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Sample records for calculate spacecraft single

  1. Four-spacecraft determination of magnetopause orientation, motion and thickness: comparison with results from single-spacecraft methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Haaland

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use Cluster data from one magnetopause event on 5 July 2001 to compare predictions from various methods for determination of the velocity, orientation, and thickness of the magnetopause current layer. We employ established as well as new multi-spacecraft techniques, in which time differences between the crossings by the four spacecraft, along with the duration of each crossing, are used to calculate magnetopause speed, normal vector, and width. The timing is based on data from either the Cluster Magnetic Field Experiment (FGM or the Electric Field Experiment (EFW instruments. The multi-spacecraft results are compared with those derived from various single-spacecraft techniques, including minimum-variance analysis of the magnetic field and deHoffmann-Teller, as well as Minimum-Faraday-Residue analysis of plasma velocities and magnetic fields measured during the crossings. In order to improve the overall consistency between multi- and single-spacecraft results, we have also explored the use of hybrid techniques, in which timing information from the four spacecraft is combined with certain limited results from single-spacecraft methods, the remaining results being left for consistency checks. The results show good agreement between magnetopause orientations derived from appropriately chosen single-spacecraft techniques and those obtained from multi-spacecraft timing. The agreement between magnetopause speeds derived from single- and multi-spacecraft methods is quantitatively somewhat less good but it is evident that the speed can change substantially from one crossing to the next within an event. The magnetopause thickness varied substantially from one crossing to the next, within an event. It ranged from 5 to 10 ion gyroradii. The density profile was sharper than the magnetic profile: most of the density change occured in the earthward half of the magnetopause.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and

  2. Rapid Calculation of Spacecraft Trajectories Using Efficient Taylor Series Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James R.; Martini, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    A variable-order, variable-step Taylor series integration algorithm was implemented in NASA Glenn's SNAP (Spacecraft N-body Analysis Program) code. SNAP is a high-fidelity trajectory propagation program that can propagate the trajectory of a spacecraft about virtually any body in the solar system. The Taylor series algorithm's very high order accuracy and excellent stability properties lead to large reductions in computer time relative to the code's existing 8th order Runge-Kutta scheme. Head-to-head comparison on near-Earth, lunar, Mars, and Europa missions showed that Taylor series integration is 15.8 times faster than Runge- Kutta on average, and is more accurate. These speedups were obtained for calculations involving central body, other body, thrust, and drag forces. Similar speedups have been obtained for calculations that include J2 spherical harmonic for central body gravitation. The algorithm includes a step size selection method that directly calculates the step size and never requires a repeat step. High-order Taylor series integration algorithms have been shown to provide major reductions in computer time over conventional integration methods in numerous scientific applications. The objective here was to directly implement Taylor series integration in an existing trajectory analysis code and demonstrate that large reductions in computer time (order of magnitude) could be achieved while simultaneously maintaining high accuracy. This software greatly accelerates the calculation of spacecraft trajectories. At each time level, the spacecraft position, velocity, and mass are expanded in a high-order Taylor series whose coefficients are obtained through efficient differentiation arithmetic. This makes it possible to take very large time steps at minimal cost, resulting in large savings in computer time. The Taylor series algorithm is implemented primarily through three subroutines: (1) a driver routine that automatically introduces auxiliary variables and

  3. A novel single thruster control strategy for spacecraft attitude stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard; Kumar, Krishna Dev; Zou, An-Min

    2013-05-01

    Feasibility of achieving three axis attitude stabilization using a single thruster is explored in this paper. Torques are generated using a thruster orientation mechanism with which the thrust vector can be tilted on a two axis gimbal. A robust nonlinear control scheme is developed based on the nonlinear kinematic and dynamic equations of motion of a rigid body spacecraft in the presence of gravity gradient torque and external disturbances. The spacecraft, controlled using the proposed concept, constitutes an underactuated system (a system with fewer independent control inputs than degrees of freedom) with nonlinear dynamics. Moreover, using thruster gimbal angles as control inputs make the system non-affine (control terms appear nonlinearly in the state equation). This necessitates the control algorithms to be developed based on nonlinear control theory since linear control methods are not directly applicable. The stability conditions for the spacecraft attitude motion for robustness against uncertainties and disturbances are derived to establish the regions of asymptotic 3-axis attitude stabilization. Several numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed controller and validate the theoretical results. The control algorithm is shown to compensate for time-varying external disturbances including solar radiation pressure, aerodynamic forces, and magnetic disturbances; and uncertainties in the spacecraft inertia parameters. The numerical results also establish the robustness of the proposed control scheme to negate disturbances caused by orbit eccentricity.

  4. Low Cost Space Demonstration for a Single-Person Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Dischinger, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a concept for a single-person spacecraft and presents plans for flying a low-cost, robotic demonstration mission. Called FlexCraft, the vehicle integrates propulsion and robotics into a small spacecraft that enables rapid, shirt-sleeve access to space. It can be flown by astronauts or tele-operated and is equipped with interchangeable manipulators used for maintaining the International Space Station (ISS), exploring asteroids, and servicing telescopes or satellites. Most FlexCraft systems are verified using ground facilities; however, a test in the weightless environment is needed to assess propulsion and manipulator performance. For this, a simplified, unmanned, version of FlexCraft is flown on a low-cost launch vehicle to a 350 km circular orbit. After separation from the upper stage, the vehicle returns to a target box mounted on the stage testing the propulsion and control capability. The box is equipped with manipulator test items that are representative of tasks performed on ISS, asteroid missions, or for satellites servicing. Nominal and off-nominal operations are conducted over 3 days then the vehicle re-enters the atmosphere without becoming a debris hazard. From concept to management to operations, the FlexCraft demonstration is designed to be low cost project that is launched within three years. This is possible using a simplified test configuration that eliminates nine systems unique to the operational version and by designing-to-availability. For example, the propulsion system is the same as the Manned Maneuvering Unit because it capable, simple, human-rated and all components or equivalent parts are available. A description of the launch vehicle options, mission operations, configuration, and demonstrator subsystems is presented.

  5. Benefits of a Single-Person Spacecraft for Weightless Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brand Norman

    2012-01-01

    Historically, less than 20 percent of crew time related to extravehicular activity (EVA) is spent on productive external work. For planetary operations space suits are still the logical choice; however for safe and rapid access to the weightless environment, spacecraft offer compelling advantages. FlexCraft, a concept for a single-person spacecraft, enables any-time access to space for short or long excursions by different astronauts. For the International Space Station (ISS), going outside is time-consuming, requiring pre-breathing, donning a fitted space suit, and pumping down an airlock. For each ISS EVA this is between 12.5 and 16 hours. FlexCraft provides immediate access to space because it operates with the same cabin atmosphere as its host. Furthermore, compared to the space suit pure oxygen environment, a mixed gas atmosphere lowers the fire risk and allows use of conventional materials and systems. For getting to the worksite, integral propulsion replaces hand-over-hand translation or having another crew member operate the robotic arm. This means less physical exertion and more time at the work site. Possibly more important, in case of an emergency, FlexCraft can return from the most distant point on ISS in less than a minute. The one-size-fits-all FlexCraft means no on-orbit inventory of parts or crew time required to fit all astronauts. With a shirtsleeve cockpit, conventional displays and controls are used, there is no suit trauma and because the work is not strenuous, no rest days are required. Furthermore, there is no need to collect hand tools because manipulators are equipped with force multiplying end-effectors that can deliver the precise torque for the job. FlexCraft is an efficient solution for asteroid exploration allowing all crew to use one vehicle with no risk of contamination. And, because FlexCraft is a vehicle, its design offers better radiation and micro-meteoroid protection than space suits.

  6. Fast Auroral Snapshot Mission Unique Electronics Complete Spacecraft Electronics Contained in a Single Enclosure

    OpenAIRE

    Dougherty, Lamar; Gruner, Timothy; Wilmot, Jonathan; Chiville, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) Mission Unique Electronics (MUE), housed in a single container, controls all major spacecraft functions. The functions include, Command and Data Handling (C&DH), Attitude Control and Stabilization (ACS), battery charge control and power distribution which comprise the Power System Electronics (PSE), thermal sensing and control, pyrotechnic device firing, spacecraft health and safety functions, Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU) interface and Small Launch V...

  7. Local controllability and stabilization of spacecraft attitude by two single-gimbal control moment gyros

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui Haichao; Jin Lei; Xu Shijie

    2013-01-01

    The attitude control problem of a spacecraft underactuated by two single-gimbal control moment gyros (SGCMGs) is investigated. Small-time local controllability (STLC) of the attitude dynamics of the spacecraft-SGCMGs system is analyzed via nonlinear controllability theory. The conditions that guarantee STLC of the spacecraft attitude by two non-coaxial SGCMGs are obtained with the momentum of the SGCMGs as inputs, implying that the spacecraft attitude is STLC when the total angular momentum of the whole system is zero. Moreover, our results indi-cate that under the zero-momentum restriction, full attitude stabilization is possible for a spacecraft using two non-coaxial SGCMGs. For the case of two coaxial SGCMGs, the STLC property of the spacecraft cannot be determined. In this case, an improvement to the previous full attitude stabiliz-ing control law, which requires zero-momentum presumption, is proposed to account for the singu-larity of SGCMGs and enhance the steady state performance. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the new control law.

