WorldWideScience

Sample records for california bight area

  1. Spatially-explicit bioenergetics of Pacific sardine in the Southern California Bight: are mesoscale eddies areas of exceptional prerecruit production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logerwell, Elizabeth A.; Lavaniegos, Bertha; Smith, Paul E.

    Previous research shows that offshore mesoscale eddies in the Southern California Bight region are areas where sardine larval abundance is significantly increased relative to inshore, slope and surrounding offshore waters. In order for mesoscale eddies to be a mechanism linking climate and sardine population variability they must be areas of exceptional prerecruit production. Temperature and prey data from various Southern California Bight (SCB) habitats, including offshore eddies, were applied to a spatially-explicit bioenergetic model which predicts sardine prerecruit growth potential. Growth potential was similar in inshore, slope, and eddy regions (11% and 12% day -1), and was lower in the offshore region, 9% day -1. To estimate production in eddy and non-eddy habitats, growth potential was multiplied by habitat-specific estimates of sardine larval biomass from at-sea surveys. A production index, a measure of potential production resulting from individual growth rate potential and local abundance, was greater in the model cyclonic eddy than in all other regions by more than an order of magnitude. In fact, the production index in the eddy was four times greater than in all other regions combined.

  2. Whole-body concentrations of elements in three fish species from offshore oil platforms and natural areas in the Southern California Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Milton S.; Saiki, Michael K.; May, Thomas W.; Yee, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    There is concern that offshore oil platforms off Southern California may be contributing to environmental contaminants accumulated by marine fishes. To examine this possibility, 18 kelp bass (Paralabrax clathratus Girard, 1854), 80 kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens Jordan and Gilbert, 1880), and 98 Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus Girard, 1854) were collected from five offshore oil platforms and 10 natural areas during 2005–2006 for whole-body analysis of 63

  3. Temporal variations in lead concentrations and isotopic composition in the Southern California Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Flegal, A.R. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Lead concentrations in surface waters of the Southern California Bight appear to have decreased threefold (from >170 to <60 pM) since they were initially measured by Clair Patterson and his associates in the 1970s. The decrease parallels a threefold decline in anthropogenic inputs of industrial lead to the bight over the past two decades. Moreover, mass balance calculations indicate that the primary source of lead to the bight now is upwelling. This is evidenced by the isotopic compositions of surface waters in the bight, which are most characteristic of Asian industrial lead aerosols (0.4793 [le] [sup 206]Pb/[sup 208]Pb [le] 0.4833) deposited in oceanic waters of the North Pacific. While the decrease in surface water lead concentrations in the bight reflects the reduction in industrial lead emissions from the United States, the isotopic compositions of surface waters in the southern reach of the bight reflect a concurrent increase in industrial lead emissions from Mexico (0.4852 [le] [sup 206]Pb/[sup 208]Pb [le] 0.4877). The isotopic composition ([sup 208]Pb/[sup 207]Pb [approximately] 2.427) of elevated lead concentrations of surface waters in San Diego Bay indicate that lead is being remobilized from contaminated sediments within that bay.

  4. Task 1: Whole-body concentrations of elements in kelp bass (Paralabrax clathratus), kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens), and Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) from offshore oil platforms and natural areas in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Milton S.

    2009-01-01

    Resource managers are concerned that offshore oil platforms in the Southern California Bight may be contributing to environmental contaminants accumulated by marine fishes. To examine this possibility, 18 kelp bass (Paralabrax clathratus), 80 kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens), and 98 Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) were collected from five offshore oil platforms and 10 natural areas during 2005-2006 for whole-body analysis of 63 elements. The natural areas, which served as reference sites, were assumed to be relatively uninfluenced by contaminants originating from platforms. Forty-two elements were excluded from statistical comparisons for one of three reasons: they consisted of major cations that were unlikely to accumulate to potentially toxic concentrations under ambient exposure conditions; they were not detected by the analytical procedures; or they were detected at concentrations too low to yield reliable quantitative measurements. The remaining 21 elements consisted of aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, lithium, manganese, mercury, nickel, rubidium, selenium, strontium, tin, titanium, vanadium, and zinc. Statistical comparisons of these 21 elements indicated that none consistently exhibited higher concentrations at oil platforms than at natural areas. Eight comparisons yielded significant interaction effects between total length (TL) of the fish and the two habitat types (oil platforms and natural areas). This indicated that relations between certain elemental concentrations (i.e., copper, rubidium, selenium, tin, titanium, and vanadium) and habitat type varied by TL of affected fish species. To better understand these interactions, we examined elemental concentrations in very small and very large individuals of affected species. Although significant interactions were detected for rubidium, tin, and selenium in kelp rockfish, the concentrations of these elements did not differ significantly between

  5. Habitat of calling blue and fin whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirovic, A.; Chou, E.; Roch, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Northeast Pacific blue whale B calls and fin whale 20 Hz calls were detected from passive acoustic data collected over seven years at 16 sites in the Southern California Bight (SCB). Calling blue whales were most common in the coastal areas, during the summer and fall months. Fin whales began calling in fall and continued through winter, in the southcentral SCB. These data were used to develop habitat models of calling blue and fin whales in areas of high and low abundance in the SCB, using remotely sensed variables such as sea surface temperature, sea surface height, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity as model covariates. A random forest framework was used for variable selection and generalized additive models were developed to explain functional relationships, evaluate relative contribution of each significant variable, and investigate predictive abilities of models of calling whales. Seasonal component was an important feature of all models. Additionally, areas of high calling blue and fin whale abundance both had a positive relationship with the sea surface temperature. In areas of lower abundance, chlorophyll a concentration and primary productivity were important variables for blue whale models and sea surface height and primary productivity were significant covariates in fin whale models. Predictive models were generally better for predicting general trends than absolute values, but there was a large degree of variation in year-to-year predictability across different sites.

  6. Data collected in the Southern California Bight in order to understand the coastal waters ecological systems, 1977 - 1999 (NODC Accession 0001162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemistry, fish species, atmospheric pollutants, and temperature profile were collected using CTD casts and other collection methods in the Southern California Bight...

  7. Modeling Study of Cross-Shore Exchange Processes in the Southern California Bight Using QuikSCAT Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.; Liu, W.; Tang, W.

    2002-12-01

    The South California Bight (SCB) forms a complex bathymetric region (islands, shallow banks, basin, and channels) extending from the coast to about 200 km offshore and from Point Conception to the tip of Baja California. Geographically the region is sheltered from the strong upwelling-favorable winds characteristic of the region north of Point Conception. However, recent QuikSCAT winds, for the first time, clearly reveal a persistent cyclonic eddy centered at Catalina Island within the Bight (Liu et al. 2001). Using a costal circulation model, we have investigated the oceanic response to the newly observed sea-surface winds. Two experiments are carried out to explore the individual roles of wind forcing and topography. The first experiment uses the COADS winds to determine the general circulation of the Bight. The second experiment uses the QuikSCAT winds to examine how the space-time variability of atmospheric forcing affects the frontal structure, circulation pattern, and cross-shore exchange of water masses. Comparisons of these two experiments allow us to identify the combined effect of winds and topography on the cross-shore exchange processes between the Bight and its adjacent waters.

  8. The sclerochronology of Donax gouldii and Chione undatella : environmental archives of the past and present Southern California Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Hatch, Marco B.A

    2012-01-01

    High resolution archives of environmental conditions determined from the chemistry and growth increments of bivalves provide a unique opportunity to examine relationships between climate-induced environmental change and biological productivity in the Southern California Bight. However, before bivalves can be used as high resolution biorecorders of environmental change, the record of interest (e.g. [delta]¹⁸O, [delta]¹³C, Sr/Ca, Ba /Ca or growth increments) must first be calibrated to known en...

  9. Coastal processes and hazards in the southern california bight: the use and requirements of multiple satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, B.; Digiacomo, P.; Washburn, L.; Jones, B. H.; Bosc, E.

    As part of an ongoing interdisciplinary study, we seek to provide a better understanding of the complex physical, ecological and biogeochemical processes in the coastal waters off southern California. At local and event-scales, this coastal area is characterized by phenomena such as eddies, internal waves and dust storms. At basin and climate scales, this region is impacted by the California Current (the eastern boundary current of the North Pacific) and remote forcing associated with ENSO events that strongly alter wind, current, water mass, and precipitation patterns. Furthermore, the Southern California Bight is adjacent to one of the largest industrialized urban populations in the world, which results in significant anthropogenic inputs to the coastal marine ecosystem, including such pollution hazard concerns as storm/waste-water runoff and oil spills. To address these diverse issues, we utilize a variety of satellite data including high-resolution ocean color observations (e.g., SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MERIS), sea surface temperature measurements (e.g., AVHRR, MODIS, and AATSR), and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of surface features and derived wind fields (e.g., RADARSAT, ERS, and ASAR) that are complemented and validated by coincident field data (from moorings, drifters, ships, and shore-based HF radar). These synergistic data sets enable the detection, quantification and understanding of under-sampled and poorly described coastal ocean processes and pollution hazards of the type described above and an assessment of their ecological (e.g., harmful algal blooms), biogeochemical (carbon cycling), and human (pathogens) impact. We will present representative case studies on the observation of these processes and hazards that demonstrate the utility of multiple sensors, as well as assessments of where continuity in multi-sensor observations is required and identification of existing or foreseen observation gaps with recommendations on how these should be

  10. Toxicity of sediments and interstitial waters form the Southern California Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay, S.; Greenstein, D.; Brown, J.; Jirik, A. [Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Westminster, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of 72 sediment samples collected during the EMAP Southern California Bight Pilot Project (SCBPP) was measured. Sediments from the mainland shelf between Point Conception and the Mexican border were collected from various depths and tested for toxicity using two methods. The toxicity of bulk sediment was measured using a 10-day amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) survival test. Interstitial water was also extracted from the samples and tested for toxicity using a 72-hour sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryo development test. Amphipod survival was high (> 80%) at all stations tested, although several sites near large sewage outfalls had statistically significant reductions in survival. No interference related to grain size variation was observed with the amphipod test. Most of the interstitial water samples produced abnormal sea urchin embryo development. Effects were not related to the presumed level of sediment contamination, but rather to ammonia concentration in virtually all cases. The impacts of sample handling procedures and ammonia on sediment toxicity data interpretation will be discussed.

  11. Anthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    KAUST Repository

    Howard, Meredith D. A.

    2014-01-26

    Anthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.

  12. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  13. Population ecology of nitrifying archaea and bacteria in the Southern California Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J Michael; Sachdeva, Rohan; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2010-05-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, and although relatively little is currently known about their biogeochemical roles in marine ecosystems, recognition that Crenarchaeota posses ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and may act as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) offers another means of probing the ecology of these microorganisms. Here we use a time series approach combining quantification of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers with bacterial community fingerprints and biogeochemistry, to explore the population and community ecology of nitrification. At multiple depths (150, 500 and 890 m) in the Southern California Bight sampled monthly from 2003 to 2006, AOA were enumerated via quantitative PCR of archaeal amoA and marine group 1 Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes. Based on amoA genes, AOA were highly variable in time - a consistent feature of marine Crenarchaeota- however, average values were similar at different depths and ranged from 2.20 to 2.76 x 10(4) amoA copies ml(-1). Archaeal amoA genes were correlated with Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes (r(2) = 0.79) and the slope of this relationship was 1.02, demonstrating that the majority of marine group 1 Crenarchaeota present over the dates and depths sampled possessed amoA. Two AOA clades were specifically quantified and compared with betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (beta-AOB) amoA genes at 150 m; these AOA groups were found to strongly co-vary in time (r(2) = 0.70, P < 0.001) whereas AOA : beta-AOB ratios ranged from 13 to 5630. Increases in the AOA : beta-AOB ratio correlated with the accumulation of nitrite (r(2) = 0.87, P < 0.001), and may be indicative of differences in substrate affinities and activities leading to periodic decoupling between ammonia and nitrite oxidation. These data capture a dynamic nitrogen cycle in which multiple microbial groups appear to be active participants.

  14. Understanding the Relative Influence of Anthropogenic Versus Natural Nitrogen on Biogeochemical Processes in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, K.; Howard, M. D.; Beck, C. D. A.; Emler, L.; Nezlin, N. P.; Sutula, M.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution is considered to be one of the most significant consequences of human-accelerated global change on coastal oceans (Howarth and Marino 2006). In the southern California Bight, wastewater effluent represents 92% of total terrestrial N loading and these loads are equivalent to the "background" N flux from upwelling (Howard et al. 2014). In this study, we attempt to quantify the relative influence of the two dominant nitrogen sources to the Bight (wastewater effluent and upwelled nitrogen) on biogeochemical processes linked to dissolved oxygen, pH and algal blooms. We will compare the sources and fate of nitrogen in an effluent impacted region (offshore of Los Angeles and Orange Counties) to minimally-impacted regions both along the coastline (offshore of Northern San Diego County) and two offshore stations. Key rates of nitrogen and carbon cycling are measured, including primary production and respiration, nitrogen uptake by primary producers, and nitrification. Stable isotope tracer techniques have also been applied to determine the relative influence of effluent versus upwelled nitrogen on biological communities and concentrations. Data generated from this study will be used to validate calculated rate constants used in oceanographic models of ecological response from natural and anthropogenic nutrient inputs in the Bight. These models will be used to estimate the extent to which anthropogenic nutrients are affecting primary production, acidification and hypoxia, as well as which regions are most at risk. They will also be used to analyze management scenarios to understand the effects of anthropogenic nutrient load reductions relative to climate change scenarios.

  15. CHANCHELULLA ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Donald F.; Stebbins, Scott A.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey there seems to be little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Chanchelulla Roadless Area, California, except for a demonstrated resource of about 7200 tons containing 0. 084 oz gold/ton, 0. 84 oz silver/ton, and accessory copper at the Chanchelulla prospect. This prospect is located on a northwest-trending quartz vein. Limestone and small amounts of magnetite occur in the area but on the basis of available data no resources are identified. No potential for energy resources was identified.

  16. PYRAMID ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey was conducted in the Pyramid Roadless Area, California. The area contains mineral showings, but no mineral-resource potential was identified during our studies. Three granodiorite samples on the west side of the roadless area contained weakly anomalous concentrations of uranium. Two samples of roof-pendant rocks, one metasedimentary rock and one metavolcanic rock, contain low concentrations of copper, and of copper and molybdenum, respectively. Although none was identified, the geologic terrane is permissive for mineral occurrences and large-scale, detailed geologic mapping of the areas of metasedimentary and metavolcanic roof pendants in the Pyramid Roadless Area could define a mineral-resource potential for tungsten and precious metals.

  17. A Lagrangian Physical-Biological Model to Study Water Parcels Associated with Algal Blooms from Southern California Bight to Todos Santos Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas Téllez, I. E.; Rivas, D.

    2015-12-01

    Lagrangian ocean circulation and biological dynamics are numerically studied in Todos Santos Bay during the spring of 2007. This period is particularly interesting after an intense toxic algal bloom occurred in April 2007 in this area, which was associated with the wind-driven upwelling in the region. High resolution, numerical model simulations were carried out to study dynamical features along of the Southern California Bight (SCB), the coast of the northern Baja California (BC), and the interior of Todos Santos Bay (TSB). These simulations are used in a three-dimensional Lagrangian (particle tracking) analysis which provides information about the origin and distribution of the waters present in the Bay during the occurrence of the toxic bloom. After the selection of trajectories of particles showing coherent patterns, a Nitrate-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) lower trophic model is implemented to study the influence of the environmental conditions that occur during the particle advection, solving the NPZD equations at every time-varying position of the advected particles. The model is also modified for phytoplankton growth as a function of the environmental temperature to somehow emulate the life cycle of Pseudo-nitzschia. The analysis of the trajectories shows that particles mainly come from two regions: from the north, in the southern portion of SCB and from regions west of the TSB. Knowing the regional circulation patterns and their phytoplankton dynamics can help to understand and even predict the origin and destination of the harmful algal blooms that occur in TSB and its surroundings.

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Backscatter, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Backscatter, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ron Brown - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  6. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  7. Strongly-sheared wind-forced currents in the nearshore regions of the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt; Robertson, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to many previous reports, winds do drive currents along the shelf in the central portion of the Southern California Bight (SCB). Winds off Huntington Beach CA are the dominant forcing for currents over the nearshore region of the shelf (water depths less than 20 m). Winds control about 50–70% of the energy in nearshore alongshelf surface currents. The wind-driven current amplitudes are also anomalously high. For a relatively weak 1 dyne/cm2 wind stress, the alongshelf surface current amplitudes in this region can reach 80 cm/s or more. Mid-depth current amplitudes for the same wind stress are around 30–40 cm/s. These wind-driven surface current amplitudes are much larger than previously measured over other nearshore shelf regions, perhaps because this program is one of the few that measured currents within a meter of the surface. The near-bed cross-shelf currents over the nearshore region of the Huntington Beach shelf have an Ekman response to winds in that they upwell (downwell) for down (up) coast winds. This response disappears further offshore. Hence, there is upwelling in the SCB, but it does not occur across the entire shelf. Subthermocline water in the nearshore region that may contain nutrients and plankton move onshore when winds are southeastward, but subthermocline water over the shelf break is not transported to the beach. The currents over the outer shelf are not predominately controlled by winds, consistent with previous reports. Instead, they are mainly driven by cross-shelf pressure gradients that are independent of local wind stress.

  8. Sacramento Metropolitan Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    resource of the river. Also, strips of riparian vegetation along the riverbank provide good areas for naturalists and birdwatching . Recreational resources...policies #1 and #2 when improvements are made costing at least 50 percent of the estimated current market value of the structure before improvements. o1 S 0...height and depth of flooding is provided in Table 1. Although depreciation values have been used in our analysis, market values also had to be considered

  9. Temporal and spatial patterns in wind stress and wind stress curl over the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Rosenfeld, Leslie K.; Robertson, George L.

    2012-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, together with several other federal and municipal agencies, began a series of field programs to determine along and cross-shelf transport patterns over the continental shelves in the central Southern California Bight. As a part of these programs, moorings that monitor winds were deployed off the Palos Verdes peninsula and within San Pedro Bay for six 3–4 month summer and winter periods between 2001 and 2008. In addition, nearly continuous records of winds for this 7-year period were obtained from a terrestrial site at the coast and from a basin site offshore of the long-term coastal site. The mean annual winds are downcoast at all sites. The alongshelf components of wind stress, which are the largest part of the low-frequency wind stress fields, are well correlated between basin, shelf and coastal sites. On average, the amplitude of alongshelf fluctuations in wind stress are 3–4 times larger over the offshore basin, compared to the coastal site, irrespective of whether the fluctuations represent the total, or just the correlated portion of the wind stress field. The curl in the large-scale wind stress tends to be positive, especially in the winter season when the mean wind stress is downcoast and larger at the offshore basin site than at the beach. However, since the fluctuation in wind stress amplitudes are usually larger than the mean, periods of weak negative curl do occur, especially in the summer season when the largest normalized differences in the amplitude of wind stress fluctuations are found in the nearshore region of the coastal ocean. Even though the low-frequency wind stress field is well-correlated over the continental shelf and offshore basins, out to distances of 35 km or more from the coast, winds even 10 km inshore of the beach do not represent the coastal wind field, at least in the summer months. The seasonal changes in the spatial structures in wind stress amplitudes suggest that an assessment of the

  10. LOST CREEK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and mineral-resource investigations identified no mineral-resource potential in the Lost Creek Roadless Area, California. Sand and gravel have been mined from alluvial flood-plain deposits less than 1 mi outside the roadless area; these deposits are likely to extend into the roadless area beneath a Holocene basalt flow that may be as much as 40 ft thick. An oil and gas lease application which includes the eastern portion of the roadless area is pending. Abundant basalt in the area can be crushed and used as aggregate, but similar deposits of volcanic cinders or sand and gravel in more favorable locations are available outside the roadless area closer to major markets. No indication of coal or geothermal energy resources was identified.

  11. AGUA TIBIA PRIMITIVE AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, William P.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Agua Tibia Primitive Area in southwestern California is underlain by igneous and metamorphic rocks that are siilar to those widely exposed throughout much of the Peninsular Ranges. To detect the presence of any concealed mineral deposits, samples of stream sediments were collected along the various creeks that head in the mountain. As an additional aid in evaluating the mineral potential, an aeromagnetic survey was made and interpreted. A search for records of past or existing mining claims within the primitive area was made but none was found. Evidence of deposits of metallic or nonmetallic minerals was not seen during the study.

  12. CACTUS SPRING ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Kuizon, Lucia

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies together with a review of historic mining and prospecting activities indicate that the Cactus Spring Roadless Area in California has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Marble bodies occur in the northern part of the roadless area and are possible resources for building stone, crushed and quarried aggregate, and lime and magnesium for Portland cement and industrial applications. It is recommended that the terrane of marble be mapped and sampled carefully in order to evaluate the quantity and quality of the carbonate resources.

  13. WEAVER BALLY ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, M.C.; Peters, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Weaver Bally Roadless Area includes approximately 22 sq mi in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Trinity County, California. A mineral survey indicates that an area of less than 1 sq mi in the northern part of the Weaver Bally Roadless Area has a substantiated mineral-resource potential for gold and silver; a much larger area has a probable mineral-resource potential for the same elements. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources and there is little promise for the occurrence of additional metallic, energy, or nonmetallic resources in the roadless area. Detailed studies, including further geochemical sampling and drilling could be done in the region of the Globe mines. In addition, the outcrops of dacite porphyry dikes and sills and associated hydrothermal alteration should be mapped in detail.

  14. Spawning areas of Engraulis anchoita in the Southeastern Brazilian Bight during late-spring and early summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Favero, Jana M.; Katsuragawa, Mario; Zani-Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Turner, Jefferson T.

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of fish egg density and distribution is indispensable for the understanding of the adult stock variability, and is a powerful tool for fisheries management. Thus, the objective of the present study was to characterize the spatial-temporal spawning patterns of Engraulis anchoita in the Southeastern Brazilian Bight, in terms of geographic location and abiotic factors. We analyzed data of eggs sampled during ten years, from 1974 to 1993, to create maps of the mean and the standard deviation (sd) of the estimated probability of egg presence, through indicative kriging. Preferred, tolerated and avoided temperature, salinity, local depth and distance for spawning of E. anchoita were defined by the estimation of bootstrapped confidence intervals of the quotient values (Q). Despite not having identified any recurrent spawning sites, a few occasional and unfavorable spawning sites were identified, showing that the spawning habit of E. anchoita not only varied spatially, but also temporally. The largest occasional spawning site and with the highest probability of egg presence (0.6-0.7) was located around 27°S, close to Florianópolis (Santa Catarina state). On the other hand, a well-marked unfavorable spawning site was located off São Sebastião Island (São Paulo state), with the probability of egg presence between 0-0.1. Abiotic and biotic factors that could be related to the changes in the spawning areas of E. anchoita were discussed, with shelf width, mesoscale hydrodynamic features and biological interactions apparently playing important roles in defining spawning sites.

  15. The barred grunt Conodon nobilis (Perciformes: Haemulidae) in shallow areas of a tropical bight: spatial and temporal distribution, body growth and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Maíra; Denadai, Márcia Regina; Bessa, Eduardo; Santos, Flávia Borges; de Faria, Vanessa Hermann; Turra, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively investigate the population biology of Conodon nobilis (Perciformes, Haemulidae) in Caraguatatuba Bight, southeastern Brazil. Monthly trawls were performed from October 2003 through October 2004 in two areas of the bight that are similar to but distant from each other, South and North. For all specimens, the size was measured and the sex and reproductive stage identified. Abundance and size were compared over areas and months. Body growth parameters were parameterized according to the Von Bertalanffy growth function. The stomach contents were identified and quantified. C. nobilis occurred mainly in the North area and showed an erratic pattern of abundance over time. Several cohorts entered in different periods, but very few large and mature individuals were observed. The results indicate a preference for shallow, ocean-influenced habitats and some degree of segregation between young and older individuals. The species showed a distribution consistent with an r-strategist species, with high abundance and a high growth constant ( K = 0.68 year-1 and L max = 34.2 cm). Both the relative length of the digestive tube and the prey items indicated a carnivorous feeding habit; mysids were the main item of the diet throughout the study period, indicating that this grunt is a specialist feeder. Other frequently observed items were amphipods and fish fragments. Ingestion of scales is possibly intentional.

  16. LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California from the California Department of Water Resources. Bare earth grids from LiDAR.This data is in ESRI Grid format with 2...

  17. LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California from the California Department of Water Resources. Bare earth grids from LiDAR.This data is in ESRI Grid format with 2...

  18. Fine-scale spatial and temporal plankton distributions in the Southern California Bight: lessons from in situ microscopes and broadband echosounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseno-Avena, Christian

    Phytoplankton and zooplankton are important components of marine ecosystems, and play a major role in the biological pump, affecting carbon transport in the global oceans. Their dynamic heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions require special tools for observing them at the ecological scales relevant to the individual organisms. In this work, I used optic and acoustic methods to study plankton organisms at spatial scales of meters and temporal scales ranging from minutes to months. Using two in situ microscopes I described the fine-scale vertical distribution of phytoplankton and several zooplankton taxa in a coastal location in the Southern California Bight. Highly resolved spatial observations revealed cryptic maxima of fluorescent particles not observed with traditional fluorometers. Furthermore, this high sampling resolution revealed that water density, and not depth, regulated the vertical position, and interactions between observed phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions. Underwater acoustic echosounders can be powerful tools to observe in situ plankton distributions. Interpreting the acoustic echoes, however, requires highly calibrated instruments and ground-truthing experiments to identify the source of acoustic signals. This work presents the description of a novel combination of a broadband, high-frequency (1.5-2.5 MHz) echosounder and a stereoscopic camera --combined, these systems can localize the echo produced by an individual target while simultaneously providing visual identification of the target. This work has provided one of the first comparisons of in situ measured broadband target strength (BTS) and the expected signal using a physical model. The results of this experiment revealed unexpected, important differences between measured and modeled BTS. This system was also used to make in situ observations of individual fragile gelatinous organisms, marine snow particles and phytoplankton, providing evidence of their significant acoustic

  19. In Situ Measurements of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Coastal Waters of the Southern California Bight with a Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME)-Based Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, E. Y.; Tsukada, D.; Diehl, D.; Noblet, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Global distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have become an increasingly significant topic in environmental research, as POPs are potential agents of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity to both humans and non-human species. One of the important transport mechanisms for POPs is advection and dispersion from point sources via oceanic currents. Therefore, measurements of POPs in open coastal waters can provide key information about the global geochemical cycling of POPs. However, because concentrations of POPs in ocean waters are typically in sub-ppt (ng/L) levels or lower, accurate measurement of ambient concentrations is challenging. To obtain sufficient mass that can be detected by current analytical instrumentation, extremely large water volumes (e.g., thousands of liters) have to be processed. Such large sample volumes represent a practical impediment for regional-scale sampling efforts. In an attempt to improve our ability to study the fate of POPs in oceanic environments, we have developed an in-situ sampling approach based on the technique of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and tested it at several coastal locations within the Southern California Bight. A custom-made SPME sampler consists of a polydimethylsioxane-coated (100-μm thickness) fiber supported on a stainless steel needle and a copper cage shielding the SPME assembly (to slow bacterial growth). We were able to deploy a large number of the samplers simultaneously at different locations and water depths known to contain varying concentrations of DDTs. The SPME samplers were retrieved after about 15 to 30 days of deployment, and the organics partitioned on the SPME fibers were analyzed with GC/MS under optimized chromatographic conditions suitable for SPME analysis. The concentrations of p,p'-DDE (the most dominant component of all DDTs) measured by the in situ SPME approach were very similar as a function of water depth and spatial location as concentrations previously measured

  20. Analysis of High Spatial, Temporal, and Directional Resolution Recordings of Biological Sounds in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    map. To the northwest of the array deployment area is Santa Catalina Island . The array number is listed next to each push-pin location. The data...very shallow- water shelf just offshore in Fig. 1. A few conclusions from the analysis of this chorus are: • The spatial distribution of the...received levels and the directionality of the received sounds indicate the primary region of chorusing occurs in the very shallow water region just offshore

  1. Modelling cyclonic eddies in the Delagoa Bight region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossa, O.; Pous, S.; Penven, P.; Capet, X.; Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to document and shed light on the circulation around the Delagoa Bight region in the southern Mozambique Channel using a realistic modelling approach. A simulation including mesoscale forcings at the boundaries of our regional configuration succeeds in reproducing the general circulation in the region as well as the existence of a semi-permanent cyclonic eddy, whose existence is attested by in situ measurements in the Bight. Characterised by a persistent local minimum in SSH located around 26°S-34°E, this cyclonic eddy termed herein the Delagoa Bight lee eddy occurs about 25% of the time with no clear seasonal preference. Poleward moving cyclones, mostly generated further north, occur another 25% of the time in the Bight area. A tracking method applied to eddies generated in Delagoa Bight using model outputs as well as AVISO data confirms the model realism and provides additional statistics. The diameter of the eddy core varies between 61 and 147 km and the average life time exceeds 20 days. Additional model analyses reveal the systematic presence of negative vorticity in the Bight that can organise and form a Delagoa Bight lee eddy depending on the intensity of an intermittent southward flow along the shore and the spatial distribution of surrounding mesoscale features. In addition, the model solution shows other cyclonic eddies generated near Inhambane and eventually travelling through the Bight. Their generation and pathways appears to be linked with large Mozambique Channel rings.

  2. Teale Urband and rural areas of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state...

  3. Numerical simulations for the area of the German Bight in spring 1995; Numerische Simulationsrechnungen fuer das Gebiet der Deutschen Bucht am Beispiel des Fruehjahrs 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, C.J. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.

    1998-01-01

    The paper reports results of the mesoscale transport, chemism and flow model METRAS for the period from 22 April to 11 May 1995. During this period, a measurement campaign was carried out in the area of the German Bight under the ``KUSTOS`` springtime scheme (``Coastal mass and energy transport processes - The transition from land to sea in the south-eastern North Sea``). In order to take instationary and inhomogeneous weather situations into account, the modellings used data provided by the German weather service, which form part of its Germany model (DM), both to initialize and drive the METRAS data. The modelling results of METRAS are compared with routine readings taken by the German weather service in some selected measuring sites. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] In diesem Beitrag werden Ergebnisse des mesoskaligen Transport-, Chemie- und Stroemungsmodells METRAS fuer den Zeitraum vom 22. April bis zum 11. Mai 1995 vorgestellt, in dem die Messkampagne des KUSTOS-Fruehjahrsexperimentes (Kuestennahe Stoff- und Energietransporte - der Uebergang Land - Meer in der suedoestlichen Nordsee) im Bereich der Deutschen Bucht stattfand. Zur Beruecksichtigung instationaerer und inhomogener Wetterlagen bei den Modellrechnungen wurden sowohl zur Initialisierung als auch zum Antrieb von METRAS Daten des Deutschland-Modells (DM) des Deutschen Wetterdienstes verwendet. Die Modellergebnisse von METRAS werden mit Routinemessungen des Deutschen Wetterdienstes an einigen ausgewaehlten Messstationen verglichen. (orig./KW)

  4. Arsenic and mercury contamination of sediments of geothermal springs, mangrove lagoon and the Santispac bight, Bahía Concepción, Baja California peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Acosta, María Luisa; Shumilin, Evgueni; Mirlean, Nicolai; Sapozhnikov, Dmitry; Gordeev, Vyacheslav

    2010-12-01

    In order to find out the environmental impact on the coastal zone, the composition of sediments of the intertidal geothermal hot spring zone and adjacent area of Playa Santispac in the pristine Bahía Concepción (Baja California peninsula) was studied. High concentrations of As (13-111 mg kg⁻¹) and Hg (0.55-25.2 mg kg⁻¹) were found in the sediments of the geothermal sources. Arsenic and Hg concentrations decrease rapidly in the adjacent small mangrove lagoon sediments and reach background levels (0.7-2.6 mg kg⁻¹ and 6-60 μg kg⁻¹ respectively) in the marine sediments collected in front of Playa Santispac.

  5. Paleoshorelines--Offshore Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Offshore Monterey, California. The vector data file is included in...

  6. Sacramento Metropolitan Area, California Reconnaissance Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    INTERVAL (YEARS) SACRAMENTO METROPOLITAN ARIA CALIFORNIA STAGE-FREQUENCY RELATIONSHIP SACRAMENTO RIVER AT FREMONT WEIR/WEST END SACRAMENTO DISTRICT...Wildlife Biologist/ Environmental Planner Karen Amerman Kuhn Civil Engineer/ Water Resources Plnr Patricia Roberson Environmental Studies

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Multibeam Backscatter for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Multibeam Backscatter GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the geomorphology of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Sun Illuminated Bathymetry for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Sun Illuminated Bathymetry GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Profile Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Profile Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth Range of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth Range GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Mean Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Mean Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Rugosity of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Rugosity GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Plan Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Plan Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Slope for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope of Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  18. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  19. Bathymetry Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  20. Faults--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data of faults for the geologic and geomorphologic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is...

  1. Folds--Offshore of Aptos Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  2. Faults--Offshore of Tomales Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  3. Folds--Offshore of Tomales Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  4. Faults--Offshore of Aptos Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. Folds--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  6. Folds--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data of folds for the geologic and geomorphologic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is...

  7. Faults--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  8. Bathymetry Hillshade Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  9. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  10. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  11. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  12. Folds--Offshore of Bodega Head Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is...

  13. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  14. Faults--Offshore of Pacifica map area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  15. Folds--Offshore of Pacifica map area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  16. Folds--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  17. Folds--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is...

  18. Folds--Offshore of Bolinas Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  19. Faults--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  20. Faults--Offshore of Half Moon Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. The vector data file is...

  1. Faults--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is...

  2. Faults--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  3. Folds--Offshore of Half Moon Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. The vector data file is...

  4. Faults--Offshore of Bolinas Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. Contours--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  6. Folds--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  7. Faults--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  8. Folds--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is...

  9. Folds--Offshore of Bodega Head Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  10. Folds--Offshore of Bolinas Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Folds--Offshore of Fort Ross Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  12. Faults--Offshore of Fort Ross Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  13. Faults--Offshore of Bolinas Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  14. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  15. Faults--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is...

  16. Folds--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  17. Faults--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  18. Faults--Offshore of Half Moon Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. The vector data file is...

  19. Faults--Offshore of Pacifica map area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  20. Folds--Offshore of Pacifica map area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  1. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  2. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Pacifica map area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  3. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  4. Folds--Offshore of Aptos Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. Bathymetry--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  6. Habitat--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  7. Contours Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is...

  8. Bathymetry Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  9. Folds--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  10. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Bolinas Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Bolinas Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  12. Folds--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  13. Faults--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  14. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Aptos Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  15. Folds--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data of folds for the geologic and geomorphologic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is...

  16. Faults--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  17. Faults--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data of faults for the geologic and geomorphologic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is...

  18. Backscatter--Offshore of Refugio Beach Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3319 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3319) of Offshore Refugio Beach map area, California. The raster data...

  19. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  20. Faults--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  1. Faults--Offshore of Aptos Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  2. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Aptos Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  3. Folds--Offshore of Half Moon Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. The vector data file is...

  4. Faults--Offshore of Fort Ross Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  5. Folds--Offshore of Fort Ross Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  6. Folds--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  7. Faults--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  8. Folds--Offshore of Tomales Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  9. Faults--Offshore of Bodega Head Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is...

  10. Faults--Offshore of Tomales Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  11. Folds--Offshore of Pacifica map area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  12. Faults--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore San Francisco map area, California. The vector data file is...

  13. Faults--Offshore of Bolinas Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  14. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  15. Folds--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  16. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Pacifica map area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  17. Faults--Offshore of Bodega Head Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is...

  18. Folds--Offshore of Bodega Head Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  19. Pollutant transport among California regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, Wayne M.; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart; Holloway, John S.; Lerner, Brian M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guha, Abhinav; Andrews, Arlyn; Nowak, John B.; Evan, Stephanie; Fischer, Marc L.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Bon, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Several regions within California have significant air quality issues. Transport of pollutants emitted in one region to another region may add to the impact of local emissions. In this work, Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations show the amounts of tracers that are transported within and among four regions, Southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley, and the rest of the state. The simulations cover May and June of 2010, the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change experiment period. Tracers of automobile emissions and one type of agricultural emission are used. Tracer mixing ratios are compared to airborne and ground-based measurements. The age of tracers in each location is also presented. Vertical profiles and diurnal cycles help to clarify the transport process. As is well known, Southern California emissions are transported to the east and affect the desert areas, and Bay Area automobile emissions are an important source of pollutants in the San Joaquin Valley. A novel result is that the Southern California Bight is filled with a mixture of well-aged carbon monoxide tracer from Southern California and the Bay Area. Air over the Bight is also affected by the agricultural emissions represented by the agricultural tracer, dominantly from the Central Valley where its sources are largest. There is no indication of transport from Southern California to the Central Valley. Emissions from the Central Valley do make their way to Southern California, as shown by the agricultural tracer, but automobile emissions from the Valley are insignificant in Southern California.

  20. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: Georgia 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  1. Bathymetry--Offshore of Refugio Beach Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3319 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3319) of the Offshore of Refugio Beach map area, California. The...

  2. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Refugio Beach Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3319 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3319) of the Offshore of Refugio Beach map area, California. The...

  3. Bathymetry [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  4. Bathymetry [2m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  5. Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Peake, R.A. [California Energy Commission, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area of northern California are hot, large and areally uniform. The geological situation is special, probably overlying a slabless window caused by interaction between tectonic plates. Consequent magmatic processes have created a high-grade resource, in which the 300{degree}C isotherm is continuous, subhorizontal, and available at the shallow depth of 2.4 to 4.7 km over an area of 800 km{sup 2}. The region is very favorable for HDR development.

  6. Significant habitats and habitat complexes of the New York Bight watershed from 1971 to 1996 (NODC Accession 0071981)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report focuses on the identification and description of essential habitats of key species inhabiting the New York Bight watershed study area. The study area...

  7. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: South Carolina 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  8. Impact of industrialization of the California Delta Area. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.B.; Giroux, H.D.; Knuth, W.A.

    1977-12-15

    A field study to investigate the potential effects of industrialization of the California Delta (Montezuma Hills) was conducted during August and September of 1976. The study consisted of meteorological and air quality observations and tracer studies. Tracer releases were made at Pinole, Matinez, and Montezuma Hills, and samples were taken within a radius of 50 to 70 km downwind. Estimates of the impact of potential emissions on downwind receptor areas were made including estimates of ozone generation resulting from potential emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons from the Montezuma Hills site.

  9. Analysis of nonlinear internal waves in the New York Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Antony K.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the nonlinear-internal-wave evolution in the New York Bight was performed on the basis of current meter mooring data obtained in the New York Bight during the SAR Internal Wave Signature Experiment (SARSEX). The solitary wave theory was extended to include dissipation and shoaling effects, and a series of numerical experiments were performed by solving the wave evolution equation, with waveforms observed in the SARSEX area as initial conditions. The results of calculations demonstrate that the relative balance of dissipation and shoaling effects is crucial to the detailed evolution of internal wave packets. From an observed initial wave packet at the upstream mooring, the numerical evolution simulation agreed reasonably well with the measurements at the distant mooring for the leading two large solitons.

  10. Methane Emissions from Point and Area Sources in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Frost, G. J.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Neuman, J.; Nowak, J. B.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    Airborne measurements of methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and nitric oxides were made aboard the NOAA WP-3D during May and June 2010, during the CalNex (Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field campaign based out of Ontario, California. Emission ratios of CH4 to these other trace gas species are calculated from observations downwind of point sources and compared to national emissions inventories. Further, background urban ratios of CH4 to CO are established, and enhancements from known area CH4 sources, such as rice paddies and cattle ranches, are analyzed. Finally, significant methane emissions from point sources not in emissions inventories are examined.

  11. Wind speed forecasting in the central California wind resource area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, E.F. [Wind Economics & Technology, Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A wind speed forecasting program was implemented in the summer seasons of 1985 - 87 in the Central California Wind Resource Area (WRA). The forecasting program is designed to use either meteorological observations from the WRA and local upper air observations or upper air observations alone to predict the daily average windspeed at two locations. Forecasts are made each morning at 6 AM and are valid for a 24 hour period. Ease of use is a hallmark of the program as the daily forecast can be made using data entered into a programmable HP calculator. The forecasting program was the first step in a process to examine whether the electrical energy output of an entire wind power generation facility or defined subsections of the same facility could be predicted up to 24 hours in advance. Analysis of the results of the summer season program using standard forecast verification techniques show the program has skill over persistence and climatology.

