSM-IV abuse and dependence diagnoses and DSM-5 mild, moderate, or severe SUDs for alcohol, cocaine, opioids, and cannabis in a sample of 7,543 individuals recruited to participate in genetic studies of substance dependence. RESULTS Switches between diagnostic systems consistently resulted in a modestly greater prevalence for DSM-5 SUDs, based largely on the assignment of DSM-5 diagnoses to DSM-IV “diagnostic ophans” (i.e., individuals meeting one or two criteria for dependence and none for abuse, and thus not receiving a DSM-IV SUD diagnosis). The vast majority of these diagnostic switches were attributable to the requirement that only two of 11 criteria be met for a DSM-5 SUD diagnosis. We found evidence to support the omission from DSM-5 of the legal criterion due to its limited diagnostic utility. The addition of craving as a criterion in DSM-5 did not substantially affect the likelihood of an SUD diagnosis. CONCLUSION The greatest advantage of DSM-5 appears to be its ability to capture diagnostic orphans. In this sample, changes reflected in DSM-5 had a minimal impact on the prevalence of SUD diagnoses. PMID:22884164

  4. Prevalence of DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol, cocaine, opioid, and cannabis use disorders in a largely substance dependent sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kyle; Rennert, Lior; Lynch, Kevin G; Farrer, Lindsay; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R

    2013-01-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) will soon replace the DSM-IV, which has existed for nearly two decades. The changes in diagnostic criteria have important implications for research and for the clinical care of individuals with Substance Use Disorders (SUDs). We used the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism to evaluate the lifetime presence of DSM-IV abuse and dependence diagnoses and DSM-5 mild, moderate, or severe SUDs for alcohol, cocaine, opioids, and cannabis in a sample of 7,543 individuals recruited to participate in genetic studies of substance dependence. Switches between diagnostic systems consistently resulted in a modestly greater prevalence for DSM-5 SUDs, based largely on the assignment of DSM-5 diagnoses to DSM-IV "diagnostic orphans" (i.e., individuals meeting one or two criteria for dependence and none for abuse, and thus not receiving a DSM-IV SUD diagnosis). The vast majority of these diagnostic switches were attributable to the requirement that only two of 11 criteria be met for a DSM-5 SUD diagnosis. We found evidence to support the omission from DSM-5 of the legal criterion due to its limited diagnostic utility. The addition of craving as a criterion in DSM-5 did not substantially affect the likelihood of an SUD diagnosis. The greatest advantage of DSM-5 for the diagnosis of SUDs appears to be its ability to capture diagnostic orphans. In this sample, changes reflected in DSM-5 had a minimal impact on the prevalence of SUD diagnoses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Paraphilic diagnoses in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Richard B; Kaplan, Meg S

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 has been under revision since 1999 and is scheduled for publication in 2013. This article will review the major proposed modifications of the Paraphilias. The information reviewed was obtained from PubMed, PsychInfo, the DSM-5.org website and other sources and reviewed. Pedohebephilia, Hypersexual Disorder and Paraphilic Coercive Disorder are new proposed diagnoses. Paraphilias have been assigned their own chapter in DSM- 5 and a distinction has been made between Paraphilias and Paraphilic Disorders. Victim numbers have been included in diagnosis of paraphilias that involve victims and remission and severity measures have been added to all paraphilias. Transvestic Disorder can apply to males or females, Fetishistic Disorder now includes partialism, and Sexual Masochism Disorder has Asphyxiophilia as a specifier. This study is based on a literature review and influenced by the knowledge and biases of the authors. The Paraphilic Disorders Section of the DSM-5 represents a significant departure from DSMIV-TR.

  6. Out of DSM: Depathologizing Homosexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Drescher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA removed the diagnosis of “homosexuality” from the second edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM. This resulted after comparing competing theories, those that pathologized homosexuality and those that viewed it as normal. In an effort to explain how that decision came about, this paper reviews some historical scientific theories and arguments that first led to the placement of homosexuality in DSM-I and DSM-II as well as alternative theories that eventually led to its removal from DSM III and subsequent editions of the manual. The paper concludes with a discussion of the sociocultural aftermath of that 1973 decision.

  7. Utilization of GIS/GPS-Based Information Technology in Commercial Crop Decision Making in California, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C S; Skinner, P W; Fox, A D; Greer, C A; Gubler, W D

    2002-09-01

    Ground-based weather, plant-stage measurements, and remote imagery were geo-referenced in geographic information system (GIS) software using an integrated approach to determine insect and disease risk and crop cultural requirements. Weather forecasts and disease weather forecasts for agricultural areas were constructed with elevation, weather, and satellite data. Models for 6 insect pests and 12 diseases of various crops were calculated and presented daily in georeferenced maps for agricultural areas in northern California and Washington. Grape harvest dates and yields also were predicted with high accuracy. The data generated from the GIS global positioning system (GPS) analyses were used to make management decisions over a large number of acres in California, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Arizona. Information was distributed daily over the Internet as regional weather, insect, and disease risk maps as industry-sponsored or subscription-based products. Use of GIS/GPS technology for semi-automated data analysis is discussed.

  8. Alcoholgerelateerde cognitieve stoornissen in de DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walvoort, S.J.W.; Wester, A.J.; Doorakkers, M.C.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Achtergrond: Binnen de dsm-iv-tr zijn alcoholgerelateerde cognitieve stoornissen moeilijk onder te brengen, met als gevolg dat deze neurocognitieve stoornissen vaak over het hoofd worden gezien. De komst van de dsm-5 zou hierin uitkomst kunnen bieden. Doel: De dsm-5 vergelijken met de dsm-iv-tr

  9. Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

    1992-02-21

    The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility's gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this non-traditional'' market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

  10. Convergence between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic models for personality disorder: evaluation of strategies for establishing diagnostic thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Skodol, Andrew E

    2013-05-01

    The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) recommended substantial revisions to the personality disorders (PDs) section of DSM-IV-TR, proposing a hybrid categorical-dimensional model that represented PDs as combinations of core personality dysfunctions and various configurations of maladaptive personality traits. Although the DSM-5 Task Force endorsed the proposal, the Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) did not, placing the Work Group's model in DSM-5 Section III ("Emerging Measures and Models") with other concepts thought to be in need of additional research. This paper documents the impact of using this alternative model in a national sample of 337 patients as described by clinicians familiar with their cases. In particular, the analyses focus on alternative strategies considered by the Work Group for deriving decision rules, or diagnostic thresholds, with which to assign categorical diagnoses. Results demonstrate that diagnostic rules could be derived that yielded appreciable correspondence between DSM-IV-TR and proposed DSM-5 PD diagnoses-correspondence greater than that observed in the transition between DSM-III and DSM-III-R PDs. The approach also represents the most comprehensive attempt to date to provide conceptual and empirical justification for diagnostic thresholds utilized within the DSM PDs.

  11. DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 eating disorders in adolescents: prevalence, stability, and psychosocial correlates in a population-based sample of male and female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Karina L; Byrne, Susan M; Oddy, Wendy H; Crosby, Ross D

    2013-08-01

    The current study aimed to compare the prevalence, stability, and psychosocial correlates of DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 eating disorders, in a population-based sample of male and female adolescents followed prospectively from 14 to 20 years of age. Participants (N = 1,383; 49% male) were drawn from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, a prospective, population-based cohort study that has followed participants from prebirth to young adulthood. Detailed self-report questionnaires were used to assess eating disorder symptoms when participants were aged 14, 17, and 20 years. Comparisons between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 were conducted using McNemar chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests. Changes in eating disorder prevalence over time were considered using generalized estimating equations. Eating disorder prevalence rates were significantly greater when using DSM-5 than DSM-IV-TR criteria, at all time points for females and at age 17 only for males. "Unspecified"/"other" eating disorder diagnoses were significantly less common when applying DSM-5 than DSM-IV-TR criteria, but still formed 15% to 30% of the DSM-5 cases. Diagnostic stability was low for all disorders, and DSM-5 binge eating disorder or purging disorder in early adolescence predicted DSM-5 bulimia nervosa in later adolescence. Cross-over from binge eating disorder to bulimia nervosa was particularly high. Regardless of the diagnostic classification system used, all eating disorder diagnoses were associated with depressive symptoms and poor mental health quality of life. These results provide further support for the clinical utility of DSM-5 eating disorder criteria, and for the significance of binge eating disorder and purging disorder. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. DSM-5 illness anxiety disorder and somatic symptom disorder: Comorbidity, correlates, and overlap with DSM-IV hypochondriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Jill M; Hobbs, Megan J; Mahoney, Alison E J; Wong, Shiu Kelvin; Andrews, Gavin

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the reliability, validity and utility of DSM-5 illness anxiety disorder (IAD) and somatic symptom disorder (SSD), and explore their overlap with DSM-IV Hypochondriasis in a health anxious sample. Treatment-seeking patients with health anxiety (N=118) completed structured diagnostic interviews to assess DSM-IV Hypochondriasis, DSM-5 IAD, SSD, and comorbid mental disorders, and completed self-report measures of health anxiety, comorbid symptoms, cognitions and behaviours, and service utilization. IAD and SSD were more reliable diagnoses than Hypochondriasis (kappa estimates: IAD: 0.80, SSD: 0.92, Hypochondriasis: 0.60). 45% of patients were diagnosed with SSD, 47% with IAD, and 8% with comorbid IAD/SSD. Most patients with IAD fluctuated between seeking and avoiding care (61%), whereas care-seeking (25%) and care-avoidant subtypes were less common (14%). Half the sample met criteria for DSM-IV Hypochondriasis; of those, 56% met criteria for SSD criteria, 36% for IAD, and 8% for comorbid IAD/SSD. Compared to IAD, SSD was characterized by more severe health anxiety, somatic symptoms, depression, and higher health service use, and higher rates of major depressive disorder, panic disorder and agoraphobia. DSM-5 IAD and SSD classifications reliably detect more cases of clinically significant health anxiety than DSM-IV Hypochondriasis. The differences between IAD and SSD appear to be due to severity. Future research should explore the generalizability of these findings to other samples, and whether diagnostic status predicts treatment response and long-term outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The relationship between excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders according to DSM-IV and DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuithof, Marlous; Ten Have, Margreet; van den Brink, Wim; Vollebergh, Wilma; de Graaf, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Although it seems intuitive that alcohol use disorders (AUDs) include excessive alcohol consumption (EAC), this notion is not well established. This study investigates to which degree EAC (defined as >14/21 drinks weekly for women/men and at least three 5+ drinking days per week) and AUD overlap and whether problematic alcohol use groups (EAC-only, AUD-only, and EAC + AUD) differ from each other and from nonproblematic alcohol users regarding sociodemographics, mental health problems, functioning, and service utilization. Data were derived from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2, a population-based study including 5,443 current drinkers (aged 18 to 64) interviewed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Both DSM-IV AUDs and a proxy of DSM-5 AUD are considered. Of the current drinkers, 3.8% reported 12-month EAC. Twelve-month prevalence of DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD were 5.4 and 4.4%, respectively. Regarding DSM-IV, only 17.7% of subjects with AUD reported EAC and 25.3% of those with EAC had an AUD. Compared with nonproblematic alcohol users, the 3 groups of problematic alcohol use (EAC-only, AUD-only, and EAC + AUD) were more often associated with mental health problems, poorer functioning, and service utilization. There were few differences between EAC-only and AUD-only regarding these correlates. However, EAC + AUD had strongest associations with above-mentioned correlates compared with the other 3 groups. Compared with DSM-IV findings, DSM-5 AUDs had slightly larger overlap with EAC, but correlates were similarly associated with problematic alcohol use groups. Findings indicate limited overlap between EAC and AUD. Yet, both dimensions were similarly associated with other problems suggesting that both should be included in future epidemiological research to detect the total group of problematic alcohol users. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. Specific phobia: a review of DSM-IV specific phobia and preliminary recommendations for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Richard T; Glenn, Daniel; Liao, Betty; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Ollendick, Thomas; Craske, Michelle G

    2010-02-01

    The present review was conducted in order to evaluate the current diagnostic criteria for specific phobia (SP) in light of the empirical evidence gathered since DSM-IV and to propose changes to DSM-V where change is clearly and reliably indicated by the evidence. In response to questions put forth by the DSM-V Anxiety, OC Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorder Work Group, four primary areas were determined for this review: the accuracy and utility of the current SP type classification system, the validity of test anxiety as a type of SP, the boundary between agoraphobia and SP, and the reliability and utility of the diagnostic criteria for SP. Developmental issues are addressed within each area. Literature reviews examining academic findings published between 1994 and 2009 were carried out and the results are included herein. The review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. All of these recommendations should be considered tentative as they await the field trials and expert consensus necessary prior to their inclusion in the DSM-V. The present review also reveals a great need for future research in the area of SP and directions for such research is provided.

  15. Triennial changes in groundwater quality in aquifers used for public supply in California: Utility as indicators of temporal trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Landon, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    From 2004 to 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey collected samples from 1686 wells across the State of California as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project (PBP). From 2007 to 2013, 224 of these wells were resampled to assess temporal trends in water quality. The samples were analyzed for 216 water-quality constituents, including inorganic and organic compounds as well as isotopic tracers. The resampled wells were grouped into five hydrogeologic zones. A nonparametric hypothesis test was used to test the differences between initial sampling and resampling results to evaluate possible step trends in water-quality, statewide, and within each hydrogeologic zone. The hypothesis tests were performed on the 79 constituents that were detected in more than 5 % of the samples collected during either sampling period in at least one hydrogeologic zone. Step trends were detected for 17 constituents. Increasing trends were detected for alkalinity, aluminum, beryllium, boron, lithium, orthophosphate, perchlorate, sodium, and specific conductance. Decreasing trends were detected for atrazine, cobalt, dissolved oxygen, lead, nickel, pH, simazine, and tritium. Tritium was expected to decrease due to decreasing values in precipitation, and the detection of decreases indicates that the method is capable of resolving temporal trends.

  16. Recent trends in hormone therapy utilization and breast cancer incidence rates in the high incidence population of Marin County, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orenstein Fern

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent declines in invasive breast cancer have been reported in the US, with many studies linking these declines to reductions in the use of combination estrogen/progestin hormone therapy (EPHT. We evaluated the changing use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, mammography screening rates, and the decline in breast cancer incidence specifically for Marin County, California, a population with historically elevated breast cancer incidence rates. Methods The Marin Women's Study (MWS is a community-based, prospective cohort study launched in 2006 to monitor changes in breast cancer, breast density, and personal and biologic risk factors among women living in Marin County. The MWS enrolled 1,833 women following routine screening mammography between October 2006 and July 2007. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that included items regarding historical hormone therapy regimen (estrogen only, progesterone only, EPHT, age of first and last use, total years of use, and reason(s for stopping, as well as information regarding complementary hormone use. Questionnaire items were analyzed for 1,083 non-Hispanic white participants ages 50 and over. Breast cancer incidence rates were assessed overall and by tumor histology and estrogen receptor (ER status for the years 1990-2007 using data from the Northern California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER cancer registry. Results Prevalence of EPHT use among non-Hispanic white women ages 50 and over declined sharply from 21.2% in 1998 to 6.7% by 2006-07. Estrogen only use declined from 26.9% in 1998 to 22.4% by 2006-07. Invasive breast cancer incidence rates declined 33.4% between 2001 and 2004, with drops most pronounced for ER+ cancers. These rate reductions corresponded to declines of about 50 cases per year, consistent with population attributable fraction estimates for EPHT-related breast cancer. Self-reported screening mammography rates did not change

  17. Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study 2016—Summary of acoustically tagged juvenile salmon and study fish release, Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Hurst, William R.

    2017-09-12

    The Yolo Bypass is a flood control bypass in Sacramento Valley, California. Flood plain habitats may be used for juvenile salmon rearing, however, the potential value of such habitats can be difficult to evaluate because of the intermittent nature of inundation events. The Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study (YBUS) used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the movements and survival of juvenile salmon adjacent to and within the Yolo Bypass during the winter of 2016. This report presents numbers, size data, and release data (times, dates, and locations) for the 1,197 acoustically tagged juvenile salmon released for the YBUS from February 21 to March 18, 2016. Detailed descriptions of the surgical implantation of transmitters are also presented. These data are presented to support the collaborative, interagency analysis and reporting of the study findings.

  18. Antisocial personality disorder in DSM-5: missteps and missed opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Donald R; Vachon, David D

    2012-10-01

    This paper evaluates the proposal for antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fifth edition (DSM-5). Some aspects of the proposal are appealing: personality disorders will be assessed using trait criteria, and these criteria are similar to trait descriptions of DSM-IV ASPD. Other aspects of the proposal are less appealing. First, the DSM-5 will depend on a newly constructed personality trait system rather than relying on a well validated, widely studied one. Second, the trait profile of ASPD is incomplete; although this profile reflects the traits included in DSM-IV, it maps poorly onto the full personality profile of ASPD. Third, the DSM Workgroup missed an opportunity to finally unify ASPD and psychopathy; history and research suggest that these disorders have diverged mistakenly. Fourth, the newly proposed criteria of impairments in self- and interpersonal functioning are of questionable derivation and utility. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Voedings- en eetstoornissen in de DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, H W; van Elburg, Annemarie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the DSM-5, feeding disorders and eating disorders have been integrated into one single category. AIM: To review the rationale for changes in the criteria for feeding and eating disorders in DSM-5. METHOD: The revised criteria were drafted and formulated by a DSM-5 workgroup. Next,

  20. Classification of mood disorders in DSM-V and DSM-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Peter R

    2008-10-01

    For any diagnostic system to be clinically useful, and go beyond description, it must provide an understanding that informs about aetiology and/or outcome. DSM-III and DSM-IV have provided reliability; the challenge for DSM-V and DSM-VI will be to provide validity. For DSM-V this will not be achieved. Believers in DSM-III and DSM-IV have impeded progress towards a valid classification system, so DSM-V needs to retain continuity with its predecessors to retain reliability and enhance research, but position itself to inform a valid diagnostic system by DSM-VI. This review examines the features of a diagnostic system and summarizes what is really known about mood disorders. The review also questions whether what are called mood disorders are primarily disorders of mood. Finally, it provides suggestions for DSM-VI.

  1. [Specific learning disabilities - from DSM-IV to DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2014-09-01

    The publication of the DSM-5 means changes in the classification and recommendations for diagnosis of specific learning disabilities. Dyslexia and dyscalculia have been reintroduced into the DSM. Three specific learning disorders - impairment in reading, impairment in the written expression, and impairment in mathematics, described by subskills - are now part of the DSM-5. Three subcomponents of the reading disorder are expressly differentiated: word reading accuracy, reading rate, and fluency and reading comprehension. Impaired subskills of the specific learning disorder with impairment in written expression are spelling accuracy, grammar and punctuation accuracy, and clarity and organization of written expression. Four subskills are found in the mathematics disorder: number sense, memorization of arithmetic facts, accurate or fluent calculation, and accurate math reasoning. Each impaired academic domain and subskill should be recorded. A description of the severity degree was also included. The diagnosis is based on a variety of methods, including medical history, clinical interview, school report, teacher evaluation, rating scales, and psychometric tests. The IQ discrepancy criterion was abandoned, though that of age or class discrepancy criterion was retained. The application of a discrepancy is recommended by 1 to 2.5 SD. All three specific developmental disorders are common (prevalence 5 %-15 %), occur early during the first years of formal schooling, and persist into adulthood.

  2. Asignaturas pendientes del DSM-5

    OpenAIRE

    Artigas, Josep, 1948-; Paula Pérez, Isabel, 1970-

    2015-01-01

    El presente artículo analiza las críticas generadas a partir de la publicación del Manual diagnóstico y estadístico de los trastornos mentales, quinta edición (DSM-5), ya anunciadas parcialmente durante las últimas fases de su elaboración. Una parte de las críticas se ha centrado en los cambios de los criterios diagnósticos para determinados trastornos y en la incorporación al DSM de nuevas entidades. Sin embargo, otra vertiente crítica va dirigida a la falta de validez de los diagnósticos de...

  3. [Science, Psychiatry, and the DSM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atbaşoğlu, E Cem; Gülöksüz, Sinan

    2013-01-01

    The upcoming publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), provides an opportunity to revisit the seldom-addressed methodological issues in contemporary psychiatry. We think that DSM widely determines the scientific and clinical orientation of the discipline, and therefore provides a good vantage point to critique the current psychiatric methodology. The main scientific problem is a perseverative attempt at validating descriptively defined disorders that are standardized and simplified to achieve diagnostic reliability. Lack of a single psychiatric phenomenon that is valid, i.e. natural, for initiating any reduction limits research to inductive-probabilistic methods, basically correlational analyses. Furthermore, reduction in psychiatry is typically directed at basic sciences, neglecting general medical diagnoses as possible intermediary correlates. The subcategory "Due to a General Medical Condition" is elusive, and the biopsychosocial approach does no more than strengthen the brain-disease illusion surrounding DSM definitions by justifying psychiatry as a branch of medicine while failing to stipulate detailed medical assessment and discouraging psychopathology-based clinical reasoning. It is therefore no surprise that, although our understanding of the neural basis and mechanisms of behavior has improved along with advances in the neurosciences, not a single DSM disorder has been validated by the discovery of a specific cause, pathophysiology, or structural abnormality since the adoption of the descriptive approach in 1980. New knowledge involves single traits or dimensions of mood, thought, or behavior, none of which are specific to any disorder. The optimum approach today would be to redefine the discipline as neuropsychiatry.

  4. Paraphilias in the DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Anthony R; Miner, Michael H; Thornton, David

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes and critically examines the changes in how the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) characterizes paraphilias. Attention is paid to the diagnostic options that were included in DSM-5, the decision not to include criterion sets for two additional disorders (paraphilic coercive disorder and hypersexual behavior disorder), and the further decision not to modify the diagnosis of pedophilic to pedohebephilic disorder. The three most significant changes are (a) the move to distinguish paraphilias from paraphilic disorders (allowing unusual sexual interests to be studied by researchers but only regarded as disorders when they cause distress or dysfunction), (b) introducing criteria describing paraphilic disorders as being in remission (when they no longer cause distress or dysfunction), and (c) clarifying the relationship between behavior and paraphilias. Concerns are noted about the forensic use of diagnoses and the lack of funding for field trials in this revision of the DSM. Suggestions are given for future directions in order to further research efficacy and clinical diagnosis.

  5. Approximating a DSM-5 Diagnosis of PTSD Using DSM-IV Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, Anthony J.; Stein, Murray B.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Petukhova, Maria V.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnostic criteria for DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are in many ways similar to DSM-IV criteria, raising the possibility that it might be possible to closely approximate DSM-5 diagnoses using DSM-IV symptoms. If so, the resulting transformation rules could be used to pool research data based on the two criteria sets. Methods The Pre-Post Deployment Study (PPDS) of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) administered a blended 30-day DSM-IV and DSM-5 PTSD symptom assessment based on the civilian PTSD Checklist for DSM-IV (PCL-C) and the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). This assessment was completed by 9,193 soldiers from three US Army Brigade Combat Teams approximately three months after returning from Afghanistan. PCL-C items were used to operationalize conservative and broad approximations of DSM-5 PTSD diagnoses. The operating characteristics of these approximations were examined compared to diagnoses based on actual DSM-5 criteria. Results The estimated 30-day prevalence of DSM-5 PTSD based on conservative (4.3%) and broad (4.7%) approximations of DSM-5 criteria using DSM-IV symptom assessments were similar to estimates based on actual DSM-5 criteria (4.6%). Both approximations had excellent sensitivity (92.6-95.5%), specificity (99.6-99.9%), total classification accuracy (99.4-99.6%), and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.96-0.98). Conclusions DSM-IV symptoms can be used to approximate DSM-5 diagnoses of PTSD among recently-deployed soldiers, making it possible to recode symptom-level data from earlier DSM-IV studies to draw inferences about DSM-5 PTSD. However, replication is needed in broader trauma-exposed samples to evaluate the external validity of this finding. PMID:25845710

  6. APPROXIMATING A DSM-5 DIAGNOSIS OF PTSD USING DSM-IV CRITERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, Anthony J; Stein, Murray B; Colpe, Lisa J; Heeringa, Steven G; Petukhova, Maria V; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Ursano, Robert J; Kessler, Ronald C

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic criteria for DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are in many ways similar to DSM-IV criteria, raising the possibility that it might be possible to closely approximate DSM-5 diagnoses using DSM-IV symptoms. If so, the resulting transformation rules could be used to pool research data based on the two criteria sets. The pre-post deployment study (PPDS) of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) administered a blended 30-day DSM-IV and DSM-5 PTSD symptom assessment based on the civilian PTSD Checklist for DSM-IV (PCL-C) and the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). This assessment was completed by 9,193 soldiers from three US Army Brigade Combat Teams approximately 3 months after returning from Afghanistan. PCL-C items were used to operationalize conservative and broad approximations of DSM-5 PTSD diagnoses. The operating characteristics of these approximations were examined compared to diagnoses based on actual DSM-5 criteria. The estimated 30-day prevalence of DSM-5 PTSD based on conservative (4.3%) and broad (4.7%) approximations of DSM-5 criteria using DSM-IV symptom assessments were similar to estimates based on actual DSM-5 criteria (4.6%). Both approximations had excellent sensitivity (92.6-95.5%), specificity (99.6-99.9%), total classification accuracy (99.4-99.6%), and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.96-0.98). DSM-IV symptoms can be used to approximate DSM-5 diagnoses of PTSD among recently deployed soldiers, making it possible to recode symptom-level data from earlier DSM-IV studies to draw inferences about DSM-5 PTSD. However, replication is needed in broader trauma-exposed samples to evaluate the external validity of this finding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Influence of gender, sexual orientation, and need on treatment utilization for substance use and mental disorders: Findings from the California Quality of Life Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mays Vickie M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior research has shown a higher prevalence of substance use and mental disorders among sexual minorities, however, the influence of sexual orientation on treatment seeking has not been widely studied. We use a model of help-seeking for vulnerable populations to investigate factors related to treatment for alcohol or drug use disorders and mental health disorders, focusing on the contributions of gender, sexual orientation, and need. Methods Survey data were obtained from a population-based probability sample of California residents that oversampled for sexual minorities. Logistic regression was used to model the enabling, predisposing, and need-related factors associated with past-year mental health or substance abuse treatment utilization among adults aged 18–64 (N = 2,074. Results Compared with individuals without a diagnosed disorder, those with any disorder were more likely to receive treatment. After controlling for both presence of disorder and other factors, lesbians and bisexual women were most likely to receive treatment and heterosexual men were the least likely. Moreover, a considerable proportion of sexual orientation minorities without any diagnosable disorder, particularly lesbians and bisexual women, also reported receiving treatment. Conclusion The study highlights the need to better understand the factors beyond meeting diagnostic criteria that underlie treatment utilization among sexual minorities. Future research should also aim to ascertain the effects of treatment provided to sexual minorities with and without diagnosable disorders, including the possibility that the provision of such treatment may reduce the likelihood of their progression to greater severity of distress, disorders, or impairments in functioning.

  8. Re-evaluating DSM-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R; Blashfield, R K

    2016-02-01

    The DSM-I is currently viewed as a psychoanalytic classification, and therefore unimportant. There are four reasons to challenge the belief that DSM-I was a psychoanalytic system. First, psychoanalysts were a minority on the committee that created DSM-I. Second, psychoanalysts of the time did not use DSM-I. Third, DSM-I was as infused with Kraepelinian concepts as it was with psychoanalytic concepts. Fourth, contemporary writers who commented on DSM-I did not perceive it as psychoanalytic. The first edition of the DSM arose from a blending of concepts from the Statistical Manual for the Use of Hospitals of Mental Diseases, the military psychiatric classifications developed during World War II, and the International Classification of Diseases (6th edition). As a consensual, clinically oriented classification, DSM-I was popular, leading to 20 printings and international recognition. From the perspective inherent in this paper, the continuities between classifications from the first half of the 20th century and the systems developed in the second half (e.g. DSM-III to DSM-5) become more visible.

  9. Screening for DSM-5 Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder in a Weight-Loss Treatment–Seeking Obese Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Mark J.; Sogg, Stephanie; Lamont, Evan M.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Becker, Anne E.; Thomas, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of specific self-report questionnaires in detecting DSM-5 eating disorders identified via structured clinical interview in a weight-loss treatment–seeking obese sample, to improve eating disorder recognition in general clinical settings. Method: Individuals were recruited over a 3-month period (November 2, 2011, to January 10, 2012) when initially presenting to a hospital-based weight-management center in the northeastern United States, which offers evaluation and treatment for outpatients who are overweight or obese. Participants (N = 100) completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV eating disorder module, a DSM-5 feeding and eating disorders interview, and a battery of self-report questionnaires. Results: Self-reports and interviews agreed substantially in the identification of bulimia nervosa (DSM-IV and DSM-5: tau-b = 0.71, P eating disorder (DSM-IV and DSM-5: tau-b = 0.60, P eating disorder (tau-b = 0.44, P eating syndrome: tau-b = –0.04, P = .72, r = 0.06 [DSM-5]). Discussion: Current self-report assessments are likely to identify full syndrome DSM-5 eating disorders in treatment-seeking obese samples, but unlikely to detect DSM-5 other specified feeding or eating disorders. We propose specific content changes that might enhance clinical utility as suggestions for future evaluation. PMID:25667810

  10. Toward a firmer foundation for DSM-5.1: domains of impairment in DSM-IV/DSM-5 personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Robert F; Bianucci, Violeta; Fishman, Daniel P; Biars, Julia W

    2014-04-01

    In recent editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, personality disorders (PDs) have been conceptualized as reflecting impairments in four areas: cognition, affectivity, interpersonal functioning, and impulse control. However, there have been no systematic surveys of PD symptoms to assess the degree to which these four domains of impairment are actually represented in the DSM-IV/DSM-5 PD symptom criteria. Results of such a survey indicated that the most common domain of impairment for DSM-IV/DSM-5 PDs is interpersonal functioning (41% of all PD symptoms), followed by cognition (30%), and affectivity (18%), with relatively few PD symptoms reflecting difficulties in impulse control (6%). Comparison of the proportions of symptoms in different impairment domains in DSM-III, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV/DSM-5 confirmed that these symptom distributions have been stable across revisions of the diagnostic manual. Implications of these results for the conceptualization of PDs in DSM-5.1 and beyond are discussed.

  11. The impact of revised DSM-5 criteria on the relative distribution and inter-rater reliability of eating disorder diagnoses in a residential treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer J; Eddy, Kamryn T; Murray, Helen B; Tromp, Marilou D P; Hartmann, Andrea S; Stone, Melissa T; Levendusky, Philip G; Becker, Anne E

    2015-09-30

    This study evaluated the relative distribution and inter-rater reliability of revised DSM-5 criteria for eating disorders in a residential treatment program. Consecutive adolescent and young adult females (N=150) admitted to a residential eating disorder treatment facility were assigned both DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnoses by a clinician (n=14) via routine clinical interview and a research assessor (n=4) via structured interview. We compared the frequency of diagnostic assignments under each taxonomy and by type of assessor. We evaluated concordance between clinician and researcher assignment through inter-rater reliability kappa and percent agreement. Significantly fewer patients received either clinician or researcher diagnoses of a residual eating disorder under DSM-5 (clinician-12.0%; researcher-31.3%) versus DSM-IV (clinician-28.7%; researcher-59.3%), with the majority of reassigned DSM-IV residual cases reclassified as DSM-5 anorexia nervosa. Researcher and clinician diagnoses showed moderate inter-rater reliability under DSM-IV (κ=.48) and DSM-5 (κ=.57), though agreement for specific DSM-5 other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) presentations was poor (κ=.05). DSM-5 revisions were associated with significantly less frequent residual eating disorder diagnoses, but not with reduced inter-rater reliability. Findings support specific dimensions of clinical utility for revised DSM-5 criteria for eating disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Het hoofdstuk 'neurodevelopmental disorders' in de DSM-5 [DSM-5: neurodevelopmental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinkstok, J.; Buitelaar, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) was published in May, 2013. AIM: To review the changes in the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ADHD in DSM-5, compared to DSM-IV. METHOD: The diagnostic criteria for ASD and ADHD

  13. Stemmingsstoornissen in de DSM-5 [Mood disorders in the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, J.; Claes, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The DSM-5 was published in May, 2013. AIM: To discuss and comment on the important changes that appear in the sections of DSM-5 dealing with mood disorders. METHOD: The DSM-5 chapters on mood disorders are reviewed. RESULTS: Bipolar disorders and depressive disorders are now dealt with

  14. Taxometric analysis of DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Saha, Tulshi D; Gmel, Gerhard; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    With preparations currently being made for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5th Edition (DSM-5), one prominent issue to resolve is whether alcohol use disorders are better represented as discrete categorical entities or as a dimensional construct. The purpose of this study was to investigate the latent structure of DSM-4th edition (DSM-IV) and proposed DSM-5 alcohol use disorders. The study used the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) to conduct taxometric analyses of DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorders defined by different thresholds to determine the taxonic or dimensional structure underlying the disorders. DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol abuse and dependence criteria with 3+ thresholds demonstrated a dimensional structure. Corresponding thresholds with 4+ criteria were clearly taxonic, as were thresholds defined by cut-offs of 5+ and 6+ criteria. DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorders demonstrated a hybrid taxonic-dimensional structure. That is, DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorders may be taxonically distinct compared to no disorder if defined by a threshold of 4 or more criteria. However, there may be dimensional variation remaining among non-problematic to subclinical cases. A careful and systematic program of structural research using taxometric and psychometric procedures is warranted. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using "DSM-IV-TR" and "DSM-5" Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Elizabeth B.; Fogler, Jason; Sideridis, Georgios; Weas, Sarah; Mauras, Carrie; Barbaresi, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the "DSM-5" criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the "DSM-5" model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and "DSM-IV-TR" sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70).…

  16. Coverage of the DSM-IV-TR/DSM-5 Section II Personality Disorders With the DSM-5 Dimensional Trait Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Stephanie L; Widiger, Thomas A

    2017-08-01

    Section III of DSM-5, for emerging measures and models, includes a five-domain, 25-trait model, assessed by the Personality Inventory for DSM-5. A primary concern with respect to the trait model is its coverage of the DSM-IV-TR personality disorder syndromes (all of which were retained in DSM-5). The current study considered not only total scale scores of three independent measures of DSM-IV-TR personality disorders but also the coverage of each diagnostic criterion included within six personality disorders: antisocial, borderline, avoidant, dependent, narcissistic, and obsessive-compulsive. Participants were 425 community adults, all of whom had received mental health treatment (36% currently; 75% within the past year). Results provided support for the coverage of the diagnostic criteria for the antisocial, borderline, avoidant, dependent, and narcissistic personality disorders. Coverage could perhaps be improved for a few of the criteria for obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

  17. DSM-5-classificatie van persoonlijkheidsstoornissen bij ouderen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, S P J; Rossi, G; Dierckx, E; Oude Voshaar, R C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it is generally agreed that personality disorders are an important topic in old-age psychiatry, DSM-5 has paid relatively little attention to older persons affected with this severe mental disorder. AIM: To look closely and carefully at several aspects of the way in which DSM-5

  18. [The DSM-V : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loas, G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to present an overview of the recently published 5th version of the DSM. After a brief historic of the different versions of the DSM since the third edition, the main features of the classification were presented followed by the particularities of the fifth version.

  19. Cognitive and Adaptive Skills in Toddlers Who Meet Criteria for Autism in DSM-IV but Not DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jashar, Dasal Tenzin; Brennan, Laura A.; Barton, Marianne L.; Fein, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The current study compared adaptive and cognitive skills, and autism severity of toddlers with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis under DSM-IV but not DSM-5 criteria (DSM-IV only group) to those who met autism criteria under both diagnostic systems (DSM-5 group) and to those without ASD (non-ASD group). The toddlers in the DSM-IV only…

  20. [Anxiety disorders in DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the DSM-5 appeared officially in May 2013 during the development of the 166th Annual Meetingof the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in San Francisco. The drafting process was long and complex; much of the debate became public so that the expectations were great. And it must be said that the new edition did not disappoint, as many changes were made in relation to their predecessors. In Chapter of Anxiety Disorders, which is reviewed in this article, the changes were significant. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and Stress-related disorders were excluded and new clinical pictures, such as separation anxiety disorder and selective mutism, were included. And took place was the long awaited split between panic disorder and agoraphobia, now two separate disorders.

  1. [Does the DSM-5 have added value?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, H W Wijbrand

    2013-01-01

    The DSM-5 was published in May of 2013. Important changes have resulted in greater harmony with the ICD and the discontinuation of the multi-axial system. Some people have criticised changes to the DSM-5 compared to the DSM-IV, arguing that it might lead to the overdiagnosis of mental disorders. One critic, Allen Frances, mentioned Binge Eating Disorder (BED) as an example; however, many studies indicate that BED is a reliable and valid diagnosis. Several arguments have been provided in support of the DSM-5 being a true improvement compared to its predecessor, the DSM-IV: the emphasis on empirical research data, the inclusion of a dimensional approach and more attention paid to a cross-cultural perspective.

  2. Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Elizabeth B; Fogler, Jason; Sideridis, Georgios; Weas, Sarah; Mauras, Carrie; Barbaresi, William J

    2015-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the DSM-5 criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and DSM-IV-TR sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70). DSM-5 was psychometrically superior to the DSM-IV-TR model (Comparative Fit Index of 0.970 vs 0.879, respectively). Measurement invariance revealed good model fit across gender and IQ. Younger children tended to meet fewer diagnostic criteria. Those with autistic disorder were more likely to meet social communication and repetitive behaviors criteria (p DSM-5 is a robust model but will identify a different, albeit overlapping population of individuals compared to DSM-IV-TR.

  3. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  4. The discriminative capacity of CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales to identify disruptive and internalizing disorders in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Osa, Nuria; Granero, Roser; Trepat, Esther; Domenech, Josep Maria; Ezpeleta, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the discriminative capacity of CBCL/1½-5 (Manual for the ASEBA Preschool-Age Forms & Profiles, University of Vermont, Research Center for Children, Youth, & Families, Burlington, 2000) DSM5 scales attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), anxiety and depressive problems for detecting the presence of DSM5 (DSM5 diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, APA, Arlington, 2013) disorders, ADHD, ODD, Anxiety and Mood disorders, assessed through diagnostic interview, in children aged 3-5. Additionally, we compare the clinical utility of the CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales with respect to analogous CBCL/1½-5 syndrome scales. A large community sample of 616 preschool children was longitudinally assessed for the stated age group. Statistical analysis was based on ROC procedures and binary logistic regressions. ADHD and ODD CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales achieved good discriminative ability to identify ADHD and ODD interview's diagnoses, at any age. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 Anxiety scale discriminative capacity was fair for unspecific anxiety disorders in all age groups. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 depressive problems' scale showed the poorest discriminative capacity for mood disorders (including depressive episode with insufficient symptoms), oscillating into the poor-to-fair range. As a whole, DSM5-oriented scales generally did not provide evidence better for discriminative capacity than syndrome scales in identifying DSM5 diagnoses. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales discriminate externalizing disorders better than internalizing disorders for ages 3-5. Scores on the ADHD and ODD CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales can be used to screen for DSM5 ADHD and ODD disorders in general populations of preschool children.

  5. Investigating the DSM-5 severity specifiers based on thinness for adults with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reas, Deborah Lynn; Rø, Øyvind

    2017-08-01

    The DSM-5 severity classification scheme for adults with anorexia nervosa (AN) is based upon current body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2) ). This study examined the utility of the DSM-5 severity specifiers for adults with AN in relation to core cognitive and behavioral features of eating pathology and associated psychosocial impairment. A clinical sample of 146 adult AN patients (140 women, 6 men) were categorized using DSM-5 current BMI severity specifiers and assessed with the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA). A total of 34 (23.3%) patients were categorized as mild (>=17.0 BMI), 35 (24.0%) as moderate (16-16.99 BMI), 32 (21.9%) as severe (15-15.99 BMI), and 45 (30.8%) as extreme (DSM-5 severity rating scheme to differentiate adults with AN in terms of core eating disorder pathology or associated psychosocial impairment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Test of the Empirical Profile and Coherence of the DSM-5 Psychopathy Specifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua D; Lamkin, Joanna; Maples-Keller, Jessica L; Sleep, Chelsea E; Lynam, Donald R

    2017-11-13

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5th edition (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) introduced a psychopathy specifier (DSM-5 PS) as part of the Section III diagnostic model of antisocial personality disorder. Designed to capture the construct of fearless dominance/boldness, the DSM-5 PS is assessed on the basis of the presence of low scores on traits of withdrawal and anxiousness, and high scores on attention seeking. These constructs have garnered attention in the past decade but are the subject of substantial debate as to their role in the conceptualization and assessment of psychopathy, given their limited relations to the maladaptive outcomes typically associated with this personality disorder. In the current study (N = 340 undergraduates; 170 informants), we examined the DSM-5 PS, both in composite form and its trait subscales, to investigate the degree to which the DSM-5 PS manifested empirical profiles associated with psychopathy and its maladaptive correlates. Consistent with prior fearless dominance/boldness research, the DSM-5 PS manifested limited relations with other components of psychopathy, symptoms of DSM-5 Section II and III antisocial personality disorder, and self- and informant-related impairment scores. When examined at the individual subscale level, the 3 DSM-5 PS subscales manifested only partially overlapping profiles and only 1 of the 3-Attention Seeking-demonstrated an association with maladaptivity (e.g., externalizing behaviors). These findings raise important concerns about the coherence and utility of the DSM-5 PS as a diagnostic specifier included in a psychiatric nosology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

  8. DSM 5: Precedents, present and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi E. Obiols

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La próxima edición del DSM (DSM 5 aparecerá en Mayo de 2013. Los borradores publicados ya han generado diversas polémicas. Se ha criticado la posible inflación diagnóstica con una previsible epidemia de falsos positivos en nuevos diagnósticos como el "síndrome psicótico atenuado". La propuesta de otros nuevos diagnósticos como el «trastorno cognitivo leve", el "trastorno por atracones" o las "adicciones conductuales", entre otros, se suman a esta polémica. También se han criticado ciertos aspectos metodológicos del proceso, como la exigencia de confidencialidad y la falta de transparencia y los conflictos de intereses. El artículo repasa los antecedentes históricos del proceso DSM, con la revolución en la fiabilidad diagnóstica del DSM-III, los problemas de validez del DSM IV y las dudas que genera el DSM 5 en el supuesto cambio de "paradigma dimensional". Asimismo, se apunta a posibles vías futuras de solución, más allá del DSM 5, en el avance de las ciencias básicas del cerebro y de la conducta.

  9. From DSM-IV to DSM-5 alcohol use disorder: an overview of epidemiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Francesco; Carrà, Giuseppe; Crocamo, Cristina; Clerici, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) has made several changes to criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD). The objective of this systematic review is to assess if new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria will increase the prevalence rates of AUD in clinical and non-clinical samples as compared with DSM-IV criteria. We searched PubMed, Scopus, and PsycINFO (via ProQuest) electronic databases, with no language restrictions. We included studies with data available on both DSM-IV (and DSM-IV-TR) and DSM-5 AUD in samples of adults, estimating from each study an expected increase in prevalence rates with relevant 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Twelve studies were included in this review. Seven studies showed an increase, two no substantial difference, and three a decrease in AUD prevalence according to DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, with differences in rates (95% CIs) varying between -12.4% (-27.4 to +5.6%) and +61.3% (+46.7 to +77.3%). Additional analyses provided confirmatory results. DSM-5 diagnostic criteria seem to inflate prevalence rates of AUD as compared with DSM-IV. The increasing likelihood of a DSM-5 AUD diagnosis may be explained by the amount of DSM-IV 'diagnostic orphans' which are more prevalent than DSM-IV single-criterion alcohol abuse individuals. Further research should be aimed to study if similar trends are detectable also for other substance use disorders that experienced similar changes in DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Should the DSM V drop Asperger syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2010-09-01

    The DSM IV defines Asperger syndrome (AS) as a pervasive developmental (autistic spectrum) disorder characterized by social deficits and rigid focused interests in the absence of language impairment and cognitive delay. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, there has been a dramatic increase in its recognition both in children and adults. However, because studies have generally failed to demonstrate a clear distinction between AS and autism, some researchers have called for its elimination from the forthcoming DSM V. This report argues for a modification of its diagnostic criteria and its continued retention in the diagnostic manual.

  11. DSM-5 and paraphilic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Given that paraphilic disorders are diagnosed largely in forensic settings, virtually every significant change in the criteria has forensic implications. Several controversial changes were considered during the DSM-5 revision process, but most were ultimately not included in the published text. However, any changes that make it easier to assign a paraphilic disorder diagnosis to an individual must be considered with caution. Criterion A for paraphilic disorders has been changed to reduce one potential risk that could result in false-positive diagnoses (i.e., allowing evaluators to diagnose a paraphilic disorder based entirely on the presence of sexual acts). In contrast, many of the other changes including some of those in the text, make it easier to diagnose a specific paraphilia and thus increase the risk of false-positive diagnoses. Since the assignment of a paraphilic disorder diagnosis can result in adverse legal consequences, the actual forensic impact of the changes will depend on how the legal system incorporates these new definitions into statutes and case law. © 2014 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  12. Dissociative disorders in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, David; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Lanius, Ruth; Vermetten, Eric; Simeon, Daphne; Friedman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The rationale, research literature, and proposed changes to the dissociative disorders and conversion disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) are presented. Dissociative identity disorder will include reference to possession as well as identity fragmentation, to make the disorder more applicable to culturally diverse situations. Dissociative amnesia will include dissociative fugue as a subtype, since fugue is a rare disorder that always involves amnesia but does not always include confused wandering or loss of personality identity. Depersonalization disorder will include derealization as well, since the two often co-occur. A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), defined by the presence of depersonalization or derealization in addition to other PTSD symptoms, is being recommended, based upon new epidemiological and neuroimaging evidence linking it to an early life history of adversity and a combination of frontal activation and limbic inhibition. Conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder) will likely remain with the somatic symptom disorders, despite considerable dissociative comorbidity.