  8. Microscopic calculations of λ single particle energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Λ binding energy data for total baryon number A ≤ 208 and for Λ angular momenta ellΛ ≤ 3 are analyzed in terms of phenomenological (but generally consistent with meson-exchange) ΛN and ΛNN potentials. The Fermi-Hypernetted-Chain technique is used to calculate the expectation values for the Λ binding to nuclear matter. Accurate effective ΛN and ΛNN potentials are obtained which are folded with the core nucleus nucleon densities to calculate the Λ single particle potential UΛ(r). We use a dispersive ΛNN potential but also include an explicit ρ dependence to allow for reduced repulsion in the surface, and the best fits have a large ρ dependence giving consistency with the variational Monte Carlo calculations for Λ5He. The exchange fraction of the ΛN space-exchange potential is found to be 0.2-0.3 corresponding to mΛ* ≅ (0.74-0.82)mΛ. Charge symmetry breaking is found to be significant for heavy hypernuclei with a large neutron excess, with a strength consistent with that obtained from the A = 4 hypernuclei

  9. Neutron Activation Analysis of Single Grains Recovered by the Hayabusa Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, M.; Sekimoto, S.; Hamajima, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Kumagai, K.; Oura, Y.; Shirai, N.; Ireland. T. R.; Kitajima, F.; Nagao, K.; Nakamura, T.; Naraoka, H.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Uesugi, M.; Yurimoto, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Abe, M.; Fujimura, A.; Mukai, T.; Yada, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Hayabusa spacecraft was launched on May 9, 2003 and reached an asteroid Itokawa (25143 Itokawa) in September 2005. After accomplishing several scientific observations, the spacecraft tried to collect the surface material of Itokawa by touching down to the asteroid in November. The spacecraft was then navigated for the earth. In encountering several difficulties, Hayabusa finally returned to the earth on June 12, 2010 and the entry capsule was successfully recovered. Initially, a g-scale of solid material was aimed to be captured into the entry capsule. Although the sample collection was not perfectly performed, it was hoped that some extraterrestrial material was stored into the capsule. After careful and extensive examination, more than 1500 particles were recognized visibly by microscopes, most of which were eventually judged to be extraterrestrial, highly probably originated from Itokawa [1]. Several years before the launching of the Hayabusa spacecraft, the initial analysis team was officially formed under the selection panel at ISAS. As a member of this team, we have been preparing for the initial inspection of the returned material from many scientific viewpoints [2]. Once the recovered material had been confirmed to be much less than 1 g, a scheme for the initial analysis was updated accordingly [3]. In this study, we aim to analyze tiny single grains by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). As the initial analysis is to be started in mid-January, 2011, some progress for the initial analysis using INAA is described here. Analytical procedure

  10. Benefits of a Single-Person Spacecraft for Weightless Operations. [(Stop Walking and Start Flying)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brand N.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, less than 20 percent of crew time related to extravehicular activity (EVA) is spent on productive external work.1 A single-person spacecraft with 90 percent efficiency provides productive new capabilities for maintaining the International Space Station (ISS), exploring asteroids, and servicing telescopes or satellites. With suits, going outside to inspect, service or repair a spacecraft is time-consuming, requiring pre-breathe time, donning a fitted space suit, and pumping down an airlock. For ISS, this is between 12.5 and 16 hours for each EVA, not including translation and work-site set up. The work is physically demanding requiring a day of rest between EVAs and often results in suit-induced trauma with frequent injury to astronauts fingers2. For maximum mobility, suits use a low pressure, pure oxygen atmosphere. This represents a fire hazard and requires pre-breathing to reduce the risk of decompression sickness (bends). With virtually no gravity, humans exploring asteroids cannot use legs for walking. The Manned Maneuvering Unit offers a propulsive alternative however it is no longer in NASA s flight inventory. FlexCraft is a single person spacecraft operating at the same cabin atmosphere as its host so there is no risk of the bends and no pre-breathing. This allows rapid, any-time access to space for repeated short or long EVAs by different astronauts. Integrated propulsion eliminates hand-over-hand translation or having another crew member operate the robotic arm. The one-size-fits-all FlexCraft interior eliminates the suit part inventory and crew time required to fit all astronauts. With a shirtsleeve cockpit, conventional displays and controls are used and because the work is not strenuous no rest days are required. Furthermore, there is no need for hand tools because manipulators are equipped with force multiplying end-effectors that can deliver the precise torque for the job.

  11. Calculational techniques (not only) for single top production

    OpenAIRE

    WEINZIERL, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    A next-to-leading order calculation for single top production including spin-dependent observables requires efficient techniques for the calculation of the relevant loop amplitudes. We discuss the adaption of dimensional regularization, the spinor helicity method and of tensor integral reduction algorithms to these needs.

  12. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  13. Calculated ionospheric variations due to changes in the solar EUV flux measured by the AEROS spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar EUV radiation from the whole solar disk for wavelengths between 15.5 and 103.76 nm was measured by the AEROS-EUV spectrometer during the period December 1972 through August 1973. These measurements show a long-term decrease in solar EUV output with decreasing solar activity, a 27-day variation, and day-to-day and other short-term fluctuations. These solar EUV flux data are used with a model of the ionospheric E- and F- regions to calculate the variation of ionospheric properties that are associated with the changes in the measured solar EUV flux. The model calculates the variations in electron and ion density, electron and ion temperature, photoelectron spectra, various airglow emission rates, and the minor neutral constituents N(2D), N(4S) and NO. The results show that in general the magnitude of all ionospheric and atmospheric properties increases with increasing solar EUV flux. However, percentage changes of the calculated properties are different from each other and also from the percentage change of the measured total solar EUV energy flux. This occurs because a nonuniform variation of the solar flux with wavelength is observed over the EUV spectrum by the AEROS-EUV spectrometer and altitude-dependent aeronomic processes are sensitive to the detailed flux values within the solar EUV spectrum. (author)

  14. Albedo calculation for single scattering gamma-rays, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several formulae for albedo calculation of single scattering gamma-rays were given here with a quantitative discussion on the irregular variation of albedo with incident photon energy close to the K-edge of the material. The formula derived analytically from the approximation that attenuation coefficient is inversely proportional to photon energy to the third power, was found to be practically applicable to albedo calculation for materials of high atomic number in the limited range of incident energies. (auth.)

  15. An Overview of Demise Calculations, Conceptual Design Studies, and Hydrazine Compatibility Testing for the GPM Core Spacecraft Propellant Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Robert H.; Moore, N. R.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an ongoing Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) project whose basic objective is to improve global precipitation measurements. It has been decided that the GPM spacecraft is to be a "design for demise" spacecraft. This requirement resulted in the need for a propellant tank that would also demise or ablate to an appropriate degree upon re-entry. This paper will describe GSFC-performed spacecraft and tankage demise analyses, vendor conceptual design studies, and vendor performed hydrazine compatibility and wettability tests performed on 6061 and 2219 aluminum alloys.

  16. Deriving solar transient characteristics from single spacecraft STEREO/HI elongation variations: a theoretical assessment of the technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Williams

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a technique has been developed whereby the radial velocity, Vr, and longitude direction, β, of propagation of an outward-moving solar transient, such as a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME, can be estimated from its track in a time-elongation map produced using Heliospheric Imager (HI observations from a single STEREO spacecraft. The method employed, which takes advantage of an artefact of projective geometry, is based on the evaluation of the best fit of the time-elongation profile of the transient, extracted from a time-elongation map, to a set of theoretical functions corresponding to known combinations of radial velocity and direction; here we present an initial theoretical assessment of the efficacy of this technique. As the method relies on the manual selection of points along the time-elongation profile, an assessment of the accuracy with which this is feasible, is initially made. The work then presented assesses theoretically this method of recovering the velocity and propagation direction of solar transients from their time-elongation profiles using a Monte-Carlo simulation approach. In particular, we assess the range of elongations over which it is necessary to make observations in order to accurately recover these parameters. Results of the Monte-Carlo simulations suggest that it is sufficient to track a solar transient out to around 40° elongation to provide accurate estimates of its associated radial velocity and direction; the accuracy to which these parameters can be estimated for a transient tracked over a particular elongation extent is, however, sensitive to its velocity and direction relative to the Sun-Spacecraft line. These initial results suggest that this technique based on single spacecraft STEREO/HI observations could prove extremely useful in terms of providing an early warning of a CME impact on the near-Earth environment.

  17. Albedo calculation for single scattering gamma-rays, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical formulae of number albedo and energy albedo for single scattering gamma-rays were given in the form of F2 function, under the assumption that cross-section, energy and attenuation coefficient of backscattered gamma-rays were constant for scattering angles. The results calculated with the analytical formula agreed with those of numerical integration within +-20% error. The more simplified formula was also presented here with a correcting term. This formula is practically useful in estimating albedo of single scattering gamma-rays with in an accuracy of 10% for most materials of a finite thickness in the incident energy ranges of 0.05 to 3 MeV. (auth.)

  18. Fixed-Star Tracking Attitude Control of Spacecraft Using Single-Gimbal Control Moment Gyros

    OpenAIRE

    Sangwon Kwon; Yuki Tani; Hiroshi Okubo; Takashi Shimomura

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: A cluster of small-sized Single-Gimbal Control Moment Gyros (SGCMGs) is proposed as an attitude control actuator for high-speed maneuver of small satellites. There exists a singularity problem what is peculiar to the CMG system. Approach: This study presented a simple singularity avoidance steering law using the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) algorithm. Results: Capability of the present steering method in singularity avoidance was demonstrated with numerical simulation...

  19. Stereoscopic electron spectroscopy of solar hard X-ray flares with a single spacecraft

    OpenAIRE

    Kontar, Eduard P.; John C. Brown

    2006-01-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) spectroscopy is the most direct method of diagnosing energetic electrons in solar flares. Here we present a technique which allows us to use a single HXR spectrum to determine an effectively stereoscopic electron energy distribution. Considering the Sun's surface to act as a 'Compton mirror' allows us to look at emitting electrons also from behind the source, providing vital information on downward-propagating particles. Using this technique we determine simultaneously the el...

  20. Spacecraft attitude maneuver using two single-gimbal control moment gyros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Shinya; Kojima, Hirohisa; Satoh, Mitsunori

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, arbitrary rest-to-rest attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using two single-gimbal control moment gyros (2SGCMGs) are considered. Although single-gimbal control moment gyros are configured in the same manner as the traditional pyramid-array CMG, only two CMGs are assumed to be available. Attitude maneuver problems are similar to problems involving two reaction wheels (RWs) from the viewpoint of the number of actuators. In other words, the problem treated herein is a kind of underactuated problem. Although 2SGCMGs can generate torques around all axes, they cannot generate torques around each axis independently. Therefore, control methods designed for a satellite using two reaction wheels cannot be applied to three-axis attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using 2SGCMGs. In this paper, for simplicity, maneuvers around the x- and z-axes are first considered, and then a maneuver around the y-axis due to the corning effect resulting from the maneuver around the x- and z-axes is considered. Since maneuvers around each axis are established by the proposed method, arbitrary attitude maneuvers can be achieved using 2SGCMGs. In addition, the maneuvering angles around the z- and x-axes, which are required in order to maneuver around the y-axis, are analytically determined, and the total time required for maneuvering around the y-axis is then analyzed numerically.

  1. Fixed-Star Tracking Attitude Control of Spacecraft Using Single-Gimbal Control Moment Gyros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwon Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A cluster of small-sized Single-Gimbal Control Moment Gyros (SGCMGs is proposed as an attitude control actuator for high-speed maneuver of small satellites. There exists a singularity problem what is peculiar to the CMG system. Approach: This study presented a simple singularity avoidance steering law using the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD algorithm. Results: Capability of the present steering method in singularity avoidance was demonstrated with numerical simulations for fixed-star tracking control of a small satellite using four SGCMGs. Conclusion: The proposed steering law utilizes the singular value decomposition to obtain singular vectors and generates the command gimbal rate that keeps the command torque in the direction orthogonal to the singular direction with a maximum gain.

  2. Full major-shell calculation for states that were degenerate in a single-j-shell calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Escuderos, A.; Robinson, S. J. Q.; Zamick, L.