  12. Stable isotopes and turnover of nitrate in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähnke, K.; Johannsen, A.; Emeis, K.

    2009-04-01

    The German Bight is a hot-spot of river-induced eutrophication of the North Sea due to nitrate loads discharged into this semi-isolated embayment by several large rivers. We analysed stable isotope signatures of water column nitrate in the area on a grid of stations in winter and early spring 2007. Overall spatial patterns of δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- image the predominant influence of the rivers Rhine and Elbe on the German Bight. On a smaller scale, however, and in offshore stations, nitrate assimilation of an incipient phytoplankton bloom is indicated by parallel enrichment of δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-. Intriguingly, the enrichment ratio in ɛ18: ɛ15 is 1.5:1, differing from the ratio of 1:1 associated with uptake by marine phytoplankton. These data suggest that the shift in nitrate isotopes is not solely due to beginning phytoplankton assimilation, but that, despite low temperatures, nitrate in the outer regions of the German Bight derives to a considerable extent from nitrification. These novel data mark remineralization in sediments as an important source of DIN and underscore the role of sediments in recharging water column nutrient inventories.

  13. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. 334.950 Section 334.950 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The... degrees true, 5.35 nautical miles; thence 040.4 degrees true to the beach. (3) The waters of the...

  14. SummerHill Homes, San Francisco Bay Area, Fremont, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-10-01

    Building America fact sheet on SummerHill Homes of Northern California. The Villa Savona Homes in Fremont, California were built using 15% fly ash in concrete, engineered lumber for floors, high efficiency windows with Low-emissivity (Low-E) glass, and fi

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 5m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 5x5 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetry Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ron Brown - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry (depth) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric PCA GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  20. Marine Spatial Planning in a Transboundary Context: Linking Baja California with California's Network of Marine Protected Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Arafeh-Dalmau

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that an effective path to globally protect marine ecosystems is through the establishment of eco-regional scale networks of MPAs spanning across national frontiers. In this work we aimed to plan for regionally feasible networks of MPAs that can be ecologically linked with an existing one in a transboundary context. We illustrate our exercise in the Ensenadian eco-region, a shared marine ecosystem between the south of California, United States of America (USA, and the north of Baja California, Mexico; where conservation actions differ across the border. In the USA, California recently established a network of MPAs through the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA, while in Mexico: Baja California lacks a network of MPAs or a marine spatial planning effort to establish it. We generated four different scenarios with Marxan by integrating different ecological, social, and management considerations (habitat representation, opportunity costs, habitat condition, and enforcement costs. To do so, we characterized and collected biophysical and socio-economic information for Baja California and developed novel approaches to quantify and incorporate some of these considerations. We were able to design feasible networks of MPAs in Baja California that are ecologically linked with California's network (met between 78.5 and 84.4% of the MLPA guidelines and that would represent a low cost for fishers and aquaculture investors. We found that when multiple considerations are integrated more priority areas for conservation emerge. For our region, human distribution presents a strong gradient from north to south and resulted to be an important factor for the spatial arrangement of the priority areas. This work shows how, despite the constraints of a data-poor area, the available conservation principles, mapping, and planning tools can still be used to generate spatial conservation plans in a transboundary context.

  1. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  2. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  3. Folds--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  4. Paleoshorelines--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is...

  5. Seafloor character--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents the seafloor-character map Offshore of Point Reyes, California (raster data file is included in "SFC_PointReyes.zip," which is...

  6. Seafloor character--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents the seafloor-character map Offshore of Point Reyes, California (raster data file is included in "SFC_PointReyes.zip," which is...

  7. Paleoshorelines--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is...

  8. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included...

  9. Folds--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  10. Numerical diagnostic of the circulation in the Santos Bight with COROAS hydrographic data

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Cirano; Edmo José Dias Campos

    1996-01-01

    This work represents part of the analyses of the data generated during the first two mesoscale hydrographic cruises of COROAS Project: one during the Summer and the other during the Winter of 1993. The area surveyed during these cruises is the region of the South Brazil Bight (or Santos Bight) limited at the coast by the cities of Ubatuba and Iguape, extending from the 50 m isobath to oceanic regions with depths greater than 2500 m. The main goal of this work consisted of the adaptation of th...

  11. Survey of potential geopressured resource areas in California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Robertson-Tait, A.; Kraemer, M.; Buening, N.

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a survey of the occurrence and characteristics of geopressured fluid resources in California using the publicly- available database involving more than 150,000 oil and gas wells drilled in the State. Of the 975 documented on-shore oil and gas pools studied, about 42% were identified as potentially geopressured. Geothermal gradients in California oil and gas fields lie within the normal range of 1 F to 2 F per 100 feet. Except for the Los Angeles Basin, there was no evidence of higher temperatures or temperature gradients in geopressured pools.

  12. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Tomales Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  15. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The polygon shapefile is included in...

  16. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Fort Ross Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  17. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  18. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Bodega Head Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  19. BackscatterA [8210]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  2. Geology and geomorphology--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The polygon shapefile is included in...

  3. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  4. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Tomales Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  7. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Fort Ross Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  8. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of San Francisco Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of San Francisco map area, California. The polygon shapefile is included in...

  9. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. The vector...

  10. Geology and geomorphology--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The polygon shapefile is included in...

  11. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Half Moon Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  12. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  13. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Bodega Head Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  14. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Half Moon Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Half Moon Bay map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  15. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. The vector...

  16. 1:250,000-scale geology of the Dry Valley Hydrographic Area, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of digital geologic data for the Dry Valley Hydrographic area, Nevada and California. It was compiled from individual 1:250,000-scale geologic...

  17. BackscatterB [Swath]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  19. BackscatterC [7125]--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. Multiple Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Richard J.; Graymer, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    With the exception of Los Angeles, perhaps no urban area in the United States is more at risk from landsliding, triggered by either precipitation or earthquake, than the San Francisco Bay region of northern California. By January each year, seasonal winter storms usually bring moisture levels of San Francisco Bay region hillsides to the point of saturation, after which additional heavy rainfall may induce landslides of various types and levels of severity. In addition, movement at any time along one of several active faults in the area may generate an earthquake large enough to trigger landslides. The danger to life and property rises each year as local populations continue to expand and more hillsides are graded for development of residential housing and its supporting infrastructure. The chapters in the text consist of: *Introduction by Russell W. Graymer *Chapter 1 Rainfall Thresholds for Landslide Activity, San Francisco Bay Region, Northern California by Raymond C. Wilson *Chapter 2 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 3 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 4 Landslide Hazard Modeled for the Cities of Oakland, Piedmont, and Berkeley, Northern California, from a M=7.1 Scenario Earthquake on the Hayward Fault Zone by Scott B. Miles and David K. Keefer *Chapter 5 Synthesis of Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike The plates consist of: *Plate 1 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike, Russell W. Graymer, Sebastian Roberts, Naomi B. Kalman, and Steven Sobieszczyk *Plate 2 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven

  1. Broadband seismological observations at The Geysers geothermal area, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Gritto, Roland; Haberland, Christian; Hartline, Craig

    2013-04-01

    The understanding of structure and dynamics of geothermal reservoirs for geothermal exploration and sustainable use of the resource requires an assessment using a multidisciplinary approach. The Geysers geothermal reservoir in northern California is the largest producing geothermal field in the world and has been exploited for over 50 years. Among other geophysical surveys, numerous seismic studies have been conducted based on data acquired by the LBNL seismic monitoring network over the past 20 years. However, thus far, no continuous seismic data have been recorded at the Geysers, which prevents detailed continuous monitoring in relation to reservoir operation. In February 2012, we deployed a temporary network of 33 broadband seismic stations, including Guralp and Trillium sensors (0.008 - 100 Hz). At present the network is still in operation. Twenty-six stations are located within the perimeter of the geothermal reservoir, while 7 are located on a perimeter around the reservoir at greater distances. While the recordings of larger magnitude events (M>3.5) may be saturated on the local stations, the outer stations are intended to record these events without interruption. We present analyses of a larger magnitude event (M~3.5) as well as correlations of continuous observations to geothermal operations. Thanks to the high density of instrumentation and the high dynamic range of the broadband sensors, smaller events (microseismicity) can be detected more easily, allowing for better precision in locations and more accuracy in the determination of magnitudes. The increased dynamic range offers an important improvement in the analysis of seismicity as the majority of events at The Geysers have magnitudes of M<2.0.

  2. Faults--Offshore of San Gregorio Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area,...

  3. Attenuation and source properties at the Coso Geothermal area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, S.E.; Lees, J.M.; Monastero, F.

    1999-01-01

    We use a multiple-empirical Green's function method to determine source properties of small (M -0.4 to 1.3) earthquakes and P- and S-wave attenuation at the Coso Geothermal Field, California. Source properties of a previously identified set of clustered events from the Coso geothermal region are first analyzed using an empirical Green's function (EGF) method. Stress-drop values of at least 0.5-1 MPa are inferred for all of the events; in many cases, the corner frequency is outside the usable bandwidth, and the stress drop can only be constrained as being higher than 3 MPa. P- and S-wave stress-drop estimates are identical to the resolution limits of the data. These results are indistinguishable from numerous EGF studies of M 2-5 earthquakes, suggesting a similarity in rupture processes that extends to events that are both tiny and induced, providing further support for Byerlee's Law. Whole-path Q estimates for P and S waves are determined using the multiple-empirical Green's function (MEGF) method of Hough (1997), whereby spectra from clusters of colocated events at a given station are inverted for a single attenuation parameter, ??, with source parameters constrained from EGF analysis. The ?? estimates, which we infer to be resolved to within 0.01 sec or better, exhibit almost as much scatter as a function of hypocentral distance as do values from previous single-spectrum studies for which much higher uncertainties in individual ?? estimates are expected. The variability in ?? estimates determined here therefore suggests real lateral variability in Q structure. Although the ray-path coverage is too sparse to yield a complete three-dimensional attenuation tomographic image, we invert the inferred ?? value for three-dimensional structure using a damped least-squares method, and the results do reveal significant lateral variability in Q structure. The inferred attenuation variability corresponds to the heat-flow variations within the geothermal region. A central low

  4. 76 FR 3652 - Dog Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... National Park Service Dog Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation...) is releasing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Dog Management Plan (Draft Plan/EIS), Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), California. Current dog management in GGNRA is based on a...

  5. 78 FR 1715 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This... to as the ``order.'' The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of...

  6. Bathymetry Hillshade [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  7. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  8. Data on wells in the Edwards Air Force Base area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcher, L.C.; Bader, J.S.; Hiltgen, W.J.

    1962-01-01

    The data presented In this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as a phase of the investigation of ground-water geology and hydrology of the Edwards Air Force Base area. The study was made in cooperation with the Department of the Air Force but also was coincident with the U.S. Geological Survey investigation of water wells and general hydrologic conditions throughout much of the desert region of southern California. The overall study of general hydrologic conditions in the desert is part of a cooperative program with the California Department of Water Resources.

  9. Geothermal investment and policy analysis with evaluation of California and Utah resource areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassel, T.A.V.; Edelstein, R.H.; Blair, P.D.; Amundsen, C.B.

    1979-10-01

    A geothermal investment decision model was developed which, when coupled to a site-specific stochastic cash flow model, estimates the conditional probability of a positive decision to invest in the development of geothermal resource areas. The geothermal cash flow model, the investment decision model and their applications for assessing the likely development potential of nine geothermal resource areas in California and Utah are described. The sensitivity of this investment behavior to several policy incentives is also analyzed and discussed.

  10. Flood-prone areas and waterways, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Robert W.; Bowers, James C.

    2002-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) is in the Mojave Desert region of southern California. Although the climate in the study area is arid, occasional intense storms result in flooding on the base, damaging roads and buildings. To plan for anticipated development at EAFB, the U.S. Department of the Air Force (USAF) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a cooperative study to locate flood-prone areas on the base. This report describes flood hazards and shows flood-prone areas of the base.

  11. A Cultural Resource Reconnaissance Study of Proposed Dredging and Construction Areas at Mission Bay Harbor, California,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-16

    Park 23 4.5 Existing Project Area Jetties 24 4.6 Dredging History 24 4.7 Historic Vessel Losses 25 5.0 SURVEY METHODOLOGY 27 5.1 Remote Sensing 29...basement rocks of the San Diego coastal area are a complex series of metamorphics and granitics formed in the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. The surface...the sea. No evidence of its presence now exists within the project areas. 4.4 MISSION BAY PARK The California Division of Parks acquired miscellaneous

  12. Tritium as a Tracer for the Discrimination of Water Bodies in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerjürgens, Jens; Badewien, Thomas; Sültenfuß, Jürgen; Zielinski, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Tritium (3H) in the atmosphere has declined to natural levels, after above ground nuclear weapon tests ended five decades ago. Currently tritium is present in the marine environment of the North Sea mainly due to liquid discharges from nuclear reprocessing plants (NRP) in La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) and different nuclear power plants (NPP) discharging their effluent to the English Channel or directly into the North Sea. This work deals with seawater samples collected in the German Bight in October 2014 onboard the research vessel Heincke that were analyzed for tritium activity concentration. The major research question of this study is the characterization of different water masses due to their tritium activity concentration. Tritium activity concentration in the coastal area is very high compared to samples taken in the central German Bight. Especially samples from the estuaries of the Elbe, Weser and Ems show high tritium activity concentrations. In correlation with salinity values, riverine freshwater masses were discriminated from oceanic influenced water masses. Activity concentrations from the coastal areas to the central bight are characterized by an exponentially decreasing gradient. It is shown that tritium can be utilized as a tracer for the discrimination of riverine freshwater from oceanic water masses.

  13. VENTANA WILDERNESS ADDITIONS, AND THE BLACK BUTTE, BEAR MOUNTAIN, AND BEAR CANYON ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiders, Victor M.; Esparza, Leon E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Ventana Wilderness additions and adjacent roadless areas in California offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. There has been virtually no history of mining in the area and very little mining has been done in geologically similar regions nearby. Oil and gas are produced from the Monterey Formation nearby, but the small areas of Monterey rocks in the area appear to lie byond the limits of productive sandstone. Quantitative data on the abundance of phosphate in the Monterey Formation would be useful in evaluating its potential for future use. Exploration for oil and gas in the Monterey Formation in adjacent areas could provide new data that could modify this current assessment of the oil and gas potential in the study area.

  14. Seismic refraction investigation of the Salton Sea geothermal area, Imperial Valley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, R.B.

    1978-12-01

    Seven seismic refraction profiles and four long-distance refraction shots have been used to investigate the Salton Sea geothermal area. From these data, two models of the geothermal and adjacent area are proposed. Model 1 proposes a basement high within the geothermal area trending parallel to the axis of the Imperial Valley. Model 2 assumes a horizontal basement in the E-W direction, and proposes a seismic velocity gradient that increases the apparent basement velocity from east to west approximately 15% within the geothermal area. Both models propose basement dip of 3 degrees to the south, yielding a thickness of sediments of 6.6 km near Brawley, California, in the center of the Imperial Valley. Based on offsets inferred in the sedimentary seismic layers of the geothermal area, two NW-SE trending fault zones are proposed.

  15. Hot dry rock resources of the Clear Lake Area, Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area of northern California is underlain by an asthenospheric upwarp. The upwarp was generated at a slabless window trailing the northward-moving Mendocino triple junction. The geothermal area lies immediately east of the Rodgers Creek rather than the San Andreas fault because of a transform jump in progress. Decompression melting of the mantle has led to basaltic underplating, and crustal anatexis. The high heat flow is due to conduction through a thin lithosphere and the latent heat of solidifying basalt, while the uniformity is due to the distribution of sources over a wide area of large flatlying sills, The Hot Dry Rock resource has heat flow exceeding 4 HFU over an area exceeding 800 km2.

  16. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB......) with cooler, fresher, oxygen-rich waters offshore. The alternating jets' flowing into the mushrooms were directed mainly northwards and southwards and differed in temperature by only 1.5 degrees C; however, the salinity difference was as much as 0.5, and therefore quite large. The GAB waters were slightly...... denser than the cooler offshore waters. The field of dipoles evolved and distorted, but appeared to drift westwards at 5km day-1 over two weeks, and one new mushroom carried GAB water southwards at 7km day(-1). Other features encountered between Cape Leeuwin and Tasmania included the Leeuwin Current...

  17. Examining patient race and area predictors of inpatient admission for schizophrenia among hospital users in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna; Rudoler, David; Durbin, Janet; Laporte, Audrey; Callaghan, Russell C

    2014-12-01

    According to international research African-Caribbean and Black African populations have increased risk of hospitalization for schizophrenia, compared to Whites. Less is known about admission risk for other racial-ethnic groups. This study investigated racial-ethnic differences in hospital admission for schizophrenia in California. It also investigated the influence of area social factors (racial-ethnic neighborhood composition, and per capita income) and health service factors (presence of primary care clinics). The study sample included individuals admitted to a California hospital during 1990-2005 with a primary appendicitis related diagnosis, and without a prior or concurrent indication of schizophrenia. The adjusted logistic model examined how patient racial-ethnicity (White, Black, Hispanic, Other), other personal, area social characteristics and presence of primary care clinics influenced hospital admissions for schizophrenia. Black individuals were almost twice as likely as Whites to be admitted while Hispanics and Other race individuals were less to be admitted. In addition, male sex, having more comorbidities and living in areas with greater proportions of non-Whites increased risk. The increased risk for Blacks compared to Whites was consistent with the existing literature. However, this is among the first studies to report that Hispanics had a reduced risk of admission for schizophrenia, compared to Whites. Future studies may want to include a broader range of health services to better understand patterns of care use among individuals with schizophrenia.

  18. California GAMA Program: A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Bakersfield Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-11-01

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MTBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin that underlies Bakersfield, in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water

  19. Susceptibility of pepper weevil (anthonomus eugenii cano) (coleoptera: curculionidae) to seven insecticides in rural areas of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalía Servín Villegas; José. L. García Hernández; Armando Tejas Romero; José L. Martínez Carrillo; M. A. Toapanta

    2008-01-01

    The susceptibility of the pepper weevil (Anthonomus eugenii), collected from Baja California Sur, Mexico, to seven insecticides was determined. Acontact, residual exposition method was used to obtain the lethal concentrations fifty (LC50) and the diagnostic concentration (LC95) of organophosphates (OF), carbamates (CA), pyrethroids (PIR), and organochlorine (OC) insecticides used to control pepper weevils from two agricultural areas (Los Planes and Todos Santos) in Southern Baja California Pe...

  20. Potential Offshore Wind Energy Areas in California: An Assessment of Locations, Technology, and Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, Walter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Philipp [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report summarizes a study of possible offshore wind energy locations, technologies, and levelized cost of energy in the state of California between 2015 and 2030. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the federal agency responsible for regulating renewable energy development on the Outer Continental Shelf. It is based on reference wind energy areas where representative technology and performance characteristics were evaluated. These reference areas were identified as sites that were suitable to represent offshore wind cost and technology based on physical site conditions, wind resource quality, known existing site use, and proximity to necessary infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to assist energy policy decision-making by state utilities, independent system operators, state government officials and policymakers, BOEM, and its key stakeholders. The report is not intended to serve as a prescreening exercise for possible future offshore wind development.

  1. 78 FR 37845 - Meeting of the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) Subgroup of the California Desert...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Meeting of the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) Subgroup of the... 92-463 and 94-579, that the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Subgroup of the California...

  2. Climate Change and Conservation Planning in California: The San Francisco Bay Area Upland Habitat Goals Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branciforte, R.; Weiss, S. B.; Schaefer, N.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change threatens California's vast and unique biodiversity. The Bay Area Upland Habitat Goals is a comprehensive regional biodiversity assessment of the 9 counties surrounding San Francisco Bay, and is designing conservation land networks that will serve to protect, manage, and restore that biodiversity. Conservation goals for vegetation, rare plants, mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates are set, and those goals are met using the optimization algorithm MARXAN. Climate change issues are being considered in the assessment and network design in several ways. The high spatial variability at mesoclimatic and topoclimatic scales in California creates high local biodiversity, and provides some degree of local resiliency to macroclimatic change. Mesoclimatic variability from 800 m scale PRISM climatic norms is used to assess "mesoclimate spaces" in distinct mountain ranges, so that high mesoclimatic variability, especially local extremes that likely support range limits of species and potential climatic refugia, can be captured in the network. Quantitative measures of network resiliency to climate change include the spatial range of key temperature and precipitation variables within planning units. Topoclimatic variability provides a finer-grained spatial patterning. Downscaling to the topoclimatic scale (10-50 m scale) includes modeling solar radiation across DEMs for predicting maximum temperature differentials, and topographic position indices for modeling minimum temperature differentials. PRISM data are also used to differentiate grasslands into distinct warm and cool types. The overall conservation strategy includes local and regional connectivity so that range shifts can be accommodated.

  3. Epidemiology and surveillance of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in two large metropolitan areas in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Jhaqueline; Roberts, Eric; Paulukonis, Susan; Collins, Natalie; English, Paul; Kaye, Wendy

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to provide demographic profiles and incidence estimates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in two diverse California metropolitan areas: Los Angeles County (LA) and the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA). Data were retrospectively collected from multiple sources. Case eligibility criteria included residency in SFBA or LA, and treatment for or diagnosis of ALS between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011. Overall incidence rates as well as age-, gender-, race- and ethnicity-specific rates were calculated. We identified 539 ALS cases in SFBA and 545 in LA; 618 were incident cases. Cases were more likely to be male and white. There were considerably more cases (p < 0.05) in LA who were foreign-born (LA, 22%; SFBA, 15%), black (LA, 10%; SFBA, 6%) or Hispanic (LA, 19%; SFBA, 10%). Conversely, the age adjusted incidence rates (per 100,000) were higher in SFBA for whites (LA, 1.40; SFBA, 2.49) and Hispanics (LA, 0.66; SFBA, 1.57) compared with LA. General case demographics and incidence rates in these two areas were similar to published studies. However, the differences between the two areas raise questions about how factors such as geography, access to care, and referral patterns may affect case ascertainment and diagnosis.

  4. Consistency and complementarity of different coastal ocean observations: A neural network-based analysis for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, K.; Stanev, E. V.

    2011-05-01

    HF radar measurements in the German Bight and their consistency with other available observations were analyzed. First, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of the radial component of the surface current measured by one radar was performed. Afterwards, Neural Networks (NNs) were trained to now- and forecast the first five EOFs from tide gauge measurements. The inverse problem, i.e., to forecast a sea level from these EOFs was also solved using NNs. For both problems, the influence of wind measurements on the nowcast/forecast accuracy was quantified. The forecast improves if HF radar data are used in combination with wind data. Analysis of the upscaling potential of HF radar measurements demonstrated that information from one radar station in the German Bight is representative of an area larger than the observational domain and could contribute to correcting information from biased observations or numerical models.

  5. Preliminary geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Stone, Paul; Powell, Charles L.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Selting, Amy J.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a new geologic digital map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map = 2,000 feet on the ground) and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. This preliminary map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Santa Barbara and Goleta 7.5' quadrangles. A planned second version will extend the mapping westward into the adjoining Dos Pueblos Canyon quadrangle and eastward into the Carpinteria quadrangle. The mapping presented here results from the collaborative efforts of geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP) (Minor, Kellogg, Stanley, Stone, and Powell) and the tectonic geomorphology research group at the University of California at Santa Barbara (Gurrola and Selting). C.L. Powell, II, performed all new fossil identifications and interpretations reported herein. T.R. Brandt designed and edited the GIS database,performed GIS database integration and created the digital cartography for the map layout. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along a west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The coastal plain region, which extends from the Santa Ynez Mountains on the north to the Santa Barbara Channel on the south, is underlain by numerous active and potentially active folds and partly buried thrust faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt. Strong earthquakes that occurred in the region in 1925 (6.8 magnitude) and 1978 (5.1 magnitude) are evidence that such structures pose a significant earthquake hazard to the approximately 200,000 people living within the major coastal population centers of Santa Barbara and Goleta. Also, young landslide deposits along the steep lower flank of the Santa

  6. Moderate, strong and strongest earthquake-prone areas in the Caucasus, California and the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzeboev, Boris; Gvishiani, Alexei

    2016-04-01

    We present this study on recognition of areas of possible occurrence of strong earthquakes. The study deals with the earthquake-prone areas in three regions with different geological and tectonic structures located in different parts of the world. The authors created a new method (FCAZ - Fuzzy Clustering and Zoning) for recognition of highly seismic areas, where epicenters of earthquakes with magnitude M≥M0 can occur. The magnitude threshold M0 depends on the seismic activity of the region. The objects of clustering are earthquake epicenters. The new method allows us to implement uniformly necessary clustering of the recognition objects respectively for moderate, strong and strongest events. Suggested approach consists of two steps: clustering of known earthquake epicenters by the original DPS (Discrete Perfect Sets) algorithm and delineating highly seismic zones around the recognized clusters by another original E2XT algorithm. By means of this method we detected the areas of possible occurrence of the epicenters of strong earthquakes in the Caucasus (M≥5), in California (M≥6.5) and in the mountain belt of the Andes (M≥7.75). The latter case relates to the possible areas of natural disaster occurence. Reliability of the results is confirmed by numerous control experiments, including individual and complete seismic history. Two strongest recent Chilean earthquakes occurred in 2014 and 2015 after the moment the results were published. Their epicenters belong to the zone recognized as high seismically hazardous. It is a strong independent argument which confirms the reliability of the results. The presented results integrate most recent outcomes of more than 40 years of research in pattern recognition and systems analysis for seismic zoning implemented in Russian Academy of Science. This research is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-30020).

  7. A Qualitative Study about Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas Living in a Rural Area of California: Lessons for Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Perez, Miguel; Torres, Victor; Krenz, Vickie

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major health concern for Latinas, who are also less likely to undergo a Pap smear exam than the general population. This study identifies alterable determinants of Pap smear screening for Latino women living in a rural area of California. It involved the design and pilot testing of a culturally appropriate instrument and the…

  8. Assessment of shallow ground-water quality in recently urbanized areas of Sacramento, California, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for anthropogenic impact on shallow ground-water quality beneath recently developed urban areas of Sacramento, California, has been observed in the sampling results from 19 monitoring wells in 1998. Eight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), four pesticides, and one pesticide transformation product were detected in low concentrations, and nitrate, as nitrogen, was detected in elevated concentrations; all of these concentrations were below National and State primary and secondary maximum contaminant levels. VOC results from this study are more consistent with the results from urban areas nationwide than from agricultural areas in the Central Valley, indicating that shallow ground-water quality has been impacted by urbanization. VOCs detected may be attributed to either the chlorination of drinking water, such as trichloromethane (chloroform) detected in 16 samples, or to the use of gasoline additives, such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), detected in 2 samples. Pesticides detected may be attributed to use on household lawns and gardens and rights-of-way, such as atrazine detected in three samples, or to past agricultural practices, and potentially to ground-water/surface-water interactions, such as bentazon detected in one sample from a well adjacent to the Sacramento River and downstream from where bentazon historically was used on rice. Concentrations of nitrate may be attributed to natural sources, animal waste, old septic tanks, and fertilizers used on lawns and gardens or previously used on agricultural crops. Seven sample concentrations of nitrate, as nitrogen, exceeded 3.0 milligrams per liter, a level that may indicate impact from human activities. Ground-water recharge from rainfall or surface-water runoff also may contribute to the concentrations of VOCs and pesticides observed in ground water. Most VOCs and pesticides detected in ground-water samples also were detected in air and surface-water samples collected at sites within or adjacent to the

  9. Late Quaternary faulting and historic seismicity in the western Lake Mead area, Nevada, Arizona and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.W.; O' Connel, D.R. (Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-04-01

    As part of a regional seismic hazard study for Reclamation dams on the northern lower Colorado River, the age and distribution of known and suspected late Quaternary faults were investigated and historic seismicity was analyzed for the western Lake Mead area. Late Quaternary faults in the area consist of the Mead Slope, Black Hills, Frenchman Mountain, and California Wash faults. Geologic mapping and scarp profiles indicate that of these late Quaternary faults, the Black Hills fault displays evidence for the youngest (probably mid-Holocene) surface faulting. No information about the ages of older events was obtained for any of the faults; however, the ages of the most recent surface-rupturing events for individual faults suggest recurrence intervals of tens of thousands of years for specific faults and regional recurrence rates of several thousand years for M[sub 3] [>=] 6 1/2 events. Since 1936 when Hoover Dam was completed and the initial filling of Lake Mead began, the Boulder Basin area, the largest and deepest part of Lake Mead, has experienced abundant seismic activity that includes some of the largest historic earthquakes in southern Nevada (at least 21 M 4 events and one M 5). Based on earthquake locations from early networks (1937--1950) and those from temporary networks operating in 1975--1976 and 1988, earthquakes are clearly associated with the northeast-striking Mead Slope and Black Hills faults; one of the few associations of seismicity with late Quaternary faults in the Basin and Range. However, earthquakes also appear to be associated with the Fortification fault, a north-striking fault with no evidence of Quaternary surface faulting. Focal mechanisms for some of the 1975--1976 and 1988 events (all events M [<=] 3) suggest active strike-slip/oblique-slip motion on north-striking faults and normal/oblique-slip motion on northeast-striking structures.

  10. Heavy Metals Concentration Levels in Soils throughout the East San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, K.; Ramirez, N.; Diaz, J.; Cuff, K.; Adarkwah, N.

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that soils near structures made of pressure treated wood created before 2003 often contain high levels of arsenic, which was widely used in the processing of such wood. One such study, conducted by student scientists affiliated with the SF ROCKS program at San Francisco State University, found high levels of arsenic in soils collected from several children's play areas in San Francisco (Negrete, et al., 2006). Due to the known health risks associated with high concentrations of arsenic, and given a general lack of data related to soils of the East San Francisco Bay Area, the current study was initiated to determine whether or not dangerously high levels of arsenic exist in soils near public schools and playgrounds located in Richmond and Oakland, California. Soil samples were collected from approximately 100 locations in and around such areas, and analyzed for arsenic and a variety of other heavy metals concentration levels using an ICP spectrometer. Preliminary results demonstrate arsenic levels that exceed the EPA's 0.4 ppm action limit in 27 of the 100 sites from which samples were collected. Also, strong correlations between arsenic and various metals in the soil were found, such as arsenic with chromium (0.7022) and nickel (0.6588). Additionally, dangerously high levels of arsenic and lead were found in soils collected along the shores of a small lake fed by Leona Creek on the campus of Mills College in the Oakland foothills, approximately 2 kilometers downstream from a former iron sulphide mine. This occurrence constitutes evidence that the owner of the mine has not complied with recent orders from a local regulatory agency to make sure that mine effluents are safe.

  11. Possible reactivation of the Vincent-Chocolate Mountains thrust in the Gavilan Hills area, southeasternmost California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, F.R.; Jacobson, C.E. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)); Haxel, G.B. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary Orocopia Schist (OS) of southeasternmost California consists of metamorphosed continental margin sedimentary and basaltic rocks, overlain by an upper plate of continental crust along the Vincent-Chocolate Mountains fault (VCMF). Previous analysis of late folds and shear band in OS and upper plate in the Gavilan Hills and adjacent ares indicated that the direction of transport of the upper plate was northeastward. This has been considered evidence of a SW dipping subduction zone, along which an outboard continental fragment was sutured to North America. Another view is that the VCMF was formed by underplating of the OS in an Andean continental margin, and that the NE-vergent late structures formed during uplift of the OS. The authors' continuing work in the Gavilan Hills confirm the NE sense of vergence but suggests a more complex structural history. The schist is characterized by refolded folds, shear bands, and two penetrative lineations. An older lineation that ranges from N10[degree]E to N30[degree]E is widespread in the area, but is more evident at low structural levels. A second lineation ranges from N40[degree]E to N70[degree]E and is strongly developed in rocks near the VCMF. The complex folding pattern, presence of mylonitic schist, relative thinness of upper-plate mylonite, and possible retrogressive character of the shear bands suggest that the VCMF in the Gavilan Hills area may have been reactivated after original thrusting. The VCMF in the Gavilan Hills is intermediate in character between the probable subduction thrust in the San Gabriel Mountains and the reactivated faults in the Orocopia Mountains and areas surrounding the Gavilan Hills.

  12. Scenario earthquake hazards for the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Branum, David M.; Wills, Chris J.; Hill, David P.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) multi-hazards project in the Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area, the California Geological Survey (CGS) developed several earthquake scenarios and evaluated potential seismic hazards, including ground shaking, surface fault rupture, liquefaction, and landslide hazards associated with these earthquake scenarios. The results of these analyses can be useful in estimating the extent of potential damage and economic losses because of potential earthquakes and in preparing emergency response plans. The Long Valley Caldera-Mono Lake area has numerous active faults. Five of these faults or fault zones are considered capable of producing magnitude ≥6.7 earthquakes according to the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2) developed by the 2007 Working Group of California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP) and the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping (NSHM) Program. These five faults are the Fish Slough, Hartley Springs, Hilton Creek, Mono Lake, and Round Valley Faults. CGS developed earthquake scenarios for these five faults in the study area and for the White Mountains Fault to the east of the study area. Earthquake scenarios are intended to depict the potential consequences of significant earthquakes. They are not necessarily the largest or most damaging earthquakes possible. Earthquake scenarios are both large enough and likely enough that emergency planners should consider them in regional emergency response plans. Earthquake scenarios presented here are based on fault geometry and activity data developed by the WGCEP, and are consistent with the 2008 Update of the United States National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHM).For the Hilton Creek Fault, two alternative scenarios were developed in addition to the NSHM scenario to account for different opinions in how far north the fault extends into the Long Valley Caldera. For each scenario, ground motions were calculated using the current standard practice

  13. Ground-water resources of the Yucca Valley-Joshua Tree area, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R.E.

    1972-01-01

    The southeastern part of the Mojave Water Agency area included in this report comprises about 600 square miles. Recharge into the area is almost exclusively from precipitation in the San Bernardino and Little San Bernardino Mountains. About 500 acre-feet per year of recharge enters the western part of the area as underflow through Pipes Wash. Little direct recharge occurs as a result of precipitation directly on the unconsolidated deposits. Presently about 11,000 persons reside in the area and current gross pumpage is about 1,600 acre-feet annually. By the year 2000 the population is estimated to be 62,000 and annual gross pumpage is expected to be nearly 11,000 acre-feet. Although over 1,200,000 acre-feet of ground water are presently in storage, most of the population is centered in the southern part of the area around the towns of Yucca Valley and Joshua Tree. About 70 percent of the population resides in the vicinity of Yucca Valley and is supplied by ground water pumped from the Warren Valley basin. Of the 96,000 acre-feet of ground water in storage in that basin in 1969, about 80,000 acre-feet will be necessary to sustain projected growth there until 2000. Assuming negligible recharge and only about 50 percent recovery of the ground water in storage, if imported water from northern California is not available before about 1990, additional local supplies will have to be developed, possibly in the adjacent Pipes subbasin to the north. Ground water in the southern part of the study area generally contains less than 250 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids and 1.0 mg/l fluoride. A general degradation of ground-water quality occurs northward toward the dry lakes where the concentrations of dissolved solids and fluoride approach 2,000 and 5.0 mg/l, respectively. In Reche subbasin some isolated occurrences of fluoride exceeding 1.5 mg/l were noted. The chemical character of ground water in Johnson Valley and Morongo Valley basins differs from well to well

  14. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.

    1978-03-01

    The objectives of the project were to determine the physical/dynamical processes controlling/affecting the distribution of phytoplankton nutrients on the continental shelf in the South Atlantic Bight. The initial objectives were to determine the short term, i.e., 2 to 10 day and longer term flux of nutrients onto the continental shelf. This is clearly related to the more general problem of combined physical and biogenic control of phytoplankton nutrients. During the period from June, 1975 to March, 1978 the study of the continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight has been principally involved with a substantial, coordinated field effort. The success of the data acquisition phase of the program has now required an intensive data analysis phase which has been slowly increasing in effort. Emphasis is placed on the main phase of the field program, located in Onslow Bay, which has beel completed and the data are being analyzed. During the three-year period 20 cruises were made into the Carolina Capes area and samples were collected. A list is included of some 100 publications during the period.

  15. Environmental Assessment for Airborne Laser Debris Management Vandenberg AFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    zooplankton in the Southern California Bight has been determined to depend on the nutritive value (i.e., nitrogen content) of phytoplankton on which they...May and September surveys. On coastal transects, California gulls (Larus californicus), western grebes, western gulls, and surf scoters (Melanitta...perspicillata) were most abundant during January; western grebes, western gulls, surf scoters, and brown pelicans were most abundant during May

  16. Pilot Inventory of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California, 1990-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenoff-Irving, M.; Howell, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey Golden Gate Field Station conducted a baseline inventory of terrestrial vertebrates within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties, California between 1990 and 1997. We established 456 permanent study plots in 6 major park habitats, including grassland, coastal scrub, riparian woodland, coastal wetland, broad-leaved evergreen forest, and needle-leaved evergreen forest. We tested multiple inventory methods, including live traps, track plate stations, and artificial cover boards, across all years and habitats. In most years, sampling occurred in 3?4 primary sampling sessions between July and September. In 1994, additional sampling occurred in February and May in conjunction with an assessment of Hantavirus exposure in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Overall, we detected 32 mammal, 14 reptile, and 6 amphibian species during 25,222 trap-nights of effort. The deer mouse?the most abundant species detected--accounted for 67% of total captures. We detected the Federal Endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) at one coastal wetland plot in 1992. This project represents the first phase in the development of a comprehensive terrestrial vertebrate inventory and monitoring program for GGNRA. This report summarizes data on relative abundance, frequency of occurrence, distribution across habitat types, and trap success for terrestrial vertebrates detected during this 7-year effort. It includes comprehensive descriptions of the inventory methods and sampling strategies employed during this survey and is intended to help guide the park in the implementation of future longterm ecological monitoring programs.

  17. Ecological strategies in california chaparral: Interacting effects of soils, climate, and fire on specific leaf area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacker, Brian; Rajakaruna, Nishanta; Ackerly, David; Harrison, Susan; Keeley, Jon E.; Vasey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background: High values of specific leaf area (SLA) are generally associated with high maximal growth rates in resource-rich conditions, such as mesic climates and fertile soils. However, fire may complicate this relationship since its frequency varies with both climate and soil fertility, and fire frequency selects for regeneration strategies (resprouting versus seeding) that are not independent of resource-acquisition strategies. Shared ancestry is also expected to affect the distribution of resource-use and regeneration traits.Aims: We examined climate, soil, and fire as drivers of community-level variation in a key functional trait, SLA, in chaparral in California.Methods: We quantified the phylogenetic, functional, and environmental non-independence of key traits for 87 species in 115 plots.Results: Among species, SLA was higher in resprouters than seeders, although not after phylogeny correction. Among communities, mean SLA was lower in harsh interior climates, but in these climates it was higher on more fertile soils and on more recently burned sites; in mesic coastal climates, mean SLA was uniformly high despite variation in soil fertility and fire history.Conclusions: We conclude that because important correlations exist among both species traits and environmental filters, interpreting the functional and phylogenetic structure of communities may require an understanding of complex interactive effects.

  18. Source processes of industrially-induced earthquakes at the Geysers geothermal area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Microearthquake activity at The Geysers geothermal area, California, mirrors the steam production rate, suggesting that the earthquakes are industrially induced. A 15-station network of digital, three-component seismic stations was operated for one month in 1991, and 3,900 earthquakes were recorded. Highly-accurate moment tensors were derived for 30 of the best recorded earthquakes by tracing rays through tomographically derived 3-D VP and VP / VS structures, and inverting P-and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios. The orientations of the P-and T-axes are very scattered, suggesting that there is no strong, systematic deviatoric stress field in the reservoir, which could explain why the earthquakes are not large. Most of the events had significant non-double-couple (non-DC) components in their source mechanisms with volumetric components up to ???30% of the total moment. Explosive and implosive sources were observed in approximately equal numbers, and must be caused by cavity creation (or expansion) and collapse. It is likely that there is a causal relationship between these processes and fluid reinjection and steam withdrawal. Compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) components were up to 100% of the deviatoric component. Combinations of opening cracks and shear faults cannot explain all the observations, and rapid fluid flow may also be involved. The pattern of non-DC failure at The Geysers contrasts with that of the Hengill-Grensdalur area in Iceland, a largely unexploited water-dominated field in an extensional stress regime. These differences are poorly understood but may be linked to the contrasting regional stress regimes and the industrial exploitation at The Geysers.