  13. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Some Key Issues for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Koran, Lorrin M.; Didie, Elizabeth R.; Fallon, Brian A.; Feusner, Jamie; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance, has been described for more than a century and increasingly studied over the past several decades. This paper provides a focused review of issues pertaining to BDD that are relevant to DSM-V. The review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V: 1) Criterion A may benefit from some rewording, without changing its focus or meaning; 2) Potential disadvantages of adding a new criterion to reflect BDD compulsive behaviors seem to outweigh potential advantages, but adding such a criterion remains an option that can be considered; 3) A clinical significance criterion seems necessary for BDD to differentiate it from normal appearance concerns; 4) BDD and eating disorders have some overlapping features and need to be differentiated; some minor changes to DSM-IV’s criterion C are suggested; 5) BDD should not be broadened to include body integrity identity disorder (apotemnophilia) or olfactory reference syndrome; 6) There is no compelling evidence for including diagnostic features or subtypes that are specific to gender-related, age-related, or cultural manifestations of BDD; 7) Adding muscle dysmorphia as a specifier may have clinical utility; and 8) The ICD-10 criteria for hypochondriacal disorder are not suitable for BDD, and there is no empirical evidence that BDD and hypochondriasis are the same disorder. The issue of how BDD’s delusional variant should be classified in DSM-V is briefly discussed and will be addressed more extensively in a separate paper. PMID:20533368

  14. Body dysmorphic disorder: some key issues for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Wilhelm, Sabine; Koran, Lorrin M; Didie, Elizabeth R; Fallon, Brian A; Feusner, Jamie; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a distressing or impairing preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance, has been described for more than a century and increasingly studied over the past several decades. This article provides a focused review of issues pertaining to BDD that are relevant to DSM-V. The review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V: (1) Criterion A may benefit from some rewording, without changing its focus or meaning; (2) There are both advantages and disadvantages to adding a new criterion to reflect compulsive BDD behaviors; this possible addition requires further consideration; (3) A clinical significance criterion seems necessary for BDD to differentiate it from normal appearance concerns; (4) BDD and eating disorders have some overlapping features and need to be differentiated; some minor changes to DSM-IV's criterion C are suggested; (5) BDD should not be broadened to include body integrity identity disorder (apotemnophilia) or olfactory reference syndrome; (6) There is no compelling evidence for including diagnostic features or subtypes that are specific to gender-related, age-related, or cultural manifestations of BDD; (7) Adding muscle dysmorphia as a specifier may have clinical utility; and (8) The ICD-10 criteria for hypochondriacal disorder are not suitable for BDD, and there is no empirical evidence that BDD and hypochondriasis are the same disorder. The issue of how BDD's delusional variant should be classified in DSM-V is briefly discussed and will be addressed more extensively in a separate article. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design. [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

    1992-02-21

    The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility`s gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this ``non-traditional`` market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

  16. VT Lidar DSM (1 meter) - 2005 - Essex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Essex County 2005 1m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  17. District Allocation of Human Resources Utilizing the Evidence Based Model: A Study of One High Achieving School District in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amber Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study applies the Gap Analysis Framework to understand the gaps that exist in human resource allocation of one Southern California school district. Once identified, gaps are closed with the reallocation of human resources, according to the Evidenced Based Model, requiring the re-purposing of core classroom teachers, specialists, special…

  18. Retention or deletion of personality disorder diagnoses for DSM-5: an expert consensus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Bernstein, David P; Widiger, Thomas A

    2012-10-01

    One of the official proposals for the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) diagnostic manual (DSM-5) is to delete half of the existing personality disorders (i.e., dependent, histrionic, narcissistic, paranoid, and schizoid). Within the APA guidelines for DSM-5 decisions, it is stated that there should be expert consensus agreement for the deletion of a diagnostic category. Additionally, categories to be deleted should have low clinical utility and/or minimal evidence for validity. The current study surveyed members of two personality disorder associations (n = 146) with respect to the utility, validity, and status of each DSM-IV-TR personality disorder diagnosis. Findings indicated that the proposal to delete five of the personality disorders lacks consensus support within the personality disorder community.

  19. Field Observed Salt Tolerance of California Pistachios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanden, Blake; Fergusion, Lousie; Kallsen, Craig

    2017-04-01

    The general concept of crop salt tolerance is over simplified: consisting of a single soil saturation extract salinity threshold with a "% relative yield" decline function. This approach minimizes the real world variability in actual tree growth and yield due to additional specific ion toxicity and soil texture/anoxia. The current salinity tolerance function for California pistachios is essentially the same as cotton. It was developed from a small plot study in an 8 to 13 year old orchard in northwestern Kern County from 1997-2002 with a threshold of 9.4 dS/m ECe and an 8.4% relative yield decline above that level. These values were confirmed for seedling growth in saline sand-tank studies at the USDA Salinity Lab in Riverside, California. A second large scale field study applied fresh and saline irrigation treatments (0.5 to 5.2 dS/m EC) from planting through 10th leaf. Trees were commercially harvested starting in 2011. Average 2011-14 root zone salinity ranged from 2.5 to 13.2 dS/m and caused a significant edible inshell yield reduction of 108 to 264 kg/ha (depending on rootstock) in the combined 4 year yield: a 1 to 3% decline for every unit EC (dS/m) increase over 6 ds/m. A greatly expanded salinity survey including 10 commercial fields (9th - 15th leaf) in western Kern County with 140 individual tree data points ranging from an average root zone (1.5 m depth) salinity of 1.6 to 20.5 dS/m resulted in a similar yield reduction of 162 to 394 kg/ha (3 year cumulative inshell yield) for every unit ECe > 6.5 dS/m.

  20. Low-income DSM Programs: Methodological approach to determining the cost-effectiveness of coordinated partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Hill, L.J.

    1994-05-01

    As governments at all levels become increasingly budget-conscious, expenditures on low-income, demand-side management (DSM) programs are being evaluated more on the basis of efficiency at the expense of equity considerations. Budgetary pressures have also caused government agencies to emphasize resource leveraging and coordination with electric and gas utilities as a means of sharing the expenses of low-income programs. The increased involvement of electric and gas utilities in coordinated low-income DSM programs, in turn, has resulted in greater emphasis on estimating program cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study is to develop a methodological approach to estimate the cost- effectiveness of coordinated low-income DSM programs, given the special features that distinguish these programs from other utility-operated DSM programs. The general approach used in this study was to (1) select six coordinated low-income DSM programs from among those currently operating across the United States, (2) examine the main features of these programs, and (3) determine the conceptual and pragmatic problems associated with estimating their cost-effectiveness. Three types of coordination between government and utility cosponsors were identified. At one extreme, local agencies operate {open_quotes}parallel{close_quotes} programs, each of which is fully funded by a single sponsor (e.g., one funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the other by a utility). At the other extreme are highly {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} programs that capitalize on the unique capabilities and resources offered by each cosponsor. In these programs, agencies employ a combination of utility and government funds to deliver weatherization services as part of an integrated effort. In between are {open_quotes}supplemental{close_quotes} programs that utilize resources to supplement the agency`s government-funded weatherization, with no changes to the operation of that program.

  1. A Prospective Study of the Concordance of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Micah O.; Lu, Frances; Symecko, Heather; Butter, Eric; Bing, Nicole M.; Hundley, Rachel J.; Poulsen, Marie; Kanne, Stephen M.; Macklin, Eric A.; Handen, Benjamin L.

    2017-01-01

    The transition from DSM-IV to DSM-5 criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) sparked considerable concern about the potential implications of these changes. This study was designed to address limitations of prior studies by prospectively examining the concordance of DSM-IV and final DSM-5 criteria on a consecutive sample of 439 children…

  2. DSM-IV versus DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder in childhood: Similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, F.J.A.; Bögels, S.M.; de Bruin, E.I.

    2015-01-01

    Within the light of the DSM-5, the current study examined (1) how many and which children with a DSM-IV classification of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fulfill the DSM-5 symptom-criteria, and (2) whether children who did and did not meet DSM-5 symptom-criteria and children with social anxiety

  3. Autism Spectrum Disorders According to "DSM-IV-TR" and Comparison with "DSM-5" Draft Criteria: An Epidemiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Marja-Leena; Kielinen, Marko; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Jussila, Katja; Ebeling, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Joseph, Robert M.; Moilanen, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The latest definitions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were specified in "DSM-IV-TR" in 2000. "DSM-5" criteria are planned for 2013. Here, we estimated the prevalence of ASDs and autism according to "DSM-IV-TR," clarified confusion concerning diagnostic criteria, and evaluated "DSM-5" draft…

  4. A Comparison of DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Diagnostic Classifications in the Clinical Diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylaci, Ferhat; Miral, Suha

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare children diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) according to DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. One hundred fifty children aged between 3 and 15 years diagnosed with PDD by DSM-IV-TR were included. PDD symptoms were reviewed through psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria. Clinical severity was determined using Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC). A statistically significant decrease (19.3 %) was detected in the diagnostic ratio with DSM-5. Age and symptom severity differed significantly between those who were and were not diagnosed with PDD using DSM-5. B4 criteria in DSM-5 was most common criterion. Results indicate that individuals diagnosed with PDD by DSM-IV-TR criteria may not be diagnosed using DSM-5 criteria.

  5. DSM-5-classificatie van persoonlijkheidsstoornissen bij ouderen [DSM-5 classification of personality disorders in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alphen, S.P. van; Rossi, G.; Dierckx, E.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it is generally agreed that personality disorders are an important topic in old-age psychiatry, DSM-5 has paid relatively little attention to older persons affected with this severe mental disorder. AIM: To look closely and carefully at several aspects of the way in which DSM-5

  6. DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-11: Identifying children with posttraumatic stress disorder after disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, BreAnne A; La Greca, Annette M

    2016-12-01

    Different criteria for diagnosing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been recommended by the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the proposed 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). Although children are vulnerable to PTSD following disasters, little is known about whether these revised criteria are appropriate for preadolescents, as diagnostic revisions have been based primarily on adult research. This study investigated rates of PTSD using DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-11 diagnostic criteria, and their associations with symptom severity, impairment, and PTSD risk factors. Children (7-11 years) exposed to Hurricanes Ike (n = 327) or Charley (n = 383) completed measures 8-9 months postdisaster. Using diagnostic algorithms for DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-11, rates of 'probable' PTSD were calculated. Across samples, rates of PTSD were similar. However, there was low agreement across the diagnostic systems, with about a third overlap in identified cases. Children identified only by ICD-11 had higher 'core' symptom severity but lower impairment than children identified only by DSM-IV or DSM-5. ICD-11 was associated with more established risk factors for PTSD than was DSM-5. Findings revealed differences in PTSD diagnosis across major diagnostic systems for preadolescent children, with no clear advantage to any one system. Further research on developmentally sensitive PTSD criteria for preadolescent children is needed. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorders in the DSM-V: Better or Worse than the DSM-IV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Lorna; Gould, Judith; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The DSM-V-committee has recently published proposed diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorders. We examine these criteria in some detail. We believe that the DSM-committee has overlooked a number of important issues, including social imagination, diagnosis in infancy and adulthood, and the possibility that girls and women with autism may…

  8. Reliability of DSM-IV Symptom Ratings of ADHD: Implications for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanto, Mary V.; Alvir, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the intrarater reliability of "DSM-IV" ADHD symptoms. Method: Two-hundred-two children referred for attention problems and 49 comparison children (all 7-12 years) were rated by parents and teachers on the identical "DSM-IV" items presented in two different formats, the…

  9. Brief Report: Comparability of DSM-IV and DSM-5 ASD Research Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazefsky, C. A.; McPartland, J. C.; Gastgeb, H. Z.; Minshew, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) criteria for ASD have been criticized for being too restrictive, especially for more cognitively-able individuals. It is unclear, however, if high-functioning individuals deemed eligible for research via standardized diagnostic assessments would meet DSM-5 criteria. This study investigated the impact of…

  10. Conversiestoornis: van DSM-IV naar DSM-5 of van psychiatrische naar neurologische diagnose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.; Willems, M. H. A.

    2015-01-01

    According to one of the diagnostic criteria of the dsm iv for conversion disorder there has to be a temporal relationship between psychological factors and the onset, or the worsening, of the symptoms. This criterion has been omitted in the dsm-5. Another criterion, namely that the symptoms are not

  11. US electric utility demand-side management, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-26

    The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

  12. Comparative performance of the AUDIT-C in screening for DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Deborah A; Smith, Sharon M; Saha, Tulshi D; Rubinsky, Anna D; Grant, Bridget F

    2012-12-01

    Under the proposed DSM-5 revision to the criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD), a substantial proportion of DSM-IV AUD cases will be lost or shifted in terms of severity, with some new cases added. Accordingly, the performance of the AUDIT-C in screening for DSM-IV AUD cannot be assumed to extend to DSM-5 AUD. The objective of this paper is to compare the AUDIT-C in screening for DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD. Using a broad range of performance metrics, the AUDIT-C was tested and contrasted as a screener for DSM-IV AUD (any AUD, abuse and dependence) and DSM-5 AUD (any AUD, moderate AUD and severe AUD) in a representative sample of U.S. adults aged 21 and older and among past-year drinkers. Optimal AUDIT-C cutpoints were identical for DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD: ≥4 for any AUD, ≥3 or ≥4 for abuse/moderate AUD and ≥4 or ≥5 for dependence/severe AUD. Screening performance was slightly better for DSM-5 severe AUD than DSM-IV dependence but did not differ for other diagnoses. At optimal screening cutpoints, positive predictive values were slightly higher for DSM-5 overall AUD and moderate AUD than for their DSM-IV counterparts. Sensitivities were slightly higher for DSM-5 severe AUD than DSM-IV dependence. Optimal screening cutpoints shifted upwards for past-year drinkers but continued to be identical for DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders. Clinicians should not face any major overhaul of their current screening procedures as a result of the DSM-5 revision and should benefit from fewer false positive screening results. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorder among young Swiss men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Foster, Simon; Gmel, Gerhard; Dey, Michelle; Dermota, Petra

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that the new DSM-5 criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD) will increase the apparent prevalence of AUD. This study estimates the 12-month prevalence of AUD using both DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria and compares the characteristics of men in a high risk sample who meet both, only one and neither sets of diagnostic criteria. 5943 Swiss men aged 18-25 years who participated in the Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors (C-SURF), a population-based cohort study recruited from three of the six military recruitment centres in Switzerland (response rate = 79.2%). DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria, alcohol use patterns, and other substance use were assessed. Approximately 31.7% (30.5-32.8) of individuals met DSM-5 AUD criteria [21.2% mild (20.1-22.2); 10.5% moderate/severe (9.7-11.3)], which was less than the total rate when DSM-IV criteria for alcohol abuse (AA) and alcohol dependence (AD) were combined [36.8% overall (35.5-37.9); 26.6% AA (25.4-27.7); 10.2% AD (9.4-10.9)]. Of 2479 respondents meeting criteria for either diagnoses, 1585 (63.9%) met criteria for both. For those meeting DSM-IV criteria only (n = 598, 24.1%), hazardous use was most prevalent, whereas the criteria larger/longer use than intended and tolerance to alcohol were most prevalent for respondents meeting DSM-5 criteria only (n = 296, 11.9%). Two in five DSM-IV alcohol abuse cases and one-third of DSM-5 mild AUD individuals fulfilled the diagnostic criteria due to the hazardous use criterion. The addition of the craving and excluding of legal criterion, respectively, did not affect estimated AUD prevalence. In a high-risk sample of young Swiss males, prevalence of alcohol use disorder as diagnosed by DSM-5 was slightly lower than prevalence of DSM-IV diagnosis of dependence plus abuse; 63.9% of those who met either criterion met criteria for both. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Analysis of Societal Response in Urban Landscape Irrigation due to the Recent California Drought Utilizing Remotely Sensed Satellite and High Resolution Aerial NAIP Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, V.; Mendoza, J.; Ha, J. J.; Pagan, B. R.; Margulis, S. A.; Pal, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    California is currently amidst the most severe multi-year drought on record. Severe strains on water supply throughout the state have resulted in calls from water agencies and the Governor of California for extensive conservation. In Southern California, as much as 65% of daily water usage in single family homes goes towards outdoor use, primarily for grass lawns and landscaping. Therefore, the majority of the water conservation messaging has been targeted at turf removal and limiting outdoor irrigation. However, quantification of the effectiveness of these conservation campaigns and subsequent impacts on outdoor irrigation in large urban areas is difficult due to a lack of readily available in situ metering data separating indoor and outdoor use. Here we use a suite of high-resolution remotely sensed products to examine the impacts of the drought on irrigated vegetation over the Greater Los Angeles County. One-meter National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) data from the United States Department of Agriculture and 30-meter Landsat data over Los Angeles is used to calculate the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). NDVI is compared between non-drought (2005, 2009, 2010) and drought years (2012, 2014). Declines in NDVI are typically manifested as browning of vegetation due to reduced irrigation, or the replacement of water intensive grass lawns with more native vegetation. Results suggest that changes in NDVI during the drought may be dependent on societal responses to water conservation campaigns. Our analysis suggests that disparities in plant greenness, a proxy of plant health, and total vegetated area exist between wealthy and poor communities, both prior to and during the drought. This disparity is likely to increase during drought periods, assuming wealthier communities are less likely to respond to increasing water rates and more stringent watering restrictions.

  15. Alternative models of DSM-5 PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Siobhan; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask

    2018-01-01

    estimated within a confirmatory factor analytic framework using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Data were analysed from a Malaysian adolescent community sample (n=481) of which 61.7% were female, with a mean age of 17.03 years. The results indicated that all models provided satisfactory model fit...... with statistical superiority for the Externalizing Behaviours and seven-factor Hybrid models. The PTSD prevalence estimates varied substantially ranging from 21.8% for the DSM-5 model to 10.0% for the Hybrid model. Estimates of risk associated with PTSD were inconsistent across the alternative models...

  16. Quantitative investigations of geologic surfaces utilizing airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data for Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data were collected over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. These two data sets were used to quantitatively characterize both the mineralogy and surface structure of the valley floor. Field mapping and characterization of the salt flats across the valley identified 16 separate units. The AVIRIS data were calibrated using the 'empirical line' method, and spectra extracted for the 16 units. A water vapor map was generated from the AVIRIS data and showed spatial variations in its distribution due to evaporation of surface water. Unmixing of the 16 spectral units produced maps of endmember abundance.

  17. Method matters: Understanding diagnostic reliability in DSM-IV and DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Michael; Clark, Lee Anna; Bagby, R Michael; Watson, David

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic reliability is essential for the science and practice of psychology, in part because reliability is necessary for validity. Recently, the DSM-5 field trials documented lower diagnostic reliability than past field trials and the general research literature, resulting in substantial criticism of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Rather than indicating specific problems with DSM-5, however, the field trials may have revealed long-standing diagnostic issues that have been hidden due to a reliance on audio/video recordings for estimating reliability. We estimated the reliability of DSM-IV diagnoses using both the standard audio-recording method and the test-retest method used in the DSM-5 field trials, in which different clinicians conduct separate interviews. Psychiatric patients (N = 339) were diagnosed using the SCID-I/P; 218 were diagnosed a second time by an independent interviewer. Diagnostic reliability using the audio-recording method (N = 49) was "good" to "excellent" (M κ = .80) and comparable to the DSM-IV field trials estimates. Reliability using the test-retest method (N = 218) was "poor" to "fair" (M κ = .47) and similar to DSM-5 field-trials' estimates. Despite low test-retest diagnostic reliability, self-reported symptoms were highly stable. Moreover, there was no association between change in self-report and change in diagnostic status. These results demonstrate the influence of method on estimates of diagnostic reliability. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Did the DSM-5 Improve the Traumatic Stressor Criterion?: Association of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criterion A with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sadie E; Berenbaum, Howard

    2017-11-17

    A recent meta-analysis found that DSM-III- and DSM-IV-defined traumas were associated with only slightly higher posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms than nontraumatic stressors. The current study is the first to examine whether DSM-5-defined traumas were associated with higher levels of PTSD than DSM-IV-defined traumas. Further, we examined theoretically relevant event characteristics to determine whether characteristics other than those outlined in the DSM could predict PTSD symptoms. One hundred six women who had experienced a trauma or significant stressor completed questionnaires assessing PTSD, depression, impairment, and event characteristics. Events were rated for whether they qualified as DSM-IV and DSM-5 trauma. There were no significant differences between DSM-IV-defined traumas and stressors. For DSM-5, effect sizes were slightly larger but still nonsignificant (except for significantly higher hyperarousal following traumas vs. stressors). Self-reported fear for one's life significantly predicted PTSD symptoms. Our results indicate that the current DSM-5 definition of trauma, although a slight improvement from DSM-IV, is not highly predictive of who develops PTSD symptoms. Our study also indicates the importance of individual perception of life threat in the prediction of PTSD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Panic disorder and agoraphobia: an overview and commentary on DSM-5 changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Taylor, Steven; Smits, Jasper A J

    2014-06-01

    The recently published DSM-5 contains a number of changes pertinent to panic disorder and agoraphobia. These changes include separation of panic disorder and agoraphobia into separate diagnoses, the addition of criteria and guidelines for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobia, the addition of a 6-month duration requirement for agoraphobia, the addition of panic attacks as a specifier to any DSM-5 diagnosis, changes to descriptors of panic attack types, as well as various changes to the descriptive text. It is crucial that clinicians and researchers working with individuals presenting with panic attacks and panic-like symptoms understand these changes. The purpose of the current paper is to provide a summary of the main changes, to critique the changes in the context of available empirical evidence, and to highlight clinical implications and potential impact on mental health service utilization. Several of the changes have the potential to improve access to evidence-based treatment; yet, although certain changes appear justified in that they were based on converging evidence from different empirical sources, other changes appear questionable, at least based on the information presented in the DSM-5 text and related publications. Ongoing research of DSM-5 panic disorder and agoraphobia as well as application of the new diagnostic criteria in clinical contexts is needed to further inform the strengths and limitations of DSM-5 conceptualizations of panic disorder and agoraphobia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparing methods for scoring personality disorder types using maladaptive traits in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Douglas B; Hopwood, Christopher J; Krueger, Robert F; Thomas, Katherine M; Ruggero, Camilo J

    2013-06-01

    The DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed.) Section III will include an alternative hybrid system for the diagnosis of personality disorder (PD). This alternative system defines PD types partly through specific combinations of maladaptive traits, rather than by using a set of polythetic diagnostic criteria. The current report utilizes a large sample of undergraduates (n = 1,159) to examine three dimensional methods for comparing an individual's trait profile to each PD type. We found that the sum of an individual's scores on the assigned traits obtained large convergent correlations (Mdn r =.61) and best reproduced the patterns of PD discriminant correlations observed within the DSM-IV measure. We also tested the DSM-5 Section III model algorithms and compared them with different thresholds for assigning categorical diagnoses. Frequency rates using the algorithms were greatly reduced, whereas requiring half of the assigned traits produced rates that more closely approximated current prevalence estimates. Our research suggests that DSM-5 Section III trait model can reproduce the DSM-IV-TR PD constructs and identifies effective methods of doing so.

  1. Structure of DSM-5 and ICD-11 personality domains in Iranian community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Mozhgan; Bach, Bo; Amini, Mahdi; Simonsen, Erik

    2018-02-02

    Personality disorders (PD) have been deemed the most problematic diagnostic grouping in terms of validity and utility, which particularly applies to non-Western societies. The current study evaluated the structural validity of PD trait domains in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5) Section III and the proposed International Classification of Diseases-11 (ICD-11) in the Iranian population. Community-dwelling adults (n = 285; 66% women) were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5, whereas the proposed ICD-11 trait domains were delineated using an algorithm for Personality Inventory for DSM-5 trait facets. The five-factor organization and higher-order hierarchical structure of both models were examined using exploratory structural equation modelling analyses. The five-factor exploratory structural equation modelling loadings overall resembled international findings on DSM-5 Section III traits (including Psychoticism), whereas the ICD-11 five-factor structure aligned with the proposed ICD-11 domain features (including Anankastia). Additionally, we identified a hierarchical structure from one to five factors for both models that conceptually aligned with established models of personality and psychopathology. This study provided initial support for the structural validity of DSM-5 and ICD-11 PD trait models in Iranian culture. Future research warrants replication in larger samples and clinical populations. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The UNCOPE: An effective brief screen for DSM-5 substance use disorders in correctional settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Steven L; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the clinical utility of the UNCOPE (Hoffmann, Hunt, Rhodes, & Riley, 2003), a brief 6-item screen that has been validated on a number of criminal justice involved populations (i.e., state prison and county jail inmates, recent arrestees, and juvenile offenders), in identifying risk for DSM-5 substance use disorders (SUDs) among a large sample of state prison inmates. Although the UNCOPE has demonstrated relatively good accuracy in identifying DSM-IV substance dependence, its utility for DSM-5 SUDs warrants investigation. The current study explored substance-specific UNCOPE screening for identifying DSM-5 diagnoses for alcohol, cocaine, and cannabis. Data for the present report were derived from routine consecutive clinical assessments of 6,871 male and 801 female inmates recently admitted to a state prison system. All inmates were administered the UNCOPE as part of a computer-prompted structured diagnostic interview conducted by certified addiction counselors during routine clinical assessments to identify SUDs. Results revealed that a cut-score of 3 positive responses yielded reasonable sensitivity estimates for a severe DSM-5 diagnosis ranging from 85% to 97%, depending on substance class and gender. Specificity findings for those without a severe diagnosis were very high and ranged from 97% to 99%. Cronbach's alphas were .90 or greater, and the item intercorrelations were generally high. Observed findings suggest screening for specific substances using the UNCOPE is a potentially valid strategy for the identification of specific DSM-5 SUDs among inmates. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  4. Meet the New (and Improved?) DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Shelly R.; Pate, Christine M.; Brock, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis is not a typical school psychologist activity. However, changes to the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM), the framework for diagnosis put forth by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), are important to consider. First published in 1952, major revisions are being proposed for this new edition…

  5. DSM-5 en psychische problemen bij kinderen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bögels, S.; Braet, C.

    2014-01-01

    Eén van de ambities van de DSM-5 was om het ontwikkelingsperspectief van psychische stoornissen, van de baarmoeder tot de dood, beter tot uiting te laten komen in het handboek. In deze bijdrage bespreken we op welke wijze deze ambitie is aangepakt en welke consequenties dit heeft gehad voor de

  6. The DSM and the Dangerous School Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The history of ADHD is in part a history of children who have not fitted in at school. Yet until recently, surges in diagnostic levels had not prompted a questioning of the school's complicity in the trend. Through an analysis of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM), the principal diagnostic guideline relating to ADHD,…

  7. Personality disorder types proposed for DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skodol, A.E.; Bender, D.S.; Morey, L.C.; Clark, L.A.; Oldham, J.M.; Alarcon, R.D.; Krueger, R.F.; Verheul, R.; Bell, C.C.; Siever, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group has proposed five specific personality disorder (PD) types for DSM-5, to be rated on a dimension of fit: antisocial/psychopathic, avoidant, borderline, obsessive-compulsive, and schizotypal. Each type is identified by core impairments in

  8. Dimensional anxiety scales for DSM-5: sensitivity to clinical severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, S; Klotsche, J; Strobel, A; Lebeau, R T; Craske, M G; Wittchen, H-U; Beesdo-Baum, K

    2013-09-01

    Psychometric properties and clinical sensitivity of brief self-rated dimensional scales to supplement categorical diagnoses of anxiety disorders in the DSM-5 were recently demonstrated in a German treatment seeking sample of adults. The present study aims to demonstrate sensitivity of these scales to clinical severity levels. The dimensional scales were administered to 102 adults at a university outpatient clinic for psychotherapy. Diagnostic status was assessed using the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview. To establish a wide range of clinical severity, we considered subthreshold (n=83) and threshold anxiety disorders (n=49, including Social Phobia, Specific Phobia, Agoraphobia, Panic Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder). Individuals with either subthreshold or threshold anxiety disorder scored higher on all dimensional scales relative to individuals without anxiety. In addition, individuals with a threshold anxiety disorder scored higher on the dimensional scales than individuals with a subthreshold anxiety disorder (except for specific phobia). Disorder-related impairment ratings, global functioning assessments and number of panic attacks were associated with higher scores on dimensional scales. Findings were largely unaffected by the number of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive disorders. The self-rated dimensional anxiety scales demonstrated sensitivity to clinical severity, and a cut-off based on additional assessment of impairment and distress may assist in the discrimination between subthreshold and threshold anxiety disorders. Findings suggest further research in various populations to test the utility of the scales for use in DSM-5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Effective electrical energy policies in terms of DSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyunah

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates how well energy policies are adopted and operated. In terms of DSM or the Demand Side Management, ways of modifying energy demand are introduced. Also their effects are showed. Furthermore future plans of DSM are illustrated shortly.

  10. Should Relational Aggression Be Included in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Coyne, Claire; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines whether relational aggression should be included in DSM-V disruptive behavior disorders. The results conclude that some additional information is gathered from assessing relational aggression but not enough to be included in DSM-V.

  11. What is a mental/psychiatric disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, D J; Phillips, K A; Bolton, D; Fulford, K W M; Sadler, J Z; Kendler, K S

    2010-11-01

    The distinction between normality and psychopathology has long been subject to debate. DSM-III and DSM-IV provided a definition of mental disorder to help clinicians address this distinction. As part of the process of developing DSM-V, researchers have reviewed the concept of mental disorder and emphasized the need for additional work in this area. Here we review the DSM-IV definition of mental disorder and propose some changes. The approach taken here arguably takes a middle course through some of the relevant conceptual debates. We agree with the view that no definition perfectly specifies precise boundaries for the concept of mental/psychiatric disorder, but in line with a view that the nomenclature can improve over time, we aim here for a more scientifically valid and more clinically useful definition.

  12. Crosswalk between DSM-IV dependence and DSM-5 substance use disorders for opioids, cannabis, cocaine and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Wilson M; Dawson, Deborah A; Goldstein, Risë B; Grant, Bridget F

    2013-09-01

    Ascertaining agreement between DSM-IV and DSM-5 is important to determine the applicability of treatments for DSM-IV conditions to persons diagnosed according to the proposed DSM-5. Data from a nationally representative sample of US adults were used to compare concordance of past-year DSM-IV opioid, cannabis, cocaine and alcohol dependence with past-year DSM-5 disorders at thresholds of 3+, 4+, 5+ and 6+ positive DSM-5 criteria among past-year users of opioids (n=264), cannabis (n=1622), cocaine (n=271) and alcohol (n=23,013). Substance-specific 2 × 2 tables yielded overall concordance (kappa), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV). For DSM-IV alcohol, cocaine and opioid dependence, optimal concordance occurred when 4+ DSM-5 criteria were endorsed, corresponding to the threshold for moderate DSM-5 alcohol, cocaine and opioid use disorders. Maximal concordance of DSM-IV cannabis dependence and DSM-5 cannabis use disorder occurred when 6+ criteria were endorsed, corresponding to the threshold for severe DSM-5 cannabis use disorder. At these optimal thresholds, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV generally exceeded 85% (>75% for cannabis). Overall, excellent correspondence of DSM-IV dependence with DSM-5 substance use disorders was documented in this general population sample of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and opioid users. Applicability of treatments tested for DSM-IV dependence is supported by these results for those with a DSM-5 alcohol, cocaine or opioid use disorder of at least moderate severity or severe cannabis use disorder. Further research is needed to provide evidence for applicability of treatments for persons with milder substance use disorders. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alciati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medically unexplained symptoms are considered ‘somatoform disorders’ in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV. The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders’ biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic criteria try to overcome the limitations of the DSM-IV definition, which was organised centrally around the concept of medically unexplained symptoms, by emphasising the extent to which a patient’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours concerning their somatic symptoms are disproportionate or excessive. This change is supported by a growing body of evidence showing that psychological and behavioural features play a major role in causing patient disability and maintaining high level of health care use. Pain disorders is the sub-category of DSM-IV somatoform disorders that most closely resembles fibromyalgia. Regardless of the diagnostic changes recently brought about by DSM-V, neuroimaging studies have identified important components of the mental processes associated with a DSM- IV diagnosis of pain disorder.

  14. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alciati, A; Atzeni, F; Sgiarovello, P; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2014-06-06

    Medically unexplained symptoms are considered 'somatoform disorders' in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders' biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic criteria try to overcome the limitations of the DSM-IV definition, which was organised centrally around the concept of medically unexplained symptoms, by emphasising the extent to which a patient's thoughts, feelings and behaviours concerning their somatic symptoms are disproportionate or excessive. This change is supported by a growing body of evidence showing that psychological and behavioural features play a major role in causing patient disability and maintaining high level of health care use. Pain disorders is the sub-category of DSM-IV somatoform disorders that most closely resembles fibromyalgia. Regardless of the diagnostic changes recently brought about by DSM-V, neuroimaging studies have identified important components of the mental processes associated with a DSM- IV diagnosis of pain disorder.

  15. Exploring the Proposed DSM-5 Criteria in a Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Azin; Perry, Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    The proposed DSM-5 criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) depart substantially from the previous DSM-IV criteria. In this file review study of 131 children aged 2-12, previously diagnosed with either Autistic Disorder or Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), 63% met the new DSM-5 ASD criteria, including 81%…

  16. Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia: Considerations for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Norr, Aaron M.; Korte, Kristina J.

    2014-01-01

    With the upcoming release of the fifth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-V) there has been a necessary critique of the DSM-IV including questions regarding how to best improve the next iteration of the DSM classification system. The aim of this article is to provide commentary on the probable…

  17. Comparison of ICD-10R, DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 in an Adult Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. Ellie; Gillan, Nicola; Spain, Deborah; Robertson, Dene; Roberts, Gedeon; Murphy, Clodagh M.; Maltezos, Stefanos; Zinkstok, Janneke; Johnston, Katie; Dardani, Christina; Ohlsen, Chris; Deeley, P. Quinton; Craig, Michael; Mendez, Maria A.; Happé, Francesca; Murphy, Declan G. M.

    2013-01-01

    An Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is often used to access services. We investigated whether ASD diagnostic outcome varied when DSM-5 was used compared to ICD-10R and DSM-IV-TR in a clinical sample of 150 intellectually able adults. Of those diagnosed with an ASD using ICD-10R, 56% met DSM-5 ASD criteria. A further 19% met DSM-5 (draft)…

  18. Assessing the Utility of Low-Cost Particulate Matter Sensors over a 12-Week Period in the Cuyama Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Anondo; Stanton, Levi G; Graham, Ashley R; Roberts, Paul T

    2017-08-05

    The use of low-cost air quality sensors has proliferated among non-profits and citizen scientists, due to their portability, affordability, and ease of use. Researchers are examining the sensors for their potential use in a wide range of applications, including the examination of the spatial and temporal variability of particulate matter (PM). However, few studies have quantified the performance (e.g., accuracy, precision, and reliability) of the sensors under real-world conditions. This study examined the performance of two models of PM sensors, the AirBeam and the Alphasense Optical Particle Counter (OPC-N2), over a 12-week period in the Cuyama Valley of California, where PM concentrations are impacted by wind-blown dust events and regional transport. The sensor measurements were compared with observations from two well-characterized instruments: the GRIMM 11-R optical particle counter, and the Met One beta attenuation monitor (BAM). Both sensor models demonstrated a high degree of collocated precision (R² = 0.8-0.99), and a moderate degree of correlation against the reference instruments (R² = 0.6-0.76). Sensor measurements were influenced by the meteorological environment and the aerosol size distribution. Quantifying the performance of sensors in real-world conditions is a requisite step to ensuring that sensors will be used in ways commensurate with their data quality.

  19. Concordance of DSM-5 and DSM-IV-TR classifications for autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kei; Mizuno, Yoshifumi; Miyachi, Taishi; Asai, Tomoko; Imaeda, Masayuki; Saitoh, Shinji

    2015-12-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was published in May 2013. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been structured for the three subtypes of pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), but the number of impairment in social and communication dimension is not stated. The subjects were 68 children who visited the Department of Psychology and Development at Nagoya City University Hospital for the first time between the ages of 6 and 15 years old. We retrospectively re-examined the subjects using DSM-IV-TR criteria and DSM-5 criteria with two rules (two of three and one of three on the social and communication dimension) and examined the concordance rate. Forty subjects were diagnosed with PDD, and 28 were not. The mean PDD subject age was 9.4 years, and mean IQ was 84.0 on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children III or 62.7 on the Tanaka-Binet test. Twenty-seven (68%) of the PDD subjects were classified with ASD using DSM-5 criteria when the two of three rule was applied, while 32 (80%) were classified with ASD when the one of three rule was applied. All subjects without PDD were not diagnosed with ASD on DSM-5 criteria. DSM-5 criteria may exclude high functioning and older subjects from ASD because they tend to be atypical. The diagnostic procedure for DSM-5 criteria is ambiguous, especially in high functioning subjects and those diagnosed at an older age. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  1. When Diagnosing ADHD in Young Adults Emphasize Informant Reports, DSM Items, and Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Derefinko, Karen J.; Garefino, Allison C.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Wymbs, Brian T.; Babinski, Dara E.; Kuriyan, Aparajita B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined several questions about the diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in young adults using data from a childhood-diagnosed sample of 200 individuals with ADHD (age M = 20.20 years) and 121 demographically similar non-ADHD controls (total N = 321). Method We examined the use of self-versus informant ratings of current and childhood functioning and evaluated the diagnostic utility of adult-specific items versus items from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manuel of Mental Disorders (DSM). Results Results indicated that although a majority of young adults with a childhood diagnosis of ADHD continued to experience elevated ADHD symptoms (75%) and clinically significant impairment (60%), only 9.6%–19.7% of the childhood ADHD group continued to meet DSM–IV–TR (DSM, 4th ed., text rev.) criteria for ADHD in young adulthood. Parent report was more diagnostically sensitive than self-report. Young adults with ADHD tended to underreport current symptoms, while young adults without ADHD tended to overreport symptoms. There was no significant incremental benefit beyond parent report alone to combining self-report with parent report. Non-DSM-based, adult-specific symptoms of ADHD were significantly correlated with functional impairment and endorsed at slightly higher rates than the DSM-IV-TR symptoms. However, DSM-IV-TR items tended to be more predictive of diagnostic group membership than the non-DSM adult-specific items due to elevated control group item endorsement. Conclusions Implications for the assessment and treatment of ADHD in young adults are discussed (i.e., collecting informant reports, lowering the diagnostic threshold, emphasizing impairment, and cautiously interpreting retrospective reports). PMID:22774792

  2. Evaluation of the DSM-5 severity indicator for binge eating disorder in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A

    2015-03-01

    Research has examined various aspects of the diagnostic criteria for binge-eating disorder (BED) but has yet to evaluate the DSM-5 severity criterion. This study examined the DSM-5 severity criterion for BED based on binge-eating frequency and tested an alternative severity specifier based on overvaluation of shape/weight. 338 community volunteers categorized with DSM-5 BED completed a battery of self-report instruments. Participants were categorized first using DSM-5 severity levels and second by shape/weight overvaluation and were compared on clinical variables. 264 (78.1%) participants were categorized as mild, 67 (19.8%) as moderate, 6 (1.8%) as severe, and 1 (0.3%) as extreme. Analyses comparing mild and moderate severity groups revealed no significant differences in demographic variables or BMI; the moderate severity group had greater eating-disorder psychopathology (small effect-sizes) but not depression than the mild group. Participants with overvaluation (N = 196; 60.1%) versus without (N = 130; 39.9%) did not differ significantly in age, sex, BMI, or binge-eating frequency. The overvaluation group had significantly greater eating-disorder psychopathology and depression than the non-overvaluation group. The greater eating-disorder and depression levels (medium-to-large effect-sizes) persisted after adjusting for ethnicity/race and binge-eating severity/frequency, without attenuation of effect-sizes. Findings from this non-clinical community sample provide support for overvaluation of shape/weight as a specifier for BED as it provides stronger information about severity than the DSM-5 rating based on binge-eating. Future research should include treatment-seeking patients with BED to test the utility of DSM-5 severity specifiers and include broader clinical validators. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solar: California, not dreaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-03-15

    The California Solar Initiative (CSI) was approved by the California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) in January 2006. The CSI is the largest solar programme of this kind ever in the USA and provides for $3.2 billion in incentives for solar projects between 2007 and 2017. The PUC will oversee a $2.5 billion programme to provide funding for solar installations on commercial and existing residential buildings, while the California Energy Commission (CEC) will manage a separate $350 million fund targeted at new residential building. Existing solar programmes operated by the PUC and CEC will be consolidated into the CSI. The CEC programme will use already allocated funding, but the PUC programme will be funded through revenues collected from customers of the main gas and electric utilities in California. Funds will be distributed via rebates to householders or companies that install solar. As well as solar photovoltaics (PV), rebates will also go to solar thermal power (concentrating solar power) and solar heating and cooling. CSI funding can be used in combination with existing federal tax credits. The aim is a gradual increase from installation of 40 MW of PV in 2005 to 100 MW by 2009. The CSI is also expected to create favourable market conditions for PV manufacturers in California and to encourage investment in production of solar-grade silicon in or near California. Objections from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) appear to have been overcome but a number of other potential snags remain. CSI is expected to be replicated in other US states.

  4. The DSM diagnostic criteria for vaginismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binik, Yitzchak M

    2010-04-01

    Vaginal spasm has been considered the defining diagnostic characteristic of vaginismus for approximately 150 years. This remarkable consensus, based primarily on expert clinical opinion, is preserved in the DSM-IV-TR. The available empirical research, however, does not support this definition nor does it support the validity of the DSM-IV-TR distinction between vaginismus and dyspareunia. The small body of research concerning other possible ways or methods of diagnosing vaginismus is critically reviewed. Based on this review, it is proposed that the diagnoses of vaginismus and dyspareunia be collapsed into a single diagnostic entity called "genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder." This diagnostic category is defined according to the following five dimensions: percentage success of vaginal penetration; pain with vaginal penetration; fear of vaginal penetration or of genito-pelvic pain during vaginal penetration; pelvic floor muscle dysfunction; medical co-morbidity.

  5. DIFFERENCES IN THE PROFILES OF DSM-IV AND DSM-5 ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICIANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Deborah A.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Existing information on consequences of the DSM-5 revision for diagnosis of alcohol use disorders (AUD) has gaps, including missing information critical to understanding implications of the revision for clinical practice. Methods Data from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were used to compare AUD severity, alcohol consumption and treatment, sociodemographic and health characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with DSM-IV abuse versus DSM-5 moderate AUD and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 severe AUD. For each pair of disorders, we additionally compared three mutually exclusive groups: individuals positive solely for the DSM-IV disorder, those positive solely for the DSM-5 disorder and those positive for both. Results Whereas 80.5% of individuals positive for DSM-IV dependence were positive for DSM-5 severe AUD, only 58.0% of those positive for abuse were positive for moderate AUD. The profiles of individuals with DSM-IV dependence and DSM-5 severe AUD were almost identical. The only significant (pDSM-5 moderate AUD and DSM-IV abuse differed substantially. The former endorsed more AUD criteria, had higher rates of physiological dependence, were less likely to be White and male, had lower incomes, were less likely to have private and more likely to have public health insurance, and had higher levels of comorbid anxiety disorders than the latter. Conclusions Similarities between the profiles of DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD far outweigh differences; however, clinicians may face some changes with respect to appropriate screening and referral for cases at the milder end of the AUD severity spectrum, and the mechanisms through which these will be reimbursed may shift slightly from the private to public sector. PMID:22974144

  6. Differences in the profiles of DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorders: implications for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Deborah A; Goldstein, Risë B; Grant, Bridget F

    2013-01-01

    Existing information on consequences of the DSM-5 revision for the diagnosis of alcohol use disorders (AUD) has gaps, including missing information critical to understanding implications of the revision for clinical practice. Data from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were used to compare AUD severity, alcohol consumption and treatment, sociodemographic and health characteristics, and psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with DSM-IV abuse versus DSM-5 moderate AUD and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 severe AUD. For each pair of disorders, we additionally compared 3 mutually exclusive groups: individuals positive solely for the DSM-IV disorder, those positive solely for the DSM-5 disorder, and those positive for both. Whereas 80.5% of individuals positive for DSM-IV dependence were positive for DSM-5 severe AUD, only 58.0% of those positive for abuse were positive for moderate AUD. The profiles of individuals with DSM-IV dependence and DSM-5 severe AUD were almost identical. The only significant (p DSM-5 moderate AUD and DSM-IV abuse differed substantially. The former endorsed more AUD criteria, had higher rates of physiological dependence, were less likely to be White individuals and men, had lower incomes, were less likely to have private and more likely to have public health insurance, and had higher levels of comorbid anxiety disorders than the latter. Similarities between the profiles of DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD far outweigh differences; however, clinicians may face some changes with respect to appropriate screening and referral for cases at the milder end of the AUD severity spectrum, and the mechanisms through which these will be reimbursed may shift slightly from the private to public sector. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  7. Concordance between DSM-5 and DSM-IV nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis use disorder diagnoses among pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sharon M; Gryczynski, Jan; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Kirk, Arethusa; O'Grady, Kevin E; Schwartz, Robert P

    2014-07-01

    The recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5) includes several major revisions to substance use diagnoses. Studies have evaluated the impact of these changes among adult samples but research with adolescent samples is lacking. 525 adolescents (93% African American) awaiting primary care appointments in Baltimore, Maryland were recruited for a study evaluating a substance use screening instrument. Participants were assessed for DSM-5 nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis use disorder, DSM-IV alcohol and cannabis abuse, and DSM-IV dependence for all three substances during the past year using the modified Composite International Diagnostic Interview-2, Substance Abuse Module. Contingency tables examining DSM-5 vs. DSM-IV joint frequency distributions were examined for each substance. Diagnoses were more prevalent using DSM-5 criteria compared with DSM-IV for nicotine (4.0% vs. 2.7%), alcohol (4.6% vs. 3.8%), and cannabis (10.7% vs. 8.2%). Cohen's κ, Somers' d, and Cramer's V ranged from 0.70 to 0.99 for all three substances. Of the adolescents categorized as "diagnostic orphans" under DSM-IV, 7/16 (43.8%), 9/29 (31.0%), and 13/36 (36.1%) met criteria for DSM-5 disorder for nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis, respectively. Additionally, 5/17 (29.4%) and 1/21 (4.8%) adolescents who met criteria for DSM-IV abuse did not meet criteria for a DSM-5 diagnosis for alcohol and cannabis, respectively. Categorizing adolescents using DSM-5 criteria may result in diagnostic net widening-particularly for cannabis use disorders-by capturing adolescents who were considered diagnostic orphans using DSM-IV criteria. Future research examining the validity of DSM-5 substance use disorders with larger and more diverse adolescent samples is needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ADSL Transceivers Applying DSM and Their Nonstationary Noise Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bostoen Tom

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic spectrum management (DSM comprises a new set of techniques for multiuser power allocation and/or detection in digital subscriber line (DSL networks. At the Alcatel Research and Innovation Labs, we have recently developed a DSM test bed, which allows the performance of DSM algorithms to be evaluated in practice. With this test bed, we have evaluated the performance of a DSM level-1 algorithm known as iterative water-filling in an ADSL scenario. This paper describes the results of, on the one hand, the performance gains achieved with iterative water-filling, and, on the other hand, the nonstationary noise robustness of DSM-enabled ADSL modems. It will be shown that DSM trades off nonstationary noise robustness for performance improvements. A new bit swap procedure is then introduced to increase the noise robustness when applying DSM.

  9. Addiction and dependence in DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Charles

    2011-05-01

    As preparations for the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) are under way, this paper focuses upon changes proposed for the substance use disorders section. It briefly outlines the history behind the current nomenclature, and the selection of the term 'dependence' over 'addiction' in earlier versions of the DSM. The term 'dependence', while used in past decades to refer to uncontrolled drug-seeking behavior, has an alternative meaning--the physiological adaptation that occurs when medications acting on the central nervous system are ingested with rebound when the medication is abruptly discontinued. These dual meanings have led to confusion and may have propagated current clinical practices related to under-treatment of pain, as physicians fear creating an 'addiction' by prescribing opioids. In part to address this problem, a change proposed for DSM-V is to alter the chapter name to 'Addiction and Related Disorders', which will include disordered gambling. The specific substance use disorders may be referred to as 'alcohol use' or 'opioid use' disorders. The criteria for the disorders are likely to remain similar, with the exception of removal of the 'committing illegal acts' criterion and addition of a 'craving' criterion. The other major change relates to the elimination of the abuse/dependence dichotomy, given the lack of data supporting an intermediate stage. These changes are anticipated to improve clarification and diagnosis and treatment of substance use and related disorders. © 2010 The Author, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Characterizing psychopathy using DSM-5 personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Casey M; Drislane, Laura E; Lucy, Megan; Krueger, Robert F; Patrick, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    Despite its importance historically and contemporarily, psychopathy is not recognized in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR). Its closest counterpart, antisocial personality disorder, includes strong representation of behavioral deviance symptoms but weak representation of affective-interpersonal features considered central to psychopathy. The current study evaluated the extent to which psychopathy and its distinctive facets, indexed by the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure, can be assessed effectively using traits from the dimensional model of personality pathology developed for DSM-5, operationalized by the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Results indicate that (a) facets of psychopathy entailing impulsive externalization and callous aggression are well-represented by traits from the PID-5 considered relevant to antisocial personality disorder, and (b) the boldness facet of psychopathy can be effectively captured using additional PID-5 traits. These findings provide evidence that the dimensional model of personality pathology embodied in the PID-5 provides effective trait-based coverage of psychopathy and its facets.