    2005-01-01

    A full fp calculation is performed for states which were degenerate in a single-j-shell calculation in which isospin-zero two-body matrix elements were set to zero energy. Most of the splitting in a complete shell calculation (but not all) comes from the T=0 part of the interaction.

  3. Spacecraft camera image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Chan, Fred N. T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system for achieving spacecraft camera (1, 2) image registration comprises a portion external to the spacecraft and an image motion compensation system (IMCS) portion onboard the spacecraft. Within the IMCS, a computer (38) calculates an image registration compensation signal (60) which is sent to the scan control loops (84, 88, 94, 98) of the onboard cameras (1, 2). At the location external to the spacecraft, the long-term orbital and attitude perturbations on the spacecraft are modeled. Coefficients (K, A) from this model are periodically sent to the onboard computer (38) by means of a command unit (39). The coefficients (K, A) take into account observations of stars and landmarks made by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2) themselves. The computer (38) takes as inputs the updated coefficients (K, A) plus synchronization information indicating the mirror position (AZ, EL) of each of the spacecraft cameras (1, 2), operating mode, and starting and stopping status of the scan lines generated by these cameras (1, 2), and generates in response thereto the image registration compensation signal (60). The sources of periodic thermal errors on the spacecraft are discussed. The system is checked by calculating measurement residuals, the difference between the landmark and star locations predicted at the external location and the landmark and star locations as measured by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2).

  4. Atomic Calculations with a One-Parameter, Single Integral Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretty, Reinaldo; Garcia, Carmelo

    1989-01-01

    Presents an energy function E(p) containing a single integral and one variational parameter, alpha. Represents all two-electron integrals within the local density approximation as a single integral. Identifies this as a simple treatment for use in an introductory quantum mechanics course. (MVL)

  5. Research on Spacecraft Illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cai

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Illumination analysis of spacecraft is very important. This paper firstly introduces the importance of spacecraft illumination analysis in aerospace fields and points out that illumination conditions will influence the design of shape of spacecraft body and the installation of spacecraft equipments. Then, it discusses two methods for analyzing spacecraft solar-panel shadow and illumination conditions: ray tracing illumination algorithm and polyhedral mesh contour edge projection algorithm and compares their efficiency and feasibility. Shadow area and solar area are computed of every cell on solar panels. We designed solar panel single-axis rotation experiment to validate the proposed algorithm. The experimental results show that contour edge projection algorithm has fine accuracy and costs less time. For detailed illumination information, we apply a practical segment clipping algorithm after some comparisons.

  6. Calculating ultra-low-frequency wave power of the compressional magnetic field vs. L and time: multi-spacecraft analysis using the Van Allen probes, THEMIS and GOES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Theodore E.; Li, Xinlin

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-low-frequency (ULF) pulsations are critical in radial diffusion processes of energetic particles, and the power spectral density (PSD) of these fluctuations is an integral part of the radial diffusion coefficients and of assimilative models of the radiation belts. Using simultaneous measurements from two Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) geosynchronous satellites, three satellites of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft constellation and the two Van Allen probes during a 10-day period of intense geomagnetic activity and ULF pulsations of October 2012, we calculate the PSDs of ULF pulsations at different L shells. By following the time history of measurements at different L it is shown that, during this time, ULF wave power is not enhanced uniformly throughout the magnetosphere but instead is mostly enhanced in the outer L shells, close to the magnetopause, and to a lesser extent in the inner magnetosphere, closer to the plasmapause. Furthermore, by using phase differences between two GOES geosynchronous satellite pairs, we estimate the daily-averaged distribution of power at different azimuthal wave numbers. These results can have significant implications in better defining the effect of radial diffusion in the phase space density of energetic particles for different wave numbers or L shell distributions of ULF power.

  7. Single event upset cross section calculation for secondary particles induced by proton using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on Monte-Carlo software Geant4, a model for calculating the proton single event upset (SEU) cross section of SRAM cell was presented. The secondary particles induced by protons were considered and effective sensitive regions were determined according to the range of the secondary particles. The single event upset and multiple bits upset (MBU) cross sections for protons with different energy were calculated. The results are in agreement with the theoretical and experimental data. (authors)

  8. Optimizing the calculation of DM,CO and VC via the single breath single oxygen tension DLCO/NO method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Kirsten E; Taylor, Bryan J; Carlson, Alex R; Wentz, Robert J; Johnson, Bruce D

    2016-01-15

    Alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (D(M,CO)) and pulmonary-capillary blood volume (V(C)) are calculated via lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL(CO)) and nitric oxide (DL(NO)) using the single breath, single oxygen tension (single-FiO2) method. However, two calculation parameters, the reaction rate of carbon monoxide with blood (θ(CO)) and the D(M,NO)/D(M,CO) ratio (α-ratio), are controversial. This study systematically determined optimal θ(CO) and α-ratio values to be used in the single-FiO2 method that yielded the most similar D(M,CO) and V(C) values compared to the 'gold-standard' multiple-FiO2 method. Eleven healthy subjects performed single breath DL(CO)/DL(NO) maneuvers at rest and during exercise. D(M,CO) and V(C) were calculated via the single-FiO2 and multiple-FiO2 methods by implementing seven θ(CO) equations and a range of previously reported α-ratios. The RP θ(CO) equation (Reeves, R.B., Park, H.K., 1992. Respiration Physiology 88 1-21) and an α-ratio of 4.0-4.4 yielded DM,CO and VC values that were most similar between methods. The RP θ(CO) equation and an experimental α-ratio should be used in future studies. PMID:26521031

  9. Spacecraft sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spacecraft sterilization is a vital factor in projects for the successful biological exploration of other planets. The microorganisms of major concern are the fungi and bacteria. Sterilization procedures are oriented toward the destruction of bacterial spores. Gaseous sterilants are examined, giving attention to formaldehyde, beta-propiolactone, ethylene oxide, and the chemistry of the bactericidal action of sterilants. Radiation has been seriously considered as another method for spacecraft sterilization. Dry heat sterilization is discussed together with the effects of ethylene oxide decontamination and dry heat sterilization on materials.

  10. Theoretical calculations of thermophysical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube bundles are promising thermal interfacial materials due to their excellent thermal and mechanical characteristics. In this study, the phonon dispersion relations and density of states of the single-wall carbon nanotube bundles are calculated by using the force constant model. The calculation results show that the inter-tube interaction leads to a significant frequency raise of the low frequency modes. To verify the applied calculation method, the specific heat of a single single-wall carbon nanotube is calculated first based on the obtained phonon dispersion relations and the results coincide well with the experimental data. Moreover, the specific heat of the bundles is calculated and exhibits a slight reduction at low temperatures in comparison with that of the single tube. The thermal conductivity of the bundles at low temperatures is calculated by using the ballistic transport model. The calculation results indicate that the inter-tube interaction, i.e. van der Waals interaction, hinders heat transfer and cannot be neglected at extremely low temperatures. For (5, 5) bundles, the relative difference of the thermal conductivity caused by ignoring inter-tube effect reaches the maximum value of 26% around 17 K, which indicates the significant inter-tube interaction effect on the thermal conductivity at low temperatures. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  11. Theoretical calculations of thermophysical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Ting-Ting; Song Meng-Xuan; Ma Wei-Gang; Zhang Xing

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube bundles are promising thermal interfacial materials due to their excellent thermal and mechanical characteristics. In this study, the phonon dispersion relations and density of states of the single-wall carbon nanotube bundles are calculated by using the force constant model. The calculation results show that the inter-tube interaction leads to a significant frequency raise of the low frequency modes. To verify the applied calculation method, the specific heat of a single single-wall carbon nanotube is calculated first based on the obtained phonon dispersion relations and the results coincide well with the experimental data. Moreover, the specific heat of the bundles is calculated and exhibits a slight reduction at low temperatures in comparison with that of the single tube. The thermal conductivity of the bundles at low temperatures is calculated by using the ballistic transport model. The calculation results indicate that the inter-tube interaction, i.e. van der Waals interaction, hinders heat transfer and cannot be neglected at extremely low temperatures. For (5, 5) bundles, the relative difference of the thermal conductivity caused by ignoring inter-tube effect reaches the maximum value of 26% around 17 K, which indicates the significant inter-tube interaction effect on the thermal conductivity at low temperatures.

  12. Calculation methods for single-sided natural ventilation - simplified or detailed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Plesner, Christoffer; Leprince, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    ) airflow. The predicted airflow rate from the new and three existing design expressions are compared to full-scale wind tunnel measurements. The new proposed calculation method for single-sided ventilation shows results, limiting the overestimation of air flow rates at especially low driving pressures...... handled. This paper presents a newly developed simplified calculation method for single-sided natural ventilation, which is proposed for the revised standard FprEN 16798-7 (earlier EN 15242:2007) for design of ventilative cooling. The aim for predicting ventilative cooling is to find the most suitable......, while maintaining an acceptable correlation with measurements on average and the authors consider the simplified calculation method well suited for the use in standards such as FprEN 16798-7 for the ventilative cooling effects from single-sided natural ventilation The comparison of different design...

  13. A New Power Calculation Method for Single-Phase Grid-Connected Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    A new method to calculate average active power and reactive power for single-phase systems is proposed in this paper. It can be used in different applications where the output active power and reactive power need to be calculated accurately and fast. For example, a grid-connected photovoltaic...... system in low voltage ride through operation mode requires a power feedback for the power control loop. Commonly, a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) based power calculation method can be adopted in such systems. However, the DFT method introduces at least a one-cycle time delay. The new power calculation...... method, which is based on the adaptive filtering technique, can achieve a faster response. The performance of the proposed method is verified by experiments and demonstrated in a 1 kW single-phase grid-connected system operating under different conditions.Experimental results show the effectiveness of...

  14. Efficient algorithm for current spectral density calculation in single-electron tunneling and hopping

    OpenAIRE

    Sverdlov, Viktor A.; Kinkhabwala, Yusuf A.; Korotkov, Alexander N.

    2005-01-01

    This write-up describes an efficient numerical method for the Monte Carlo calculation of the spectral density of current in the multi-junction single-electron devices and hopping structures. In future we plan to expand this write-up into a full-size paper.

  15. Ventilation system consequence calculations to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the radiological dose and toxicological exposure calculations for an accident scenario involved with the ventilation system used to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101. This tank has been listed on the Hydrogen Watch List

  16. Second-order Born calculation of laser-assisted single ionization of helium by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Born approximation has been extended to second-order Born amplitude in order to describe the laser-assisted single ionization of helium atom by impact of electrons. In this study, we have used a Sturmian basis expansion to perform detailed calculations of the scattering amplitudes. We discuss the influence of varying the incident energy on the angular distribution of the ejected electron. From the analysis of the results, we find that second-order calculation is significantly different from the first-order calculation at low incoming energies. It means that the process of the laser-assisted single ionization of helium by slow incident electron requires a double interaction of this electron with the target. (authors)

  17. Spacecraft operations

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmaier, Florian; Schmidhuber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The book describes the basic concepts of spaceflight operations, for both, human and unmanned missions. The basic subsystems of a space vehicle are explained in dedicated chapters, the relationship of spacecraft design and the very unique space environment are laid out. Flight dynamics are taught as well as ground segment requirements. Mission operations are divided into preparation including management aspects, execution and planning. Deep space missions and space robotic operations are included as special cases. The book is based on a course held at the German Space Operation Center (GSOC).