  19. Geology and geomorphology--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  20. Geology and geomorphology--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  1. The Role of Intense Storms on Backbarrier Morphodynamics: Examples From the New York/New Jersey Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scileppi, E.; Donnelly, J. P.; Mahoney, M.

    2004-12-01

    Intense storms can significantly modify coastal landforms. Understanding the influence of these relatively rare, but potentially important, events on the evolution of coastal systems is important if we are to reliably forecast future changes. In the New York/New Jersey Bight the most intense storms are landfalling tropical cyclones that approach the region from the south. Since European settlement, four severe tropical cyclones, occurring in 1693, 1788, 1821, and 1893, have made landfall in the New York/New Jersey Bight. Each of these storms resulted in a rise in water level of over 2.5 meters above mean sea level (MSL) in New York City. Storm surges of this magnitude can overtop and breach barrier beaches creating inlets and depositing overwash deposits across the surface of backbarrier marshes. Severe winter storms, near miss, and minimal hurricanes impacting the region in the 20th century caused water levels to rise approximately 1.5-2 meters above MSL. Events of this magnitude likely caused erosion of the beach face, and limited overtopping and breaching restricted to areas with little or no dune development. Backbarrier sediments can preserve an archive of environmental changes. We collected a series of vibracores from four backbarrier marshes in the New York/New Jersey Bight. High-resolution grain-size and loss-on-ignition analyses were used to characterize the sediments and yield evidence of multiple storm-induced deposits. Heavy metal pollution horizons, pollen stratigraphic data, and C-14 ages were used to provide chronological control. In order to link the dynamics of the barriers with the sedimentary framework of the backbarrier estuary, we used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to map the subsurface character of the barrier sediments. Our results indicate that intense tropical cyclones are very important in shaping the barrier and backbarrier environments in the New York/New Jersey Bight. Backbarrier and barrier sediments reveal records of overwash

  2. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this

  3. Cephalopods and cetaceans as indicators of offshore bioavailability of cadmium off Central South Brazil Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorneles, Paulo Renato [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: dorneles@biof.ufrj.br; Lailson-Brito, Jose [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lailson@uerj.br; Aguiar dos Santos, Roberta [Centro de Pesquisa e Gestao de Recursos Pesqueiros do Litoral Sudeste e Sul, IBAMA, 88301-700 Itajai, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: gibteuthis@yahoo.com.br; Silva da Costa, Paulo Alberto [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Populacoes Marinhas, UNIRIO, 22290-240 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: pauloascosta@uol.com.br; Malm, Olaf [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: olaf@biof.ufrj.br; Azevedo, Alexandre Freitas [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: azevedo.alex@uol.com.br; Machado Torres, Joao Paulo [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: jptorres@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-07-15

    Regarding Brazilian coast, industrial and urban developments are concentrated along Central South Brazil Bight. Samples from inshore and offshore species from the concerned area were analyzed, comprising 24 cetaceans (9 species) and 32 squids (2 species). Cadmium was determined by GFAAS and our results were in agreement with certified values (DOLT-2, NRCC). Mean cadmium concentration (in {mu}g/g, wet weight) observed in the digestive gland of sexually mature Argentine short-finned squids (Illex argentinus) was 1002.9. To our knowledge this is the highest cadmium level ever reported for a cephalopod. Concerning cetaceans, our results include one of the highest renal cadmium concentrations described for striped dolphins (71.29 {mu}g/g, wet weight). Anthropogenic action, upwelling and cannibalism of Argentine short-finned squid on the studied area are possible reasons for such remarkable cadmium concentrations. - Cd levels in ommastrephid squids from Brazil are the highest ever reported for cephalopods.

  4. Isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponce, D.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Morin, R.L.; Mankinen, E.A.

    2002-03-12

    Gravity investigations of the Death Valley ground-water model area are part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (Interagency agreement DE-AI08-96NV11967) to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwestern Nevada and parts of California. The Death Valley ground-water model is located between lat 35 degrees 00' and 38 degrees 15' N., and long 115 degrees and 118 degrees W. An isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley ground-water model was prepared from over 40,000 gravity stations, most of which are publicly available on a CD-ROM of gravity data of Nevada (Ponce, 1997). The map also includes gravity data recently collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (Mankinen and others, 1998; Morin and Blakely, 1999). A subset of these gravity data in the Nevada Test Site and vicinity were described in detail by Harris and others (1989) who included information on gravity meters used, dates of collection, sources, descriptions of base stations, plots of data, and digital and paper lists of principal facts. For display purposes only, gravity data within Yucca Flat were thinned by a factor of 10. The digital gravity data set was gridded at an interval of 400 m using a computer program (Webring, 1981) based on a minimum curvature algorithm by Briggs (1974). The resulting grid was then interpolated to a 200-m grid to minimize pixel size, and then it was color contoured.

  5. Geologic Map of the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain Area, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Keller, Edward A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a newly revised and expanded digital geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground)1 and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Dos Pueblos Canyon, Goleta, Santa Barbara, and Carpinteria 7.5' quadrangles. The new map supersedes an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002; revised 2006) that provided coastal coverage only within the Goleta and Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping to the west and east, geologic mapping in parts of the central map area has been significantly revised from the preliminary map compilation - especially north of downtown Santa Barbara in the Mission Ridge area - based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units, including several new units recognized in the areas of expanded mapping, are described in detail in the accompanying pamphlet. Abundant new biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault kinematic observations embedded in the digital map database are more complete owing to the addition of slip-sense determinations. Finally, the pamphlet accompanying the present report includes an expanded and refined summary of stratigraphic and structural observations and interpretations that are based on the composite geologic data contained in the new map compilation. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest

  6. Monitoring and modeling conditions for regional shallow landslide initiation in the San Francisco Bay area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B. D.; Stock, J. D.; Godt, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Intense winter storms in the San Francisco Bay area (SFBA) of California often trigger widespread landsliding, including debris flows that originate as shallow (initiation thresholds are available for the SFBA, antecedent soil moisture conditions also play a major role in determining the likelihood for landslide generation from a given storm. Previous research has demonstrated that antecedent triggering conditions can be obtained using pre-storm precipitation thresholds (e.g., 250-400 mm of seasonal pre-storm rainfall). However, these types of thresholds do not account for the often cyclic pattern of wetting and drying that can occur early in the winter storm season (i.e. October - December), and which may skew the applicability of precipitation-only based thresholds. To account for these cyclic and constantly evolving soil moisture conditions, we have pursued methods to measure soil moisture directly and integrate these measurements into predictive analyses. During the past three years, the USGS installed a series of four subsurface hydrology monitoring stations in shallow landslide-prone locations of the SFBA to establish a soil-moisture-based antecedent threshold. In addition to soil moisture sensors, the monitoring stations are each equipped with piezometers to record positive pore water pressure that is likely required for shallow landslide initiation and a rain gauge to compare storm intensities with existing precipitation-based thresholds. Each monitoring station is located on a natural, grassy hillslope typically composed of silty sands, underlain by sandstone, sloping at approximately 30°, and with a depth to bedrock of approximately 1 meter - conditions typical of debris flow generation in the SFBA. Our observations reveal that various locations respond differently to seasonal precipitation, with some areas (e.g., Marin County) remaining at higher levels of saturation for longer periods of time during the winter compared to other areas (e.g., the East

  7. Analysis of the upscaling problem - A case study for the barotropic dynamics in the North Sea and the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The upscaling problem is investigated using the barotropic dynamics of the North Sea and the German Bight as an example. The impact of small scale perturbations of bathymetry, bottom roughness, wind forcing, and boundary forcing is quantified using a two-dimensional linear barotropic model for the entire North Sea with 5 km resolution. The model is solved in the spectral domain for the dominant M2 tide. Comparisons with results from a fully nonlinear 3D circulation model show that the main circulation features are well captured by the spectral model. The impact of different types of perturbations is estimated by inversion of the model using the perturbation covariance matrix as input. Case studies with white noise and fully correlated noise are presented. It is shown that the German Bight area stands out in its sensitivity with respect to small scale uncertainties of bathymetry. Small scale changes of bottom roughness have a particularly strong effect in the English Channel. Small scale wind perturbations have a significant local effect only in very shallow near coastal areas. It is shown that uncorrelated noise introduced along an open boundary around the German Bight only has a very local effect. Perturbations with long correlation length are shown to lead to significant far field effects along the east coast of England. It is demonstrated that this effect is related to the boundary conditions used for the North Sea model. In a next step a German Bight grid with 1 km resolution is nested into the North Sea grid and the spectral model is solved in a two way nested configuration. It is shown that there are some significant local and far field effects caused by the change of resolution in this coastal area. Finally, the potential impact of observations taken in coastal areas is investigated by evaluating the Kalman a posteriori distribution of analysis vectors based on different assumptions about model errors. The area of influence of a single tide gauge is

  8. EFH Conservation Areas off Washington, Oregon, and California for NMFS' Final Rule Implementing Amendment 19 to the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data depict Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) conservation areas off Washington, Oregon, and California. The coordinate locations are from NMFS' Final Rule to...

  9. Areas permitted for irrigation, storage, evaporation, and disposal of treated sewage effluent in the upper Carson River Basin, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of areas permitted for irrigation, storage, evaporation, and disposal of treated sewage effluent in the Upper Carson River Basin, California...

  10. 75 FR 51661 - Amendment of the Pacific High and Low Offshore Airspace Areas; California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... separation procedures in lieu of ICAO separation and enhance system capacity and allow for more efficient... California. ICAO Considerations As part of this action relates to navigable airspace outside the United States, this notice is submitted in accordance with the ICAO International Standards and...

  11. 75 FR 32119 - Proposed Amendment of the Pacific High and Low Offshore Airspace Areas; California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... Aviation Organization (ICAO) oceanic air traffic control (ATC) procedures are used to separate and manage... separation procedures in lieu of ICAO separation and enhance system capacity and allow for more efficient... the coast of California. ICAO Considerations As part of this proposal relates to navigable...

  12. Brazilian sardine (Sardinella brasiliensis spawning in the southeast Brazilian Bight over the period 1976-1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunobu Matsuura

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on sampling over the period 1976-1993 in the southeast Brazilian Bight, the distribution of spawning of the Brazilian sardine (Sardinella brasi/iensis is described in relation to environmental conditions. The area of intense spawning occurs in the southern part of the bight where coastal upwelling was less /Tequent. Spawning intensity showed high interannllal variation and the egg abundance in the survey area ranged /Tom 99 billion eggs in the January 1988 cruise to 4669 billion eggs in the January 1981 cruise. Peak spawning takes place one hour after midnight and eggs hatch . out within 19 hours with a water temperature of 24 °e.Baseado nos dados coletados durante nove cruzeiros oceanográficos realizados na região sudeste, as áreas de desova da sardinha-verdadeira (Sardinella brasiliensis foram apresentadas c discutidas em relação às condições oceanográficas. As áreas de desova intensiva foram localizadas na parte sul da área de investigação, onde a ressurgência costeira foi menos freqüente. A intensidade de desova demonstrou uma variação anual relativamente grande. A produção total de ovos da sardinha- ­verdadeira variou de 99 bilhões de ovos durante o cruzeiro de janeiro de 1988 para 4669 bilhões de ovos em janeiro de 1981. O pico de desova ocorre na camada de mistura de superfície uma hora após a meia noite e os ovos eclodem em 19 horas com a temperatura de água 24 °e.

  13. California Hass avocado: profiling of carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-11-11

    The California Hass avocado ( Persea americana ) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore, in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July, and September, 2008, from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside, and San Diego) and analyzed for total fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids, and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with the total fat content (r = 0.99, p Hass avocado. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area, and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes.

  14. California Hass Avocado: Profiling of Carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-01-01

    The California Hass avocado (Persea Americana) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July and September 2008 from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego), and analyzed fortotal fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with total fat content (r=0.99, pavocado.. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes. PMID:19813713

  15. 228Ra, 226Ra, 224Ra and 223Ra in potential sources and sinks of land-derived material in the German Bight of the North Sea: implications for the use of radium as a tracer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, C.; Hanfland, C.; Regnier, P.; Van Cappellen, P.; Schlüter, M.; Knauthe, U.; Stimac, I.; Geibert, W.

    2011-01-01

    Activities of the naturally occurring radium nuclides 228Ra, 226Ra, 224Ra and 223Ra were determined in waters of the open German Bight and adjacent nearshore areas in the North Sea, in order to explore the potential use of radium isotopes as natural tracers of land–ocean interaction in an environmen

  16. California State Waters Map Series--Hueneme Canyon and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Endris, Charles A.; Clahan, Kevin B.; Sliter, Ray W.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Normark, William R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Hueneme Canyon and vicinity map area lies within the eastern Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. The area is part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation - at least 90° - since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area, which is offshore of the Oxnard plain and west of and along the trend of the south flank of the Santa Monica Mountains, lies at the east end of the Santa Barbara littoral cell, characterized by west-to-east littoral transport of sediment derived mainly from coastal watersheds. The Hueneme Canyon and vicinity map area in California's State Waters is characterized by two major physiographic features: (1) the nearshore continental shelf, and (2) the Hueneme and Mugu Submarine Canyon system, which, in the map area, includes Hueneme Canyon and parts

  17. Differences in reproductive risk factors for breast cancer in middle-aged women in Marin County, California and a sociodemographically similar area of Northern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uratsu Connie S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Northern California county of Marin (MC has historically had high breast cancer incidence rates. Because of MC's high socioeconomic status (SES and racial homogeneity (non-Hispanic White, it has been difficult to assess whether these elevated rates result from a combination of established risk factors or other behavioral or environmental factors. This survey was designed to compare potential breast cancer risks and incidence rates for a sample of middle-aged MC women with those of a demographically similar population. Methods A random sample of 1500 middle-aged female members of a large Northern California health plan, half from Marin County (MC and half from a comparison area in East/Central Contra Costa County (ECCC, were mailed a survey covering family history, reproductive history, use of oral contraceptives (OC and hormone replacement therapy (HRT, behavioral health risks, recency of breast screening, and demographic characteristics. Weighted data were used to compare prevalence of individual breast cancer risk factors and Gail scores. Age-adjusted cumulative breast cancer incidence rates (2000–2004 were also calculated for female health plan members aged 40–64 residing in the two geographic areas. Results Survey response was 57.1% (n = 427 and 47.9% (n = 359 for MC and ECCC samples, respectively. Women in the two areas were similar in SES, race, obesity, exercise frequency, current smoking, ever use of OCs and HRT, age at onset of menarche, high mammography rates, family history of breast cancer, and Gail scores. However, MC women were significantly more likely than ECCC women to be former smokers (43.6% vs. 31.2%, have Ashkenazi Jewish heritage (12.8% vs. 7.1%, have no live births before age 30 (52.7% vs. 40.8%, and be nulliparous (29.2% vs. 15.4%, and less likely to never or rarely consume alcohol (34.4% vs. 41.9%. MC and ECCC women had comparable 2000–2004 invasive breast cancer incidence rates. Conclusion

  18. Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in Cuyama Valley and surrounding areas, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.; Langenheim, V.E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Stratigraphic information from 391 oil and gas exploration wells from Cuyama Valley, California, and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Cuyama Basin is located within the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges, west of the San Andreas fault. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time, and helps in understanding the slip history and partitioning of slip on San Andreas and related faults.

  19. Spatial ecology of krill, micronekton and top predators in the central California Current: Implications for defining ecologically important areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santora, Jarrod A.; Field, John C.; Schroeder, Isaac D.; Sakuma, Keith M.; Wells, Brian K.; Sydeman, William J.

    2012-11-01

    Marine spatial planning and ecosystem models that aim to predict and protect fisheries and wildlife benefit greatly from syntheses of empirical information on physical and biological partitioning of marine ecosystems. Here, we develop spatially-explicit oceanographic and ecological descriptions of the central California Current region. To partition this region, we integrate data from 20 years of shipboard surveys with satellite remote-sensing to characterize local seascapes of ecological significance, focusing on krill, other micronekton taxa, and top predators (seabirds and marine mammals). Specifically, we investigate if micronekton and predator assemblages co-vary spatially with mesoscale oceanographic conditions. The first principal component of environmental and micronekton seascapes indicates significant coupling between physics, primary productivity, and secondary and tertiary marine consumers. Subsequent principal components indicate latitudinal variability in niche-community space due to varying habitat characteristics between Monterey Bay (deep submarine canyon system) and the Gulf of the Farallones (extensive continental shelf), even though both of these sub-regions are located downstream from upwelling centers. Overall, we identified five ecologically important areas based on spatial integration of environmental and biotic features. These areas, characterized by proximity to upwelling centers, shallow pycnoclines, and high chlorophyll-a and krill concentrations, are potential areas of elevated trophic focusing for specific epipelagic and mesopelagic communities. This synthesis will benefit ecosystem-based management approaches for the central California Current, a region long-impacted by anthropogenic factors.

  20. Transfer factors of contamination between the German Bight and its tributary waters derived from measured tritium and Cs-137 activity concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, C.; Fraemcke, G.

    1992-04-13

    Evaluation of the results of radioactivity monitoring in the southern North Sea between 1977 and 1987 has shown that in the water of the German Bight three areas stand out due to their different ratios between salinity and concentration of dissolved Cs-137 and tritium. While salinity steadily increases with greater distance from the coast, the Cs-137 concentration above 34 PSU (Practical Salinity Unit) increases sharply and shows how far water from the western and central North Sea, contaminated by nuclear reprocessing in Sellafield (Irish Sea), reaches into the German Bight. In the 34 to 32.5 PSU range, the influence can be seen of water contaminated by tritium originating in the rivers Rhein, Maas and Schelde, precipitation and the nuclear reprocessing plant at La Hague (Channel). Below 32.5 PSU, the influence of the influx from the rivers Elbe, Weser and Ems becomes apparent. These rivers are less contaminated with tritium. (orig.)

  1. Integrated Modeling of Drought-Impacted Areas using Remote Sensing and Microenvironmental Data in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.; Silber-coats, Z.; Lawrence, F.

    2015-12-01

    California's ongoing drought condition shriveled not just the agricultural sector, but also the natural resources sector including forestry, wildlife, and fisheries. As future predictions of drought and fire severity become more real in California, there is an increased awareness to pursue innovative and cost-effective solutions that are based on silvicultural treatments and controlled burns to improve forest health and reduce the risk of high-severity wildfires. The main goal of this study is to develop a GIS map of the drought-impacted region of northern and central California using remote sensing data for the summer period of 2014. Specifically, Landsat/NAIP imagery will be analyzed using a combination of object-oriented classification and spectral indices such as the Modified Perpendicular Drought Index (MPDI). This spectral index basically scales the line perpendicular to the soil line defined in the Red-NIR feature space in conjunction with added information about vegetative fraction derived using NDVI. The resulting output will be correlated with USGS-produced estimates of climatic water deficit (CWD) data to characterize the severity of the drought. The CWD is simulated based on hydrological tool, Basin Characterization Model (BCM) that ingests historical climate data in conjunction with soils, topography, and geological data to predict other monthly hydrological outputs including runoff, recharge, and snowpack. In addition to field data, data collected by state agencies including USFS, calforests.org will be used in the classification and accuracy assessment procedures. Visual assessment using high-resolution imagery such as NAIP will be used to further refine the spatial maps. The drought severity maps produced will greatly facilitate site-specific planning efforts aimed at implementing resource management decisions.

  2. Comparison of noise characteristics of GPS position time-series between the San Francisco Bay area and Southern California networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J.; Svarc, J.; Murray-Moraleda, J.

    2008-12-01

    The continuous GPS networks located in both the San Francisco (SF) Bay region and Southern California have been installed to measure the deformation from long-wavelength, tectonic processes. The long time- series of position changes from the sites that make up these networks allow us to estimate the spectrum of background noise. Once the background noise has been characterized, it can be used as a benchmark to monitor changes in positions and to detect whether future position changes are consistent with the known, background-noise processes. Williams et al [2004] and Langbein [2008] have previously studied the noise characteristics of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN). In this paper, we use the methods of Langbein [2008] to characterize the noise from the Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) GPS network for comparison with results from SCIGN. In particular, we examine only the sites for which there exist more than 3.8 years of observations. Compared with more than 200 sites for SCIGN that existed at the time of Langbein's [2008] study, the BARD network, localized to the SF Bay area, has only 25 sites available for analysis. In addition, where the SCIGN network consists predominately of deeply braced monuments, the BARD network has a mix of monument types, including cement piers pinned to underlying rock, casing of borehole strainmeters, and rock pins. Only recently, with the installation of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), have deeply braced monuments been installed in the SF Bay area. Preliminary examination of both the long-term and short-time noise suggests that there are no major differences in noise characteristics between sites in the SF Bay area and those of SCIGN. Furthermore, there are no large, systematic differences in noise between the differing monument types used in the SF Bay area; finer resolution of any differences is limited due to the lack of time-series with long records of observations.

  3. Geological synthesis of Las Tres Virgenes geothermal area, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Sintesis geologica de la zona geotermica de Las Tres Virgenes, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Hernandez, Aida (Departamento de Exploracion, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico))

    1998-01-15

    The Las Tres Virgenes geothermal area is placed in middle Baja California Peninsula, in a zone affected by deformational events since Late Miocene. As a result of tensional stress, NW-SE faults were generated. During this process the Santa Rosalia basin was formed starting the deposition of marine sediments. At the same time La Reforma and Aguajito volcanic centers were emplaced, their deposits were interfingered with sand deposits. At the end of the volcanic activity at Aguajito, the stress regimen changed, old normal faults were reactivated as lateral faults and a pull apart system was initiated. NE-SW and NNE-SSW faults resulted from this deformational stage, and Las Tres Virgenes volcanic products were erupted through this weakness zone. The hydrothermal active system is hosted in a grid constructed by NE-SW, NW-SE faults within the granodioritic basement under the El Azufre volcano. The fluid's discharged take place at Las Viboras zone where intense superficial fracturing is present, associated with El Azufre dextral fault. Drilling results from seven wells confirm the existence of high temperatures making feasible the exploitation of this resource to generate electric energy.

  4. Evaluation of Governance in the Administration of Protected Areas on the Peninsula of Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naín MARTÍNEZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available R ESUMEN En este artículo se analiza la incorporación de los principios normativos de la gobernanza en la gestión de las áreas naturales protegidas de la península de Baja California en el período 2007- 2011. A través de una revisión documental, se evaluaron la ef icacia, ef iciencia, participación, inclusión y equidad. Se encontró que la administración presenta cambios que tienden a mejorar su gobernanza. Sin embargo, éstos aún son insuf icientes para incorporar a los actores sociales, por lo que es necesario continuar mejorando las prácticas gubernamentales y af inar los mecanismos de participación.

  5. Appendix 1—California plant community types represented in Forest Service research natural areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheauchi Cheng

    2004-01-01

    Community types and codes (Holland 1986) are in boldface; research natural area names (with ecological survey names in parentheses, if different from the research natural area names) are in plain type.

  6. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Southern California: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive human-use data for critical habitats, fishery areas, management areas, marine sanctuaries, national forests, national parks, The...

  7. Outer boundary of major discharge areas of Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The digital data set delineates the outer boundary of each major discharge area evaluated as part of the study. These areas were used to refine estimates of...

  8. Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Surficial Sediment Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Study was funded by NOAA and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The Atlas was a historical...

  9. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1980-01-31

    Progress is reported on research conducted during 1979 on the biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. The presentation consists of a number of published articles and abstracts of oral presentations. (ACR)

  10. Development and validation of hydroacoustic monitoring concepts for the coastal German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielck, Finn; Hass, H. Christian; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander; Neumann, Andreas; Kröncke, Ingrid; Reimers, Hans-Christian; Capperucci, Ruggero

    2016-04-01

    The joint research project WIMO (Wissenschaftliche Monitoringkonzepte für die Deutsche Bucht/Scientific Monitoring Concepts for the German Bight, NE North Sea) aims at providing methods for detection and analysis of seabed habitats using modern remote sensing techniques. Our subproject focuses on hydroacoustic techniques in order to gain information about seafloor environments and sediment dynamics. In a timeframe of four years, several key areas in the German Bight were repeatedly observed using different hydroacoustic gear (i. e. sidescan sonars, single/multibeam echo sounders and sub-bottom profilers). In order to ground-truth the acoustic data, hundreds of grab samples and underwater videos were taken. With these techniques it is possible to distinguish between different seafloor habitats, which range from muddy to sandy seafloors (esp. near the barrier islands) to rugged or vegetated/populated reefs around Helgoland. The conducted monitoring program revealed seasonal changes regarding the abundance of the sand mason worm (Lanice conchilega) and the brittle star (Amphiora filiformis) as well as ongoing sedimentary processes driven by tidal currents and wind/storms. It was also possible to determine relationships between sediment characteristics and benthos in some key areas. An essential part of our project included a comparison between the datasets obtained with different hydroacoustic devices, configurations, and evaluation methods in the same study areas. The investigation reveals that there could be distinct differences in interpreting the data and hence in the determination of prevailing seafloor habitats, especially in very heterogeneous areas and at transition zones between the habitats. Therefore, it is recommended to employ more than one hydroacoustic system (preferably a singlebeam device combined with a wide-swath sonar system) synchronously during a survey in order to gain more reliable and detailed information about the seafloor environments. The

  11. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  12. Mobile colposcopy in urban and underserved suburban areas in Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, Marta; Contreras, Sonia; Villalobos, Octavio; Kahn, Bruce S.; Safir, Amit; Levitz, David

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for women in low resource settings, often affecting the most economically disenfranchised segment of the population. The key challenge with cervical cancer is the lack of an effective screening program for many of the at-risk, difficult-to-reach women. Outreach programs that utilize mobile clinics to increase access to screening and care in Baja California have been developed. However, many barriers such as quality assurance, efficient referral remained a challenge in this region. Visualization-based co-tests together with cytology (Pap smears) as a primary screen have been proposed. Here, the mobile colposcope of the enhanced visual assessment (EVA) is used to capture an image immediately following a Pap smear. EVA images were reviewed by expert colposcopists. Initial or preliminary data from pilot services showed that Pap false positives and Pap false negatives maybe reduced by expert review of EVA images. This suggests that reviewing of EVA images may be instrumental in catching inaccurate Pap results, thereby improving care. Thus, there is a need to further explore the benefits of using EVA as additional information when conducting Pap smear screenings.

  13. 50 CFR 660.399 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... boundary of the Anacapa Island EFH Conservation Area is defined by the mean high water line and straight... Island. The boundary of the Catalina Island EFH Conservation Area is defined by straight lines connecting... 37°57.62′ N. lat., 123°24.22′ W. long. (j) Farallon Islands/Fanny Shoal. The boundary of the...

  14. 75 FR 53877 - Proposed Establishment of the Antelope Valley of the California High Desert Viticultural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... area. In 2007, the proposed viticultural area included 128 planted acres in 16 commercial vineyards.... Viticulture restarted in 1981, when Steve Godde planted 5 acres to grapevines on the west side of the valley.... You may also obtain copies at 20 cents per 8.5- x 11-inch page. Contact our information specialist...

  15. 78 FR 16792 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; State of California; Imperial Valley...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... (see, e.g., the PM 10 area designations in 40 CFR 81.305 for Coso Junction planning area, Owens Valley... before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating the rule must submit a rule report, which includes... States. EPA will submit a report containing this action and other required information to the U.S. Senate...

  16. Invertebrate communities associated with hard bottom habitats in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, E. L.; Knott, D. M.; Van Dolah, R. F.; Burrell, V. G.

    1983-08-01

    Epibenthic invertebrates associated with nine hard bottom areas in the South Atlantic Bight between South Carolina and northern Florida were collected with dredge, trawl, suction and grab samplers to evaluate species composition, biomass, abundance, diversity, spatial distributions, and seasonality (winter and summer). Species composition changed noticeably with depth and season. Inner and outer shelf stations were least similar in species composition. Middle shelf areas were transitional and contained taxa characteristic of both inner and outer sites. Bryozoa (88 taxa), Cnidaria (85 taxa), Porifera (67 taxa), Annelida (261 taxa) and Mollusca (203 taxa) represented the richest taxonomic groups of the 1175 taxa collected. Both diversity (1175 total taxa) and biomass (1995 kg total) of invertebrates from hard bottom areas exceeded those reported in the literature for sand bottom communities. Sponges accounted for >60% of the total invertebrate biomass collected by dredge and trawl during both seasons. High diversity values were attributed primarily to habitat complexity and did not exhibit any discernible pattern with depth or latitude.

  17. First survey of fungi in hypersaline soil and water of Mono Lake area (California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiman, Régine; Ford, Larry; Ducros, Véronique; Lafond, Jean-Luc; Guiraud, Pascale

    2004-01-01

    Mono Lake is a closed lake located in central California, east of the Sierra Nevada mountains. It contains dissolved carbonates, sulfates and chlorides at high concentrations. Due to its high salinity, Mono Lake was sometimes compared to the Dead Sea. However, it appears that Mono Lake water and vicinity abound with life. In this work, the fungal flora living in this extreme ecosystem was studied for the first time. Soil, tufa, water and sediment samples were also analyzed for their mineral and salt composition. Results showed that water was particularly rich in sodium, potassium, phosphorus and boron. Soil and sediments contained very high levels of calcium and magnesium, but also barium, boron and strontium. Sodium, phosphorus and iron levels varied in a large extent from one to another sample. Neutral to very alkaline pH were recorded. Water samples were found sterile in the conditions chosen for fungi isolation, while sediment, soil and tufa samples led to the isolation of a total of 67 fungal species (from 23 samples), belonging to various taxonomic groups. From our results no clear effects of the chemical parameters of the samples were observed on fungal life apart from the pH. The methods chosen did not allow the isolation of extremely halotolerant species. We isolated in this work a series of ubiquitous species, suggesting that a selection of resistant and/or adaptable strains of some common species could have occurred. Depending on the medium and the temperature of isolation, it can be hypothesized that some species were present as dormant structures, while some others, isolated at pH 8 on a medium enriched in Na and Ca, could be in a growing form adapted to alkaline and saline conditions. This work contributes to a better knowledge of the mycobiota present in the Mono Lake's ecosystem.

  18. Site-specific profiles of estrogenic activity in agricultural areas of California's inland waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Ramon; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Floyd, Emily; Kolodziej, Edward P; Snyder, Shane A; Sedlak, David L; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence and sources of compounds capable of feminizing fish in agriculturally impacted waterways of the Central Valley of California, water samples were extracted and subjected to chemical analyses as well as in vitro and in vivo measurements of vitellogenin in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Among the 16 sites sampled, 6 locations frequently exhibited elevated concentrations of estrogenic substances with 17beta-estradiol equivalents up to 242 ng/L in vitro and 12 microg/kg in vivo. The patterns of activity varied among sites, with two sites showing elevated activity only in vitro, two showing elevated activity only in vivo, and two showing elevated activity in both assays. Sequential elution of solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks followed by bioassay-guided fractionation was used to characterize water samples from the two locations where activity was observed in both bioassays. The highest estrogenic activity was observed in the most nonpolar fractions (80-100% methanol eluent) from the Napa River, while most of the activity in the Sacramento River Delta eluted in the 60% methanol eluent. Quantitative analyses of SPE extracts and additional HPLC fractionation of the SPE extracts by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS indicated concentrations of steroid hormones, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, and herbicides that were at least 1-3 orders of magnitude below bioassay 17beta-estradiol equivalent calculations. Given the different patterns of activity and chemical properties of the estrogenic compounds, it appears that estrogenic activity in these agriculturally impacted surface waters is attributable to multiple compounds. Further investigation is needed to identify the compounds causing the estrogenic activity and to determine the potential impacts of these compounds on feral fish.

  19. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MERCED COUNTY, CALIFORNIA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  20. Study area boundary for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) study area which encompasses approximately 100,000-square kilometers in...

  1. Terrestrial laser scanner data from Hetch Hetchy area, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are 3D point cloud data collected by laser scanner in the Hetch Hetchy area of Yosemite National Park, USA. The data were collected to assess landscape...

  2. Study area boundary for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) study area which encompasses approximately 100,000-square kilometers in...

  3. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains boundaries of Coast Guard facilities; management areas; marinas; marine sanctuaries; national forests; national, regional, and state parks;...

  4. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northern California: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use data for designated critical habitats, essential habitats, management areas, marine sanctuaries, National Park Service properties,...

  5. Exploring German Bight coastal morphodynamics based on modelled bed shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösters, Frank; Winter, Christian

    2014-02-01

    The prediction of large-scale coastal and estuarine morphodynamics requires a sound understanding of the relevant driving processes and forcing factors. Data- and process-based methods and models suffer from limitations when applied individually to investigate these systems and, therefore, a combined approach is needed. The morphodynamics of coastal environments can be assessed in terms of a mean bed elevation range (BER), which is the difference of the lowest to highest seabed elevation occurring within a defined time interval. In this study of the coastal sector of the German Bight, North Sea, the highly variable distribution of observed BER for the period 1984-2006 is correlated to local bed shear stresses based on hindcast simulations with a well-validated high-resolution (typically 1,000 m in coastal settings) process-based numerical model of the North Sea. A significant correlation of the 95th percentile of bed shear stress and BER was found, explaining between 49 % and 60 % of the observed variance of the BER under realistic forcing conditions. The model then was applied to differentiate the effects of three main hydrodynamic drivers, i.e. tides, wind-induced currents, and waves. Large-scale mapping of these model results quantify previous qualitative suggestions: tides act as main drivers of the East Frisian coast, whereas waves are more relevant for the morphodynamics of the German west coast. Tidal currents are the main driver of the very high morphological activity of the tidal channels of the Ems, Weser and Elbe estuaries, the Jade Bay, and tidal inlets between the islands. This also holds for the backbarrier tidal flats of the North Frisian Wadden Sea. The morphodynamics of the foreshore areas of the barrier island systems are mainly wave-driven; in the deeper areas tides, waves and wind-driven currents have a combined effect. The open tidal flats (outer Ems, Neuwerker Watt, Dithmarschen Bight) are affected by a combination of tides, wind

  6. Increasing Hydrogen Ion Activity of Water in Two Reservoirs Supplying the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, J. G.

    1981-10-01

    The hydrogen ion activity (H+) of water in two Sierra Nevada reservoirs (Pardee and Hetch Hetchy) that supply the San Francisco Bay area has been increasing with time over the period 1954-1979. This conclusion is based on weekly measurements ofpH at the two reservoirs and is supported by measurements of alkalinity which decreased at Pardee over the period 1944-1979. Based on linear models, the rate of the increasing (H+) was the same at both reservoirs, and (H+) varied concomitantly from year to year, suggesting a common, general cause. Mean monthly variation in (H+) corresponded to mean monthly variation in atmospheric pollution from a nine-county area around San Francisco Bay. The most likely cause of the increasing (H+) of reservoir waters is NOx from automobile exhausts primarily from the San Francisco Bay area.

  7. The Pathway Program: A Collaboration between 3 Universities to Deliver a Social Work Distance Education (DL) Program to Underserved Areas of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Teresa; Jones, Celeste A.; Sehrawats, Seema

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a partnership between three campuses to develop a (DL) education program-serving employees of county and tribal Health and Human Service Departments in remote rural areas of California. Specifically, the program supports the development of a career pathway for students living in isolated regions of Northern…

  8. Distribution of bivalve mollusks Macoma golikovi Scarlato and Kafanov, 1988 and Macoma calcarea (Gmelin, 1791) in the shallow-water hydrothermal ecosystem of Kraternaya Bight (Yankich Island, Kuril Islands): connection with feeding type and hydrothermal activity of Ushishir Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenev, G. M.; Kavun, V. Ya; Tarasov, V. G.; Fadeev, V. I.

    2004-01-01

    Kraternaya Bight (Yankich Island, the Kuril Islands) is a submerged crater of the active Ushishir Volcano characterized by terrestrial and underwater gasohydrothermal activity. The gasohydrothermal activity of the volcano produces a great influence on the physico-chemical characteristics of water column, as well as planktonic and bottom communities of marine organisms of the bight. The bivalve mollusks Macoma golikovi and Macoma calcarea are dominant macrobenthos species of Kraternaya Bight, which inhabit all the zones of underwater volcanic activity. Macoma golikovi occurs at a depth of 1-45 m. This species forms the densest aggregations (with an average biomass of 500-800 g m -2 and a population density of 500-700 ind. m -2) at a depth of 3-15 m, on steep underwater crater slopes (40-45°), on slightly silted gravel. The majority of gasohydrothermal vents are located at that depth. Macoma calcarea occurs at a depth of 5-55 m. In contrast to Macoma golikovi, this species is dominant at a depth of 25-40 m, on gentle slopes of the crater (to 20°), on silt and silty sand. That depth is less subjected to the influence of volcanic products. Its average biomass is 450-750 g m -2 with a population density of 200-450 ind. m -2 there. It is assumed that the differences in the distribution are due the fact that Macoma golikovi is mainly a suspension-feeder in Kraternaya Bight, and Macoma calcarea is a deposit-feeder. The studies conducted between 1987 and 1997 on the quantitative distribution of Macoma golikovi and Macoma calcarea in four areas of the bight, which had different intensity, temperature and chemical composition of gasohydrothermal vents and volcanic water seeping showed that both species formed settlements with lesser density in the area of the gasohydrothermal vents containing hydrogen sulfide. Beyond the area of volcanic activity, these species were most abundant. In 1993 and 1995, the mortality of the populations of the bivalve mollusks was observed in the

  9. Storm rainfall conditions for floods and debris flows from recently burned areas in southwestern Colorado and southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, S.H.; Gartner, J.E.; Wilson, R.C.; Bowers, J.C.; Laber, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flows generated during rain storms on recently burned areas have destroyed lives and property throughout the Western U.S. Field evidence indicate that unlike landslide-triggered debris flows, these events have no identifiable initiation source and can occur with little or no antecedent moisture. Using rain gage and response data from five fires in Colorado and southern California, we document the rainfall conditions that have triggered post-fire debris flows and develop empirical rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for the occurrence of debris flows and floods following wildfires in these settings. This information can provide guidance for warning systems and planning for emergency response in similar settings. Debris flows were produced from 25 recently burned basins in Colorado in response to 13 short-duration, high-intensity convective storms. Debris flows were triggered after as little as six to 10??min of storm rainfall. About 80% of the storms that generated debris flows lasted less than 3??h, with most of the rain falling in less than 1??h. The storms triggering debris flows ranged in average intensity between 1.0 and 32.0??mm/h, and had recurrence intervals of two years or less. Threshold rainfall conditions for floods and debris flows sufficiently large to pose threats to life and property from recently burned areas in south-central, and southwestern, Colorado are defined by: I = 6.5D-??0.7 and I = 9.5D-??0.7, respectively, where I = rainfall intensity (in mm/h) and D = duration (in hours). Debris flows were generated from 68 recently burned areas in southern California in response to long-duration frontal storms. The flows occurred after as little as two hours, and up to 16??h, of low-intensity (2-10??mm/h) rainfall. The storms lasted between 5.5 and 33??h, with average intensities between 1.3 and 20.4??mm/h, and had recurrence intervals of two years or less. Threshold rainfall conditions for life- and property-threatening floods and debris

  10. 75 FR 68942 - Karnal Bunt; Regulated Areas in Arizona, California, and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... (Triticum aestivum), durum wheat (Triticum durum), and triticale (Triticum aestivum X Secale cereale), a... planted with seed from a lot found to contain a bunted wheat kernel; A distinct definable area that... total of 5 years (the years need not be consecutive). After tilling, the field may be planted with...

  11. 75 FR 17031 - Grapes Grown in a Designated Area of Southeastern California and Imported Table Grapes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... strawberries in the past but are also being used for other fruit. They are made of a clear, rigid plastic and... the production area. In addition, there are about 100 importers of grapes. Small agricultural service..., Egypt, Italy, Mexico, Morocco, Peru, and South Africa, and known grape importers were notified of...