  11. Personality disorder types proposed for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodol, Andrew E; Bender, Donna S; Morey, Leslie C; Clark, Lee Anna; Oldham, John M; Alarcon, Renato D; Krueger, Robert F; Verheul, Roel; Bell, Carl C; Siever, Larry J

    2011-04-01

    The Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group has proposed five specific personality disorder (PD) types for DSM-5, to be rated on a dimension of fit: antisocial/psychopathic, avoidant, borderline, obsessive-compulsive, and schizotypal. Each type is identified by core impairments in personality functioning, pathological personality traits, and common symptomatic behaviors. The other DSM-IV-TR PDs and the large residual category of personality disorder not otherwise specified (PDNOS) will be represented solely by the core impairments combined with specification by individuals' unique sets of personality traits. This proposal has three main features: (1) a reduction in the number of specified types from 10 to 5; (2) description of the types in a narrative format that combines typical deficits in self and interpersonal functioning and particular configurations of traits and behaviors; and (3) a dimensional rating of the degree to which a patient matches each type. An explanation of these modifications in approach to diagnosing PD types and their justifications--including excessive co-morbidity among DSM-IV-TR PDs, limited validity for some existing types, lack of specificity in the definition of PD, instability of current PD criteria sets, and arbitrary diagnostic thresholds--are the subjects of this review.

  12. sA Comparison of DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Diagnostic Classifications in the Clinical Diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylaci, Ferhat; Miral, Suha

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare children diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) according to DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. One hundred fifty children aged between 3 and 15 years diagnosed with PDD by DSM-IV-TR were included. PDD symptoms were reviewed through psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria.…

  13. Comparison of DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for alcohol use disorders in VA primary care patients with frequent heavy drinking enrolled in a trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Traci; Lapham, Gwen; Chavez, Laura J; Lee, Amy K; Williams, Emily C; Richards, Julie E; Greenberg, Diane; Rubinsky, Anna; Berger, Douglas; Hawkins, Eric J; Merrill, Joseph O; Bradley, Katharine A

    2017-07-18

    Criteria for alcohol use disorders (AUD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) were intended to result in a similar prevalence of AUD as DSM-IV. We evaluated the prevalence of AUD using DSM-5 and DSM-IV criteria, and compared characteristics of patients who met criteria for: neither DSM-5 nor DSM-IV AUD, DSM-5 alone, DSM-IV alone, or both, among Veterans Administration (VA) outpatients in the Considering Healthier drinking Options In primary CarE (CHOICE) trial. VA primary care patients who reported frequent heavy drinking and enrolled in the CHOICE trial were interviewed at baseline using the DSM-IV Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for AUD, as well as questions about socio-demographics, mental health, alcohol craving, and substance use. We compared characteristics across 4 mutually exclusive groups based on DSM-5 and DSM-IV criteria. Of 304 participants, 13.8% met criteria for neither DSM-5 nor DSM-IV AUD; 12.8% met criteria for DSM-5 alone, and 73.0% met criteria for both DSM-IV and DSM-5. Only 1 patient (0.3%) met criteria for DSM-IV AUD alone. Patients meeting both DSM-5 and DSM-IV criteria had more negative drinking consequences, mental health symptoms and self-reported readiness to change compared with those meeting DSM-5 criteria alone or neither DSM-5 nor DSM-IV criteria. In this sample of primary care patients with frequent heavy drinking, DSM-5 identified 13% more patients with AUD than DSM-IV. This group had a lower mental health symptom burden and less self-reported readiness to change compared to those meeting criteria for both DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01400581. 2011 February 17.

  14. Feasibility and acceptability of the DSM-5 Field Trial procedures in the Johns Hopkins Community Psychiatry Programs†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E.; Wilcox, Holly C.; Miller, Leslie; Cullen, Bernadette; Gerring, Joan; Greiner, Lisa H.; Newcomer, Alison; Mckitty, Mellisha V.; Regier, Darrel A.; Narrow, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) contains criteria for psychiatric diagnoses that reflect advances in the science and conceptualization of mental disorders and address the needs of clinicians. DSM-5 also recommends research on dimensional measures of cross-cutting symptoms and diagnostic severity, which are expected to better capture patients’ experiences with mental disorders. Prior to its May 2013 release, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) conducted field trials to examine the feasibility, clinical utility, reliability, and where possible, the validity of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and dimensional measures. The methods and measures proposed for the DSM-5 field trials were pilot tested in adult and child/adolescent clinical samples, with the goal to identify and correct design and procedural problems with the proposed methods before resources were expended for the larger DSM-5 Field Trials. Results allowed for the refinement of the protocols, procedures, and measures, which facilitated recruitment, implementation, and completion of the DSM-5 Field Trials. These results highlight the benefits of pilot studies in planning large multisite studies. PMID:24615761

  15. Feasibility and acceptability of the DSM-5 Field Trial procedures in the Johns Hopkins Community Psychiatry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E; Wilcox, Holly C; Miller, Leslie; Cullen, Bernadette; Gerring, Joan; Greiner, Lisa H; Newcomer, Alison; McKitty, Mellisha V; Regier, Darrel A; Narrow, William E

    2014-06-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) contains criteria for psychiatric diagnoses that reflect advances in the science and conceptualization of mental disorders and address the needs of clinicians. DSM-5 also recommends research on dimensional measures of cross-cutting symptoms and diagnostic severity, which are expected to better capture patients' experiences with mental disorders. Prior to its May 2013 release, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) conducted field trials to examine the feasibility, clinical utility, reliability, and where possible, the validity of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and dimensional measures. The methods and measures proposed for the DSM-5 field trials were pilot tested in adult and child/adolescent clinical samples, with the goal to identify and correct design and procedural problems with the proposed methods before resources were expended for the larger DSM-5 Field Trials. Results allowed for the refinement of the protocols, procedures, and measures, which facilitated recruitment, implementation, and completion of the DSM-5 Field Trials. These results highlight the benefits of pilot studies in planning large multisite studies. Copyright © 2013, American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.

  16. [Forensic assessment of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder: a commentary on the transition from DSM-IV-TR (I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A; Fabra, M

    2013-12-01

    In May 2013 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) has released the latest and fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5). Like its predecessor, the DSM-IV-TR, it will have considerable impact on the science of Psychiatry. The DSM-5 describes - actually available in English - the present medical knowledge about mental disorders. In the short run, German medical science and scientific medicolegal expertises will continue to rely on the German version of the DSM-IV-TR, however, they will be difficult to defend without bearing in mind the changes that DSM-5 brings about. This report discusses the transition from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 with regard to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and provides suggestions, how the criteria might be evaluated.

  17. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in US combat soldiers: a head-to-head comparison of DSM-5 versus DSM-IV-TR symptom criteria with the PTSD checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Charles W; Riviere, Lyndon A; Wilk, Joshua E; Herrell, Richard K; Weathers, Frank W

    2014-09-01

    The definition of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) underwent substantial changes in the 2013 edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). How this will affect estimates of prevalence, whether clinical utility has been improved, and how many individuals who meet symptom criteria according to the previous definition will not meet new criteria is unknown. Updated screening instruments, including the PTSD checklist (PCL), have not been compared with previously validated methods through head-to-head comparisons. We compared the new 20-item PCL, mapped to DSM-5 (PCL-5), with the original validated 17-item specific stressor version (PCL-S) in 1822 US infantry soldiers, including 946 soldiers who had been deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Surveys were administered in November, 2013. Soldiers alternately received either of two surveys that were identical except for the order of the two PCL versions (911 per group). Standardised scales measured major depression, generalised anxiety, alcohol misuse, and functional impairment. In analysis of all soldiers, 224 (13%) screened positive for PTSD by DSM-IV-TR criteria and 216 (12%) screened positive by DSM-5 criteria (κ 0·67). In soldiers exposed to combat, 177 (19%) screened positive by DSM-IV-TR and 165 (18%) screened positive by DSM-5 criteria (0·66). However, of 221 soldiers with complete data who met DSM-IV-TR criteria, 67 (30%) did not meet DSM-5 criteria, and 59 additional soldiers met only DSM-5 criteria. PCL-5 scores from 15-38 performed similarly to PCL-S scores of 30-50; a PCL-5 score of 38 gave optimum agreement with a PCL-S of 50. The two definitions showed nearly identical association with other psychiatric disorders and functional impairment. Our findings showed the PCL-5 to be equivalent to the validated PCL-S. However, the new PTSD symptom criteria do not seem to have greater clinical utility, and a high percentage of soldiers who met criteria by one definition did not meet

  18. Panic disorder: a review of DSM-IV panic disorder and proposals for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Kircanski, Katharina; Epstein, Alyssa; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Pine, Danny S; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Hinton, Devon

    2010-02-01

    This review covers the literature since the publication of DSM-IV on the diagnostic criteria for panic attacks (PAs) and panic disorder (PD). Specific recommendations are made based on the evidence available. In particular, slight changes are proposed for the wording of the diagnostic criteria for PAs to ease the differentiation between panic and surrounding anxiety; simplification and clarification of the operationalization of types of PAs (expected vs. unexpected) is proposed; and consideration is given to the value of PAs as a specifier for all DSM diagnoses and to the cultural validity of certain symptom profiles. In addition, slight changes are proposed for the wording of the diagnostic criteria to increase clarity and parsimony of the criteria. Finally, based on the available evidence, no changes are proposed with regard to the developmental expression of PAs or PD. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V.

  19. DSM-IV to DSM-5: The impact of proposed revisions on diagnosis of alcohol use disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arpana; Heath, Andrew C.; Lynskey, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To determine the prevalence of past 12 month DSM-5 alcohol use disorders (AUDs), to quantify and characterize individuals who remain stably unaffected or affected and those who diagnostically “switch” between DSM-IV and DSM-5 classifications. Design Data from the nationally representative Wave 2 of the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) collected in 2004–2005. Setting General population survey. Participants All surveyed participants (N=34,653, aged 21 and older) and 29,993 individuals reporting lifetime alcohol use across both waves of NESARC. Measurements DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria were coded using proposed guidelines. Findings The prevalence of DSM-5 AUDs was 10.8% with the corresponding prevalence of DSM-IV abuse/dependence being 9.7%, implying a modest 11.3% increase. Those who diagnostically switched from affected to unaffected (19.6% of DSM-IV affected) were most likely to have endorsed hazardous use, particularly due to drinking and driving while those who transitioned from unaffected to affected (3.3% of DSM-IV unaffected) were primarily DSM-IV diagnostic orphans reporting larger/longer and quit/cut-back. Dropping the legal criterion did not significantly affect the prevalence while the addition of craving also had a relatively modest impact on prevalence. Conclusion The proposed DSM-5 revisions successfully eliminate individuals previously diagnosed with DSM-IV alcohol abuse primarily due to hazardous use alone and incorporate diagnostic orphans into the diagnostic realm. Definitions of craving and importantly, hazardous use require considerable attention as it is likely that they will contribute to variations in reports of increased prevalence of AUDs between DSM-IV to DSM-5. PMID:21631621

  20. Bone density, body composition, and psychopathology of anorexia nervosa spectrum disorders in DSM-IV vs DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Melanie; Thomas, Jennifer J; Eddy, Kamryn T; Dichtel, Laura E; Lawson, Elizabeth A; Meenaghan, Erinne; Lederfine Paskal, Margaret; Fazeli, Pouneh K; Faje, Alexander T; Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K

    2017-04-01

    DSM-5 revised the diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa (AN) by eliminating the amenorrhea requirement, liberalizing weight and psychological criteria, and adding the formal diagnosis of "atypical AN" for individuals with AN psychological symptoms without low weight. We sought to determine whether bone density (BMD) is impaired in women diagnosed with AN using the new, more liberal, DSM-5 criteria. Cross-sectional study of 168 women, 18 - 45y: (1) AN by DSM-IV (DSM-IV AN) (n = 37), (2) AN by DSM-5 but not DSM-IV criteria (DSM-5 AN) (n = 33), (3) atypical AN (ATYPICAL AN) (n = 77), (4) healthy comparison group (HC) (n = 21). Measurements included dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales. BMD Z-score DSM-IV, 82% of DSM-5, and 69% of ATYPICAL. Mean Z-scores were comparably low in DSM-IV and DSM-5, intermediate in ATYPICAL, and highest in HC. Lack of prior low weight or amenorrhea was, but history of overweight/obesity was not, protective against bone loss. Mean lean mass and percent fat mass were significantly lower in all AN groups than HC. DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ATYPICAL had comparable psychopathology. Despite liberalizing diagnostic criteria, many women diagnosed with AN and atypical AN using DSM-5 criteria have low BMD. Presence or history of low weight and/or amenorrhea remain important indications for DXA. Loss of lean mass, in addition to fat mass, is present in all AN groups, and may contribute to low BMD. The deleterious effect of eating disorders on BMD extends beyond those with current low weight and amenorrhea. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:343-351). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. DSM-IV to DSM-5: the impact of proposed revisions on diagnosis of alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arpana; Heath, Andrew C; Lynskey, Michael T

    2011-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of past 12-month DSM-5 alcohol use disorders (AUDs), to quantify and characterize individuals who remain stably unaffected or affected and those who 'switch' diagnostically between DSM-IV and DSM-5 classifications. Data from the nationally representative wave 2 of the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) collected in 2004-05. General population survey. All surveyed participants (n=34,653, aged 21 years and older) and 29,993 individuals reporting life-time alcohol use across both waves of NESARC. DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria were coded using proposed guidelines. The prevalence of DSM-5 AUDs was 10.8% with the corresponding prevalence of DSM-IV abuse/dependence being 9.7%, implying a modest 11.3% increase. Those who switched diagnostically from affected to unaffected (19.6% of DSM-IV affected) were most likely to have endorsed hazardous use, due particularly to drinking and driving, while those who transitioned from unaffected to affected (3.3% of DSM-IV unaffected) were primarily DSM-IV diagnostic orphans reporting larger/longer and quit/cut-back. Dropping the legal criterion did not affect the prevalence significantly, while the addition of craving also had a relatively modest impact on prevalence. The proposed DSM-5 revisions eliminate successfully individuals diagnosed previously with DSM-IV alcohol abuse due primarily to hazardous use alone and incorporate diagnostic orphans into the diagnostic realm. Definitions of craving and importantly, hazardous use require considerable attention as it is likely that they will contribute to variations in reports of increased prevalence of alcohol use disorders between DSM-IV to DSM-5. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  2. Measures of the DSM-5 mixed-features specifier of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark

    2017-04-01

    During the past two decades, a number of studies have found that depressed patients frequently have manic symptoms intermixed with depressive symptoms. While the frequency of mixed syndromes are more common in bipolar than in unipolar depressives, mixed states are also common in patients with major depressive disorder. The admixture of symptoms may be evident when depressed patients present for treatment, or they may emerge during ongoing treatment. In some patients, treatment with antidepressant medication might precipitate the emergence of mixed states. It would therefore be useful to systematically inquire into the presence of manic/hypomanic symptoms in depressed patients. We can anticipate that increased attention will likely be given to mixed depression because of changes in the DSM-5. In the present article, I review instruments that have been utilized to assess the presence and severity of manic symptoms and therefore could be potentially used to identify the DSM-5 mixed-features specifier in depressed patients and to evaluate the course and outcome of treatment. In choosing which measure to use, clinicians and researchers should consider whether the measure assesses both depression and mania/hypomania, assesses all or only some of the DSM-5 criteria for the mixed-features specifier, or assesses manic/hypomanic symptoms that are not part of the DSM-5 definition. Feasibility, more so than reliability and validity, will likely determine whether these measures are incorporated into routine clinical practice.

  3. Social anxiety disorder: questions and answers for the DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögels, Susan M; Alden, Lynn; Beidel, Deborah C; Clark, Lee Anna; Pine, Daniel S; Stein, Murray B; Voncken, Marisol

    2010-02-01

    This review evaluates the DSM-IV criteria of social anxiety disorder (SAD), with a focus on the generalized specifier and alternative specifiers, the considerable overlap between the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for SAD and avoidant personality disorder, and developmental issues. A literature review was conducted, using the validators provided by the DSM-V Spectrum Study Group. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. Little supporting evidence was found for the current specifier, generalized SAD. Rather, the symptoms of individuals with SAD appear to fall along a continuum of severity based on the number of fears. Available evidence suggested the utility of a specifier indicating a "predominantly performance" variety of SAD. A specifier based on "fear of showing anxiety symptoms" (e.g., blushing) was considered. However, a tendency to show anxiety symptoms is a core fear in SAD, similar to acting or appearing in a certain way. More research is needed before considering subtyping SAD based on core fears. SAD was found to be a valid diagnosis in children and adolescents. Selective mutism could be considered in part as a young child's avoidance response to social fears. Pervasive test anxiety may belong not only to SAD, but also to generalized anxiety disorder. The data are equivocal regarding whether to consider avoidant personality disorder simply a severe form of SAD. Secondary data analyses, field trials, and validity tests are needed to investigate the recommendations and options.

  4. DSM-5 under-Identifies PDDNOS: Diagnostic Agreement between the DSM-5, DSM-IV, and Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Black, Amanda; Tierney, Cheryl D.

    2013-01-01

    Agreement between the DSM-5, DSM-IV, and Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder was assessed in 125 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which included high and low functioning autism (HFA and LFA) and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDDNOS), and children with other clinical disorders (e.g., ADHD, mental…

  5. Suicidal behavior on Axis VI: clinical data supporting a sixth Axis for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Kimberly A; Witte, Tracy K; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Gordon, Kathryn H; Joiner, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Oquendo and colleagues (Oquendo, Baca-García, Mann, & Giner, 2008; Oquendo & Currier, 2009) recommend that DSM-V emphasize suicide risk assessment on a sixth axis, thereby increasing regularity of suicide risk assessments. We propose that evidence of nonredundancy with Axis V - Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) is one piece of data that can serve as a starting point for a line of research establishing incremental predictive utility for a separate suicide risk assessment in the DSM framework. A standardized suicide risk assessment protocol, measures of depressive, anxious, and eating disordered symptomatology, as well as an index of comorbidity were administered to a sample of 412 adult outpatients. Our data indicate that data from standardized suicide risk assessments are associated with indices of symptomatology severity as well as comorbidity, controlling for GAF. These results support the nonredundancy of the assessments and suggest the utility of longitudinal investigations of the predictive utility of a sixth DSM axis in the assessment of suicide risk.

  6. Clinical characteristics and distinctiveness of DSM-5 eating disorder diagnoses: findings from a large naturalistic clinical database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background DSM-IV eating disorder (ED) diagnoses have been criticized for lack of clinical utility, diagnostic instability, and over-inclusiveness of the residual category “ED not otherwise specified” (EDNOS). Revisions made in DSM-5 attempt to generate a more scientifically valid and clinically relevant system of ED classification. The aim with the present study was to examine clinical characteristics and distinctiveness of the new DSM-5 ED diagnoses, especially concerning purging disorder (PD). Methods Using a large naturalistic Swedish ED database, 2233 adult women were diagnosed using DSM-5. Initial and 1-year follow-up psychopathology data were analyzed. Measures included the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Structural Eating Disorder Interview, Clinical Impairment Assessment, Structural Analysis of Social Behavior, Comprehensive Psychiatric Rating Scale, and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. Results Few meaningful differences emerged between anorexia nervosa binge/purge subtype (ANB/P), PD, and bulimia nervosa (BN). Unspecified Feeding and Eating Disorders (UFED) showed significantly less severity compared to other groups. Conclusions PD does not appear to constitute a distinct diagnosis, the distinction between atypical AN and PD requires clarification, and minimum inclusion criteria for UFED are needed. Further sub-classification is unlikely to improve clinical utility. Instead, better delineation of commonalities is important. PMID:24999410

  7. A comparison of DSM-IV pervasive developmental disorder and DSM-5 autism spectrum disorder prevalence in an epidemiologic sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Shin; Fombonne, Eric; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Leventhal, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    Changes in autism diagnostic criteria found in DSM-5 may affect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence, research findings, diagnostic processes, and eligibility for clinical and other services. Using our published, total-population Korean prevalence data, we compute DSM-5 ASD and social communication disorder (SCD) prevalence and compare them with DSM-IV pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) prevalence estimates. We also describe individuals previously diagnosed with DSM-IV PDD when diagnoses change with DSM-5 criteria. The target population was all children from 7 to 12 years of age in a South Korean community (N = 55,266), those in regular and special education schools, and a disability registry. We used the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire for systematic, multi-informant screening. Parents of screen-positive children were offered comprehensive assessments using standardized diagnostic procedures, including the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Best-estimate clinical diagnoses were made using DSM-IV PDD and DSM-5 ASD and SCD criteria. DSM-5 ASD estimated prevalence was 2.20% (95% confidence interval = 1.77-3.64). Combined DSM-5 ASD and SCD prevalence was virtually the same as DSM-IV PDD prevalence (2.64%). Most children with autistic disorder (99%), Asperger disorder (92%), and PDD-NOS (63%) met DSM-5 ASD criteria, whereas 1%, 8%, and 32%, respectively, met SCD criteria. All remaining children (2%) had other psychopathology, principally attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and anxiety disorder. Our findings suggest that most individuals with a prior DSM-IV PDD meet DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for ASD and SCD. PDD, ASD or SCD; extant diagnostic criteria identify a large, clinically meaningful group of individuals and families who require evidence-based services. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reliability, Validity, and Classification Accuracy of the DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for Gambling Disorder and Comparison to DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchfield, Randy; McCready, John; Turner, Nigel E; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Petry, Nancy M; Grant, Jon; Welte, John; Chapman, Heather; Winters, Ken C

    2016-09-01

    The DSM-5 was published in 2013 and it included two substantive revisions for gambling disorder (GD). These changes are the reduction in the threshold from five to four criteria and elimination of the illegal activities criterion. The purpose of this study was to twofold. First, to assess the reliability, validity and classification accuracy of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for GD. Second, to compare the DSM-5-DSM-IV on reliability, validity, and classification accuracy, including an examination of the effect of the elimination of the illegal acts criterion on diagnostic accuracy. To compare DSM-5 and DSM-IV, eight datasets from three different countries (Canada, USA, and Spain; total N = 3247) were used. All datasets were based on similar research methods. Participants were recruited from outpatient gambling treatment services to represent the group with a GD and from the community to represent the group without a GD. All participants were administered a standardized measure of diagnostic criteria. The DSM-5 yielded satisfactory reliability, validity and classification accuracy. In comparing the DSM-5 to the DSM-IV, most comparisons of reliability, validity and classification accuracy showed more similarities than differences. There was evidence of modest improvements in classification accuracy for DSM-5 over DSM-IV, particularly in reduction of false negative errors. This reduction in false negative errors was largely a function of lowering the cut score from five to four and this revision is an improvement over DSM-IV. From a statistical standpoint, eliminating the illegal acts criterion did not make a significant impact on diagnostic accuracy. From a clinical standpoint, illegal acts can still be addressed in the context of the DSM-5 criterion of lying to others.

  9. Inter-Observer Reliability of DSM-5 Substance Use Disorders*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Cécile M.; Gelernter, Joel; Hart, Amy B.; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although studies have examined the impact of changes made in DSM-5 on the estimated prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) diagnoses, there is limited evidence of the reliability of DSM-5 SUDs. We evaluated the inter-observer reliability of four DSM-5 SUDs in a sample in which we had previously evaluated the reliability of DSM-IV diagnoses, allowing us to compare the two systems. Methods Two different interviewers each assessed 173 subjects over a 2-week period using the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism (SSADDA). Using the percent agreement and kappa (κ) coefficient, we examined the reliability of DSM-5 lifetime alcohol, opioid, cocaine, and cannabis use disorders, which we compared to that of SSADDA-derived DSM-IV SUD diagnoses. We also assessed the effect of additional lifetime SUD and lifetime mood or anxiety disorder diagnoses on the reliability of the DSM-5 SUD diagnoses. Results Reliability was good to excellent for the four disorders, with κ values ranging from 0.65 to 0.94. Agreement was consistently lower for SUDs of mild severity than for moderate or severe disorders. DSM-5 SUD diagnoses showed greater reliability than DSM-IV diagnoses of abuse or dependence or dependence only. Co-occurring SUD and lifetime mood or anxiety disorders exerted a modest effect on the reliability of the DSM-5 SUD diagnoses. Conclusions For alcohol, opioid, cocaine and cannabis use disorders, DSM-5 criteria and diagnoses are at least as reliable as those of DSM-IV. PMID:26048641

  10. Transitioning from DSM-IV to DSM-5: A systematic review of eating disorder prevalence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall Dahlgren, Camilla; Wisting, Line

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature on assessment of eating disorder prevalence during the DSM-IV era (1994-2015). A PubMed search was conducted targeting articles on prevalence, incidence and epidemiology of eating disorders. The review was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines, and was limited to DSM-IV based eating disorder diagnoses published between 1994 and 2015. A total of 74 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Results yielded evidence of over 40 different assessment instruments used to assess eating disorder prevalence, with the EAT-40 being the most commonly used screening instrument, and the SCID being the most frequently used interview. The vast majority of studies employed two-stage designs, closely followed by clinical interviews. Observations of higher prevalence rates were found in studies employing self-reports compared to two-stage designs and interviews. Eating disorder prevalence rates have varied significantly during the DSM-IV era, and are dependent on assessment methods used and samples investigated. Following the transition to the DSM-5, eating disorder prevalence will change, warranting novel approaches to assessment and treatment planning. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The DSM diagnostic criteria for female orgasmic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, CA

    2010-01-01

    This is the post-print version of the article. The official published version can be found at the link below. This article reviews the DSM diagnostic criteria for Female Orgasmic Disorder (FOD). Following an overview of the concept of female orgasm, research on the prevalence and associated features of FOD is briefly reviewed. Specific aspects of the DSM-IV-TR criteria for FOD are critically reviewed and key issues that should be considered for DSM-V are discussed. The DSM-IV-TR text on FO...

  12. DSM for soil erosion risk in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro; McLeaod, Jim; Castellazzi, Marie; Baggio Compagnucci, Andrea; Irvine, Justin

    2017-04-01

    Soils play a crucial role in ecosystem functioning, and modelling its risk of degradation is fundamental, especially in the context of climate change. In this work we used continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping (DSM) approaches to map sediment erosion and deposition patterns due to rainfall. The test area covers the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Soil profiles data were interpolated using a geo-statistical hybrid Generalised Additive Models method for a range of soil properties such as organic matter, texture, soil depth and peat presence. The same method was used to interpolate climatic data and management information. Remote sensing data were integrated in the process and land use data included. Information on grazing (sheep and deer) pressure was taken into account in the modelling. The uncertainty was accounted and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils with an assessment adapted to each of them. The results and intermediate steps were compared with available continental scale results. The results show the importance of the use of DSM approaches for modeling soils and ecosystem functions and assessing uncertainty propagation.

  13. Interactive efforts to address DSM and IRP issues: Findings from the first year of a two-year study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, M.; Altman, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Yourstone, E. [Consultant, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-04-01

    This report presents findings from the first year of a two-year study of interactive efforts involving utilities and non-utility parties (NUPS) working together to prepare plans, develop Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs, or otherwise promote integrated planning and the use of cost-effective DSM measures. Of the ten cases covered in the current study, seven involved the collaborative approach to NUP involvement, which generally is marked by intensive utility-NUP interactions designed to reach consensus on a broad range of important issues; in collaboratives, outside consultants often are provided to enhance the technical capabilities of the NUPS. Another of the cases in this study involved a ``cooperative arrangement,`` whereby a utility and a NLT worked together in a focused short-term effort to develop a single DSM program. The intense interaction involved in this approach makes it very similar to a collaborative, except that both the scope and the duration of the effort were much more limited than in a normal collaborative. The ninth case concerned a task force run by state regulatory staff that was charged with the limited job of studying various cost-effectiveness tests available for assessing prospective DSM measures. All of these approaches (collaborative, cooperative arrangement, and task force) are types of interactive effort, as that term is used in this report. The final case concerned NUPs` attempts to encourage greater utility use of DSM in Florida but, to date, no interactive effort has been initiated there. Three main features of interactive efforts are described in this report: (1) the participants involved; (2) the context in which the efforts took place; and (3) key characteristics of the interactive process. This report also examines the outcomes achieved by the interactive efforts. These outcomes can be divided into two general categories: Product-related and participant-related.

  14. Interactive efforts to address DSM and IRP issues: Findings from the first year of a two-year study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); English, M.; Altman, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Yourstone, E. (Consultant, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-04-01

    This report presents findings from the first year of a two-year study of interactive efforts involving utilities and non-utility parties (NUPS) working together to prepare plans, develop Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs, or otherwise promote integrated planning and the use of cost-effective DSM measures. Of the ten cases covered in the current study, seven involved the collaborative approach to NUP involvement, which generally is marked by intensive utility-NUP interactions designed to reach consensus on a broad range of important issues; in collaboratives, outside consultants often are provided to enhance the technical capabilities of the NUPS. Another of the cases in this study involved a cooperative arrangement,'' whereby a utility and a NLT worked together in a focused short-term effort to develop a single DSM program. The intense interaction involved in this approach makes it very similar to a collaborative, except that both the scope and the duration of the effort were much more limited than in a normal collaborative. The ninth case concerned a task force run by state regulatory staff that was charged with the limited job of studying various cost-effectiveness tests available for assessing prospective DSM measures. All of these approaches (collaborative, cooperative arrangement, and task force) are types of interactive effort, as that term is used in this report. The final case concerned NUPs' attempts to encourage greater utility use of DSM in Florida but, to date, no interactive effort has been initiated there. Three main features of interactive efforts are described in this report: (1) the participants involved; (2) the context in which the efforts took place; and (3) key characteristics of the interactive process. This report also examines the outcomes achieved by the interactive efforts. These outcomes can be divided into two general categories: Product-related and participant-related.

  15. Proceedings of the symposium on multiple-use managementof California's hardwood resources; November 12-14, 1986; San Luis Obispo, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy R. Plumb; Norman H. Pillsbury

    1987-01-01

    The Symposium on the Ecology, Management, and Utilization of California Oaks held in June 1979 at Claremont, California, was the first to take a comprehensive look at California's native oak resource. At that time, interest in several species of California oaks was rapidly growing with particular concern about their regeneration, preservation, and wildlife...

  16. DSM-IV criteria endorsement patterns in alcohol dependence: relationship to severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Howard B; Chen, Chiung M; Yi, Hsiao-ye

    2008-02-01

    In DSM-IV, the diagnostic threshold for alcohol dependence (AD) is met when a patient presents with at least 3 of 7 criteria. We have computed the predictive value for each individual DSM-IV AD criterion, and examined subtypes of AD criteria endorsement patterns and their associated severity indicators for community-dwelling AD individuals. We utilized data from the 2001 to 2002 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Positive predictive values (PPV) for DSM-IV AD were computed for each of the individual criteria. Patterns of criteria endorsements were identified by latent class analysis (LCA). Sociodemographic status, age of onset and duration of AD, patterns of drinking, and drinking treatment history, were conditional on DSM criteria endorsement clusters, as indicators of the respondents' clinical severity. At the individual criterion level, the single criterion with the greatest PPV was D7--"Activities given up" with approximately 95% of drinking individuals who endorsed this DSM criterion correctly diagnosed as having DSM-IV AD. In addition to D7, only D5--"Physical/Psychological problems", and D6--"Time spent" had a PPV for AD substantially >50%. The LCA of AD endorsement patterns yielded a 6-cluster solution. The most common response pattern (34.5% of those with AD) was endorsement of 5 criteria: D1--"Quit/Control," D2--"Larger/Longer," D3--"Tolerance," D4--"Withdrawal," and D5--"Physical/Psychological problems." The most severe cluster (14%) was comprised of those who were likely to endorse 7/7 criteria. Cluster 1 (8.3%) did not include an endorsement of withdrawal, despite a heavy pattern of alcohol consumption. Unmarried status was associated with more severe criteria endorsement patterns. The present findings indicate a Guttman-like scaling of endorsement which yielded associations with severity for some of the concurrent indicators included in the analysis. However, severity measures did not always increase with DSM

  17. National Estimates of Exposure to Traumatic Events and PTSD Prevalence Using DSM-IV and DSM-5 Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Milanak, Melissa E.; Miller, Mark W.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Friedman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) defined according to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5; 2013) and fourth edition (DSM-IV; 1994) was compared in a national sample of U.S. adults (N = 2,953) recruited from an online panel. Exposure to traumatic events, PTSD symptoms, and functional impairment were assessed online using a highly structured, self-administered survey. Traumatic event exposure using DSM-5 criteria was high (89.7%), and exposure to multiple traumatic event types was the norm. PTSD caseness was determined using Same Event (i.e., all symptom criteria met to the same event type) and Composite Event (i.e., symptom criteria met to a combination of event types) definitions. Lifetime, past-12-month, and past 6-month PTSD prevalence using the Same Event definition for DSM-5 was 8.3%, 4.7%, and 3.8% respectively. All 6 DSM-5 prevalence estimates were slightly lower than their DSM-IV counterparts, although only 2 of these differences were statistically significant. DSM-5 PTSD prevalence was higher among women than among men, and prevalence increased with greater traumatic event exposure. Major reasons individuals met DSM-IV criteria, but not DSM-5 criteria were the exclusion of nonaccidental, nonviolent deaths from Criterion A, and the new requirement of at least 1 active avoidance symptom. PMID:24151000

  18. Generalized worry disorder: a review of DSM-IV generalized anxiety disorder and options for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin; Hobbs, Megan J; Borkovec, Thomas D; Beesdo, Katja; Craske, Michelle G; Heimberg, Richard G; Rapee, Ronald M; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Stanley, Melinda A

    2010-02-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has undergone a series of substantial classificatory changes since its first inclusion in DSM-III. The majority of these revisions have been in response to its poor inter-rater reliability and concerns that it may lack diagnostic validity. This article provides options for the revision of the DSM-IV GAD criteria for DSM-V. First, searches were conducted to identify the evidence that previous DSM Work Groups relied upon when revising the DSM-III-R GAD and the overanxious disorder classifications. Second, the literature pertaining to the DSM-IV criteria for GAD was examined. The review presents a number of options to be considered for DSM-V. One option is for GAD to be re-labeled in DSM-V as generalized worry disorder. This would reflect its hallmark feature. Proposed revisions would result in a disorder that is characterized by excessive anxiety and worry generalized to a number of events or activities for 3 months or more. Worry acts as a cognitive coping strategy that manifests in avoidant behaviors. The reliability and validity of the proposed changes could be investigated in DSM-V validity tests and field trials.

  19. Diagnostic concordance of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, María; Gómez, M M

    2016-05-01

    The present study aims to analyze diagnostic concordance between the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic criteria and their different groups of symptoms. Furthermore, analyses are conducted to establish the features of participants with no concordant diagnoses. The study assessed 166 people over 18 who had experienced at least one traumatic event. PTSD diagnosis was established using the Global Scale for Posttraumatic Stress (EGEP), a self-report measure to assess PTSD. The presence of cognitive avoidance was a determinant in the PTSD DSM-5 diagnosis (86% positive predictive value). The analysis of the non-concordant individuals revealed that individuals who were diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria but not the DSM-5 criteria were primarily indirect victims. Conversely, individuals who were diagnosed with the DSM-5 criteria and not with the DSM-IV criteria presented cognitive avoidance and alterations in cognition not included in the DSM-IV criteria. A within-subjects concordance analysis showed high agreement for PTSD diagnosis between the two classifications. Differences between the diagnoses are due to the new definition of C (avoidance) and D (negative alterations in cognitions and mood) in the DSM-5.

  20. A Comparison of DSM-5 and DSM-IV Diagnostic Criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Traumatized Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Müller, Julia; Morina, Naser; Schick, Matthis; Bryant, Richard A; Nickerson, Angela

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence rate and factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on the diagnostic criteria of the fourth and fifth editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, , ) in traumatized refugees. There were 134 adult treatment-seeking, severely and multiply traumatized patients from various refugee backgrounds were assessed in their mother tongue using a computerized set of questionnaires consisting of a trauma list, the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, and the new PTSD items that had been suggested by the DSM-5 Task Force of the American Psychiatric Association. Using DSM-IV, 60.4% of participants met diagnostic criteria for PTSD; using DSM-5, only 49.3% fulfilled all criteria (p DSM-IV and DSM-5 items showed good and comparable model fits. Furthermore, classification functions in the DSM-5 were satisfactory. The new Cluster D symptoms showed relatively high sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive power, and negative predictive power. The DSM-5 symptom structure appears to be applicable to traumatized refugees. Negative alterations in cognitions and mood may be especially useful for clinicians, not only to determine the extent to which an individual refugee is likely to meet criteria for PTSD, but also in providing targets for clinical intervention. Copyright © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  1. National estimates of exposure to traumatic events and PTSD prevalence using DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Dean G; Resnick, Heidi S; Milanak, Melissa E; Miller, Mark W; Keyes, Katherine M; Friedman, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) defined according to the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5; 2013) and fourth edition (DSM-IV; 1994) was compared in a national sample of U.S. adults (N = 2,953) recruited from an online panel. Exposure to traumatic events, PTSD symptoms, and functional impairment were assessed online using a highly structured, self-administered survey. Traumatic event exposure using DSM-5 criteria was high (89.7%), and exposure to multiple traumatic event types was the norm. PTSD caseness was determined using Same Event (i.e., all symptom criteria met to the same event type) and Composite Event (i.e., symptom criteria met to a combination of event types) definitions. Lifetime, past-12-month, and past 6-month PTSD prevalence using the Same Event definition for DSM-5 was 8.3%, 4.7%, and 3.8% respectively. All 6 DSM-5 prevalence estimates were slightly lower than their DSM-IV counterparts, although only 2 of these differences were statistically significant. DSM-5 PTSD prevalence was higher among women than among men, and prevalence increased with greater traumatic event exposure. Major reasons individuals met DSM-IV criteria, but not DSM-5 criteria were the exclusion of nonaccidental, nonviolent deaths from Criterion A, and the new requirement of at least 1 active avoidance symptom. Published 2013. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Comparison of DSM-5 Classifications of Alcohol Use Disorders With Those of DSM-IV, DSM-III-R, and ICD-10 in a General Population Sample in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Andreas; Hallgren, Mats; Forsman, Mikael; Forsell, Yvonne

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to employ the criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD), according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), in a general population sample and to compare the diagnostic classifications and prevalence with those of DSM-IV, DSM-III-R, and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10). We used a stratified random sample of 1,091 participants (ages 18-64) in Stockholm County, who were interviewed between 1998 and 2002. A semistructured interview was conducted using Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry. Diagnoses were made according to DSM-5, DSM-IV, DSM-III-R, and ICD-10. Agreement was studied using Cohen's κ. The prevalence of DSM-5 AUD was 11.0%, with corresponding dependence or abuse/harm diagnosis being 8.7% for DSM-IV, 8.5% for DSM-III-R, and 4.9% for ICD-10. With the shift from DSM-IV to DSM-5, 3.2% of those with no disorder were reclassified as mild AUD, whereas 28.9% of those with DSM-IV abuse were reclassified as having no disorder. The majority of the "new cases" had two DSM-IV dependence criteria, and few endorsed the new DSM-5 craving criteria. Cohen's κ between DSM-5 AUD and dependence or abuse/harm was as follows: DSM-IV, .84, DSM-III-R, .83, and ICD-10, .62. These findings were lower than the κ between the older systems: between DSM-IV and DSM-III-R, .98, between DSM-IV and ICD-10, .70, and between DSM-III-R and ICD- 10, .72. In the present study population, there were more undiagnosed DSM-IV cases being diagnosed as AUD using DSM-5 than vice versa, but in total the number of cases increased moderately when going from DSM-IV to DSM-5. Concerning reliability, there are substantial to almost perfect agreements between DSM-5 classifications of AUDs and those of DSM-IV, DSM-III-R, and ICD-10.

  3. DSM-5 proposals for mood disorders: a cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 revision is underway. The review examines draft proposals for changes in mood disorders (posted February 2010 on DSM-5 web site), explains their rationale, and considers relative costs vs. benefits. Proposals covered include recommendation for a comorbid anxiety dimension; addition of a new disorder, mixed anxiety depression; replacement of mixed manic episodes with a 'mixed features' specifier applicable to manic, hypomanic, and major depressive episodes; addition of severity dimensions for manic and major depressive episodes; and removal of the bereavement exclusion in major depressive episode. Although some proposals (particularly the anxiety dimension and the use of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as depression severity dimension) may improve clinical and research utility, others have a high potential for false positives (e.g., addition of mixed anxiety depression, removal of bereavement exclusion), unclear clinical utility (e.g., mixed features specifier for depressive episodes), or problematic implementation (e.g., use of Clinical Global Impression (CGI), which requires prior experience of treating bipolar patients, for rating manic episode severity). A cost-benefit analysis of mood proposals yields mixed results, with some having significant benefits and others carrying the risk of significant problems. Only proposals in which benefits outweigh costs should be included in the final DSM-5.

  4. Should there be both categorical and dimensional criteria for the substance use disorders in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helzer, John E; van den Brink, Wim; Guth, Sarah E

    2006-09-01

    As discussed in the following literature review, the relative advantages of categorical and dimensional criteria for classifying the substance use disorders (SUDs) have been debated for many years. The scheduled revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) offers an opportunity to re-examine this question. Both categorical and dimensional approaches to diagnosis offer advantages, both may in fact be necessary for a comprehensive taxonomy. One means of resolving debate about the direction to take in revising DSM-V and simultaneously of achieving maximum taxonomic utility is to include both categorical and dimensional criteria in DSM-V. This could be accomplished by first defining a set of categorical criteria, as in the previous editions of the DSM. Corresponding dimensional criteria could then be created using a more empirical methodology. In this paper we review some of the relevant literature, offer a specific proposal for a dimensional component for the DSM-V substance use disorders that also preserves the categorical definitions and suggest areas for additional research relevant the this agenda. There is evidence that alcohol and other forms of substance abuse and dependence are heterogeneous categories and that the SUDs can be conceptualized viably as arrayed along a continuum. Amplifying clinically derived categorical definitions with more empirically derived dimensional components to better capture this variability is a particularly important consideration for a substance use research agenda for DSM-V. It is crucial that a dimensional approach be offered in some form in DSM-V; but it is also vital that any dimensional approach be linked to the categorical definition. The proposal offered herein provides a model for amplifying categorical definitions with a dimensional component in a way that is evolutionary and not disruptive to the existing taxonomy.

  5. Epidemiology of DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Bridget F.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Chou, S. Patricia; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Pickering, Roger P.; Ruan, W. June; Smith, Sharon M.; Huang, Boji; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE National epidemiologic information from recently collected data on the new DSM-5 classification of alcohol use disorder (AUD) using a reliable, valid, and uniform data source is needed. OBJECTIVE To present nationally representative findings on the prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, associated disability, and treatment of DSM-5 AUD diagnoses overall and according to severity level (mild, moderate, or severe). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted face-to-face interviews with a representative US noninstitutionalized civilian adult (≥18 years) sample (N = 36 309) as the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III (NESARC-III). Data were collected from April 2012 through June 2013 and analyzed in October 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Twelve-month and lifetime prevalences of AUD. RESULTS Twelve-month and lifetime prevalences of AUD were 13.9% and 29.1%, respectively. Prevalence was generally highest for men (17.6% and 36.0%, respectively), white (14.0% and 32.6%, respectively) and Native American (19.2% and 43.4%, respectively), respondents, and younger (26.7% and 37.0%, respectively) and previously married (11.4% and 27.1%, respectively) or never married (25.0% and 35.5%, respectively) adults. Prevalence of 12-month and lifetime severe AUD was greatest among respondents with the lowest income level (1.8% and 1.5%, respectively). Significant disability was associated with 12-month and lifetime AUD and increased with the severity of AUD. Only 19.8% of respondents with lifetime AUD were ever treated. Significant associations were found between 12-month and lifetime AUD and other substance use disorders, major depressive and bipolar I disorders, and antisocial and borderline personality disorders across all levels of AUD severity, with odds ratios ranging from 1.2 (95% CI, 1.08-1.36) to 6.4 (95% CI, 5.76-7.22). Associations between AUD and panic disorder, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety

  6. Poor Validity of the DSM-IV Schizoid Personality Disorder Construct as a Diagnostic Category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummelen, Benjamin; Pedersen, Geir; Wilberg, Theresa; Karterud, Sigmund

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to evaluate the construct validity of schizoid personality disorder (SZPD) by investigating a sample of 2,619 patients from the Norwegian Network of Personality-Focused Treatment Programs by a variety of statistical techniques. Nineteen patients (0.7%) reached the diagnostic threshold of SZPD. Results from the factor analyses indicated that SZPD consists of three factors: social detachment, withdrawal, and restricted affectivity/ anhedonia. Overall, internal consistency and diagnostic efficiency were poor and best for the criteria that belong to the social detachment factor. These findings pose serious questions about the clinical utility of SZPD as a diagnostic category. On the other hand, the three factors were in concordance with findings from previous studies and with the trait model for personality disorders in DSM-5, supporting the validity of SZPD as a dimensional construct. The authors recommend that SZPD should be deleted as a diagnostic category in future editions of DSM-5.

  7. The Five-Factor Model of personality disorder and DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Five-Factor Model of personality disorders (FFMPD; Widiger & Mullins-Sweatt, ) developed from the recognition that the popular Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality could be used to describe and understand the official personality disorder (PD) constructs from the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) diagnostic manuals (e.g., DSM-IV-TR, APA, ). This article provides an overview of the FFM, highlighting its validity and utility in characterizing PDs as well as its ability to provide a comprehensive account of personality pathology in general. In 2013, DSM-5 is scheduled to appear, and the "hybrid" PD proposal will emphasize a 25-personality trait model. I present the current version of this new model, compare it to the FFMPD, and discuss issues related to the implementation of the FFMPD. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Personality © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Integrating normal and abnormal personality structure: a proposal for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiger, Thomas A

    2011-06-01

    The personality disorders section of the American Psychiatric Association's fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) is currently being developed. The purpose of the current paper is to encourage the authors of DSM-V to integrate normal and abnormal personality structure within a common, integrative model, and to suggest that the optimal choice for such an integration would be the five-factor model (FFM) of general personality structure. A proposal for the classification of personality disorder from the perspective of the FFM is provided. Discussed as well are implications and issues associated with an FFM of personality disorder, including validity, coverage, feasibility, clinical utility, and treatment implications.

  9. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. The Impact of the Proposed Changes for the DSM-5 on Diagnoses of First-time DUI/DWI Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baley, John W; Hoffman, Norman G

    2015-01-01

    Driving while impaired (DWI) is a frequently committed crime with enormous individual and social costs. The type of disposition and/or treatment appropriate for an individual offender is often determined, in part, by diagnostic criteria based on the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistics Manual. The DSM-5 significantly modified these criteria by eliminating legal problems as a criterion and dropping the categories of abuse and dependence. A brief substance abuse focused interview was conducted with 658 consecutive first-time DUI offenders who were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol. Most were white, well-educated males. Contingency analyses were utilized to compare the current with the new diagnostic criteria based on algorithms for both diagnostic formulations. The major change observed when moving from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 criteria was that, approximately 54% of first-time DUI/DWI offenders would no longer meet diagnostic criteria based on the DSM-5. Of the nearly 17% who met dependence criteria, the majority were in the severe designation of the DSM-5.

  11. Synthesizing dimensional and categorical approaches to personality disorders: refining the research agenda for DSM-V Axis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Robert F; Skodol, Andrew E; Livesley, W John; Shrout, Patrick E; Huang, Yueqin

    2007-01-01

    Personality disorder researchers have long considered the utility of dimensional approaches to diagnosis, signaling the need to consider a dimensional approach for personality disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). Nevertheless, a dimensional approach to personality disorders in DSM-V is more likely to succeed if it represents an orderly and logical progression from the categorical system in DSM-IV. With these considerations and opportunities in mind, the authors sought to delineate ways of synthesizing categorical and dimensional approaches to personality disorders that could inform the construction of DSM-V. This discussion resulted in (1) the idea of having a set of core descriptive elements of personality for DSM-V, (2) an approach to rating those elements for specific patients, (3) a way of combining those elements into personality disorder prototypes, and (4) a revised conception of personality disorder as a construct separate from personality traits. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. [Alcohol-related cognitive impairment and the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walvoort, S.J.; Wester, A.J.; Doorakkers, M.C.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Egger, J.I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is evident from the dsm-iv-tr that alcohol-related impairment is extremely difficult to classify accurately. As a result, cognitive deficits can easily be overlooked. The dsm-5, however, incorporates a new category, namely 'neurocognitive disorders', which may lead to significant

  13. Review of the Proposed "DSM-5" Substance Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. Dayle; Gill, Carman; Ray, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    The "DSM-5" Task Force has recommended a new substance use disorder to replace substance abuse and dependence. This article provides an overview of substance abuse and dependence, a description of the "DSM-5" substance use disorder, and implications and potential consequences of this change.