  18. The New Horizons Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Fountain, Glen H; Hersman, Christopher B; Herder, Timothy S; Coughlin, Thomas B; Gibson, William C; Clancy, Deborah A; DeBoy, Christopher C; Hill, T Adrian; Kinnison, James D; Mehoke, Douglas S; Ottman, Geffrey K; Rogers, Gabe D; Stern, S Alan; Stratton, James M; Vernon, Steven R; Williams, Stephen P

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft was launched on 19 January 2006. The spacecraft was designed to provide a platform for seven instruments that will collect and return data from Pluto in 2015. The design drew on heritage from previous missions developed at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and other missions such as Ulysses. The trajectory design imposed constraints on mass and structural strength to meet the high launch acceleration needed to reach the Pluto system prior to the year 2020. The spacecraft subsystems were designed to meet tight mass and power allocations, yet provide the necessary control and data handling finesse to support data collection and return when the one-way light time during the Pluto flyby is 4.5 hours. Missions to the outer solar system require a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) to supply electrical power, and a single RTG is used by New Horizons. To accommodate this constraint, the spacecraft electronics were designed to operate on less than 200 W....

  19. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  20. Single event upsets calculated from new ENDF/B-VI proton and neutron data up to 150 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, M.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Normand, E. [Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Systems, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Single-event upsets (SEU) in microelectronics are calculated from newly-developed silicon nuclear reaction recoil data that extend up to 150 MeV, for incident protons and neutrons. Calculated SEU cross sections are compared with measured data.

  1. Xenia Spacecraft Study Addendum: Spacecraft Cost Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Spencer; Hopkins, Randall

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Xenia spacecraft cost estimates as an addendum for the Xenia Spacecraft study. The NASA/Air Force Cost model (NAFCPOM) was used to derive the cost estimates that are expressed in 2009 dollars.

  2. Guidance and control of swarms of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Daniel James

    using computer simulations. The swarm-keeping problem can be solved by placing the spacecraft on J2-invariant relative orbits, which prevent collisions and minimize the drift of the swarm over hundreds of orbits using a single burn. These orbits are achieved by energy matching the spacecraft to the reference orbit. Additionally, these conditions can be repeatedly applied to minimize the drift of the swarm when atmospheric drag has a large effect (orbits with an altitude under 500 km). The swarm reconfiguration is achieved using two steps: trajectory optimization and assignment. The trajectory optimization problem can be written as a nonlinear, optimal control problem. This optimal control problem is discretized, decoupled, and convexified so that the individual femtosats can efficiently solve the optimization. Sequential convex programming is used to generate the control sequences and trajectories required to safely and efficiently transfer a spacecraft from one position to another. The sequence of trajectories is shown to converge to a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point of the nonconvex problem. In the case where many of the spacecraft are interchangeable, a variable-swarm, distributed auction algorithm is used to determine the assignment of spacecraft to target positions. This auction algorithm requires only local communication and all of the bidding parameters are stored locally. The assignment generated using this auction algorithm is shown to be near optimal and to converge in a finite number of bids. Additionally, the bidding process is used to modify the number of targets used in the assignment so that the reconfiguration can be achieved even when there is a disconnected communication network or a significant loss of agents. Once the assignment is achieved, the trajectory optimization can be run using the terminal positions determined by the auction algorithm. To implement these algorithms in real time a model predictive control formulation is used. Model predictive

  3. Talys calculations for evaluation of neutron-induced single-event upset cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code TALYS has been used to calculate interactions between cosmic-ray neutrons and silicon nuclei with the goal to describe single-event upset (SEU) cross sections in microelectronics devices. Calculations for the Si(n,X) reaction extend over an energy range of 2 to 200 MeV. The obtained energy spectra of the resulting residuals and light-ions have been integrated using several different critical charges as SEU threshold. It is found that the SEU cross section seems largely to be dominated by 28Si recoils from elastic scattering. Furthermore, the shape of the SEU cross section as a function of the energy of the incoming neutron changes drastically with decreasing critical charge. The results presented in this report stress the importance of performing studies at mono-energetic neutron beams to advance the understanding of the underlying mechanisms causing SEUs

  4. FSD- FLEXIBLE SPACECRAFT DYNAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics and Control program (FSD) was developed to aid in the simulation of a large class of flexible and rigid spacecraft. FSD is extremely versatile and can be used in attitude dynamics and control analysis as well as in-orbit support of deployment and control of spacecraft. FSD has been used to analyze the in-orbit attitude performance and antenna deployment of the RAE and IMP class satellites, and the HAWKEYE, SCATHA, EXOS-B, and Dynamics Explorer flight programs. FSD is applicable to inertially-oriented spinning, earth oriented, or gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft. The spacecraft flexibility is treated in a continuous manner (instead of finite element) by employing a series of shape functions for the flexible elements. Torsion, bending, and three flexible modes can be simulated for every flexible element. FSD can handle up to ten tubular elements in an arbitrary orientation. FSD is appropriate for studies involving the active control of pointed instruments, with options for digital PID (proportional, integral, derivative) error feedback controllers and control actuators such as thrusters and momentum wheels. The input to FSD is in four parts: 1) Orbit Construction FSD calculates a Keplerian orbit with environmental effects such as drag, magnetic torque, solar pressure, thermal effects, and thruster adjustments; or the user can supply a GTDS format orbit tape for a particular satellite/time-span; 2) Control words - for options such as gravity gradient effects, control torques, and integration ranges; 3) Mathematical descriptions of spacecraft, appendages, and control systems- including element geometry, properties, attitudes, libration damping, tip mass inertia, thermal expansion, magnetic tracking, and gimbal simulation options; and 4) Desired state variables to output, i.e., geometries, bending moments, fast Fourier transform plots, gimbal rotation, filter vectors, etc. All FSD input is of free format, namelist construction. FSD

  5. Single-step propagators for calculation of time evolution in quantum systems with arbitrary interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Ivan; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-05-01

    We propose and develop a general method of numerical calculation of the wave function time evolution in a quantum system which is described by Hamiltonian of an arbitrary dimensionality and with arbitrary interactions. For this, we obtain a general n-order single-step propagator in closed-form, which could be used for the numerical solving of the problem with any prescribed accuracy. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by considering a quantum problem with non-separable time-dependent Hamiltonian: the propagation of an electron in focused electromagnetic field with vortex electric field component.

  6. Chemisorption of single fluorine atoms on the surface of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes: A model calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margulis, Vl.A. [Department of Physics, N.P. Ogarev Mordovian State University, Saransk 430000 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: 612033@inbox.ru; Muryumin, E.E. [Department of Chemistry, N.P. Ogarev Mordovian State University, Saransk 430000 (Russian Federation)

    2007-03-01

    We report a model calculation of the chemisorption energies {delta}E{sub ads} of single fluorine atoms on the outer surface of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (Z-SWCNTs) (p,0) with p ranging from 11 to 21. A simplified model based on an effective-mass theory is adopted to describe the electronic structure of the nanotubes. Chemisorption is treated within the Anderson-Newns approach, which takes account of Coulomb interaction between adsorbate electrons. Considering adsorption of an adatom directly on top of a surface carbon atom, we find that in the case of a fluorine atom bonded to the sidewall of the nanotubes, the absolute values of {delta}E{sub ads} are in the range 4.3-5.5eV for Z-SWCNTs with typical diameters of 0.86-1.66nm, larger {delta}E{sub ads} values being associated with semiconducting tubes. For the latter ones, {delta}E{sub ads} decreases rather significantly as the radius R of the tubes increases, tending towards the ''infinite'' radius graphene case, whereas for metallic tubes {delta}E{sub ads} slightly increases with increasing R. The localized acceptor states induced by a fluorine atom in the band gap of the semiconducting tubes are found to be responsible for such difference in the behaviour of {delta}E{sub ads} for the two above-mentioned types of tubes. The results obtained shed light on the possible mechanism of the atomic fluorine adsorption-induced hole-doping of the semiconducting tubes, which might significantly affect the transport properties of these tubes.

  7. SRAM single event upset calculation and test using protons in the secondary beam in the BEPC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yuanming; Guo Hongxia; Zhang Fengqi; Zhang Keying; Chen Wei; Luo Yinhong; Guo Xiaoqiang

    2011-01-01

    The protons in the secondary beam in the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) are first analyzed and a large proportion at the energy of 50 100 MeV supply a source gap of high energy protons.In this study,the proton energy spectrum of the secondary beam was obtained and a model for calculating the proton single event upset (SEU) cross section of a static random access memory (SRAM) cell has been presented in the BEPC secondary beam proton radiation environment.The proton SEU cross section for different characteristic dimensions has been calculated.The test of SRAM SEU cross sections has been designed,and a good linear relation between SEUs in SRAM and the fluence was found,which is evidence that an SEU has taken place in the SRAM.The SEU cross sections were measured in SRAM with different dimensions.The test result shows that the SEU cross section per bit will decrease with the decrease of the characteristic dimensions of the device,while the total SEU cross section still increases upon the increase of device capacity.The test data accords with the calculation results,so the high-energy proton SEU test on the proton beam in the BEPC secondary beam could be conducted.