  12. Estimation of water flux in urban area using eddy covariance measurements in Riverside, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenerette, D.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Micrometeorological methods can direct measure the sensible and latent heat flux in specific sites and provide robust estimates of the evaporative fraction (EF), which is the fraction of available surface energy contained in latent heat. Across a vegetation coverage gradient in urban area, an empirical relationship is expected between EF and vegetation coverage, which provides the opportunity to quantify regional water flux. Here we deployed three eddy covariance (EC) systems to quantify the relationship between EF and vegetation coverage. First, two continuous systems were deployed at an industrial area with very low vegetation cover and another located in the orange orchid in Riverside, CA, to quantify the temporal dynamic of EF for the endpoints. Second, a mobile EC system was deployed to quantify the spatial distribution of EF across a gradient of vegetation coverage, during the summer time in Riverside, CA. These data showed the EF in high vegetation cover is 31.16±3.99%, but at the lower vegetation cover site EF is only 16.48±5.40%, which about 2 times lower in EF than the area with high vegetation cover. These results derived from the EC measurements provide essential data to quantify the temporal and spatial water fluxes in urban area and are needed to better understand and manage urban water use in response to drought.

  13. Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the Donner Lake-Cisco Grove area, northern Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulow, Matthew J.; Hanson, Richard E.; Girty, Gary H.; Girty, Melissa S.; Harwood, David S.

    1998-01-01

    The northernmost occurrences of extensive, glaciated exposures of the Sierra Nevada batholith occur in the Donner Lake-Cisco Grove area of the northern Sierra Nevada. The plutonic rocks in this area, which are termed here the Castle Valley plutonic assemblage, crop out over an area of 225 km2 and for the most part are shown as a single undifferentiated mass on previously published geological maps. In the present work, the plutonic assemblage is divided into eight separate intrusive units or lithodemes, two of which each consist of two separate plutons. Compositions are dominantly granodiorite and tonalite, but diorite and granite form small plutons in places. Spectacular examples of comb layering and orbicular texture occur in the diorites. U-Pb zircon ages have been obtained for all but one of the main units and range from ~120 to 114 Ma, indicating that the entire assemblage was emplaced in a narrow time frame in the Early Cretaceous. This is consistent with abundant field evidence that many of the individual phases were intruded penecontemporaneously. The timing of emplacement correlates with onset of major Cretaceous plutonism in the main part of the Sierra Nevada batholith farther south. The emplacement ages also are similar to isotopic ages for gold-quartz mineralization in the Sierran foothills west of the study area, suggesting a direct genetic relationship between the voluminous Early Cretaceous plutonism and hydrothermal gold mineralization.

  14. Lithologic mapping in the Mountain Pass, California area using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L.C.; Mars, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of an Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of the Mountain Pass, California area indicates that several important lithologic groups can be mapped in areas with good exposure by using spectral-matching techniques. The three visible and six near-infrared bands, which have 15-m and 30-m resolution, respectively, were calibrated by using in situ measurements of spectral reflectance. Calcitic rocks were distinguished from dolomitic rocks by using matched-filter processing in which image spectra were used as references for selected spectral categories. Skarn deposits and associated bright coarse marble were mapped in contact metamorphic zones related to intrusion of Mesozoic and Tertiary granodioritic rocks. Fe-muscovite, which is common in these intrusive rocks, was distinguished from Al-muscovite present in granitic gneisses and Mesozoic granite. Quartzose rocks were readily discriminated, and carbonate rocks were mapped as a single broad unit through analysis of the 90-m resolution, five-band surface emissivity data, which is produced as a standard product at the EROS Data Center. Three additional classes resulting from spectral-angle mapper processing ranged from (1) a broad granitic rock class (2) to predominately granodioritic rocks and (3) a more mafic class consisting mainly of mafic gneiss, amphibolite and variable mixtures of carbonate rocks and silicate rocks. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, K.S.

    1972-01-01

    The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only

  16. Investigation of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in the Sonoma Valley Area, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, Leslie G.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Bezore, Stephen P.; Majmundar, Hasu H.

    1983-01-01

    The Sonoma Valley area contains low-temperature geothermal resources (20 C {le} T {le} 90 C) having the potential for useful development. Sonoma Valley residents, local governments and institutions, private developers, and manufacturers may be able to utilize the geothermal resources as an alternate energy source. Historically, there have been at least six geothermal spring areas developed in the Sonoma Valley. Four of these (Boyes Hot Springs, Fetter's Hot Springs, Agua Caliente Springs, and the Sonoma State Hospital warm spring) lie on a linear trend extending northwestward from the City of Sonoma. Detailed geophysical surveys delineated a major fault trace along the east side of the Sonoma Valley in association with the historic geothermal areas. Other fault traces were also delineated revealing a general northwest-trending structural faulting fabric underlying the valley. Water wells located near the ''east side'' fault have relatively high boron concentrations. Geochemical evidence may suggest the ''east side'' fault presents a barrier to lateral fluid migration but is a conduit for ascending fluids. Fifteen of the twenty-nine geothermal wells or springs located from literature research or field surveys are located along or east of this major fault in a 10 km (6.2 miles) long, narrow zone. The highest recorded water temperature in the valley appears to be 62.7 C (145 F) at 137.2 meters (450 feet) in a well at Boyes Hot Springs. This is consistent with the geothermal reservoir temperature range of 52-77 C (126-171 F) indicated by geothermometry calculations performed on data from wells in the area. Interpretation of data indicates a low-temperature geothermal fluid upwelling or ''plume'', along the ''east side'' fault with subsequent migration into permeable aquifers predominantly within volcanic strata. It is quite likely other geothermal fluid &apos

  17. Spatial and temporal patterns in oxygen and nutrient fluxes in sediment of German Bight (North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2016-04-01

    The German Bight in the southern North Sea is affected by intensive anthropogenic exploitation. Over a century of intensive use by shipping, fishery, and input by polluted rivers has pushed the coastal ecosystem far from its pristine state. The nutrient load reached a maximum in the early 1990s (Amann et al. 2012), and implementation of environmental protection policies substantially decreased the riverine nutrient load. While the riverine input of pollutants has constantly reduced since then, new forms of sea exploitation emerge. The most noticeable example is the installation of more than 600 wind turbines over the past few years in the German EEZ, and additionally 1,200 are already planned. The impact of these installations on hydrology and biogeochemical cycles is largely unclear. In a series of monitoring cruises we repeatedly sampled the sediment at a set of monitoring stations, which represent all typical habitats of the German Bight. We deployed benthic landers for in-situ chamber incubations and performed ex-situ whole-core incubations to investigate the benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients, and their spatial and temporal variability. Our first results indicate that benthic nutrient recycling is more intense during summer than during winter, which suggests that biological processes contribute substantially to the recycling of nutrients. The fluxes of reactive nitrogen appear lower than observations from 1992 (Lohse et al. 1993), when riverine N loads were at their maximum (Amann et al. 2012). The comparison of our recent measurements with observations from the past decades will enable us to assess the effect of decreasing nutrient discharge into the coastal North Sea. Our results will further set a baseline for elucidating the impact of the massive installation of wind turbines in the near future. This study contributes to the NOAH project (North Sea; Observation and Assessment of Habitats). References Amann T., A. Weiss, and J. Hartmann (2012): Carbon

  18. Monitoring shipping emissions in the German Bight using MAX-DOAS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, André; Wittrock, Folkard; Kattner, Lisa; Mathieu-Üffing, Barbara; Peters, Enno; Richter, Andreas; Schmolke, Stefan; Burrows, John P.

    2017-09-01

    A 3-year time series of ground-based multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of NO2 and SO2 on the island Neuwerk has been analyzed for contributions from shipping emissions. The island is located in the German Bight, close to the main shipping lane (at a distance of 6-7 km) into the river Elbe towards the harbor of Hamburg. Measurements of individual ship plumes as well as of background pollution are possible from this location. A simple approach using the column amounts of the oxygen molecule dimer or collision complex, O4, for the determination of the horizontal light path length has been applied to retrieve path-averaged volume mixing ratios. An excellent agreement between mixing ratios determined from NO2 retrievals in the UV and visible parts of the spectrum has been found, showing the validity of the approach. Obtained mixing ratios of NO2 and SO2 are compared to co-located in situ measurements showing good correlation on average but also a systematic underestimation by the MAX-DOAS O4 scaling approach. Comparing data before and after the introduction of stricter fuel sulfur content limits (from 1 to 0.1 %) on 1 January 2015 in the North Sea Emission Control Area (ECA), a significant reduction in SO2 levels is observed. For situations with wind from the open North Sea, where ships are the only local source of air pollution, the average mixing ratio of SO2 decreased by a factor of 8, while for NO2 in the whole time series from 2013 to 2016, no significant change in emissions was observed. More than 2000 individual ship emission plumes have been identified in the data and analyzed for the emission ratio of SO2 to NO2, yielding an average ratio of 0.3 for the years 2013/2014 and decreasing significantly, presumably due to lower fuel sulfur content, in 2015/2016. By sorting measurements according to the prevailing wind direction and selecting two angular reference sectors representative for wind from the open North Sea and

  19. Research in the Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    1981-01-01

    The Geysers-Clear Lake area is one of two places in the world where major vapor-dominated hydrothermal reservoirs are commercially exploited for electric power production. Because energy can be extracted more efficiently from steam than from hot water, vapor-dominated systems are preferable for electric power generation, although most geothermal electric power facilities tap water-dominated systems. The Geysers- Clear Lake geothermal system has therefore been of great interest to the geothermal industry.

  20. Ground-water hydrology of the Lower Milliken-Sarco-Tulucay Creeks area, Napa County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael J.

    1977-01-01

    The Sonoma Volcanics are the principal water-bearing materials in the lower Milliken-Sarco-Tulucay Creeks area, which occupies about 15 square miles (39 square kilometers) in and east of Napa, Calif. The distribution and composition of these volcanic units are highly variable and complex. Within the Sonoma Volcanics the tuffs constitute the best ground-water reservoir. They are principally pumicitic ash-flow tuffs, partly welded and moderately permeable. These tuffs extend to a depth exceeding 500 feet (150 meters), and are irregularly interbedded with clay, igneous flows, and other volcanically derived material of very low permeability which locally confine the tuffs. Recharge and movement of ground water within these tuffs are affected by the highly variable character of this rock sequence, by adjacent formations, and by tectonic features such as the Cup and Saucer ridge and the Soda Creek fault. The lithology of the area limits specific yields to about 4 percent (unconfined conditions). Specific capacities of wells average less than 3 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown (0.6 liter per second per meter) except in the most permeable areas.

  1. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources near US naval facilities in the San Diego area, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    A reconnaissance study has found little evidence of potential geothermal resources useful at naval facilities in the greater San Diego metropolitan area. However, there is a zone of modest elevated water well temperatures and slightly elevated thermal gradients that may include the eastern portion of the Imperial Beach Naval Air Station south of San Diego Bay. An increase of 0.3/sup 0/ to 0.4/sup 0/F/100 ft over the regional thermal gradient of 1.56/sup 0/F/100 ft was conservatively calculated for this zone. The thermal gradient can be used to predict 150/sup 0/F temperatures at a depth of approximately 4000 ft. This zone of greatest potential for a viable geothermal resource lies within a negative gravity anomaly thought to be caused by a tensionally developed graben, approximately centered over the San Diego Bay. Water well production in this zone is good to high, with 300 gpm often quoted as common for wells in this area. The concentration of total dissolved solids (TDS) in the deeper wells in this zone is relatively high due to intrusion of sea water. Productive geothermal wells may have to be drilled to depths economically infeasible for development of the resource in the area of discussion.

  2. Understanding Urban Watersheds through Digital Interactive Maps, San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, J. M.; Ticci, M. G.; Mulvey, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dense urbanization has resulted in the "disappearance" of many local creeks in urbanized areas surrounding the San Francisco Bay. Long reaches of creeks now flow in underground pipes. Municipalities and water agencies trying to reduce non-point-source pollution are faced with a public that cannot see and therefore does not understand the interconnected nature of the drainage system or its ultimate discharge to the bay. Since 1993, we have collaborated with the Oakland Museum, the San Francisco Estuary Institute, public agencies, and municipalities to create creek and watershed maps to address the need for public understanding of watershed concepts. Fifteen paper maps are now published (www.museumca.org/creeks), which have become a standard reference for educators and anyone working on local creek-related issues. We now present digital interactive creek and watershed maps in Google Earth. Four maps are completed covering urbanized areas of Santa Clara and Alameda Counties. The maps provide a 3D visualization of the watersheds, with cartography draped over the landscape in transparent colors. Each mapped area includes both Present and Past (circa 1800s) layers which can be clicked on or off by the user. The Present layers include the modern drainage network, watershed boundaries, and reservoirs. The Past layers include the 1800s-era creek systems, tidal marshes, lagoons, and other habitats. All data are developed in ArcGIS software and converted to Google Earth format. To ensure the maps are interesting and engaging, clickable icons pop-up provide information on places to visit, restoration projects, history, plants, and animals. Maps of Santa Clara Valley are available at http://www.valleywater.org/WOW.aspx. Maps of western Alameda County will soon be available at http://acfloodcontrol.org/. Digital interactive maps provide several advantages over paper maps. They are seamless within each map area, and the user can zoom in or out, and tilt, and fly over to explore

  3. Characteristics of AVIRIS Band Measurements in Desert Agroecosystems in the Area of Blythe, California. 1; Studies of Cotton Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Safwat H. Shakir

    2001-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data from Blythe, California, were acquired in June 1997 to study agricultural spectra from different crops and to identify crops in other areas with similar environmental factors and similar spectral properties. The main objectives of this study are: (1) to compare the spectral and radiometric characteristics of AVIRIS data from agriculture crops with ground spectra measured by a FieldSpec ASD spectrometer; (2) to explore the use of AVIRIS spectral images for identifying agricultural crops; (3) to study the spectral expression of environmental factors on selected crops; and (4) to build a spectral library for the crops that were studied. A long-term goal is to extend the spectral library for different vegetation or crops in different stages of growth. To support our study, on July 18 and 19, 2000, we collected spectra using the FieldSpec spectrometer from selected fields with different crops in the Blythe area of California (longitude 114 deg 33.28 W and latitude 33 deg 25.42 N to longitude 1140 44.53 W and latitude 33 deg 39.77 N). These crops were cotton in different stages of growth, varieties of grass pure or mixed, Sudan grass, Bermuda grass, Teff grass, and alfalfa. Some of the fields were treated with different types of irrigation (i.e., wet to dry conditions). Additional parameters were studied such as the soil water content (WC), pH, and organic matter (OM). The results of this study showed that for crops known to be similar, there is a significant correlation between the spectra that were collected by AVIRIS in 1997 and spectra measured by the FieldSpec (registered) spectrometer in 2000. This correlation allowed development of a spectral library to be used in ENVI-IDL analysis software. This library was used successfully to identify different crops. Furthermore, using IDL algorithms of Spectral Angle Mapper classification (SAM), spectral feature fitting (SFF) and spectral binary encoding (SPE

  4. Environmental Assessment for East Housing Area Solar Energy Project, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    with live music Gas lawn mower at 50 ft. 80 Noisy restaurant 70 Vacuum cleaner at 10 ft. Commercial/Urban area daytime Normal speech at 3 ft...LRR C) Depleted Matrix (F3) Redox Dark Surface (F6) Depleted Dark Surface (F7) Redox Depressions (F8) Sandy Redox (S5) Stripped Matrix (S6) Matrix...Surface (F6) Depleted Dark Surface (F7) Redox Depressions (F8) Sandy Redox (S5) Stripped Matrix (S6) Matrix Redox FeaturesDepth Loa y ucky ineral (F1

  5. Ground-water resources in the lower Milliken--Sarco--Tulucay Creeks area, southeastern Napa County, California, 2000-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Metzger, Loren F.

    2003-01-01

    -water extraction produced three large pumping depressions in the northern and east-central parts of the area. The general decline in ground-water levels is a result of increases in ground-water pumpage and possibly changes in infiltration capacity caused by changes in land use. Ground-water-level declines during 1960-2002 are evident in the records for 9 of 10 key monitoring wells. In five of these wells, water levels dropped by greater than 20 feet since the 1980s. The largest water-level declines have occurred since the mid 1970s, corresponding with a period of accelerated well construction and ground-water extraction. Analysis of samples from 15 wells indicates that the chemical quality of ground water in the study generally is acceptable. However, arsenic concentrations in samples from five wells exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking-water standard of 10 micrograms per liter, and iron concentrations in samples from five wells exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Health Services secondary drinking-water standard of 300 micrograms per liter. Water from 12 of 15 wells sampled contained concentrations of manganese that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Health Services secondary drinking-water standard of 50 micrograms per liter. Two wells produced water that had boron in excess of the California Department of Health Services action level of 1 milligram per liter. Stable isotope, chlorofluorocarbon, and tritium data indicate that ground water in the area is a mixture of waters that recharged the aquifer system at different times. The presence of chlorofluorocarbons and tritium in water from the study area is evidence that modern recharge (post 1950) does take place. Water-temperature logs indicate that ground-water temperatures throughout the study area exceed 30?C at depths in excess of 600 feet. Further, water at

  6. Parameterization of synoptic weather systems in the South Atlantic Bight for modeling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Voulgaris, George; Kumar, Nirnimesh

    2017-10-01

    An event based, long-term, climatological analysis is presented that allows the creation of coastal ocean atmospheric forcing on the coastal ocean that preserves both frequency of occurrence and event time history. An algorithm is developed that identifies individual storm event (cold fronts, warm fronts, and tropical storms) from meteorological records. The algorithm has been applied to a location along the South Atlantic Bight, off South Carolina, an area prone to cyclogenesis occurrence and passages of atmospheric fronts. Comparison against daily weather maps confirms that the algorithm is efficient in identifying cold fronts and warm fronts, while the identification of tropical storms is less successful. The average state of the storm events and their variability are represented by the temporal evolution of atmospheric pressure, air temperature, wind velocity, and wave directional spectral energy. The use of uncorrected algorithm-detected events provides climatologies that show a little deviation from those derived using corrected events. The effectiveness of this analysis method is further verified by numerically simulating the wave conditions driven by the characteristic wind forcing and comparing the results with the wave climatology that corresponds to each storm type. A high level of consistency found in the comparison indicates that this analysis method can be used for accurately characterizing event-based oceanic processes and long-term storm-induced morphodynamic processes on wind-dominated coasts.

  7. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Phytoplankton response. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verity, P.G.; Yoder, J.A.

    1992-03-10

    This study addressed shelf-wide processes and nearshore (coastal boundary zone) processes occurring in the southeastern. Coastal boundary zone (CBZ) US continental shelf dynamics involve studies of circulation and of biological and chemical transformations. Continental shelf processes affect the removal of material from the coastal boundary zone into areas where the material no longer interacts with or influences concentrations in the CBZ. The two arbitrarily separate components are, in fact, unified. The CBZ typically extends about 300 km along-shore and about 20 km offshore from its center off Savannah, Georgia, where most runoff occurs. The rates of biological and chemical transformations are controlled by proximity to the bottom and the amounts of fine suspended organic matter originating from rivers and salt marshes. Once material is removed from this zone, either by a long-shelf or cross-shelf advection to regions where the materials are no longer in contact with the bottom, the suite of factors governing the rates of chemical and biological transformations changes. The determination of contrasting rates in these two environments was one of the central focuses of the South Atlantic Bight program.

  8. Integrated geomorphic and geodynamic modeling of a potential blind thrust in the San Francisco Bay area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Courtney B.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Kirby, Eric

    2009-06-01

    Geometries and slip budgets of the faults in the San Francisco Bay area imply previously unrecognized fault linkages, including examples of blind thrust structures that appear to connect segments of strike-slip faults and accommodate along-strike variations in slip rate along these structures. Displacement along linking faults may be associated with the development of topography and also may serve as earthquake sources. In Marin County, California, systematic spatial patterns in landscape topography and geomorphic indices suggest that the region north of Mt. Tamalpais is experiencing differential rock uplift. We suggest that a blind thrust underlies the elevated area, creating the observed topography and possibly resolving a slip discrepancy between the Hayward and San Andreas Fault in this region. We have developed and implemented an integrative approach that combines observations from tectonic deformation and geomorphic properties to identify a potential blind thrust beneath Marin County. Elastic displacement modeling has been tested for compatibility with the blind thrust hypothesis and to assess the sensitivity of observables to fault geometry and orientation; from this, a set of plausible blind thrust structures are defined. We use a range of empirical relationships between channel steepness index and erosion rate to estimate spatial variations in erosion rate along Bolinas Ridge. By coupling these erosion estimates with elastic displacement fault modeling, we can use the resulting topographic envelopes to constrain the rate and duration of deformation. These constraints, along with spatial bounds on the possible fault models, are used to calculate potential seismic moment and moment magnitude. With an assumed recurrence interval of ~ 100 years, such blind thrusts can produce a Mw ~ 6.3 earthquake, while a longer recurrence time (~ 1000 years) results in a maximum Mw ~ 7.0 earthquake. Although such events are not likely to be catastrophic, they are large

  9. Using SLAM to Look For the Dog Valley Fault, Truckee Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, V. S.; Ashburn, J. A.; Sverdrup, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Truckee earthquake (9/12/1966, ML6.0) was a left-lateral event on a previously unrecognized NW-trending fault. The Prosser Creek and Boca Dams sustained damage, and the trace of the suspected causative fault passes near or through the site of the then-incomplete Stampede Dam. Another M6 earthquake occurred along the same general trend in 1948 with an epicenter in Dog Valley ~14 km to the NW of the 1966 epicenter. This trend is called the Dog Valley Fault (DVF), and its location on the ground surface is suggested by a prominent but broad zone of geomorphic lineaments near the cloud of aftershock epicenters determined for the 1966 event. Various ground effects of the 1966 event described by Kachadoorian et al. (1967) were located within this broad zone. The upper shoreface of reservoirs in the Truckee-Prosser-Martis basin are now exposed due to persistent drought. We have examined fault strands in a roadcut and exposed upper shoreface adjacent to the NE abutment of Stampede Dam. These are interpreted to be small-displacement splays associated with the DVF -- perhaps elements of the DVF damage zone. We have used the Seismo-Lineament Analysis Method (SLAM) to help us constrain the location of the DVF, based on earthquake focal mechanisms. Seismo-lineaments were computed, using recent revisions in the SLAM code (bearspace.baylor.edu/Vince_Cronin/www/SLAM/), for the 1966 main earthquake and for the better-recorded earthquakes of 7/3/1983 (M4) and 8/30/1992 (M3.2) that are inferred to have occurred along the DVF. Associated geomorphic analysis and some field reconnaissance identified a trend that might be associated with a fault, extending from the NW end of Prosser Creek Reservoir ~32° toward the Stampede Dam area. Triangle-strain analysis using horizontal velocities of local Plate Boundary Observatory GPS sites P146, P149, P150 and SLID indicates that the area rotates clockwise ~1-2°/Myr relative to the stable craton, as might be expected because the study area is

  10. Geologic structure of the Yucaipa area inferred from gravity data, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Langenheim, V.E.; Morita, Andrew; Danskin, Wesley R.

    2016-09-30

    In the spring of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District, began working on a gravity survey in the Yucaipa area to explore the three-dimensional shape of the sedimentary fill (alluvial deposits) and the surface of the underlying crystalline basement rocks. As water use has increased in pace with rapid urbanization, water managers have need for better information about the subsurface geometry and the boundaries of groundwater subbasins in the Yucaipa area. The large density contrast between alluvial deposits and the crystalline basement complex permits using modeling of gravity data to estimate the thickness of alluvial deposits. The bottom of the alluvial deposits is considered to be the top of crystalline basement rocks. The gravity data, integrated with geologic information from surface outcrops and 51 subsurface borings (15 of which penetrated basement rock), indicated a complex basin configuration where steep slopes coincide with mapped faults―such as the Crafton Hills Fault and the eastern section of the Banning Fault―and concealed ridges separate hydrologically defined subbasins.Gravity measurements and well logs were the primary data sets used to define the thickness and structure of the groundwater basin. Gravity measurements were collected at 256 new locations along profiles that totaled approximately 104.6 km (65 mi) in length; these data supplemented previously collected gravity measurements. Gravity data were reduced to isostatic anomalies and separated into an anomaly field representing the valley fill. The ‘valley-fill-deposits gravity anomaly’ was converted to thickness by using an assumed, depth-varying density contrast between the alluvial deposits and the underlying bedrock.To help visualize the basin geometry, an animation of the elevation of the top of the basement-rocks was prepared. The animation “flies over” the Yucaipa groundwater basin, viewing the land surface

  11. Coastal Vertical Land motion in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthias; Fenoglio, Luciana; Reckeweg, Florian

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of the ESA Sea Level Climate Change Initiative (CCI) we analyse a set of GNSS equipped tide gauges at the German Bight. Main goals are the determination of tropospheric zenith delay corrections for altimetric observations, precise coordinates in ITRF2008 and vertical land motion (VLM) rates of the tide gauge stations. These are to be used for georeferencing the tide gauges and the correction of tide gauge observations for VLM. The set of stations includes 38 GNSS stations. 19 stations are in the German Bight, where 15 of them belong to the Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde, 3 to EUREF and 1 to GREF. These stations are collocated with tide gauges (TGs). The other 19 GNSS stations in the network belong to EUREF, IGS and GREF. We analyse data in the time span from 2008 till the end of 2016 with the Bernese PPP processing approach. Data are partly rather noisy and disturbed by offsets and data gaps at the coastal TG sites. Special effort is therefore put into a proper estimation of the VLM. We use FODITS (Ostini2012), HECTOR (Bos et al, 2013), CATS (Williams, 2003) and the MIDAS approach of Blewitt (2016) to robustly derive rates and realistic error estimates. The results are compared to those published by the European Permanent Network (EPN), ITRF and the Système d'Observation du Niveau des Eaux Littorales (SONEL) for common stations. Vertical motion is small in general, at the -1 to -2 mm/yr level for most coastal stations. A comparison of the standard deviations of the velocity differences to EPN with the mean values of the estimated velocity standard deviations for our solution shows a very good agreement of the estimated velocities and their standard deviations with the reference solution from EPN. In the comparison with results by SONEL the standard deviation of the differences is slightly higher. The discrepancies may arise from differences in the time span analyzed and gaps, offsets and data preprocessing. The combined estimation of functional

  12. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Ventura map area lies within the Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the Ventura Basin, in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The city of Ventura is the major cultural center in the map area. The Ventura River cuts through Ventura, draining the Santa Ynez Mountains and the coastal hills north of Ventura. Northwest of Ventura, the coastal zone is a narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors and a few small residential clusters. Rincon Island, an island constructed for oil and gas production, lies offshore of Punta Gorda. Southeast of Ventura, the coastal zone consists of the mouth and broad, alluvial plains of the Santa Clara River

  13. Ground-water geology of the coastal zone, Long Beach-Santa Ana area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, J.F.; Piper, A.M.

    1956-01-01

    This paper is the first chapter of a comprehensive report on the ground-water features in the southern part of the coastal plain in Los Angeles and Orange Counties, Calif., with special reference to the effectiveness of the so-called coastal barrier--the Newport-Inglewood structural zone--in restraining landwar,-1 movement of saline water. The coastal plain in Los Angeles and Orange Counties, which covers some 775 square miles, sustains a large urban and rural population, diverse industries, and intensive agricultural developments. The aggregate ground-water withdrawal in 1945 was about 400,000 acre-feet a year, an average of about 360 million gallons a day. The dominant land-form elements are a central lowland plain with tongues extending to the coast, bordering highlands and foothills, and a succession of low hills and mesas aligned northwestward along the coastal edge of the central low- land plain. These low hills and mesas are the land-surface expression of geologic structure in the Newport-Inglewood zone. The highland areas that border the inland edge of the coastal plain are of moderate altitude and relief; most of the ridge crests range from 1,400 to 2,500 feet in altitude, but Santiago Peak in the Santa Ana Mountains attains a height of 5,680 feet above sea level. From these highlands the land surface descends across foothills and aggraded alluvial aprons to the central lowland, Downey Plain, here defined as the surface formed by alluvial aggradation during the post-Pleistocene time of rising base level. The Newport-Inglewood belt of hills and plains (mesas) has a maximum relief of some 500 feet but is widely underlain at a depth of about 30 feet by a surface of marine plantation. As initially formed in late Pleistocene time that surface was largely a featureless plain. Thus the present land-surface forms within the Newport-Inglewood belt measure the earth deformation that has occurred there since late Pleistocene time and so are pertinent with respect to

  14. Shallow ground-water quality beneath rice areas in the Sacramento Valley, California, 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Barbara J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey installed and sampled 28 wells in rice areas in the Sacramento Valley as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purpose of the study was to assess the shallow ground-water quality and to determine whether any effects on water quality could be related to human activities and particularly rice agriculture. The wells installed and sampled were between 8.8 and 15.2 meters deep, and water levels were between 0.4 and 8.0 meters below land surface. Ground-water samples were analyzed for 6 field measurements, 29 inorganic constituents, 6 nutrient constituents, dissolved organic carbon, 86 pesticides, tritium (hydrogen- 3), deuterium (hydrogen-2), and oxygen-18. At least one health-related state or federal drinking-water standard (maximum contaminant or long-term health advisory level) was exceeded in 25 percent of the wells for barium, boron, cadmium, molybdenum, or sulfate. At least one state or federal secondary maximum contaminant level was exceeded in 79 percent of the wells for chloride, iron, manganese, specific conductance, or dissolved solids. Nitrate and nitrite were detected at concentrations below state and federal 2000 drinking-water standards; three wells had nitrate concentrations greater than 3 milligrams per liter, a level that may indicate impact from human activities. Ground-water redox conditions were anoxic in 26 out of 28 wells sampled (93 percent). Eleven pesticides and one pesticide degradation product were detected in ground-water samples. Four of the detected pesticides are or have been used on rice crops in the Sacramento Valley (bentazon, carbofuran, molinate, and thiobencarb). Pesticides were detected in 89 percent of the wells sampled, and rice pesticides were detected in 82 percent of the wells sampled. The most frequently detected pesticide was the rice herbicide bentazon, detected in 20 out of 28 wells (71 percent); the other pesticides detected have been used for rice, agricultural

  15. Interstratified arkosic and volcanic rocks of the Miocene Spanish Canyon Formation, Alvord Mountain area, California: descriptions and interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Spanish Canyon Foundation in the Alvord Mountain area, California, varies from about 50 to 120 m thick and records the interstratification of arkosic sandstone and conglomerate with tuffaceous deposits and lava flows. In the lower third of the formation, arkosic sandstone and conglomerate are interstratified with tuffaceous deposits. Some tuffs might have been deposited as primary, nonwelded to partially welded ignimbrites or fallout tephra. Many of the tuffaceous deposits represent redeposited material that formed tuffaceous sandstone, and many of these deposits contain arkosic grains that represent mixing of different source matieral. Arkosic sandstone, and especially conglomerate (some with maximum clast lengths up to 1 m), represent intermittent incursions of coarser plutoniclastic fan deposits into other finer grained and mostly volcaniclastic basin deposits. After deposition of the 18.78 Ma Peach Spring Tuff, the amount of tuffaceous material decreased. The upper two-thirds of the formation has arkosic sandstone and conglomerate interstratified with two olivine basalt lave flows. locally, conglomerate clasts in this part of the section have maximum lengths up to 1 m. Many tuffaceous and arkosic sandstone beds of the Spanish Canyon Formation have tabular to broad (low-relief) lenticular geometry, and locally, some arkosic conglomerate fills channels as much as 1.5 m deep. These bedforms are consistent with deposition in medial to distal alluvial-fan or fluvial environments; some finer-grained deposits might have formed in lacustrine environments.

  16. Opinions from teachers in the Fresno area of Central California regarding the influence of mobile technology on their students’ learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navaridas, Fermín

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most relevant results of a study in which opinions of the teachers in the area of Fresno (Central California, USA about the effects of the integration of mobile devices into the teaching-learning process. Among other objectives, this study has tried to analyze the influence of mobile learning over three very important learning factors: affective-emotional (motivation, ethic-social (social skills and the cognitive one (cognitive skills. In order to carry out this study, a descriptive methodological approach was adopted, using the survey technique as the most adequate method to collect teachers´ opinions in a relatively fast and precise way. Obtained results show a widespread agreement among teachers about the pedagogical potential of mobile devices as a tool to improve learning quality. In general terms, conclusions suggest an improvement in the students’ interest on educational tasks, an increase during study activities, a better collaborative work, as well as an improvement of creativity and information acquisition.

  17. Analysis of sediment, water, and biological samples from the Bay Farm Borrow Area, San Francisco Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thom, R.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The Bay Farm Borrow Area (BFBA) of San Francisco Bay, California, is under consideration as a dredged-material disposal site by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). As part of the analysis of the site, information is required on the quality of benthic biota, sediment, and water in the BFBA. The objective of this report was to provide data on infauna communities, sediment, and water chemistry from samples collected from the BFBA. The samples were collected, and the data will be analyzed by Science Applications International (SAIC). A total of four samples for sediment chemistry, four samples for water chemistry, and 7 samples for infauna communities were analyzed by the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL). Water analyses included tests for dissolved organic carbon, total suspended solids, four metals, butyltins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), four phenols, and total phenol. Sediment samples were analyzed for percent solids, total organic carbon, total oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, grain size, 10 metals, butyltins, PCBs, chlorinated pesticides, PAHs, four phenols, and total phenol. The data along with controls and spike recovery analyses, are presented in tables, and the results are discussed in the text. The quality assurance/quality control criteria were met for the analyses as were the detection limits specified by the sponsor.

  18. A method for producing digital probabilistic seismic landslide hazard maps; an example from the Los Angeles, California, area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Randall W.; Harp, Edwin L.; Michael, John A.

    1998-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake is the first earthquake for which we have all of the data sets needed to conduct a rigorous regional analysis of seismic slope instability. These data sets include (1) a comprehensive inventory of triggered landslides, (2) about 200 strong-motion records of the mainshock, (3) 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping of the region, (4) extensive data on engineering properties of geologic units, and (5) high-resolution digital elevation models of the topography. All of these data sets have been digitized and rasterized at 10-m grid spacing in the ARC/INFO GIS platform. Combining these data sets in a dynamic model based on Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis yields estimates of coseismic landslide displacement in each grid cell from the Northridge earthquake. The modeled displacements are then compared with the digital inventory of landslides triggered by the Northridge earthquake to construct a probability curve relating predicted displacement to probability of failure. This probability function can be applied to predict and map the spatial variability in failure probability in any ground-shaking conditions of interest. We anticipate that this mapping procedure will be used to construct seismic landslide hazard maps that will assist in emergency preparedness planning and in making rational decisions regarding development and construction in areas susceptible to seismic slope failure.

  19. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in Paso Robles, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campion, L.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    Ninety-eight geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted, and a geologic map and cross sections were compiled. Detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The geological and geophysical work delineated the basement highs and trough-like depressions that can exercise control on the occurrence of the thermal waters. The Rinconada fault was also evident. Cross sections drawn from oil well logs show the sediments conforming against these basement highs and filling the depressions. It is along the locations where the sediments meet the basement highs that three natural warm springs in the area occur. Deep circulation of meteoric waters along faults seems to be a reasonable source for the warm water. The Santa Margarita, Pancho Rico, and Paso Robles Formations would be the first permeable zones that abut the faults through which water would enter. Temperatures and interpretation of well logs indicate the warmest aquifer at the base of the Paso Robles Formation. Warm water may be entering higher up in the section, but mixing with water from cooler zones seems to be evident. Geothermometry indicates reservoir temperatures could be as high as 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F).

  20. Coastal flooding: impact of waves on storm surge during extremes - a case study for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Wahle, Kathrin; Koch, Wolfgang; Behrens, Arno; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Stanev, Emil V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the impact of wind, waves, tidal forcing and baroclinicity on the sea level of the German Bight during extreme storm events. The role of wave-induced processes, tides and baroclinicity is quantified, and the results are compared with in situ measurements and satellite data. A coupled high-resolution modelling system is used to simulate wind waves, the water level and the three-dimensional hydrodynamics. The models used are the wave model WAM and the circulation model GETM. The two-way coupling is performed via the OASIS3-MCT coupler. The effects of wind waves on sea level variability are studied, accounting for wave-dependent stress, wave-breaking parameterization and wave-induced effects on vertical mixing. The analyses of the coupled model results reveal a closer match with observations than for the stand-alone circulation model, especially during the extreme storm Xaver in December 2013. The predicted surge of the coupled model is significantly enhanced during extreme storm events when considering wave-current interaction processes. This wave-dependent approach yields a contribution of more than 30 % in some coastal areas during extreme storm events. The contribution of a fully three-dimensional model compared with a two-dimensional barotropic model showed up to 20 % differences in the water level of the coastal areas of the German Bight during Xaver. The improved skill resulting from the new developments justifies further use of the coupled-wave and three-dimensional circulation models in coastal flooding predictions.

  1. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  2. Geologic Map and Map Database of the Oakland Metropolitan Area, Alameda, Contra Costa, and San Francisco Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graymer, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction This report contains a new geologic map at 1:50,000 scale, derived from a set of geologic map databases containing information at a resolution associated with 1:24,000 scale, and a new description of geologic map units and structural relationships in the mapped area. The map database represents the integration of previously published reports and new geologic mapping and field checking by the author (see Sources of Data index map on the map sheet or the Arc-Info coverage pi-so and the textfile pi-so.txt). The descriptive text (below) contains new ideas about the Hayward fault and other faults in the East Bay fault system, as well as new ideas about the geologic units and their relations. These new data are released in digital form in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Management Agency Project Impact in Oakland. The goal of Project Impact is to use geologic information in land-use and emergency services planning to reduce the losses occurring during earthquakes, landslides, and other hazardous geologic events. The USGS, California Division of Mines and Geology, FEMA, California Office of Emergency Services, and City of Oakland participated in the cooperative project. The geologic data in this report were provided in pre-release form to other Project Impact scientists, and served as one of the basic data layers for the analysis of hazard related to earthquake shaking, liquifaction, earthquake induced landsliding, and rainfall induced landsliding. The publication of these data provides an opportunity for regional planners, local, state, and federal agencies, teachers, consultants, and others outside Project Impact who are interested in geologic data to have the new data long before a traditional paper map could be published. Because the database contains information about both the bedrock and surficial deposits, it has practical applications in the study of groundwater and engineering of hillside materials, as well as the study of geologic hazards and

  3. Structural character of Hosgri fault zone and adjacent areas in offshore central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, J.K.; Bachman, S.B.

    1987-05-01

    The Hosgri fault zone extends from the east-west Transverse Ranges structures near Point Arguello northward for more than 150 km to the offshore area near San Simeon Point. The fault zone is seismically active and consists chiefly of a continuous series of eastside-up thrust and high-angle reverse faults. East of the fault zone, Miocene Monterey and volcanic rocks, along with underlying pre-Miocene strata, have been tightly folded as a result of low-angle imbricate thrust faulting during post-Miocene time. These highly deformed strata have been uplited and truncated along the inner shelf. Immediately west of the Hosgria fault zone, similar Monterey and older rocks, which are less folded, conformably underlie Pliocene and younger basinal strata at structural levels that are generally 1200 to 2000 m deeper than correlative strata east of the Hosgri fault zone. Following its discovery in 1971, the Hosgri fault zone was characterized by subsequent investigators as a northwest-trending fault that was part of the San Andreas system of strike-slip faults, with disagreements on the timing and amount of right-lateral offset along the fault zone. However, modern offshore seismic-reflection data, earthquake focal-mechanism studies, and recently available offshore well information suggest that the Hosgri fault zone is instead a major imbricate thrust zone. Detailed structural analyses along part of the Hosgri fault zone suggest that little, if any, strike-slip offset has occurred along this structural trend since its post-Miocene inception. Nevertheless, the Hosgri fault zone itself can be interpreted to be a product of the larger overall San Andreas transform system in that compression has developed because the San Andreas is not parallel to the Pacific-North American plate motion.

  4. Analysis of one year of HF radar data acquired in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E. V.; Seemann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Surface current measurements are taken on a pre-operational basis by three HF radar stations in the German Bight. This area is very shallow and dominated by tides. The HF radar is part of the COSYNA system, which aims at the implementation of an integrated observing system for the North Sea. The radars provide meridional and zonal current components at intervals of 20 minutes in areas where at least two stations overlap and only radial components elswhere. An analysis of the radar observations is performed for a data set of one year. A tidal decompositions is carried out to identify dominating constituents for different areas. Furthermore, the two dimensional surface current dynamics is analysed using tidal ellipses parameters.The generation of overtides in the shallow water areas is demonstrated. Different factors driving this mechanism are discussed. A closer look at the neap/spring tide cycle provides insight into the relative role of bottom friction processes. The relation between the inclination of tidal ellipses and bathymetric features is studied in this context as well. Current, salinity and temperature profile measurements taken at the offshore platform FINO-3 are used in addition to study stratification effects. The impact of the meteo forcing is investigated based on several case studies such as storm events and rapid changes of wind direction. For this purpose residual currents are estimated from the radar data. Finally the divergence of the observed current fields is analysed and the relation to water level dynamics is discussed. The study is meant to support the ongoing work on data assimilation and quality control within COSYNA. The relevance of the presented analysis for this work is explained and illustrated. The work is of value for the optimisation of HF radar system setups in other regions as well.