  14. DSM-5 Further Inflates Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batstra, Laura; Frances, Allen

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) prevalence and medication use unexpectedly increased significantly. In this article, we explore the DSM-5 proposals for ADHD that are likely to further increase its prevalence. We also address the possible

  15. Brief Report: Should the DSM V Drop Asperger Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The DSM IV defines Asperger syndrome (AS) as a pervasive developmental (autistic spectrum) disorder characterized by social deficits and rigid focused interests in the absence of language impairment and cognitive delay. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, there has been a dramatic increase in its recognition both in children and adults. However,…

  16. Adult separation anxiety disorder in the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bögels, S.M.; Knappe, S.; Clark, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike other DSM-IV anxiety disorders, separation anxiety disorder (SAD) has been considered a disorder that typically begins in childhood, and could be diagnosed only in adults "if onset is before 18." Moreover, SAD is the only DSM-IV anxiety disorder placed under "Disorders Usually First Diagnosed

  17. Binge Eating Disorder: A Review of a New "DSM" Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Laura L.; Wiman, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    In 1994, binge eating disorder (BED) was introduced as a disorder requiring further study in the "American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", fourth edition ("DSM-IV"). It is now listed as a distinct eating disorder in the "DSM-5", along with bulimia nervosa and anorexia…

  18. Dimensional and Cross-Cutting Assessment in the "DSM-5"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. Dayle

    2012-01-01

    A significant proposed change to the 5th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM-5") that will significantly affect the way counselors diagnose mental disorders is the addition of dimensional assessments to the categorical diagnoses. The author reviews the current "DSM"'s (4th ed., text rev.; American…

  19. Classification of amok in DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, A C; Bernstein, R L

    1992-08-01

    Culture-bound syndromes have been described worldwide in many individuals and, for certain syndromes, in epidemic proportion, yet these disorders have been classified as rare and exotic conditions warranting minimal attention. Development of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the tenth edition of the International Classification of Diseases offers an opportunity for providing a more sophisticated classification of these phenomena. The authors examine amok, a syndrome first described in Malaysia that consists of homicidal frenzy preceded by a state of brooding and ending with somnolence and amnesia. They discuss the concept of and criteria for a culture-specific disorder and propose that amok be classified as a culture-specific explosive behavioral disorder in DSM-IV.

  20. Evaluation of the DSM-5 Severity Specifier for Bulimia Nervosa in Treatment-Seeking Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Colmegna, Fabrizia; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Di Giacomo, Ester; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo

    2017-05-16

    A new severity specifier for bulimia nervosa (BN), based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviours (e.g., laxative misuse, self-induced vomiting, fasting, diuretic misuse, and excessive exercise), has been added to the most recent (fifth) edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a means of addressing variability and heterogeneity in the severity of the disorder. While existing research provides support for the DSM-5 severity specifier for BN in adult patients, evidence for its validity and clinical utility in youth is currently lacking. To address this gap, data from 272 treatment-seeking adolescents with DSM-5 BN (94.2% female, M age = 15.3 years, SD 1.7) were analysed to examine whether these patients, sub-grouped based on the DSM-5 severity definitions, would show meaningful differences in a broad range of clinical variables and demographic and physical characteristics. Analyses revealed that participants categorized with mild, moderate, severe, and extreme severity of BN significantly differed from each other in 15 variables regarding eating disorder pathological features and putative maintenance factors (i.e., core low self-esteem, perfectionism, social appearance anxiety, body surveillance, and mood intolerance), health-related quality of life and comorbid psychiatric (i.e., affective and anxiety) disorders (large effect sizes). Between-group differences in demographics, body mass index, or age-of-BN onset were not observed. Collectively, our findings provide support for the utility of the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviours as a severity indicator for BN and suggest that age-at-onset of BN is probably more disorder- than severity-dependent. Implications for future research are outlined.

  1. Dimensional assessment of anxiety disorders in parents and children for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Eline L; Majdandžić, Mirjana; Craske, Michelle G; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-09-01

    The current shift in the DSM towards the inclusion of a dimensional component allows clinicians and researchers to demonstrate not only the presence or absence of psychopathology in an individual, but also the degree to which the disorder and its symptoms are manifested. This study evaluated the psychometric properties and utility of a set of brief dimensional scales that assess DSM-based core features of anxiety disorders, for children and their parents. The dimensional scales and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-71), a questionnaire to assess symptoms of all anxiety disorders, were administered to a community sample of children (n = 382), aged 8-13 years, and their mothers (n = 285) and fathers (n = 255). The dimensional scales assess six anxiety disorders: specific phobia, agoraphobia, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and separation anxiety disorder. Children rated their own anxiety and parents their child's anxiety. The dimensional scales demonstrated high internal consistency (α > 0.78, except for father reported child panic disorder, for reason of lack of variation), and moderate to high levels of convergent validity (rs  = 0.29-0.73). Children who exceeded the SCARED cutoffs scored higher on the dimensional scales than those who did not, providing preliminary support for the clinical sensitivity of the scales. Given their strong psychometric properties and utility for both child and parent report, addition of the dimensional scales to the DSM-5 might be an effective way to incorporate dimensional measurement into the categorical DSM-5 assessment of anxiety disorders in children. Copyright © 2014 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.

  2. [Critical evaluation of the first draft of DSM-V].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, A

    2011-02-16

    Critical evaluation of DSM-V first draft This is an evaluation of the first DSM-V (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V) draft from the DSM-IV chairman. First, a brief history of DSM is reported. Then, major reasons for present controversies and the threat they raise to APA leadership in the field are discussed. Third point is careful recollection of the several conflicting aspects of the DSM-V draft, paying attention to drawbacks and their implications for future clinical practice, research and forensic activity. Comment is finally provided about APA (American Psychiatric Association) decisions aimed at reaching more consensus about this basic instrument of American psychiatry.

  3. An Interpersonal Analysis of Pathological Personality Traits in DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Thomas, Katherine M.; Markon, Kristian E.; Krueger, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    The proposed changes to the personality disorder section of the DSM-5 places an increased focus on interpersonal impairment as one of the defining features of personality psychopathology. In addition, a proposed trait model has been offered to provide a means of capturing phenotypic variation on the expression of personality disorder. In this study, we subject the proposed DSM-5 traits to interpersonal analysis using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems – Circumplex scales via the structural summary method for circumplex data. DSM-5 traits were consistently associated with generalized interpersonal dysfunction suggesting that they are maladaptive in nature, the majority of traits demonstrated discriminant validity with prototypical and differentiated interpersonal problem profiles, and conformed well to a priori hypothesized associations. These results are discussed in the context of the DSM-5 proposal and contemporary interpersonal theory, with a particular focus on potential areas for expansion of the DSM-5 trait model. PMID:22589411

  4. On the road to DSM-V and ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, David J; Regier, Darrel A; Kuhl, Emily A

    2008-11-01

    Development of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) has been ongoing since 1994, though official release will not occur for another 4 years. Potential revisions are being derived from multiple sources, including building on perceived limitations of DSM-IV; broad-based literature reviews; secondary and primary data analyses; and discussions between global members of the mental health community. The current focus on aligning DSM with the International Classification of Diseases-11 (ICD-11) speaks to the importance of creating a unified text that embraces cross-cutting issues of diagnostics, such as developmental, age-related, and cultural phenomena. International discourse is vital to this process and has been fostered by a National Institutes of Health-sponsored conference series on diagnosis-specific topics. From this series, the DSM-V Task Force developed the following set of revision principals to guide the efforts of the DSM-V Work Groups: grounding recommendations in empirical evidence; maintaining continuity with previous editions of DSM; removing a priori limitations on the amount of changes DSM-V may incur; and maintaining DSM's status as a living document. With work group formation complete, members are currently carrying out the research and revision recommendations proposed during the conference series. Ongoing activities include adding specialized advisors to each work group; completing literature reviews and planning data analyses; and forming study groups to discuss integration of cross-cutting issues (e.g., developmental lifespan factors; formation of diagnostic spectra). The road to DSM-V and ICD-11 has been challenging, but members continue to work diligently in their goal of constructing the most harmonious, scientifically sound, and clinically relevant DSM to date.

  5. "DSM IV," "DSM-5," and the Five-Factor Model: the Diagnosis of Personality Disorder with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, William R.; Steptoe, Lesley; McVicker, Ronnie; Haut, Fabian; Robertson, Colette

    2018-01-01

    In "DSM-5" there has been a move to dimensional personality disorder (PD) diagnosis, incorporating personality theory in the form of the five-factor model (FFM). It proposes an alternative assessment system based on diagnostic indicators and the FFM, while retaining "DSM-IV" categorical criteria. Four individuals with…

  6. From CBCL to DSM: A Comparison of Two Methods to Screen for DSM-IV Diagnoses Using CBCL Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Nicole P. C. M.; De Bruyn, Eric E. J.; Coolen, Jolanda C.; van Aarle, Edward J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The screening efficiency of 2 methods to convert Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) assessment data into Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnoses was compared. The Machine-Aided Diagnosis (MAD) method converts CBCL input data directly into DSM-IV symptom criteria. The…

  7. Prevalence and severity of eating disorders: A comparison of DSM-IV and DSM-5 among German adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Verena; Bürger, Arne; Hammerle, Florian

    2017-11-01

    Changes in the DSM-5 eating disorders criteria sought to increase the clarity of the diagnostic categories and to decrease the preponderance of nonspecified eating disorders. The first objective of this study was to analyze how these revisions affect threshold and EDNOS/OSFED eating disorder diagnoses in terms of prevalence, sex ratios, and diagnostic distribution in a student sample. Second, we aimed to compare the impairment levels of participants with a threshold, an EDNOS/OSFED and no diagnosis using both DSM-IV and DSM-5. A sample of 1654 7th and 8th grade students completed self-report questionnaires to determine diagnoses and impairment levels in the context of an eating disorder prevention program in nine German secondary schools. Height and weight were measured. The prevalence of threshold disorders increased from .48% (DSM-IV) to 1.15% (DSM-5). EDNOS disorders increased from 2.90 to 6.23% when using OSFED-categories. A higher proportion of girls was found throughout all the diagnostic categories, and the sex ratios remained stable. The effect sizes of DSM-5 group differences regarding impairment levels were equal to or larger than those of the DSM-IV comparisons, ranging from small to medium. We provide an in-depth overview of changes resulting from the revisions of DSM eating disorder criteria in a German adolescent sample. Despite the overall increase in prevalence estimates, the results suggest that the DSM-5 criteria differentiate participants with threshold disorders and OSFED from those no diagnosis as well as or even more distinctly than the DSM-IV criteria. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparison of DSM-IV and DSM-5 factor structure models for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Whitney; Swineford, Lauren B; Wetherby, Amy M; Lord, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    The present study examined the factor structure of autism symptoms in toddlers, to aid understanding of the phenotype during the developmental period that represents the earliest manifestations of autism symptoms. This endeavor is particularly timely, given changes in symptom structure from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) to the recently released Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Factor structure was examined in a sample of toddlers between 12 and 30 months of age (mean = 20.37 months, SD = 3.32 months) diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and recruited from community settings or referred for evaluation (N = 237). Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted comparing the relative fit of 4 distinct, previously proposed and validated models: DSM-5, DSM-IV, 1-factor, and an alternative 3-factor model proposed by van Lang et al. Findings revealed that the 1-factor model provided the poorest fit, followed by the DSM-IV model and the van Lang et al. model. The DSM-5 model provided the best fit to the data relative to other models and good absolute fit. Indicators for the confirmatory factor analyses, drawn from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Toddler Module (ADOS-T), loaded strongly onto the DSM-5 Social Communication and Social Interaction factor and more variably onto the DSM-5 Restricted/Repetitive Language and Behavior factor. Results indicate that autism symptoms in toddlers, as measured by the ADOS-T, are separable and best deconstructed into the 2-factor DSM-5 structure, supporting the reorganization of symptoms in the DSM-5. Consistency of the present results in toddlers with previous studies in older children and adults suggests that the structure of autism symptoms may be similar throughout development. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  9. DSM-IV and DSM-5 Prevalence of Social Anxiety Disorder in a Population Sample of Older People.

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    Karlsson, Björn; Sigström, Robert; Östling, Svante; Waern, Margda; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Skoog, Ingmar

    2016-12-01

    To examine the prevalence of social anxiety disorders (SAD) with (DSM-IV) and without (DSM-5) the person's own assessment that the fear was unreasonable, in a population sample of older adults. Further, to determine whether clinical and sociodemographic correlates of SAD differ depending on the criteria applied. Cross-sectional. General population in Gothenburg, Sweden. A random population-based sample of 75- and 85-year olds (N = 1200) without dementia. Psychiatric research nurses carried out a semi-structured psychiatric examination including the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. DSM-IV SAD was diagnosed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. SAD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria. The 6-month duration criterion in DSM-5 was not applied because of lack of information. Other assessments included the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), the Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA), and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The 1-month prevalence of SAD was 2.5% (N = 30) when the unreasonable fear criterion was defined in accordance with DSM-IV and 5.1% (N = 61) when the DSM-5 criterion was applied. Clinical correlates (GAF, MADRS, and BSA) were worse in SAD cases identified by either procedure compared with all others, and ratings for those reporting unreasonable fear suggested greater (albeit nonsignificant) overall psychopathology. Shifting the judgment of how reasonable the fear was, from the individual to the clinician, doubled the prevalence of SAD. This indicates that the DSM-5 version might increase prevalence rates of SAD in the general population. Further studies strictly applying all DSM-5 criteria are needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An analysis of the factors influencing demand-side management activity in the electric utility industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Mark Joseph

    Demand-side management (DSM), defined as the "planning, implementation, and monitoring of utility activities designed to encourage consumers to modify their pattern of electricity usage, including the timing and level of electricity demand," is a relatively new concept in the U.S. electric power industry. Nevertheless, in twenty years since it was first introduced, utility expenditures on DSM programs, as well as the number of such programs, have grown rapidly. At first glance, it may seem peculiar that a firm would actively attempt to reduce demand for its primary product. There are two primary explanations as to why a utility might pursue DSM: regulatory mandate, and self-interest. The purpose of this dissertation is to determine the impact these influences have on the amount of DSM undertaken by utilities. This research is important for two reasons. First, it provides insight into whether DSM will continue to exist as competition becomes more prevalent in the industry. Secondly, it is important because no one has taken a comprehensive look at firm-level DSM activity on an industry-wide basis. The primary data set used in this dissertation is the U.S. Department of Energy's Annual Electric Utility Report, Form EIA-861, which represents the most comprehensive data set available for analyzing DSM activity in the U.S. There are four measures of DSM activity in this data set: (1) utility expenditures on DSM programs; (2) energy savings by DSM program participants; and (3) the actual and (4) the potential reductions in peak load resulting from utility DSM measures. Each is used as the dependent variable in an econometric analysis where independent variables include various utility characteristics, regulatory characteristics, and service territory and customer characteristics. In general, the results from the econometric analysis suggest that in 1993, DSM activity was primarily the result of regulatory pressure. All of the evidence suggests that if DSM continues to

  11. Epidemiology of DSM-5 Drug Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Bridget F.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Ruan, W. June; Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Smith, Sharon M.; Pickering, Roger P.; Huang, Boji; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current information on the prevalence and sociodemographic and clinical profiles of individuals in the general population with DSM-5 drug use disorder (DUD) is limited. Given the present societal and economic context in the United States and the new diagnostic system, up-to-date national information is needed from a single uniform data source. OBJECTIVE To present nationally representative findings on the prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability, and treatment of DSM-5 DUD diagnoses overall and by severity level. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In-person interviews were conducted with 36 309 adults in the 2012–2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III, a cross-sectional representative survey of the United States. The household response rate was 72%; person-level response rate, 84%; and overall response rate, 60.1%. Data were collected April 2012 through June 2013 and analyzed from February through March 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Twelve-month and lifetime DUD, based on amphetamine, cannabis, club drug, cocaine, hallucinogen, heroin, nonheroin opioid, sedative/tranquilizer, and/or solvent/inhalant use disorders. RESULTS Prevalences of 12-month and lifetime DUD were 3.9% and 9.9%, respectively. Drug use disorder was generally greater among men, white and Native American individuals, younger and previously or never married adults, those with lower education and income, and those residing in the West. Significant associations were found between 12-month and lifetime DUD and other substance use disorders. Significant associations were also found between any 12-month DUD and major depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% CI, 1.09–1.64), dysthymia (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09–2.02), bipolar I (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.06–2.05), posttraumatic stress disorder (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.27–2.10), and antisocial (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.11–1.75), borderline (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.41–2.24), and schizotypal (OR, 1

  12. Latent Factor Structure of DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentes, Emily; Dennis, Paul A.; Kimbrel, Nathan A.; Kirby, Angela C.; Hair, Lauren P.; Beckham, Jean C.; Calhoun, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the latent factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on DSM-5 criteria in a sample of participants (N = 374) recruited for studies on trauma and health. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were used to compare the fit of the previous 3-factor DSM-IV model of PTSD to the 4-factor model specified in DSM-5 as well as to a competing 4-factor “dysphoria” model (Simms, Watson, & Doebbeling, 2002) and a 5-factor (Elhai et al., 2011) model of PTSD. Results indicated that the Elhai 5-factor model (re-experiencing, active avoidance, emotional numbing, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal) provided the best fit to the data, although substantial support was demonstrated for the DSM-5 4-factor model. Low factor loadings were noted for two of the symptoms in the DSM-5 model (psychogenic amnesia and reckless/self-destructive behavior), which raises questions regarding the adequacy of fit of these symptoms with other core features of the disorder. Overall, the findings from the present research suggest the DSM-5 model of PTSD is a significant improvement over the previous DSM-IV model of PTSD. PMID:26366290

  13. Nosologic Comparisons of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Chou, S Patricia; Smith, Sharon M; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Saha, Tulshi D; Pickering, Roger P; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine prevalences and concordances between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), and Fifth Edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders (SUDs) in a newly completed U.S. epidemiologic survey. The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III surveyed 36,309 civilian, noninstitutionalized adults. SUDs were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5. Concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders were assessed using kappa statistics. Prevalences of past-year substance-specific DSM-5 disorders (2+ criteria) were modestly higher than those of DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined for alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers, opioids, and heroin, but lower for cannabis, cocaine, and stimulants. Lifetime prevalences were lower under DSM-5. Prevalences were similar between moderate to severe (4+ criteria) DSM-5 disorders and dependence, whereas prevalences of DSM-5 disorders at 3+ criteria (DSM-5 [3+]) were higher, particularly for cannabis. Past-year concordances were excellent for DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined versus any DSM-5 and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 moderate to severe disorders; lifetime concordances were fair to excellent. Past-year concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 (3+) were generally similar to or modestly higher than those with any DSM-5 disorder; lifetime concordances were mostly lower. Findings are consistent with those informing the development of DSM-5. Future research should examine differences in patterns between past-year and lifetime disorders, particularly for cannabis. Other questions warranting investigation include whether different combinations of the same numbers of criteria carry different clinical or nosologic implications, whether changes innosology yield changes in treatment demand, and whether changes in characteristics of individuals with DSM-5 SUDs dictate modifications to screening and

  14. Nosologic Comparisons of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Smith, Sharon M.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Saha, Tulshi D.; Pickering, Roger P.; June Ruan, W.; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine prevalences and concordances between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), and Fifth Edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders (SUDs) in a newly completed U.S. epidemiologic survey. Method: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III surveyed 36,309 civilian, noninstitutionalized adults. SUDs were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule–5. Concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders were assessed using kappa statistics. Results: Prevalences of past-year substance-specific DSM-5 disorders (2+ criteria) were modestly higher than those of DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined for alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers, opioids, and heroin, but lower for cannabis, cocaine, and stimulants. Lifetime prevalences were lower under DSM-5. Prevalences were similar between moderate to severe (4+ criteria) DSM-5 disorders and dependence, whereas prevalences of DSM-5 disorders at 3+ criteria (DSM-5 [3+]) were higher, particularly for cannabis. Past-year concordances were excellent for DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined versus any DSM-5 and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 moderate to severe disorders; lifetime concordances were fair to excellent. Past-year concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 (3+) were generally similar to or modestly higher than those with any DSM-5 disorder; lifetime concordances were mostly lower. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with those informing the development of DSM-5. Future research should examine differences in patterns between past-year and lifetime disorders, particularly for cannabis. Other questions warranting investigation include whether different combinations of the same numbers of criteria carry different clinical or nosologic implications, whether changes innosology yield changes in treatment demand, and whether changes in characteristics of individuals with DSM-5 SUDs

  15. Should A2 be a diagnostic requirement for posttraumatic stress disorder in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Meaghan L; Creamer, Mark; McFarlane, Alexander C; Silove, Derrick; Bryant, Richard A

    2010-04-30

    The requirement that trauma survivors experience fear, helplessness or horror (Criterion A2) as a part of their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis was introduced into DSM-IV. The imminent re-definition of PTSD in DSM-V highlights the need for empirical studies to validate the utility of the A2 requirement. We aimed to identify (i) how often A2 was associated with PTSD (B-F criteria) at 3 months after trauma and (ii) what was the peritraumatic emotional experience for those who met PTSD criteria but were A2 negative. In a prospective design cohort study we assessed the peritraumatic emotional experience of 535 injury patients in four Australian hospitals. These patients were followed up 3 months later and assessed for PTSD using a structured clinical interview. The majority of those who developed PTSD (B-F criterion) at 3 months met A2 criteria. A substantial minority, however (23%), did not meet A2 criteria. Those PTSD patients who were A2 negative fell into three groups: (i) those who experienced subthreshold levels of A2; (ii) those who experienced intense peritrauma emotional responses other than fear, helplessness or horror; and (iii) those who were amnesic to their peritrauma emotional experience. These findings do not support the inclusion of A2 as diagnostic requirement for DSM-V. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnosing the DSM: Diagnostic Classification Needs Fundamental Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Steven E

    2011-03-01

    If all goes as planned, the American Psychiatric Association will release a new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) in May 2013. Since 1980, the DSM has provided a shared diagnostic language to clinicians, patients, scientists, school systems, courts, and pharmaceutical and insurance companies; any changes to the influential manual will have serious ramifications. But, argues Dr. Steven Hyman, the DSM is a poor mirror of clinical and biological realities; a fundamentally new approach to diagnostic classification is needed as researchers uncover novel ways to study and understand mental illness.

  17. California Energy Systems for the 21st Century 2016 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Randwyk, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boutelle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McClelland, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weed, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-25

    The California Energy Systems for the 21st Century (CES-21) Program is a public-private collaborative research and development program between the California Joint Utilities1 and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of this annual report is to provide the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC or Commission) with a summary of the 2016 progress of the CES-21 Program.

  18. Highly Efficient Thermostable DSM Cellulases: Why & How?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manoj [DSM Innovation, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2011-04-26

    These are the slides from this presentation. Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  19. Comparative distribution and validity of DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnoses of eating disorders in adolescents from the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Martine F; Buchholz, Annick; Henderson, Katherine; Obeid, Nicole; Maras, Danijela; Schubert, Nick; Paterniti, Sabrina; Goldfield, Gary

    2015-03-01

    DSM-5 changes for eating disorders (EDs) aimed to reduce preponderance of non-specified cases and increase validity of specific diagnoses. The objectives were to estimate the combined effect of changes on prevalence of EDs in adolescents and examine validity of diagnostic groupings. A total of 3043 adolescents (1254 boys and 1789 girls, Mage  = 14.19 years, SD = 1.61) completed self-report questionnaires including the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale. Prevalence of full-threshold EDs increased from 1.8% (DSM-IV) to 3.7% (DSM-5), with a higher prevalence of bulimia nervosa (1.6%) and the addition of the diagnosis of purging disorder (1.4%); prevalence of binge eating disorder was unchanged (0.5%), and non-specified cases decreased from 5.1% (DSM-IV) to 3.4% (DSM-5). Validation analyses demonstrated that DSM-5 ED subgroups better captured variance in psychopathology than DSM-IV subgroups. Findings extend results from previous prevalence and validation studies into the adolescent age range. Improved diagnostic categories should facilitate identification of EDs and indicate targeted treatments. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  20. Examining the stability of DSM-IV and empirically derived eating disorder classification: implications for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carol B; Crow, Scott J; Swanson, Sonja A; Crosby, Ross D; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Mitchell, James E; Agras, W Stewart; Halmi, Katherine A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to derive an empirical classification of eating disorder symptoms in a heterogeneous eating disorder sample using latent class analysis (LCA) and to examine the longitudinal stability of these latent classes (LCs) and the stability of DSM-IV eating disorder (ED) diagnoses. A total of 429 females with ED symptoms were assessed using the Eating Disorder Examination every 6 months for 2 years. LCA was used to derive empirical classification at baseline. Latent transition analysis (LTA) was used to examine the longitudinal stability of LCs, and Markov modeling procedures were used to examine DSM-IV ED diagnoses over all the time points. LCA yielded a 3-class solution: binge eating and purging, binge eating only, and low body mass index. LTA indicated that these LCs showed greater stability over 2 years than DSM-IV diagnoses with the probability of remaining in the same class ranging from 0.69 to 0.91 for LCs and from 0.40 to 0.75 for DSM-IV diagnoses. Transition patterns also revealed more stability for LCs with only 21% changing classes compared with 63% of the DSM-IV diagnostic categories. Empirically derived classes of ED symptoms showed greater longitudinal stability than DSM-IV diagnoses over a 2-year time period, suggesting that modifying the criteria to be consistent with empirically based classification (e.g., reducing frequency requirements of binge eating and purging) may reduce ED diagnostic crossover in DSM-5.

  1. Trajectories of Preschool Disorders to Full DSM Depression at School Age and Early Adolescence: Continuity of Preschool Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Joan L.; Gaffrey, Michael S.; Tillman, Rebecca; April, Laura M.; Belden, Andy C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preschool-onset depression, a developmentally adapted form of depression arising between the ages of 3–6, has demonstrated numerous features of validity including characteristic alterations in stress reactivity and brain function. Notably, this validated syndrome with multiple clinical markers is characterized by sub-threshold DSM Major Depressive Disorder criteria, raising questions about its clinical significance. To clarify the utility and public health significance of the preschool-onset depression construct, diagnostic outcomes of this group at school age and adolescence were investigated. Methods We investigated the likelihood of meeting full DSM Major Depressive Disorder criteria in later childhood (i.e., ≥ age 6) as a function of preschool depression, other preschool Axis I disorders, maternal depression, parenting non-support and traumatic life events in a longitudinal prospective study of preschool children. Results Preschool-onset depression emerged as a robust predictor of DSM-5 Major Depressive Disorder in later childhood even after accounting for the effect of maternal depression and other risk factors. Preschool-onset conduct disorder also predicted DSM-5 Major Depressive Disorder in later childhood, but this association was partially mediated by maternal non-support, reducing the effect of preschool conduct disorder in predicting DSM depression by 21%. Discussion Study findings provide evidence that this preschool depressive syndrome is a robust risk factor for meeting full DSM criteria for Major Depressive Disorder in later childhood over and above other established risk factors. Preschool conduct disorder also predicted Major Depressive Disorder but was mediated by maternal non-support. Findings suggest that attention to preschool depression and conduct disorder in addition to maternal depression and exposure to trauma should now become an important factor for identification of young children at highest risk for later MDD who should

  2. Reliability and validity of the DSM-IV-TR and proposed DSM-5 criteria for pedophilia: Implications for the ICD-11 and the next DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Michael C; Fedoroff, J Paul; Bradford, John M; Knack, Natasha; Rodrigues, Nicole C; Curry, Susan; Booth, Brad; Gray, Jonathan; Cameron, Colin; Bourget, Dominique; Messina, Sarina; James, Elizabeth; Watson, Diane; Gulati, Sanjiv; Balmaceda, Rufino; Ahmed, Adekunle G

    We tested the inter-rater reliability and criterion-related validity of the DSM-IV-TR pedophilia diagnosis and proposed DSM-5 pedohebephilia diagnosis in a sample of 79 men who had committed child pornography offenses, contact sexual offenses against children, or who were referred because of concerns about whether they had a sexual interest in children. Participants were evaluated by two independent psychiatrists with an interview and questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics, sexual history, and self-reported sexual interests; they also completed phallometric and visual reaction time testing. Kappa was .59 for ever meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for pedophilia and .52 for ever meeting the proposed DSM-5 criteria for pedohebephilia. Ever meeting DSM-IV-TR diagnosis was significantly related to self-reported index of sexual interest in children (highest AUC=.81, 95% CI=.70-.91, pTR except for a distinction between having a paraphilia (the interest) and a paraphilic disorder (the paraphilia plus clinically significant distress or impairment). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. A cross-national examination of differences in classification of lifetime alcohol use disorder between DSM-IV and DSM-5: Findings from the World Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Tim; Chiu, Wai-Tat; Glantz, Meyer; Kessler, Ronald C.; Lago, Luise; Sampson, Nancy; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Florescu, Silvia; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Murphy, Sam; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; de Galvis, Yolanda Torres; Viana, Maria Carmen; Xavier, Miguel; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    Aims To examine the diagnostic overlap in DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD) and determine the clinical correlates of changing diagnostic status across the two classification systems. Design DSM-IV and DSM-5 definitions of AUD were compared using cross-national community survey data. Setting Nine low-, middle- and high-income countries. Participants/Cases 31,367 respondents to surveys in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative. Measures Composite International Diagnostic Interview, version 3.0 was used to derive DSM-IV and DSM-5 lifetime diagnoses of AUD. Clinical characteristics, also assessed in the surveys, included lifetime DSM-IV anxiety, mood and drug use disorders, lifetime suicidal ideation, plan and attempt, general functional impairment and psychological distress. Findings Compared to DSM-IV AUD (12.3%, SE=0.3%), the DSM-5 definition yielded slightly lower prevalence estimates (10.8%, SE=0.2%). Almost one third (n=802) of all DSM-IV Abuse cases switched to sub-threshold according to DSM-5 and one quarter (n=467) of all DSM-IV diagnostic orphans switched to mild AUD according to DSM-5. New cases of DSM-5 AUD were largely similar to those who maintained their AUD across both classifications. Similarly, new DSM-5 non-cases were similar to those who were sub-threshold across both classifications. The exception to this was with regards to the prevalence of any lifetime drug use disorder. Conclusions In this large cross-national community sample, the prevalence of DSM-5 lifetime AUD was only slightly lower than the prevalence of DSM-IV lifetime AUD. Nonetheless there was considerable diagnostic switching, with a large number of people inconsistently identified across the two DSM classifications. PMID:27426631

  4. A Cross-National Examination of Differences in Classification of Lifetime Alcohol Use Disorder Between DSM-IV and DSM-5: Findings from the World Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Tim; Chiu, Wai-Tat; Glantz, Meyer; Kessler, Ronald C; Lago, Luise; Sampson, Nancy; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Florescu, Silvia; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Murphy, Sam; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Torres de Galvis, Yolanda; Viana, Maria Carmen; Xavier, Miguel; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-08-01

    The current study sought to examine the diagnostic overlap in DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD) and determine the clinical correlates of changing diagnostic status across the 2 classification systems. DSM-IV and DSM-5 definitions of AUD were compared using cross-national community survey data in 9 low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Participants were 31,367 respondents to surveys in the World Health Organization's World Mental Health Survey Initiative. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview, version 3.0, was used to derive DSM-IV and DSM-5 lifetime diagnoses of AUD. Clinical characteristics, also assessed in the surveys, included lifetime DSM-IV anxiety; mood and drug use disorders; lifetime suicidal ideation, plan, and attempt; general functional impairment; and psychological distress. Compared with DSM-IV AUD (12.3%, SE = 0.3%), the DSM-5 definition yielded slightly lower prevalence estimates (10.8%, SE = 0.2%). Almost one-third (n = 802) of all DSM-IV abuse cases switched to subthreshold according to DSM-5 and one-quarter (n = 467) of all DSM-IV diagnostic orphans switched to mild AUD according to DSM-5. New cases of DSM-5 AUD were largely similar to those who maintained their AUD across both classifications. Similarly, new DSM-5 noncases were similar to those who were subthreshold across both classifications. The exception to this was with regard to the prevalence of any lifetime drug use disorder. In this large cross-national community sample, the prevalence of DSM-5 lifetime AUD was only slightly lower than the prevalence of DSM-IV lifetime AUD. Nonetheless, there was considerable diagnostic switching, with a large number of people inconsistently identified across the 2 DSM classifications. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Item response theory analyses of DSM-IV and DSM-5 stimulant use disorder criteria in an American Indian community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, David A; Gizer, Ian R; Lau, Philip; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2014-02-01

    Native Americans experience some of the highest rates of DSM-IV stimulant dependence (SD) of all U.S. ethnic groups. This report compares DSM-IV and DSM-5 stimulant use disorder (SUD) diagnostic criteria in an American Indian community sample. Demographic information, stimulant (methamphetamine or cocaine) use, and lifetime DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnoses were assessed in 858 adult American Indians. Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were used to assess SUD criteria in both DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria sets along an underlying latent trait severity continuum and the effect of demographic variables on differential item functioning (DIF) in those criteria. The overall rate of DSM-IV SD was 33%, of DSM-IV SUD was 38%, and of DSM-5 SUD was 36% with no gender differences. All SUD symptoms in both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 datasets functioned on the moderate portion of the underlying severity continuum. "Craving" discriminated better than any other criterion at its level of severity in indicating the presence or absence of SUD. There was little DIF in groups defined by gender or any other demographic variable in either the DSM-IV or DSM-5 datasets. These findings indicate that in this American Indian sample, diagnostic criteria for DSM-IV and DSM-5 SUD function similarly in terms of severity and DIF and that the abolition of the DSM-IV distinction between stimulant abuse and dependence in DSM-5 is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yourstone, N.E. (Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group's functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities' views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  7. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yourstone, N.E. [Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group`s functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities` views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  8. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  9. DSM-III and the diagnosis of borderline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, W N

    1983-07-01

    In order to achieve more understanding of the diagnosis of borderline personality, particularly as it relates to DSM-III, a historical review of influential diagnostic approaches is undertaken. DSM-III defines the borderline personality disorder in a simple way, enhancing reliability and research value. In comparison to other influential approaches, however, there is an overemphasis on affective disturbance, plus an obvious omission amongst the diagnostic criteria of the vulnerability to brief psychotic regressions under stress. The checklist approach of DSM-III greatly takes away from dynamic understanding and makes potentially valuable items such as defensive organization difficult to include. The DSM-III concept of the borderline personality as one of many distinct personality disorders seems unfounded. The concept of the borderline as a superordinate diagnosis under which more specific personality disorders would fall, appears more reasonable.

  10. Strengthening the DSM: incorporating resilience and cultural competence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, Betty; Petrovich, Anne

    2011-01-01

    "Garcia and Petrovich...provide a balanced overview of the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM, a comprehensive review of the nature, etiology, and treatment of major mental disorders, and most importantly, a perspective...

  11. Subgrouping the autism "spectrum": reflections on DSM-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Lai

    Full Text Available DSM-5 has moved autism from the level of subgroups ("apples and oranges" to the prototypical level ("fruit". But making progress in research, and ultimately improving clinical practice, will require identifying subgroups within the autism spectrum.

  12. The epistemological significance of possession entering the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Craig

    2015-09-01

    The discourse of the American Psychiatric Association's DSM reflects the inherently dialogic or contradictory nature of its stated mandate to demonstrate both 'nosological completeness' and cultural 'inclusiveness'. Psychiatry employs the dialogic discourse of the DSM in a one-sided, positivistic manner by identifying what it considers universal mental disease entities stripped of their cultural context. In 1992 the editors of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders proposed to introduce possession into their revisions. A survey of the discussions about introducing 'possession' as a dissociative disorder to be listed in the DSM-IV indicates a missed epistemological break. Subsequently the editors of the DSM-5 politically 'recuperated' possession into its official discourse, without acknowledging the anarchic challenges that possession presents to psychiatry as a cultural practice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. VT Lidar nDSM (2 meter) - 2012 - Bennington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Bennington County 2012 2.0m and related "normalized" Digital Surface Model (nDSM)....

  14. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2008 - West Franklin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Missisquoi Lower 2008 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  15. VT Lidar DSM (3.2 meter) - 2004 - Chittenden County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Chittenden County 2004 3.2m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  16. APPLICATION OF DSM IN OBSTACLE CLEARANCE SURVEYING OF AERODROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the wide use of digital elevation model (DEM, digital surface model (DSM receives less attention because that it is composed by not only terrain surface, but also vegetations and man-made objects which are usually regarded as useless information. Nevertheless, these objects are useful for the identification of obstacles around an aerodrome. The primary objective of the study was to determine the applicability of DSM in obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome. According to the requirements of obstacle clearance surveying at QT airport, aerial and satellite imagery were used to generate DSM, by means of photogrammetry, which was spatially analyzed with the hypothetical 3D obstacle limitation surfaces (OLS to identify the potential obstacles. Field surveying was then carried out to retrieve the accurate horizontal position and height of the obstacles. The results proved that the application of DSM could make considerable improvement in the efficiency of obstacle clearance surveying of aerodrome.

  17. Parental Alienation, DSM-5, and ICD-11: Response to Critics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William Bernet; Amy J. L. Baker

    2013-01-01

    There has been considerable interest among forensic practitioners in the proposals that parental alienation be included in the next editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases (DSM...

  18. The DSM diagnostic criteria for female orgasmic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Cynthia A

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews the DSM diagnostic criteria for Female Orgasmic Disorder (FOD). Following an overview of the concept of female orgasm, research on the prevalence and associated features of FOD is briefly reviewed. Specific aspects of the DSM-IV-TR criteria for FOD are critically reviewed and key issues that should be considered for DSM-V are discussed. The DSM-IV-TR text on FOD focused on the physiological changes that may (or may not) accompany orgasm in women; one of the major recommendations here is that greater emphasis be given to the subjective aspects of the experience of orgasm. Additional specific recommendations are made for revision of diagnostic criteria, including the use of minimum severity and duration criteria, and better acknowledgment of the crucial role of relationship factors in FOD.

  19. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  20. LINE-BASED REGISTRATION OF DSM AND HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Avbelj

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Data fusion techniques require a good registration of all the used datasets. In remote sensing, images are usually geo-referenced using the GPS and IMU data. However, if more precise registration is required, image processing techniques can be employed. We propose a method for multi-modal image coregistration between hyperspectral images (HSI and digital surface models (DSM. The method is divided in three parts: object and line detection of the same object in HSI and DSM, line matching and determination of transformation parameters. Homogeneous coordinates are used to implement matching and adjustment of transformation parameters. The common object in HSI and DSM are building boundaries. They have apparent change in height and material, that can be detected in DSM and HSI, respectively. Thus, before the matching and transformation parameter computation, building outlines are detected and adjusted in HSI and DSM. We test the method on a HSI and two DSM, using extracted building outbounds and for comparison also extracted lines with a line detector. The results show that estimated building boundaries provide more line assignments, than using line detector.

  1. [Conversion disorder: from DSM IV to DSM 5 or from a psychiatric to a neurological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, M; Willems, M H A

    2015-01-01

    According to one of the diagnostic criteria of the dsm iv for conversion disorder there has to be a temporal relationship between psychological factors and the onset, or the worsening, of the symptoms. This criterion has been omitted in the dsm-5. Another criterion, namely that the symptoms are not produced intentionally, has also been abandoned. A new recommendation is that therapists should look for neurological symptoms that support the diagnosis. To investigate whether studies support the changes in the criteria. We searched literature using PubMed. When the symptoms first appear, trauma or stress in 37% of patients is of a physical rather than a psychological nature. Different forms of stress were found in equal proportions (20%) in patients with or without conversion disorder. There are no specific stressors, except possibly in patients with dysphonia. The percentages of childhood abuse vary widely, namely from 0 to 85%. The characteristic phenomenon of 'la belle indifference' occurs in only 3% of patients with conversion disorder versus only 2% of controls. Most of the 'positive' clinical tests for partial paralysis and sensory and gait disorders are highly specific. There are no reliable tests for distinguishing conversion disorder from simulation. The changes of the criteria are supported by recent studies.

  2. A network analysis of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and correlates in U.S. military veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Fried, Eiko I; Deserno, Marie K; Tsai, Jack; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments in psychometrics enable the application of network models to analyze psychological disorders, such as PTSD. Instead of understanding symptoms as indicators of an underlying common cause, this approach suggests symptoms co-occur in syndromes due to causal interactions. The current study has two goals: (1) examine the network structure among the 20 DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, and (2) incorporate clinically relevant variables to the network to investigate whether PTSD symptoms exhibit differential relationships with suicidal ideation, depression, anxiety, physical functioning/quality of life (QoL), mental functioning/QoL, age, and sex. We utilized a nationally representative U.S. military veteran's sample; and analyzed the data from a subsample of 221 veterans who reported clinically significant DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. Networks were estimated using state-of-the-art regularized partial correlation models. Data and code are published along with the paper. The 20-item DSM-5 PTSD network revealed that symptoms were positively connected within the network. Especially strong connections emerged between nightmares and flashbacks; blame of self or others and negative trauma-related emotions, detachment and restricted affect; and hypervigilance and exaggerated startle response. The most central symptoms were negative trauma-related emotions, flashbacks, detachment, and physiological cue reactivity. Incorporation of clinically relevant covariates into the network revealed paths between self-destructive behavior and suicidal ideation; concentration difficulties and anxiety, depression, and mental QoL; and depression and restricted affect. These results demonstrate the utility of a network approach in modeling the structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, and suggest differential associations between specific DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and clinical outcomes in trauma survivors. Implications of these results for informing the assessment and treatment of this disorder, are discussed

  3. Parent-child relational problem: field trial results, changes in DSM-5, and proposed changes for ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamboldt, Marianne; Cordaro, Anthony; Clarke, Diana

    2015-03-01

    Caregiving relationships are significant factors in the development, mediation, or moderation of childhood mental health problems. However, epidemiological and clinical research has been limited by lack of reliable, succinct, and standardized methods of assessing parent-child relationship constructs. The Relational Processes Workgroup (ad hoc to the DSM-5 process) proposed more specific criteria to define a parent-child relational problem (PCRP). These criteria were field tested in one of the DSM-5 Field trial sites, utilizing a similar research design as DSM-5. Participants included 133 symptomatic children (5-17 years) in active treatment for a mental health problem and their primary caregiver (86% mothers). Two separate clinicians, each blinded to the assessment of the other clinician as well as the DSM-5 diagnoses, interviewed the dyads within a 2-week period, utilizing the proposed PCRP criteria. Prior to each interview, parents were asked to write about their relationship with their child, and children (over the age of 10 years) filled out the Parental Bonding Instrument, Brief Current, and the Perceived Criticism Measure. Clinicians were able to read the narratives and see results of the child report measures before assessing the dyad. The weighted prevalence of a PCRP in this sample was 34%. The interclass kappa for overall agreement between clinicians was 0.58 (0.40, 0.72), which indicates good interrater reliability. Further, clinicians found the PCRP diagnostic criteria clinically useful and an improvement over the brief description of PCRP that was presented in DSM-IV. Relationships between children and their primary caregiver can be assessed in a reliable manner, based on clinical interview with the child-caregiver dyad and several self-report measures. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  4. A review of somatoform disorders in DSM-IV and somatic symptom disorders in proposed DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Firoozabadi, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Psychiatric care providers should be trained to use current changes in the somatoform disorders criteria. New diagnostic criteria for Somatic Symptom disorders in the proposed DSM-V is discussed and compared with its older counterpart in DSM-IV. A new category called Somatic Syndrome Disorders is suggested. It includes new subcategories such as "Complex Somatic Symptom Disorder" (CSSD) and "Simple Somatic Symptom Disorder" (SSSD). Some of the subcategories of DSM-IV derived disorders are included in CSSD. While there are some changes in diagnostic criteria, there are concerns and limitations about the new classification needed to be more discussed before implementation. Functional somatic disturbance, the counterpart of converion disorder in DSM-IV, can be highly dependet on the developmental level of children. However, the role of developmental level needs to be considered.

  5. A comparison of DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 definitions for sexual dysfunctions: critiques and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Mehmet Z; Gündüz, Anil

    2014-02-01

    The diagnostic criteria of sexual dysfunctions (SDs) are paramount for the development of sexual medicine as reliable diagnoses are essential to guide treatment plans. Prior Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) classifications based definitions of SD mostly on expert opinions and included imprecise terms. The validity of diagnoses of SD has only recently been challenged, and efforts are made to make more operational definitions. This paper aims to compare and contrast the recently released Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria of SD with that of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) and explains the rationale for making changes in the new DSM-5. It also aims to address some issues to be considered further for the future. Online proposed American Psychiatric Association website DSM-5, the new released DSM-5, and DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for SD were thoroughly inspected, and an extensive literature search was performed for comparative reasons. Changes in diagnostic criteria of DSM-5 were detected, and DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for SD were compared and contrasted. Diagnostic criteria were more operationalized, and explicit duration and frequency criteria were set up in DSM-5 for purposes of good clinical research. Classifications based on simple linear sexual response were abandoned, and diagnostic classifications were separately made for males and females. Desire and arousal disorders in women were merged. Drifting apart from linear sexual response cycle may be an advancement in establishing specific diagnostic criteria for different genders. However, it is still a question of debate whether there is enough evidence to lump sexual interest and arousal disorders in females. Making more precise definitions is important to differentiate disorders from other transient conditions. However, there is still room to

  6. Neurocognitive disorders: cluster 1 of the proposed meta-structure for DSM-V and ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, P; Andrews, G; Hobbs, M J; Sunderland, M; Anderson, T M

    2009-12-01

    In an effort to group mental disorders on the basis of aetiology, five clusters have been proposed. In this paper, we consider the validity of the first cluster, neurocognitive disorders, within this proposal. These disorders are categorized as 'Dementia, Delirium, and Amnestic and Other Cognitive Disorders' in DSM-IV and 'Organic, including Symptomatic Mental Disorders' in ICD-10. We reviewed the literature in relation to 11 validating criteria proposed by a Study Group of the DSM-V Task Force as applied to the cluster of neurocognitive disorders. 'Neurocognitive' replaces the previous terms 'cognitive' and 'organic' used in DSM-IV and ICD-10 respectively as the descriptor for disorders in this cluster. Although cognitive/organic problems are present in other disorders, this cluster distinguishes itself by the demonstrable neural substrate abnormalities and the salience of cognitive symptoms and deficits. Shared biomarkers, co-morbidity and course offer less persuasive evidence for a valid cluster of neurocognitive disorders. The occurrence of these disorders subsequent to normal brain development sets this cluster apart from neurodevelopmental disorders. The aetiology of the disorders is varied, but the neurobiological underpinnings are better understood than for mental disorders in any other cluster. Neurocognitive disorders meet some of the salient criteria proposed by the Study Group of the DSM-V Task Force to suggest a classification cluster. Further developments in the aetiopathogenesis of these disorders will enhance the clinical utility of this cluster.