  8. SRAM single event upset calculation and test using protons in the secondary beam in the BEPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuanming; Guo Hongxia; Zhang Fengqi; Zhang Keying; Chen Wei; Luo Yinhong; Guo Xiaoqiang, E-mail: wangym2007@gmail.com [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2011-09-15

    The protons in the secondary beam in the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) are first analyzed and a large proportion at the energy of 50-100 MeV supply a source gap of high energy protons. In this study, the proton energy spectrum of the secondary beam was obtained and a model for calculating the proton single event upset (SEU) cross section of a static random access memory (SRAM) cell has been presented in the BEPC secondary beam proton radiation environment. The proton SEU cross section for different characteristic dimensions has been calculated. The test of SRAM SEU cross sections has been designed, and a good linear relation between SEUs in SRAM and the fluence was found, which is evidence that an SEU has taken place in the SRAM. The SEU cross sections were measured in SRAM with different dimensions. The test result shows that the SEU cross section per bit will decrease with the decrease of the characteristic dimensions of the device, while the total SEU cross section still increases upon the increase of device capacity. The test data accords with the calculation results, so the high-energy proton SEU test on the proton beam in the BEPC secondary beam could be conducted. (semiconductor physics)

  9. SRAM single event upset calculation and test using protons in the secondary beam in the BEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protons in the secondary beam in the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) are first analyzed and a large proportion at the energy of 50-100 MeV supply a source gap of high energy protons. In this study, the proton energy spectrum of the secondary beam was obtained and a model for calculating the proton single event upset (SEU) cross section of a static random access memory (SRAM) cell has been presented in the BEPC secondary beam proton radiation environment. The proton SEU cross section for different characteristic dimensions has been calculated. The test of SRAM SEU cross sections has been designed, and a good linear relation between SEUs in SRAM and the fluence was found, which is evidence that an SEU has taken place in the SRAM. The SEU cross sections were measured in SRAM with different dimensions. The test result shows that the SEU cross section per bit will decrease with the decrease of the characteristic dimensions of the device, while the total SEU cross section still increases upon the increase of device capacity. The test data accords with the calculation results, so the high-energy proton SEU test on the proton beam in the BEPC secondary beam could be conducted. (semiconductor physics)

  10. Research on Spacecraft Illumination

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Cai; Ling Li; Jing Hu; Biao He; Yuan Long; Dengyi Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Illumination analysis of spacecraft is very important. This paper firstly introduces the importance of spacecraft illumination analysis in aerospace fields and points out that illumination conditions will influence the design of shape of spacecraft body and the installation of spacecraft equipments. Then, it discusses two methods for analyzing spacecraft solar-panel shadow and illumination conditions: ray tracing illumination algorithm and polyhedral mesh contour edge projection algorithm and...

  11. Ab-initio calculation of n-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margine, Elena R.; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2004-03-01

    We study charge-induced changes in shape and electronic structure for n-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes within density functional theory. A certain nearly free electron state is downshifted in the presence of extra electrons. A similar effect has been seen in potassium-doped carbon nanotubes [1], where the downshift was attributed to the hybridization of the nearly free electron state with the K 4s state. In the present calculation the negative charge is neutralized by a uniform positive background, so the downshift must arise from a different effect. The state crosses the Fermi level at a charge per carbon atom of 0.04 for all the tubes studied. Connections are made to recent experiments in the group of P. Eklund.[1]Yoshiyuki Miyamoto, Angel Rubio, X. Blase, Marvin L. Cohen, and Steven G. Louie PRL 74, 2993 (1995)

  12. SYN3D: a single-channel, spatial flux synthesis code for diffusion theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. H.

    1976-07-01

    This report is a user's manual for SYN3D, a computer code which uses single-channel, spatial flux synthesis to calculate approximate solutions to two- and three-dimensional, finite-difference, multigroup neutron diffusion theory equations. SYN3D is designed to run in conjunction with any one of several one- and two-dimensional, finite-difference codes (required to generate the synthesis expansion functions) currently being used in the fast reactor community. The report describes the theory and equations, the use of the code, and the implementation on the IBM 370/195 and CDC 7600 of the version of SYN3D available through the Argonne Code Center.

  13. Numerical calculation and analysis of radial force on the single-action vane pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unbalanced radial force is a serious adversity that restricts the working pressure and reduces service life of the single-action vane pump. For revealing and predicting the distribution of radial force on the rotor, a numerical simulation about its transient flow field was performed by using dynamic mesh method with RNG κ ε-turbulent model. The details of transient flow characteristic and pressure fluctuation were obtained, and the radial force and periodic variation can be calculated based on the details. The results show: the radial force has a close relationship with the pressure pulsation; the radial force can be reduced drastically by optimizing the angle of port plate and installing the V-shaped cavity; if the odd number vanes are chosen, it will help reduce the radial force of rotor and optimize the pressure fluctuation effectively

  14. Monte Carlo calculations of PET coincidence timing: single and double-ended readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Monte Carlo computational methods for estimating the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillator detector pairs in positron emission tomography (PET) and present results for Lu2SiO5 : Ce (LSO), LaBr3 : Ce, and a hypothetical ultra-fast scintillator with a 1 ns decay time. The calculations were applied to both single-ended and double-ended photodetector readout with constant-fraction triggering. They explicitly include (1) the intrinsic scintillator properties (luminosity, rise time, decay time, and index of refraction), (2) the exponentially distributed depths of interaction, (3) the optical photon transport efficiency, delay, and time dispersion, (4) the photodetector properties (fill factor, quantum efficiency, transit time jitter, and single electron response), and (5) the determination of the constant fraction trigger level that minimizes the CRT. The calculations for single-ended readout include the delayed photons from the opposite reflective surface. The calculations for double-ended readout include (1) the simple average of the two photodetector trigger times, (2) more accurate estimators of the annihilation photon entrance time using the pulse height ratio to estimate the depth of interaction and correct for annihilation photon, optical photon, and trigger delays, and (3) the statistical lower bound for interactions at the center of the crystal. For time-of-flight (TOF) PET we combine stopping power and TOF information in a figure of merit equal to the sensitivity gain relative to whole-body non-TOF PET using LSO.For LSO crystals 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  30 mm, a decay time of 37 ns, a total photoelectron count of 4000, and a photodetector with 0.2 ns full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) timing jitter, single-ended readout has a CRT of 0.16 ns fwhm and double-ended readout has a CRT of 0.111 ns fwhm. For LaBr3 : Ce crystals 3 mm  ×  3 mm  ×  30 mm, a rise time of 0.2 ns, a decay time of 18

  15. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Krupnikov, K K; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language.

  16. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language

  17. Calculation of theoretical chromospheric models and the interpretation of solar spectra from rockets and spacecraft. Semiannual Report, 1 January-31 December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculated results based on two chromospheric flare models F1 and F2 of Machado, et al., (1980) are presented. Two additional models are included: F1*, which has enhanced temperatures relative to the weak-flare model F1 in the upper photosphere and low chromosphere, and F3 which has enhanced temperatures relative to the strong flare model F2 in the upper chromosphere. Each model is specified by means of a given variation of the temperature as a function of column mass. The corresponding variation of particle density and the geometrical height scale are determined by assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The coupled equations of statistical equilibrium is solved as is radiative transfer for H, H-, He I-II, C I-IV, Si I-II, Mg I-II, Fe, Al, O I-II, Na, and Ca II. The overall absorption and emission of radiation by lines throughout the spectrum is determined by means of a reduced set of opacities sampled from a compilation of over 10 to the 7th power individual lines. That the white flight flare continuum may arise by extreme chromospheric overheating as well as by an enhancement of the minimum temperature region is also shown. The radiative cooling rate calculations for our brightest flare model suggest that chromospheric overheating provides enhanced radiation that could cause significant heating deep in the flare atmosphere

  18. Simulating spacecraft systems

    CERN Document Server

    Eickhoff, Jens

    2009-01-01

    This book on the application of functional system simulation in spacecraft development covers the entire process from spacecraft design to final verification. It offers the latest research in all relevant topics and includes numerous examples.

  19. Spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    been based entirely on direct human supervision and control. This paper describes a vision-based system and methodology, that autonomously generates accurate guidance information that may assist a human operator in performing the tasks associated with both the rendezvous and docking navigation...... procedures. The method described generates, based on a single camera and a priory information about the target vehicle and orbit data, all necessary guidance information for closed-loop autonomous navigation, from first detection at far distance, to a close up a hold point. Furthermore, the system provide......The phenomenons and problems encountered when a rendezvous manoeuvre, and possible docking, of two spacecrafts has to be performed, have been the topic for numerous studies, and, details of a variety of scenarios has been analysed. So far, all solutions that has been brought into realization has...

  20. Radial Dose Profiles: Calculation Refinements and Sensitivities to Single Event Effects Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jeffrey; Swimm, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Comparisons of radial dose calculation are performed, as well as the introduction of important physics to improve the calculation techniques. Also, the consequences to device performance are explored via numerical simulations.

  1. Ab Initio Calculations of Differential Cross Sections for Single Charge Transfer in 3He2++4 He Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yong; YAN Bing; LIU Ling; WANG Jian-Guo

    2007-01-01

    The single charge transfer process in 3 He2+ + 4He collisions is investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecularorbital close-coupling method, in which the adiabatic potentials and radial couplings are calculated by using the ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction methods. The differential cross sections for the single charge transfer are presented at the laboratorial energies E = 6kev and 10keV for the projectile 3He2+. Comparison with the existing data shows that the present results are better in agreement with the experimental measurements than other calculations in the dominant small angle scattering, which is attributed to the accurate calculations of the adiabatic potentials and the radial couplings.

  2. EARLINET Single Calculus Chain - technical - Part 2: Calculation of optical products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattis, Ina; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Baars, Holger; Amodeo, Aldo; Madonna, Fabio; Iarlori, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present the automated software tool ELDA (EARLINET Lidar Data Analyzer) for the retrieval of profiles of optical particle properties from lidar signals. This tool is one of the calculus modules of the EARLINET Single Calculus Chain (SCC) which allows for the analysis of the data of many different lidar systems of EARLINET in an automated, unsupervised way. ELDA delivers profiles of particle extinction coefficients from Raman signals as well as profiles of particle backscatter coefficients from combinations of Raman and elastic signals or from elastic signals only. Those analyses start from pre-processed signals which have already been corrected for background, range dependency and hardware specific effects. An expert group reviewed all algorithms and solutions for critical calculus subsystems which are used within EARLINET with respect to their applicability for automated retrievals. Those methods have been implemented in ELDA. Since the software was designed in a modular way, it is possible to add new or alternative methods in future. Most of the implemented algorithms are well known and well documented, but some methods have especially been developed for ELDA, e.g., automated vertical smoothing and temporal averaging or the handling of effective vertical resolution in the case of lidar ratio retrievals, or the merging of near-range and far-range products. The accuracy of the retrieved profiles was tested following the procedure of the EARLINET-ASOS algorithm inter-comparison exercise which is based on the analysis of synthetic signals. Mean deviations, mean relative deviations, and normalized root-mean-square deviations were calculated for all possible products and three height layers. In all cases, the deviations were clearly below the maximum allowed values according to the EARLINET quality requirements.

  3. Analytical calculation of the RFOC method in single-phase induction motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannati, M.; Monadi, A.; Idris, N. R. N.; Faudzi, A. A. M.

    2016-05-01

    This study discusses the different techniques for speed control of single-phase induction motor with two asymmetrical main and auxiliary windings based on Rotor Field-Oriented Control (RFOC) method. In the presented methods, transformation matrices are introduced and applied to the equations of single-phase induction motor. It is shown by applying these rotational transformations to the unbalanced equations of single-phase induction motor, equations of single-phase induction motor are transformed into symmetrical equations. These rotational transformations are achieved based from the steady-state equivalent circuit of single-phase induction motor. Finally, a method for RFOC of single-phase induction motor is proposed. Results show the good performance of the proposed method.