  5. Middle Atlantic Bight Marine Ecosystem: A Regional Forecast Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Coles, V. J.; Garraffo, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in basin scale climate patterns can drive changes in mesoscale physical oceanographic processes and subsequent alterations of ecosystem states. Climatic variability can be induced in the northeastern shelfbreak large marine ecosystem by climate oscillations, such as North Atlantic Oscillation, Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation; and long-term trends, such as a warming pattern. Short term variability can be induced by changes in the water masses in the northern and southern boundaries, by Gulf Stream path and transport variations, and by local mesoscale and submesoscale features. A coupled bio-physical model (HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model) is being used to forecast the evolution of the frontal and current systems of the shelf and Gulf Stream, and subsequent changes in thermal conditions and ecosystem structure over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB). This study aims to forecast the ocean state and nutrients in the MAB, and to investigate how cross-shelf exchanges of different water masses could affect nutrient budgets, primary and secondary production, and fish populations in coastal and shelf marine ecosystems. Preliminary results are shown for a regional MAB model nested to the global 1/12o HYCOM run at NOAA/NCEP/EMC using Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO) daily initialization. Elements of this simulation are nutrient influx condition at the northern and southern boundaries through regression to ocean thermodynamic variables, and nutrient input at the river mouths.

  6. Stable isotope signatures and element stoichiometry of Fucus vesiculosus as indicators for environmental conditions in the Kiel Bight, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winde, Vera; Mahler, Annika; Voss, Maren; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2014-05-01

    In the frame of the BMBF project BIOACID II we aim for an understanding of the natural distribution and variation of isotopic composition and C-N-S stoichiometry in Fucus vesiculosus growing around the coast line of the Kiel fjord (part of the Kiel bight). Environmental conditions (aquatic chemistry, temperature, salinity) were monitored, too. Some changes in aquatic chemistry are related to stress factors like human activity (e.g., waste input) and further factors leading to specific changes in the composition of Fucus vesiculosus. Sampling was carried out at different stations at the west and east coast of the Kiel Fjord. For each sampling station the aquatic chemistry (TA, pH, salinity, d13C(DIC), main and trace elements and nutrients) as well as the composition of the Fucus organic tissues (stoichiometry and stable isotope composition of carbon, nitrogen) are analysed. The Fucus tissue was sampled in three size classes (small, medium, large). It is shown, that Fucus vesiculosus indicates clear differences in the N contents and stable isotopes between the west and the east site of the Kiel Fjord. Stable nitrogen isotope signatures in Fucus vesiculosus, are useful proxies to identify the influence factors in the Fucus habitat. From the data it is obtained that the influence of human activity (wastewater treatment plant, harbour), small stream and drainage channels, which flow from the near coastal area into the bight, leads to different Fucus vesiculosus compositions. In future work, it is intended to extend the investigation to trace element signatures to further estimate environmental impacts.

  7. Structure contour map of the tops of the Kreyenhagen Formation and Cretaceous strata in the Coalinga area, Fresno and Kings counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigler, J.L.; Wentworth, C.M.; Bartow, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    This structure contour map, originally compiled during a study of the 1983 Coalinga earthquakes, shows the general structural configuration of the upper several kilometers of section in the Coalinga area. It was compiled by using electric well-log data available through April 1982 (Ammann Map Services, 1978; Petroleum Information Corporation, 1982; California Division of Oil and Gas, 1982) and surface geology (Dibblee, 1971; Mansfield, 1971).

  8. Effects of social defeat on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area in male and female California mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Gian D; Steinman, Michael Q; Doig, Ian E; Hao, Rebecca; Trainor, Brian C

    2015-12-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have important functions related to rewards but are also activated in aversive contexts. Electrophysiology studies suggest that the degree to which VTA dopamine neurons respond to noxious stimuli is topographically organized across the dorsal-ventral extent. We used c-fos immunohistochemistry to examine the responses of VTA dopamine neurons in contexts of social defeat and social approach. Studying monogamous California mice (Peromyscus californicus) allowed us to observe the effects of social defeat on both males and females. Females exposed to three episodes of defeat, but not a single episode, had more tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)/c-fos-positive cells in the ventral (but not dorsal) VTA compared with controls. This observation suggests that repeated exposure to aversive contexts is necessary to trigger activation of VTA dopamine neurons. Defeat did not affect TH/c-fos colocalizations in males. We also examined the long-term effects of defeat on c-fos expression in a social interaction test. As previously reported, defeat reduced social interaction in females but not males. Surprisingly, there were no effects of defeat stress on TH/c-fos colocalizations in any subregion of the VTA. However, females had more TH/c-fos-positive cells than males across the entire VTA, and also had greater c-fos-positive cell counts in posterior subregions of the nucleus accumbens shell. Our results show that dopamine neurons in the VTA are more responsive to social contexts in females and that the ventral VTA in particular is sensitive to aversive contexts.

  9. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Carpinteria map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The small city of Carpinteria is the most significant onshore cultural center in the map area; the smaller town of Summerland lies west of Carpinteria. These communities rest on a relatively flat coastal piedmont that is surrounded on the north, east, and west by hilly relief on the flanks of the Santa Ynez Mountains. El Estero, a salt marsh on the coast west of Carpinteria, is an ecologically important coastal estuary. Southeast of Carpinteria, the coastal zone is narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors

  10. Pico and nanoplankton abundance and carbon stocks along the Brazilian Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gérikas Ribeiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW, the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW and the Coastal Water (CW, which have highly variable properties. In order to assess how pico- and nanoplankton communities are distributed in these different water masses, we determined by flow cytometry the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes along three transects, extending from 23°S to 31°S and 39°W to 49°W. Heterotrophic bacteria (including archaea, maximum of 1.5 × 106 cells mL−1 were most abundant in Coastal and Tropical Water whereas Prochlorococcus was most abundant in open-ocean oligotrophic waters (maximum of 300 × 103 cells mL−1. Synechococcus(up to 81 × 103 cells mL−1, as well as autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes seemed to benefit from the influx of nutrient-rich waters near the continental slope. Autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes were also abundant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM layers from offshore waters, and their highest abundances were 20 × 103 cells mL−1 and 5 × 103 cells mL−1, respectively. These data are consistent with previous observations in other marine areas where Synechococcus and autotrophic eukaryotes dominate mesotrophic waters, whereas Prochlorococcus dominate in more oligotrophic areas. Regardless of the microbial community structure near the surface, the carbon stock dominance by autotrophic picoeukaryotes near the DCM is possibly linked to vertical mixing of oligotrophic surface waters with the nutrient-rich SACW and their tolerance to lower light levels.

  11. Pico and nanoplankton abundance and carbon stocks along the Brazilian Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes dos Santos, Adriana; Marie, Dominique; Helena Pellizari, Vivian; Pereira Brandini, Frederico; Vaulot, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW), the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the Coastal Water (CW), which have highly variable properties. In order to assess how pico- and nanoplankton communities are distributed in these different water masses, we determined by flow cytometry the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes along three transects, extending from 23°S to 31°S and 39°W to 49°W. Heterotrophic bacteria (including archaea, maximum of 1.5 × 106 cells mL−1) were most abundant in Coastal and Tropical Water whereas Prochlorococcus was most abundant in open-ocean oligotrophic waters (maximum of 300 × 103 cells mL−1). Synechococcus(up to 81 × 103 cells mL−1), as well as autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes seemed to benefit from the influx of nutrient-rich waters near the continental slope. Autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes were also abundant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layers from offshore waters, and their highest abundances were 20 × 103 cells mL−1 and 5 × 103 cells mL−1, respectively. These data are consistent with previous observations in other marine areas where Synechococcus and autotrophic eukaryotes dominate mesotrophic waters, whereas Prochlorococcus dominate in more oligotrophic areas. Regardless of the microbial community structure near the surface, the carbon stock dominance by autotrophic picoeukaryotes near the DCM is possibly linked to vertical mixing of oligotrophic surface waters with the nutrient-rich SACW and their tolerance to lower light levels. PMID:27867760

  12. Drifter Observations Of Wave-Current Evolution Through The San Francisco Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, D. W.; Herbers, T. H.; Janssen, T. T.; McIntyre, S.; Jessen, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean waves approaching the Golden Gate, the narrow strait connecting the San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean, are affected by refraction over the San Francisco Bar and the strong tidal currents in the area. During ebb tides, when currents through the Golden Gate can exceed 2.5 m/s, the approach to San Francisco Bay is characterized by focusing and steepening of the incident wave field on the opposing current jet. These dynamics are not uncommon in coastal inlets and are known to present hazardous navigation conditions. The strong inhomogeneity and enhanced nonlinearity of the waves can result in deviations from non-Gaussian statistics and changes in the likelihood of extreme waves. However, since observations of wave-current dynamics are so difficult to make with conventional instruments, these dynamics remain still poorly understood. In this work we present the development and testing of a compact, low-cost, Wave-Resolving Drifter (WRD), designed to resolve the wave orbital surface motions and surface drifts in high-energy areas. The WRDs consist of a 30cm buoy equipped with an off-the-shelf GPS receiver and a three-axis accelerometer. The combined GPS-accelerometer package is functionally equivalent to a conventional pitch-roll (or PUV) wave height and direction instrument, but at a fraction of the price. In our presentation we will discuss results from several WRD array deployments in the San Francisco Bight during high-energy conditions with strong ebb currents. The buoys are shown to resolve the surface waves and surface drift with remarkable accuracy and allow the analysis of the evolution of the wave group structure over the opposing current. To obtain statistical results for currents and waves, WRDs were released in clusters (ensemble) from which shoaling effects over the bar and wave-current interaction can be identified.

  13. Pico and nanoplankton abundance and carbon stocks along the Brazilian Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérikas Ribeiro, Catherine; Lopes Dos Santos, Adriana; Marie, Dominique; Helena Pellizari, Vivian; Pereira Brandini, Frederico; Vaulot, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW), the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the Coastal Water (CW), which have highly variable properties. In order to assess how pico- and nanoplankton communities are distributed in these different water masses, we determined by flow cytometry the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes along three transects, extending from 23°S to 31°S and 39°W to 49°W. Heterotrophic bacteria (including archaea, maximum of 1.5 × 10(6) cells mL(-1)) were most abundant in Coastal and Tropical Water whereas Prochlorococcus was most abundant in open-ocean oligotrophic waters (maximum of 300 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)). Synechococcus(up to 81 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)), as well as autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes seemed to benefit from the influx of nutrient-rich waters near the continental slope. Autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes were also abundant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layers from offshore waters, and their highest abundances were 20 × 10(3) cells mL(-1) and 5 × 10(3) cells mL(-1), respectively. These data are consistent with previous observations in other marine areas where Synechococcus and autotrophic eukaryotes dominate mesotrophic waters, whereas Prochlorococcus dominate in more oligotrophic areas. Regardless of the microbial community structure near the surface, the carbon stock dominance by autotrophic picoeukaryotes near the DCM is possibly linked to vertical mixing of oligotrophic surface waters with the nutrient-rich SACW and their tolerance to lower light levels.

  14. Inversion for sediment geoacoustic properties at the New England Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potty, Gopu R.; Miller, James H.; Lynch, James F.

    2003-10-01

    This article discusses inversions for bottom geoacoustic properties using broadband acoustic signals obtained from explosive sources. Two different inversion schemes for estimating the compressional wave speeds and attenuation are presented in this paper. In addition to these sediment parameters, source-receiver range is also estimated using the arrival time data. The experimental data used for the inversions are SUS charge explosions acquired on a vertical hydrophone array during the Shelf Break Primer Experiment conducted south of New England in the Middle Atlantic Bight in August 1996. The modal arrival times are extracted using a wavelet analysis. In the first inversion scheme, arrival times corresponding to various modes and frequencies from 10 to 200 Hz are used for the inversion of compressional wave speeds. A hybrid inversion scheme based on a genetic algorithm (GA) is used for the inversion. In an earlier study, Potty et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108(3), 973-986 (2000)] have used this hybrid scheme in a range-independent environment. In the present study results of range-dependent inversions are presented. The sound speeds in the water column and bathymetry are assumed range dependent, whereas the sediment compressional wave speeds are assumed range independent. The variations in the sound speeds in the water column are represented using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). The replica fields corresponding to the unknown parameters were constructed using adiabatic theory. In the second inversion scheme, modal attenuation coefficients are calculated using modal amplitude ratios. The ratios of the modal amplitudes are also calculated using time-frequency diagrams. A GA-based inversion scheme is used for this search. Finally, as a cross check, the computed compressional wave speeds along with the modal arrival times were used to estimate the source-receiver range. The inverted sediment properties and ranges are seen to compare well with in situ measurements

  15. Application of Geographic Information System Methods to Identify Areas Yielding Water that will be Replaced by Water from the Colorado River in the Vidal and Chemehuevi Areas, California, and the Mohave Mesa Area, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lawrence E.; Angeroth, Cory E.; Walton, Sarah J.

    2008-01-01

    Relations between the elevation of the static water level in wells and the elevation of the accounting surface within the Colorado River aquifer in the vicinity of Vidal, California, the Chemehuevi Indian Reservation, California, and on Mohave Mesa, Arizona, were used to determine which wells outside the flood plain of the Colorado River are presumed to yield water that will be replaced by water from the Colorado River. Wells that have a static water-level elevation equal to or below the elevation of the accounting surface are presumed to yield water that will be replaced by water from the Colorado River. Geographic Information System (GIS) interpolation tools were used to produce maps of areas where water levels are above, below, and near (within ? 0.84 foot) the accounting surface. Calculated water-level elevations and interpolated accounting-surface elevations were determined for 33 wells in the vicinity of Vidal, 16 wells in the Chemehuevi area, and 35 wells on Mohave Mesa. Water-level measurements generally were taken in the last 10 years with steel and electrical tapes accurate to within hundredths of a foot. A Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) was used to determine land-surface elevations to within an operational accuracy of ? 0.43 foot, resulting in calculated water-level elevations having a 95-percent confidence interval of ? 0.84 foot. In the Vidal area, differences in elevation between the accounting surface and measured water levels range from -2.7 feet below to as much as 17.6 feet above the accounting surface. Relative differences between the elevation of the water level and the elevation of the accounting surface decrease from west to east and from north to south. In the Chemehuevi area, differences in elevation range from -3.7 feet below to as much as 8.7 feet above the accounting surface, which is established at 449.6 feet in the vicinity of Lake Havasu. In all of the Mohave Mesa area, the water-level elevation is near or below the

  16. Diseases and parasites of Baltic cod ( Gadus morhua ) from the Mecklenburg Bight to the Estonian coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellergaard, Stig; Lang, T.

    1999-01-01

    the Mecklenburg Bight in the southwest to the Estonian coast in the northeast of the Baltic Sea. Prevalences were highest in the western part, except for skeletal deformities, which were highest in the central part. The spatial distribution of pseudobranchial swellings, C. lingua and L. branchialis appeared...

  17. Geohydrological characterization, water-chemistry, and ground-water flow simulation model of the Sonoma Valley area, Sonoma County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Metzger, Loren F.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2006-01-01

    changes by region. In recent years, pumping depressions have developed southeast of Sonoma and southwest of El Verano. Water-chemistry data for samples collected from 75 wells during 2002-04 indicate that the ground-water quality in the study area generally is acceptable for potable use. The water from some wells, however, contains one or more constituents in excess of the recommended standards for drinking water. The chemical composition of water from creeks, springs, and wells sampled for major ions plot within three groups on a trilinear diagram: mixed-bicarbonate, sodium-mixed anion, and sodium-bicarbonate. An area of saline ground water in the southern part of the Sonoma Valley appears to have shifted since the late 1940s and early 1950s, expanding in one area, but receding in another. Sparse temperature data from wells southwest of the known occurrence of thermal water suggest that thermal water may be present beneath a larger part of the valley than previously thought. Thermal water contains higher concentrations of dissolved minerals than nonthermal waters because mineral solubilities generally increase with temperature. Geohydrologic Characterization, Water-Chemistry, and Ground-Water Flow Simulation Model of the Sonoma Valley Area, Sonoma County, California Oxygen-18 (d18 O) and deuterium (dD) values for water from most wells plot along the global meteoric water line, indicating that recharge primarily is derived from the direct infiltration of precipitation or the infiltration of seepage from creeks. Samples from shallow- and intermediate-depth wells located near Sonoma Creek and (or) in the vicinity of Shellville plot to the right of the global meteoric water line, indicating that these waters are partly evaporated. The d18 O and dD composition of water from sampled wells indicates that water from wells deeper than 200 feet is isotopically lighter (more negative) than water from wells less than 200 feet deep, possibly indicating that older ground wate

  18. Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-01

    This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

  19. Numerical diagnostic of the circulation in the Santos Bight with COROAS hydrographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cirano

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This work represents part of the analyses of the data generated during the first two mesoscale hydrographic cruises of COROAS Project: one during the Summer and the other during the Winter of 1993. The area surveyed during these cruises is the region of the South Brazil Bight (or Santos Bight limited at the coast by the cities of Ubatuba and Iguape, extending from the 50 m isobath to oceanic regions with depths greater than 2500 m. The main goal of this work consisted of the adaptation of the Princeton Ocean Model to the area of study, including realistic topography, observed thermohaline structure and open boundaries. Using this model, a set of diagnostic experiments was realized using density structures based on the COROAS hydrographic data. The baroclinic velocity fields obtained, as expected from preliminary analyses of the thermohaline structures, showed similar features for the Brazil Current in bOla seasonal cruises. The results show an intrusion of Tropical Water over the continental shelf in the region between Ubatuba and Santos, both during the Summer and the Winter cruises. The results also suggest the penetration of the South Atlantic Central Water, underneath the Tropical Water, to the external part of the continental shelf in both occasions.Este artigo representa parte das análises desenvolvidas com os dados hidrográficos coletados durante os dois primeiros cruzeiros do sub-projeto Hidrografia de Meso-escala (HM do Projeto COROAS: o primeiro no verão e o outro no inverno de 1993. A área amostrada nos dois cruzeiros é limitada na costa pelas cidades de Iguape e Ubatuba, estendendo-se da isóbata de 50 m até regiões oceânicas com mais de 2500 m de profundidade. O objetivo central deste trabalho resumiu-se na adaptação do Princeton Ocean Model para a região de estudo, incluindo batimetria real, os campos termohalinos observados e contornos abertos. Usando-se esse modelo, realizou-se um conjunto de experimentos diagn

  20. Characterizing pinniped use of offshore oil and gas platforms as haulouts and foraging areas in waters off southern California from 2013-01-01 to 2015-01-31 (NCEI Accession 0138984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) use offshore oil and gas platforms as resting and foraging areas. Both...

  1. Blue Whale Visual and Acoustic Encounter Rates in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    encounter rates. Dual-mode shipboard surveys of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and humpback ( Megaptera novaeangliae ) whales reported higher acoustic than...2003. Acoustic and visual survey of humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae ) distribution in the eastern and southern Caribbean Sea. Caribbean Journal...Comparison between visual and pas- sive acoustic detection of finless porpoises in the Yangtze River . Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

  2. Modeling of Habitat and Foraging Behavior of Beaked Whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    solid black line to highlight the similarity with the example encounter. Middle panel: Histograms of peak frequency (left, pfr ) and inter-pulse interval...right, ipi) with median values for pfr , center frequency (cfr), duration (dur), and IPI. Bottom panel: Mean spectra of encounter (left, solid line

  3. Modeling of Habitat and Foraging Behavior of Beaked Whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    whale distribution and foraging behavior and to describe inter -specific differences. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns for Cuvier’s beaked whale...distribution and foraging behavior and to describe inter -specific differences. Knowledge about foraging behavior and habitat preference and...Foraging bouts (buzzes) were automatically detected by an algorithm that searched for consecutive low inter -click intervals (5-10 ms) and low received

  4. Annual cyclicity in export efficiency in the inner Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, William Z.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Sandwith, Zoe O.

    2017-02-01

    The balance of marine autotrophy and heterotrophy regulates the ocean's ability to serve as a CO2 sink, as organic material produced by autotrophs sinks into the ocean interior to drive the biological pump. Marine ecosystems over the continental margins, especially coastal upwelling regions, account for a disproportionate amount of carbon export; thus, even small fluctuations in export in these regions can have a large impact on the global carbon cycle. In this study, we estimated the rate of gross oxygen production (GOP), stoichiometrically related to gross primary production, by combining measurements of the triple isotope composition of dissolved oxygen with estimates of vertical advection, eddy diffusion, and air-sea gas exchange in a one-dimensional two-box nonsteady state model of the euphotic zone. Net oxygen production (NOP) estimates based on O2/Ar were then combined with GOP to estimate the NOP/GOP ratio, or potential export efficiency, out of the euphotic zone at the San Pedro Ocean Time-series during an 18 month period between January 2013 and June 2014. GOP estimates ranged from 161 ± 44 to 477 ± 155 mmol m-2 d-1 during this period, peaking in May each year, and NOP/GOP ratios ranged from 0.05 ± 0.10 to 0.65 ± 0.28. The highest export efficiency occurred in late February/early March, following the onset of spring upwelling, declining as the upwelling season continued. This study demonstrates that export efficiency changes through time in this temperate coastal upwelling region on a repeated annual cycle, and the magnitude of export efficiency suggests efficient photosynthetic energy conversion by phytoplankton in spring.

  5. Provenance of Holocene calcareous beach-dune sediments, Western Eyre Peninsula, Great Australian Bight, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Noel P.; Bone, Yvonne

    2017-07-01

    Much of western Eyre Peninsula adjacent to the Great Australian Bight is veneered with siliceous and calcareous Quaternary aeolian dunes. The lengthy coastline adjacent to this cool-water carbonate factory is a series of Precambrian crystalline bedrock-Pleistocene aeolianite headlands that separate many long, sweeping, Holocene carbonate sand beaches and their backbeach dunes. Incessant SW waves, rolling swells, and onshore winds have resulted in > 350 km of semi-continuous calcareous strandline aeolian sands. The sediment is composed of quartz grains, Cenozoic limestone clasts, and relict particles (extraclasts) but the deposits are overwhelmingly dominated by contemporaneous biofragments from offshore. These skeletal grains are, in order of relative abundance, molluscs > benthic foraminifers > coralline algae > bryozoans, and echinoids. Benthic foraminifers are mostly small (especially rotaliids and miliolids) but the large relict symbiont-bearing protistMarginopora vertebralis, which grew in the latter stages of MIS 2, is present locally. There are no significant onshore-offshore trends within individual beach-dune complexes. There is, however, a prominent spatial partitioning, with extraclast-rich sediments in the north and biofragment-rich deposits in the south. This areal trend is interpreted to result from more active seafloor carbonate production in the south, an area of conspicuous seasonal nutrient upwelling and profound nektic and benthic biological productivity. The overall system is strikingly similar to Holocene and Pleistocene aeolianites along the inboard margin of the Lacepede Shelf and Bonney Coast some 500 km to the southeast, implying a potential universality to the nature of cool-water carbonate aeolianite deposition. The composition of these cool-water aeolianites is more multifaceted than those formed on warm-water, shallow flat-topped platforms, largely because of the comparatively deep, temperate shelf, the high-energy wave and swell

  6. Studying the Post-Fire Response of Vegetation in California Protected Areas with NDVI-based Pheno-Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, S.; Gillespie, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Post-fire response from vegetation is determined by the intensity and timing of fires as well as the nature of local biomes. Though the field-based studies focusing on selected study sites helped to understand the mechanisms of post-fire response, there is a need to extend the analysis to a broader spatial extent with the assistance of remotely sensed imagery of fires and vegetation. Pheno-metrics, a series of variables on the growing cycle extracted from basic satellite measurements of vegetation coverage, translate the basic remote sensing measurements such as NDVI to the language of phenology and fire ecology in a quantitative form. In this study, we analyzed the rate of biomass removal after ignition and the speed of post-fire recovery in California protected areas from 2000 to 2014 with USGS MTBS fire data and USGS eMODIS pheno-metrics. NDVI drop caused by fire showed the aboveground biomass of evergreen forest was removed much slower than shrubland because of higher moisture level and greater density of fuel. In addition, the above two major land cover types experienced a greatly weakened immediate post-fire growing season, featuring a later start and peak of season, a shorter length of season, and a lower start and peak of NDVI. Such weakening was highly correlated with burn severity, and also influenced by the season of fire and the land cover type, according to our modeling between the anomalies of pheno-metrics and the difference of normalized burn ratio (dNBR). The influence generally decayed over time, but can remain high within the first 5 years after fire, mostly because of the introduction of exotic species when the native species were missing. Local-specific variables are necessary to better address the variance within the same fire and improve the outcomes of models. This study can help ecologists in validating the theories of post-fire vegetation response mechanisms and assist local fire managers in post-fire vegetation recovery.

  7. Evaluation of Adsorbed Arsenic and Potential Contribution to Shallow Groundwater in Tulare Lake Bed Area, Tulare Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Fujii, R.; Chalmers, A.T.; Tanji, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    Elevated As concentrations in shallow groundwater in parts of the Tulare Basin, California, are a concern because of potential migration into deeper aquifers that could serve as a source of future drinking water. The objectives of this study were to evaluate adsorbed As and the potential contribution to groundwater using (i) isotopic dilution, (ii) successive extraction with an electrolyte solution resembling the pore-water chemical composition, and (iii) PO4 exchange for As. Sediment samples collected from 2 to 4 m below land surface in the Tulare Lake bed area contained a total As concentration of 24 mg As kg-1. Pore water extracted under hydraulic pressure contained a total As concentration of 590 ??g As L-1, which predominantly contained As as arsenate [As(V), 97%], a minor amount of arsenite [As(III), 3%], and non-detectable organic As. The isotopic dilution method [73As(V)] estimated that the concentration of adsorbed As(V) on the sediment was 5.7 mg As kg-1 at pH 8.5 and 6.7 mg As kg-1 at pH 7.5, respectively. Fourteen successive 24-h extractions with the artificial pore water released up to 57 to 61% of the adsorbed As(V) that was determined by isotopic dilution, indicating that only a portion of the adsorbed As could be released to groundwater. The phosphate-exchangeable As (0.1 M PO4, pH 8.5 or 7.5) was 63% of the isotopically exchangeable As(V). Thus, extraction of As by 0.1 M PO4 at ambient pHs is recommended as a method to determine the potential amount of As(V) on sediments that could be released to the solution phase. The overall results indicated that adsorbed As could be a significant source of As to groundwater. However, other factors that affect As transport such as the leaching rate need to be considered.

  8. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  9. Small proportions of actively-smoking patrons and high PM2.5 levels in southern California tribal casinos: support for smoking bans or designated smoking areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klepeis Neil E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly all California casinos currently allow smoking, which leads to potentially high patron exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke pollutants. Some argue that smoking restrictions or bans would result in a business drop, assuming > 50% of patrons smoke. Evidence in Nevada and responses from the 2008 California tobacco survey refute this assertion. The present study investigates the proportion of active smokers in southern California tribal casinos, as well as occupancy and PM2.5 levels in smoking and nonsmoking sections. Methods We measured active-smoker and total-patron counts during Friday or Saturday night visits (two per casino to smoking and nonsmoking gaming areas inside 11 southern California casinos. We counted slot machines and table games in each section, deriving theoretical maximum capacities and occupancy rates. We also measured PM2.5 concentrations (or used published levels in both nonsmoking and smoking areas. Results Excluding one casino visit with extremely high occupancy, we counted 24,970 patrons during 21 casino visits of whom 1,737 were actively smoking, for an overall active- smoker proportion of 7.0% and a small range of ~5% across casino visits (minimum of 5% and maximum of 10%. The differences in mean inter-casino active-smoker proportions were not statistically significant. Derived occupancy rates were 24% to 215% in the main (low-stakes smoking-allowed slot or table areas. No relationship was found between observed active-smoker proportions and occupancy rate. The derived maximum capacities of nonsmoking areas were 1% to 29% of the overall casino capacity (most under 10% and their observed occupancies were 0.1 to over 3 times that of the main smoking-allowed casino areas. Seven of twelve visits to nonsmoking areas with no separation had occupancy rates greater than main smoking areas. Unenclosed nonsmoking areas don’t substantially protect occupants from PM2.5 exposure. Nonsmoking areas

  10. Integrated Mapping of Drought-Impacted Areas in the Sierra-Nevada Foothills Region of California Using Landsat Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-12-01

    Drought is a natural disaster with serious implications to environmental, social and economic well-being at local, regional and global scales. In its third year, California's drought condition has seriously impacted not just the agricultural sector, but also the natural resources sector including forestry, wildlife, and fisheries. As of July 15, 2014, the National Weather Service drought monitor shows 81% of California in the category of extreme drought. As future predictions of drought and fire severity become more real in California, there is an increased awareness to pursue innovative and cost-effective solutions that are based on silvicultural treatments and controlled burns to improve forest health and reduce the risk of high-severity wildfires. The main goal of this study is to develop a GIS map of the drought-impacted region of northern and central California using remote sensing data. Specifically, based on a geospatial database for the study region, Landsat imagery in conjunction with field and ancillary data will be analyzed using a combination of supervised and unsupervised classification techniques in addition to spectral indices such as the Modified Perpendicular Drought Index (MPDI). This spectral index basically scales the line perpendicular to the soil line defined in the Red-NIR feature space in conjunction with added information about vegetative fraction derived using NDVI. The image processing will be conducted for two time periods (2001 and 2014) to characterize the severity of the drought. In addition to field data, data collected by state agencies including calforests.org will be used in the classification and accuracy assessment procedures. Visual assessment using high-resolution imagery such as NAIP will be used to further refine the spatial maps. The drought severity maps produced will greatly facilitate site-specific planning efforts aimed at implementing resource management decisions.

  11. Reproductive mode and fine-scale population genetic structure of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae) in a viticultural area in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Sajedul; Roush, Tamara L; Walker, Michael Andrew; Granett, Jeffrey; Lin, Hong

    2013-12-24

    Grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae) is one of the world's most important viticultural pests. However, the reproductive mode, genetic structure and host adaptation of phylloxera in various viticultural environments remains unclear. We examined reproductive mode and genetic structure of phylloxera by analyzing microsatellite makers across the samples from four vineyard-sites in California. The phylloxera populations in California are believed to have predominantly parthenogenetic reproduction. Therefore, genetic diversity of phylloxera is expected to be limited. However, this study showed relatively high levels of diversity in Napa and Yolo county populations with a large number of unique genotypes, average number of alleles (2.1 to 2.9) and observed heterozygosities (0.330 to 0.388) per vineyard-sites. Reproduction diversity index (G: N-unique genotypes versus number of samples) ranged from 0.500 to 0.656 among vineyard-sites. Both significant and non-significant Psex (probability of sexual reproduction) were observed among different repeated genotypes within each vineyard. Moreover, high variation of FIS was observed among different loci in each vineyard-site. Genetic structure analysis (UPGMA) and various measures of population differentiations (FST, PCA, and gene flow estimates) consistently separated AXR#1 (Vitis vinifera x V. rupestris-widely planted in California during the 1960s and 1970s) associated populations from the populations associated with other different rootstocks. Genetic diversity, G: N ratio, Psex and FIS consistently suggested the occurrence of both parthenogenetic and sexual reproduction in California populations. This study clearly identified two major groups of phylloxera obtained from various rootstocks, with one group exclusively associated with only AXR#1 rootstock, defined as "biotype B", and another group associated with vinifera-based rootstocks, known as "biotype A".

  12. Groundwater quality in the shallow aquifers of the Tulare, Kaweah, and Tule Groundwater Basins and adjacent highlands areas, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.

    2017-01-18

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The shallow aquifers of the Tulare, Kaweah, and Tule groundwater basins and adjacent highlands areas of the southern San Joaquin Valley constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  13. Seafloor monitoring west of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) using the acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Fiorentino, Dario; Papenmeier, Svenja; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Marine habitats of shelf seas are in constant dynamic change and therefore need regular assessment particularly in areas of special interest. In this study, the single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn served to assess seafloor hardness and roughness, and combine these parameters into one variable expressed as RGB (red green blue) color code followed by k-means fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA). The data were collected at a monitoring site west of the island of Helgoland (German Bight, SE North Sea) in the course of four surveys between September 2011 and November 2014. The study area has complex characteristics varying from outcropping bedrock to sandy and muddy sectors with mostly gradual transitions. RoxAnn data enabled to discriminate all seafloor types that were suggested by ground-truth information (seafloor samples, video). The area appears to be quite stable overall; sediment import (including fluid mud) was detected only from the NW. Although hard substrates (boulders, bedrock) are clearly identified, the signal can be modified by inclination and biocover. Manually, six RoxAnn zones were identified; for the FCA, only three classes are suggested. The latter classification based on `hard' boundaries would suffice for stakeholder issues, but the former classification based on `soft' boundaries is preferred to meet state-of-the-art scientific objectives.

  14. Seafloor monitoring west of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) using the acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Fiorentino, Dario; Papenmeier, Svenja; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Marine habitats of shelf seas are in constant dynamic change and therefore need regular assessment particularly in areas of special interest. In this study, the single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn served to assess seafloor hardness and roughness, and combine these parameters into one variable expressed as RGB (red green blue) color code followed by k-means fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA). The data were collected at a monitoring site west of the island of Helgoland (German Bight, SE North Sea) in the course of four surveys between September 2011 and November 2014. The study area has complex characteristics varying from outcropping bedrock to sandy and muddy sectors with mostly gradual transitions. RoxAnn data enabled to discriminate all seafloor types that were suggested by ground-truth information (seafloor samples, video). The area appears to be quite stable overall; sediment import (including fluid mud) was detected only from the NW. Although hard substrates (boulders, bedrock) are clearly identified, the signal can be modified by inclination and biocover. Manually, six RoxAnn zones were identified; for the FCA, only three classes are suggested. The latter classification based on `hard' boundaries would suffice for stakeholder issues, but the former classification based on `soft' boundaries is preferred to meet state-of-the-art scientific objectives.

  15. The recirculation of the intermediate western boundary current at the Tubarão Bight - Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vladimir S.; Mill, Guilherme N.; Gabioux, Mariela; Grossmann-Matheson, Guisela S.; Paiva, Afonso M.

    2017-02-01

    Lagrangian floats and current meter measurements from two moored arrays are analyzed, in combination with altimetry data, in order to investigate the recirculation of Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW), and of the Intermediate Western Boundary Current (IWBC) at the Tubarão Bight, in the vicinity of the Vitória-Trindade Ridge (VTR), Brazil. Results from a high-resolution numerical simulation provide a complementary view of the flow at intermediate and surface levels. The data depict a topographically-induced cyclonic recirculation at intermediate levels, and five Argo floats are successively trapped inside the bight for two-and-a-half years, performing a total of 10 closed clockwise gyres during this period of time. In situ measurements at the western side of the bight show an intense alongshore flow at intermediate levels, with averaged velocities at 800 m of 30 cm/s, and peak velocities exceeding 50 cm/s, magnitudes comparable to the Brazil Current (BC) flow at surface levels. The recirculation extends from at least 1000 m deep up to 370 m, reaching sometimes depths as shallow as 150 m, but is mostly uncoupled from the surface flow during the one-and-a-half year long current meter record. Three different flow patterns are observed, and simulated, at surface levels inside the bight during the time the recirculation is well established at intermediate levels: a shallow cyclonic circulation, somewhat akin to the Vitória Eddy; a recurrent anticyclonic flow that encompasses the entire bight; and a southwestward-oriented circulation, associated with the BC being reorganized in a coherent flow after negotiating its way through the VTR channels. A significant portion (about 50% according to the model) of the inflow of intermediate waters recirculates, enhancing the flow of the IWBC within the bight, and increasing the age of AAIW that will eventually cross the VTR on its way to lower latitudes. Although the data are not conclusive about a preferential pathway of the

  16. Active Crustal Deformation in the Area of San Carlos, Baja California Sur, Mexico as Shown by Data of Local Earthquake Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía, Luis; González-Escobar, Mario; Navarro, Miguel; Valdez, Tito; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Wong, Victor; Luna, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed earthquakes of sequences that occurred at different times near San Carlos, a town of approximately 5000 inhabitants. The seismic sequences happened during March-April 1989, October 2000-June 2001, and 5-15 February 2004 at about 200 km west of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. The strong shaking from initial earthquakes of the first two sequences prompted the installation of temporary seismic stations in the area. With data recorded by these stations, we found an earthquake distribution that is consistent with the northwest segment of the Santa Margarita fault. Both the focal depth, that seemed to increase in E-NE direction, and a composite fault-plane solution, obtained from polarity data of the small earthquakes, were also consistent with the main characteristics of that fault. We also found that our normal-faulting mechanism (east side down) was quite similar to centroid moment tensor solutions for earthquakes with M w 5.4 and 5.3 that occurred in the area in February 2004. It is likely, then, that these larger earthquakes also occurred along the Santa Margarita Fault. To get some insight into the regional stress pattern, we compared the above mechanisms with mechanisms reported for other earthquakes of the Pacific margin of Baja California Sur and the Gulf of California regions. We observed that focal mechanisms of the two regions have T axes of stress that plunge sub horizontally in E-NE average direction. The corresponding P axes have N-NW average trend, but for the Pacific earthquakes these axes plunge at angles that are ~35° larger than those for the Gulf earthquakes. These more vertically inclined P axes of compressive stress mean substantial oblique fault motions. The mixture of oblique and strike-slip components of fault motions, as the focal mechanisms show, confirms a transtensional stress regime for the region. Before this research, we knew little about the seismicity and styles of faulting in the area. Now we know that

  17. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin – Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H. D.; Vessi, Andrea; Jobling, Mark A.; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Primativo, Giuseppina; Biondi, Gianfranco; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Ottoni, Claudio; Decorte, Ronny; Rickards, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY) has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample. Therefore, the uniquely

  18. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin - Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten H D Larmuseau

    Full Text Available Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample

  19. Joint NOAA/NWS/USGS prototype debris flow warning system for recently burned areas in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, P.; Jorgensen, D.P.; Cannon, S.H.; Costa, J.; Laber, J.; Major, J.; Martner, B.; Purpura, J.; Werner, K.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flows, also known as mudslides, are composed gravity-driven mixtures of sediment and water that travel through steep channels, over open hillslopes, and the like. Addressing this issue, US Geological Survey (USGS) and NOAA have established a debris-flow warning system that has the ability to monitor and forecast precipitation and issue timely weather hazard warning. In 2005, this joint NOAA-USGS prototype debris-flow warning system was issued in Southern California and as a result, it has provided valuable information to emergency managers in affected communities.

  20. Policy challenges in the fight against childhood obesity: low adherence in San Diego area schools to the California Education Code regulating physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglieri, G; Leon-Chi, L; Newfield, R S

    2013-01-01

    Assess the adherence to the Physical Education (PE) requirements per California Education Code in San Diego area schools. Surveys were administered anonymously to children and adolescents capable of physical activity, visiting a specialty clinic at Rady Children's Hospital San Diego. The main questions asked were their gender, grade, PE classes per week, and time spent doing PE. 324 surveys were filled, with 36 charter-school students not having to abide by state code excluded. We report on 288 students (59% females), mostly Hispanic (43%) or Caucasian (34%). In grades 1-6, 66.7% reported under the 200 min per 10 school days required by the PE code. Only 20.7% had daily PE. Average PE days/week was 2.6. In grades 7-12, 42.2% had reported under the 400 min per 10 school days required. Daily PE was noted in 47.8%. Average PE days/week was 3.4. Almost 17% had no PE, more so in the final two grades of high school (45.7%). There is low adherence to the California Physical Education mandate in the San Diego area, contributing to poor fitness and obesity. Lack of adequate PE is most evident in grades 1-6 and grades 11-12. Better resources, awareness, and enforcement are crucial.