  7. A Novel Prosumer-Based Energy Sharing and Management (PESM Approach for Cooperative Demand Side Management (DSM in Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Razzaq

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing population and modern lifestyle have raised energy demands globally. Demand Side Management (DSM is one important tool used to manage energy demands. It employs an advanced power infrastructure along with bi-directional information flow among utilities and users in order to achieve a balanced load curve and minimize demand-supply mismatch. Traditionally, this involves shifting the electricity demand from peak hours to other times of the day in an optimized manner. Multiple users equipped with renewable resources work in coordination with each other in order to achieve mutually beneficial energy management. This, in turn, has generated the concept of cooperative DSM. Such users, called prosumers, consume and produce energy using renewable resources (solar, wind etc.. Prosumers with surplus energy sell to the grid as well as to other consumers. In this paper, a novel Prosumer-based Energy Sharing and Management (PESM scheme for cooperative DSM has been proposed. A simulation model has been developed for testing the proposed method. Different variations of the proposed methodology have been experimented with different criteria. The results show that the proposed energy sharing scheme achieves DSM purposes in a useful manner.

  8. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be

  9. Classifying Intersex in DSM-5: Critical Reflections on Gender Dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Cynthia

    2015-07-01

    The new diagnosis of Gender Dysphoria (GD) in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) defines intersex, renamed "Disorders of Sex Development" (DSD), as a specifier of GD. With this formulation, the status of intersex departs from prior editions, especially from the DSM-IV texts that defined intersex as an exclusion criterion for Gender Identity Disorder. Conversely, GD--with or without a DSD--can apply in the same manner to DSD and non-DSD individuals; it subsumes the physical condition under the mental "disorder." This conceptualization, I suggest, is unprecedented in the history of the DSM. In my view, it is the most significant change in the revised diagnosis, and it raises the question of the suitability of psychiatric diagnosis for individuals with intersex/DSD. Unfortunately, this fundamental question was not raised during the revision process. This article examines, historically and conceptually, the different terms provided for intersex/DSD in the DSM in order to capture the significance of the DSD specifier, and the reasons why the risk of stigma and misdiagnosis, I argue, is increased in DSM-5 compared to DSM-IV. The DSM-5 formulation is paradoxically at variance with the clinical literature, with intersex/DSD and transgender being conceived as incommensurable terms in their diagnostic and treatment aspects. In this light, the removal of intersex/DSD from the DSM would seem a better way to achieve the purpose behind the revised diagnosis, which was to reduce stigma and the risk of misdiagnosis, and to provide the persons concerned with healthcare that caters to their specific needs.

  10. Hoarding disorder: a new diagnosis for DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Frost, Randy O; Pertusa, Alberto; Clark, Lee Anna; Saxena, Sanjaya; Leckman, James F; Stein, Dan J; Matsunaga, Hisato; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2010-06-01

    This article provides a focused review of the literature on compulsive hoarding and presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. In DSM-IV-TR, hoarding is listed as one of the diagnostic criteria for obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). According to DSM-IV-TR, when hoarding is extreme, clinicians should consider a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and may diagnose both OCPD and OCD if the criteria for both are met. However, compulsive hoarding seems to frequently be independent from other neurological and psychiatric disorders, including OCD and OCPD. In this review, we first address whether hoarding should be considered a symptom of OCD and/or a criterion of OCPD. Second, we address whether compulsive hoarding should be classified as a separate disorder in DSM-V, weighing the advantages and disadvantages of doing so. Finally, we discuss where compulsive hoarding should be classified in DSM-V if included as a separate disorder. We conclude that there is sufficient evidence to recommend the creation of a new disorder, provisionally called hoarding disorder. Given the historical link between hoarding and OCD/OCPD, and the conservative approach adopted by DSM-V, it may make sense to provisionally list it as an obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder. An alternative to our recommendation would be to include it in an Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study. The creation of a new diagnosis in DSM-V would likely increase public awareness, improve identification of cases, and stimulate both research and the development of specific treatments for hoarding disorder. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Application of DSM-5 criteria for autism spectrum disorder to three samples of children with DSM-IV diagnoses of pervasive developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Marisela; Bishop, Somer L; Duncan, Amie; Hus, Vanessa; Lord, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Substantial revisions to the DSM-IV criteria for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been proposed in efforts to increase diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. This study evaluated the proposed DSM-5 criteria for the single diagnostic category of autism spectrum disorder in children with DSM-IV diagnoses of pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) and non-PDD diagnoses. Three data sets included 4,453 children with DSM-IV clinical PDD diagnoses and 690 with non-PDD diagnoses (e.g., language disorder). Items from a parent report measure of ASD symptoms (Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised) and clinical observation instrument (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule) were matched to DSM-5 criteria and used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the proposed DSM-5 criteria and current DSM-IV criteria when compared with clinical diagnoses. Based on just parent data, the proposed DSM-5 criteria identified 91% of children with clinical DSM-IV PDD diagnoses. Sensitivity remained high in specific subgroups, including girls and children under 4. The specificity of DSM-5 ASD was 0.53 overall, while the specificity of DSM-IV ranged from 0.24, for clinically diagnosed PDD not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), to 0.53, for autistic disorder. When data were required from both parent and clinical observation, the specificity of the DSM-5 criteria increased to 0.63. These results suggest that most children with DSM-IV PDD diagnoses would remain eligible for an ASD diagnosis under the proposed DSM-5 criteria. Compared with the DSM-IV criteria for Asperger's disorder and PDD-NOS, the DSM-5 ASD criteria have greater specificity, particularly when abnormalities are evident from both parents and clinical observation.

  12. Cocaine use disorder prevalence: From current DSM-IV to proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria with both a two and three severity level classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Steven L; Kopak, Albert M; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2014-06-01

    This article presents a secondary analysis from a study investigating the compatibility of the current DSM-IV and previously proposed DSM-5 cocaine use disorder (CUD) criteria (S. L. Proctor, A. M. Kopak, & N. G. Hoffmann, 2012, Compatibility of current DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for cocaine use disorders. Addictive Behaviors, 37, 722-728). The current analyses examined the compatibility of the current DSM-IV and two sets of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for CUDs among adult male inmates (N = 6,871) recently admitted to the Minnesota Department of Corrections state prison system from 2000-2003. Initially proposed DSM-5 criteria (DSM-5.0) featured only two diagnostic designations (i.e., moderate and severe). A subsequent revision (DSM-5.1) included the addition of a mild designation and required a greater number of positive findings for the severe designation. A computer-prompted structured diagnostic interview was administered to all inmates as part of routine clinical assessments. The past 12-month prevalence of DSM-IV CUDs was 12.70% (Abuse, 3.78%, Dependence, 8.92%), while 10.98% met past 12-month DSM-5.1 criteria for a CUD (Mild [MiCUD], 1.72%; Moderate [MCUD], 1.12%; and Severe [SCUD], 8.14%). The vast majority of those with no diagnosis (99.6%) continued to have no diagnosis, and most of those with a dependence diagnosis (91.2%) met SCUD criteria of the proposed DSM-5.1. Most of the variation in DSM-5.1 diagnostic classifications was accounted for by those with a current abuse diagnosis. DSM-5.0 MCUD cases were most affected when DSM-5.1 criteria were applied. The proposed diagnostic changes might translate to reduced access to treatment for those individuals evincing symptoms consistent with DSM-IV cocaine abuse.

  13. Do DSM-5 Eating Disorder Criteria Overpathologize Normative Eating Patterns among Individuals with Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. DSM-5 revisions have been criticized in the popular press for overpathologizing normative eating patterns—particularly among individuals with obesity. To evaluate the evidence for this and other DSM-5 critiques, we compared the point prevalence and interrater reliability of DSM-IV versus DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs among adults seeking weight-loss treatment. Method. Clinicians (n=2 assigned DSM-IV and DSM-5 ED diagnoses to 100 participants via routine clinical interview. Research assessors (n=3 independently conferred ED diagnoses via Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and a DSM-5 checklist. Results. Research assessors diagnosed a similar proportion of participants with EDs under DSM-IV (29% versus DSM-5 (32%. DSM-5 research diagnoses included binge eating disorder (9%, bulimia nervosa (2%, subthreshold binge eating disorder (5%, subthreshold bulimia nervosa (2%, purging disorder (1%, night eating syndrome (6%, and other (7%. Interrater reliability between clinicians and research assessors was “substantial” for both DSM-IV (κ = 0.64, 84% agreement and DSM-5 (κ = 0.63, 83% agreement. Conclusion. DSM-5 ED criteria can be reliably applied in an obesity treatment setting and appear to yield an overall ED point prevalence comparable to DSM-IV.

  14. Do DSM-5 Eating Disorder Criteria Overpathologize Normative Eating Patterns among Individuals with Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kamryn T.; Murray, Helen B.; Gorman, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. DSM-5 revisions have been criticized in the popular press for overpathologizing normative eating patterns—particularly among individuals with obesity. To evaluate the evidence for this and other DSM-5 critiques, we compared the point prevalence and interrater reliability of DSM-IV versus DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs) among adults seeking weight-loss treatment. Method. Clinicians (n = 2) assigned DSM-IV and DSM-5 ED diagnoses to 100 participants via routine clinical interview. Research assessors (n = 3) independently conferred ED diagnoses via Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and a DSM-5 checklist. Results. Research assessors diagnosed a similar proportion of participants with EDs under DSM-IV (29%) versus DSM-5 (32%). DSM-5 research diagnoses included binge eating disorder (9%), bulimia nervosa (2%), subthreshold binge eating disorder (5%), subthreshold bulimia nervosa (2%), purging disorder (1%), night eating syndrome (6%), and other (7%). Interrater reliability between clinicians and research assessors was “substantial” for both DSM-IV (κ = 0.64, 84% agreement) and DSM-5 (κ = 0.63, 83% agreement). Conclusion. DSM-5 ED criteria can be reliably applied in an obesity treatment setting and appear to yield an overall ED point prevalence comparable to DSM-IV. PMID:25057413

  15. Prevalence of DSM-IV disorders in a population-based sample of 5- to 8-year-old children : the impact of impairment criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Stevens, Gonneke W J M; van der Ende, Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C.; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the impact of impairment criteria on the prevalence and patterns of comorbidity of child DSM-IV disorders. The validity of these impairment criteria was tested against different measures of mental health care referral and utilization. We interviewed parents of 1,154 children

  16. [Adjustment disorder and DSM-5: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appart, A; Lange, A-K; Sievert, I; Bihain, F; Tordeurs, D

    2017-02-01

    higher than for the adjustment disorder. According to their relevance and their content, we have split the articles into seven subcategories: 1. General description: most scientific articles generally describe the adjustment disorder as being a transition diagnosis, which is ambiguous, marginal and difficult to detect. The findings claim that only a few studies have been conducted on the adjustment disorder despite a high prevalence in the general population and in the clinical field. 2. the DSM-5 defined the adjustment disorder as a set of different outcomes and syndromes induced by stress after a difficult life event. While the link to other disorders has not been mentioned, the diagnosis of this disorder is no longer excluded or perceived as a secondary diagnosis. The DSM-5 faced criticism from three points of view: the operationalization of the concept of stress, the differential diagnosis and the description. 3. Prevalence: different samples have shown a significantly high prevalence of the adjustment disorder within the population. In addition to the psychiatric pain induced by difficult life events we need to emphasize the fact that 12.5 to 19.4 percent of the patients faced heavy and severe pathologies and depended on clinical care and treatment. 4. Etiology, comorbidity or associated symptomatology: the literature identified the tendency to commit suicide and stressful life events as being two fundamental characteristics of adjustment disorder. The third one is the personality profile. 5. that motivates researchers to focus on the adjustment disorder: the differentiation approach as to the major depression. Indeed, the aetiology, the symptomatology and the treatment differ from the adjustment disorder. 6. very recently, Dutch researchers have developed and validated the Diagnostic Interview Adjustment Disorder (DIAD). 7. in 2014, no data or meta-analysis recommended drug treatment in addition to therapy. In fact, several authors have demonstrated the

  17. A comparison of delirium diagnosis in elderly medical inpatients using the CAM, DRS-R98, DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamis, Dimitrios; Rooney, Siobhan; Meagher, David; Mulligan, Owen; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2015-06-01

    The recently published DSM-5 criteria for delirium may lead to different case identification and rates of delirium than previous classifications. The aims of this study are to determine how the new DSM-5 criteria compare with DSM-IV in identification of delirium in elderly medical inpatients and to investigate the agreement between different methods, using CAM, DRS-R98, DSM-IV, and DSM-5 criteria. Prospective, observational study of elderly patients aged 70+ admitted under the acute medical teams in a regional general hospital. Each participant was assessed within 3 days of admission using the DSM-5, and DSM-IV criteria plus the DRS-R98, and CAM scales. We assessed 200 patients [mean age 81.1±6.5; 50% female; pre-existing cognitive impairment in 63%]. The prevalence rates of delirium for each diagnostic method were: 13.0% (n = 26) for DSM-5; 19.5% (n = 39) for DSM-IV; 13.5% (n = 27) for DRS-R98 and 17.0%, (n = 34) for CAM. Using tetrachoric correlation coefficients the agreement between DSM-5 and DSM-IV was statistically significant (ρtetr = 0.64, SE = 0.1, p concept (delirium). Clarity of diagnosis is required for classification but also further research considering the relevance in predicting outcomes can allow for more detailed evaluation of the DSM-5 criteria.

  18. Greater Prevalence of Proposed DSM-5 Nicotine Use Disorder Compared to DSM-IV Nicotine Dependence in Treated Adolescents and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tammy; Martin, Christopher S.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Cornelius, Jack R.; Clark, Duncan B.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Compared to DSM-IV nicotine dependence, proposed DSM-5 Nicotine Use Disorder (NUD) would lower the threshold from 3 to 2 symptoms, and increase the number of criteria used for diagnosis from 7 to 11. The impact of the proposed changes on nicotine disorder prevalence, and the concurrent validity of diagnostic criteria were examined. Design Cross-sectional survey to compare DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 algorithms. Setting and Participants Adolescent (N=179) and young adult (N=292) past year cigarette users recruited from addictions treatment. Measurements Semi-structured clinical interview to evaluate DSM-IV nicotine dependence, and 10 of the 11 proposed DSM-5 NUD criteria; 30-day Time Line Follow-Back; and Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Findings Prevalence of proposed DSM-5 NUD (2-symptom threshold) was much higher (adolescents: 69%, young adults: 86%) than DSM-IV nicotine dependence (33% and 60%, respectively), although prevalence of DSM-5 severe NUD (4-symptom threshold) was similar to DSM-IV nicotine dependence. Concurrent validity analyses in both samples indicated consistent support for DSM-5 severe NUD diagnosis (4-symptoms) but not for the moderate NUD (2-symptoms) diagnosis, which had modest relations with only FTND score. IRT analyses indicated strong support for the new Craving item, but not for the proposed Interpersonal Problems and Hazardous Use items. Conclusions The proposed DSM-5 Nicotine Use Disorder criteria have substantial limitations when applied to adolescents and young adults, and appear to have low concurrent validity. PMID:22092543

  19. Brief Report: An Exploratory Study Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes for Autism Spectrum Disorders under DSM-IV-TR with the Proposed DSM-5 Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Vicki; Aldridge, Fiona; Chandler, Felicity; Witzlsperger, Ellen; Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The proposed revision for Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) represents a shift from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). As the proposed DSM-5 criteria require a higher minimum number of symptoms to be…

  20. Del DSM-IV-TR al DSM-5: análisis de algunos cambios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Rodríguez Testal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La publicación de la quinta edición del DSM ha avivado un debate iniciado tiempo atrás, desde el anuncio de los cambios en los criterios de diagnóstico propuestos por la APA. En este artículo se analizan algunas de estas modificaciones. Se plantean aspectos interesantes y acertados, como la inclusión de la dimensionalidad, tanto en las clases diagnósticas como en algunos trastornos, la incorporación de un espectro obsesivo-compulsivo o la desaparición de los subtipos de esquizofrenia. También se analizan otros aspectos más controvertidos como la consideración del síndrome de psicosis atenuada, la descripción de un trastorno depresivo persistente, la reordenación en trastornos de síntomas somáticos los clásicos trastornos somatoformes, o el mantenimiento de los tres grandes grupos de trastornos de la personalidad, siempre insatisfactorios, junto con un planteamiento anunciado, pero marginal, de la perspectiva dimensional de las alteraciones de la personalidad. La nueva clasificación del DSM-5 abre numerosos interrogantes acerca de la validez que se pretende mejorar en el diagnóstico, en esta ocasión, asumiendo un planteamiento más cercano a la neurología y la genética que a la psicopatología clínica.

  1. The DSM diagnostic criteria for paraphilia not otherwise specified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Martin P

    2010-04-01

    The category of "Not Otherwise Specified" (NOS) for DSM-based psychiatric diagnosis has typically retained diagnoses whose rarity, empirical criterion validation or symptomatic expression has been insufficient to be codified. This article reviews the literature on Telephone Scatologia, Necrophilia, Zoophilia, Urophilia, Coprophilia, and Partialism. Based on extant data, no changes are suggested except for the status of Partialism. Partialism, sexual arousal characterized by "an exclusive focus on part of the body," had historically been subsumed as a type of Fetishism until the advent of DSM-III-R. The rationale for considering the removal of Partialism from Paraphilia NOS and its reintegration as a specifier for Fetishism is discussed here and in a companion review on the DSM diagnostic criteria for fetishism (Kafka, 2009). In the DSM-IV and DSM-IV-TR, the essential features of a Paraphilia are recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges or behaviors generally involving nonhuman objects, the suffering or humiliation of oneself or one's partner, or children or other nonconsenting persons that occur over a period of at least 6 months (Criterion A). Given consideration for the erotic focus of Partialism and Autoerotic Asphyxia, amending the operational criteria for Paraphilia should be considered to include an atypical focus involving human subjects (self or others).

  2. Evaluation of the DSM-5 severity indicator for bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the DSM-5 severity criterion for bulimia nervosa (BN) based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. 199 community volunteers classified with BN were categorized using DSM-5 severity levels and compared on demographic and clinical variables. 77 (39%) participants were categorized as mild, 68 (34%) as moderate, 32 (16%) as severe, and 22 (11%) as extreme. The severity groups did not differ significantly in demographic variables or body mass index. Shape and Weight concerns did not differ significantly across severity groups. Binge eating differed with the extreme group having significantly higher frequency than the severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Restraint differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than the mild group. Eating concerns differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than moderate and mild groups. Depression differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Findings from this non-clinical group provide new, albeit modest, support for DSM-5 severity rating for BN based on frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. Statistical findings indicate that differences in collateral clinical variables associated with the DSM-5 severity ratings reflect small effect sizes. Further research is needed with treatment-seeking patient groups with BN to establish the validity of the DSM-5 severity specifier and should include broader clinical and functional validators. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparing polysaccharide decomposition between the type strains Gramella echinicola KMM 6050(T) (DSM 19838(T)) and Gramella portivictoriae UST040801-001(T) (DSM 23547(T)), and emended description of Gramella echinicola Nedashkovskaya et al. 2005 emend. Shahina et al. 2014 and Gramella portivictoriae Lau et al. 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panschin, Irina; Huang, Sixing; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Tindall, Brian J; Rohde, Manfred; Verbarg, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Trong, Stephan; Haynes, Matthew; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Hahnke, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the genus Gramella (family Flavobacteriacae, phylum Bacteroidetes) were isolated from marine habitats such as tidal flat sediments, coastal surface seawater and sea urchins. Flavobacteriaceae have been shown to be involved in the decomposition of plant and algal polysaccharides. However, the potential to decompose polysaccharides may differ tremendously even between species of the same genus. Gramella echinicola KMM 6050(T) (DSM 19838(T)) and Gramella portivictoriae UST040801-001(T) (DSM 23547(T)) have genomes of similar lengths, similar numbers of protein coding genes and RNA genes. Both genomes encode for a greater number of peptidases compared to 'G. forsetii'. In contrast to the genome of 'G. forsetii', both genomes comprised a smaller set of CAZymes. Seven polysaccharide utilization loci were identified in the genomes of DSM 19838(T) and DSM 23547(T). Both Gramella strains hydrolyzed starch, galactomannan, arabinoxylan and hydroxyethyl-cellulose, but not pectin, chitosan and cellulose (Avicel). Galactan and xylan were hydrolyzed by strain DSM 19838(T), whereas strain DSM 23547(T) hydrolyzed pachyman and carboxy-methyl cellulose. Conclusively, both Gramella type strains exhibit characteristic physiological, morphological and genomic differences that might be linked to their habitat. Furthermore, the identified enzymes mediating polysaccharide decomposition, are of biotechnological interest.

  4. Use of the TAT in the assessment of DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S J; Clemence, A J; Weatherill, R; Hilsenroth, M J

    1999-12-01

    The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale (SCORS), developed by Western, Lohr, Silk, Kerber, and Goodrich (1985), is a diagnostic instrument used to assess an array of psychological functioning by using clinical narratives such as the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943) stories. This study investigated the utility of the SCORS to differentiate between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) antisocial personality disorder (ANPD), borderline personality disorder (BPD), narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), and Cluster C personality disorder (CPD). A sample of 58 patients was separated into four groups: ANPD (n = 9), BPD (n = 21; 18 with a primary BPD diagnosis and 3 with prominent borderline traits who met 4 of the 5 DSM-IV criteria necessary for a BPD diagnosis), NPD (n = 16; 8 with a primary NPD diagnosis and 8 with prominent narcissistic traits who met 4 of the 5 DSM-IV criteria necessary for a NPD diagnosis), and CPD (n = 12). These groups were then compared on the 8 SCORS variables by using 5 TAT cards (1, 2, 3BM, 4, and 13MF). Spearman-Brown correction for 2-way mixed effects model of reliability for the 8 SCORS variables ranged from .70 to .95. The results of categorical and dimensional analyses indicate that (a) SCORS variables can be used to differentiate ANPD, BPD, and NPD; (b) the BPD group scored significantly lower (greater maladjustment) than did the CPD group on certain variables; (c) the BPD group scored significantly lower (greater maladjustment) than did the NPD group on all 8 SCORS variables; (d) the ANPD group scored significantly lower than did the NPD group on certain variables; (e) certain variables were found to be empirically related to the total number of DSM-IV ANPD, BPD, and NPD criteria; and (f) certain variables were found to be empirically related to Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen

  5. Deriving ICD-11 personality disorder domains from dsm-5 traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, B; Sellbom, M; Kongerslev, M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The personality disorder domains proposed for the ICD-11 comprise Negative Affectivity, Detachment, Dissociality, Disinhibition, and Anankastia, which are reasonably concordant with the higher-order trait domains in the Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders. METHOD: We...... examined (i) whether designated DSM-5 trait facets can be used to describe the proposed ICD-11 trait domains, and (ii) how these ICD-11 trait features are hierarchically organized. A mixed Danish derivation sample (N = 1541) of 615 psychiatric out-patients and 925 community participants along with a US...... replication sample (N = 637) completed the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). Sixteen PID-5 traits were designated to cover features of the ICD-11 trait domains. RESULTS: Exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) analyzes showed that the designated traits were meaningfully organized...

  6. Operationalization of diagnostic criteria of DSM-5 somatic symptom disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Nana; Zhang, Yaoyin; Wei, Jing; Leonhart, Rainer; Fritzsche, Kurt; Mewes, Ricarda; Hong, Xia; Cao, Jinya; Li, Tao; Jiang, Jing; Zhao, Xudong; Zhang, Lan; Schaefert, Rainer

    2017-11-07

    The aim of this study was to test the operationalization of DSM-5 somatic symptom disorder (SSD) psychological criteria among Chinese general hospital outpatients. This multicenter, cross-sectional study enrolled 491 patients from 10 general hospital outpatient departments. The structured clinical "interview about cognitive, affective, and behavioral features associated with somatic complaints" was used to operationalize the SSD criteria B. For comparison, DSM-IV somatoform disorders were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview plus. Cohen's к scores were given to illustrate the agreement of the diagnoses. A three-structure model of the interview, within which items were classified as respectively assessing the cognitive (B1), affective (B2), and behavioral (B3) features, was examined. According to percentages of screening-positive persons and the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, a cut-off point of 2 was recommended for each subscale of the interview. With the operationalization, the frequency of DSM-5 SSD was estimated as 36.5% in our sample, and that of DSM-IV somatoform disorders was 8.2%. The agreement between them was small (Cohen's к = 0.152). Comparisons of sociodemographic features of SSD patients with different severity levels (mild, moderate, severe) showed that mild SSD patients were better-off in terms of financial and employment status, and that the severity subtypes were congruent with the level of depression, anxiety, quality of life impairment, and the frequency of doctor visits. The operationalization of the diagnosis and severity specifications of SSD was valid, but the diagnostic agreement between DSM-5 SSD and DSM-IV somatoform disorders was small. The interpretation the SSD criteria should be made cautiously, so that the diagnosis would not became over-inclusive.

  7. The Impact of DSM-5 on Eating Disorder Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Megen; Accurso, Erin C; Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Eating disorder diagnostic criteria were revised from the fourth to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV and -5, respectively). This study examines the impact of these revisions on rates of eating disorder diagnoses in treatment-seeking youth. Participants were 651 youth, ages 7-18 years, presenting to an outpatient eating disorders program who met criteria for a DSM-IV eating disorder diagnosis on intake. Patients completed well-validated semi-structured interviews to assess eating disorder psychopathology and psychiatric comorbidity. Participants were predominantly female (n = 588; 90.3%) with an average age of 15.28 years (SD = 2.21), mean percent of median Body Mass Index (mBMI) of 101.91 (SD = 31.73), and average duration of illness of 16.74 months (SD = 17.63). Cases of DSM-IV Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS), now most consistent with DSM-5 Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder, decreased from 47.6% to 39.0%, Anorexia Nervosa increased from 29.6% to 33.5%, and Bulimia Nervosa increased from 22.7% to 24.7%. Consistent with previous studies, and in keeping with the aims of the DSM-5 for eating disorders, the revised diagnostic criteria reduced cases of DSM-IV EDNOS and increased cases of specified eating disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:578-581). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Culture and the anxiety disorders: recommendations for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Hinton, Devon E; Laria, Amaro J; Patterson, Elissa H; Hofmann, Stefan G; Craske, Michelle G; Stein, Dan J; Asnaani, Anu; Liao, Betty

    2010-02-01

    The anxiety disorders specified in the fourth edition, text revision, of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV-TR) are identified universally in human societies, and also show substantial cultural particularities in prevalence and symptomatology. Possible explanations for the observed epidemiological variability include lack of measurement equivalence, true differences in prevalence, and limited validity or precision of diagnostic criteria. One central question is whether, through inadvertent "over-specification" of disorders, the post-DSM-III nosology has missed related but somewhat different presentations of the same disorder because they do not exactly fit specified criteria sets. This review canvases the mental health literature for evidence of cross-cultural limitations in DSM-IV-TR anxiety disorder criteria. Searches were conducted of the mental health literature, particularly since 1994, regarding cultural or race/ethnicity-related factors that might limit the universal applicability of the diagnostic criteria for six anxiety disorders. Possible mismatches between the DSM criteria and the local phenomenology of the disorder in specific cultural contexts were found for three anxiety disorders in particular. These involve the unexpectedness and 10-minute crescendo criteria in Panic Disorder; the definition of social anxiety and social reference group in Social Anxiety Disorder; and the priority given to psychological symptoms of worry in Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Limited evidence was found throughout, particularly in terms of neurobiological markers, genetic risk factors, treatment response, and other DSM-V validators that could help clarify the cross-cultural applicability of criteria. On the basis of the available data, options and preliminary recommendations for DSM-V are put forth that should be further evaluated and tested.

  9. [An approach to DSM-5: a breakthrough in psychiatry?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerlein, Andrés L

    2014-01-01

    One of the main problems of current psychiatry is that its diagnostic classification systems are not precise and reliable, they do not help to identify with certainty a specific type of mental disorder and they frequently overlap two or more diagnoses. This may conduce to over diagnosis and overtreatment, which is the main criticism of the DSM system. The American Psychiatric Association (APA) launched recently the DSM-5, the fifth edition of its diagnostic manual, which provides diagnostic criteria for thousands of psychiatrist, psychologist and researchers and who will be using it in the next coming years. DSM-5, like the preceding editions, placed disorders in discrete categories such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The problem is that scientists have been unable to find yet a genetic or neurobiological evidence to support the theory of mental disorders as separate categories. Several authors wanted the latest DSM to move away from the category model towards a new "dimensional approach", where disorders can be measured and mental illnesses overlapping can be reduced. Recent findings supports this new dimensional strategy, suggesting that the disorders are a product of shared risk factors that lead to abnormalities in specific drives, which can be measured and used to place persons on one of several spectra. In some parts the DSM-5 entered changes aiming to achieve a greater objectivity. The door for new changes in each category, dimension or criteria has been opened, favoring an evidence-based development of the future versions. DSM-5 is presented as a "living document" that can be updated easily. However, the category model still remains for many disorders. The future research in psychiatric diagnostic systems requires more genetic-molecular and neurophysiological evidence and more objective multinational field trials, in order to confirm the existence of the new diagnostic entities, spectrums or dimensions. This approach may provide us reliable

  10. A comparison of outcomes according to different diagnostic systems for delirium (DSM-5, DSM-IV, CAM, and DRS-R98).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamis, Dimitrios; Meagher, David; Rooney, Siobhan; Mulligan, Owen; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2017-09-14

    Studies indicate that DSM-5 criteria for delirium are relatively restrictive, and identify different cases of delirium compared with previous systems. We evaluate four outcomes of delirium (mortality, length of hospital stay, institutionalization, and cognitive improvement) in relation to delirium defined by different DSM classification systems. Prospective, longitudinal study of patients aged 70+ admitted to medical wards of a general hospital. Participants were assessed up to a maximum of four times during two weeks, using DSM-5 and DSM-IV criteria, DRS-R98 and CAM scales as proxies for DSM III-R and DSM III. Of the 200 assessed patients (mean age 81.1, SD = 6.5; and 50% female) during hospitalization, delirium was identified in 41 (20.5%) using DSM-5, 45 (22.5%) according to DSM-IV, 46 (23%) with CAM positive, and 37 (18.5%) with DRS-R98 severity score >15. Mortality was significantly associated with delirium according to any classification system, but those identified with DSM-5 were at greater risk. Length of stay was significantly longer for those with DSM-IV delirium. Discharge to a care home was associated only with DRS-R98 defined delirium. Cognitive improvement was only associated with CAM and DSM-IV. Different classification systems for delirium identify populations with different outcomes.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Propionibacterium freudenreichii DSM 20271(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Patrik; Deptula, Paulina; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Tamene, Fitsum; Kammonen, Juhana; Savijoki, Kirsi; Paulin, Lars; Piironen, Vieno; Auvinen, Petri; Varmanen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. freudenreichii DSM 20271(T) is the type strain of species Propionibacterium freudenreichii that has a long history of safe use in the production dairy products and B12 vitamin. P. freudenreichii is the type species of the genus Propionibacterium which contains Gram-positive, non-motile and non-sporeforming bacteria with a high G + C content. We describe the genome of P. freudenreichii subsp. freudenreichii DSM 20271(T) consisting of a 2,649,166 bp chromosome containing 2320 protein-coding genes and 50 RNA-only encoding genes.

  12. The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Maples-Keller, Jessica L; Bo, Sune

    2016-01-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured...... with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal...

  13. Comparison of DSM-5 and proposed ICD-11 criteria for PTSD with DSM-IV and ICD-10: changes in PTSD prevalence in military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Annika; Köhler, Kai; Ehring, Thomas; Knaevelsrud, Christine; Kober, Louisa; Krüger-Gottschalk, Antje; Schäfer, Ingo; Schellong, Julia; Wesemann, Ulrich; Rau, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recently, changes have been introduced to the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Objectives:This study investigated the effect of the diagnostic changes made from DSM-IV to DSM-5 and from ICD-10 to the proposed ICD-11. The concordance of provisional PTSD prevalence between the diagnostic criteria was examined in a convenience sample of 100 members of the German Armed Forces. Method: Based on questionnaire measurements, provisional PTSD prevalence was assessed according to DSM-IV, DSM-5, ICD-10, and proposed ICD-11 criteria. Consistency of the diagnostic status across the diagnostic systems was statistically evaluated. Results: Provisional PTSD prevalence was the same for DSM-IV and DSM-5 (both 56%) and comparable under DSM-5 versus ICD-11 proposal (48%). Agreement between DSM-IV and DSM-5, and between DSM-5 and the proposed ICD-11, was high (both p DSM-IV, DSM-5, and proposed ICD-11. This supports the assumption of a set of PTSD core symptoms as suggested in the ICD-11 proposal, when at the same time a satisfactory concordance between ICD-11 proposal and DSM was given. The finding of increased provisional PTSD prevalence under ICD-11 proposal in contrast to ICD-10 can be of guidance for future epidemiological research on PTSD prevalence, especially concerning further investigations on the impact, appropriateness, and usefulness of the time criterion included in ICD-10 versus the consequences of its deletion as proposed for ICD-11.

  14. The role of criterion A2 in the DSM-IV diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Elie George; Andrews, Gavin; Bromet, Evelyn; Petukhova, Maria; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Salamoun, Mariana; Sampson, Nancy; Stein, Dan J; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura Helena; Angermeyer, Matthias; Demyttenaere, Koen; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Kaminer, Debra; Kotov, Roman; Lee, Sing; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Oakley Browne, Mark A; Posada-Villa, José; Sagar, Rajesh; Shalev, Arieh Y; Takeshima, Tadashi; Tomov, Toma; Kessler, Ronald C

    2010-09-01

    Controversy exists about the utility of DSM-IV posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criterion A2 (A2): that exposure to a potentially traumatic experience (PTE; PTSD criterion A1) is accompanied by intense fear, helplessness, or horror. Lifetime DSM-IV PTSD was assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview in community surveys of 52,826 respondents across 21 countries in the World Mental Health Surveys. Of 28,490 representative PTEs reported by respondents, 37.6% met criterion A2, a proportion higher than the proportions meeting other criteria (B-F; 5.4%-9.6%). Conditional prevalence of meeting all other criteria for a diagnosis of PTSD given a PTE was significantly higher in the presence (9.7%) than absence (.1%) of A2. However, as only 1.4% of respondents who met all other criteria failed A2, the estimated prevalence of PTSD increased only slightly (from 3.64% to 3.69%) when A2 was not required for diagnosis. Posttraumatic stress disorder with or without criterion A2 did not differ in persistence or predicted consequences (subsequent suicidal ideation or secondary disorders) depending on presence-absence of A2. Furthermore, as A2 was by far the most commonly reported symptom of PTSD, initial assessment of A2 would be much less efficient than screening other criteria in quickly ruling out a large proportion of noncases. Removal of A2 from the DSM-IV criterion set would reduce the complexity of diagnosing PTSD, while not substantially increasing the number of people who qualify for diagnosis. Criterion A2 should consequently be reconceptualized as a risk factor for PTSD rather than as a diagnostic requirement. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex.

  16. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  17. The Eating Disorder Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5): Development and Validation of a Structured Interview for Feeding and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysko, Robyn; Glasofer, Deborah R.; Hildebrandt, Tom; Klimek, Patrycja; Mitchell, James E.; Berg, Kelly C.; Peterson, Carol B.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objective Existing measures for DSM-IV eating disorder diagnoses have notable limitations, and there are important differences between DSM-IV and DSM-5 feeding and eating disorders. This study developed and validated a new semi-structured interview, the Eating Disorders Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5). Method Two studies evaluated the utility of the EDA-5. Study 1 compared the diagnostic validity of the EDA-5 to the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) and evaluated the test-retest reliability of the new measure. Study 2 compared the diagnostic validity of an EDA-5 electronic application (“app”) to clinician interview and self-report assessments. Results In Study 1, the kappa for EDE and EDA-5 eating disorder diagnoses was 0.74 across all diagnoses (n= 64), with a range of κ=0.65 for Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED)/Unspecified Feeding or Eating Disorder (USFED) to κ=0.90 for Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The EDA-5 test-retest kappa coefficient was 0.87 across diagnoses. For Study 2, clinical interview versus “app” conditions revealed a kappa of 0.83 for all eating disorder diagnoses (n=71). Across individual diagnostic categories, kappas ranged from 0.56 for OSFED/USFED to 0.94 for BN. Discussion High rates of agreement were found between diagnoses by EDA-5 and the EDE, and EDA-5 and clinical interviews. As this study supports the validity of the EDA-5 to generate DSM-5 eating disorders and the reliability of these diagnoses, the EDA-5 may be an option for the assessment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and BED. Additional research is needed to evaluate the utility of the EDA-5 in assessing DSM-5 feeding disorders. PMID:25639562

  18. DSM-5 and mental disorders in older individuals: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Perminder S.; Mohan, Adith; Taylor, Lauren; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2015-01-01

    About every 20 years, the American Psychiatric Association revises its official classification of mental disorders. The fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was published in 2013, exciting considerable commentary, debate and criticism. This article briefly describes the process that led to the DSM-5 and the main changes from the previous version (DSM-IV) that would be of interest to a geriatric psychiatrist. While there have been a number of changes in the areas of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depressive disorders and anxiety disorders, the majority of these changes are minor and unlikely to have major treatment implications. The classification of neurocognitive disorders has however seen a major revision and elaboration in comparison with DSM-IV, with the introduction of Mild and Major Neurocognitive Disorders, the latter equated with dementia. A common language is introduced for the criteria of the various etiological subtypes of neurocognitive disorders. All physicians treating patients with neurocognitive disorders should familiarize themselves with these criteria. Their use in research has the potential to harmonize the field. PMID:26332215

  19. DSM-5 ASD Moves Forward into the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Luke Y.; Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) (APA in diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Author, Washington, 2013) has decided to merge the subtypes of pervasive developmental disorders into a single category of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on the assumption that they cannot be…

  20. Debating DSM-5: diagnosis and the sociology of critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickersgill, Martyn D

    2014-08-01

    The development of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-the DSM-5-has reenergised and driven further forward critical discourse about the place and role of diagnosis in mental health. The DSM-5 has attracted considerable criticism, not least about its role in processes of medicalisation. This paper suggests the need for a sociology of psychiatric critique. Sociological analysis can help map fields of contention, and cast fresh light on the assumptions and nuances of debate around the DSM-5; it underscores the importance of diagnosis to the governance of social and clinical life, as well as the wider discourses critical commentaries connect with and are activated by. More normatively, a sociology of critique can indicate which interests and values are structuring the dialogues being articulated, and just how diverse clinical opinion regarding the DSM can actually be. This has implications for the considerations of health services and policy decision-makers who might look to such debates for guidance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Understanding DSM-5. Advice for South African practitioners

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding DSM-5. Advice for. South African practitioners. Correspondence. Prof. C Allgulander email: Christer.Allgulander@ki.se. Table I: Brief history of classic diagnoses and classifications. 81-138 Aretaeus: bipolar disease. 1746. Carl von Linné: Morbi mentales: Dementia, Mania, Vesania,. Delirium, Melancholia.

  2. Textual standardization and the DSM-5 "common language".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patty A

    2014-06-01

    In February 2010, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) launched their DSM-5 website with details about the development of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The APA invited "the general public" to review the draft diagnostic criteria and provide written comments and suggestions. This revision marks the first time the APA has solicited public review of their diagnostic manual. This article analyzes reported speech on the DSM-5 draft diagnostic criteria for the classification Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. It demonstrates how textual standardization facilitates the cultural portability of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria such that a community of speakers beyond the borders of the APA come to be seen as exemplary speakers, writers, and revisers of the professional style. Furthermore, analysis shows how co-authoring practices recontextualize the "voice" and persona of putative patient reported speech on Criterion D2. As a consequence of textual standardization, spoken discourse becomes recontextualized as the product of scientific inquiry and the organization of psychiatric knowledge.

  3. [Substance-related and addictive disorders in the DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasius, Rainer; Sack, Peter-Michael; Strittmatter, Esther; Kaess, Michael

    2014-03-01

    This paper concerns the revised classification of Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders in the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). In DSM-5, substance use disorders are diagnosed on a continuum of severity specified by explicit operationalized diagnostic criteria. "Gambling disorder" is the only behavioral addiction added to the DSM. Furthermore, preliminary criteria for "Caffeine Use Disorder" and "Internet Gaming Disorder" have now been defined in the manual. Adopting the DSM-5 criteria catalogue within the German treatment system for children and adolescents with substance use disorders or at risk for developing substance use disorders would be of great significance. Since the diagnostic threshold is lower, more patients would be eligible for treatment. Thus, early intervention in the area of substance use disorders should be strengthened, a development that appears to be highly desirable from the perspective of child and adolescent psychiatry. The current Section III diagnoses, with their now comprehensive diagnostic criteria, facilitate more internationally compatible research.

  4. [THE PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSIS GUIDE - DSM-5 - INNOVATIONS AND CRITICISM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Shmuel; Zemishlany, Zvi

    2015-05-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) as a guide for diagnosing psychiatric diseases and enables the alignment of psychiatric diagnoses with those of the psychologists, the social workers, the nursing staff and other mental health professionals. In addition, it helps bring cohesion to research, public health policy, education, the field of insurance and compensation and the legal system. After 14 years of hard work, the updated version of the DSM, the DSM-5, was published on May 2013. The current review aims to update the readers on the essence of the DSM and the methods of psychiatric diagnosing and to present the main changes in the field, as expressed in the 5th edition of the guide. In addition to details of those changes we included discussions of the criticisms brought against them. We hope that the review will contribute to broadening the readers' knowledge, broaden exposure and familiarity with the psychiatric lingo and to strengthening the professional ties between psychiatrists and professionals in other, tangential, medical fields.

  5. [Cultural components within DSM-5: achievements, hopes, and expectations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D

    2014-01-01

    Cultural Psychiatry deals with the description, definition, evaluation and management of psychiatric conditions as a clinical reflection of cultural factors within an integral context, and as an explanatory, interpretative, nosological, therapeutic and preventive attribute in professional practice. This article attempts to analyze that link in the context of the dominant classification in our era, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), with emphasis on the development of its latest version, DSM-5. The cultural content of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) of the World Health Organization (WHO) can be the subject of further analysis, even when it can be said that, in general, it seemingly has less reach than the American classification. The author's participation, work and reflections about the DSM-5 Committee, created by the APA at the beginning of this century, constitute the basis of the presentation and discussion of concrete achievements, more or less idealized hopes, and more or less realistic expectations with a view to the future. Conclusions will also try to cover implications of DSM-5 cultural components in the field of Latin American and spanish-speaking psychiatry.

  6. Food Addiction in the Light of DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Meule

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The idea that specific kind of foods may have an addiction potential and that some forms of overeating may represent an addicted behavior has been discussed for decades. In recent years, the interest in food addiction is growing and research on this topic lead to more precise definitions and assessment methods. For example, the Yale Food Addiction Scale has been developed for the measurement of addiction-like eating behavior based on the diagnostic criteria for substance dependence of the fourth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV. In 2013, diagnostic criteria for substance abuse and—dependence were merged, thereby increasing the number of symptoms for substance use disorders (SUDs in the DSM-5. Moreover, gambling disorder is now included along SUDs as a behavioral addiction. Although a plethora of review articles exist that discuss the applicability of the DSM-IV substance dependence criteria to eating behavior, the transferability of the newly added criteria to eating is unknown. Thus, the current article discusses if and how these new criteria may be translated to overeating. Furthermore, it is examined if the new SUD criteria will impact future research on food addiction, for example, if “diagnosing” food addiction should also be adapted by considering all of the new symptoms. Given the critical response to the revisions in DSM-5, we also discuss if the recent approach of Research Domain Criteria can be helpful in evaluating the concept of food addiction.

  7. Are we slaves to DSM? A South African perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-18

    May 18, 2013 ... DSM-5 has instead turned it into a psychiatric illness called Binge Eating. Disorder”.7. • First time substance abusers will be diagnostically grouped together with long-term addicts despite their very different treatment needs and prognosis. Frances points out that this will lead to unnecessary stigmatisation of ...

  8. DSM-III-R and the Family Therapist: Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Wayne H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ethical and practical concerns family therapists face when using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition Revised (DSM-III-R), including incompatibility of orientations, stigma associated with diagnosing, being asked to misrepresent diagnoses to third-party payers, and competency of some family therapists…

  9. Counsellors Respond to the DSM-IV-TR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Tom; Gaete, Joaquin; Sametband, Ines N.; French, Jared; Eeson, Jen

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) is an administrative fact for many counsellors. This psychiatric approach to formulating client concerns runs counter to those used by counsellors of many approaches (e.g., systemic, feminist). Using an online survey of counsellors (N = 116), invited contributions to a website…

  10. Examination of DSM-5 Section III avoidant personality disorder in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellbom, Martin; Carmichael, Kieran L C; Liggett, Jacqueline

    2017-11-01

    The current research evaluated the continuity between DSM-5 Section II and Section III diagnostic operationalizations of avoidant personality disorder (AvPD). More specifically, the study had three aims: (1) to examine which personality constructs comprise the optimal trait constellation for AvPD; (2) to investigate the utility of the proposed structure of the Section III AvPD diagnosis, in regard to combining functional impairment (criterion A) and a dimensional measure of personality (criterion B) variables; and (3) to determine whether AvPD-specific impairment confers incremental meaningful contribution above and beyond general impairment in personality functioning. A mixed sample of 402 university and community participants was recruited, and they were administered multiple measures of Section II PD, personality traits, and personality impairment. A latent measurement model approach was used to analyse data. Results supported the general continuity between Section II and Section III of the DSM-5; however, three of the four main criterion B traits were the stronger predictors. There was also some support for the trait unassertiveness augmenting the criterion B trait profile. The combination of using functional impairment criteria (criterion A) and dimensional personality constructs (criterion B) in operationalizing AvPD was supported; however, the reliance of disorder-specific over general impairment for criterion A was not supported. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Bjerre, Anne-Belinda

    2017-08-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria digitata harvested from the coast of the Danish North Sea as substrate. The highest butanol yield (0.42g/g-consumed-substrates) compared to literature was achieved, with a significantly higher butanol:acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) molar ratio (0.85) than typical (0.6). This demonstrates the possibility of using the seaweed L. digitata as a potential biomass for butanol production. For the first time, consumption of alginate components was observed by C. beijerinckii DSM-6422. The efficient utilization of sugars and lactic acid further highlighted the potential of using this strain for future development of large-scale cost-effective butanol production based on (ensiled) seaweed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Avolition and expressive deficits capture negative symptom phenomenology: implications for DSM-5 and schizophrenia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Julie W; Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Mendelsohn, Erika; Prudent, Vasthie; Stanford, Arielle D; Malaspina, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    The DSM-5 formulation presents an opportunity to refine the negative symptom assessments that are crucial for a schizophrenia diagnosis. This review traces the history of negative symptom constructs in neuropsychiatry from their earliest conceptualizations in the 19th century. It presents the relevant literature for distinguishing between different types of negative symptoms. Although a National Institute of Mental Health consensus initiative proposed that there are five separate negative symptom domains, our review of the individual items demonstrates no more than three negative symptom domains. Indeed, numerous factor analyses of separate negative symptom scales routinely identify only two domains: 1) expressive deficits, which include affective, linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and 2) avolition for daily life and social activities. We propose that a focus on expressive deficits and avolition will be of optimum utility for diagnosis, treatment-considerations, and research purposes compared to other negative symptom constructs. We recommend that these two domains should be assessed as separate dimensions in the DSM-5 criteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic Crossover in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: Implications for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kamryn T.; Dorer, David J.; Franko, Debra L.; Tahilani, Kavita; Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is designed primarily as a clinical tool. Yet high rates of diagnostic “crossover” among the anorexia nervosa subtypes and bulimia nervosa may reflect problems with the validity of the current diagnostic schema, thereby limiting its clinical utility. This study was designed to examine diagnostic crossover longitudinally in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa to inform the validity of the DSM-IV-TR eating disorders classification system. Method A total of 216 women with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were followed for 7 years; weekly eating disorder symptom data collected using the Eating Disorder Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Examination allowed for diagnoses to be made throughout the follow-up period. Results Over 7 years, the majority of women with anorexia nervosa experienced diagnostic crossover: more than half crossed between the restricting and binge eating/purging anorexia nervosa subtypes over time; one-third crossed over to bulimia nervosa but were likely to relapse into anorexia nervosa. Women with bulimia nervosa were unlikely to cross over to anorexia nervosa. Conclusions These findings support the longitudinal distinction of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa but do not support the anorexia nervosa subtyping schema. PMID:18198267

  14. Comparison of DSM-5 and proposed ICD-11 criteria for PTSD with DSM-IV and ICD-10: changes in PTSD prevalence in military personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Annika; Köhler, Kai; Ehring, Thomas; Knaevelsrud, Christine; Kober, Louisa; Krüger-Gottschalk, Antje; Schäfer, Ingo; Schellong, Julia; Wesemann, Ulrich; Rau, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Recently, changes have been introduced to the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Objectives:This study investigated the effect of the diagnostic changes made from DSM-IV to DSM-5 and from ICD-10 to the proposed ICD-11. The concordance of provisional PTSD prevalence between the diagnostic criteria was examined in a convenience sample of 100 members of the German Armed Forces. Method: Based on questionnaire measurements, provisional PTSD prevalence was assessed according to DSM-IV, DSM-5, ICD-10, and proposed ICD-11 criteria. Consistency of the diagnostic status across the diagnostic systems was statistically evaluated. Results: Provisional PTSD prevalence was the same for DSM-IV and DSM-5 (both 56%) and comparable under DSM-5 versus ICD-11 proposal (48%). Agreement between DSM-IV and DSM-5, and between DSM-5 and the proposed ICD-11, was high (both p DSM-5, and proposed ICD-11. This supports the assumption of a set of PTSD core symptoms as suggested in the ICD-11 proposal, when at the same time a satisfactory concordance between ICD-11 proposal and DSM was given. The finding of increased provisional PTSD prevalence under ICD-11 proposal in contrast to ICD-10 can be of guidance for future epidemiological research on PTSD prevalence, especially concerning further investigations on the impact, appropriateness, and usefulness of the time criterion included in ICD-10 versus the consequences of its deletion as proposed for ICD-11.