  4. Calculation Method of Single Well Controlled Reserves Using Data of Production Trends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Xianhong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Single well controlled reserves of offshore oilfields are very large.Sometimes one or two wells are adopted for the development control of the reserves of a certain block.It is of great significance for directing the oilfield adjustment work to know the actual conditions of the single well controlled reserves.Generally, the single well controlled reserves of a well are determined by such methods as volumetric method, well test method and numerical simulation method.

  5. Numerical Calculations of Single-Cell Electroporation with an Electrolyte-Filled Capillary

    OpenAIRE

    Zudans, Imants; Agarwal, Aparna; Orwar, Owe; Weber, Stephen G.

    2007-01-01

    An electric field is focused on one cell in single-cell electroporation. This enables selective electroporation treatment of the targeted cell without affecting its neighbors. While factors that lead to membrane permeation are the same as in bulk electroporation, quantitative description of the single-cell experiments is more complicated. This is due to the fact that the potential distribution cannot be solved analytically. We present single-cell electroporation with an electrolyte-filled cap...

  6. Internet Access to Spacecraft

    OpenAIRE

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Sa...

  7. In-in and δN calculations of the bispectrum from non-attractor single-field inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingang; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Sasaki, Misao

    2013-12-01

    In non-attractor single-field inflation models producing a scale-invariant power spectrum, the curvature perturbation on super-horizon scales grows as Script Rproptoa3. This is so far the only known class of self-consistent single-field models with a Bunch-Davies initial state that can produce a large squeezed-limit bispectrum violating Maldacena's consistency relation. Given the importance of this result, we calculate the bispectrum with three different methods: using quantum field theory calculations in two different gauges, and classical calculations (the δN formalism). All the results agree, giving the local-form bispectrum parameter of flocalNL = 5(1+cs2)/(4cs2). This result is valid for arbitrary values of the speed of sound parameter, cs, for a particular non-attractor model we consider in this paper.

  8. Spacecraft Spin Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides the capability to correct unbalances of spacecraft by using dynamic measurement techniques and static/coupled measurements to provide products of...

  9. Calculation of the detection efficiency in liquid scintillators. I.- Single negatrons emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counting efficiency for 62 single beta emitters has been computed from the beta energy distribution, the figure of merit and the ionization quenching. Efficiency v.s. figure of merit is plotted and tabulated. (Author) 16 refs

  10. CALCULATION OF FINANCIAL INDICATORS IN A SINGLE-ENTRY ACCOUNTING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Arbidāne, Iluta; Poļaka, Gunta; Ruža, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    The company’s accounting data are a base for the analysis of its business performance. As provided by the legislation, the company can choose whether the accountancy is maintained in a single-entry or in a double-entry system. Exploiting the financial analysis formulas, an economic performance analysis could be easily enough performed by the enterprises keeping their accounts in accordance with the accrual principle. If the accounting registers are kept in a single-entry system, data provided...

  11. STRUCTURAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE LIFTING IN VERTICAL ORIENTATION OF 5-DHLW/DOE SNF SINGLE CRM WASTE PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this activity is to determine the structural response of the extension of outer shell (which is referred to as skirt throughout this document) designs of both long and short design concepts of 5-Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) single corrosion resistant material (CRM) waste packages (WP), subjected to a gravitational load in the course of lifting in vertical orientation. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This activity is associated with the WP design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.124, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  12. Open-ended recursive calculation of single residues of response functions for perturbation-dependent basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Daniel H; Ringholm, Magnus; Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-13

    We present theory, implementation, and applications of a recursive scheme for the calculation of single residues of response functions that can treat perturbations that affect the basis set. This scheme enables the calculation of nonlinear light absorption properties to arbitrary order for other perturbations than an electric field. We apply this scheme for the first treatment of two-photon circular dichroism (TPCD) using London orbitals at the Hartree-Fock level of theory. In general, TPCD calculations suffer from the problem of origin dependence, which has so far been solved by using the velocity gauge for the electric dipole operator. This work now enables comparison of results from London orbital and velocity gauge based TPCD calculations. We find that the results from the two approaches both exhibit strong basis set dependence but that they are very similar with respect to their basis set convergence. PMID:26574270

  13. Single- and double-wall carbon nanotubes fully covered with tetraphenylporphyrins: Stability and optoelectronic properties from ab-initio calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The optoelectronic properties of single- and double-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) noncovalently functionalized with tetraphenylporphyrins (TPPs) are addressed by dispersion-corrected ab initio calculations. Five CNT species with different chiralities were considered. We find that the most stable configurations are those where the CNTs are fully covered by TPPs, exhibiting binding energy of about 2~eV/TPP. The semiconducting CNT-TPP compounds show optical response characterized by a strong abso...

  14. A strategy of integrating ultraviolet absorption and crosslinking in a single molecule: DFT calculation and experimental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mingli; Liu, Yujing; Xia, Shuwei; Tang, Qunwei; Yu, Liangmin

    2016-03-01

    Creation of advanced ultraviolet light absorbers having crosslinking ability has been persistent objective for anti-ultraviolent aging polymers. We present here the integration of 2, 4-dihydroxybenzophenone (UV-0) and N-methylol acrylamide (NMA) for novel ultraviolet absorber namely (3,5-dimethacrylamide-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl) (phenyl)methanone (UV-CA), which is subsequently utilized as a crosslinking agent after suffering Friedel-Crafts reaction. The preliminary results demonstrate that quantum chemical calculations (DFT) is a promising avenue in demonstrating the optimized geometry, charges, energy levels and UV electronic absorption bands of the UV-CA in the singlet (steady and excited states). The structure parameters and natural band orbital (NBO) calculations suggest that the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) in the UV-0 group is significantly enhanced in comparison to that between UV-0 and NMA groups. The acrylic acid polymers functionalized with UV-CA yield high crosslinking degree and robust UV absorbing performance. The impressive results demonstrate that quantum chemical calculations are promising in organic synthesis to develop advanced compounds.

  15. Attitude Estimation in Fractionated Spacecraft Cluster Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Blackmore, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An attitude estimation was examined in fractioned free-flying spacecraft. Instead of a single, monolithic spacecraft, a fractionated free-flying spacecraft uses multiple spacecraft modules. These modules are connected only through wireless communication links and, potentially, wireless power links. The key advantage of this concept is the ability to respond to uncertainty. For example, if a single spacecraft module in the cluster fails, a new one can be launched at a lower cost and risk than would be incurred with onorbit servicing or replacement of the monolithic spacecraft. In order to create such a system, however, it is essential to know what the navigation capabilities of the fractionated system are as a function of the capabilities of the individual modules, and to have an algorithm that can perform estimation of the attitudes and relative positions of the modules with fractionated sensing capabilities. Looking specifically at fractionated attitude estimation with startrackers and optical relative attitude sensors, a set of mathematical tools has been developed that specify the set of sensors necessary to ensure that the attitude of the entire cluster ( cluster attitude ) can be observed. Also developed was a navigation filter that can estimate the cluster attitude if these conditions are satisfied. Each module in the cluster may have either a startracker, a relative attitude sensor, or both. An extended Kalman filter can be used to estimate the attitude of all modules. A range of estimation performances can be achieved depending on the sensors used and the topology of the sensing network.

  16. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent

  17. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunt, A. J. G., E-mail: alexander.lunt@eng.ox.ac.uk; Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Korsunsky, A. M. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J. [ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Neo, T. K. [Specialist Dental Group, Mount Elizabeth Orchard, 3 Mount Elizabeth, #08-03/08-08/08-10, Singapore 228510 (Singapore)

    2014-08-07

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  18. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, A. J. G.; Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.; Neo, T. K.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  19. Prototype particulate stack sampler with single-cut nozzle and microcomputer calculating/display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype particulate stack sampler (PPSS) has been developed to improve on the existing EPA Method 5 sampling apparatus. Its primary features are (1) higher sampling rate (56 1/min); (2) display (on demand) of all required variables and calculated values by a microcomputer-based calculating and display system; (3) continuous stack gas moisture determination; (4) a virtual impactor nozzle with 3 μm mass median diameter cutpoint which collects fine and coarse particle fractions on separate glass fiber filters; (5) a variable-area inlet to maintain isokinetic sampling conditions; and (6) conversion to stainless steel components from the glass specified by EPA Method 5. The basic sampling techniques of EPA Method 5 have been retained; however, versatility in the form of optional in-stack filters and general modernization of the stack sampler have been provided in the prototype design. Laboratory testing with monodisperse dye aerosols has shown the present variable inlet, virtual impactor nozzle to have a collection efficiency which is less than 77% and significant wall losses. This is primarily due to lack of symmetry in this rectangular jet impactor and short transition lengths dictated by physical design constraints (required passage of the nozzle through a 7.6 cm (3 in) diameter stack port). Electronic components have shown acceptable service in laboratory testing although no field testing of the prototype under a broad range of temperature, humidity, and SO2 concentration has been undertaken

  20. Variational R-matrix calculations for singly and doubly excited singlet gerade channels in H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variational ab initio R-matrix theory is combined with generalized multichannel quantum defect theory, implemented in spheroidal coordinates, to calculate clamped-nuclei 1Σg+, 1 product g, and 1Δg+ electron-ion scattering phase shift matrices for H2. The calculations cover the bound state region below H2+ 1σg, the resonance region between H2+ 1σg and H2+ 1σu, and they extend beyond the H2+ 1σu threshold. They span the range of internuclear distances 1≤R≤5 a.u. The use of spheroidal instead of spherical coordinates allows a restricted partial wave expansion to be used, thus yielding a compact set of interaction parameters pertaining to the electron-ion scattering dynamics in H2. The accuracy of our fixed-nuclei quantum defects is generally of the order of about 0.02. At the same time the quantum defect matrices obtained here exhibit a smooth behavior across the ionization thresholds and their elements also vary rather smoothly with internuclear distance. These results represent a step toward the goal of constructing a unfied theoretical description of ionization and dissociation fragmentation dynamics of H2

  1. Optical reflection, transmission and absorption properties of single-layer black phosphorus from a model calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Vl A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    An effective anisotropic tight-binding model is developed to analytically describe the low-energy electronic structure and optical response of phosphorene (a black phosphorus (BP) monolayer). Within the framework of the model, we derive explicit closed-form expressions, in terms of elementary functions, for the elements of the optical conductivity tensor of phosphorene. These relations provide a convenient parametrization of the highly anisotropic optical response of phosphorene, which allows the reflectance, transmittance, and absorbance of this material to be easily calculated as a function of the frequency of the incident radiation at arbitrary angles of incidence. The results of such a calculation are presented for both a free-standing phosphorene layer and the phosphorene layer deposited on a {{SiO}}2 substrate, and for the two principal cases of polarization of the incident radiation either parallel to or normal to the plane of incidence. Our findings (e.g., a ‘quasi-Brewster’ effect in the reflectance of the phosphorene/{{SiO}}2 overlayer system) pave the way for developing a new, purely optical method of distinguishing BP monolayers.