  1. Policy Challenges in the Fight against Childhood Obesity: Low Adherence in San Diego Area Schools to the California Education Code Regulating Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consiglieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Assess the adherence to the Physical Education (PE requirements per California Education Code in San Diego area schools. Methods. Surveys were administered anonymously to children and adolescents capable of physical activity, visiting a specialty clinic at Rady Children's Hospital San Diego. The main questions asked were their gender, grade, PE classes per week, and time spent doing PE. Results. 324 surveys were filled, with 36 charter-school students not having to abide by state code excluded. We report on 288 students (59% females, mostly Hispanic (43% or Caucasian (34%. In grades 1–6, 66.7% reported under the 200 min per 10 school days required by the PE code. Only 20.7% had daily PE. Average PE days/week was 2.6. In grades 7–12, 42.2% had reported under the 400 min per 10 school days required. Daily PE was noted in 47.8%. Average PE days/week was 3.4. Almost 17% had no PE, more so in the final two grades of high school (45.7%. Conclusions. There is low adherence to the California Physical Education mandate in the San Diego area, contributing to poor fitness and obesity. Lack of adequate PE is most evident in grades 1–6 and grades 11-12. Better resources, awareness, and enforcement are crucial.

  2. Coastal observing and forecasting system for the German Bight – estimates of hydrophysical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Petersen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A coastal observing system for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA aims at construction of a long-term observatory for the German part of the North Sea, elements of which will be deployed as prototype modules in Arctic coastal waters. At present a coastal prediction system deployed in the area of the German Bight integrates near real-time measurements with numerical models in a pre-operational way and provides continuously state estimates and forecasts of coastal ocean state. The measurement suite contributing to the pre-operational set up includes in situ time series from stationary stations, a High-Frequency (HF radar system measuring surface currents, a FerryBox system and remote sensing data from satellites. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in a data-assimilation mode, which are forced with up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews the present status of the system and its recent upgrades focusing on developments in the field of coastal data assimilation. Model supported data analysis and state estimates are illustrated using HF radar and FerryBox observations as examples. A new method combining radial surface current measurements from a single HF radar with a priori information from a hydrodynamic model is presented, which optimally relates tidal ellipses parameters of the 2-D current field and the M2 phase and magnitude of the radials. The method presents a robust and helpful first step towards the implementation of a more sophisticated assimilation system and demonstrates that even using only radials from one station can substantially benefit state estimates for surface currents. Assimilation of FerryBox data based on an optimal interpolation approach using a Kalman filter with a stationary background covariance matrix derived from a preliminary model run which was validated against remote sensing and in situ data demonstrated the capabilities of the pre-operational system. Data

  3. Coastal observing and forecasting system for the German Bight – estimates of hydrophysical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Stanev

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A coastal observing system for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA aims at construction of a long-term observatory for the German part of the North Sea, elements of which will be deployed as prototype modules in Arctic coastal waters. At present a coastal prediction system deployed in the area of the German Bight integrates near real-time measurements with numerical models in a pre-operational way and provides continuously state estimates and forecasts of coastal ocean state. The measurement suite contributing to the pre-operational set up includes in situ time series from stationary stations, a High-Frequency (HF radar system measuring surface currents, a FerryBox system and remote sensing data from satellites. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in a data-assimilation mode, which are forced with up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews the present status of the system and its recent upgrades focusing on developments in the field of coastal data assimilation. Model supported data analysis and state estimates are illustrated using HF radar and FerryBox observations as examples. A new method combining radial surface current measurements from a single HF radar with a priori information from a hydrodynamic model is presented, which optimally relates tidal ellipses parameters of the 2-D current field and the M2 phase and magnitude of the radials. The method presents a robust and helpful first step towards the implementation of a more sophisticated assimilation system and demonstrates that even using only radials from one station can substantially benefit state estimates for surface currents. Assimilation of FerryBox data based on an optimal interpolation approach using a Kalman filter with a stationary background covariance matrix derived from a preliminary model run which was validated against remote sensing and in situ data demonstrated the capabilities of the pre-operational system. Data

  4. Characterizing Wave- and Current-Induced Bottom Shear Stress: U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, S.; Butman, B.

    2011-12-01

    The combined action of waves and currents at the seabed creates bottom shear stress, impacting local geology, habitat, and anthropogenic use. In this study, a methodology is developed to characterize the magnitude of benthic disturbance based on spatially and seasonally-resolved statistics (mean, standard deviation, 95th percentile) of wave-current bottom shear stress. The frequency of stress forcing is used to distinguish regions dominated by storms (return interval longer than 33 hours) from those dominated by the tides (periods shorter than 33 hours). In addition, the relative magnitude of the contribution to stress from waves, tides, and storm-driven currents is investigated by comparing wave stress, tidal current stress, and stress from the residual current (currents with tides removed), as well as through cross-correlation of wave and current stress. The methodology is applied to numerical model time-series data for the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) off the U.S. East Coast for April 2010 to April 2011; currents are provided from the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) operational hydrodynamic forecast Experimental System for Predicting Shelf and Slope Optics (ESPreSSO) and waves are provided from a Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) hindcast developed for this project. Spatial resolution of the model is about 5 km and time-series wave and current data are at 1 and 2-hours respectively. Regions of the MAB delineated by stress characteristics include a tidally-dominated shallow region with relative high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves; a region dominated by waves and wind-driven currents offshore of the Outer Banks of North Carolina; and a low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the "Mud Patch". Comparison of the stress distribution with surface sediment texture data shows that

  5. Data assimilation of ocean wind waves using Neural Networks. A case study for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Kathrin; Staneva, Joanna; Guenther, Heinz

    2015-12-01

    A novel approach of data assimilation based on Neural Networks (NN's) is presented and applied to wave modeling in the German Bight. The method takes advantage from the ability of NN's to emulate models and to invert them. Combining forward and inverse model NN with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm provides boundary values or wind fields in agreement with measured wave integrated parameters. Synthesized HF-radar wave data are used to test the technique for two academic cases.

  6. 3D Propagation and Geoacoustic Inversion Studies in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    bathymetric features and ocean fronts near the shelf break of the mid-Atlantic Bight, and use of various data for geoacoutic inversion studies . The results ...Island (using a propagation model with a genetic algorithm approach). WORK COMPLETED Numerical analysis of significance of 3D propagation influences ... influences of geoacoustic properties have been completed. RESULTS The numerical analysis showed that the dominant mechanism for 3-D azimuthal

  7. Tritium in the German Bight 1980 to 1995. Trends of activity and balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, C. [Bundesamt fuer Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Full text: Since 1980 seawater samples have been taken yearly in the German Bight on 9 fixed stations for tritium analysis. The initial mean value of 1.9 Bq/l measured in 1980 changed to a concentration of 1.1 Bq/l in 1992 and is now increasing to 2.8 Bq/l in 1995. The accumulated effect to the German Bight derived from the tritium sources discharging into the adjacent seas is calculated by transfer factors. The calculations take into account the yearly liquid discharges from the nuclear reprocessing plants and power stations into the British and French coastal waters as well as the tritium concentration in the Atlantic and North Sea water, the rain water input and the freshwater tributaries to the southern North Sea. The activity values used are taken both from literature and own measurements. The results show that the nuclear weapons fallout was the predominant source in 1980. Nowadays the nuclear power industry is the main source of tritium concentration in the German Bight. The poster demonstrates the temporal development of the activity concentration measured in relation to the calculated contributions. The geographic locations of the sample stations and the sites of the sources are displayed. Moreover, the individual sources and their tritium discharges (in 1993, as an example) as well as the transfer factors used are listed

  8. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  9. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  10. El papel de las areas naturales protegidas en el desarrollo local: el caso de la peninsula de Baja California

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riemann, Hugo; Santes-Alvarez, Ricardo V; Pombo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Las areas naturales protegidas (ANP) se perciben de forma dual: como areas de oportunidad para el desarrollo y como regiones que limitan el acceso a mejores condiciones de bienestar para la poblacion...

  11. Statistical and dynamical analysis of internal waves on the continental shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight from Space Shuttle photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Quanan; Yan, Xiao-Hai; Klemas, Vic

    1993-01-01

    The internal waves on the continental shelf on the Middle Atlantic Bight seen on Space Shuttle photographs taken during the STS-40 mission in June 1991 are measured and analyzed. The internal wave field in the sample area has a three-level structure which consists of packet groups, packets, and solitons. An average packet group wavelength of 17.5 km and an average soliton wavelength of 0.6 km are measured. Finite-depth theory is used to derive the dynamic parameters of the internal solitons: the maximum amplitude of 5.6 m, the characteristic phase speed of 0.42 m/s, the characteristic period of 23.8 min, the velocity amplitude of the water particles in the upper and lower layers of 0.13 m/s and 0.030 m/s respectively, and the theoretical energy per unit crest line of 6.8 x 10 exp 4 J/m. The frequency distribution of solitons is triple-peaked rather than continuous. The major generation source is at 160 m water depth, and a second is at 1800 m depth, corresponding to the upper and lower edges of the shelf break.

  12. Seasonal and spatial patterns of Penilia avirostris and three tunicate species in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Julie W.; Kumar, Ajoy; Moisan, Tiffany A.; Aulenbach, Donielle L.; Day, Melissa C.; Dix, Stephanie A.; Winsor, Michele A.

    2013-10-01

    The cladoceran Penilia avirostris and three tunicate species, Oikopleura dioica, Dolioletta gegenbauri and Thalia democratica, form a mesozooplankton group which ingests a wide range of particles from pico- to micro- plankton, grows rapidly due to asexual reproduction, and thus can have major impacts on phytoplankton populations. These four zooplankton species were the most abundant tunicate and cladoceran species in a study where zooplankton were sampled biweekly at five stations across the inner continental shelf in the Mid-Atlantic Bight in 2005, 2006 and 2007. Vertical tows were taken at shallow stations and depth stratified vertical tows at stations >10 m. P. avirostris and O. dioica had highly predictable seasonal cycles with peak abundances in July and August. D. gegenbauri also was present during this time period if upwelling favorable winds were present, which implies cross shelf transport from source populations in slope waters and the Gulf Stream. T. democratica only appeared in pulses when southerly winds were increasing in strength. The co-occurrence P. avirostris and the tunicate species with abundant Synechococcus and heterotrophic nanoflagellates during highly stratified summer conditions provide potential connections to microbial food webs as well as grazing opportunities on event scale blooms of dinoflagellate and diatoms species present in the area.

  13. Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management System to Balance Intermittent Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration and California ISO Control Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Yang, Bo; DeSteese, John G.

    2009-01-01

    (CAISO) areas. The proposed wide area energy management system (WAEMS) addresses these additional balancing requirements through energy exchange between the participat-ing control areas and through the use of energy storage and other generation resources. For the BPA and CAISO control areas, the new...... energy storage technologies for the pro-posed application include flywheel energy storage devices (ESD), pumped or conventional hydro power plants, and so-dium sulfur or nickel cadmium batteries. A preferred WAEMS architecture was selected as an aggregation of a flywheel ESD and a pumped storage (or...

  14. Long-term impact of bottom trawling on pelagic-benthic coupling in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine; Janssen, Felix; Ahmerkamp, Soeren; Holtappels, Moritz; Schueckel, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    were measured on sandy (permeable) and silty (diffusive) sediments, whereas significant differences of microbial O2 uptake were observed indeed between permeable and diffusive sediments. Nevertheless, when considering the multitude of different methods, we found that benthic respiration over the season seemed to be governed mainly by settling of fresh organic matter during calm periods and its rapid turnover in a region where strong tidal and wind-forced currents distribute suspended particles over large areas. Summer pelagic respiration rates were an order of magnitude higher then benthic rates, and account for 88-93% of total respiration, which represents 79-98% of pelagic primary production. Our measurements of benthic respiration account for 7-12% of the total in the German Bight, which is lower compared to earlier studies. Strong tidal and wind-forced currents along with the lack of complex three-dimensional biogenic structures seem to prevent settling of suspended matter and foster resuspension, thereby supporting pelagic turnover processes. Hence, we assume that benthic turnover might have been higher before systematic bottom trawling destroyed the bottom hydrobiological regime. Today, due to the strong current regime in the German Bight, the pelagic system appears to be a largely closed system of production and respiration, with comparably little for export to the benthic system due to absence of biogenic structures. References Callaway R, Engelhard GH, Dann J, Cotter J, Rumohr H (2007) One century of North Sea epibenthos and fishing: comparison between 1902-1912, 1982-1985 and 2000. Marine Ecology Progress Series 346, 27-43. Christiansen S (2009) Towards good environmental status - A network of marine protected areas for the North Sea. In: Lutter S (ed) WWF Germany, Fankfurt/Main Emeis K-C, van Beusekom J, Callies U, Ebinghaus R, Kannen A, Kraus G, Kröncke I, Lenhart H, Lorkowski I, Matthias V, Möllmann C, Pätsch J, Scharfe M, Thomas H, Weisse R, Zorita E

  15. Geologic map and upper Paleozoic stratigraphy of the Marble Canyon area, Cottonwood Canyon quadrangle, Death Valley National Park, Inyo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.; Belasky, Paul; Montañez, Isabel P.; Martin, Lauren G.; Wardlaw, Bruce R.; Sandberg, Charles A.; Wan, Elmira; Olson, Holly A.; Priest, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    This geologic map and pamphlet focus on the stratigraphy, depositional history, and paleogeographic significance of upper Paleozoic rocks exposed in the Marble Canyon area in Death Valley National Park, California. Bedrock exposed in this area is composed of Mississippian to lower Permian (Cisuralian) marine sedimentary rocks and the Jurassic Hunter Mountain Quartz Monzonite. These units are overlain by Tertiary and Quaternary nonmarine sedimentary deposits that include a previously unrecognized tuff to which we tentatively assign an age of late middle Miocene (~12 Ma) based on tephrochronologic analysis, in addition to the previously recognized Pliocene tuff of Mesquite Spring. Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks in the Marble Canyon area represent deposition on the western continental shelf of North America. Mississippian limestone units in the area (Tin Mountain, Stone Canyon, and Santa Rosa Hills Limestones) accumulated on the outer part of a broad carbonate platform that extended southwest across Nevada into east-central California. Carbonate sedimentation was interrupted by a major eustatic sea-level fall that has been interpreted to record the onset of late Paleozoic glaciation in southern Gondwana. Following a brief period of Late Mississippian clastic sedimentation (Indian Springs Formation), a rise in eustatic sea level led to establishment of a new carbonate platform that covered most of the area previously occupied by the Mississippian platform. The Pennsylvanian Bird Spring Formation at Marble Canyon makes up the outer platform component of ten third-order (1 to 5 m.y. duration) stratigraphic sequences recently defined for the regional platform succession. The regional paleogeography was fundamentally changed by major tectonic activity along the continental margin beginning in middle early Permian time. As a result, the Pennsylvanian carbonate shelf at Marble Canyon subsided and was disconformably overlain by lower Permian units (Osborne Canyon and

  16. Geologic Map of the Warm Spring Canyon Area, Death Valley National Park, Inyo County, California, With a Discussion of the Regional Significance of the Stratigraphy and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrucke, Chester T.; Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.

    2007-01-01

    Warm Spring Canyon is located in the southeastern part of the Panamint Range in east-central California, 54 km south of Death Valley National Park headquarters at Furnace Creek Ranch. For the relatively small size of the area mapped (57 km2), an unusual variety of Proterozoic and Phanerozoic rocks is present. The outcrop distribution of these rocks largely resulted from movement on the east-west-striking, south-directed Butte Valley Thrust Fault of Jurassic age. The upper plate of the thrust fault comprises a basement of Paleoproterozoic schist and gneiss overlain by a thick sequence of Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic rocks, the latter of which includes diamictite generally considered to be of glacial origin. The lower plate is composed of Devonian to Permian marine formations overlain by Jurassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous plutons intrude rocks of the area, and one pluton intrudes the Butte Valley Thrust Fault. Low-angle detachment faults of presumed Tertiary age underlie large masses of Neoproterozoic dolomite in parts of the area. Movement on these faults predated emplacement of middle Miocene volcanic rocks in deep, east-striking paleovalleys. Excellent exposures of all the rocks and structural features in the area result from sparse vegetation in the dry desert climate and from deep erosion along Warm Spring Canyon and its tributaries.

  17. Response patterns of phytoplankton growth to variations in resuspension in the German Bight revealed by daily MERIS data in 2003 and 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Su

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (chl a concentration in coastal seas exhibits variability on various spatial and temporal scales. Resuspension of particulate matter can somewhat limit algal growth, but can also enhance productivity because of the intrusion of nutrient-rich pore water from sediments or bottom water layers into the whole water column. This study investigates whether characteristic changes in net phytoplankton growth can be directly linked to resuspension events within the German Bight. Satellite-derived chl a were used to derive spatial patterns of net rates of chl a increase/decrease (NR in 2003 and 2004. Spatial correlations between NR and mean water column irradiance were analysed. High correlations in space and time were found in most areas of the German Bight (R2 > 0.4, suggesting a tight coupling between light availability and algal growth during spring. These correlations were reduced within a distinct zone in the transition between shallow coastal areas and deeper offshore waters. In summer and autumn, a mismatch was found between phytoplankton blooms (chl a > 6 mg m−3 and spring-tidal induced resuspension events as indicated by bottom velocity, suggesting that there is no phytoplankton resuspension during spring tides. It is instead proposed here that frequent and recurrent spring-tidal resuspension events enhance algal growth by supplying remineralized nutrients. This hypothesis is corroborated by a lag correlation analysis between resuspension events and in-situ measured nutrient concentrations. This study outlines seasonally different patterns in phytoplankton productivity in response to variations in resuspension, which can serve as a reference for modelling coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  18. Engineering geology of the Geysers Geothermal Resource Area, Lake, Mendocino, and Sonoma Counties, California. Special report 122

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, C.F.; Amimoto, P.Y.; Sherburne, R.W.; Slosson, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Guidelines for the engineering geology assessment of The Geysers Geothermal Resource Area (GRA) are presented. Approximately 50 percent of the geothermal wells and some of the power plants are presently located on landslide areas. Several geothermal wells have failed, causing additional land instability, loss of energy resource, and unnecessary expense. Hazardous geologic conditions in the area are identified, and measures for mitigating those hazardous conditions are recommended. Such measures or other equally adequate measures should be considered for any proposed development activity in The Geysers area.

  19. Incorporating genetic sampling in long-term monitoring and adaptive management in the San Diego County Management Strategic Plan Area, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, Amy G.

    2017-06-02

    Habitat and species conservation plans usually rely on monitoring to assess progress towards conservation goals. Southern California, USA, is a hotspot of biodiversity and home to many federally endangered and threatened species. Here, several regional multi-species conservation plans have been implemented to balance development and conservation goals, including in San Diego County. In the San Diego County Management Strategic Plan Area (MSPA), a monitoring framework for the preserve system has been developed with a focus on species monitoring, vegetation monitoring, threats monitoring and abiotic monitoring. Genetic sampling over time (genetic monitoring) has proven useful in gathering species presence and abundance data and detecting population trends, particularly related to species and threats monitoring objectives. This report reviews genetic concepts and techniques of genetics that relate to monitoring goals and outlines components of a genetic monitoring scheme that could be applied in San Diego or in other monitoring frameworks throughout the Nation.

  20. Detailed microearthquake survey of Long Valley, California, known geothermal resource area, July-September 1981. Final technical report, 30 September 1980-31 June 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, C.H.; Stierman, D.J.; Lee, T.C.

    1983-07-01

    This report presents the results of a detailed microearthquake survey of the geothermal area at Long Valley, California. High quality digital data from a dense 3-component array covering a three-month period during the summer of 1981 have been processed for locations, velocity structure, magnitudes, focal mechanisms, and source parameters. Hypocenter locations determined from this array have estimated errors of 0.5 km in epicenter and 1.0 km in depth relative to one another. Detailed hypocentral locations show two complex zones of seismicity beneath the south moat of the caldera which seems associated with the major hot spring activity within the caldera and could be part of the conduit system feeding hydrothermal waters to these hot springs. Seismic activity at Long Valley appears to be influenced by both regional tectonic stresses and local volcanotectonic activity.

  1. Mental health and substance abuse characteristics among a clinical sample of urban American Indian/Alaska native youths in a large California metropolitan area: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Daniel L; Johnson, Carrie L

    2012-02-01

    This study analyzes descriptive data among a clinical sample of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youths receiving mental health services in a large California metropolitan area. Among 118 urban AI/AN youths, mood disorders (41.5%) and adjustment disorder (35.4%) were the most common mental health diagnoses. Alcohol (69.2%) and marijuana (50.0%) were the most commonly used substances. Witnessing domestic violence (84.2%) and living with someone who had a substance abuse problem (64.7%) were reported. The majority of patients demonstrated various behavior and emotional problems. Enhancing culturally relevant mental health and substance abuse treatment and prevention programs for urban AI/AN youth is suggested.

  2. Stress orientation and anisotropy based on shear-wave splitting observations in the Cerro Prieto fault area, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, F. R.; Castro, R. R.; Domínguez, T.

    1995-03-01

    Digital seismograms continuously recorded from 1988 to 1992 by two stations of the RESNOM seismic network in northern Baja California, Mexico, were used to search for probable shear-wave anisotropic characteristics in the region of the Cerro Prieto fault. Shear-wave splitting was identified in many of the three-component records analyzed. We measured the polarization direction of the leading S wave inside the S-wave window as well as the delay times between fast and slow phases on those records displaying shear-wave splitting. For station CPX, which is nearest the Imperial Valley region to the north, the preferred polarization direction found in this study (azimuth 180°±10°) coincides with the direction of the regional maximum compressive stress determined for the region. This polarization direction can be interpreted in terms of the “Extensive Dilatancy Anisotropy” model as the effect of vertical parallel aligned cracks. The preferred polarization direction measured at LMX, however, gives an azimuth of 45°±5°. Thus, it appears that faults and fractures aligned oblique to the main tectonic trend have a greater influence on the anisotropic characteristics of the crust south of Cerro Prieto volcano than that of the regional stress field. Time delays between slow and fast S waves observed at CPX appear constant from 1988 to 1992 while delays measured at LMX for the same interval indicate a small increase with time which cannot be attributed to azimuthal variations of paths.

  3. Mineral resource potential map of the Blanco Mountain and Black Canyon roadless areas, Inyo and Mono counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggles, Michael F.; Blakely, Richard J.; Rains, Richard L.; Schmauch, Steven W.

    1983-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and a survey of mines and prospects, the mineral resource potential for gold, silver, lead, zinc, tungsten, and barite of the Blanco Mountain and Black Canyon Roadless Areas is judged to be low to moderate, except for one local area that has high potential for gold and tungsten resources.

  4. Seismic source parameters of the induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermal area, California, by a generalized inversion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picozzi, Matteo; Oth, Adrien; Parolai, Stefano; Bindi, Dino; De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia

    2017-04-01

    The accurate determination of stress drop, seismic efficiency and how source parameters scale with earthquake size is an important for seismic hazard assessment of induced seismicity. We propose an improved non-parametric, data-driven strategy suitable for monitoring induced seismicity, which combines the generalized inversion technique together with genetic algorithms. In the first step of the analysis the generalized inversion technique allows for an effective correction of waveforms for the attenuation and site contributions. Then, the retrieved source spectra are inverted by a non-linear sensitivity-driven inversion scheme that allows accurate estimation of source parameters. We therefore investigate the earthquake source characteristics of 633 induced earthquakes (ML 2-4.5) recorded at The Geysers geothermal field (California) by a dense seismic network (i.e., 32 stations of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Geysers/Calpine surface seismic network, more than 17.000 velocity records). We find for most of the events a non-selfsimilar behavior, empirical source spectra that requires ωγ source model with γ > 2 to be well fitted and small radiation efficiency ηSW. All these findings suggest different dynamic rupture processes for smaller and larger earthquakes, and that the proportion of high frequency energy radiation and the amount of energy required to overcome the friction or for the creation of new fractures surface changes with the earthquake size. Furthermore, we observe also two distinct families of events with peculiar source parameters that, in one case suggests the reactivation of deep structures linked to the regional tectonics, while in the other supports the idea of an important role of steeply dipping fault in the fluid pressure diffusion.

  5. 2016 Cartographic Boundary File, 2010 Urban Areas (UA) within 2010 County and Equivalent for California, 1:500,000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2016 cartographic boundary KMLs are simplified representations of selected geographic areas from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically...

  6. Boundary of the area contributing flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the area contributing ground-water flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow-system (DVRFS) model domain. The...

  7. Boundary of the area contributing flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the area contributing ground-water flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow-system (DVRFS) model domain....

  8. Distribution, nesting activities, and age-class of territorial pairs of golden eagles at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California, 2014–16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Patrick S.; Wiens, J. David

    2017-03-22

    The substantial numbers of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) killed by collisions with oldgeneration wind turbines each year at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) in California has been well documented from previous studies. Few eagle nests have been documented in the APWRA, however, and adults and subadults 3+ years of age killed by turbines were generally not associated with nearby territories. We searched a subset of randomly selected survey plots for territorial pairs of golden eagles and associated nesting attempts within the APWRA as part of a broader investigation of population dynamics in the surrounding northern Diablo Range. In contrast to limited historical observations from 1988 to 2013, our surveys documented up to 15 territorial pairs within 3.2 kilometers (km) of wind turbines at the APWRA annually, 9 of which were not previously documented or only observed intermittently during historical surveys. We found evidence of nesting activity by adult pairs at least once during our study at six of these territories. We also determined that 23–36 percent of territories identified within 3.2 km of the APWRA had a subadult pair member, but that no pairs with a subadult member attempted to nest. These data will be useful to developers, wildlife managers, and future raptor studies in the area to evaluate and minimize the potential effects of wind energy or other development activities on previously unknown territorial pairs in the area.

  9. Identifying areas with potential for high indoor radon levels: analysis of the national airborne radiometric reconnaissance data for California and the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moed, B.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Schwehr, M.B.; Van Heuvelen, A.

    1984-04-01

    Radon-222 is an important indoor air pollutant which, through the inhalation of its radioactive decay products, accounts for nearly half of the effective dose equivalent to the public from natural ionizing radiation. Indoor radon concentrations vary widely, largely because of local and regional differences in the rate of entry from sources. The major sources are soil and rock near building foundations, earth-based building materials, and domestic water; of these, soil and rock are thought to be predominant in many buildings with higher-than-average concentrations. Thus, one key factor in determining radon source potential is the concentration of radium, the progenitor of radon, in surficial rocks and soils. Aerial radiometric data were analyzed, collected for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, for seven Western states to: (1) provide information on the spatial distribution of radium contents in surficial geologic materials for those states; and (2) investigate approaches for using the aerial data, which have been collected throughout the contiguous United States and Alaska, to identify areas where high indoor radon levels may be common. Radium concentrations were found to be relatively low in central and western portions of Washington, Oregon, and northern California; they were found to be relatively high in central and southern California. A field validation study, conducted along two flight-line segments near Spokane, Washington, showed close correspondence between the aerial data, in situ measurements of both radium content and radon flux from soil, and laboratory measurements of both radium content of and radon emanation rate from soil samples. 99 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Does damming of the Colorado River affect the nursery area of blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris (Decapoda: Penaeidae in the Upper Gulf of California?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Alberto Aragón-Noriega

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available After damming the Colorado River the freshwater flow was reduced to 1 % of its virgin flow to the Upper Gulf of California (UGC. The ecological effects need to be properly documented. The UGC is the nursery area for Litopenaeus stylirostris, the most profitable fishery in the zone. In order to know the relative abundance of L. stylirostris postlarval stage we conducted a sampled survey every 14 days in 1993, 1994 and 1997, plus an intensive sampling during a complete tide cycle in July 1995 and 1996. We did 10 min trawls each hour during the flood tide. Relative abundance of postlarvae was higher (pEl represamiento del Río Colorado ha ocasionado que el flujo de agua dulce sobre el Alto Golfo de California (AGC se haya reducido hasta el 1 % del flujo original. Se ha documentado el efecto de la reducción de agua dulce sobre las condiciones hidrográficas del AGC, pero las repercusiones ecológicas no se han descrito apropiadamente. El AGC ha sido área de crianza para especies comerciales como el camarón Litopenaeus stylirostris. Se hicieron recolectas de postlarvas de L. stylirostris en el AGC durante cinco años consecutivos. Los muestreos fueron catorcenalmente en los años de 1993, 1994 y 1997 y se realizó una recolecta diaria durante 15 días consecutivos en los años 1995 y 1996. Para ello se arrastró una red de plancton de 505 µ durante 10 min cada hora durante el flujo de marea. La abundancia relativa de las postlarvas de camarón en esta zona viaria considerablemente en años cuando el flujo de agua dulce incrementa. La abundancia es mayor hasta en un 200 % (p < 0.05 cuando existe descarga de agua dulce al AGC.

  11. Curie point depth from spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data from Cerro Prieto geothermal area, Baja California, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cardeña, J. M.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2008-10-01

    Using aeromagnetic data acquired in the area from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, we estimated the depth to the Curie point isotherm, interpreted as the base of the magnetic sources, following statistical spectral-based techniques. According to our results the Curie point isotherm is located at a depths ranging from 14 to 17 km. Our result is somewhat deeper than that obtained previously based only in 2-D and 3-D forward modeling of previous low-quality data. However, our results are supported by independent information comprising geothermal gradients, seismicity distribution in the crust, and gravity determined crustal thickness. Our results imply a high thermal gradient (ranging between 33 and 38 °C/km) and high heat flow (of about 100 mW/m 2) for the study area. The thermal regime for the area is inferred to be similar to that from the Salton trough.

  12. Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janice Gillespie

    2004-11-01

    Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top of the stratigraphic section even though the measured fault displacement is greatest in this zone. Bacterial gas is not present in the west in the deeper LSOZ which

  13. Assessing the susceptibility to contamination of two aquifer systems used for public water supply in the Modesto and Fresno metropolitan areas, California, 2001 and 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected from 90 active public supply wells in the Fresno and Modesto metropolitan areas as part of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) program. The CAS program was formed to examine the susceptibility to contamination of aquifers that are tapped by public supply wells to serve the citizens of California. The objectives of the program are twofold: (1) to evaluate the quality of ground water used for public supply using volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in ground-water samples and (2) to determine if the occurrence and distribution of low level VOCs in ground water and characteristics, such as land use, can be used to predict aquifer susceptibility to contamination from anthropogenic activities occurring at, or near, land surface. An evaluation was made of the relation between VOC occurrence and the explanatory variables: depth to the top of the uppermost well perforation, land use, relative ground-water age, high nitrate concentrations, density of leaking underground fuel tanks (LUFT), and source of recharge water. VOCs were detected in 92 percent of the wells sampled in Modesto and in 72 percent of the wells sampled in Fresno. Trihalomethanes (THM) and solvents were frequently detected in both study areas. Conversely, the gasoline components?benzene, toluene ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)?were rarely, if at all, detected, even though LUFTs were scattered throughout both study areas. The rare occurrence of BTEX compounds may be the result of their low solubility and labile nature in the subsurface environment. Samples were analyzed for 85 VOCs; 25 were detected in at least one sample. The concentrations of nearly all VOCs detected were at least an order of magnitude below action levels set by drinking water standards. Concentrations of four VOCs exceeded federal and state maximum contaminant levels (MCL): the solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and the fumigant 1, 2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) in Fresno, and the

  14. A Global Talent Magnet: How a San Francisco/Bay Area Global Higher Education Hub Could Advance California's Comparative Advantage in Attracting International Talent and Further Build US Economic Competitiveness. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.9.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, John; Edelstein, Richard; Hoareau, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    During the 2009-10 academic year international students generated more than $18.8 billion in net income into the US economy. California alone had nearly 100,000 international students with an economic impact of nearly $3.0 billion. In this paper, we outline a strategy for the San Francisco/Bay Area to double the number of international students…

  15. Analysis of phytoplankton distribution and community structure in the German Bight with respect to the different size classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschläger, Jochen; Wiltshire, Karen Helen; Petersen, Wilhelm; Metfies, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Investigation of phytoplankton biodiversity, ecology, and biogeography is crucial for understanding marine ecosystems. Research is often carried out on the basis of microscopic observations, but due to the limitations of this approach regarding detection and identification of picophytoplankton (0.2-2 μm) and nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm), these investigations are mainly focused on the microphytoplankton (20-200 μm). In the last decades, various methods based on optical and molecular biological approaches have evolved which enable a more rapid and convenient analysis of phytoplankton samples and a more detailed assessment of small phytoplankton. In this study, a selection of these methods (in situ fluorescence, flow cytometry, genetic fingerprinting, and DNA microarray) was placed in complement to light microscopy and HPLC-based pigment analysis to investigate both biomass distribution and community structure of phytoplankton. As far as possible, the size classes were analyzed separately. Investigations were carried out on six cruises in the German Bight in 2010 and 2011 to analyze both spatial and seasonal variability. Microphytoplankton was identified as the major contributor to biomass in all seasons, followed by the nanophytoplankton. Generally, biomass distribution was patchy, but the overall contribution of small phytoplankton was higher in offshore areas and also in areas exhibiting higher turbidity. Regarding temporal development of the community, differences between the small phytoplankton community and the microphytoplankton were found. The latter exhibited a seasonal pattern regarding number of taxa present, alpha- and beta-diversity, and community structure, while for the nano- and especially the picophytoplankton, a general shift in the community between both years was observable without seasonality. Although the reason for this shift remains unclear, the results imply a different response of large and small phytoplankton to environmental influences.

  16. Physical, chemical, and mineralogical data from surficial deposits, groundwater levels, and water composition in the area of Franklin Lake playa and Ash Meadows, California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Breit, George N.; Yount, James C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Reheis, Marith C.; Skipp, Gary L.; Fisher, Eric M.; Lamothe, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents data and describes the methods used to determine the physical attributes, as well as the chemical and mineralogical composition of surficial deposits; groundwater levels; and water composition in the area of Franklin Lake playa and Ash Meadows, California and Nevada. The results support studies that examine (1) the interaction between groundwater and the ground surface, and the transport of solutes through the unsaturated zone; (2) the potential for the accumulation of metals and metalloids in surface crusts; (3) emission of dust from metal-rich salt crust; and (4) the effects of metal-rich dusts on human and ecosystem health. The evaporation of shallow (salt in the subsurface and (or) the formation of salt crusts at the ground surface. Ground-surface characteristics such as hardness, electrical conductivity, and mineralogy depend on the types and forms of these salt crusts. In the study area, salt crusts range from hard and bedded to soft and loose (Reynolds and others, 2009). Depending on various factors such as the depth and composition of groundwater and sediment characteristics of the unsaturated zone, salt crusts may accumulate relatively high contents of trace elements. Soft, loose salt crusts are highly vulnerable to wind erosion and transport. These vulnerable crusts, which may contain high contents of potentially toxic trace elements, can travel as atmospheric dust and affect human and ecosystem health at local to regional scales.

  17. Observations of drinking water access in school food service areas before implementation of federal and state school water policy, California, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anisha I; Chandran, Kumar; Hampton, Karla E; Hecht, Kenneth; Grumbach, Jacob M; Kimura, Amanda T; Braff-Guajardo, Ellen; Brindis, Claire D

    2012-01-01

    Recent legislation requires schools to provide free drinking water in food service areas (FSAs). Our objective was to describe access to water at baseline and student water intake in school FSAs and to examine barriers to and strategies for implementation of drinking water requirements. We randomly sampled 24 California Bay Area public schools. We interviewed 1 administrator per school to assess knowledge of water legislation and barriers to and ideas for policy implementation. We observed water access and students' intake of free water in school FSAs. Wellness policies were examined for language about water in FSAs. Fourteen of 24 schools offered free water in FSAs; 10 offered water via fountains, and 4 provided water through a nonfountain source. Four percent of students drank free water at lunch; intake at elementary schools (11%) was higher than at middle or junior high schools (6%) and high schools (1%). In secondary schools when water was provided by a nonfountain source, the percentage of students who drank free water doubled. Barriers to implementation of water requirements included lack of knowledge of legislation, cost, and other pressing academic concerns. No wellness policies included language about water in FSAs. Approximately half of schools offered free water in FSAs before implementation of drinking water requirements, and most met requirements through a fountain. Only 1 in 25 students drank free water in FSAs. Although schools can meet regulations through installation of fountains, more appealing water delivery systems may be necessary to increase students' water intake at mealtimes.

  18. Observations of Drinking Water Access in School Food Service Areas Before Implementation of Federal and State School Water Policy, California, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Kumar; Hampton, Karla E.; Hecht, Kenneth; Grumbach, Jacob M.; Kimura, Amanda T.; Braff-Guajardo, Ellen; Brindis, Claire D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Recent legislation requires schools to provide free drinking water in food service areas (FSAs). Our objective was to describe access to water at baseline and student water intake in school FSAs and to examine barriers to and strategies for implementation of drinking water requirements. Methods We randomly sampled 24 California Bay Area public schools. We interviewed 1 administrator per school to assess knowledge of water legislation and barriers to and ideas for policy implementation. We observed water access and students’ intake of free water in school FSAs. Wellness policies were examined for language about water in FSAs. Results Fourteen of 24 schools offered free water in FSAs; 10 offered water via fountains, and 4 provided water through a nonfountain source. Four percent of students drank free water at lunch; intake at elementary schools (11%) was higher than at middle or junior high schools (6%) and high schools (1%). In secondary schools when water was provided by a nonfountain source, the percentage of students who drank free water doubled. Barriers to implementation of water requirements included lack of knowledge of legislation, cost, and other pressing academic concerns. No wellness policies included language about water in FSAs. Conclusion Approximately half of schools offered free water in FSAs before implementation of drinking water requirements, and most met requirements through a fountain. Only 1 in 25 students drank free water in FSAs. Although schools can meet regulations through installation of fountains, more appealing water delivery systems may be necessary to increase students’ water intake at mealtimes. PMID:22765930

  19. A Tool for Providing Data on Small Areas: Development of Neighborhood Profiles for Santa Clara County, California, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; van Erp, Brianna; Baath, Mandeep; Bazhaw, Greg; Kelsey, Kate; Schenk, Douglas; Shah, Roshni; Shoe, Bill; Sujeer, Anandi

    2016-01-01

    Data on small geographic areas that can be easily accessed and updated have become essential for targeting public health programs and services. Disaggregating data at the sub-county or sub-city level has the potential to reveal disparities not otherwise evident for large geographies. As important as such data are, the methods to produce data on small geographic areas are challenging and resource-intensive, and little description and analysis of such tools exists. We describe a tool--neighborhood profiles--that provides a way for public health agencies and their partners to define neighborhood boundaries, select indicators, and disseminate data in a user-friendly format. We also share lessons learned, including the importance of involving planning departments in boundary definition to ensure relevance to the community, selecting a framework that links indicators to broader conceptual categories that can highlight disparities, and forming a team with the diverse skills necessary for planning and developing the profiles.