  15. Post-traumatic stress disorder in DSM-5: estimates of prevalence and criteria comparison versus DSM-IV-TR in a non-clinical sample of earthquake survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmassi, C; Akiskal, H S; Yong, S S; Stratta, P; Calderani, E; Massimetti, E; Akiskal, K K; Rossi, A; Dell'Osso, L

    2013-12-01

    The latest edition of DSM (DSM-5) introduced important revisions to PTSD symptomatological criteria, such as a four-factor model and the inclusion of new symptoms. To date, only a few studies have investigated the impact that the proposed DSM-5 criteria will have on prevalence rates of PTSD. An overall sample of 512 adolescents who survived the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake and were previously investigated for the presence of full and partial PTSD, using DSM-IV-TR criteria, were reassessed according to DSM-5 criteria. All subjects completed the Trauma and Loss Spectrum-Self Report (TALS-SR). A DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis emerged in 39.8% of subjects, with a significant difference between the two sexes (pDSM-IV-TR. Most of the inconsistent diagnoses that fulfilled DSM-IV-TR criteria but not DSM-5 criteria can be attributed to the subjects not fulfilling the new criterion C (active avoidance). Each DSM-5 symptom was more highly correlated with its corresponding symptom cluster than with other symptom clusters, but two of the new symptoms showed moderate to weak item-cluster correlations. Among DSM-5 PTSD cases: 7 (3.4%) endorsed symptom D3; 151 (74%) D4; 28 (13.7%) both D3 and D4; 75 (36.8%) E2. The use of a self-report instrument; no information on comorbidity; homogeneity of study sample; lack of assessment on functional impairment; the rates of DSM-IV-TR qualified PTSD in the sample was only 37.5%. This study provides an inside look at the empirical performance of the DSM-5 PTSD criteria in a population exposed to a natural disaster, which suggests the need for replication in larger epidemiological samples. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. [Addiction in DSM V and ICD-11 state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesch, O-M

    2009-09-01

    Diagnoses are made for identifying rather homogeneous groups of patients being thereby relevant for research and for therapy. Therefore diagnostic manuals, like the DSM-IV and the ICD-10 are subjected to changing knowledge derived from research on one hand and to changes of clinical necessities. The diagnosis of substance related disorders, published for DSM-IV in 1994 and for the ICD-10 in 1992, has proven of value for epidemiological research and economic validation. In spite of these advantages the concept has prove to be too broad and rather unspecific for research, specific therapeutic strategies and for defining an illness course. During the last 20 years research has yielded many criteria of interest, which never entered DSM IV or ICD-10, remaining therefore on the level of single items, which are nowadays additionally assigned to all patients (like e. g. early versus late onset) or on the level of typologies (like e. g. Lesch's typology) demanding different treatments. To give an example: acamprosate has lasting relapse preventing effects in Lesch types I and II, while naltrexone is effective in types III and IV. For rendering an expertise in Germany, the referring literature recommends to utilize Lesch's typology additionally to the ICD-10 diagnosis, especially when prognosis or therapeutic strategies are demanded. Since 1999 different expert groups strive for including new criteria into DSM IV and ICD-10. The revised manuals should include easily assignable items for severity of different arrays (time illness onset, co-morbidity, withdrawal symptoms, bridge symptoms and neurological sequela). Different therapy stages (e. g. withdrawal or relapse prevention) need a different weighting of individual symptoms (e. g. degree of intoxication, severity of withdrawal is needed for acute treatment, while an assignment of co-morbidity and personality factors is necessary for relapse prevention). This quantifier is rendered by Lesch's typology, which is available in

  17. Deconstructing the DSM-IV-TR: a critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warelow, Philip; Holmes, Colin A

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines and offers a critique of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), underlying principles and assumptions, and the nature and consequences of its nosological framework. The reason for this critique is to look at the rationale for some of the diagnostic categories and also why some categories are retained, including some of the long-standing diagnostic groups, such as schizophrenia. It is not the intention here to rehearse the problems of biological psychiatric thinking, nor argue the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM-IV-TR in its definitions and descriptions of particular syndromes and illnesses. The ideas presented here derive from a range of previous research that argued that the DSM-IV-TR colludes in a system of psychiatric care in which all people, by virtue of characteristically human foibles and idiosyncrasies, are potentially classifiable into a variety of diagnostic mental health categories. In the present study, it was argued that because of resource constraints, professional dispute, and public concern, the major criterion for attracting a formal diagnosis is not classifiability according to the DSM-IV-TR, but rather, that of 'social risk', defined in terms of risk to oneself and/or others and embodying obvious social control functions. Here, we expand and develop some of these ideas, and relate them more specifically to insights offered by critical or deconstructive psychology and the development of the forthcoming the DSM-V. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. Olfactory reference syndrome: issues for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feusner, Jamie D; Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    The published literature on olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) spans more than a century and provides consistent descriptions of its clinical features. The core symptom is preoccupation with the belief that one emits a foul or offensive body odor, which is not perceived by others. This syndrome is associated with substantial distress and disability. DSM-IV and ICD-10 do not explicitly mention ORS, but note convictions about emitting a foul body odor in their description of delusional disorder, somatic type. However, the fact that such symptoms can be nondelusional poses a diagnostic conundrum. Indeed, DSM-IV also mentions fears about the offensiveness of one's body odor in the social phobia text (as a symptom of taijin kyofusho). There also seems to be phenomenological overlap with body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and hypochondriasis. This article provides a focused review of the literature to address issues for DSM-V, including whether ORS should continue to be mentioned as an example of another disorder or should be included as a separate diagnosis. We present a number of options and preliminary recommendations for consideration for DSM-V. Because research is still very limited, it is unclear how ORS should best be classified. Nonetheless, classifying ORS as a type of delusional disorder seems problematic. Given this syndrome's consistent clinical description across cultures for more than a century, substantial morbidity and a small but growing research literature, we make the preliminary recommendation that ORS be included in DSM-Vs Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study, and we suggest diagnostic criteria. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Delusional versus nondelusional body dysmorphic disorder: recommendations for DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Hart, Ashley S.; Simpson, Helen Blair; Stein, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    The core feature of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is distressing or impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in one’s physical appearance. BDD beliefs are characterized by varying degrees of insight, ranging from good (ie, recognition that one’s BDD beliefs are not true) through “absent insight/delusional” beliefs (ie, complete conviction that one’s BDD beliefs are true). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd ed., rev. (DSM-III-R) and The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) classified BDD’s nondelusional form in the somatoform section of the manual and its delusional form in the psychosis section, as a type of delusional disorder, somatic type (although DSM-IV allowed double-coding of delusional BDD as both a psychotic disorder and BDD). However, little or no evidence on this issue was available when these editions were published. In this article, we review the classification of BDD’s delusional and nondelusional variants in earlier editions of DSM and the limitations of their approaches. We then review empirical evidence on this topic, which has become available since DSM-IV was developed. Available evidence indicates that across a range of validators, BDD’s delusional and nondelusional variants have many more similarities than differences, including response to pharmacotherapy. Based on these data, we propose that BDD’s delusional and nondelusional forms be classified as the same disorder and that BDD’s diagnostic criteria include an insight specifier that spans a range of insight, including absent insight/delusional BDD beliefs. We hope that this recommendation will improve care for patients with this common and often-severe disorder. This increased understanding of BDD may also have implications for other disorders that have an “absent insight/delusional” form. PMID:23659348

  20. Utility investments in low-income energy-efficiency programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    In the increasingly competitive utility industry, it is imperative that equity programs be as cost-effective as possible. In some cases, this is accomplished by working in partnership with government programs such as the US Department of Energy`s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. This paper provides an overview of the DSM and conservation programs being operated by utilities for low-income customers and describes the types of utility-government partnerships that exist.

  1. Teale California shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state of...

  2. Mediterranean California, Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Fenn; E.B. Allen; L.H. Geiser

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean California ecoregion (CEC 1997; Fig 2.2) encompasses the greater Central Valley, Sierra foothills, and central coast ranges of California south to Mexico and is bounded by the Pacific Ocean, Sierra Nevada Mountains and Mojave Desert.

  3. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  4. Evaluation of the DSM-5 Severity Indicator for Binge Eating Disorder in a Community Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Grilo, Carlos. M.; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A.

    2015-01-01

    Research has examined various aspects of the diagnostic criteria for binge-eating disorder (BED) but has yet to evaluate the DSM-5 severity criterion. This study examined the DSM-5 severity criterion for BED based on binge-eating frequency and tested an alternative severity specifier based on overvaluation of shape/weight. 338 community volunteers categorized with DSM-5 BED completed a battery of self-report instruments. Participants were categorized first using DSM-5 severity levels and seco...

  5. Redefining Autism Spectrum Disorder Using DSM-5: The Implications of the Proposed DSM-5 Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robyn L.; Rodi, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    A number of changes were made to pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) in the recently released diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (APA, "Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders," American Psychiatric Publishing, Arlington, VA, 2013). Of the 210 participants in the present study who met DSM-IV-TR…

  6. Examining the Stability of "DSM-IV" and Empirically Derived Eating Disorder Classification: Implications for "DSM-5"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carol B.; Crow, Scott J.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.; Agras, W. Stewart; Halmi, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to derive an empirical classification of eating disorder symptoms in a heterogeneous eating disorder sample using latent class analysis (LCA) and to examine the longitudinal stability of these latent classes (LCs) and the stability of DSM-IV eating disorder (ED) diagnoses. Method: A total of 429…

  7. The psychometric properties of the personality inventory for DSM-5 in an APA DSM-5 field trial sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C; Ayearst, Lindsay; Chmielewski, Michael; Pollock, Bruce G; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-06-01

    Section 3 of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes a hybrid model of personality pathology, in which dimensional personality traits are used to derive one of seven categorical personality disorder diagnoses. The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) was developed by the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders workgroup and their consultants to produce a freely available instrument to assess the personality traits within this new system. To date, the psychometric properties of the PID-5 have been evaluated primarily in undergraduate student and community adult samples. In the current investigation, we extend this line of research to a psychiatric patient sample who participated in the APA DSM-5 Field Trial (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health site). A total of 201 psychiatric patients (102 men, 99 women) completed the PID-5 and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R). The internal consistencies of the PID-5 domain and facet trait scales were acceptable. Results supported the unidimensional structure of all trait scales but one, and the convergence between the PID-5 and analogous NEO PI-R scales. Evidence for discriminant validity was mixed. Overall, the current investigation provides support for the psychometric properties of this diagnostic instrument in psychiatric samples.

  8. The New DSM-5 Impairment Criterion: A Challenge to Early Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Eric; Bölte, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The possible effect of the DSM-5 impairment criterion on diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in young children was examined in 127 children aged 20-47 months with a DSM-IV-TR clinical consensus diagnosis of ASD. The composite score of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) served as a proxy for the DSM-5 impairment criterion. When…

  9. Commentary on the Inclusion of Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder in DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group has proposed criteria for Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder (PCBRD) for inclusion in the appendix of DSM-5. The authors feel that it is important that dysfunctional grief will become a formal condition in DSM-5 because that would…

  10. Greater Prevalence of Proposed ICD-11 Alcohol and Cannabis Dependence Compared to ICD-10, DSM-IV, and DSM-5 in Treated Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tammy; Cornelius, Jack; Clark, Duncan; Martin, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Proposed International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition (ICD-11), criteria for substance use disorder (SUD) radically simplify the algorithm used to diagnose substance dependence. Major differences in case identification across DSM and ICD impact determinations of treatment need and conceptualizations of substance dependence. This study compared the draft algorithm for ICD-11 SUD against DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-10, for alcohol and cannabis. Adolescents (n = 339, ages 14 to 18) admitted to intensive outpatient addictions treatment completed, as part of a research study, a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM SUDs adapted for use with adolescents and which has been used to assess DSM and ICD SUD diagnoses. Analyses examined prevalence across classification systems, diagnostic concordance, and sources of diagnostic disagreement. Prevalence of any past-year proposed ICD-11 alcohol or cannabis use disorder was significantly lower compared to DSM-IV and DSM-5 (ps DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-10 (ps DSM-5 SUD diagnoses showed only moderate concordance. For both alcohol and cannabis, youth typically met criteria for an ICD-11 dependence diagnosis by reporting tolerance and much time spent using or recovering from the substance, rather than symptoms indicating impaired control over use. The proposed ICD-11 dependence algorithm appears to "overdiagnose" dependence on alcohol and cannabis relative to DSM-IV and ICD-10 dependence, and DSM-5 moderate/severe use disorder, generating potential "false-positive" cases of dependence. Among youth who met criteria for proposed ICD-11 dependence, few reported impaired control over substance use, highlighting ongoing issues in the conceptualization and diagnosis of SUD. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Estimating the Prevalence of Binge Eating Disorder in a Community Sample From the United States: Comparing DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossrow, Nicole; Pawaskar, Manjiri; Witt, Edward A; Ming, Eileen E; Victor, Timothy W; Herman, Barry K; Wadden, Thomas A; Erder, M Haim

    2016-08-01

    To estimate binge eating disorder (BED) prevalence according to DSM-5 and DSM-IV-TR criteria in US adults and to estimate the proportion of individuals meeting DSM-5 BED criteria who reported being formally diagnosed. A representative sample of US adults who participated in the National Health and Wellness Survey were asked to respond to an Internet survey (conducted in October 2013). Assessments included 3-month, 12-month, and lifetime BED prevalence based on DSM-5 and DSM-IV-TR criteria and demographics, psychiatric comorbidities, and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale). Descriptive statistics are provided. Prevalence estimates were calculated using poststratification sampling weights. Of 22,397 respondents, 344 (women, n = 242; men, n = 102) self-reported symptoms consistent with DSM-5 BED symptom criteria. The 3-month, 12-month, and lifetime DSM-5 prevalence estimates (95% CIs) projected to the US population were 1.19% (1.04%-1.37%), 1.64% (1.45%-1.85%), and 2.03% (1.83%-2.26%), respectively. The 12-month and lifetime projected DSM-IV-TR prevalence estimates were 1.15% (1.00%-1.32%) and 1.52% (1.35%-1.70%), respectively. Of respondents meeting DSM-5 BED criteria in the past 12 months, 3.2% (11/344) reported receiving a formal diagnosis. Compared with non-BED respondents, respondents meeting DSM-5 BED criteria in the past 12 months were younger (mean ± SD age = 46.01 ± 14.32 vs 51.59 ± 15.80 years; P DSM-5 BED criteria resulted in higher BED prevalence estimates than with DSM-IV-TR criteria. Most BED respondents did not report being formally diagnosed, indicating an unmet need in BED recognition and diagnosis. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. Craving as an Alcohol Use Disorder Symptom in DSM-5: An Empirical Examination in a Treatment-seeking Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cara M.; Stojek, Monika K.; Few, Lauren R.; Rothbaum, Alex O.; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    Craving has been added as an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) symptom in DSM-5 but relatively few nosological studies have directly examined the empirical basis for doing so. The current study investigated the validity of craving as an AUD symptom in a sample of heavy drinking treatment-seeking individuals. Using a semi-structured clinical interview, treatment-seeking heavy drinkers (N = 104; 62% male) were assessed for symptoms of DSM-IV AUD. The extent to which individuals endorsed pathological levels of craving in comparison to other AUD symptoms was investigated as was the association between craving and several aspects of problematic alcohol involvement. Factor analysis was utilized to examine whether craving and other AUD symptoms comprised a unidimensional syndrome. Results indicated that craving was significantly positively correlated with AUD severity, quantitative indices of drinking, and adverse consequences of alcohol abuse. In terms of frequency of endorsement, craving was present in 47% of the sample and was the 8th most frequent of the twelve symptoms evaluated. When considered with the DSM-IV AUD criteria, craving aggregated with other symptoms to form a unidimensional syndrome. Extending previous findings from epidemiological samples, these data suggest that, in a clinical sample, many relevant aspects of craving aggregate to form a diagnostic criterion that functions similarly to other AUD symptoms and is related to diverse aspects of alcohol-related impairment. PMID:24490710

  13. Impulsivity and Stillness: NADA, Pharmaceuticals, and Psychotherapy in Substance Use and Other DSM 5 Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kenneth; Olshan-Perlmutter, Michelle

    2015-11-26

    Pharmaceuticals and psychotherapy are commonly used in the management of impulsivity.  The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol is an adjunctive therapy that involves the bilateral insertion of 1 to 5 predetermined ear needle points. One of the main benefits reported by patients, providers, and programs utilizing NADA is the sense of stillness, centering, and well-being. The induction of this attitude is seen as contributing to improved clinical outcomes including engagement and retention.  The attitude of stillness is also suggestive of a pathway to mitigating impulsivity. Impulsivity is associated with substance use disorders and other DSM 5 diagnoses.  Impulsivity has characteristics that are manifested clinically in behaviors such as disinhibition, poor self-control, lack of deliberation, thrill seeking, risk-taking. NADA holds promise as a useful treatment adjunct in the comprehensive management of disorders for which impulsivity is a prominent component.

  14. The effect of draft DSM-V criteria on posttraumatic stress disorder prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Patrick S; Hertzberg, Jeffrey S; Kirby, Angela C; Dennis, Michelle F; Hair, Lauren P; Dedert, Eric A; Beckham, Jean C

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the concordance of proposed DSM-V posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria with DSM-IV classification rules and examine the impact of the proposed DSM-V PTSD criteria on prevalence. The sample (N = 185) included participants who were recruited for studies focused on trauma and health conducted at an academic medical center and VA medical center in the southeastern United States. The prevalence and concordance between DSM-IV and the proposed DSM-V classifications were calculated based on results from structured clinical interviews. Prevalence rates and diagnostic efficiency indices including sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and Kappa were calculated for each of the possible ways to define DSM-V PTSD. Ninety-five percent of the sample reported an event that met both DSM-IV PTSD Criterion A1 and A2, but only 89% reported a trauma that met Criterion A on DSM-V. Results examining concordance between DSM-IV and DSM-V algorithms indicated that several of the algorithms had AUCs above 0.90. The requirement of two symptoms from both Clusters D and E provided strong concordance to DSM-IV (AUC = 0.93; Kappa = 0.86) and a greater balance between sensitivity and specificity than requiring three symptoms in both Clusters D and E. Despite several significant changes to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD for DSM-V, several possible classification rules provided good concordance with DSM-IV. The magnitude of the impact of DSM-V decision rules on prevalence will be largely affected by the DSM-IV PTSD base rate in the population of interest. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Effect of Draft DSM-5 Criteria on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Patrick S.; Hertzberg, Jeffrey S.; Kirby, Angela C.; Dennis, Michelle F.; Hair, Lauren P.; Dedert, Eric A.; Beckham, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was designed to examine the concordance of proposed DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria with DSM-IV classification rules and examine the impact of the proposed DSM-5 PTSD criteria on prevalence. Method The sample (N=185) included participants who were recruited for studies focused on trauma and health conducted at an academic medical center and VA medical center in the southeastern United States. The prevalence and concordance between DSM-IV and the proposed DSM-5 classifications were calculated based on results from structured clinical interviews. Prevalence rates and diagnostic efficiency indices including sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and Kappa were calculated for each of the possible ways to define DSM-5 PTSD. Results Ninety-five percent of the sample reported an event that met both DSM-IV PTSD Criterion A1 and A2, but only 89% reported a trauma that met Criterion A on DSM-5. Results examining concordance between DSM-IV and DSM-5 algorithms indicated that several of the algorithms had AUCs above .90. The requirement of two symptoms from both Clusters D and E provided strong concordance to DSM-IV (AUC = .93; Kappa = .86) and a greater balance between sensitivity and specificity than requiring three symptoms in both Clusters D and E. Conclusions Despite several significant changes to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD for DSM-5, several possible classification rules provided good concordance with DSM-IV. The magnitude of the impact of DSM-5 decision rules on prevalence will be largely affected by the DSM-IV PTSD base rate in the population of interest. PMID:23109002

  16. DSM-IV antisocial personality disorder and conduct disorder: evidence for taxonic structures among individuals with and without substance use disorders in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Bradley T; Saha, Tulshi D; Hasin, Deborah S

    2014-05-01

    The categorical-dimensional status of DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) conduct disorder (CD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a source of controversy. This study examined whether the underlying structure of DSM-IV CD and ASPD was dimensional or categorical (taxonic) among individuals with and without substance use disorders. Using a national large representative survey of U.S. adults (n = 43,093), taxometric analyses of DSM-IV CD and ASPD diagnostic criteria were conducted on the total sample and among those with and without substance use disorders. Results of three taxometric procedures were consistent in showing that the structures underlying DSM-IV CD and ASPD were clearly taxonic in the total sample and among individuals with and without substance use disorders. Comparison curve fit indices exceeded 0.57 for each model. Taxonic findings of the present study were in contrast to the dimensional results of prior taxometric research among incarcerated samples with substantial comorbidity of antisocial syndromes and substance use disorders. Results supported the categorical representation and diagnostic thresholds of ASPD and CD as defined in DSM-IV and DSM-5. That the structure of ASPD and CD may be taxonic suggests that further research on these disorders use group comparative designs in which samples with and without these disorders are compared in terms of sociodemographic and clinical correlates, comorbidity, and treatment utilization. The taxonic structure of ASPD and CD may contribute to future research on causal processes through which these antisocial syndromes develop.

  17. Assessing the dimensionality of lifetime DSM-IV alcohol use disorders and a quantity-frequency alcohol use criterion in the Australian population: a factor mixture modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Orla; Teesson, Maree; Baillie, Andrew; Slade, Tim

    2011-01-01

    With the revision of the DSM-IV underway, two important research issues currently dominate the addiction literature: (a) how can the dimensionality of DSM-IV alcohol use disorders (AUD) diagnostic criteria best be described? and (ii) should a quantity-frequency alcohol use (QF) criterion be added to the existing diagnostic criteria set in the DSM-V? The current study addressed these aims by analysing lifetime data from a recent Australian population survey. Data from adults screened for lifetime DSM-IV AUD in the 2007 National Survey on Mental Health and Wellbeing (NSMHWB) were analysed (n = 5409). A series of alternative factor analytic, latent class and factor mixture or 'hybrid' models were used to assess the dimensionality of lifetime DSM-IV AUD diagnostic criteria and a lifetime QF criterion. Examination of the goodness-of-fit indices revealed that a one-factor or a two-factor model, a three-class latent class model or a two-factor zero-class hybrid model, were all acceptable models for the data. A simple structure one-factor model was considered to be the most parsimonious and theoretically meaningful model, given the high correlation between the abuse and dependence factors (0.874) in the two-factor model. The inclusion of the QF criterion did not enhance the fit of the one-factor model. Incorporating both dimensional and categorical conceptions of lifetime AUD did not provide substantial gains over a simple structure unidimensional model of AUD severity. The utility of a QF use criterion in helping to diagnose AUD is questionable. These findings should be of relevance to the DSM-5 substance use disorder workgroup.

  18. OBSESSIVE–COMPULSIVE DISORDER: A REVIEW OF THE DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA AND POSSIBLE SUBTYPES AND DIMENSIONAL SPECIFIERS FOR DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, James F.; Denys, Damiaan; Simpson, H. Blair; Mataix-Cols, David; Hollander, Eric; Saxena, Sanjaya; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Rauch, Scott L.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Phillips, Katharine A.; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since the publication of the DSM-IV in 1994, research on obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) has continued to expand. It is timely to reconsider the nosology of this disorder, assessing whether changes to diagnostic criteria as well as subtypes and specifiers may improve diagnostic validity and clinical utility. Methods The existing criteria were evaluated. Key issues were identified. Electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies. Results This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. These include: (1) clarifying and simplifying the definition of obsessions and compulsions(criterion A); (2) possibly deleting the requirement that people recognize that their obsessions or compulsions are excessive or unreasonable (criterion B); (3) rethinking the clinical significance criterion (criterion C) and, in the interim, possibly adjusting what is considered “time-consuming” for OCD; (4) listing additional disorders to help with the differential diagnosis (criterion D); (5) rethinking the medical exclusion criterion (criterion E) and clarifying what is meant by a “general medical condition”; (6) revising the specifiers (i.e., clarifying that OCD can involve a range of insight, in addition to “poor insight,” and adding “tic-related OCD”); and (7) highlighting in the DSM-V text important clinical features of OCD that are not currently mentioned in the criteria (e.g., the major symptom dimensions). Conclusions A number of changes to the existing diagnostic criteria for OCD are proposed. These proposed criteria may change as the DSM-V process progresses. PMID:20217853

  19. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: a review of the diagnostic criteria and possible subtypes and dimensional specifiers for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, James F; Denys, Damiaan; Simpson, H Blair; Mataix-Cols, David; Hollander, Eric; Saxena, Sanjaya; Miguel, Euripedes C; Rauch, Scott L; Goodman, Wayne K; Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    Since the publication of the DSM-IV in 1994, research on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has continued to expand. It is timely to reconsider the nosology of this disorder, assessing whether changes to diagnostic criteria as well as subtypes and specifiers may improve diagnostic validity and clinical utility. The existing criteria were evaluated. Key issues were identified. Electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. These include: (1) clarifying and simplifying the definition of obsessions and compulsions (criterion A); (2) possibly deleting the requirement that people recognize that their obsessions or compulsions are excessive or unreasonable (criterion B); (3) rethinking the clinical significance criterion (criterion C) and, in the interim, possibly adjusting what is considered "time-consuming" for OCD; (4) listing additional disorders to help with the differential diagnosis (criterion D); (5) rethinking the medical exclusion criterion (criterion E) and clarifying what is meant by a "general medical condition"; (6) revising the specifiers (i.e., clarifying that OCD can involve a range of insight, in addition to "poor insight," and adding "tic-related OCD"); and (7) highlighting in the DSM-V text important clinical features of OCD that are not currently mentioned in the criteria (e.g., the major symptom dimensions). A number of changes to the existing diagnostic criteria for OCD are proposed. These proposed criteria may change as the DSM-V process progresses. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Validation of the Portuguese DSM-IV-MR-J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Filipa; Alexandre, Joana; Griffiths, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Youth problem gambling is viewed as an emergent public health issue in many countries, and is also an emerging area of public concern in Portugal. However, there is currently no Portuguese instrument that focuses specifically on the measurement of problem gambling among young people. Consequently, the present study aimed to validate the DSM-IV-MR-J for use among Portuguese adolescents and to examine its' psychometric properties. A cross-cultural adaption of this instrument to the Portuguese language was performed using the translation and back translation method. The final version of the instrument was administered to 753 Portuguese high school and first year college students. The findings revealed an acceptable internal reliability and replicated the one-factor structure of this scale. Based on these findings, the Portuguese DSM-IV-MR-J appears to be a valid and reliable instrument, and provides a much needed psychometric tool for the development of more research on youth gambling in Portugal.

  1. Defining paraphilia in DSM-5: do not disregard grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderliter, Andrew C

    2011-01-01

    Blanchard (2009a, 2009b, 2009c) proposed a definition of paraphilia for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-5, delimiting a range of so-called normative sexuality and defining paraphilia as any intense and persistent sexual interest other than that. The author examines the wording and intended meaning of this definition, and he argues that there are many problems with it that "correct" interpretation requires ignoring what it says. Because of these problems and the possibility of civil commitment under sexually violent predator/person laws on the basis of a diagnosis of paraphilia NOS, caution and careful consideration of grammar and wording is urged in drafting a definition for paraphilia for DSM-5.

  2. Crisis DSM Generation To Support Refugee Camp Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gstaiger, Veronika; d'Angelo, Pablo; Schneiderhan, Tobais; Krauss, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The extraction of high resolution surface information from satellite data has become an important area of research. One of the numerous fields of application is disaster management. Detailed information about the affected terrain is not only needed for analyses during the emergency relief phase, but also for reconstruction and prevention activities. In this paper the authors present the generation of a Digital Surface Model (DSM) based on three very high resolution optical satellite images. The DSM was produced to supplement a flood mapping activity in Jordan and serves as example for the implementation of scientific results during an emergency request. The flood affected the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan and was mapped by the Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information (ZKI) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in January 2013 under emergency mapping conditions.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Propionibacterium freudenreichii DSM 20271T

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, Patrik; Deptula, Paulina; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Tamene, Fitsum; Kammonen, Juhana; Savijoki, Kirsi; Paulin, Lars; Piironen, Vieno; Auvinen, Petri; Varmanen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. freudenreichii DSM 20271T is the type strain of species Propionibacterium freudenreichii that has a long history of safe use in the production dairy products and B12 vitamin. P. freudenreichii is the type species of the genus Propionibacterium which contains Gram-positive, non-motile and non-sporeforming bacteria with a high G + C content. We describe the genome of P. freudenreichii subsp. freudenrei...

  4. Treatment recommendations for DSM-5-defined mixed features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblat, Joshua D; McIntyre, Roger S

    2017-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) mixed features specifier provides a less restrictive definition of mixed mood states, compared to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), including mood episodes that manifest with subthreshold symptoms of the opposite mood state. A limited number of studies have assessed the efficacy of treatments specifically for DSM-5-defined mixed features in mood disorders. As such, there is currently an inadequate amount of data to appropriately inform evidence-based treatment guidelines of DSM-5 defined mixed features. However, given the high prevalence and morbidity of mixed features, treatment recommendations based on the currently available evidence along with expert opinion may be of benefit. This article serves to provide these interim treatment recommendations while humbly acknowledging the limited amount of evidence currently available. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) appear to have the greatest promise in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) with mixed features. Conventional mood stabilizing agents (ie, lithium and divalproex) may also be of benefit; however, they have been inadequately studied. In the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) with mixed features, the comparable efficacy of antidepressants versus other treatments, such as SGAs, remains unknown. As such, antidepressants remain first-line treatment of MDD with or without mixed features; however, there are significant safety concerns associated with antidepressant monotherapy when mixed features are present, which merits increased monitoring. Lurasidone is the only SGA monotherapy that has been shown to be efficacious specifically in the treatment of MDD with mixed features. Further research is needed to accurately determine the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of treatments specifically for mood episodes with mixed features to adequately inform

  5. Validation of Proposed "DSM-5" Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Speer, Leslie; Embacher, Rebecca; Law, Paul; Constantino, John; Findling, Robert L.; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Eng, Charis

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the validity of proposed "DSM-5" criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method: We analyzed symptoms from 14,744 siblings (8,911 ASD and 5,863 non-ASD) included in a national registry, the Interactive Autism Network. Youth 2 through 18 years of age were included if at least one…

  6. Clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis in the DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Modica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Personality disorders represent psychopathological conditions hard to be diagnosed. The Author highlights the clinical aspects of personality disorder diagnosis according to the criteria of the DSM-5. In this study, some of the numerous definitions of personality are mentioned; afterwards, some of the theories on the development of personality shall be. Later on, concepts of temperament, character and personality get analysed. Then, the current approach to personality disorders according to the two models of DSM-5 is reported. The first model is included in the Section II of DSM-5; while in the Section III there exists a proposal for a so-called alternate model. The first one suggests a qualitative or categorical kind of approach to personality disorders, whereas the alternate model proposes a dimensional or quantitative kind of approach and aims to formulate, as well as a diagnosis for general alterations of the personological functioning, even a trait-based personality disorder diagnosis, which can be formulated when a personality disorder is there but doesn't fit criteria for a specific disorder. Ultimately, it can be so claimed: 1 diagnostic criteria of the first model are similar to those of DSM-IV with its respective strenghts and weaknesses, and namely high probability in diagnosis, where  there, of personality disorder, yet insufficient sensitivity in the specification of the disorder; 2 the alternate model, despite criticism, thanks to the possibility of delivering a trait-based personality disorder diagnosis, seems to be more equipped both in the identification of the personality disorder and further specifications.

  7. How Voting and Consensus Created the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines how Task Force votes were central to the development of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III and DSM-III-R). Data were obtained through a literature review, investigation of DSM archival material housed at the American Psychiatric Association (APA), and interviews with key Task Force members of DSM-III and DSM-III-R. Such data indicate that Task Force votes played a central role in the making of DSM-III, from establishing diagnostic criteria and diagnostic definitions to settling questions about the inclusion or removal of diagnostic categories. The paper concludes that while the APA represented DSM-III, and the return to descriptive psychiatry it inaugurated, as a triumph of empirically based decision-making, the evidence presented here fails to support that view. Since the DSM is a cumulative project, and as DSM-III lives on through subsequent editions, this paper calls for a more socio-historically informed understanding of DSM's construction to be deployed in how the DSM is taught and implemented in training and clinical settings.

  8. Evaluating the Utility of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Discriminating among "DSM-IV" ADHD Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kelly M.; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate how the inclusion of 3 Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) symptoms in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) diagnostic criteria influences the external validity of the ADHD subtypes. The sample comprised 228 children (166 boys, 62 girls) ranging in age from 5-18 years who were referred to…

  9. Tourette's: syndrome, disorder or spectrum? Classificatory challenges and an appraisal of the DSM criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary May; Eapen, Valsamma

    2014-10-01

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) was released in May 2013 after 14 years of development and almost two decades after the last edition DSM-IV was published in 1994. We review the DSM journey with regards to Tourette Syndrome from the original publication of DSM 1 in 1952 till date. In terms of changes in DSM 5, the major shift has come in the placement of Tourette Syndrome under the 'Neurodevelopmental Disorders' alongside other disorders with a developmental origin. This review provides an overview of the changes in DSM-5 highlighting key points for clinical practice and research along with a snap shot of the current use of DSM as a classificatory system in different parts of the world and suggestions for improving the subtyping and the diagnostic confidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Alternative models of DSM-5 PTSD: Examining diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Siobhan; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask; Yong Chen, Yoke; Raudzah Ghazali, Siti; Shevlin, Mark

    2017-09-09

    The factor structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been extensively debated with evidence supporting the recently proposed seven-factor Hybrid model. However, despite myriad studies examining PTSD symptom structure few have assessed the diagnostic implications of these proposed models. This study aimed to generate PTSD prevalence estimates derived from the 7 alternative factor models and assess whether pre-established risk factors associated with PTSD (e.g., transportation accidents and sexual victimisation) produce consistent risk estimates. Seven alternative models were estimated within a confirmatory factor analytic framework using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Data were analysed from a Malaysian adolescent community sample (n = 481) of which 61.7% were female, with a mean age of 17.03 years. The results indicated that all models provided satisfactory model fit with statistical superiority for the Externalising Behaviours and seven-factor Hybrid models. The PTSD prevalence estimates varied substantially ranging from 21.8% for the DSM-5 model to 10.0% for the Hybrid model. Estimates of risk associated with PTSD were inconsistent across the alternative models, with substantial variation emerging for sexual victimisation. These findings have important implications for research and practice and highlight that more research attention is needed to examine the diagnostic implications emerging from the alternative models of PTSD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  12. Are symptoms of spirit possessed patients covered by the DSM-IV or DSM-5 criteria for possession trance disorder? A mixed-method explorative study in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijl, Marjolein; Kleijn, Wim; de Jong, Joop

    2013-09-01

    As in many cultures, spirit possession is a common idiom of distress in Uganda. The DSM-IV contains experimental research criteria for dissociative and possession trance disorder (DTD and PTD), which are under review for the DSM-5. In the current proposed categories of the DSM-5, PTD is subsumed under dissociative identity disorder (DID) and DTD under dissociative disorders not elsewhere classified. Evaluation of these criteria is currently urgently required. This study explores the match between local symptoms of spirit possession in Uganda and experimental research criteria for PTD in the DSM-IV and proposed criteria for DID in the DSM-5. A mixed-method approach was used combining qualitative and quantitative research methods. Local symptoms were explored of 119 spirit possessed patients, using illness narratives and a cultural dissociative symptoms' checklist. Possible meaningful clusters of symptoms were inventoried through multiple correspondence analysis. Finally, local symptoms were compared with experimental criteria for PTD in the DSM-IV and proposed criteria for DID in the DSM-5. Illness narratives revealed different phases of spirit possession, with passive-influence experiences preceding the actual possession states. Multiple correspondence analysis of symptoms revealed two dimensions: 'passive' and 'active' symptoms. Local symptoms, such as changes in consciousness, shaking movements, and talking in a voice attributed to spirits, match with DSM-IV-PTD and DSM-5-DID criteria. Passive-influence experiences, such as feeling influenced or held by powers from outside, strange dreams, and hearing voices, deserve to be more explicitly described in the proposed criteria for DID in the DSM-5. The suggested incorporation of PTD in DID in the DSM-5 and the envisioned separation of DTD and PTD in two distinctive categories have disputable aspects.

  13. Analysis of successful demaind-side management at publicly owned utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States); Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present an analysis of case studies of publicly owned utilities that have made cost effective investments in demand-side management (DSM) and which have had marked success to date. Through this analysis we hope to determine some of the factors that have contributed to their success in order to help identify other utilities which may be strong candidates for future DSM program development. While many investor-owned utilities have not yet implemented DSM programs and thus also have the occasion to exploit this resource option, public power utilities appear to have an exceptional opportunity based on their charters. Publicly owned utilities can focus first and foremost on their customers, who are in fact their owners. This clear link between utility benefit and customer benefit presents itself as an opportunity for publicly owned utilities. To carry out the scope of this project, IRT Environment staff first sought to identify publicly owned utilities that have had success with DSM. To that end, IRT Environment conferred with staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the American Public Power Association, and conducted a limited number of telephone calls to leading public power officials seeking {open_quotes}clear winner{close_quotes} programs. Rather than a scientific exercise with specific selection criteria, final selection was instead based on utilities` reputations with demand-side management. From a list of two dozen utilities, five utilities were chosen. IRT Environment then visited each utility for two days during the fall and winter of 1993-1994. At each utility carefully planned visits resulted in comprehensive meetings with DSM program staff, including planners, implementers, evaluators, and senior management. Field visits were conducted in each city as well, providing an important complement to extensive meetings at the utilities` headquarters.

  14. Improved electrical load match in California by combining solar thermal power plants with wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of wind and solar electrical energy generation to match the current utility electrical load in California was analyzed. We compared the renewable electrical generation and the utility load in California using actual hourly wind farm data at two different locations and predicted hourly p...

  15. Psychiatric comorbidities in autism spectrum disorder: A comparative study between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Marina; Aguilar, Juan Manuel; Del-Rey-Mejías, Ángel; Mayoral, Fermín; Rapado, Marta; Peciña, Marta; Barbancho, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz-Veguilla,Miguel; Lara, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: The heterogeneous clinical presentations of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) pose a significant challenge for sample characterization. Therefore the main goal of DSM-5 must be to identify subgroups of ASD, including comorbidity disorders and severity. The main goal of this study is to explore the psychiatric comorbidities and the severity of symptoms that could be relevant for the phenotype characterization in ASD and also to compare these results accordi...

  16. The Swedish Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory: psychometrics and clinical correlates from a DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Rachel E; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar; Bäckström, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Depressive personality is commonly seen in clinical practice, and today only one exclusive self-report instrument-the Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (DPDI)-is available for its assessment based on the DSM-IV description of the construct. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a Swedish version of this measure (DPDI-Swe) in terms of its reliability, internal structure, and convergent validity using related variables from the DSM-IV criteria for depressive personality disorder (DPD) and the proposed DPD trait set for DSM-5. A non-clinical sample of 255 adults in southern Sweden completed a self-report package, which, in addition to DPD, included the assessment of self-esteem, optimism, hope, rumination, worry, depression, and anxiety. Quality of life was also measured. Results indicated that the DPDI-Swe was internally consistent (α = 0.96). Exploratory factor analysis with oblique rotation yielded three components, together accounting for 48.21% of the variance in DPDI-Swe scores. There were strong positive associations between the DPDI-Swe and measures of depression, anxiety, rumination, and worry, and strong negative associations between the DPDI-Swe and measures of self-esteem, optimism, hope, and quality of life. These significant relationships remained, albeit slightly diminished, after statistically controlling for current depressed mood. The DPDI-Swe appears to be a reliable and valid measure of DPD, and it is available for clinical and research use.

  17. Geothermal energy in California: Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citron, O.; Davis, C.; Fredrickson, C.; Granit, R.; Kerrisk, D.; Leibowitz, L.; Schulkin, B.; Wornack, J.

    1976-06-30

    The potential for electric energy from geothermal resources in California is currently estimated to be equivalent to the output from 14 to 21 large (1000 MW) central station power plants. In addition, since over 30 California cities are located near potential geothermal resources, the non-electric applications of geothermal heat (industrial, agriculture, space heating, etc.) could be enormous. Therefore, the full-scale utilization of geothermal resources would have a major impact upon the energy picture of the state. This report presents a summary of the existing status of geothermal energy development in the state of California as of the early part of 1976. The report provides data on the extent of the resource base of the state and the present outlook for its utilization. It identifies the existing local, state, and federal laws, rules and regulations governing geothermal energy development and the responsibilities of each of the regulatory agencies involved. It also presents the differences in the development requirements among several counties and between California and its neighboring states. Finally, it describes on-going and planned activities in resource assessment and exploration, utilization, and research and development. Separate abstracts are prepared for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) for Sections II--VI and the three Appendixes.

  18. Are symptoms of spirit possessed patients covered by the DSM-IV or DSM-5 criteria for possession trance disorder? A mixed-method explorative study in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijl, M.; Kleyn, W.; de Jong, J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and aims As in many cultures, spirit possession is a common idiom of distress in Uganda. The DSM-IV contains experimental research criteria for dissociative and possession trance disorder (DTD and PTD), which are under review for the DSM-5. In the current proposed categories of the

  19. Water use in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Justin; Sneed, Michelle; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Metzger, Loren F.; Rewis, Diane; House, Sally F.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the USGS National Water Use Compilation, the California Water Science Center works in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies as well as academic and private organizations to collect and report total water withdrawals for California. The 2010 California water use data are aggregated here, in this website, for the first time. The California Water Science Center released these data ahead of the online USGS National Water Use Compilation circular report, in response to increased interest associated with current drought conditions. The national report is expected to be released late in 2014. The data on this website represents the most current California water use data available in the USGS National Water Use Compilation. It contains a section on water use in California for 2010. Water-use estimates are compiled by withdrawal source type, use category, and county. Withdrawal source types include groundwater, both fresh and saline,

  20. A comparison of the capacity of DSM-IV and DSM-5 acute stress disorder definitions to predict posttraumatic stress disorder and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Richard A; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Silove, Derrick; McFarlane, Alexander C; Forbes, David

    2015-04-01

    This study addresses the extent to which DSM-IV and DSM-5 definitions of acute stress disorder (ASD) predict subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related psychiatric disorders following trauma. Patients with randomized admissions to 5 hospitals across Australia (N = 596) were assessed in hospital and reassessed for PTSD at 3 (n = 508), 12 (n = 426), 24 (n = 439), and 72 (n = 314) months using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale; DSM-IV definition of PTSD was used at each assessment, and DSM-5 definition was used at 72 months. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used at each assessment to assess anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders. Forty-five patients (8%) met DSM-IV criteria, and 80 patients (14%) met DSM-5 criteria for ASD. PTSD was diagnosed in 93 patients (9%) at 3, 82 patients (10%) at 12, 100 patients (12%) at 24, and 26 patients (8%) at 72 months; 19 patients (6%) met DSM-5 criteria for PTSD at 72 months. Comparable proportions of those diagnosed with ASD developed PTSD using DSM-IV (3 months = 46%, 12 months = 39%, 24 months = 32%, and 72 months = 25%) and DSM-5 (43%, 42%, 33%, and 24%) ASD definitions. Sensitivity was improved for DSM-5 relative to DSM-IV for depression (0.18 vs 0.30), panic disorder (0.19 vs 0.41), agoraphobia (0.14 vs 0.40), social phobia (0.12 vs 0.44), specific phobia (0.24 vs 0.58), obsessive-compulsive disorder (0.17 vs 0.47), and generalized anxiety disorder (0.20 vs 0.47). More than half of participants with DSM-5-defined ASD had a subsequent disorder. The DSM-5 criteria for ASD results in better identification of people who will subsequently develop PTSD or another psychiatric disorder relative to the DSM-IV criteria. Although prediction is modest, it suggests that the new ASD diagnosis can serve a useful function in acute trauma settings for triaging those who can benefit from either early intervention or subsequent monitoring. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Comorbid psychopathology rates in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders according to the DSM-IV-TR and the proposed DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieske, Robert D; Matson, Johnny L; Beighley, Jennifer S; Cervantes, Paige E; Goldin, Rachel L; Jang, Jina

    2015-01-01

    To investigate differences in comorbid psychopathology rates between individuals who meet criteria of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) according to DSM-5 or the DSM-IV-TR. Comorbid psychopathology was measured using the Autism Spectrum Disorders- Comorbid for Children. 424 individuals between the ages of 2 and 18 years of age; including children who met criteria for an ASD according to the DSM-5, the DSM-IV-TR only, and a control group that did not meet either set of criteria. Of the ASD participants, 36% would no longer meet criteria according to proposed DSM-5. Comorbidity rates for the ASD groups were significantly different from the control group; however, ASD groups were not significantly different in terms of total comorbid psychopathology. The results elucidate the need for further research regarding services and treatments for those individuals that will no longer meet criteria for an ASD but still have significant rates of comorbid psychopathology.