  2. Calculating Hurst exponent and neutron monitor data in a single parallel algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussainov, A. S.; Kussainov, S. G.

    2015-09-01

    We implemented an algorithm for simultaneous parallel calculation of the Hurst exponent H and the fractal dimension D for the time series of interest. Parallel programming environment was provided by OpenMPI library installed on three machines networked in the virtual cluster and operated by Debian Wheeze operating system. We applied our program for a comparative analysis of week and a half long, one minute resolution, six channels data from neutron monitor. To ensure a faultless functioning of the written code we applied it to analysis of the random Gaussian noise signal and time series with manually introduced self-affinity features. Both of them have the well-known values of H and D. All results are in good correspondence with each other and supported by the modern theories on signal processing thus confirming the validity of the implemented algorithms. Our code could be used as a standalone tool for the different time series data analysis as well as for the further work on development and optimization of the parallel algorithms for the time series parameters calculations.

  3. Single universal curve for Alpha decay derived from semi-microscopic calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, M; Ellithi, A Y; Abdurrahman, A

    2015-01-01

    The universal curve is one of the simple ways to get preliminary information about the Alpha-decay half-life times of heavy nuclei. We try to find parameterization for the universal curve of Alpha decay based on semi-microscopic calculations, starting from the realistic M3Y-Reid nucleon-nucleon interaction. Within the deformed density-dependent cluster model, the penetration probability and the assault frequency are calculated using the WKB penetration probability. The deformations of daughter nuclei and the ground-state spin and parity of the involved nuclei are considered. We found that it is accurate enough to express the assault frequency, for all studied decays, either as a function of the mass number of the parent nuclei or as a constant average value. The average preformation probability of the Alpha cluster inside four groups of 166 even(Z)-even(N), 117 odd-even, 141 even-odd, and 72 odd-odd Alpha-emitters are obtained, individually. The effect of participating unpaired nucleons in the involved nuclei...

  4. Spacecraft momentum control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leve, Frederick A; Peck, Mason A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this book is to serve both as a practical technical reference and a resource for gaining a fuller understanding of the state of the art of spacecraft momentum control systems, specifically looking at control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). As a result, the subject matter includes theory, technology, and systems engineering. The authors combine material on system-level architecture of spacecraft that feature momentum-control systems with material about the momentum-control hardware and software. This also encompasses material on the theoretical and algorithmic approaches to the control of space vehicles with CMGs. In essence, CMGs are the attitude-control actuators that make contemporary highly agile spacecraft possible. The rise of commercial Earth imaging, the advances in privately built spacecraft (including small satellites), and the growing popularity of the subject matter in academic circles over the past decade argues that now is the time for an in-depth treatment of the topic. CMGs are augmented ...

  5. Spacecraft Material Outgassing Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of outgassing data of materials intended for spacecraft use were obtained at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), utilizing equipment developed...

  6. Spacecraft Power Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will develop the Spacecraft Power Monitor (SPM) which will use non-intrusive electrical monitoring (NEMO). NEMO transforms the power...

  7. Ground Experimental Research on Autonomous Thermal Control of Single-Phase Fluid Loop for Micro or Mini Spacecraft%微小航天器单相流体回路自主热控地面实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘东晓; 李运泽; 李淼; 李明敏; 李运华

    2012-01-01

    单相流体回路是解决微小航天器热控问题的一种重要手段,但是由于其内热源功率密度高、轨道热环境变化复杂,要求其具有高度自适应控制能力.为满足开展微小航天器单相流体回路自主热控研究的需要,提出了一种单相流体回路核心部件-微机械泵的PWM控制策略及实现算法,设计并搭建了其地面等效模拟实验装置,实现了该单相流体回路包括微机械泵驱动电压-压差输入输出关系、热源载荷变化及微机械泵转速变化的开环动态特性实验研究,并在此基础上完成了所提出的单相流体回路自主控制方法控制效果的地面等效模拟实验研究,达到±0.5℃以内的自主控温效果.该控制策略除了可以实现高精度自主控温以外,由于机械泵功耗基本上与热载荷成正比,还可以减少热控系统运行能耗,因而在能量供应有限的微小航天器上具有广阔应用前景.%Single-phase fluid loop is an important means to solve thermal control problem of micro or mini spacecraft, however, high adaptive control ability is required due to its high power density internal heat source and complex changing orbital thermal environment. To meet the need of carrying out experimental research on single-phase fluid loop autonomous thermal control for micro or mini spacecrafts, a kind of PWM control strategy and algorithm implementation on single-phase fluid loop core component-micro mechanical pump are proposed, and ground equivalent simulation experiment equipment is designed and built. Then, the experimental research an open-loop dynamic characteristics including input-output relationship testing between micro mechanical pump driving voltage and pressure difference, heat source payload change and micro mechanical pump speed change is performed for a single-phase fluid loop. On the basis of this, ground equivalent simulation experiment research on control effect of the proposed single-phase fluid

  8. NASA spacecraft propulsion activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Francis M.; Tyburski, Timothy E.; Sankovic, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Sovey, James S.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA's activities in the development of spacecraft propulsion systems are reviewed, with emphasis on program directions and recent progress made in this domain. The recent trends towards the use of smaller spacecraft and launch vehicles call for new onboard propulsion systems. The NASA's efforts are conducted within the framework of the onboard propulsion program. The research and development work carried out in relation to the different propulsion system technologies are considered: electromagnetic systems; electrostatic systems; electrothermal systems; bipropellant systems; and monopropellant systems.

  9. Orbital spacecraft resupply technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Tracey, T. R.; Bailey, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The resupplying of orbital spacecraft using the Space Shuttle, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle, Orbital Transfer Vehicle or a depot supply at a Space Station is studied. The governing factor in fluid resupply designs is the system size with respect to fluid resupply quantities. Spacecraft propellant management for tankage via diaphragm or surface tension configurations is examined. The capabilities, operation, and application of adiabatic ullage compression, ullage exchange, vent/fill/repressurize, and drain/vent/no-vent fill/repressurize, which are proposed transfer methods for spacecraft utilizing tankage configurations, are described. Selection of the appropriate resupply method is dependent on the spacecraft design features. Hydrazine adiabatic compression/detonation, liquid-free vapor venting to prevent freezing, and a method for no-vent liquid filling are analyzed. Various procedures for accurate measurements of propellant mass in low gravity are evaluated; a system of flowmeters with a PVT system was selected as the pressurant solubility and quantity gaging technique. Monopropellant and bipropellant orbital spacecraft consumable resupply system tanks which resupply 3000 lb of hydrazine and 7000 lb of MMH/NTO to spacecraft on orbit are presented.

  10. Convergence of CI single center calculations of positron-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mitroy, J

    2006-01-01

    The Configuration Interaction (CI) method using orbitals centered on the nucleus has recently been applied to calculate the interactions of positrons interacting with atoms. Computational investigations of the convergence properties of binding energy, phase shift and annihilation rate with respect to the maximum angular momentum of the orbital basis for the e^+Cu and PsH bound states, and the e^+-H scattering system were completed. The annihilation rates converge very slowly with angular momentum, and moreover the convergence with radial basis dimension appears to be slower for high angular momentum. A number of methods of completing the partial wave sum are compared, an approach based on a Delta X_J = a/(J + 1/2)^n + b/(J + 1/2)^(n+1) form (with n = 4 for phase shift (or energy) and n = 2 for the annihilation rate) seems to be preferred on considerations of utility and underlying physical justification.

  11. Convergence of configuration-interaction single-center calculations of positron-atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The configuration interaction (CI) method using orbitals centered on the nucleus has recently been applied to calculate the interactions of positrons interacting with atoms. Computational investigations of the convergence properties of binding energy, phase shift, and annihilation rate with respect to the maximum angular momentum of the orbital basis for the e+Cu and PsH bound states, and the e+-H scattering system were completed. The annihilation rates converge very slowly with angular momentum, and moreover the convergence with radial basis dimension appears to be slower for high angular momentum. A number of methods of completing the partial wave sum are compared; an approach based on a ΔXJ=a(J+(1/2))-n+b(J+(1/2))-(n+1) form [with n=4 for phase shift (or energy) and n=2 for the annihilation rate] seems to be preferred on considerations of utility and underlying physical justification

  12. Calculation of photoelectron spectra within the time-dependent configuration interaction singles scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Karamatskou, Antonia; Chen, Yi-Jen; Santra, Robin

    2014-01-01

    We present the extension of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) method to the computation of the electron kinetic-energy spectrum in photoionization processes. Especially for strong and long ionizing light pulses the detection of the photoelectron poses a computational challenge because propagating the outgoing photoelectron wavepacket requires large grid sizes. Two different methods which allow for the extraction of the asymptotic photoelectron momentum are compared regarding their methodological and computational performance. The first method follows the scheme of Tong et al. \\cite{tong} where the photoelectron wavefunction is absorbed by a real splitting function. The second method after Tao and Scrinzi \\cite{scrinzi} measures the flux of the electron wavepacket through a surface at a fixed radius. With both methods the full angle- and energy-resolved photoelectron spectrum is obtained. Combined with the TDCIS scheme it is possible to analyze the dynamics of the outgoing electron i...

  13. Calculation of the Autocorrelation Function of the Stochastic Single Machine Infinite Bus System

    CERN Document Server

    Ghanavati, Goodarz; Lakoba, Taras; Cotilla-Sanchez, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Critical slowing down (CSD) is the phenomenon in which a system recovers more slowly from small perturbations. CSD, as evidenced by increasing signal variance and autocorrelation, has been observed in many dynamical systems approaching a critical transition, and thus can be a useful signal of proximity to transition. In this paper, we derive autocorrelation functions for the state variables of a stochastic single machine infinite bus system (SMIB). The results show that both autocorrelation and variance increase as this system approaches a saddle-node bifurcation. The autocorrelation functions help to explain why CSD can be used as an indicator of proximity to criticality in power systems revealing, for example, how nonlinearity in the SMIB system causes these signs to appear.

  14. In-in and δN calculations of the bispectrum from non-attractor single-field inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xingang [Centre for Theoretical Cosmology, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Komatsu, Eiichiro [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, Garching, 85741 (Germany); Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sasaki, Misao, E-mail: xingang.chen@utdallas.edu, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: komatsu@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: mh.namjoo@ipm.ir, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Yukawa Institute for theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606–8502 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    In non-attractor single-field inflation models producing a scale-invariant power spectrum, the curvature perturbation on super-horizon scales grows as R∝a{sup 3}. This is so far the only known class of self-consistent single-field models with a Bunch-Davies initial state that can produce a large squeezed-limit bispectrum violating Maldacena's consistency relation. Given the importance of this result, we calculate the bispectrum with three different methods: using quantum field theory calculations in two different gauges, and classical calculations (the δN formalism). All the results agree, giving the local-form bispectrum parameter of f{sup local}{sub NL} = 5(1+c{sub s}{sup 2})/(4c{sub s}{sup 2}). This result is valid for arbitrary values of the speed of sound parameter, c{sub s}, for a particular non-attractor model we consider in this paper.