  20. Stormwater plume detection by MODIS imagery in the southern California coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezlin, N.P.; DiGiacomo, P.M.; Diehl, D.W.; Jones, B.H.; Johnson, S.C.; Mengel, M.J.; Reifel, K.M.; Warrick, J.A.; Wang, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stormwater plumes in the southern California coastal ocean were detected by MODIS-Aqua satellite imagery and compared to ship-based data on surface salinity and fecal indicator bacterial (FIB) counts collected during the Bight'03 Regional Water Quality Program surveys in February-March of 2004 and 2005. MODIS imagery was processed using a combined near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR-SWIR) atmospheric correction method, which substantially improved normalized water-leaving radiation (nLw) optical spectra in coastal waters with high turbidity. Plumes were detected using a minimum-distance supervised classification method based on nLw spectra averaged within the training areas, defined as circular zones of 1.5-5.0-km radii around field stations with a surface salinity of S 33.0 ('ocean'). The plume optical signatures (i.e., the nLw differences between 'plume' and 'ocean') were most evident during the first 2 days after the rainstorms. To assess the accuracy of plume detection, stations were classified into 'plume' and 'ocean' using two criteria: (1) 'plume' included the stations with salinity below a certain threshold estimated from the maximum accuracy of plume detection; and (2) FIB counts in 'plume' exceeded the California State Water Board standards. The salinity threshold between 'plume' and 'ocean' was estimated as 32.2. The total accuracy of plume detection in terms of surface salinity was not high (68% on average), seemingly because of imperfect correlation between plume salinity and ocean color. The accuracy of plume detection in terms of FIB exceedances was even lower (64% on average), resulting from low correlation between ocean color and bacterial contamination. Nevertheless, satellite imagery was shown to be a useful tool for the estimation of the extent of potentially polluted plumes, which was hardly achievable by direct sampling methods (in particular, because the grids of ship-based stations covered only small parts of the plumes detected via

  1. Comparison of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenylethers, and organochlorine pesticides in Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) from offshore oil platforms and natural reefs along the California coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert W.; Tanner, Michael J.; Love, Milton S.; Nishimoto, Mary M.; Schroeder, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the relative exposure of Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at oil-production platforms was reported, indicating negligible exposure to PAHs and no discernible differences between exposures at platforms and nearby natural areas sites. In this report, the potential for chronic PAH exposure in fish is reported, by measurement of recalcitrant, higher molecular weight PAHs in tissues of fish previously investigated for PAH metabolites in bile. A total of 34 PAHs (20 PAHs, 11 alkylated PAHs, and 3 polycyclic aromatic thiophenes) were targeted. In addition, legacy contaminants—polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs),—and current contaminants, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) linked to endocrine disruption, were measured by gas chromatography with electron-capture or mass spectrometric detection, to form a more complete picture of the contaminant-related status of fishes at oil production platforms in the Southern California Bight. No hydrocarbon profiles or unresolved complex hydrocarbon background were found in fish from platforms and from natural areas, and concentrations of aliphatics were low less than 100 nanograms per gram (ng/g) per component]. Total-PAH concentrations in fish ranged from 15 to 37 ng/g at natural areas and from 8.7 to 22 ng/g at platforms. Profiles of PAHs were similar at all natural and platform sites, consisting mainly of naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. Total-PCB concentrations (excluding non-ortho-chloro-substituted congeners) in fish were low, ranging from 7 to 22 ng/g at natural areas and from 10 to 35 ng/g at platforms. About 50 percent of the total-PCBs at all sites consisted of 11 congeners: 153 > 138/163/164 > 110 > 118 > 15 > 99 > 187 > 149 > 180. Most OCPs, except dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)-related compounds, were not detectable or were at concentrations of less than 1 ng/g in fish. p

  2. High-resolution gravity and seismic-refraction surveys of the Smoke Tree Wash area, Joshua Tree National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, Victoria E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Goldman, Mark R.; Watt, Janet T.; Powell, Robert E.; Matti, Jonathan C.

    2016-03-02

    We describe high-resolution gravity and seismic refraction surveys acquired to determine the thickness of valley-fill deposits and to delineate geologic structures that might influence groundwater flow beneath the Smoke Tree Wash area in Joshua Tree National Park. These surveys identified a sedimentary basin that is fault-controlled. A profile across the Smoke Tree Wash fault zone reveals low gravity values and seismic velocities that coincide with a mapped strand of the Smoke Tree Wash fault. Modeling of the gravity data reveals a basin about 2–2.5 km long and 1 km wide that is roughly centered on this mapped strand, and bounded by inferred faults. According to the gravity model the deepest part of the basin is about 270 m, but this area coincides with low velocities that are not characteristic of typical basement complex rocks. Most likely, the density contrast assumed in the inversion is too high or the uncharacteristically low velocities represent highly fractured or weathered basement rocks, or both. A longer seismic profile extending onto basement outcrops would help differentiate which scenario is more accurate. The seismic velocities also determine the depth to water table along the profile to be about 40–60 m, consistent with water levels measured in water wells near the northern end of the profile.

  3. Relative abundance and distribution of fishes within an established Area of Critical Environmental Concern, of the Amargosa River Canyon and Willow Creek, Inyo and San Bernardino Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoppettone, G. Gary; Hereford, Mark E.; Rissler, Peter H.; Johnson, Danielle M.; Salgado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Amargosa River Canyon of San Bernardino and Inyo County, California, has been designated by the Bureau of Land Management as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern, due in part to its unique flora and fauna. As a task of the Area of Critical Environmental Concern implementation plan, a survey of native fishes was conducted from June 21 to August 12, 2010. Geographic Information System tools were used to map sampling locations, which were spaced at 50-meter intervals. Global Positioning Systems were used to locate sampling stations, and stations with adequate water for successful trapping were sampled with baited minnow traps. Amargosa River pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis amargosae) and speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus spp.) were widespread throughout Armargosa River Canyon. Throughout the study area 8,558 pupfish were captured at 194 stations; 3,472 speckled dace were captured at 210 stations; 238 red-swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkia) were captured at 83 stations; and 1,095 western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinus) were captured at 110 stations. Pupfish were most abundant in open water habitat with native riparian vegetation, and they were significantly less abundant where the stream was completely covered by cattails or where saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) dominated the riparian corridor. There was no relationship between stream cover and speckled dace distribution. Non-native western mosquitofish and red-swamp crayfish densities were significantly higher in stream reaches dominated by saltcedar. The continued spread of saltcedar threatens to negatively affect pupfish and potentially reduce speckled dace abundance throughout the Amargosa River Canyon. This study can serve as baseline information for observing native fish populations in the future, as related to potential changes to the Amargosa River Canyon ecosystem.

  4. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Source Detection and Attribution in the San Francisco Bay Area of California Using a Mobile Measurement Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Bower, J.; Martien, P. T.; Perkins, I.; Randall, S.; Stevenson, E.; Young, A.; Hilken, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Bay Area Air Quality Management District is the greater San Francisco Bay metropolitan area's chief air quality regulatory agency. Aligning itself with the Governor's Executive Order S-3-05, the Air District has set a goal to reduce the region's GHG emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The Air District's 2016 Clean Air Plan will lay out the agency's vision and actions to put the region on a path forward towards achieving the 2050 goal while also reducing air pollution and related health impacts. The 2016 Plan has three overarching objectives: 1) develop a multi-pollutant emissions control strategy, (2) reduce population exposure to harmful air pollutants, especially in vulnerable communities, and (3) protect climate through a comprehensive Regional Climate Protection Strategy. To accomplish one of 2016 Plan's control measures (SL3 - Greenhouse Gas Monitoring and Measurement Network), the Air District has fabricated a mobile measurement platform i.e. a GHG research van to perform targeted CH4 emissions hotspot detection and source attribution. The van is equipped with analyzers capable of measuring CH4, CO2 and N2O in ambient plumes at fast sampling rates. The coincident measurement of source tracers like isotopic methane (13C - CH4), CO and ethane (C2H6) provide the capability to distinguish between biogenic, combustion-based and fossil-based fugitive methane sources, respectively. The GHG research van is a comprehensive mobile tool to perform tracer-based GHG source identification and apportionment. We report observation-based source-specific tracer-to-tracer emission ratios from a region-wide survey of well-known area sources like landfills, wastewater treatment facilities and dairies, and compare those with similar ratios in the Air District's GHG inventory. We also investigate plumes from potentially under-inventoried sources like anaerobic digesters, composting operations, active and plugged oil and gas wells, and a natural gas storage

  5. Anatexis, hybridization and the modification of ancient crust: Mesozoic plutonism in the Old Woman Mountains area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C.F.; Wooden, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    A compositionally expanded array of granitic (s.l.) magmas intruded the > 2 Ga crust of the Old Woman Mountains area between 160 and 70 Ma. These magmas were emplaced near the eastern (inland) edge of the Jurassic/Cretaceous arcs of western North America, in an area where magma flux, especially during the Jurassic, was considerably lower than to the west. The Jurassic intrusives and over half of the Cretaceous intrusives are predominantly metaluminous and variable in composition; a major Cretaceous suite comprises only peraluminous monzogranite. Only the Jurassic intrusions show clear evidence for the presence of mafic liquids. All units, including the most mafic rocks, reveal isotopic evidence for a significant crustal component. However, none of the Mesozoic intrusives matches in isotopic composition either average pre-intrusion crust or any major unit of the exposed crust. Elemental inconsistencies also preclude closed system derivation from exposed crust. Emplacement of these magmas, which doubled the volume of the mid- to upper crust, did not dramatically change its elemental composition. It did, however, affect its Nd and especially Sr isotopic composition and modify some of the distinctive aspects of the elemental chemistry. We propose that Jurassic magmatism was open-system, with a major influx of mantle-derived mafic magma interacting strongly with the ancient crust. Mesozoic crustal thickening may have led to closed-system crustal melting by the Late Cretaceous, but the deep crust had been profoundly modified by earlier Mesozoic hybridization so that crustal melts did not simply reflect the original crustal composition. The clear evidence for a crustal component in magmas of the Old Woman Mountains area may not indicate any fundamental differences from the processes at work elsewhere in this or other magmatic arcs where the role of pre-existing crust is less certain. Rather, a compositionally distinctive, very old crust may simply have yielded a more

  6. Groundwater-quality data in the Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas study unit, 2010: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 112-square-mile Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas (BEAR) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from April to August 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The BEAR study unit was the thirty-first study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as the zones corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the BEAR study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallow or deep water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the BEAR study unit, groundwater samples were collected from two study areas (Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas) in San Bernardino County. Of the 38 sampling sites, 27 were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the primary aquifer system in the study unit (grid sites), and the remaining 11 sites were selected to aid in the understanding of the potential groundwater-quality issues associated with septic tank use and with ski areas in the study unit (understanding sites). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and

  7. Operation of a real-time warning system for debris flows in the San Francisco bay area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Raymond C.; Mark, Robert K.; Barbato, Gary; ,

    1993-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Weather Service (NWS) have developed an operational warning system for debris flows during severe rainstorms in the San Francisco Bay region. The NWS makes quantitative forecasts of precipitation from storm systems approaching the Bay area and coordinates a regional network of radio-telemetered rain gages. The USGS has formulated thresholds for the intensity and duration of rainfall required to initiate debris flows. The first successful public warnings were issued during a severe storm sequence in February 1986. Continued operation of the warning system since 1986 has provided valuable working experience in rainfall forecasting and monitoring, refined rainfall thresholds, and streamlined procedures for issuing public warnings. Advisory statements issued since 1986 are summarized.

  8. Population Dynamics and Diet of the Madamango Sea Catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829) (Siluriformes: Ariidae) in a Tropical Bight in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Márcia; Pombo, Maíra; Santos, Flávia Borges; Bessa, Eduardo; Ferreira, Adriana; Turra, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae), is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16) corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z) was 1.01 yr−1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet. PMID:24282575

  9. Population dynamics and diet of the madamango Sea catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829 (Siluriformes: Ariidae in a tropical bight in Southeastern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Denadai

    Full Text Available The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae, is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16 corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z was 1.01 yr(-1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet.

  10. The Purisima Formation and related rocks (upper Miocene - Pliocene), greater San Francisco Bay area, central California; review of literature and USGS collection now housed at the Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks more than 1.6 kilometers thick are attributed to the upper Miocene to upper Pliocene Purisima Formation in the greater San Francisco Bay area. These rocks occur as scattered, discontinuous outcrops from Point Reyes National Seashore in the north to south of Santa Cruz. Lithologic divisions of the Formation appear to be of local extent and are of limited use in correlating over this broad area. The Purisima Formation occurs in several fault-bounded terranes which demonstrate different stratigraphic histories and may be found to represent more than a single depositional basin. The precise age and stratigraphic relationship of these scattered outcrops are unresolved and until they are put into a stratigraphic and paleogeographic context the tectonic significance of the Purisima Foramtion can only be surmised. This paper will attempt to resolve some of these problems. Mollusks and echinoderms are recorded from the literature and more than 70 USGS collections that have not previously been reported. With the exception of one locality, the faunas suggest deposition in normal marine conditions at water depths of less than 50 m and with water temperatures the same or slightly cooler than exist along the present coast of central California. The single exception is a fauna from outcrops between Seal Cove and Pillar Point, where both mollusks and foraminifers suggest water depths greater than 100 m. Three molluscan faunas, the La Honda, the Pillar Point, and the Santa Cruz, are recognized based on USGS collections and published literature for the Purisima Formation. These biostratigraphically distinct faunas aid in the correlation of the scattered Purisima Formation outcrops. The lowermost La Honda fauna suggests shallow-water depths and an age of late Miocene to early Pliocene. This age is at odds with a younger age determination from an ash bed in the lower Purisima Formation along the central San Mateo County coast. The Pillar Point fauna contains only a

  11. Comparison of sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from watersheds draining the Bay Area and the Central Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, L.J.; Lewicki, M.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Ganju, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying suspended sediment loads is important for managing the world's estuaries in the context of navigation, pollutant transport, wetland restoration, and coastal erosion. To address these needs, a comprehensive analysis was completed on sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from fluvial sources. Suspended sediment, optical backscatter, velocity data near the head of the estuary, and discharge data obtained from the output of a water balance model were used to generate continuous suspended sediment concentration records and compute loads to the Bay from the large Central Valley watershed. Sediment loads from small tributary watersheds around the Bay were determined using 235 station-years of suspended sediment data from 38 watershed locations, regression analysis, and simple modeling. Over 16 years, net annual suspended sediment load to the head of the estuary from its 154,000 km2 Central Valley watershed varied from 0.13 to 2.58 (mean = 0.89) million metric t of suspended sediment, or an average yield of 11 metric t/km2/yr. Small tributaries, totaling 8145 km2, in the nine-county Bay Area discharged between 0.081 and 4.27 (mean = 1.39) million metric t with a mean yield of 212 metric t/km2/yr. The results indicate that the hundreds of urbanized and tectonically active tributaries adjacent to the Bay, which together account for just 5% of the total watershed area draining to the Bay and provide just 7% of the annual average fluvial flow, supply 61% of the suspended sediment. The small tributary loads are more variable (53-fold between years compared to 21-fold for the inland Central Valley rivers) and dominated fluvial sediment supply to the Bay during 10 out of 16 yr. If San Francisco Bay is typical of other estuaries in active tectonic or climatically variable coastal regimes, managers responsible for water quality, dredging and reusing sediment accumulating in shipping channels, or restoring wetlands in the world's estuaries may need to more carefully

  12. The Influence of Structural Conditions and Cultural Inertia on Water Usage and Landscape Decision-Making in a California Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Katti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban development and planning are increasingly centered on matters of sustainability, balancing economic development with ecosystem services and biological diversity within urban environments. In addition to these institutional and structural factors, the decision-making process within individual households must be understood to address rising concerns about water use. Therefore, individual characteristics and preferences that influence the use of water also warrant examination. In response to a survey of occupants of single-family residences in the Fresno Clovis Metropolitan Area of California, contextual interviews and focus group interviews with a homeowner sub-sample, we find evidence of an interplay of social—structural, institutional, and cultural factors involved in influencing individual water use behaviors and landscape decision-making. The complexity of residential behaviors and decision-making poses some potential issues with regards to the interactions between individual households and institutional actors in matters of water usage and landscaping, as residents surveyed indicate relatively little confidence in institutions and groups to make wise water policy decisions. We conclude that the promotion and implementation of sustainable water use practices will require not only environmental education for the citizenry, but also a tailoring of information for environmental educational initiatives that address the particularities of individual neighborhoods and communities.

  13. One-Dimensional Convolutional Neural Network Land-Cover Classification of Multi-Seasonal Hyperspectral Imagery in the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Guidici

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 1-D Convolutional Neural Network (CNN architecture was developed, trained and utilized to classify single (summer and three seasons (spring, summer, fall of hyperspectral imagery over the San Francisco Bay Area, California for the year 2015. For comparison, the Random Forests (RF and Support Vector Machine (SVM classifiers were trained and tested with the same data. In order to support space-based hyperspectral applications, all analyses were performed with simulated Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI imagery. Three-season data improved classifier overall accuracy by 2.0% (SVM, 1.9% (CNN to 3.5% (RF over single-season data. The three-season CNN provided an overall classification accuracy of 89.9%, which was comparable to overall accuracy of 89.5% for SVM. Both three-season CNN and SVM outperformed RF by over 7% overall accuracy. Analysis and visualization of the inner products for the CNN provided insight to distinctive features within the spectral-temporal domain. A method for CNN kernel tuning was presented to assess the importance of learned features. We concluded that CNN is a promising candidate for hyperspectral remote sensing applications because of the high classification accuracy and interpretability of its inner products.

  14. Well-response model of the confined area, Bunker Hill ground-water basin, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Timothy J.; Morgan, Charles O.

    1978-01-01

    The Bunker Hill ground-water basin, in the vicinity of San Bernardino, Calif., is being artificially recharged with imported water. Current and future artificial recharge of the basin may cause the potentiometric surface in an area of confined ground water to rise above land surface and water to flow from uncapped and unplugged wells. This could cause damage to structures where the soil becomes waterlogged and where buried wells begin to flow beneath the structures. A well-response model was used to generate a series of water-level hydrographs representing the response of the ground-water basin to six possible combinations of conditions for each well; one pumping rate, two artificial-recharge rate, and three natural-recharge rates. Inflow to the ground-water basin exceeds outflow for all tested combinations. According to model predictions, the accumulation of stored ground water resulting from the excess of inflow is sufficient to cause the water level in the selected wells to rise above land surface for all but one of the combinations of conditions tested. Water levels in wells are predicted to rise above the land surface as early as 1981 for the combination with the greatest excess of inflow. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Seismic-reflection evidence that the hayward fault extends into the lower crust of the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.

    1998-01-01

    This article presents deep seismic-reflection data from an experiment across San Francisco Peninsula in 1995 using large (125 to 500 kg) explosive sources. Shot gathers show a mostly nonreflective upper crust in both the Franciscan and Salinian terranes (juxtaposed across the San Andreas fault), an onset of weak lower-crustal reflectivity beginning at about 6-sec two-way travel time (TWTT) and bright southwest-dipping reflections between 11 and 13 sec TWTT. Previous studies have shown that the Moho in this area is no deeper than 25 km (~8 to 9 sec TWTT). Three-dimensional reflection travel-time modeling of the 11 to 13 sec events from the shot gathers indicates that the bright events may be explained by reflectors 15 to 20 km into the upper mantle, northeast of the San Andreas fault. However, upper mantle reflections from these depths were not observed on marine-reflection profiles collected in San Francisco Bay, nor were they reported from a refraction profile on San Francisco Peninsula. The most consistent interpretation of these events from 2D raytracing and 3D travel-time modeling is that they are out-of-plane reflections from a high-angle (dipping ~70??to the southwest) impedance contrast in the lower crust that corresponds with the surface trace of the Hayward fault. These results suggest that the Hayward fault truncates the horizontal detachment fault suggested to be active beneath San Francisco Bay.

  16. Mussel Watch update: long-term trends in selected contaminants from coastal California, 1977-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melwani, Aroon R; Gregorio, Dominic; Jin, Yujie; Stephenson, Mark; Ichikawa, Gary; Siegel, Emily; Crane, Dave; Lauenstein, Gunnar; Davis, Jay A

    2014-04-30

    This study examined trends in contaminants measured during three decades of "Mussel Watch" monitoring on the California coast. Chlorinated organic contaminants and butyltins declined the most rapidly, with tissue concentrations in 2010 that were up to 75% lower than during the 1980s. Silver and lead declined at about half of the stations statewide, but generally exhibited slower rates of decline relative to the organic compounds. In contrast, copper increased at many stations, and PAHs showed little evidence for declines. Mussels from San Francisco Bay and the Southern California Bight were historically the most contaminated and have had the steepest declines. Overall, these data show that the "Mussel Watch" approach to monitoring contaminants in California has provided some of the best evidence of the effectiveness of actions to improve water quality over the past 30 years. These datasets also highlight challenges that remain in managing PAHs and copper.

  17. Documentation of a groundwater flow model (SJRRPGW) for the San Joaquin River Restoration Program study area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traum, Jonathan A.; Phillips, Steven P.; Bennett, George Luther; Zamora, Celia; Metzger, Loren F.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the potential effects of restoration flows on existing drainage problems, anticipated as a result of the San Joaquin River Restoration Program (SJRRP), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), developed a groundwater flow model (SJRRPGW) of the SJRRP study area that is within 5 miles of the San Joaquin River and adjacent bypass system from Friant Dam to the Merced River. The primary goal of the SJRRP is to reestablish the natural ecology of the river to a degree that restores salmon and other fish populations. Increased flows in the river, particularly during the spring salmon run, are a key component of the restoration effort. A potential consequence of these increased river flows is the exacerbation of existing irrigation drainage problems along a section of the river between Mendota and the confluence with the Merced River. Historically, this reach typically was underlain by a water table within 10 feet of the land surface, thus requiring careful irrigation management and (or) artificial drainage to maintain crop health. The SJRRPGW is designed to meet the short-term needs of the SJRRP; future versions of the model may incorporate potential enhancements, several of which are identified in this report. The SJRRPGW was constructed using the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW and was built on the framework of the USGS Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) within which the SJRRPGW model domain is embedded. The Farm Process (FMP2) was used to simulate the supply and demand components of irrigated agriculture. The Streamflow-Routing Package (SFR2) was used to simulate the streams and bypasses and their interaction with the aquifer system. The 1,300-square mile study area was subdivided into 0.25-mile by 0.25-mile cells. The sediment texture of the aquifer system, which was used to distribute hydraulic properties by model cell, was refined from that used in the CVHM to better represent

  18. Current meter, CTD, and other data from the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 13 April 2003 to 17 April 2003 (NODC Accession 0002443)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter, CTD, and other data were collected using CTD, current meter, fluorometer, and tow in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from April 14, 2003 to April 17, 2003....

  19. Data from exploratory sampling of groundwater in selected oil and gas areas of coastal Los Angeles County and Kern and Kings Counties in southern San Joaquin Valley, 2014–15: California oil, gas, and groundwater project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, David B.; Davis, Tracy A.; Landon, Matthew K.; Land, Michael T.; Wright, Michael T.; Kulongoski, Justin T.

    2016-12-09

    Exploratory sampling of groundwater in coastal Los Angeles County and Kern and Kings Counties of the southern San Joaquin Valley was done by the U.S. Geological Survey from September 2014 through January 2015 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Water Quality in Areas of Oil and Gas Production Regional Groundwater Monitoring Program. The Regional Groundwater Monitoring Program was established in response to the California Senate Bill 4 of 2013 mandating that the California State Water Resources Control Board design and implement a groundwater-monitoring program to assess potential effects of well-stimulation treatments on groundwater resources in California. The U.S. Geological Survey is in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board to collaboratively implement the Regional Groundwater Monitoring Program through the California Oil, Gas, and Groundwater Project.Many researchers have documented the utility of different suites of chemical tracers for evaluating the effects of oil and gas development on groundwater quality. The purpose of this exploratory sampling effort was to determine whether tracers reported in the literature could be used effectively in California. This reconnaissance effort was not designed to assess the effects of oil and gas on groundwater quality in the sampled areas. A suite of water-quality indicators and geochemical tracers were sampled at groundwater sites in selected areas that have extensive oil and gas development. Groundwater samples were collected from a total of 51 wells, including 37 monitoring wells at 17 multiple-well monitoring sites in coastal Los Angeles County and 5 monitoring wells and 9 water-production wells in southern San Joaquin Valley, primarily in Kern and Kings Counties.Groundwater samples were analyzed for field water-quality indicators; organic constituents, including volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds and dissolved organic carbon indicators; naturally

  20. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  1. A high resolution water level forecast for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehüser, Sebastian; Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Jensen, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal regions worldwide are potentially endangered by storm surges which can cause disastrous damages and loss of life. Due to climate change induced sea level rise, an accumulation of such events is expected by the end of the 21th century. Therefore, advanced storm surge warnings are needed to be prepared when another storm surge hits the coast. In the shallow southeastern North Sea these storm surge warnings are nowadays routinely provided for selected tide gauge locations along a coastline through state-of-the-art forecast systems, which are based on a coupled system of empirical tidal predictions and numerical storm surge forecasts. Along the German North Sea coastline, the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency in cooperation with the German Weather Service is responsible for the storm surge warnings. They provide accurate, high frequency and real-time water level forecasts for up to six days ahead at selected tide gauge sites via internet, telephone and broadcast. Since water levels along the German North Sea coastline are dominated by shallow water effects and a very complex bathymetric structure of the seabed, the pointwise forecast is not necessarily transferable to un-gauged areas between the tide gauges. Here we aim to close this existing gap and develop water level forecasts with a high spatial (continuously with a resolution of at least 1 kilometer) as well as a high temporal (at least 15-minute values) resolution along the entire German North Sea coastline. We introduce a new methodology for water level forecasts which combines empirical or statistical and numerical models. While the tidal forecast is performed by non-parametric interpolation techniques between un-gauged and gauged sites, storm surges are estimated on the basis of statistical/empirical storm surge formulas taken from a numerical model hindcast. The procedure will be implemented in the operational mode forced with numerical weather forecasts.

  2. Occurrence and distribution of triclosan in the German Bight (North Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Zhiyong [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)], E-mail: zhiyong.xie@gkss.de; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Floeser, Goetz; Caba, Armando [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Ruck, Wolfgang [Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    The potential of triclosan (TCS) acting as an endocrine disruptor has led to growing concern about the presence of TCS in the environment. In this study, seawater samples were collected from the German Bight during sampling campaigns conducted with the German research ships Gauss and Ludwig Prandtl. TCS was determined both in the dissolved phase and in the suspended particulate matters with concentrations ranging 0.8-6870 pg L{sup -1} and <1-95 pg L{sup -1}, respectively. High concentrations of TCS were present in the estuaries of the Elbe and the Weser, indicating significant input of TCS by the river discharge. The correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) between the dissolved concentration and salinity was 0.79 for the data obtained from the Gauss cruise, showing an obvious declining trend from the coast to the open sea. - Investigation with coastal survey reveals distribution of triclosan in marine waters.

  3. Cross-shelf Distribution of Dimethylsulfide in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanke, N. L.; Pound, H.; Shore, S. K.; Penta, W. B.; Zavala, J.; Lee, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    The cross-shelf distribution of the climatically-important dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) were examined along a transect starting near Gray's Reef (coastal Georgia) during three expeditions in 2015. Gulf Stream meanders and eddies coupled with shelf-break upwelling of nutrient-rich water can have a profound effect on the productivity and taxonomy of the phytoplankton community in the South Atlantic Bight. In 2015, Gulf Stream waters were observed more than 20 km inshore with cold, upwelled waters reaching the 40 m isobath. Yet, despite the presence of nutrient-rich water inshore of the shelf break, Chl a was low at all depths (less than 4 mg L-1) during the expeditions. In the neritic zone, pigment analyses revealed the existence of cyanobacteria in the surface layer and a mixture of prymnesiophytes and cryptophytes associated with upwelled water in the bottom layer. In the oligotrophic waters of the western Sargasso Sea, cyanobacteria were prevalent with prochorophytes dominating at depth. The pigment signatures for prymnesiophytes and cryptophytes were also noted at depth in the oceanic zone. Modest levels of both dissolved and particulate DMSP were measured across the shelf (2-40 nmol L-1) with lower levels observed in oligotrophic waters. However, DMS levels were uniformly low across the entire transect (typically less than 2 nmol L-1) and are thought to result from phytoplankton cells being entirely ingested by tunicates rather than broken open during grazing by copepods. As a consequence, the South Atlantic Bight does not appear to be a significant contributor to global DMS sea-to-air fluxes.

  4. p,p'-DDE bioaccumulation in female sea lions of the California Channel Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John P.; Glaser, David

    2002-05-01

    An area of sediment on the Palos Verdes shelf and in Santa Monica Bay off Los Angeles, CA is contaminated with DDE and other breakdown products of DDT as a result of discharges of DDT through the Whites Point outfall. Elevated concentrations of DDE have been found in the water column of the Palos Verdes Shelf and in various fish species inhabiting the shelf and Santa Monica Bay. High concentrations have also been found in California sea lions from San Miguel Island and sea lion carcasses on Santa Catalina Island. These islands are located some distance from the Palos Verdes shelf and Santa Monica Bay. It was the purpose of this study to determine if it is likely that the Palos Verdes Shelf/Santa Monica Bay sediments were the principal source of the DDE in the Channel Island sea lions via a pathway from sediments to water and fish preyed on by sea lions. A time variable, age dependent, physiologically based toxicokinetic model of female California sea lions was developed. Mass and energy balance equations describe the uptake and loss of contaminants. The contaminants are partitioned among multiple body compartments, including lipid and non-lipid body tissue and milk. Contaminants are distributed into a fetus of females. Physiological and toxicokinetic data were used to establish rates of growth, respiration, reproduction and lactation, internal partitioning of DDE, efficiency of DDE uptake and rates of DDE excretion. The model was used to estimate the likely DDE exposure history of the sea lions in view of their DDE body burdens. Field-measured dietary composition and prey contaminant levels were then used to establish potential exposure to DDE from various regions within the Southern California Bight. Comparison of the estimated exposure history with that attainable from the various regions indicated that the more highly contaminated lactating females were exposed to prey at levels found only on the Palos Verdes Shelf and in Santa Monica Bay. Thus, it is likely

  5. Women of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harry

    This publication points out the achievements of women who contributed to the development and history of California from the 16th century, when the Spanish Conquistadores moved westward into the San Francisco Bay area, to the gold rush of 1848, and during the following period when women helped stabilize society on the rugged frontier. Women not…

  6. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  7. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  8. Contours--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is...

  9. DS796 California Groundwater Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The California Groundwater Units dataset classifies and delineates the State into one of three groundwater based polygon units: (1) those areas defined as alluvial...

  10. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Contours--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Aptos map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  13. Heavy metals in four fish species from the French coast of the Eastern English Channel and Southern Bight of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F; Amara, R; Courcot, L; Lacouture, D; Bertho, M-L

    2004-07-01

    Shallow coastal waters act as nurseries for various fish species and have been recognized as essential fish habitat. We studied heavy metal concentrations in four fish species (plaice, dab, flounder and cod) as an indicator of large-scale habitat quality. The study took place along the French coasts between the Eastern English Channel and the Southern Bight of the North Sea. All species show different concentrations of measured metals (e.g., Cd, Cu, Mn and Pb) in liver but not in muscle. The highest concentrations are found for the flounder and the lowest for cod which is consistent with their habitat and diet. Although our results do not highlight levels of appreciable pollution within the study area, inter-site differences are mainly observed in the muscle tissues and are generally in agreement with the known environmental data (e.g., anthropogenic pressure). However, in the Bay of Seine, one of the most contaminated estuaries in Europe, metal concentrations are in the same range or even lower than those found in fish collected from areas distant from any anthropogenic pressures. At one site, the comparisons of the Cd, Cu and Pb concentrations between healthy and diseased dabs have been carried out on the muscle and liver tissues. The results of this preliminary study show a relationship between metal concentrations and the pathological status of the fish. The use of fish health as indicator of habitat quality is discussed.

  14. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Conrad, James E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Finlayson, David P.; Sliter, Ray W.; Wong, Florence L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Leifer, Ira; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fong, Grace; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.0 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The cities of Goleta and Isla Vista, the main population centers in the map area, are in the western part of a contiguous urban area that extends eastward through Santa Barbara to Carpinteria. This urban area is on the south flank of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains, on coalescing alluvial fans and uplifted marine terraces underlain by folded and

  15. Pressure effects on regional mean sea level trends in the German Bight in the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Frauke; Weisse, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The effect of large-scale atmospheric pressure changes on regional mean sea level projections in the German Bight in the twenty-first century are considered. A developed statistical model is applied to climate model data of sea level pressure for the twenty-first century to assess the potential contribution of large-scale atmospheric changes to future sea level changes in the German Bight. Using 78 experiments, an ensemble mean of 1.4-cm rise in regional mean sea level is estimated until the end of the twenty-first century. Changes are somewhat higher for realisations of the special report on emission scenarios (SRES) A1B and A2, but generally do not exceed a few centimeters. This is considerably smaller than the changes expected from steric and self-gravitational effects. Large-scale changes in sea level pressure are thus not expected to provide a substantial contribution to twenty-first century sea level changes in the German Bight.

  16. Southern California Hook and Line Survey - Annual So. CA Bight hook and line data collection/survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an annual, fishery-independent survey aimed at collecting abundance and biological data for use in the stock assessments of several key rockfish species...

  17. Hot Spots and Hot Moments of Methylmercury Production Associated With Agricultural and Non-agricultural Wetlands of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin-Dipasquale, M.; Windham-Myers, L.; Agee, J. L.; Kakouros, E.; Cox, M. H.; Fleck, J.; Alpers, C. N.; Stephenson, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area (YBWA) is part of the larger Yolo Bypass floodwater protection zone associated with the Sacramento River and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, in California. While mercury contamination is widespread throughout the region due to historic mining practices, the Yolo Bypass is responsible for a high proportion of the aqueous methylmercury (MeHg) entering the Delta, and biota from the Yolo Bypass are particularly elevated in toxic MeHg. Land use in the YBWA includes seasonally flooded agricultural fields (white rice, wild rice, fallow fields), and permanently and seasonally flooded non-agricultural wetlands used for resident and migratory waterfowl. Mercury biogeochemistry was examined in 0-2 cm surface sediment, as a function of habitat type, wetland management, and agricultural practices during the 2007-08 crop year. In permanently flooded wetlands, MeHg concentrations varied within a narrow range (ca. 0.5-1.5 ng/g dry wt) throughout the study period. In contrast, the three types of agricultural fields had higher MeHg concentrations throughout the rice-growing season (June-Sept; ca. 1.5-3.5 ng/g), and exhibited the highest levels (ca. 3.3-6.3 ng/g) in the post-harvest winter period (Dec-Feb). Further, naturally dried sediment, sampled during July '08 from post-harvest drained fallow agricultural fields (prior to reflooding) had MeHg concentrations that were also quite elevated (3.1 +/- 1.5 ng/g). This suggests that the initial elevated concentrations of overlying water MeHg, sometimes measured soon after flooding previously dried fields, may be related to the release of MeHg formed during the previous wet season and trapped in dried sediment, as opposed to being MeHg newly produced by bacteria upon soil rewetting. These results indicate that the 'hot spots and hot moments' associated with MeHg production in this system are linked to hydrologic manipulations (wetting and drying) in the agricultural fields, and that the practice of post

  18. A Study of the Job Satisfaction of Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Directors and Local School District Special Education Directors in Four Counties of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory Haynes, III

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived level of job satisfaction of SELPA directors with that of local school district special education directors in the counties of Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Orange of Southern California and to identify factors that contribute to their job satisfaction. Additionally, this…

  19. Ecomorphodynamic feedbacks and barrier island response to disturbance: Insights from the Virginia Barrier Islands, Mid-Atlantic Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolner, Catherine W. V.; Moore, Laura J.; Young, Donald R.; Brantley, Steven T.; Bissett, Spencer N.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2013-10-01

    Ecomorphodynamic feedbacks play an important role in the susceptibility and response of barrier islands to disturbance by overwash. Dune-building grasses, like Ammophila breviligulata, can help to restore areas of high relief after overwash events (i.e., resist disturbance). If overwash recurs before dunes have reestablished, however, overwash-adapted "maintainer" species, like Spartina patens (upright variety), may preferentially survive. Maintainer species help to preserve low, flat topography, thereby increasing the likelihood of future overwash (i.e., reinforcing disturbance). Under frequent disturbance conditions, this positive feedback may lead to overwash persistence. We explore the potential influence of the maintainer feedback on two morphologically distinct barrier islands in the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR), located in the Mid-Atlantic Bight of the U.S. East Coast. Combined topographic and vegetation surveys show that on Hog Island (high-relief, rotating), where dunes dominated by A. breviligulata are ubiquitous, overwash zones are currently limited in extent and related to beach width rather than dominance by S. patens. Historical aerial photos and stratigraphic evidence (ground-penetrating radar, cores) indicate that gradual recovery has taken place following overwash events on Hog Island, except where the beach is narrow and eroding. Conversely, on Metompkin Island (low-relief, transgressing), overwash is widespread and dominated by S. patens, particularly along the rapidly migrating northern half of the island, where shell armoring is also common. Overwash has generally been more prevalent and persistent here than on Hog Island. We present a new conceptual model of the response of barrier islands to disturbance incorporating ecological and physical processes. Our findings suggest that in barrier systems where both dune-building grasses and overwash-adapted maintainer species are common (like the VCR), the maintainer feedback is likely to be a more

  20. Hydrogeologic framework refinement, ground-water flow and storage, water-chemistry analyses, and water-budget components of the Yuma area, southwestern Arizona and southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Land, Michael; Faunt, Claudia C.; Leake, S.A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Fleming, John B.; Pool, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    The ground-water and surface-water system in the Yuma area in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California is managed intensely to meet water-delivery requirements of customers in the United States, to manage high ground-water levels in the valleys, and to maintain treaty-mandated water-quality and quantity requirements of Mexico. The following components in this report, which were identified to be useful in the development of a ground-water management model, are: (1) refinement of the hydrogeologic framework; (2) updated water-level maps, general ground-water flow patterns, and an estimate of the amount of ground water stored in the mound under Yuma Mesa; (3) review and documentation of the ground-water budget calculated by the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior (Reclamation); and (4) water-chemistry characterization to identify the spatial distribution of water quality, information on sources and ages of ground water, and information about the productive-interval depths of the aquifer. A refined three-dimensional digital hydrogeologic framework model includes the following hydrogeologic units from bottom to top: (1) the effective hydrologic basement of the basin aquifer, which includes the Pliocene Bouse Formation, Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and pre-Tertiary metamorphic and plutonic rocks; (2) undifferentiated lower units to represent the Pliocene transition zone and wedge zone; (3) coarse-gravel unit; (4) lower, middle, and upper basin fill to represent the upper, fine-grained zone between the top of the coarse-gravel unit and the land surface; and (5) clay A and clay B. Data for the refined model includes digital elevation models, borehole lithology data, geophysical data, and structural data to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units. The top surface of the coarse-gravel unit, defined by using borehole and geophysical data, varies similarly to terraces resulting from the down cutting of the Colorado River. Clay A

  1. Body growth and reproduction of individuals of the sciaenid fish Stellifer rastrifer in a shallow tropical bight: A cautionary tale for assumptions regarding population parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Maíra; Denadai, Márcia Regina; Turra, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge of population parameters and the ability to predict their responses to environmental changes are useful tools to aid in the appropriate management and conservation of natural resources. Samples of the sciaenid fish Stellifer rastrifer were taken from August 2003 through October 2004 in shallow areas of Caraguatatuba Bight, southeastern Brazil. The results showed a consistent presence of length-frequency classes throughout the year and low values of the gonadosomatic index of this species, indicating that the area is not used for spawning or residence of adults, but rather shelters individuals in late stages of development. The results may serve as a caveat for assessments of transitional areas such as the present one, the nursery function of which is neglected compared to estuaries and mangroves. The danger of mismanaging these areas by not considering their peculiarities is emphasized by using these data as a study case for the development of some broadly used population-parameter analyses. The individuals' body growth parameters from the von Bertalanffy model were estimated based on the most common approaches, and the best values obtained from traditional quantification methods of selection were very prone to bias. The low gonadosomatic index (GSI) estimated during the period was an important factor in stimulating us to select more reliable parameters of body growth (L∞ = 20.9, K = 0.37 and Z = 2.81), which were estimated based on assuming the existence of spatial segregation by size. The data obtained suggest that the estimated mortality rate included a high rate of migration of older individuals to deeper areas, where we assume that they completed their development.

  2. Sighting characteristics and photo-identification of Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) near San Clemente Island, California: a key area for beaked whales and the military?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Erin A; Schorr, Gregory S; Douglas, Annie B; Calambokidis, John; Henderson, Elizabeth; McKenna, Megan F; Hildebrand, John; Moretti, David

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between beaked whales and certain anthropogenic sounds remains poorly understood and of great interest. Although Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) are widely distributed, little is known of their behavior and population structure throughout much of their range. We conducted a series of five combined visual-acoustic marine mammal surveys from 2006 to 2008 in the southern San Nicolas Basin, a site of frequent naval activity off the southern California coast, west of San Clemente Island. The study area was defined by a 1,800 km(2) array of 88 bottom-mounted hydrophones at depths up to 1,850 m. The array was used to vector visual observers toward vocalizing marine mammal species. Thirty-seven groups of Cuvier's beaked whales were encountered during the study period. The overall encounter rate was one group for every 21.0 h of survey effort, and was as high as one group per 10.2 h of effort during the October 2007 survey. Whales were encountered in the deepest portion of the study area, at a mean bottom depth of 1,580 m (SD 138). The average group size was 3.8 individuals (SD 2.4), which was higher than has been reported from other studies of this species. Twenty-four groups were observed over multiple surfacings (median = 4 surfacings, range 2-15). The mean encounter duration of extended sightings was 104 min (SD 98, range 12-466 min) and the mean distance moved over the course of sightings was 1.66 km (SD 1.56, range 0.08-6.65 km). Temporal surfacing patterns during extended encounters were similar to dive behavior described from Cuvier's beaked whales carrying time-depth recording tags. Seventy-eight photographic identifications were made of 58 unique individuals, for an overall resighting rate of 0.26. Whales were sighted on up to 4 days, with duration from first to last sighting spanning 2-79 days. For those whales sighted on subsequent days, the mean distance between subsequent sightings was 8.6 km (SD 7.9). Individuals

  3. Circulation in the Hudson Shelf Valley: MESA Physical Oceanographic Studies in New York Bight, 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dennis A.; Han, Gregory C.; Hansen, Donald V.