  2. Agreement between DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for alcohol use disorder among outpatients suffering from depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Francesco; Carrà, Giuseppe; Biagi, Enrico; Crocamo, Cristina; Dakanalis, Antonios; Di Carlo, Francesco; Parma, Francesca; Perin, Anna Paola; Di Giacomo, Ester; Zappa, Luigi; Madeddu, Fabio; Colmegna, Fabrizia; Clerici, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Since significant differences have been reported, we estimated agreement between DSM-5 and DSM-IV criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD). We assessed 327 outpatients (mean age: 45.2 ± 13.4) with depressive or anxiety disorders. Absolute differences in prevalence rates between DSM-5 and DSM-IV AUD ranged from -1.1% (subjects with anxiety disorders) to +1.8% (tobacco smokers). The agreement was excellent (k = 0.88), also accounting for specific subgroups (relevant k coefficients >0.80). DSM-5 criteria did not inflate AUD rates. Our results have epidemiological significance since, unlike previous reports, we found diagnostic stability between new and old AUD criteria in this clinical population. (Am J Addict 2017;26:53-56). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  3. The myth of DSM's invention of new categories of disorder: Houts's diagnostic discontinuity thesis disconfirmed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, J C

    2001-05-01

    Houts (2001) argues that increases in DSM diagnostic categories are due to the invention of new disorders that are discontinuous with old conceptions of disorder and would not have been previously diagnosed. He maintains that DSM category increases are not comparable in nature to ICD category increases, which are mainly refinements of recognized disorders. I survey categories of disorder introduced after DSM-II and assess whether they are discontinuous with old concepts and categories of disorder. Candidate categories are identified from: Houts and Follette (1998), Mentalism, mechanisms, and medical analogues: Reply to Wakefield. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology; Kutchins and Kirk (1997) Making us crazy: DSM: The psychiatric bible and the creation of mental disorders. New York: Free Press; and my own list. The result is that virtually none of the candidate categories are invented, discontinuous categories. In almost every case, the newly labeled conditions were considered disorders at the time of DSM-II and would have been diagnosed under DSM-II categories. I also reexamine DSM-IV sleep disorder categories, which Houts claims are discontinuous with past diagnostic conceptions. The result is that all DSM-IV sleep disorders were recognized as disorders at the time of DSM-II, and most were recognized as mental disorders. I conclude that DSM category increases are comparable in nature to ICD category increases, and that the invention-of-disorder account cannot explain the vast majority of such increases.

  4. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  5. Posttraumatic stress disorder according to DSM-5 and DSM-IV diagnostic criteria: a comparison in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Susanne; Koebach, Anke; Hinkel, Harald; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Compared to DSM-IV, the criteria for diagnosing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been modified in DSM-5. Objective The first aim of this study was to examine how these modifications impact rates of PTSD in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants. The second goal of this study was to investigate whether PTSD symptoms were associated with perpetrator-related acts or victim-related traumatic events. Method Ninety-five male ex-combatants in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were interviewed. Both the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 PTSD symptom criteria were assessed. Results The DSM-5 symptom criteria yielded a PTSD rate of 50% (n=47), whereas the DSM-IV symptom criteria were met by 44% (n=42). If the DSM-5 would be set as the current “gold standard,” then DSM-IV would have produced more false negatives (8%) than false positives (3%). A minority of participants (19%, n=18) indicated an event during which they were involved as a perpetrator as their most stressful event. Results of a regression analysis (R 2=0.40) showed that, after accounting for the number of types of traumatic events, perpetrated violent acts were not associated with the symptom severity of PTSD. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that more diagnostic cases were produced with the DSM-5 diagnostic rules than were dropped resulting in an increase in PTSD rates compared to the DSM-IV system. The missing association between PTSD symptoms and perpetrated violent acts might be explained by a potential fascinating and excited perception of these acts. PMID:25720994

  6. Posttraumatic stress disorder according to DSM-5 and DSM-IV diagnostic criteria: a comparison in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Susanne; Koebach, Anke; Hinkel, Harald; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Compared to DSM-IV, the criteria for diagnosing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been modified in DSM-5. The first aim of this study was to examine how these modifications impact rates of PTSD in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants. The second goal of this study was to investigate whether PTSD symptoms were associated with perpetrator-related acts or victim-related traumatic events. Ninety-five male ex-combatants in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were interviewed. Both the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 PTSD symptom criteria were assessed. The DSM-5 symptom criteria yielded a PTSD rate of 50% (n=47), whereas the DSM-IV symptom criteria were met by 44% (n=42). If the DSM-5 would be set as the current "gold standard," then DSM-IV would have produced more false negatives (8%) than false positives (3%). A minority of participants (19%, n=18) indicated an event during which they were involved as a perpetrator as their most stressful event. RESULTS of a regression analysis (R (2)=0.40) showed that, after accounting for the number of types of traumatic events, perpetrated violent acts were not associated with the symptom severity of PTSD. The findings demonstrate that more diagnostic cases were produced with the DSM-5 diagnostic rules than were dropped resulting in an increase in PTSD rates compared to the DSM-IV system. The missing association between PTSD symptoms and perpetrated violent acts might be explained by a potential fascinating and excited perception of these acts.

  7. College students who endorse a sub-threshold number of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder criteria: alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use in DSM-5 diagnostic orphans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Brett T; Cohn, Amy M; Schonfeld, Lawrence; Moore, Kathleen; Barrett, Blake

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic orphans (DOs) represent a group of individuals with no formal diagnosis, despite endorsing some criteria of an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Prior research has indicated that rates of DSM-IV DOs in college are high and closely resemble those with an alcohol abuse diagnosis across pertinent alcohol use risk factors. However, significant changes to the DSM-IV AUD criteria have been made for the current DSM-5 manual, which may impact how DOs are classified. This study examined the unique alcohol and illicit drug use characteristics of a group of 2,620 DSM-5 DOs in college and tested whether DOs differed from those with and without a DSM-5 AUD across pertinent alcohol and drug use risk factors. Participants were 2,620 DSM-5 DO undergraduate college students, between the ages of 18 and 30, recruited from three public universities in the Southeastern, United States. Diagnostic orphans represented 19.6% (n = 506) of the sample; with the most frequently endorsed criteria being tolerance and consuming alcohol in hazardous situations. DOs reported significantly greater alcohol consumption, alcohol and drug related problems, and illicit drug use compared to those with no DSM-5 AUD diagnosis. Alternatively, DOs reported significantly lower alcohol use and illicit drug use compared to those with a DSM-5 AUD. The present findings indicate that DSM-5 DOs in college represent a distinct group of drinkers relative to those with and without a DSM-5 AUD. Current screening initiatives should target this group to prevent future escalation of problem drinking. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. Posttraumatic stress disorder according to DSM-5 and DSM-IV diagnostic criteria: a comparison in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schaal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Compared to DSM-IV, the criteria for diagnosing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD have been modified in DSM-5. Objective: The first aim of this study was to examine how these modifications impact rates of PTSD in a sample of Congolese ex-combatants. The second goal of this study was to investigate whether PTSD symptoms were associated with perpetrator-related acts or victim-related traumatic events. Method: Ninety-five male ex-combatants in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo were interviewed. Both the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 PTSD symptom criteria were assessed. Results: The DSM-5 symptom criteria yielded a PTSD rate of 50% (n=47, whereas the DSM-IV symptom criteria were met by 44% (n=42. If the DSM-5 would be set as the current “gold standard,” then DSM-IV would have produced more false negatives (8% than false positives (3%. A minority of participants (19%, n=18 indicated an event during which they were involved as a perpetrator as their most stressful event. Results of a regression analysis (R 2=0.40 showed that, after accounting for the number of types of traumatic events, perpetrated violent acts were not associated with the symptom severity of PTSD. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that more diagnostic cases were produced with the DSM-5 diagnostic rules than were dropped resulting in an increase in PTSD rates compared to the DSM-IV system. The missing association between PTSD symptoms and perpetrated violent acts might be explained by a potential fascinating and excited perception of these acts.

  9. Disordered Gambling as Defined by the DSM-IV and the South Oaks Gambling Screen: Evidence for a Common Etiologic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutske, Wendy S.; Zhu, Gu; Meier, Madeline H.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous paper we demonstrated in a large twin study that disordered gambling (DG) as defined by the DSM-IV symptom set runs in families, that about half of the variation in liability for DG was due to familial factors, and that all of this was explained by shared genetic rather than shared environmental influences (Slutske et al., 2010). The purpose of the present study was to extend this work to also include an alternative conceptualization of DG that is provided by the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS) item set in order to (a) compare the magnitude of the familial resemblance obtained when using the two definitions of DG (based on the DSM-IV and the SOGS), (b) examine the extent to which the two definitions tap the same underlying sources of genetic and environmental variation, and (c) examine whether the same results will be obtained among men and women. The results of bivariate twin model-fitting analyses suggested that DG as defined by the DSM-IV and SOGS substantially overlapped at the etiologic level among both men and women, which supports the construct validity of both the DSM and SOGS conceptualizations of DG. This study highlights the utility of twin studies for appraising the validity of the diagnostic nomenclature. PMID:21443290

  10. Labview utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  11. Saving PTSD from itself in DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Robert L; First, Michael B; Wakefield, Jerome C

    2007-01-01

    Papers in this special issue of the Journal of Anxiety Disorders concern critical issues and core assumptions that underlie the diagnostic construct of posttraumatic stress disorder. Rather than addressing specific points raised in these papers, we consider the issues and their implications for redefining PTSD and associated disorders in the DSM-V. Specific proposals are advanced to tighten definitional criteria for traumatic events and posttraumatic symptoms. We believe the more stringent criteria express the intent of the PTSD category and will promote more effective research on whether that intent was legitimate or based on misconceptions.

  12. DSM complete synthetic seismograms: SH, spherically symmetric, case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Phil R.; Geller, Robert J.; Hatori, Tomohiko; Takeuchi, Nozomu

    1994-04-01

    We present a new technique, based om the Direct Solution Method (DSM) (Geller et al., 1990; Hara et al., 1991; Geller and Ohminato, 1994), for calculating SH (toroidal) synthetic seismograms for spherically symmetric, isotropic, media. No asymptotic approximations are used and the synthetics, which fully include both body and surface waves, can be computed for a broad range of frequencies. Our algorithm accurately handles sources that require discontinuities in the vertically dependent part of the displacement. We use matrix operators that minimize the numerical error of the solutions. An example synthetic profile is presented for a 600km deep source in the IASP91 model for the period range 4-5000s.

  13. Will mania survive DSM-5 and ICD-11?

    OpenAIRE

    Angst, Jules

    2015-01-01

    As a natural phenomenon, mania without major depression will of course survive DSM-5 and ICD-11, but following its integration as a diagnosis into bipolar-I disorder (BP-I) in those manuals, BP-I will be more heterogeneous and, paradoxically, will include a unipolar disorder. Furthermore, unipolar mania will no longer be adequately identified and coded as an independent disorder in public health statistics. Mania without major depression, with prevalence rates of 1.7?1.8?%, is even more commo...

  14. O DSM, o sujeito e a clínica

    OpenAIRE

    Max Silva Moreira

    2010-01-01

    Esta dissertação objetiva demonstrar que, embora o Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico de Transtornos Mentais (DSM), desde sua terceria edição, afirme o caráter ateórico de sua metodologia, há uma relevante contribuição da teoria psicanalítica sobre a histeria subjacente aos Transtornos Somatoformes e aos Transtornos Dissociativos ali descritos. Para isso, relacionamos eventos que demonstram as controvertidas situações que expuseram a psiquiatria ao questionamento público de suas bases científic...

  15. [Classification of enuresis/encopresis according to DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Elimination disorders are common in childhood and adolescence. Enuresis is traditionally defined as wetting from the age of 5 years and encopresis as soiling from 4 years onwards - after all organic causes have been excluded. In the past decades, many subtypes of elimination disorders have been identified with different symptoms, etiologies, and specific treatment options. Unfortunately, the DSM-5 criteria did not integrate these new approaches. In contrast, classification systems of the International Children's Incontinence Society (ICCS) for enuresis and urinary incontinence as well as the ROME-III criteria for fecal incontinence offer new and relevant suggestions for both clinical and research purposes.

  16. Neopositivism and the DSM psychiatric classification. An epistemological history. Part 1: Theoretical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, Massimiliano

    2013-06-01

    Recent research suggests that the DSM psychiatric classification is in a paradigmatic crisis and that the DSM-5 will be unable to overcome it. One possible reason is that the DSM is based on a neopositivist epistemology which is inadequate for the present-day needs of psychopathology. However, in which sense is the DSM a neopositivist system? This paper will explore the theoretical similarities between the DSM structure and the neopositivist basic assumptions. It is shown that the DSM has the following neopositivist features: (a) a sharp distinction between scientific and non-scientific diagnoses; (b) the exclusion of the latter as nonsensical; (c) the faith on the existence of a purely observable basis (the description of reliable symptoms); (d) the introduction of the operative diagnostic criteria as rules of correspondence linking the observational level to the diagnostic concept.

  17. A proposal for including nomophobia in the new DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Del Puente, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is considered to be the gold standard manual for assessing the psychiatric diseases and is currently in its fourth version (DSM-IV), while a fifth (DSM-V) has just been released in May 2013. The DSM-V Anxiety Work Group has put forward recommendations to modify the criteria for diagnosing specific phobias. In this manuscript, we propose to consider the inclusion of nomophobia in the DSM-V, and we make a comprehensive overview of the existing literature, discussing the clinical relevance of this pathology, its epidemiological features, the available psychometric scales, and the proposed treatment. Even though nomophobia has not been included in the DSM-V, much more attention is paid to the psychopathological effects of the new media, and the interest in this topic will increase in the near future, together with the attention and caution not to hypercodify as pathological normal behaviors.

  18. Utility-scale system preventive and failure-related maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, C.; Hutchinson, P.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance background on PVUSA utility-scale systems at Davis and Kerman, California, and reports on a preventative and failure-related maintenance approach and costs.

  19. Spain: Europe's California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilvert, Calvin

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, as Spain integrates into the European Economic Community, it is considered to be Europe's California. Asserts that making regional comparisons between California and Spain can be an effective teaching method. Provides comparisons in such areas as agriculture and tourism. (CFR)

  20. California-Baja California border master plan - plan maestro fronterizo California-Baja California : executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Crossborder travel at the six land ports of entry (POEs) in the California-Baja California region has grown : significantly over the years. The San Diego County-Tijuana/Tecate region is home to the San Ysidro- : Puerta Mxico, the Otay Mesa-Mesa de ...

  1. California-Baja California border master plan - plan maestro fronterizo California-Baja California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Crossborder travel at the six land ports of entry (POEs) in the California-Baja California region has grown : significantly over the years. The San Diego County-Tijuana/Tecate region is home to the San Ysidro- : Puerta Mxico, the Otay Mesa-Mesa de ...

  2. California's Reference Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Social and economic issues affecting the vitality of public libraries in California are discussed. A 1993 study by the California State Library identified diminishing reference skills and reference collections, reduced funding which impacted staffing, increased demand, technology change, and language/culture issues as contributing factors to…

  3. Psychometric assessment of DSM-III personality disorders: another facet of the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titscher, E; Opgenoorth, E; Ruhs, A; Schuster, P

    1990-01-01

    An empirical study with the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire, which in substance follows exactly the criteria of personality disorders described in the DSM-III, is used to highlight a number of problems connected with the DSM-III. Criticisms of the DSM-III previously expressed by other authors, e.g. concerning multiple choice between characteristics and equal weighting of different symptoms, are supported by this empirical study.

  4. An assessment of the compatibility of DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5 criteria in the diagnosis of cannabis use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopak, Albert M; Proctor, Steven Lee; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2012-10-01

    The current study used an automated version of the substance use disorder diagnostic schedule-IV (SUDDS-IV) to assess DSM-IV (fourth edition of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders) and two sets of proposed DSM-5 (fifth edition of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders) cannabis use disorder criteria among adult prison inmates in the Minnesota Department of Corrections state prison system from 2000 to 2003. Initially proposed DSM-5 criteria had only two diagnostic designations (moderate and severe). A subsequent revision added a mild designation and required a greater number of positive findings for the severe diagnosis. The sample was composed of 7,672 (89.6% male) inmates. Inmates with no DSM-IV diagnoses and most who currently received a cannabis dependence diagnosis according to the DSM-IV guidelines will fit into corresponding DSM-5 categories (i.e., no diagnosis and severe cannabis use disorder, respectively). Some diagnostic criteria, in addition to those proposed for the DSM-5, emerged as cardinal indicators of moderate cannabis use disorder. The study's limitations are noted.

  5. Concordance between gambling disorder diagnoses in the DSM-IV and DSM-5: Results from the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Blanco, Carlos; Jin, Chelsea; Grant, Bridget F

    2014-06-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) eliminates the committing illegal acts criterion and reduces the threshold for a diagnosis of gambling disorder to 4 of 9 criteria. This study compared the DSM-5 "4 of 9" classification system to the "5 of 10" DSM-IV system, as well as other permutations (i.e., just lowing the threshold to 4 criteria or just eliminating the illegal acts criterion) in 43,093 respondents to the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Subgroups were analyzed to ascertain whether changes will impact differentially diagnoses based on gender, age, or race/ethnicity. In the full sample and each subpopulation, prevalence rates were higher when the DSM-5 classification system was employed relative to the DSM-IV system, but the hit rate between the two systems ranged from 99.80% to 99.96%. Across all gender, age, and racial/ethnic subgroups, specificity was greater than 99% when the DSM-5 system was employed relative to the DSM-IV system, and sensitivity was 100%. Results from this study suggest that eliminating the illegal acts criterion has little impact on diagnosis of gambling disorder, but lowering the threshold for diagnosis does increase the base rate in the general population and each subgroup, even though overall rates remain low and sensitivity and specificity are high.

  6. Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment as a Traumatic Stressor in DSM-IV and DSM-5: Prevalence and Relationship to Mental Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrykowski, Michael A; Steffens, Rachel F; Bush, Heather M; Tucker, Thomas C

    2015-06-01

    Little research has examined how lung cancer survivors whose cancer experience met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) traumatic stressor criterion differ with regard to posttreatment mental health status from survivors whose cancer experience did not. No research of which we are aware has examined the impact of the revised DSM-5 traumatic stressor criterion on this question. Non-small-cell (NSC) lung cancer survivors (N = 189) completed a telephone interview and questionnaire assessing distress and growth/benefit-finding. Survivors were categorized into Trauma and No Trauma groups using both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 stressor criterion. Using the DSM-IV criterion, the Trauma group (n = 70) reported poorer status than the No Trauma group (n = 119) on 10 of 10 distress indices (mean ES = 0.57 SD) and better status on all 7 growth/benefit-finding indices (mean ES = 0.30 SD). Using the DSM-5 stressor criterion, differences between the Trauma (n = 108) and No Trauma (n = 81) groups for indices of distress (mean ES = 0.26 SD) and growth/benefit-finding (mean ES = 0.17 SD) were less pronounced. Those who experience cancer as a traumatic stressor show greater distress and growth/benefit-finding, particularly when the more restrictive DSM-IV stressor criterion defines trauma exposure. Copyright © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  7. Concordance between DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for delirium diagnosis in a pooled database of 768 prospectively evaluated patients using the delirium rating scale-revised-98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, David J; Morandi, Alessandro; Inouye, Sharon K; Ely, Wes; Adamis, Dimitrios; Maclullich, Alasdair J; Rudolph, James L; Neufeld, Karin; Leonard, Maeve; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Davis, Daniel; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Kreisel, Stefan; Thomas, Christine; Hasemann, Wolfgang; Timmons, Suzanne; O'Regan, Niamh; Grover, Sandeep; Jabbar, Faiza; Cullen, Walter; Dunne, Colum; Kamholz, Barbara; Van Munster, Barbara C; De Rooij, Sophia E; De Jonghe, Jos; Trzepacz, Paula T

    2014-09-30

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5) provides new criteria for delirium diagnosis. We examined delirium diagnosis using these new criteria compared with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fourth edition (DSM-IV) in a large dataset of patients assessed for delirium and related presentations. Patient data (n = 768) from six prospectively collected cohorts, clinically assessed using DSM-IV and the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R98), were pooled. Post hoc application of DRS-R98 item scores were used to rate DSM-5 criteria. 'Strict' and 'relaxed' DSM-5 criteria to ascertain delirium were compared to rates determined by DSM-IV. Using DSM-IV by clinical assessment, delirium was found in 510/768 patients (66%). Strict DSM-5 criteria categorized 158 as delirious including 155 (30%) with DSM-IV delirium, whereas relaxed DSM-5 criteria identified 466 as delirious, including 455 (89%) diagnosed by DSM-IV (P DSM-IV and the strict DSM-5, 91% (ĸ = 0.82) between the DSM-IV and relaxed DSM-5 criteria and 60% (ĸ = 0.29) between the strict versus relaxed DSM-5 criteria. Only 155 cases were identified as delirium by all three approaches. The 55 (11%) patients with DSM-IV delirium who were not rated as delirious by relaxed criteria had lower mean DRS-R98 total scores than those rated as delirious (13.7 ± 3.9 versus 23.7 ± 6.0; P DSM-5 criteria was consistent with suggested cutoff scores for full syndromal delirium. Only 11 cases met DSM-5 criteria that were not deemed to have DSM-IV delirium. The concordance between DSM-IV and the new DSM-5 delirium criteria varies considerably depending on the interpretation of criteria. Overly-strict adherence for some new text details in DSM-5 criteria would reduce the number of delirium cases diagnosed; however, a more 'relaxed' approach renders DSM-5 criteria comparable to DSM-IV with minimal impact on their actual application and is thus recommended.

  8. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially...

  9. Television Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosh, O.; Wright, E. N.

    The utilization of educational television (ETV) in schools can be ascertained by considering the teacher training in ETV, the extent of access to ETV, the student reaction, and the programing. Using a questionnaire survey method combined with detailed ETV logs, this study was able to analyze both ETV and film utilization in 13 elementary and…

  10. Sexual disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-11: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Megan M; Artz, Lillian; Stein, Dan J

    2015-11-01

    The nature and classification of sexual disorders has been a focus during work on the development of DSM-5 and ICD-11. This article proposes different conceptual approaches to the sexual disorders, including classical, critical and integrative positions. Disorders associated with sexual orientation, gender dysphoria/incongruence and paraphilias/paraphilic disorders are discussed from each of these positions. A range of conventional and nonconventional consensual sexual behaviours are prevalent but not necessarily indicative of a mental disorder; there is little diagnostic validity or clinical utility for including these in the nosology. When such behaviours are clinically excessive and associated with distress or impairment, however, a disorder may be present. Debate surrounds the medicalization of some sexual behaviours that are criminal in nature. The classification of sexual behaviour as disordered is necessarily theory-dependent and value-laden. Nevertheless, reasoned debate about the relevant data and values is possible, and will hopefully further improve the diagnostic validity and clinical utility of psychiatric nosology.

  11. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the

  12. Informing DSM-5: biological boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cosgrove, Victoria E; Suppes, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) opted to retain existing diagnostic boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia...

  13. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-05-17

    Building energy benchmarking is a useful starting point for commercial building owners and operators to target energy savings opportunities. There are a number of tools and methods for benchmarking energy use. Benchmarking based on regional data can provides more relevant information for California buildings than national tools such as Energy Star. This paper discusses issues related to benchmarking commercial building energy use and the development of Cal-Arch, a building energy benchmarking database for California. Currently Cal-Arch uses existing survey data from California's Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), a largely underutilized wealth of information collected by California's major utilities. Doe's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is used by a similar tool, Arch, and by a number of other benchmarking tools. Future versions of Arch/Cal-Arch will utilize additional data sources including modeled data and individual buildings to expand the database.

  14. The Evaluation of Photogrammetry-Based DSM from Low-Cost UAV by LiDAR-Based DSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo Gašparović

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs are flexible to solve various surveying tasks which make them useful in many disciplines, including forestry. The main goal of this research is to evaluate the quality of photogrammetry-based digital surface model (DSM from low-cost UAV’s images collected in non-optimal weather (windy and cloudy weather and environmental (inaccessibility for regular spatial distribution of ground control points - GCPs conditions. Materials and Methods: The UAV-based DSMs without (DSMP and with using GCPs (DSMP-GCP were generated. The vertical agreement assessment of the UAV-based DSMs was conducted by comparing elevations of 60 checkpoints of a regular 100 m sampling grid obtained from LiDAR-based DSM (DSML with the elevations of planimetrically corresponding points obtained from DSMP and DSMP-GCP. Due to the non-normal distribution of residuals (vertical differences between UAV- and LiDAR-based DSMs, a vertical agreement was assessed by using robust measures: median, normalised median absolute deviation (NMAD, 68.3% quantile and 95% quantile. Results: As expected, DSMP-GCP shows higher accuracy, i.e. higher vertical agreement with DSML than DSMP. The median, NMAD, 68.3% quantile, 95% quantile and RMSE* (without outliers values for DSMP are 2.23 m, 3.22 m, 4.34 m, 15.04 m and 5.10 m, respectively, whereas for DSMP-GCP amount to -1.33 m, 2.77 m, 0.11 m, 8.15 m and 3.54 m, respectively. Conclusions: The obtained results confirmed great potential of images obtained by low-cost UAV for forestry applications, even if they are surveyed in non-optimal weather and environmental conditions. This could be of importance for cases when urgent UAV surveys are needed (e.g. detection and estimation of forest damage which do not allow careful and longer survey planning. The vertical agreement assessment of UAV-based DSMs with LiDAR-based DSM confirmed the importance of GCPs for image orientation and DSM generation. Namely

  15. Mental suffering and the DSM-5: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheule, Stijn; Devisch, Ignaas

    2014-12-01

    The definition of mental disorder included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), indicates that mental disorders are usually associated with significant distress. However, the handbook is vague with respect to whether distress is crucial to the diagnosis of mental disorders, and a conceptual framework on the precise nature of distress is lacking. As a result, it remains vague how the term 'distress' is to be taken into account in actual diagnostic situations: the DSM-5 provides no operational framework for diagnosing distress. The authors argue that the work of Georges Canguilhem, who focuses on the topic of abnormality and pathology, and Paul Ricoeur's philosophical reflections on the theme of mental suffering may provide a structure for conceptualizing and evaluating distress. Ricoeur's phenomenological model of mental suffering is discussed. Here, mental suffering can be thought of in terms of the relationship between self and other, and also in terms of the continuum made up by, what he terms, languishing and acting. Ricoeur suggests that distress is not a quantity that can be measured, but a characteristic that should be studied qualitatively in interpersonal and narrative contexts. Consequently, diagnosticians should describe and document how individuals experience subjective distress. On a practical level, this means that clinicians' ideas about patients' distress should be embedded in case formulations. A detailed evaluation of an individual's pathos-experience should be made before conclusions are drawn with regard to diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Psychotic disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Falko; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) was published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 2013, and the Work Group on the Classification of Psychotic disorders (WGPD), installed by the World Health Organization (WHO), is expected to publish the new chapter about schizophrenia and other primary psychotic disorders in 2017. We reviewed the available literature to summarize the major changes, innovations, and developments of both manuals. If available and possible, we outline the theoretical background behind these changes. Due to the fact that the development of ICD-11 has not yet been completed, the details about ICD-11 are still proposals under ongoing revision. In this ongoing process, they may be revised and therefore have to be seen as proposals. DSM-5 has eliminated schizophrenia subtypes and replaced them with a dimensional approach based on symptom assessments. ICD-11 will most likely go in a similar direction, as both manuals are planned to be more harmonized, although some differences will remain in details and the conceptual orientation. Next to these modifications, ICD-11 will provide a transsectional diagnostic criterion for schizoaffective disorders and a reorganization of acute and transient psychotic and delusional disorders. In this manuscript, we will compare the 2 classification systems.

  17. The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johan; Östling, Svante; Waern, Margda; Karlsson, Björn; Sigström, Robert; Guo, Xinxin; Skoog, Ingmar

    2012-11-01

    To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression. During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V. The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate. While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities. 2012 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

  18. Alcohol Use Disorders in Argentinian Girls and Women 12 Months Before Delivery: Comparison of DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-10 Diagnostic Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Mariana B; Conde, Karina; Cremonte, Mariana

    The evidence of important problems related to prenatal alcohol exposure has faced researchers with the problem of understanding and screening alcohol use in this population. Although any alcohol use should be considered risky during pregnancy, identifying alcohol-drinking problems (ADPs) could be especially important because women with ADPs could not benefit from a simple advice of abstinence and because their offsprings are subjected to a higher risk of problems related with prenatal alcohol exposure. In this context, we aim to study the prevalence and characteristics of ADPs in pregnant women, evaluating the performance of different diagnostic systems in this population. The aims of the study were to describe the prevalence of ADPs obtained with the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in its fourth (DSM-IV) and fifth edition (DSM-5), and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10, in Argentinean females aged 13 to 44 years, 12 months before delivery; to evaluate the level of agreement between these classification systems; and to analyze the performance of each diagnosis criterion in this population. Data were collected through personal interviews of a probability sample of puerperal women (N = 641) in the city of Santa Fe (Argentina), between October 2010 and February 2011. Diagnoses compatible with DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ICD-10 were obtained through the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Agreement among diagnostic systems was measured through Cohen kappa. Diagnosis criteria performance were analyzed considering their prevalence and discriminating ability (D value). Total ADP prevalence was 6.4% for DSM-IV (4.2% abuse and 2.2% dependence), 8.1% for DSM-5 (6.4% mild, 0.8% moderate, and 0.9% severe alcohol use disorder), and 14.1% for the ICD-10 (11.9% harmful use and 2.2% dependence). DSM-5 modifications improved agreement between DSM and ICD. The least prevalent and worst discriminating ability diagnostic

  19. Equity and electric power generation facility location in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, E.H. Jr.; Huning, J.R. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Hutchinson, C.F. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA). Office of Arid Lands Studies)

    1985-06-01

    An alternative to cost/benefit analysis for analyzing the equity of electric power generation facility location, utilizing the potential for air quality degradation, is developed and applied to California. Siting issues motivating disagreement on facility location are reviewed. Equity concepts are introduced, and their implementation is discussed. Several measures for assessing the equity of facility location are proposed, and the equities of existing facility locations in California are analyzed for each measure. Equity considerations for future siting decisions are examined.

  20. Demonstrating a small utility approach to demand-side program implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The US DOE awarded a grant to the Burlington Electric Department (B.E.D.) to test a demand-side management (DSM) demonstration program designed to quickly save a significant amount of power with little disruption to the utility's customers or its normal operations. B.E.D. is a small municipal utility located in northern Vermont, with a lengthy history of successful DSM involvement. In our grant application, we proposed to develop a replicable program and approach to DSM that might be useful to other small utilities and to write a report to enable such replication. We believe that this DSM program and/or individual program components are replicable. This report is designed to allow other utilities interested in DSM to replicate this program or specific program design features to meet their DSM goals. We also wanted to use the opportunity of this grant to test the waters of residential heating fuel-switching. We hoped to test the application of one fuel-switching technology, and to benefit from the lessons learned in developing a full-scale DSM program for this end- use. To this end the pilot effort has been very successful. In the pilot pressure we installed direct-vent gas fired space heaters sized as supplemental heating units in 44 residences heated solely by electric resistance heat. We installed the gas space heating units at no cost to the owners or residents. We surveyed participating customers. The results of those surveys are included in this report and preliminary estimates of winter peak capacity load reductions are also noted in this report.

  1. Classification of body dysmorphic disorder - what is the advantage of the new DSM-5 criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; de Zwaan, Martina; Martin, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    In DSM-5 the diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has been subjected to two important changes: Firstly, BDD has been assigned to the category of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Secondly, a new criterion has been defined requiring the presence of repetitive behaviors or mental acts in response to appearance concerns. The aims of this study were to report the prevalence rates of BDD based on a DSM-5 diagnosis, and to evaluate the impact of the recently introduced DSM-5 criteria for BDD by comparing the prevalence rates (DSM-5 vs. BDD-criteria (DSM-IV/DSM-5), dysmorphic concerns, and depressive symptoms, were assessed in a representative sample of the German general population (N=2129, aged 18-65years). The association between BDD case identification based on DSM-IV and DSM-5 was strong (Phi=.95, p<.001), although point prevalence of BDD according to DSM-5 was slightly lower (2.9%, n=62 vs. 3.2%, n=68). Approximately one third of the identified BDD (DSM-5) cases reported time-consuming behavioral acts in response to appearance concerns. In detail, 0.8% of the German general population fulfilled the BDD criteria and reported repetitive acts of at least one hour/day. The revised criteria of BDD in DSM-5 do not seem to have an impact on prevalence rates. However, the recently added B-criterion reflects more precisely the clinical symptoms of BDD, and may be useful for distinguishing between various severity levels related to repetitive behaviors/mental acts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The six most essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis: a pluralogue part 3: issues of utility and alternative approaches in psychiatric diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips James

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1 the nature of a mental disorder; 2 the definition of mental disorder; 3 the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4 the role of pragmatic considerations in the construction of DSM-5; 5 the issue of utility of the DSM – whether DSM-III and IV have been designed more for clinicians or researchers, and how this conflict should be dealt with in the new manual; and 6 the possibility and advisability, given all the problems with DSM-III and IV, of designing a different diagnostic system. Part 1 of this article took up the first two questions. Part 2 took up the second two questions. Part 3 now deals with Questions 5 & 6. Question 5 confronts the issue of utility, whether the manual design of DSM-III and IV favors clinicians or researchers, and what that means for DSM-5. Our final question, Question 6, takes up a concluding issue, whether the acknowledged problems with the earlier DSMs warrants a significant overhaul of DSM-5 and future manuals. As in Parts 1 & 2 of this article, the general introduction, as well as the introductions and conclusions for the specific questions, are written by James Phillips, and the responses to commentaries are written by Allen Frances.

  3. What are 'good' depression symptoms?: Comparing the centrality of DSM and non-DSM symptoms of depression in a network analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fried, E.I; Epskamp, S; Nesse, R.M; Tuerlinckx, F; Borsboom, D

    2016-01-01

    Background The symptoms for Major Depression (MD) defined in the DSM-5 differ markedly from symptoms assessed in common rating scales, and the empirical question about core depression symptoms is unresolved...

  4. California Immigrants Today

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelius, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will focus on the Mexico-origin component of the California immigrant population. Drawing on the results of field studies conducted throughout California and in west-central Mexico during the last ten years,the paper will describe how the profile of Mexican migration to California has changed since the 197Os, suggest explanations for these changes, and discuss their implications for public policy. Effects of the long-running economic crisis in Mexico and of the 1986 U.S. immigra-ti...

  5. The role of Criterion A2 in the DSM-IV diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Elie George; Andrews, Gavin; Bromet, Evelyn; Petukhova, Maria; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Salamoun, Mariana; Sampson, Nancy; Stein, Dan J.; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura Helena; Angermeyer, Matthias; Demyttenaere, Koen; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Kaminer, Debra; Kotov, Roman; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean Pierre; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Browne, Mark A. Oakley; Posada-Villa, José; Sagar, Rajesh; Shalev, Arieh Y.; Takeshima, Tadashi; Tomov, Toma; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Controversy exists about the utility of DSM-IV post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Criterion A2: that exposure to a potentially traumatic experience (PTE; PTSD Criterion A1) is accompanied by intense fear, helplessness, or horror. Methods Lifetime DSM-IV PTSD was assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview in community surveys of 52,826 respondents across 21 countries in the World Mental Health Surveys. Results 37.6% of 28,490 representative PTEs reported by respondents met Criterion A2, a proportion higher than the proportions meeting other criteria (B-F; 5.4-9.6%). Conditional prevalence of meeting all other criteria for a diagnosis of PTSD given a PTE was significantly higher in the presence (9.7%) than absence (0.1%) of A2. However, as only 1.4% of respondents who met all other criteria failed A2, the estimated prevalence of PTSD increased only slightly (from 3.64% to 3.69%) when A2 was not required for diagnosis. PTSD with or without Criterion A2 did not differ in persistence or predicted consequences (subsequent suicidal ideation or secondary disorders) depending on presence-absence of A2. Furthermore, as A2 was by far the most commonly reported symptom of PTSD, initial assessment of A2 would be much less efficient than screening other criteria in quickly ruling out a large proportion of non-cases. Conclusion Removal of A2 from the DSM-IV criterion set would reduce the complexity of diagnosing PTSD while not substantially increasing the number of people who qualify for diagnosis. A2 should consequently be reconceptualized as a risk factor for PTSD rather than as a diagnostic requirement. PMID:20599189

  6. Executive functions as a potential neurocognitive endophenotype in anxiety disorders: A systematic review considering DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnostic criteria classification

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana de Lima Muller; Kamilla Irigaray Torquato; Gisele Gus Manfro; Clarissa Marceli Trentini

    2015-01-01

    Evidence in the literature indicates that neurocognitive impairments may represent endophenotypes in psychiatric disorders.Objective:This study aimed to conduct a systematic review on executive functions as a potential neurocognitive endophenotype in anxiety disorder diagnosis according to the DSM-IV and DSM-5 classifications.Methods:A literature search of the LILACS, Cochrane Library, Index Psi Periódicos Técnico-Científicos, PubMed and PsycInfo databases was conducted, with no time limits. ...

  7. Reassessment of patients with Eating Disorders after moving from DSM-IV towards DSM-5: a retrospective study in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualandi, Malvina; Simoni, Marzia; Manzato, Emilia; Scanelli, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    To compare the relative prevalence of eating disorders moving from DSM-IV to DSM-5, and to reassess the overall medical impairment in the revised diagnostic classes. We applied DSM-5 to 206 patients (age 15-56 years) previously studied and classified according to DSM-IV. Medical impairment was classified as low, medium, or high, based on a cumulative score of clinical severity (SCS), computed as the sum of specific weights assigned to different pathological conditions and their ascertained prognostic impact. Application of DSM-5 produced a decrease in Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) by 17 %, an increase in anorexia (AN) by 14 % and bulimia (BN) by 2.4 %; 44.6 % of EDNOS migrated to AN, 8 % to BN, and 30.8 % was reclassified as Other Specified Feeding and Eating Disorders (OSFED). Mean SCS was higher in AN than in other diagnoses independent of classification. Differently from EDNOS, no high score was found in OSFED. BMI (OR 0.74, 95 % CI 0.56-0.98) and duration of amenorrhea >1 year (OR 6.63, 95 % CI 1.29-34.16) resulted significantly associated with the risk for medium-high SCS level in AN classified with DSM-5. The results confirmed that DSM-5 reduces the number of EDNOS. DSM-5 seems to better represent the clinical picture in OSFED than in EDNOS. The clinical relevance of BMI and duration of amenorrhea should be considered even more now that they are no longer used as diagnostic hallmarks of AN.

  8. Alcohol use disorder diagnoses in the criminal justice system: an analysis of the compatibility of current DSM-IV, proposed DSM-5.0, and DSM-5.1 diagnostic criteria in a correctional sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopak, Albert M; Metze, Amanda V; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2014-06-01

    This study explored the compatibility between the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence with the initial (DSM-5.0) and most recent (DSM-5.1) proposed diagnostic criteria. Data drawn from a structured clinical interview used in the assessment of 6,871 male and 801 female state prison inmates were analyzed according to the existing and proposed diagnostic formulations. The greatest congruence was observed in cases that received no diagnosis according to the DSM-IV-TR because these also received no diagnosis in the DSM-5.1. Most cases with a current dependence diagnosis received a severe designation according to the proposed criteria. However, those with an abuse diagnosis were divided across various DSM-5.1 severity levels. Some diagnostic criteria were nearly universally endorsed among those classified with the highest severity levels, which indicated that some criteria may serve as cardinal indicators of a severe alcohol use disorder (SAUD). Additional diagnostic criteria not yet suggested for inclusion in the DSM (i.e., preoccupation with alcohol use and alcohol use to relieve emotional distress) were also evaluated. Evidence demonstrated these two criteria served as functional indicators of alcohol use disorder (AUD). This assessment approach can be used to establish appropriate treatment objectives based on the severity of diagnosed AUDs. Meeting these treatment objectives, especially in a correctional population, may have important implications for future offending. Recommendations are made for prospective research in this area.

  9. The Clinical Features of Paranoia in the 20th Century and Their Representation in Diagnostic Criteria From DSM-III Through DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2017-03-01

    This review traces, through psychiatric textbooks, the history of the Kraepelinian concept of paranoia in the 20th century and then relates the common reported symptoms and signs to the diagnostic criteria for paranoia/delusional disorder in DSM-III through DSM-5. Clinical descriptions of paranoia appearing in 10 textbooks, published 1899 to 1970, revealed 11 prominent symptoms and signs reported by 5 or more authors. Three symptoms (systematized delusions, minimal hallucinations, and prominent ideas of reference) and 2 signs (chronic course and minimal affective deterioration) were reported by 8 or 9 of the authors. Four textbook authors rejected the Kraepelinian concept of paranoia. A weak relationship was seen between the frequency with which the clinical features were reported and the likelihood of their inclusion in modern DSM manuals. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for paranoia/delusional disorder shifted substantially from DSM-III to DSM-5. The modern operationalized criteria for paranoia/delusional disorder do not well reflect the symptoms and signs frequently reported by historical experts. In contrast to results of similar reviews for depression, schizophrenia and mania, the clinical construct of paranoia/delusional disorder has been somewhat unstable in Western Psychiatry since the turn of the 20th century as reflected in both textbooks and the DSM editions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. DSM-5 criteria for PTSD in parents of pediatric patients with epilepsy: What are the changes with respect to DSM-IV-TR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmassi, Claudia; Corsi, Martina; Gesi, Camilla; Bertelloni, Carlo Antonio; Faggioni, Francesco; Calderani, Enrico; Massimetti, Gabriele; Saggese, Giuseppe; Bonuccelli, Alice; Orsini, Alessandro; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2017-05-01

    Increasing literature suggests the need to explore for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and post-traumatic stress symptoms in parents and caregivers of children with acute and chronic illnesses but scant data are available on epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to estimate full and partial PTSD rates among parents of children with epilepsy comparing DSM-5 and DSM-IV-TR criteria. Further, the aim of the present study was to examine possible gender differences between mothers and fathers. Results showed 9.1% and 12.1% PTSD rates in the total sample, according to DSM-5 or DSM-IV-TR criteria, respectively, with an overall consistency of 92.9% (Kohen's K=0.628, p=.453). Significant gender differences emerged for Avoidance/Numbing and Hyperarousal symptoms diagnosed by means of DSM-IV-TR criteria, as well as for Negative alterations in cognitions/mood and Hyperarousal symptoms, when adopting DSM-5 criteria. This study underscores the relevance of detecting PTSD in parents of children with a chronic illness such as epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Social anxiety disorder: questions and answers for the DSM-V

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogels, S.M.; Stein, M.; Alden, L.; Beidel, D.C.; Clark, L.A.; Pine, D.S.; Stein, M.B.; Voncken, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This review evaluates the DSM-IV criteria of social anxiety disorder (SAD), with a focus on the generalized specifier and alternative specifiers, the considerable overlap between the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for SAD and avoidant personality disorder, and developmental issues. Method: A

  12. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Do Not Help Support DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Janssen, Joost; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aims to determine whether or not structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data support the DSM-5 proposal of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic category, and whether or not classical DSM-IV autistic disorder (AD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) categories should be subsumed into it. The most replicated sMRI findings…

  13. Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder: Who Will Get a DSM-5 Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Rachel G.; Carrington, Sarah J.; Le Couteur, Ann; Gould, Judith; Wing, Lorna; Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina; Leekam, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Introduction of proposed criteria for DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has raised concerns that some individuals currently meeting diagnostic criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD; DSM-IV-TR/ICD- 10) will not qualify for a diagnosis under the proposed changes. To date, reports of sensitivity and specificity of the new…

  14. How Will DSM-5 Affect Autism Diagnosis? A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M.; Smaldone, Arlene M.; Cohn, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effect of changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-5 on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and explore policy implications. We identified 418 studies; 14 met inclusion criteria. Studies consistently reported decreases in ASD diagnosis (range 7.3-68.4%) using DSM-5…

  15. Giving Voice to the Trans Community on GID Reform in the "DSM-5": A Saskatchewan Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jai T.

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of the diagnosis of gender identity disorder (GID) within the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") is a contentious issue. A summary of the arguments for retention, removal, or reform of the diagnosis in the "DSM-5" is presented. A qualitative study with 7 individuals from…

  16. Sensitivity and Specificity of Proposed "DSM-5" Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James C.; Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the potential impact of proposed "DSM-5" diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method: The study focused on a sample of 933 participants evaluated during the "DSM-IV" field trial; 657 carried a clinical diagnosis of an ASD, and 276 were diagnosed with a non-autistic disorder. Sensitivity and…

  17. Testing the Construct Validity of Proposed Criteria for "DSM-5" Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, William P. L.; Charman, Tony; Skuse, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To use confirmatory factor analysis to test the construct validity of the proposed "DSM-5" symptom model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), in comparison to alternative models, including that described in "DSM-IV-TR." Method: Participants were 708 verbal children and young persons (mean age, 9.5 years) with mild to severe autistic…

  18. Autism Spectrum Disorder in the DSM-5: Diagnostic Sensitivity and Specificity in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansz, Jessica A.; Gray, Kylie M.; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    Changes to the DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) criteria raised concerns among parents and practitioners that the criteria may exclude some children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). Few studies have examined DSM-5 sensitivity and specificity in children less than 5 years of age. This study evaluated 185 children aged 20-55 months…

  19. 77 FR 71750 - DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of petition. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that DSM Nutritional Products has filed a...

  20. 78 FR 77384 - DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of petition. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that DSM Nutritional Products has filed a...

  1. The Bulimia Test--Revised: Validation with "DSM-IV" Criteria for Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Bulimia Test--Revised (BULIT-R) was given to 23 female subjects who met the criteria for bulimia in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-IV) and 124 female controls. The BULIT-R appears to be a valid instruction for identifying individuals who meet DSM-IV criteria for bulimia. (SLD)

  2. Assessment of High School Students' Understanding of DSM-IV-MR-J Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Amelie; Ladouceur, Robert; Fortin, Josee-Melanie; Ferland, Francine

    2004-01-01

    The current study examines the understanding of the DSM-IV-MR-J items to assess pathological gambling among adolescents aged 12 to 15, and explores its accuracy. The DSM-IV-MR-J was first administered in the classroom. Participants were assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Participants in the first group were asked to explain the…

  3. Research Review: DSM-V Conduct Disorder--Research Needs for an Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R.; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C.; Odgers, Candice L.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Viding, Essi

    2008-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to…

  4. An Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelhorn, Heather; Hartman, Christie; Sakai, Joseph; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan; Rhee, Soo; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John; Hopfer, Christian; Crowley, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Interviews with over 3,000 adolescents were made to evaluate the extent to which DSM-IV criteria characterizes the range of severity of adolescent antisocial behavior within and across sex. The DSM-IV conduct disorder (CD) criteria are a useful indicator of severe adolescent antisocial behavior but some CD criteria display sex bias.

  5. Validation of DSM-IV Model of Psychiatric Syndromes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecavalier, Luc; Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Edwards, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the internal construct validity of the DSM-IV as a conceptual model for characterizing behavioral syndromes in children with ASD. Parent and teachers completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4, a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale, for 6-to-12 year old clinic referrals with an ASD (N = 498). Ratings were…

  6. The New Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders: Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeffrey S.; Risler, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the new alternative "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", fifth edition (DSM-5) model for personality disorders (PDs) as it is seen by its creators and critics. Method: Follow the DSM revision process by monitoring the American Psychiatric Association website and the publication of pertinent journal…

  7. Prevalence and Severity of DSM-5 Eating Disorders in a Community Cohort of Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, Frederique R. E.; van Hoeken, Daphne; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Hoek, Hans W.

    Objective: The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes a considerably revised eating disorder section. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence and severity of eating disorders based on the new DSM-5 criteria in a community cohort of

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239, a Potential Psychrophilic Chemical Producer through Syngas Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Soonkyu; Song, Yoseb; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2015-09-24

    Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239 is an anaerobic, psychrophilic, and chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that is a potential platform for producing commodity chemicals from syngas fermentation. We report here the draft genome sequence of A. bakii DSM 8239 (4.14 Mb) to elucidate its physiological and metabolic properties related to syngas fermentation. Copyright © 2015 Hwang et al.

  9. A genetic perspective on the proposed inclusion of cannabis withdrawal in DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.; Agrawal, A.; Nat, N.O.; Creemers, H.E.; Huizink, A.C.; Martin, N.G.; Lynskey, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Various studies support the inclusion of cannabis withdrawal in the diagnosis of cannabis use disorder (CUD) in the upcoming DSM-5. The aims of the current study were to (1) estimate the prevalence of DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal (criterion B), (2) estimate the role of genetic and

  10. Wildfires Rage in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Large plumes of smoke rising from devastating wildfires burning near Los Angeles and San Diego on Sunday, October 26, 2003, are highlighted in this set of images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). These images include a natural color view from MISR's nadir camera (left) and an automated stereo height retrieval (right). The tops of the smoke plumes range in altitude from 500 - 3000 meters, and the stereo retrieval clearly differentiates the smoke from patches of high-altitude cirrus. Plumes are apparent from fires burning near the California-Mexico border, San Diego, Camp Pendleton, the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains, and in and around Simi Valley. The majority of the smoke is coming from the fires near San Diego and the San Bernardino Mountains.The Multiangle Imaging Spectro Radiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 20510. The panels cover an area of 329 kilometers x 543 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 62 to 66 within World Reference System-2 path 40.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  11. Understanding sexual, paraphilic, and gender dysphoria disorders in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFeo, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    With every Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders that has been published, there has been controversy within controversy; however, what appears to be lacking is the importance of truly understanding what, why, and how the changes impact the community at large. Issues such as homosexuality, the five axial diagnostic system, and transitioning from a medical model to a biopsychosocial model have been hot topics that have led clinicians to challenge the reliability and validity of the manual throughout history. As clinicians and medical professionals, it is important to objectively look at the manual and become educated on how and why these changes exist. With that being said, this commentary aims to challenge the article " Problems with the Sexual Disorders Sections of DSM-5" by Colin A. Ross (2015). The structure of this commentary purposefully mirrors the structure of the commentary that it is challenging.

  12. Parental alienation, DSM-5, and ICD-11: response to critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, William; Baker, Amy J L

    2013-01-01

    There has been considerable interest among forensic practitioners in the proposals that parental alienation be included in the next editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases (DSM) and The International Classification of Diseases (ICD). However, there has also been a great deal of misunderstanding about the proposals, and misinformation has been expressed in professional meetings, on websites, and in journal articles. In this article we address four common misunderstandings regarding parental alienation: that there is a lack of research to support it as a diagnosis; that adopting parental alienation as a diagnosis will lead to serious adverse consequences; that the advocates of parental alienation are driven by self-serving or malevolent motives; and that Richard Gardner should be criticized for self-publishing his description of parental alienation syndrome.

  13. Gambling disorder, DSM-5 criteria and symptom severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.; Chamberlain, Samuel R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Gambling disorder (GD) is a prevalent psychiatric condition whose severity is typically defined by the number of DSM-5 criteria met out of a maximum of nine. The relationships between the levels of gambling severity, thus defined, and other measures of psychopathology and everyday...... of variance models. Results: The sample included 574 adults with GD, of whom 73 (12.7%) had mild, 184 (32.1%) moderate, and 317 (55.2%) severe GD. The moderate and severe cases, compared to mild severity group tended be older, had later age of onset, lost more money to gambling in the preceding year, had...... for Pathological Gambling (PG-YBOCS) discriminated significantly between all three groups. Conclusions: Several measures of psychopathology and functional impact of gambling symptoms appear similar between moderate and severe GD cases, while mild cases are clearly differentiated from moderate and severe cases...

  14. Expanding the definition of addiction: DSM-5 vs. ICD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2016-08-01

    While considerable efforts have been made to understand the neurobiological basis of substance addiction, the potentially "addictive" qualities of repetitive behaviors, and whether such behaviors constitute "behavioral addictions," is relatively neglected. It has been suggested that some conditions, such as gambling disorder, compulsive stealing, compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, and problem Internet use, have phenomenological and neurobiological parallels with substance use disorders. This review considers how the issue of "behavioral addictions" has been handled by latest revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), leading to somewhat divergent approaches. We also consider key areas for future research in order to address optimal diagnostic classification and treatments for such repetitive, debilitating behaviors.

  15. Genome sequencing and annotation of Amycolatopsis azurea DSM 43854T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Khatri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the 9.2 Mb genome of the azureomycin A and B antibiotic producing strain Amycolatopsis azurea isolated from a Japanese soil sample. The draft genome of strain DSM 43854T consists of 9,223,451 bp with a G + C content of 69.0% and the genome contains 3 rRNA genes (5S–23S–16S and 58 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. The homology searches revealed that the PKS gene clusters are supposed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of naptomycin, macbecin, rifamycin, mitomycin, maduropeptin enediyne, neocarzinostatin enediyne, C-1027 enediyne, calicheamicin enediyne, landomycin, simocyclinone, medermycin, granaticin, polyketomycin, teicoplanin, balhimycin, vancomycin, staurosporine, rubradirin and complestatin.

  16. Bipolar and related disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenboeck, Alexander; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried

    2016-08-01

    Bipolar disorders are a group of psychiatric disorders with profound negative impact on affected patients. Even if their symptomatology has long been recognized, diagnostic criteria have changed over time and diagnosis often remains difficult. The Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), issued in May 2013, comprises several changes regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorders compared to the previous edition. Diagnostic categories and criteria for bipolar disorders show some concordance with the internationally also widely used Tenth Edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). However, there are also major differences that are worth highlighting. The aim of the following text is to depict and discuss those.

  17. A DSM-based framework for integrated function modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisenbart, Boris; Gericke, Kilian; Blessing, Lucienne T. M.

    2017-01-01

    an integrated function modelling framework, which specifically aims at relating between the different function modelling perspectives prominently addressed in different disciplines. It uses interlinked matrices based on the concept of DSM and MDM in order to facilitate cross-disciplinary modelling and analysis......Function modelling is proposed in the literature from different disciplines, in interdisciplinary approaches, and used in practice with the intention of facilitating system conceptualisation. However, function models across disciplines are largely diverse addressing different function modelling...... of the functionality of a system. The article further presents the application of the framework based on a product example. Finally, an empirical study in industry is presented. Therein, feedback on the potential of the proposed framework to support interdisciplinary design practice as well as on areas of further...

  18. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  19. University of Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The focus of the University of Southern California (USC) Children''s Environmental Health Center is to develop a better understanding of how host susceptibility and...

  20. California Data Exchange Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make July &28;Water Smart Month.&29; &28;Conserving ... Remote sensors today indicate that statewide, snowpack water content is 54 percent of ... California ranked first, along with Texas, on ...

  1. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  2. Kelp distribution off California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set delineates kelp beds (Nereocystis leutkeana and Macrocystis spp.) along the Pacific Coast of California. Multiple years of kelp mapping data for the...

  3. California Harpoon Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vessel logbook and landings data from harpoon vessels that fish within 200 miles of the California coast, from 1974 to present. The harpoon...

  4. Earthquakes in Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There have been many earthquake occurrences in Southern California. This set of slides shows earthquake damage from the following events: Imperial Valley, 1979,...

  5. California Watershed Hydrologic Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is intended to be used as a tool for water-resource management and planning activities, particularly for site-specific and localized studies requiring a...

  6. Perspectivas e principais alterações no DSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Bandeira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: com o avanço das pesquisas em neurobiologia e a necessidade de optimização dos critérios diagnósticos, a 5ª edição do Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico de Transtornos Mentais (DSM-5 realizou importantes mudanças no modo de classificar, catalogar e diagnosticar as doenças mentais. Material e métodos: empreendemos pesquisa de artigos na Pubmed com análises sob diferentes perspectivas com o propósito de obter uma ampla visão das limitações e conquistas com sua publicação. Desenvolvimento: a nova edição do manual efetuou inúmeras alterações em relação à anterior, como a mudança do sistema de classificação multiaxial para dimensional, a fim de melhor abordar os sintomas como um continuum de intensidade, e a elaboração de critérios com maior especificidade para reduzir os diagnósticos “sem outra especificação”. Por fim, citamos o projeto Research Domain Criteria Project (RDoC, ressaltando o contexto e os motivos de sua criação em torno do DSM-5. Conclusão: a atualização conseguiu apenas parcialmente seu objetivo de adotar amplamente o sistema dimensional e não obteve sucesso em incluir critérios genéticos ou neurobiológicos. Contudo, sua possibilidade de contínua revisão possibilita que seja renovada de acordo com as descobertas relevantes.

  7. Attitudes toward orthorexia nervosa relative to DSM-5 eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Courtney C; Mazzeo, Suzanne E

    2017-07-01

    A pattern of disordered eating involving a pathological fixation with healthy food consumption, labeled orthorexia nervosa (ON), has recently generated attention; however, research has not yet investigated perceptions of ON-related behaviors. This study examined potential stigmatization of ON, compared with DSM-5 ED diagnoses. Participants (N = 505) were randomly assigned to read a vignette depicting a woman with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge-eating disorder (BED), or ON. They then answered questions about the individual depicted in the vignette. A series of MANOVAs investigated whether opinions and beliefs about the person depicted varied as a function of the disorder described in the vignette. Individuals with ON were perceived as less likely to "improve with treatment" than individuals with BN, and less likely to "pull themselves together," than individuals with BED. Individuals with ON and AN were viewed as "hard[er] to talk to" and more of a "danger to others" compared with individuals with BED. ON was viewed as less distressing, less likely to evoke sympathy, and more acceptable than the other disorders. Finally, "poor living choices" were perceived as contributing more substantially to ON. Participants' attributions of various personality characteristics did not differ based on ED diagnosis. Results suggest that ON is viewed as less severe, more desirable, and more often the result of personal life choices. However, findings also imply that ON is associated with stigma, similar to DSM-5 EDs. These negative attitudes might reinforce ON behaviors, and limit awareness of their potential complications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Autism Spectrum Disorder and DSM-5: Spectrum or Cluster?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Xaver; Freiberger, Verena; Greulich, Heide; Blank, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Within the new DSM-5, the currently differentiated subgroups of "Autistic Disorder" (299.0), "Asperger's Disorder" (299.80) and "Pervasive Developmental Disorder" (299.80) are replaced by the more general "Autism Spectrum Disorder". With regard to a patient-oriented and expedient advising therapy planning, however, the issue of an empirically reproducible and clinically feasible differentiation into subgroups must still be raised. Based on two Autism-rating-scales (ASDS and FSK), an exploratory two-step cluster analysis was conducted with N=103 children (age: 5-18) seen in our social-pediatric health care centre to examine potentially autistic symptoms. In the two-cluster solution of both rating scales, mainly the problems in social communication grouped the children into a cluster "with communication problems" (51 % and 41 %), and a cluster "without communication problems". Within the three-cluster solution of the ASDS, sensory hypersensitivity, cleaving to routines and social-communicative problems generated an "autistic" subgroup (22%). The children of the second cluster ("communication problems", 35%) were only described by social-communicative problems, and the third group did not show any problems (38%). In the three-cluster solution of the FSK, the "autistic cluster" of the two-cluster solution differentiated in a subgroup with mainly social-communicative problems (cluster 1) and a second subgroup described by restrictive, repetitive behavior. The different cluster solutions will be discussed with a view to the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, for following studies a further specification of some of the ASDS and FSK items could be helpful.

  9. Potential Impact of DSM-5 Criteria on Autism Spectrum Disorder Prevalence Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenner, Matthew J.; Rice, Catherine E.; Arneson, Carrie L.; Cunniff, Christopher; Schieve, Laura A.; Carpenter, Laura A.; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Kirby, Russell S.; Bakian, Amanda V.; Durkin, Maureen S.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The DSM-5 contains revised diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the DSM-IV-TR. Potential impacts of the new criteria on ASD prevalence are unclear. OBJECTIVE To assess potential effects of the DSM-5 ASD criteria on ASD prevalence estimation by retrospectively applying the new criteria to population-based surveillance data collected for previous ASD prevalence estimation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional, population-based ASD surveillance based on clinician review of coded behaviors documented in children’s medical and educational evaluations from 14 geographically defined areas in the United States participating in the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network in 2006 and 2008. This study included 8-year-old children living in ADDM Network study areas in 2006 or 2008, including 644 883 children under surveillance, of whom 6577 met surveillance ASD case status based on the DSM-IV-TR. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Proportion of children meeting ADDM Network ASD criteria based on the DSM-IV-TR who also met DSM-5 criteria; overall prevalence of ASD using DSM-5 criteria. RESULTS Among the 6577 children classified by the ADDM Network as having ASD based on the DSM-IV-TR, 5339 (81.2%) met DSM-5 ASD criteria. This percentage was similar for boys and girls but higher for those with than without intellectual disability (86.6% and 72.5%, respectively; P DSM-5 ASD criteria but not current ADDM Network ASD case status. Based on these findings, ASD prevalence per 1000 for 2008 would have been 10.0 (95% CI, 9.6–10.3) using DSM-5 criteria compared with the reported prevalence based on DSM-IV-TR criteria of 11.3 (95% CI, 11.0–11.7). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Autism spectrum disorder prevalence estimates will likely be lower under DSM-5 than under DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria, although this effect could be tempered by future adaptation of diagnostic practices and documentation of behaviors to fit the new

  10. [Impact of DSM-5: Application and Problems Based on Clinical and Research Viewpoints on Anxiety Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioiri, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the impact of DSM-5 has been greater than we had imagined. The Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology organized a group for translation and the members spent many hours in this volunteer effort over a 2-year period. This highlights the significance of and expectations for DSM-5 in clinical practice in Japan. Regarding anxiety disorders, the highlights of changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 are as follows. Firstly, the DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorder no longer includes obsessive-compulsive disorder (which is included with obsessive-compulsive and related disorders) or posttraumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder(which are included with trauma- and stressor-related disorders). However, the sequential order of these chapters in DSM-5 reflects the close relationships among them. Secondly, in DSM-IV, selective mutism and separation anxiety disorder were classified in the section "Disorders Usually First Diagnosed in Infancy, Childhood, or Adolescence." They are now classified as an anxiety disorder. Through these two changes, at the beginning of the chapter, it can be clearly noted that anxiety disorders include disorders that share features of excessive fear and anxiety and related behavioral disturbances. Thirdly, panic disorder and agoraphobia are not associated in DSM-5. Thus, the former DSM-IV diagnoses of panic disorder with agoraphobia, panic disorder without agoraphobia, and agoraphobia without a history of panic disorder are now replaced by two diagnoses, panic disorder and agoraphobia, each with separate criteria. The co-occurrence of panic disorder and agoraphobia is now coded with two diagnoses. This change recognizes that a marked number of individuals with agoraphobia do not experience panic symptoms. For the present, this change ends the. controversy over the hierarchy between panic disorder and agoraphobia. The diagnostic criteria for agoraphobia are derived from the DSM-IV descriptors for agoraphobia, although the clarification

  11. How Do DSM-5 Personality Traits Align With Schema Therapy Constructs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Bo; Lee, Christopher; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Simonsen, Erik

    2016-08-01

    DSM-5 offers an alternative model of personality pathology that includes 25 traits. Although personality disorders are mostly treated with psychotherapy, the correspondence between DSM-5 traits and concepts in evidence-based psychotherapy has not yet been evaluated adequately. Suitably, schema therapy was developed for treating personality disorders, and it has achieved promising evidence. The authors examined associations between DSM-5 traits and schema therapy constructs in a mixed sample of 662 adults, including 312 clinical participants. Associations were investigated in terms of factor loadings and regression coefficients in relation to five domains, followed by specific correlations among all constructs. The results indicated conceptually coherent associations, and 15 of 25 traits were strongly related to relevant schema therapy constructs. Conclusively, DSM-5 traits may be considered expressions of schema therapy constructs, which psychotherapists might take advantage of in terms of case formulation and targets of treatment. In turn, schema therapy constructs add theoretical understanding to DSM-5 traits.

  12. Clinical consequences of the revised DSM-5 definition of agoraphobia in treatment-seeking anxious youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchio, Danielle; Chou, Tommy; Sacks, Hayley; Pincus, Donna; Comer, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background In DSM-5, the agoraphobia core symptom criterion has been revised to require fear about multiple situations from across at least two distinct domains in which escape might be difficult or panic-like symptoms might develop. The present study examined patterns and correlates of the recent change in a sample of anxious youth with symptom presentations consistent with the DSM-IV agoraphobia definition and/or specific phobia (SP) to consider how the recent diagnostic change impacts the prevalence and composition of agoraphobia in children and adolescents. Method Analyses (N=151) evaluated impairment and correlates of agoraphobic youth who no longer meet the DSM-5 agoraphobia criteria relative to agoraphobic youth who do meet the new DSM-5 criteria. Secondary analyses compared agoraphobic youth not meeting DSM-5 criteria to SP youth. Results One-quarter of youth with symptom presentations consistent with the DSM-IV agoraphobia definition no longer met criteria for DSM-5 agoraphobia, but showed comparable severity and impairment across most domains to youth who do meet criteria for DSM-5 agoraphobia. Further, these youth showed higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and internalizing psychopathology relative to youth with SP. Conclusions A substantial proportion of impaired youth with considerable agoraphobic symptom presentations have been left without a specified anxiety diagnosis by the DSM-5, which may affect their ability to receive and/or get coverage for services and their representation in treatment evaluations. Future DSM iterations may do well to include a “circumscribed” agoraphobia specifier that would characterize presentations of fear or anxiety about multiple situations, but that do not span across at least two distinct situational domains. PMID:25845579

  13. Craving as a DSM-5 Symptom of Alcohol Use Disorder in Non-Treatment Seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Emily E; Ray, Lara A

    2017-11-14

    DSM-5 has added craving as a new criterion and changed the diagnostic structure of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Though craving has long been a target of intervention, less is known about the impact this addition will have on prevalence and factor structure of AUD, particularly in non-treatment seeker with alcohol problems. Non-treatment seeking individuals reporting alcohol-related problems (N = 296) completed a structured clinical interview and the Penn Alcohol Craving Scale (PACS). PACS scores greater than 20 were considered to meet diagnostic criteria for the alcohol craving symptom. This study examined DSM-IV to DSM-5 diagnostic conversion and conducted an exploratory factor analysis to test the factor structure of the DSM-5 symptoms, including craving. The mean PACS score was 13.1 and alcohol craving was strongly correlated with other measures of alcohol use. Using the proposed cut-off score of PACS > 20, 46 participants (16.2%) met criteria for alcohol craving. Craving loaded moderately (0.47) onto the retained DSM symptoms and produced a unidimensional factor structure. The majority of participants who met for a DSM-IV AUD also met for a DSM-5 AUD (98.8%). Craving prevalence using the PACS was relatively low compared to the remaining 10 DSM-5 symptoms, possibly due to the non-treatment seeking nature of the sample. Conversion of DSM-IV to DSM-5 in this sample led to a small increase in overall AUD prevalence. Craving loaded well onto a single factor structure for AUD.

  14. CLINICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE REVISED DSM-5 DEFINITION OF AGORAPHOBIA IN TREATMENT-SEEKING ANXIOUS YOUTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchio, Danielle; Chou, Tommy; Sacks, Hayley; Pincus, Donna; Comer, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    In DSM-5, the agoraphobia core symptom criterion has been revised to require fear about multiple situations from across at least two distinct domains in which escape might be difficult or panic-like symptoms might develop. The present study examined patterns and correlates of the recent change in a sample of anxious youth with symptom presentations consistent with the DSM-IV agoraphobia definition and/or specific phobia (SP) to consider how the recent diagnostic change impacts the prevalence and composition of agoraphobia in children and adolescents. Analyses (N = 151) evaluated impairment and correlates of agoraphobic youth who no longer meet the DSM-5 agoraphobia criteria relative to agoraphobic youth who do meet the new DSM-5 criteria. Secondary analyses compared agoraphobic youth not meeting DSM-5 criteria to SP youth. One-quarter of youth with symptom presentations consistent with the DSM-IV agoraphobia definition no longer met criteria for DSM-5 agoraphobia, but showed comparable severity and impairment across most domains to youth who do meet criteria for DSM-5 agoraphobia. Further, these youth showed higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and internalizing psychopathology relative to youth with SP. A substantial proportion of impaired youth with considerable agoraphobic symptom presentations have been left without a specified anxiety diagnosis by the DSM-5, which may affect their ability to receive and/or get coverage for services and their representation in treatment evaluations. Future DSM iterations may do well to include a "circumscribed" agoraphobia specifier that would characterize presentations of fear or anxiety about multiple situations, but that do not span across at least two distinct situational domains. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Pathological personality traits can capture DSM-IV personality disorder types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua D; Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; MacKillop, James

    2015-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) includes an alternative diagnostic approach to the assessment of personality disorders (PDs) in Section III with the aim of stimulating further research. Diagnosis of a PD using this approach is predicated on the presence of personality impairment and pathological personality traits. The types of traits present (e.g., callousness vs. emotional lability) are used to derive DSM-IV PD scores. Concerns have been raised, however, that such a trait-based approach will yield PD constructs that differ substantially from those generated using the approaches articulated in previous iterations of the DSM. We empirically examined this issue in a sample of 109 adults who were currently receiving mental health treatment. More specifically, we examined the correlations between interview-based PD scores derived from DSM-IV to DSM-5 PD trait counts, and tested them in relation to the 30 specific facets of the five-factor model, as well as internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Overall, the DSM-IV PD scores and DSM-5 PD trait counts correlated significantly with one another (Mr = .63), demonstrated similar patterns of interrelations among the PDs, and manifested highly similar patterns of correlations with general personality traits and symptoms of psychopathology. These results indicate that the DSM-5 PD trait counts specified in the alternative DSM-5 PD diagnostic approach capture the same constructs as those measured using the more traditional DSM-IV diagnostic system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Measurement of DSM-5 section II personality disorder constructs using the MMPI-2-RF in clinical and forensic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Pymont, Carly; Smid, Wineke; De Saeger, Hilde; Kamphuis, Jan H

    2015-09-01

    In the current study, we evaluated the associations between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) scale scores and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) Section II personality disorder (PD) criterion counts in inpatient and forensic psychiatric samples from The Netherlands using structured clinical interviews to operationalize PDs. The inpatient psychiatric sample included 190 male and female patients and the forensic sample included 162 male psychiatric patients. We conducted correlation and count regression analyses to evaluate the utility of relevant MMPI-2-RF scales in predicting PD criterion count scores. Generally, results from these analyses emerged as conceptually expected and provided evidence that MMPI-2-RF scales can be useful in assessing PDs. At the zero-order level, most hypothesized associations between Section II disorders and MMPI-2-RF scales were supported. Similarly, in the regression analyses, a unique set of predictors emerged for each PD that was generally in line with conceptual expectations. Additionally, the results provided general evidence that PDs can be captured by dimensional psychopathology constructs, which has implications for both DSM-5 Section III specifically and the personality psychopathology literature more broadly. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. 27 ways to meet PTSD: Using the PTSD-checklist for DSM-5 to examine PTSD core criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, C Laurel; Raines, Amanda M; Cuccurullo, Lisa-Ann J; Chambliss, Jessica L; Maieritsch, Kelly P; Tompkins, A Madison; Walton, Jessica L

    2018-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been criticized for including symptoms that substantially overlap with other depression and anxiety disorders. To address this concern, Brewin et al. (2009) reformulated the diagnosis around a core symptom set. Although several studies have examined the utility of the core criteria in predicting diagnostic status, none have done so using a self-report screening instrument. The sample included 617 veterans presenting for outpatient psychological services. As a part of the intake process, veterans completed the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) and were assessed using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5). Veterans meeting core criteria on the PCL-5 were over 22 times more likely to meet PCL-5 diagnosed PTSD than veterans who met the core criteria on the PCL-5 but did not meet PCL-5 diagnosed PTSD (OR = 22.94; CI [12.76, 41.25]). Further, veterans who met core criteria on the PCL-5 were over 2 times more likely (OR = 2.34; 95.0% CI [1.53, 3.59]) to meet CAPS-5 diagnosed PTSD than veterans who met the core criteria on the PCL-5 but did not meet CAPS-5 diagnosed PTSD. Findings from the current study have implications for the assessment and classification of PTSD. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. DSM-5 cannabis use disorder, substance use and DSM-5 specific substance-use disorders: Evaluating comorbidity in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Amie C; Stough, Con; Downey, Luke A

    2017-08-01

    Cannabis use disorder (CUD) is frequently associated with concurrent substance use and/or comorbid substance use disorders (SUDs); however there is little specificity with regard to commonly abused individual drug types/classes. This study therefore aimed to provide insight into the degree of these co-occurring relationships across several specific newer and older generation illicit and prescription drugs. 36,309 adults aged 18+ from wave 3 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC-III) were assessed. Weighted cross-tabulations and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate comorbidity between current DSM-5 CUD, substance use and DSM-5 SUD. Current DSM-5 CUD is associated with greater lifetime use of all examined drug classes, and previous 12-month use of several newer-class illicit and prescription stimulant-based substances (all pDSM-5 CUD was similarly associated with increased incidence of a range of DSM-5 SUDs and was independently associated with concurrently reporting current DSM-5; sedative (Adjusted OR= 5.1, 95%CI 2.9-9.0), cocaine (AOR= 9.3, 95%CI 5.6-15.5), stimulant (AOR= 4.3, 95%CI 2.3-7.9), club drug (AOR= 16.1, 95%CI 6.3-40.8), opioid (AOR= 4.6, 95%CI 3.0-6.8) and alcohol-use disorder (AOR= 3.0, 95%CI 2.5-3.7); but not heroin or 'other' drug use disorder (both p>0.05). High comorbidity exists between DSM-5 CUD and many specific DSM-5 SUDs. Newer-class illicit and prescription stimulant-based drug use disorders are overrepresented among those with DSM-5 CUD. These findings underscore the need for tailored treatment programs for those presenting with DSM-5 CUD, and for greater treatment specification where poly-drug use is evident. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of attenuated psychotic symptoms and their relationship with DSM-IV diagnoses in a general psychiatric outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiano, Brandon A; Zimmerman, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Attenuated psychosis syndrome (APS) is being proposed for inclusion in Section III of DSM-5 for those impaired by subthreshold psychotic symptoms that are not better accounted for by another diagnosis and not meeting criteria for a psychotic disorder. The rationale is to identify patients who are at high risk for transition to a psychotic disorder in the near future. However, the potential impact of using this new diagnosis in routine clinical practice settings has not been carefully examined. As part of the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, a treatment-seeking psychiatric outpatient sample (n = 1,257) recruited from June 1997 to June 2002 completed a self-report measure of psychiatric symptoms and afterward were administered structured clinical interviews. For the current post hoc study, we investigated the prevalence rate of endorsing attenuated psychotic experiences to identify patients who could potentially meet criteria for APS. After the exclusion of those with lifetime DSM-IV psychotic disorders, psychotic experiences remained highly prevalent in the sample (28% reported at least 1 psychotic experience during the past 2 weeks), and rates were similar across all major DSM-IV diagnostic categories. Only 1 patient (0.08%) reported psychotic experiences but did not meet criteria for another current DSM disorder; however, this individual endorsed other nonpsychotic symptoms of greater severity. Psychotic experience endorsement was positively correlated with nearly all other nonpsychotic symptom domains, and multivariate analysis showed that general clinical severity predicted endorsement of psychotic experiences (P values < .001). We could not identify any patients who clearly met criteria for APS alone in our sample. Psychotic experiences appear to be common in outpatients and represent nonspecific indicators of psychopathology. Diagnosing APS in the community could result in high rates of false-positives or high

  20. [Autism Spectrum Disorder in DSM-5 - concept, validity, and reliability, impact on clinical care and future research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christine M

    2014-05-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in DSM-5 comprises the former DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of Autistic Disorder, Asperger's Disorder and PDD-nos. The criteria for ASD in DSM-5 were considerably revised from those of ICD-10 and DSM-IV-TR. The present article compares the diagnostic criteria, presents studies on the validity and reliability of ASD, and discusses open questions. It ends with a clinical and research perspective.

  1. The structure and correlates of self-reported DSM-5 maladaptive personality traits: findings from two German-speaking samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann Johannes; Altenstein David; Krieger Tobias; Grosse Holtforth Martin; Pretsch Johanna; Alexopoulos Johanna; Spitzer Carsten; Benecke Cord; Krueger Robert F; Markon Kristian E; Leising Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the structure and correlates of DSM 5 maladaptive personality traits in two samples of 577 students and 212 inpatients using the German self report form of the Personality Inventory for DSM 5. They found that (a) the factor structure of DSM 5 trait facets is largely in line with the proposed trait domains of Negative Affectivity Detachment Antagonism Disinhibition and Psychoticism; (b) all DSM 5 trait domains except Psychoticism are highly related to the respective do...

  2. PTSD's risky behavior criterion: Relation with DSM-5 PTSD symptom clusters and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contractor, Ateka A; Weiss, Nicole H; Dranger, Paula; Ruggero, Camilo; Armour, Cherie

    2017-06-01

    A new symptom criterion of reckless and self-destructive behaviors (E2) was recently added to posttraumatic stress disorder's (PTSD) diagnostic criteria in DSM-5, which is unsurprising given the well-established relation between PTSD and risky behaviors. Researchers have questioned the significance and incremental validity of this symptom criterion within PTSD's symptomatology. Unprecedented to our knowledge, we aim to compare trauma-exposed groups differing on their endorsement status of the risky behavior symptom on several psychopathology constructs (PTSD, depression, distress tolerance, rumination, anger). The sample included 123 trauma-exposed participants seeking mental health treatment (M age=35.70; 68.30% female) who completed self-report questionnaires assessing PTSD symptoms, depression, rumination, distress tolerance, and anger. Results of independent samples t-tests indicated that participants who endorsed the E2 criterion at a clinically significant level reported significantly greater PTSD subscale severity; depression severity; rumination facets of repetitive thoughts, counterfactual thinking, and problem-focused thinking; and anger reactions; and significantly less absorption and regulation (distress tolerance facets) compared to participants who did not endorse the E2 criterion at a clinically significant level. Results indicate the utility of the E2 criterion in identifying trauma-exposed individual with greater posttraumatic distress, and emphasize the importance of targeting such behaviors in treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two New Xylanases with Different Substrate Specificities from the Human Gut Bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-01-24

    Xylan is an abundant plant cell wall polysaccharide and is a dominant component of dietary fiber. Bacteria in the distal human gastrointestinal tract produce xylanase enzymes to initiate the degradation of this complex heteropolymer. These xylanases typically derive from glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 10 and 11; however, analysis of the genome sequence of the xylan-degrading human gut bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393 revealed the presence of two putative GH8 xylanases. In the current study, we demonstrate that the two genes encode enzymes that differ in activity. The xyn8A gene encodes an endoxylanase (Xyn8A), and rex8A encodes a reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase (Rex8A). Xyn8A hydrolyzed both xylopentaose (X5) and xylohexaose (X6) to a mixture of xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3), while Rex8A hydrolyzed X3 through X6 to a mixture of xylose (X1) and X2. Moreover, rex8A is located downstream of a GH3 gene (xyl3A) that was demonstrated to exhibit β-xylosidase activity and would be able to further hydrolyze X2 to X1. Mutational analyses of putative active site residues of both Xyn8A and Rex8A confirm their importance in catalysis by these enzymes. Recent genome sequences of gut bacteria reveal an increase in GH8 Rex enzymes, especially among the Bacteroidetes, indicating that these genes contribute to xylan utilization in the human gut.

  4. Alternatives to compressor cooling in California climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feustel, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); de Almeida, A. (Coimbra Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Blumstein, C. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Universitywide Energy Research Group)

    1991-01-01

    This review and discussion has been prepared for the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) to examine research on alternatives to compressor cooling. The report focuses on strategies for eliminating compressors in California's transition climates -- moderately warm areas located between the cool coastal regions and the hot central regions. Many of these strategies could also help reduce compressor use in hotter climates. Compressor-driven cooling of residences in California's transition climate regions is an undesirable load for California's electric utilities because load factor is poor and usage is typically high during periods of system peak demand. We review a number of alternatives to compressors, including low-energy strategies: evaporative cooling, natural and induced ventilation, reflective coatings, shading with vegetation and improved glazing, thermal storage, and radiative cooling. Also included are two energy-intensive strategies: absorption cooling and desiccant cooling. Our literature survey leads us to conclude that many of these strategies, used either singly or in combination, are technically and economically feasible alternatives to compressor-driven cooling. 78 refs., 8 figs.

  5. The Effects of DSM-5 Criteria on Number of Individuals Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Isaac C.; Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research has raised concerns about the number of individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to DSM-IV-TR who may no longer qualify for diagnoses under the new DSM-5 criteria, published in May 2013. The current study systematically reviews 25 articles evaluating samples according to both DSM-IV-TR and…

  6. Concurrent validity of the DSM-IV scales Affective Problems and Anxiety Problems of the Youth Self-Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lang, NDJ; Ferdinand, RF; Oldehinkel, AJ; Ormel, J; Verhulst, FC

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the concurrent validity of the DSM-IV scales Anxiety Problems and Affective Problems of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) in a community sample of Dutch young adolescents aged 10-12 years. We first examined the extent to which the YSR/DSM-IV scales reflect symptoms of DSM-IV

  7. Private Schools, California, 2009, California Department of Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — California law (California Education Code Section 33190) requires private schools offering or conducting a full-time elementary or secondary level day school for...

  8. Relating DSM-5 section II and section III personality disorder diagnostic classification systems to treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Leslie C; Benson, Kathryn T

    2016-07-01

    Beginning with DSM-III, the inclusion of a "personality" axis was designed to encourage awareness of personality disorders and the treatment-related implications of individual differences, but since that time there is little accumulated evidence that the personality disorder categories provide substantial treatment-related guidance. The DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group sought to develop an Alternative Model for personality disorder, and this study examined whether this model is more closely related to clinicians' decision-making processes than the traditional categorical personality disorder diagnoses. A national sample of 337 clinicians provided complete personality disorder diagnostic information and several treatment-related clinical judgments about one of their patients. The dimensional concepts of the DSM-5 Alternative Model for personality disorders demonstrated stronger relationships than categorical DSM-IV/DSM-5 Section II diagnoses to 10 of 11 clinical judgments regarding differential treatment planning, optimal treatment intensity, and long-term prognosis. The constructs of the DSM-5 Alternative Model for personality disorders may provide more clinically useful information for treatment planning than the official categorical personality disorder diagnostic system retained in DSM-5 Section II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Test-retest reliability of the proposed DSM-5 eating disorder diagnostic criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysko, Robyn; Roberto, Christina A.; Barnes, Rachel D.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Attia, Evelyn; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The proposed DSM-5 classification scheme for eating disorders includes both major and minor changes to the existing DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. It is not known what effect these modifications will have on the ability to make reliable diagnoses. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the short-term test-retest reliability of the proposed DSM-5 eating disorder diagnoses: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and feeding and eating conditions not elsewhere classified. Participants completed two independent telephone interviews with research assessors (n=70 Study 1; n=55 Study 2). Fair to substantial agreements (κ= 0.80 and 0.54) were observed across eating disorder diagnoses in Study 1 and Study 2, respectively. Acceptable rates of agreement were identified for the individual eating disorder diagnoses, including DSM-5 anorexia nervosa (κ’s of 0.81 to 0.97), bulimia nervosa (κ=0.84), binge eating disorder (κ’s of 0.75 and 0.61), and feeding and eating disorders not elsewhere classified (κ’s of 0.70 and 0.46). Further, improved short-term test-retest reliability was noted when using the DSM-5, in comparison to DSM-IV, criteria for binge eating disorder. Thus, these studies found that trained interviewers can reliably diagnose eating disorders using the proposed DSM-5 criteria; however, additional data from general practice settings and community samples are needed. PMID:22401974

  10. How should we revise diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders in the DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher S; Chung, Tammy; Langenbucher, James W

    2008-08-01

    This article reviews literature on the validity and performance characteristics of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders (SUDs) and recommends changes in these criteria that should be considered for the next edition of the DSM (DSM-V). Substantial data indicate that DSM-IV substance abuse and substance dependence are not distinct categories and that SUD criteria are best modeled as reflecting a unidimensional continuum of substance-problem severity. The conceptually and empirically problematic substance abuse diagnosis should be abandoned in the DSM-V, with substance dependence defined by a single set of criteria. Data also indicate that various individual SUD criteria should be revised, dropped, or considered for inclusion in the DSM-V. The DSM-V should provide a framework that allows the integration of categorical and dimensional approaches to diagnosis. Important areas for further research are noted. Copyright (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Requiring both avoidance and emotional numbing in DSM-V PTSD: will it help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David; Fletcher, Susan; Lockwood, Emma; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Creamer, Mark; Bryant, Richard A; McFarlane, Alexander; Silove, Derrick

    2011-05-01

    The proposed DSM-V criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specifically require both active avoidance and emotional numbing symptoms for a diagnosis. In DSM-IV, since both are included in the same cluster, active avoidance is not essential. Numbing symptoms overlap with depression, which may result in spurious comorbidity or overdiagnosis of PTSD. This paper investigated the impact of requiring both active avoidance and emotional numbing on the rates of PTSD diagnosis and comorbidity with depression. We investigated PTSD and depression in 835 traumatic injury survivors at 3 and 12 months post-injury. We used the DSM-IV criteria but explored the potential impact of DSM-IV and DSM-V approaches to avoidance and numbing using comparison of proportion analyses. The DSM-V requirement of both active avoidance and emotional numbing resulted in significant reductions in PTSD caseness compared with DSM-IV of 22% and 26% respectively at 3 and 12 months posttrauma. By 12 months, the rates of comorbid PTSD in those with depression were significantly lower (44% vs. 34%) using the new criteria, primarily due to the lack of avoidance symptoms. These preliminary data suggest that requiring both active avoidance and numbing as separate clusters offers a useful refinement of the PTSD diagnosis. Requiring active avoidance may help to define the unique aspects of PTSD and reduce spurious diagnoses of PTSD in those with depression. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Automatic Extraction of DTM from Low Resolution Dsm by Twosteps Semi-Global Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Automatically extracting DTM from DSM or LiDAR data by distinguishing non-ground points from ground points is an important issue. Many algorithms for this issue are developed, however, most of them are targeted at processing dense LiDAR data, and lack the ability of getting DTM from low resolution DSM. This is caused by the decrease of distinction on elevation variation between steep terrains and surface objects. In this paper, a method called two-steps semi-global filtering (TSGF) is proposed to extract DTM from low resolution DSM. Firstly, the DSM slope map is calculated and smoothed by SGF (semi-global filtering), which is then binarized and used as the mask of flat terrains. Secondly, the DSM is segmented with the restriction of the flat terrains mask. Lastly, each segment is filtered with semi-global algorithm in order to remove non-ground points, which will produce the final DTM. The first SGF is based on global distribution characteristic of large slope, which distinguishes steep terrains and flat terrains. The second SGF is used to filter non-ground points on DSM within flat terrain segments. Therefore, by two steps SGF non-ground points are removed robustly, while shape of steep terrains is kept. Experiments on DSM generated by ZY3 imagery with resolution of 10-30m demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. [The present and future of anxiety disorders: a view and problems to DSM-5: panic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioiri, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare shows that the estimated number of all patients with any anxiety disorders is more than ten million, while the number of all depressive patients is about six million. Thus, anxiety disorders are very important in daily clinical situation of psychiatry. Recently, DSM-5 draft posted online (http://www.dsm5.org). Many of the disorders that were previously listed in the anxiety disorders chapter in DSM-IV have been distributed throughout this chapter as well as separate chapters on obsessive-compulsive and related disorders and trauma-and stressor-related disorders. As for panic disorder that was one of the new concepts of psychiatric disorder in DSM-III, there are some changes in the criteria, for instance subcategory according to with/without agoraphobia are discontinued since agoraphobia is proposed to be a codable disorder in DSM-5. In this paper, we will review the history and pathogenesis of panic disorder and the relationships between DSM and ICD, and then discuss the present and future of panic disorder viewed in DSM-5 draft.

  14. [Parental alienation, child psychological abuse and DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensussan, P

    2017-12-01

    Psychiatric experts find it is easier to deal with more horrible crimes than highly conflictual divorces. In the former, projections are impossible and "files" raise very interesting issues with regard to criminology; in contrast, in the latter the expert is confronted not just with a family but also and lest one forget, a couple that at one point in time had loved each other. However, the separation resembles a bloodbath. We will not detail the various psychiatric pathologies, which may further complicate a separation: they are well-known and, on a procedural level, do not raise any specific concerns. We will however address "pathological divorces" where although individuals, assessed on a case-by-case basis, are exempt from ascertainable or developing psychiatric pathologies, pathology permeates systemic relations, inextricably linked to hatred or disgust. In this light, fault-based divorces still remain rare: it is in this context, marked by defiance and doubt as to the parental competence of each member of the couple that the psychiatric expert intervenes, with a similar acknowledged mission to that of the court: recommendations to be offered regarding visitation and custody rights. Amongst the conflictual and inextricable situations the most often encountered in expert practice, the parental alienation syndrome (PAS) now known as parental alienation (PA) refers to all psychopathological manifestations observed in children subject to highly conflictual parental separations, and above all, the unjustified or inexplicable rejection of a parent by a child (or even by siblings). This recent entity has raised controversy: some even go so far as to deny the existence itself of this phenomenon claiming that it does not appear in the international classifications of psychiatric disorders. Consequently, it was not included in the last edition of the DSM and does not appear in the ICD classification of the OMS whose 11th edition is currently being prepared. The

  15. DSM-5: ¿SÍNDROME DE PSICOSIS ATENUADA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome psicótico aglutina un conjunto de trastornos mentales devastadores que se caracterizan por una ruptura de las funciones mentales superiores. Los signos y síntomas de psicosis comienzan en la adolescencia o temprana adultez y suelen tener un inicio gradual y progresivo en el tiempo. El Síndrome de psicosis atenuada es una nueva propuesta diagnóstica del DSM-V que trata de identificar a personas con un estado mental de alto riesgo (EMAR que pueda ser predictor de transición a la psicosis. El beneficio potencial sería que si el trastorno psicótico es tratado con más eficacia en sus fases iniciales se podría producir un efecto beneficioso duradero que probablemente no se alcanzaría con intervenciones más tardías. Dicho síndrome ha generado un intenso debate en los foros científicos y profesionales especializados, esgrimiéndose argumentos a favor y en contra de su inclusión. La evaluación de los EMARs se realiza preferentemente en población de adolescentes o adultos jóvenes. La evolución de los EMARs se asocia a una mayor tasa de transición hacia psicosis no afectivas, si bien puede evolucionar hacia otro trastorno mental, mantenerse estable o remitir con el tiempo. La evidencia empírica indica que una intervención temprana parece tener un cierto efecto beneficioso, aunque los resultados son por el momento insuficientes y contradictorios. La falta de especificidad de los síntomas en la predicción de la psicosis, la presencia de ciertas limitaciones (p. ej., estigmatización, los resultados encontrados en las intervenciones tempranas y la falta de evidencia empírica, han llevado a incluir el Síndrome de psicosis atenuada en el apéndice III del DSM-V. A la luz de los hallazgos encontrados se comentan los principales beneficios y limitaciones de la inclusión de esta supuesta categoría, las posibles lecciones aprendidas de este tipo de estudios así como futuras líneas de actuación.

  16. Unmanned Aerial Systems and DSM matching for rock glacier monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Asta, Elisa; Forlani, Gianfranco; Roncella, Riccardo; Santise, Marina; Diotri, Fabrizio; Morra di Cella, Umberto

    2017-05-01

    Among other techniques, aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry have long been used to control the displacements of landslides and glaciers as well as for the detection of terrain morphological changes. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are today an efficient tool to perform data acquisition in rough or difficult terrain, both safely and quickly, avoiding hazards and risks for the operators while at the same time containing the survey costs. Since 2012 ARPAVdA (the Regional Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley, Italy) periodically surveys with UAS photogrammetry the Gran Sometta rock glacier, the Agency main monitoring site for the climate change impacts on high-mountain areas and related infrastructures. A Digital Surface Model (DSM) and an orthophoto of the rock glacier are produced after each survey flight. In order to accurately georeference them in a stable reference system, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) campaign is carried out at each epoch, to update the coordinates of signalised Ground Control Points (GCPs), since they partly lay in unstable (moving) areas. In late August 2015 a survey flight has been executed with a senseFly eBee RTK, with differential corrections sent from a ground reference station. The block has been adjusted without GCP using, as control information, only the projection centres coordinates encoded in the images. The RMS of the differences found on twelve Check Points were about 4 cm in horizontal and 7 cm in elevation, i.e. practically the same accuracy found using GCP. Differences between the DSMs produced at the same epoch with block orientation performed with GCP and with GNSS-determined projection centres were also investigated. To evaluate the rock glacier displacement fields between two epochs, corresponding features were at first manually identified on the orthophotos by a trained operator. To avoid the manual time-consuming procedure and increase the density of displacement information, two automatic

  17. Diagnostic Concordance between DSM-5 and ICD-10 Cannabis Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Steven L; Williams, Daniel C; Kopak, Albert M; Voluse, Andrew C; Connolly, Kevin M; Hoffmann, Norman G

    2016-07-01

    With the recent federal mandate that all U.S. health care settings transition to ICD-10 billing codes, empirical evidence is necessary to determine if the DSM-5 designations map to their respective ICD-10 diagnostic categories/billing codes. The present study examined the concordance between DSM-5 and ICD-10 cannabis use disorder diagnoses. Data were derived from routine clinical assessments of 6871 male and 801 female inmates recently admitted to a state prison system from 2000 to 2003. DSM-5 and ICD-10 diagnostic determinations were made from algorithms corresponding to the respective diagnostic formulations. Past 12-month prevalence rates of cannabis use disorders were comparable across classification systems. The vast majority of inmates with no DSM-5 diagnosis continued to have no diagnosis per the ICD-10, and a similar proportion with a DSM-5 severe diagnosis received an ICD-10 dependence diagnosis. Most of the variation in diagnostic classifications was accounted for by those with a DSM-5 moderate diagnosis in that approximately half of these cases received an ICD-10 dependence diagnosis while the remaining cases received a harmful use diagnosis. Although there appears to be a generally high level of agreement between diagnostic classification systems for those with no diagnosis or those evincing symptoms of a more severe condition, concordance between DSM-5 moderate and ICD-10 dependence diagnoses was poor. Additional research is warranted to determine the appropriateness and implications of the current DSM-5 coding guidelines regarding the assignment of an ICD-10 dependence code for those with a DSM-5 moderate diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing the clinical utility of agoraphobia in the context of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B; Cromer, Kiara R

    2008-01-01

    In the DSM-IV, a panic disorder (PD) diagnosis includes specification of agoraphobia, which is primarily an index of situational avoidance due to fear of panic. No other anxiety diagnosis requires specification of level of avoidance. This raises the question as to whether agoraphobia provides unique information beyond the core features of PD (i.e., panic attacks and panic-related worry). The incremental validity of agoraphobia, defined using DSM-IV specifiers versus level of situational avoidance, was examined in relation to the expression and treatment of PD (N=146). Analyses indicate that agoraphobia status adds uniquely to the prediction of PD symptoms, impairment, and response to treatment. However, level of situational avoidance, defined either as a continuous or dichotomous variable, appears to have greater utility compared to the DSM-IV method of classifying agoraphobia. In summary, the agoraphobia specifier seems to have clinical utility but this could be improved by focusing on a dimensional assessment of situational avoidance.

  19. Digital Surface and Terrain Models (DSM,DTM), 1.7 meter DSM in Urban Areas, 5 Meter DSM in National Forest, flown as part of the LAR-IAC project, Published in 2006, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Los Angeles County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Digital Surface and Terrain Models (DSM,DTM) dataset current as of 2006. 1.7 meter DSM in Urban Areas, 5 Meter DSM in National Forest, flown as part of the LAR-IAC...

  20. A systematic literature review of PTSD's latent structure in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV to DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Műllerová, Jana; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    The factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been widely researched, but consensus regarding the exact number and nature of factors is yet to be reached. The aim of the current study was to systematically review the extant literature on PTSD's latent structure in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in order to identify the best-fitting model. One hundred and twelve research papers published after 1994 using confirmatory factor analysis and DSM-based measures of PTSD were included in the review. In the DSM-IV literature, four-factor models received substantial support, but the five-factor Dysphoric arousal model demonstrated the best fit, regardless of gender, measurement instrument or trauma type. The recently proposed DSM-5 PTSD model was found to be a good representation of PTSD's latent structure, but studies analysing the six- and seven-factor models suggest that the DSM-5 PTSD factor structure may need further alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.