    1982-11-01

    Over 900 days of current velocity data were obtained at mainly two locations in the inner and outer Hudson Shelf Valley (HSV). The large cross-axis depth gradients in the HSV, together with the strong winter cyclones and the baroclinic density distribution over the shelf, are primarily responsible for the major circulation features observed in the valley. CSTD data from 12 cruises and meteorological data from JFK International Airport and an environmental buoy were collected concurrently with the current meter data. Although the mean cross-shelf pressure gradient is generally seaward in the Middle Atlantic Bight, it is shoreward in the HSV below the level of the adjacent continental shelf (shelf horizon), thus imposing a bias toward upvalley flow. The average velocity below the surrounding shelf horizon in the HSV is upvalley or shoreward (west-northwestward ≈ 290° T) in the range of 2-5 cm/s. The circulation in the HSV is seasonal and individual events can drastically alter the mean picture. The several day average upvalley flow can sometimes approach 20 cm/s when intense winter cyclones pass over the bight and can sometimes also be directed downvalley depending upon the path of the winter cyclone. A topographically controlled barotropic flow commonly opposes the dominant (southeast-ward) wind direction even near the surface in the winter. In the context of circulation on the open shelf, upvalley (downvalley) flow events generated by winter cyclones are associated with reduced (enhanced) southwestward flow or flow reversals that are northeastward in the lower half of the water column at LTM, a typical mid/shelf site (Mayer et al., 1979). Current meter data suggest that whether or not reversals occur on the open shelf depends upon the interannual variability of the winter wind regime. Upvalley flow events are not confined only to the winter (unstratified) season but are stronger in the winter and can last for several days and longer. During the summer

  4. CVP Service Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Federal Water Contract Service Area boundaries are incorporated boundaries of districts having contracts with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), within...

  5. Analysis of two catalogues of seismicity at the Cerro Prieto geothermal area (Baja California) from 1988 to 1995, relationship with reinjection; Analisis de dos catalogos de sismicidad en el area geotermica de Cerro Prieto (Baja California) de 1988 a 1995, relacion con la reinyeccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabriol, Hubert [Centro de Investigacion y de Ensenanza Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Ensenada (Mexico)

    1996-09-01

    In order to study the effects of fluid reinjection in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, started in 1989, seismicity recorded in this area and included in the USGS-Caltech (California Technology) (US) and the Red Sismologica del Noreste de Mexico (RESNOM) of the Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Ensenanza Superior (CICESE, Mexico) catalogues is reviewed since 1988. The precision of determination of epicenters is compared with the location of moderate events recorded by a local array, setup around Cerro Prieto since August 1994. We note a bias in both catalogues, as events located by USGS-Caltech are shifted between 5 to 10 km towards south and events of RESNOM are shifted between 4 to 8 km towards northeast. That limits the use of these catalogues for precise studies of reinjection effects in the geothermal field. Seismic activity is low until 1991 and increases afterwards, particularly in 1993 and 1995. Comparison of USGS-Caltech catalogue with changes in reinjection flow rates show at beginning of 1995 only one example of short-range effect between reinjection and seismicity (but using the epicenter determination of the local network) and possibly several medium-range effects (between 6 and 8 months). In that case, the flow rate increase corresponding to the beginning of winter, could be followed by one or more events of magnitude ranging from Ml=3 to Ml=4 during midsummer. Taking into account the tectonic context of the area, it is also possible that those event could be associated either to Cerro Prieto fault or to the spreading center source of the thermal anomaly. The continuous monitoring with a local network will allow to precise those preliminary results, obtained with regional networks. [Espanol] Como parte del estudio sobre los efectos de la reinyeccion de fluido en el campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto, iniciado en 1989, se analiza de manera critica la sismicidad registrada en el area y reportada en los catalogos de USGS-Caltech (Tecnologico de

  6. Seismo-acoustic imaging of marine hard substrate habitats: a case study from the German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenmeier, Svenja; Hass, H. Christian

    2016-04-01

    comparably small foot print which results in high spatial resolution (decimeter in the xyz directions) and hence allows a more precise demarcation of hard substrate areas. Data for this study were recorded in the "Sylt Outer Reef" (German Bight, North Sea) in May 2013 and March 2015. The investigated area is characterized by heterogeneously distributed moraine deposits and rippled coarse sediments partly draped with Holocene fine sands. The relict sediments and the rippled coarse sediments indicate both high backscatter intensities but can be distinguished by means of the hyperbola locations. The northeast of the study area is dominated by rippled coarse sediments (without hyperbolas) and the southwestern part by relict sediments with a high amount of stones represented by hyperbolas which is also proven by extensive ground-truthing (grab sampling and high quality underwater videos). An automated procedure to identify and export the hyperbola positions makes the demarcation of hard substrate grounds (here: relict sediments) reproducible, faster and less complex in comparison to the visual-manual identification on the basis of sidescan sonar data.

  7. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the North Pacific Gyre. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Matthew T.; Mannino, Antonio; Kirchman, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AM) bacteria, cyanobacteria and heterotrophs was examined in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the central North Pacific gyre using infrared fluorescence microscopy coupled with image analysis and flow cytometry. AAP bacteria comprised 5% to 16% of total prokaryotes in the Atlantic but only 5% or less in the Pacific. In the Atlantic, AAP bacterial abundance was as much as 2-fold higher than Prochlorococcus and 10-folder higher than Synechococcus. In contrast, Prochlorococcus outnumbered AAP bacteria 5- to 50-fold in the Pacific. In both oceans, subsurface abundance maxima occurred within the photic zone, and AAP bacteria were least abundant below the 1% light depth. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) were low (approx.1%) compared to chlorophyll a. Although the BChl a content of AAP bacteria per cell was typically 20- to 250-fold lower than the divinyl-chlorophyll a content of Prochlorococcus, in shelf break water the pigment content of AAP bacteria approached that of Prochlorococcus. The abundance of AAP bacteria rivaled some groups of strictly heterotrophic bacteria and was often higher than the abundance of known AAP genera (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter spp.). The distribution of AAP bacteria in the water column, which was similar in the Atlantic and the Pacific, was consistent with phototrophy.

  8. Variability in along-shelf and cross-shelf circulation in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yeping; Castelao, Renato M.; He, Ruoying

    2017-02-01

    Variability in along-shelf and cross-shelf circulation in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) is investigated using altimetry observations. Satellite-derived along-shelf velocity anomalies are in good agreement with independent near-surface current measurements from moored acoustic Doppler current profilers and surface velocities from high frequency radar at adjacent locations. This is especially true if wind-driven Ekman velocities are added to the geostrophic velocities, suggesting that the influence of Ekman dynamics to surface along-shelf flow in the SAB is unusually large. The decade-long time series reveals substantial seasonal variability in surface velocities, with peak poleward anomalies during late spring and summer and strong equatorward flow during autumn. Convergences and divergences in the along-shelf transport between two cross-sections are compared with three-dimensional numerical model results and used to estimate cross-shelf transport across the 50 m isobath in the SAB. The calculation suggests a pattern of weak offshore flow during spring followed by prolonged and relatively stronger offshore flow during summer and early autumn, while cross-shelf velocity anomalies during winter are weak and slightly onshore. Prolonged offshore flow following the peak in river discharge that generally occurs in spring indicates the potential for the establishment of a conduit for offshore export of riverine material. The long-term time series also reveals several large events of interannual variability, including the 2003 cold event observed in the SAB.

  9. RNA-Based Assessment of Diversity and Composition of Active Archaeal Communities in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wemheuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in various biogeochemical cycles. They are known extremophiles inhabiting environments such as thermal springs or hydrothermal vents. Recent studies have revealed a significant abundance of Archaea in moderate environments, for example, temperate sea water. Nevertheless, the composition and ecosystem function of these marine archaeal communities is largely unknown. To assess diversity and composition of active archaeal communities in the German Bight, seven marine water samples were taken and studied by RNA-based analysis of ribosomal 16S rRNA. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from the samples and converted to cDNA. Archaeal community structures were investigated by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons generated from cDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining next-generation sequencing and metatranscriptomics to study archaeal communities in marine habitats. The pyrosequencing-derived dataset comprised 62,045 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. We identified Halobacteria as the predominant archaeal group across all samples with increased abundance in algal blooms. Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota and the Marine Group I (Thaumarchaeota were identified in minor abundances. It is indicated that archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  10. Bacterial communities associated with four ctenophore genera from the German Bight (North Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenjin; Gerdts, Gunnar; Peplies, Jörg; Wichels, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Intense research has been conducted on jellyfish and ctenophores in recent years. They are increasingly recognized as key elements in the marine ecosystem that serve as critical indicators and drivers of ecosystem performance and change. However, the bacterial community associated with ctenophores is still poorly investigated. Based on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing, we investigated bacterial communities associated with the frequently occurring ctenophore species Mnemiopsis leidyi, Beroe sp., Bolinopsis infundibulum and Pleurobrachia pileus at Helgoland Roads in the German Bight (North Sea). We observed significant differences between the associated bacterial communities of the different ctenophore species based on ARISA patterns. With respect to bacterial taxa, all ctenophore species were dominated by Proteobacteria as revealed by pyrosequencing. Mnemiopsis leidyi and P. pileus mainly harboured Gammaproteobacteria, with Marinomonas as the dominant phylotype of M. leidyi. By contrast, Pseudoalteromonas and Psychrobacter were the most abundant Gammaproteobacteria in P. pileus. Beroe sp. was mainly dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, particularly by the genus Thalassospira. For B. infundibulum, the bacterial community was composed of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in equal parts, which consisted of the genera Thalassospira and Marinomonas. In addition, the bacterial communities associated with M. leidyi display a clear variation over time that needs further investigation. Our results indicate that the bacterial communities associated with ctenophores are highly species- specific. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Parasite transfer from crustacean to fish hosts in the Lübeck Bight, SW Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, C. D.; Groenewold, S.; Strohbach, U.

    1994-03-01

    Four helminth parasites out of 19 species found in the Lübeck Bight, Baltic Sea, were chosen for investigations on the transfer from invertebrate to small-sized fish hosts: larvae of the tapeworms Schistocephalus sp. and Bothriocephalus sp. (Cestoda) living in planktonic copepods as primary hosts; Podocotyle atomon (Digenea) and Hysterothylacium sp. (Nematoda) were found in benthic crustaceans, especially Gammarus spp. These hosts were the prey of 3 gobiid fishes, Gobiusculus flavescens (feeding mainly on plankton), Pomatoschistus minutus (preferring benthos), and P. pictus (feeding more on plankton than benthos). Because the fishes selected smaller sizes of crustaceans, they ingested all stages of the copepods but only the smaller-sized groups of gammarids which were often less infested by parasites. In order to evaluate the probability for a fish to be parasitized by a helminth, an infestation potential index (IP) was calculated. Podocotyle atomon and Hysterothylacium sp. revealed an IP which was far lower in gobies than expected when the prevalences of the previous hosts were taken into consideration. The IP of tapeworm larvae was mainly influenced by the feeding pressure of the gobiid predators, which might change with developmental stage and season. It is concluded that parasite transfer to the next host decreases when sizes of prey and predator differ only moderately. This mechanism can reduce the numbers of parasites transferred to less suitable or wrong hosts.

  12. Food and feeding ecology of purple sandpipers Calidris maritima on rocky intertidal habitats (Helgoland, German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierschke, Volker

    On the island of Helgoland (German Bight) Purple Sandpipers Calidris maritima feed mainly in the intertidal of piers and rocky shores. The main prey species are Littorina saxatilis and Mytilus edulis, complemented by crustaceans, polychaetes, other molluscs and green algae. Beach habitats are used as alternative feeding sites during storms. Feeding sites seem to be selected according to rates of assimilated energy intake. The most profitable habitat (wrack beds on the high-tide line with kelp-fly larvae, 16.8 W) is used after arrival in October but is not available during winter. Because of high intake rates in rocky habitats (13.1 W on piers, 5.5 W on mussel beds), which allow short daily feeding times, and available alternative feeding sites during storms, Purple Sandpipers do not need to carry fat reserves in winter like other waders wintering in central and Western Europe. This, and the ever accessible food supply of epibenthic macrofauna on rocky shores, may enable Purple Sandpipers to winter further north than other wader species.

  13. Dynamics of the southern California current system

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    The dynamics of seasonal to long-term variability of the Southern California Current System (SCCS) is studied using a four dimensional space-time analysis of the 52 year (1949--2000) California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) hydrography combined with a sensitivity analysis of an eddy permitting primitive equation ocean model under various forcing scenarios. The dynamics of the seasonal cycle in the SCCS can be summarized as follows. In spring upwelling favorable winds force an upward tilt of the isopycnals along the coast (equatorward flow). Quasi-linear Rossby waves are excited by the ocean adjustment to the isopycnal displacement. In summer as these waves propagate offshore poleward flow develops at the coast and the Southern California Eddy (SCE) reaches its seasonal maxima. Positive wind stress curl in the Southern California Bight is important in maintaining poleward flow and locally reinforcing the SCE with an additional upward displacement of isopycnals through Ekman pumping. At the end of summer and throughout the fall instability processes within the SCE are a generating mechanism for mesoscale eddies, which fully develop in the offshore waters during winter. On decadal timescales a warming trend in temperature (1 C) and a deepening trend in the depth of the mean thermocline (20 m) between 1950 and 1998 are found to be primarily forced by large-scale decadal fluctuations in surface heat fluxes combined with horizontal advection by the mean currents. After 1998 the surface heat fluxes suggest the beginning of a period of cooling, which is consistent with colder observed ocean temperatures. The temporal and spatial distribution of the warming is coherent over the entire northeast Pacific Ocean. Salinity changes are decoupled from temperature and uncorrelated with indices of large-scale oceanic variability. Temporal modulation of southward horizontal advection by the California Current is the primary mechanism controlling local

  14. VENTANA WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, R.C.; Fillo, P.V.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Ventana Primitive Area (now the Ventana Wilderness) in California was made. On the basis of known mineral occurrences and geologic and geochemical studies, this part of the Coast Ranges of central California contains little evidence for the existence of mineral resources. Small bodies of good quality marble are scattered through parts of the wilderness. Because of their small size these marble occurrences are not considered as having resource potential. Detailed mapping and sampling of the sulfide-bearing gneiss and schist will be needed to determine the grade and extent of these rocks and the possibility that they, in fact, could represent significant resources. The numerous thermal springs in and near the area suggest a high geothermal gradient and that geothermal-energy resources should be investigated.

  15. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

    1981-08-01

    Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

  16. New insights into impacts of anthropogenic nutrients on urban ecosystem processes on the Southern California coastal shelf: Introduction and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Meredith D. A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; McLaughlin, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient inputs are one of the most important factors contributing to eutrophication of coastal waters. Coastal upwelling regions are naturally highly variable, exhibiting faster flushing and lower retention times than estuarine systems. As such, these regions are considered more resilient to anthropogenic influences than other coastal waters. Recent studies have shown our perception of the sustainability of these systems may be flawed and that anthropogenic nutrients can have an impact at local and regional spatial scales within these larger upwelling ecosystems. Maintenance of an outfall pipe discharging wastewater effluent to the Southern California Bight (SCB) provided an opportunity to study effects of anthropogenic nutrient inputs on a near-shore coastal ecosystem. The diversion of wastewater effluent from a primary, offshore outfall to a secondary, near-shore outfall set up a large-scale, in situ experiment allowing researchers to track the fate of wastewater plumes as they were ;turned off; in one area and ;turned on; in another. In this introduction to a special issue, we synthesize results of one such wastewater diversion conducted by the Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) during fall 2012. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) from point-source discharges altered biogeochemical cycling and the community composition of bacteria and phytoplankton. Nitrification of ammonium to nitrate in wastewater effluent close to outfalls constituted a significant source of N utilized by the biological community that should be considered in quantifying ;new; production. The microbial-loop component of the plankton community played a significant role, exemplified by a large response of heterotrophic bacteria to wastewater effluent that resulted in nutrient immobilization within the bacterial food web. This response, combined with the photosynthetic inhibition of phytoplankton due to disinfection byproducts, suppressed phytoplankton responses. Our findings have

  17. Biological interactions and their role in community structure in the rocky intertidal of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Klaus

    1990-06-01

    Over 3 successive seasonal cycles (April 1986 to October 1988), field experiments were established within 3 intertidal levels in the sheltered rocky intertidal of Helgoland (North Sea, German Bight). Competitors for space ( Mytilus edulis, macroalgae), herbivores ( Littorina spp.) and predators ( Carcinus maenas) were either excluded from areas (0.25 m2) covered by undisturbed communities or enclosed at natural densities on areas that were cleared before of animals and plants. All the experimental fields (each 0.25 m2) were covered by cages with 4 mm gauze at the sides and a plexiglas top. The results of the experiments in the upper intertidal (occupied by Littorina spp. and Enteromorpha) showed that a natural density of herbivores could not prevent algal settlement and had only little influence on algal growth. Instead abiotic factors (storms, algae washed ashore) decreased the stock of the green algae. Experiments in the mid intertidal, dominated by Mytilus (50% cover), Fucus spp. (20%) and grazing L. littorea (100 ind. m-2) showed that community structure was directly changed both by grazing periwinkles and by competition for space between mussels and macroalgae. Whenever Littorina was excluded, the canopy of Fucus spp. increased continuously and reached total cover within two years. In addition to the increase of Fucus spp., the rock surface and the mussel shells were overgrown by Ulva pseudocurvata, which covered the experimental fields during parts of the summer in the absence of herbivores. As soon as perennial species (fucoids) covered most of the experimental areas, the seasonal growth of Ulva decreased drastically. Presence and growth of macroalgae were also controlled by serious competition for space with mussels. Established Mytilus prevented the growth of all perennial and ephemeral algae on the rocks. However, the shells of the mussels provided free space for a new settlement of Fucus and Ulva. In the lower intertidal (dominated by total algal cover

  18. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in Litopenaeus vannamei captured from the Gulf of California near an area of extensive aquaculture activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijangos-Alquisires, Z; Quintero-Arredondo, N; Castro-Longoria, R; Grijalva-Chon, J M; Ramos-Paredes, J

    2006-07-11

    For the shrimp farming industry of Mexico, disease outbreaks caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) are relatively recent. Efforts to control the virus are assisted by monitoring for its prevalence in aquaculture systems, but few attempts have been made to search for it in carriers from coastal waters. To search for WSSV carriers in the Gulf of California, we made surveys off the coast of Sinaloa, Mexico, in March 2001, November 2001, and September 2003 using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays and histopathology. WSSV-positive shrimp were detected only in November 2001, after hurricane Julliete. This suggested possible dispersal of WSSV to the marine environment from infected shrimp farms.

  19. Petrology and stable isotope geochemistry of three wells in the Buttes area of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, C.

    1976-12-01

    A detailed investigation is reported of cuttings recovered from three wells in the Salton Sea geothermal field located at the southeast end of the Salton Sea, California. The wells, Magmamax No. 2, Magmamax No. 3, and Woolsey No. 1 penetrate 1340 m, 1200 m, and 730 m, respectively, of altered sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Colorado River delta. The wells are located at the crest of a thermal anomaly, reach a maximum of 320/sup 0/C at 1070 m, and produce a brine containing approximately 250,000 mg/1 of dissolved solids.

  20. Biostratigraphy of the San Joaquin Formation in borrow-source area B-17, Kettleman Hills landfill, North Dome, Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Charles L.; Fisk, Lanny H.; Maloney, David F.; Haasl, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The stratigraphic occurrences and interpreted biostratigraphy of invertebrate fossil taxa in the upper San Joaquin Formation and lower-most Tulare Formation encountered at the Chemical Waste Management Kettleman Hills waste disposal facility on the North Dome of the Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California are documented. Significant new findings include (1) a detailed biostratigraphy of the upper San Joaquin Formation; (2) the first fossil occurrence of Modiolus neglectus; (3) distinguishing Ostrea sequens from Myrakeena veatchii (Ostrea vespertina of authors) in the Central Valley of California; (4) differentiating two taxa previously attributed to Pteropurpura festivus; (5) finding a stratigraphic succession between Caesia coalingensis (lower in the section) and Catilon iniquus (higher in the section); and (6) recognizing Pliocene-age fossils from around Santa Barbara. In addition, the presence of the bivalves Anodonta and Gonidea in the San Joaquin Formation, both restricted to fresh water and common in the Tulare Formation, confirm periods of fresh water or very close fresh-water environments during deposition of the San Joaquin Formation.

  1. Oligocene tectonics and sedimentation, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the Oligocene epoch, California was marked by extensive nonmarine sedimentation, in contrast to its pre-Oligocene and post-Oligocene depositional history. The Oligocene continental deposits are especially widespread in southern California and fill a number of small and generally partly restricted basins. Fluvial facies in many basins prograded over previously deposited lower Tertiary turbidites. Volcanism, from widespread centers, was associated with the nonmarine sedimentation. However, some basins remained marine and a few contain Oligocene turbidites and pelagic sediments deposited at bathyal depths. The Oligocene redbeds of California do not form a post-orogenic molasse sequence comparable to the Old Red Sandstone or Alpine molasse. They are synorogenic and record local uplift of basins and surrounding source areas. Late Cretaceous to contemporary orogenesis in California has been generally characterized by the formation of small restricted basins of variable depth adjacent to small upland areas in response to strike-slip faulting. Deposition of Oligocene redbeds was associated with climatic change from warm and humid to cold and semiarid, and a global lowering of sea level. Oligocene tectonism occurred during the transition from subduction of the Farallon Plate to initiation of the modern San Andreas transform system. However, the major influence that caused uplift, formation of fault-bounded basins, and extensive redbed deposition, especially in southern California, was the approach of the Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge to the western margin of California. ?? 1984.

  2. Characterizing the vertical structure of chlorophyll-a in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changjin; Maerz, Joeran; Hofmeister, Richard; Schrum, Corinna; Riethmüller, Rolf; Wirzt, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Coastal and shelf seas display a strong variability in chlorophyll-a (CHL) vertical profiles, which challenges both sampling and interpretation. A high-resolution, vertically resolved transect data set for biogeochemical and physical properties was collected in the inner German Bight (GB) from 2009 to 2011 at a seasonal basis, mainly under moderate weather conditions. We identified different types of CHL vertical profiles in regions deeper than 10 meters and analyzed their spatial-temporal appearance, mainly in context of the hydrodynamic environment. Interestingly, despite the GB as a shallow and tidally energetic system has been assumed as well mixed, vertically homogeneous CHL profiles were rare (9.6% in our study). A smaller subset (8.4%) of all casts showed distinguishable subsurface CHL layers in the vicinity of the pycnocline, under strong stratified conditions in deeper water (>25m). Highest CHL in the upper part of the water column was observed in 43% of casts; these profiles were mainly restricted to the shallower part (biological model (GETM+MAECS) for stratified summer conditions, the contributing factors to the development of the HCB profiles were further investigated. The model results point to three major processes responsible for the local occurrence of the HCB profiles: (1) resuspension of aggregated material comprising intra- or extracellular pigments, (2) erosion from a pre-existing CHL subsurface layer, and (3) advection in the bottom mixed layer. Considering the spatial-temporal distribution of CHL profiles' heterogeneity under mild weather conditions, we inferred that tidal stirring and the distribution of living resources shape the CHL vertical profiles. The study also highlights the relevance of resuspension for the vertical profiles of CHL in a shallow shelf sea, such as the GB, with implications for both new sampling strategies and model development.

  3. Isolation of novel pelagic bacteria from the German bight and their seasonal contributions to surface picoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, H; Pernthaler, J; Peplies, J; Glöckner, F O; Gerdts, G; Amann, R

    2001-11-01

    We tested new strategies for the isolation of abundant bacteria from coastal North Sea surface waters, which included reducing by several orders of magnitude the concentrations of inorganic N and P compounds in a synthetic seawater medium. Agar plates were resampled over 37 days, and slowly growing colonies were allowed to develop by repeatedly removing all newly formed colonies. A fivefold increase of colonies was observed on plates with reduced nutrient levels, and the phylogenetic composition of the culture collection changed over time, towards members of the Roseobacter lineage and other alpha-proteobacteria. Novel gamma-proteobacteria from a previously uncultured but cosmopolitan lineage (NOR5) formed colonies only after 12 days of plate incubation. A time series of German Bight surface waters (January to December 1998) was screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with isolate-specific and general probes. During spring and early summer, a prominent fraction of FISH-detectable bacteria (mean, 51%) were affiliated with the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group (CF) of the Bacteroidetes. One Cytophaga sp. lineage with cultured representatives formed almost 20% of the CF group. Members of the Roseobacter cluster constituted approximately 50% of alpha-proteobacteria, but none of the Roseobacter-related isolates formed populations of >1% in the environment. Thus, the readily culturable members of this clade are probably not representative of Roseobacter species that are common in the water column. In contrast, members of NOR5 were found at high abundances (>10(5) cells ml(-1)) in the summer plankton. Some abundant pelagic bacteria are apparently able to form colonies on solid media, but appropriate isolation techniques for different species need to be developed.

  4. Identification of storm surge events over the German Bight from atmospheric reanalysis and climate model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befort, D. J.; Fischer, M.; Leckebusch, G. C.; Ulbrich, U.; Ganske, A.; Rosenhagen, G.; Heinrich, H.

    2015-06-01

    A new procedure for the identification of storm surge situations for the German Bight is developed and applied to reanalysis and global climate model data. This method is based on the empirical approach for estimating storm surge heights using information about wind speed and wind direction. Here, we hypothesize that storm surge events are caused by high wind speeds from north-westerly direction in combination with a large-scale wind storm event affecting the North Sea region. The method is calibrated for ERA-40 data, using the data from the storm surge atlas for Cuxhaven. It is shown that using information of both wind speed and direction as well as large-scale wind storm events improves the identification of storm surge events. To estimate possible future changes of potential storm surge events, we apply the new identification approach to an ensemble of three transient climate change simulations performed with the ECHAM5/MPIOM model under A1B greenhouse gas scenario forcing. We find an increase in the total number of potential storm surge events of about 12 % [(2001-2100)-(1901-2000)], mainly based on changes of moderate events. Yearly numbers of storm surge relevant events show high interannual and decadal variability and only one of three simulations shows a statistical significant increase in the yearly number of potential storm surge events between 1900 and 2100. However, no changes in the maximum intensity and duration of all potential events is determined. Extreme value statistic analysis confirms no frequency change of the most severe events.

  5. Identification of storm surge events over the German Bight from atmospheric reanalysis and climate model data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Befort

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the identification of storm surge situations for the German Bight is developed and applied to reanalysis and global climate model data. This method is based on the empirical approach for estimating storm surge heights using information about wind speed and wind direction. Here, we hypothesize that storm surge events are caused by high wind speeds from north-westerly direction in combination with a large-scale wind storm event affecting the North Sea region. The method is calibrated for ERA-40 data, using the data from the storm surge atlas for Cuxhaven. It is shown that using information of both wind speed and direction as well as large-scale wind storm events improves the identification of storm surge events. To estimate possible future changes of potential storm surge events, we apply the new identification approach to an ensemble of three transient climate change simulations performed with the ECHAM5/MPIOM model under A1B greenhouse gas scenario forcing. We find an increase in the total number of potential storm surge events of about 12 % [(2001–2100–(1901–2000], mainly based on changes of moderate events. Yearly numbers of storm surge relevant events show high interannual and decadal variability and only one of three simulations shows a statistical significant increase in the yearly number of potential storm surge events between 1900 and 2100. However, no changes in the maximum intensity and duration of all potential events is determined. Extreme value statistic analysis confirms no frequency change of the most severe events.

  6. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  7. The assessment of optimal MERIS ocean colour products in the shelf waters of the KwaZulu-Natal Bight, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, ME

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The KwaZulu-Natal Bight is a highly variable bio-optical environment, where waters over the shelf can change from the oligotrophic case 1 conditions of the Agulhas Current to the case 2 inshore environment influenced by upwelling and riverine influx...

  8. Tools to evaluate seafloor integrity: comparison of multi-device acoustic seafloor classifications for benthic macrofauna-driven patterns in the German Bight, southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Peter; Markert, Edith; Bartholomä, Alexander; Capperucci, Ruggero; Hass, H. Christian; Kröncke, Ingrid; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, H. Christian

    2016-12-01

    To determine the spatial resolution of sediment properties and benthic macrofauna communities in acoustic backscatter, the suitability of four acoustic seafloor classification devices (single-beam echosounder with RoxAnn and QTC 5.5 seafloor classification system, sidescan sonar with QTC Swathview seafloor classification, and multi-beam echosounder with QTC Swathview seafloor classification) was compared in a study area of approx. 6 km2 northwest of the island of Helgoland in the German Bight, southern North Sea. This was based on a simple similarity index between simultaneous sidescan sonar, single-beam echosounder and multi-beam echosounder profiling spanning the period 2011-2014. The results show a high similarity between seafloor classifications based on sidescan sonar and RoxAnn single-beam systems, in turn associated with a lower similarity for the multi-beam echosounder system. Analyses of surface sediment samples at 39 locations along four transects (0.1 m2 Van Veen grab) revealed the presence of sandy mud (southern and western parts), coarse sand, gravel and cobbles. Rock outcrops were identified in the north-eastern and eastern parts. A typical Nucula nitidosa-Abra alba community was found in sandy muds to muddy sands in the northern part, whereas the southern part is characterised by widespread occurrence of the ophiuroid brittle star Amphiura filiformis. A transitional N. nitidosa-A. filiformis community was detected in the central part. Moreover, the southern part is characterised by a high abundance of A. filiformis and its commensal bivalve Kurtiella bidentata. The high number of A. filiformis feeding arms (up to ca. 6,800 per m2) can largely explain the gentle change of backscatter intensity along the tracks, because sediment composition and/or seafloor structures showed no significant variability.

  9. Highly dynamic biological seabed alterations revealed by side scan sonar tracking of Lanice conchilega beds offshore the island of Sylt (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, C.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.

    2016-10-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys are common tools for habitat investigation and monitoring that aid in the realisation of the aims of the EU Marine Directives. However, the creation of habitat maps is difficult, especially when benthic organisms densely populate the seafloor. This study assesses the sensitivity of entropy and homogeneity image texture parameters derived from backscatter strength data to benthic habitats dominated by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega. Side scan sonar backscatter surveys were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the German Bight (southern North Sea) at two sites approx. 20 km offshore of the island of Sylt. Abiotic and biotic seabed facies, such as sorted bedforms, areas of fine to medium sand and L. conchilega beds with different tube densities, were identified and characterised based on manual expert analysis and image texture analysis. Ground truthing was performed by grab sampling and underwater video observations. Compared to the manual expert analysis, the k-means classification of image textures proves to be a semi-automated method to investigate small-scale differences in a biologically altered seabed from backscatter data. The texture parameters entropy and homogeneity appear linearly interrelated with tube density, the former positively and the latter negatively. Reinvestigation of one site after 1 year showed an extensive change in the distribution of the L. conchilega-altered seabed. Such marked annual fluctuations in L. conchilega tube cover demonstrate the need for dense time series and high spatial coverage to meaningfully monitor ecological patterns on the seafloor with acoustic backscatter methods in the study region and similar settings worldwide, particularly because the sand mason plays a pivotal role in promoting biodiversity. In this context, image texture analysis provides a cost-effective and reproducible method to track biologically altered seabeds from side scan sonar backscatter signatures.

  10. The Algebra Content Knowledge of Beginning Teachers in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the competence of beginning California K-6 teachers in basic algebra topics, and to investigate their level of math anxiety and attitudes toward math. The sample for this study was beginning California elementary teachers in the Bay Area of California. An algebra content assessment and a self-report…

  11. The Algebra Content Knowledge of Beginning Teachers in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the competence of beginning California K-6 teachers in basic algebra topics, and to investigate their level of math anxiety and attitudes toward math. The sample for this study was beginning California elementary teachers in the Bay Area of California. An algebra content assessment and a self-report…

  12. Concentrations of metals and trace elements in aquatic biota associated with abandoned mine lands in the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area and nearby Clear Creek watershed, Shasta County, northwestern California, 2002-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Gibson, Jennifer K.; Brussee, Brianne E.

    2015-01-01

    Park management of the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, in northwestern California, identified a critical need to determine if mercury (Hg) or other elements originating from abandoned mines within the Upper Clear Creek watershed were present at concentrations that might adversely affect aquatic biota living within the park. During 2002–03, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, collected aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, and fish, and analyzed them for Hg, cadmium, zinc, copper, and other metals and trace elements. The data from the biota, in conjunction with data from concurrent community bioassessments, habitat analyses, water quality, and concentrations of metals and trace elements in water and sediment, were used to identify contamination “hot spots.”

  13. 1,2 Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) and ethylene dibromide (EDB) in well water in the Fresno/Clovis metropolitan area, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, H

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water contamination with the pesticides 1,2 dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) and ethylene dibromide (EDB) affects Fresno/Clovis city in California. The spatial and temporal distribution of DBCP and EDB in public wells in Fresno/Clovis was examined, using mapping and time-series analyses of chemical test results, during the time periods 1979-1980 and 1992-1993. Health risks were estimated from mean concentrations, lifetime cancer risks were estimated, and monitoring and control programs were reviewed. Mean DBCP concentrations in selected wells declined from 0.56 ppb in 1979-1980 to 0.18 ppb in 1992-1993. Closure of wells and wellhead filtration caused levels to be reduced further (i.e., to 0.06 ppb). Mean EDB concentrations declined from 0.25 ppb to 0.15 ppb during the same time periods. The estimated lifetime cancer risk for DBCP was 1 excess death per 125 000 population in 1992-1993, but this risk varied within the city. The risk for EDB was 1 excess death per 2.2 million. Recommendations were made for the modeling of pesticide movement in ground water and for epidemiological studies.

  14. On the dynamics of compound bedforms in high-energy tidal channels: field observations in the German Bight and the Danish Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Verner B.; Winter, Christian; Becker, Marius; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2010-05-01

    Tidal inlets are a common feature along much of the world's coastlines. They interrupt the alongshore continuity of shoreline processes, and by being exposed to both wave and current forcing, tidal inlets belong to the morphologically most dynamic and complex coastal systems on Earth. The tidal channels in these inlets are characterized by high flow velocities and, accordingly, the channel beds are typically sandy and covered with bedforms. The bedform fields in nature are often complex systems with larger primary-bedforms superimposed by smaller secondary-bedforms (cf. Bartholdy et al., 2002). There is a considerable amount of detailed field investigations on the dynamics of primary-bedforms at various temporal scales, ranging from short- to long-term tide-related cycles to flood hydrographs to seasonality. However, Julien et al. (2002) stated that a composite analysis of primary- and secondary-bedforms is recommended for future studies on resistance to flow. Such knowledge on the behaviour of compound bedforms is still deficient. In this study, we combine the findings on the dynamics of primary- and secondary-bedform height from detailed field investigations carried out in two high-energy tidal channels during 2007 and 2008: the Knudedyb tidal inlet channel in the Danish Wadden Sea and the Innenjade tidal channel in the Jade Bay, German Bight (both survey areas being ebb-dominated). We provide process-based explanations of the bedform behaviour and present a conceptual model of compound bedform dynamics. The conducted field investigations comprised repetitive, simultaneous measurements of high-resolution swath bathymetry (using a multibeam echosounder system) and flow velocity (using an acoustic Doppler current profiler) in combination with detailed spatial mapping of bed material characteristics (from grab sampling of bed material). For an objective and discrete analysis of primary- and secondary-bedforms a modified version of the bedform tracking tool

  15. Atlantic surfclam connectivity within the Middle Atlantic Bight: Mechanisms underlying variation in larval transport and settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhong; Munroe, Daphne; Haidvogel, Dale; Powell, Eric N.

    2016-05-01

    Larval transport and settlement have been shown in various studies to be essential in determining population abundance and connectivity for benthic invertebrates. This transport is influenced by both the physical environment and biological behavior. The Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima, is a commercially important benthic invertebrate fishery species along the U.S northeastern coast. In this study, a physical circulation model is coupled to a surfclam larval model to investigate the dynamics of larval transport and settlement within the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf in 2006. The main physical mechanisms causing variability in larval transport and settlement are also examined. Model results show that surfclam larvae released from July to early October experience relatively larger settlement rates, due to higher average temperatures experienced by larvae. Larval along-shore transport exhibits a mean down-coast pattern following the coastal current from the northeast to the southwest, with most high-frequency (period of 2-10 days) variations caused by fluctuations in the along-shore surface wind stress, and with seasonal variations speculated to be driven mainly by changes in the across-shelf density gradient. Larval across-shelf movement is highly correlated with the along-shore surface wind stress mediated by coastal upwelling and downwelling episodes, but the correlation is further dependent on the vertical distribution of the larvae, particularly their position relative to the thermocline. Most surfclam larvae released from the Middle Atlantic shelf stay below the thermocline and experience a net onshore transport during the summer-stratified season when upwelling-favorable wind forcing dominates. A proposed critical value of water temperature at the thermocline successfully regulates the observed patterns of vertical distribution of surfclam larvae and their across-shelf movement off the New Jersey and South Virginia shelves; that is, when the water

  16. Current, temperature, backscatter, and other data from bottom instrument packages deployed from the RV Oceanus and other platforms in support of sediment transport observation in the Middle Atlantic Bight from 11 December 1975 to 30 October 1980 (NODC Accession 0066005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A series of studies to assess environmental hazards to petroleum development in the Middle Atlantic Bight. Long-term observations of currents and near-bottom...

  17. HYDROCARBONS - TOTAL RESOLVED, CAS (CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE) PARAMETER CODES and PCB, and other data from UNKNOWN in the New York Bight on 1901-01-01 (NCEI Accession 8600271)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This submission contains the master data set assembled in a study called "Contaminant Body Burdens, Variability and Monitoring Implications for the New York Bight"....

  18. Physical, taxonomic code, and other data from current meter and other instruments in New York Bight from DOLPHIN and other platforms; 14 March 1971 to 03 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, taxonomic code, and other data were collected using current meter and other instruments from DOLPHIN and other platforms in New York Bight. Data were...

  19. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 10 April 1984 - 31 October 1984 (NODC Accession 8500225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight from April 10, 1984 to October 31, 1984. Data were...

  20. Temperature and other data collected using visual observations and other instruments in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and other Seas from GYRE from 01 August 1985 to 26 May 1990 (NODC Accession 9300074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and other data were collected using visual observations, bottle casts, and other instruments from GYRE and other platforms in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2012-10-25 to 2012-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0145723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider ru23 was deployed prior to the movement of Hurrican Sandy into the Mid-Atlantic Bight and was deployed to sample the sub-surface waters during the...

  2. The cave fauna of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Elliott; James R. Reddell; D. Craig Rudolph; G.O. Graening; Thomas S. Briggs; Darrell Ubick; Rolf L. Aalbu; Jean Krejca; Steven J. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Hidden biodiversity is revealed in this study of California's subterranean fauna, which contains distinctive elements that differentiate it from other North American regions. Since 1975, the rate of discovery of new species has accelerated with funded projects in most of the important cave areas of the state, including our own studies. Here we compile all...

  3. Bathymetry--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  4. Bathymetry--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  5. Contours-Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. The vector data file is...

  6. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  7. Faults--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  8. Folds--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Pigeon Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  9. Faults--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  10. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  11. Folds--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. Faults--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Pigeon Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  13. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  14. Folds--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Pigeon Point map area, California. The vector data file is...

  15. Folds--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  16. Faults--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  17. Faults--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  18. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  19. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  20. Contours--Offshore of Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. The vector data file is...