  15. Compact All-optical Parity calculator based on a single all-active Mach-Zehnder Interferometer with an all-SOA amplified feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Petersen, Martin Nordal; Nord, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An all-optical signal processing circuit capable of parity calculations is demonstrated using a single integrated all-active SOA-based MZI, exploiting the integrated SOAs for feedback amplification.......An all-optical signal processing circuit capable of parity calculations is demonstrated using a single integrated all-active SOA-based MZI, exploiting the integrated SOAs for feedback amplification....

  16. Interaction between single vacancies in graphene sheet: An ab initio calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopel, W. L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Freitas, Jair C. C.

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate the interaction between single vacancies in a graphene sheet, we have used spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT). Two distinct configurations were considered, either with the two vacancies located in the same sublattice or in different sublattices, and the effect of changing the separation between the vacancies was also studied. Our results show that the ground state of the system is indeed magnetic, but the presence of the vacancies in the same sublattice or in different sublattices and the possible topological configurations can lead to different contributions from the π and σ orbitals to magnetism. On the other hand, our findings reveal that the net magnetic moment of the system with the two vacancies in the same sublattice move towards the value of the magnetic moment per isolated vacancy with the increase of the distance between the vacancies, which is ascribed to the different contributions due to π electrons. Moreover, it is also found that the local magnetic moments for vacancies in the same sublattice are in parallel configuration, while they have different orientations when the vacancies are created in different sublattices. So, our findings have clearly evidenced how difficult it would be to observe experimentally the emergence of magnetic order in graphene-based systems containing randomly created atomic vacancies, since the energy difference between cases of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order decreases quickly with the increase in the distance separating each vacancy pair.

  17. First-principles calculations on the structure and electronic properties of boron doping zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Calculations have been made for single-walled zigzag(n,0) carbon nanotubes containing substitutional boron impurity atoms using ab initio density functional theory.It is found that the formation energies of these nanotubes depend on the tube diameter,as do the electronic properties,and show periodic fea-ture that results from their different π bonding structures compared to those of perfect zigzag carbon nanotubes.When more boron atoms are incorporated into a single-walled zigzag carbon nanotube,the substitutional boron atoms tend to come together to form structure of BC3 nanodomains,and B-doped tubes have striking acceptor states above the top of the valence bands.For the structure of BC3,there are two kinds of configurations with different electronic structures.

  18. On the feasibility of ab initio electronic structure calculations for Cu using a single s orbital basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Ganesh, E-mail: ganesh.h@ssi.samsung.com; Bowen, R. Chris [Advanced Logic Lab, Samsung Semiconductor Inc., Austin, TX 78754 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The accuracy of a single s-orbital representation of Cu towards enabling multi-thousand atom ab initio calculations of electronic structure is evaluated in this work. If an electrostatic compensation charge of 0.3 electron per atom is used in this basis representation, the electronic transmission in bulk and nanocrystalline Cu can be made to compare accurately to that obtained with a Double Zeta Polarized basis set. The use of this representation is analogous to the use of single band effective mass representation for semiconductor electronic structure. With a basis of just one s-orbital per Cu atom, the representation is extremely computationally efficient and can be used to provide much needed ab initio insight into electronic transport in nanocrystalline Cu interconnects at realistic dimensions of several thousand atoms.

  19. On the feasibility of ab initio electronic structure calculations for Cu using a single s orbital basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of a single s-orbital representation of Cu towards enabling multi-thousand atom ab initio calculations of electronic structure is evaluated in this work. If an electrostatic compensation charge of 0.3 electron per atom is used in this basis representation, the electronic transmission in bulk and nanocrystalline Cu can be made to compare accurately to that obtained with a Double Zeta Polarized basis set. The use of this representation is analogous to the use of single band effective mass representation for semiconductor electronic structure. With a basis of just one s-orbital per Cu atom, the representation is extremely computationally efficient and can be used to provide much needed ab initio insight into electronic transport in nanocrystalline Cu interconnects at realistic dimensions of several thousand atoms

  20. Charge and spin transport in single and packed ruthenium-terpyridine molecular devices: Insight from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morari, C; Buimaga-Iarinca, L; Rungger, I; Sanvito, S; Melinte, S; Rignanese, G-M

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic and transport properties of rutheniumterpyridine molecules sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. We analyse both single and packed molecular devices, more amenable to scaling and realistic integration approaches. The devices display all together robust negative differential resistance features at low bias voltages. Remarkably, the electrical control of the spin transport in the studied systems implies a subtle distribution of the magnetisation density within the biased devices and highlights the key role of the Au(111) electrical contacts. PMID:27550064

  1. On the calculation of single ion activity coefficients in homogeneous ionic systems by application of the grand canonical ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The grand canonical ensemble has been used to study the evaluation of single ion activity coefficients in homogeneous ionic fluids. In this work, the Coulombic interactions are truncated according to the minimum image approximation, and the ions are assumed to be placed in a structureless......, homogeneous dielectric continuum. Grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo calculation results for two primitive model electrolyte solutions are presented. Also, a formula involving the second moments of the total correlation functions is derived from fluctuation theory, which applies for the derivatives of the...... individual ionic activity coefficients with respect to the total ionic concentration. This formula has previously been proposed on the basis of somewhat different considerations....

  2. Ab initio calculations as a quantitative tool in the inelastic neutron scattering study of a single-molecule magnet analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonci, Michele; Giansiracusa, Marcus J; Gable, Robert W; Van den Heuvel, Willem; Latham, Kay; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Yu, Dehong; Mole, Richard A; Soncini, Alessandro; Boskovic, Colette

    2016-02-01

    Ab initio calculations carried out on the Tb analogue of the single-molecule magnet family Na9[Ln(W5O18)2] (Ln = Nd, Gd, Ho and Er) have allowed interpretation of the inelastic neutron scattering spectra. The combined experimental and theoretical approach sheds new light on the sensitivity of the electronic structure of the Tb(III) ground and excited states to small structural distortions from axial symmetry, thus revealing the subtle relationship between molecular geometry and magnetic properties of the two isostructural species that comprise the sample. PMID:26690503

  3. Charge and spin transport in single and packed ruthenium-terpyridine molecular devices: Insight from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morari, C.; Buimaga-Iarinca, L.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Melinte, S.; Rignanese, G.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic and transport properties of rutheniumterpyridine molecules sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. We analyse both single and packed molecular devices, more amenable to scaling and realistic integration approaches. The devices display all together robust negative differential resistance features at low bias voltages. Remarkably, the electrical control of the spin transport in the studied systems implies a subtle distribution of the magnetisation density within the biased devices and highlights the key role of the Au(111) electrical contacts. PMID:27550064

  4. Numerical Calculation and Analysis of Lubricating Water Film Cavitation of A Water Flooded Air Single Screw Compressor

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Rui; Li, Ting; Feng, Quanke; Wu, Weifeng

    2012-01-01

    Reynolds equations and one-phase model with N-S (Navier Stocks) equations are widely used to calculate pressure distribution in the liquid film. In most cases, negative pressure exits in the obtained results. In a water-flooded single screw compressor, it is necessary to investigate the pressure of water film along the whole tooth flank. A negative pressure may not be right, because that when the pressure is lower than the saturated vapor pressure, cavitation occurs. In this paper, we investi...

  5. Dose calculation and dosimetry tests for clinical implementation of 1D tissue-deficit compensation by a single dynamic absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study the possibilities for implementing 1D tissue-deficit compensation techniques by a dynamic single absorber were investigated. This research firstly involved a preliminary examination on the accuracy of a pencil beam-based algorithm, implemented for irregularly shaped photon beams in our 3D treatment planning system (TPS) (Cadplan 2.7, Varian-Dosetek Oy), in calculating dose distributions delivered in 1D non-uniform fields. Once the reliability of the pencil beam (PB) algorithm for dose calculations in non-uniform beams was verified, we proceeded to test the feasibility of tissue-deficit compensation using our single absorber modulator. As an example, we considered a mantle field technique. Materials and methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the method employed in calculating dose distributions delivered in 1D non-uniform fields, three different fluence profiles, which could be considered as a small sample representative of clinically relevant applications, were selected. The incident non-uniform fluences were simulated by the sum of simple blocked fields (i.e. with rectangular 'strip' blocks, one per beam) properly weighed by the 'modulation factors' Fi, defined in each interval of the subdivided profile as the ratio between the desired fluence and the open field fluence. Depth dose distributions in a cubic phantom were then calculated by the TPS and compared with the corresponding doses (at 5 and 10 cm acrylic depths) delivered by the single absorber modulation system. In the present application, the absorber speed profile able to compensate for the tissue deficit along the cranio-caudal direction and then homogenizing the dose distribution on a 'midline' isocentric plane with sufficient accuracy can be directly derived from anatomic data, such as the SSDs (source-skin distances) along the patient contour. The compensation can be verified through portal dosimetry techniques (using a traditional port film system). Results: The

  6. Analytical Investigation of Pumped Fluid Loop Radiators for Orion Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavis, Gretchen

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of pumped fluid loop radiators used in Apollo spacecraft, and the problems and challenges for using them in the Orion Spacecraft. Included in this presentation are the issues of Flow stagnation, flow stability, for single panels and multi-panels.

  7. Single-well injection-withdrawal tests (SWIW). Literature review and scoping calculations for homogeneous crystalline bedrock conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a literature review and scoping calculations carried out in order to test the feasibility of using SWIW (Single Well Injection Withdrawal) tracer experiments for expected hydraulic conditions in Swedish bedrock. The motivation for using SWIW tests in the site investigation programme is that extensive cross-hole tracer tests may not be possible and that such SWIW tests are more or less the only available single-hole tracer test method. The scoping calculations are aimed at establishing conditions under which SWIW tests should be feasible, by studying experimental attributes such as expected bedrock properties (transmissivity, porosity, etc), ambient hydraulic gradients, duration of various experimental phases, hydraulic injection pressure and parameter identification possibilities. Particular emphasis has been placed on the use of the dilution probe as an experimental device for SWIW, although the scoping results also should be considered applicable to any experimental equipment approach. The results from the scoping calculations indicate that SWIW tests using the dilution probe are feasible under the required experimental and site requirements for the forthcoming site investigations programme. The characteristic flow reversibility feature inherent in SWIW tests causes some differences compared with cross-hole tracer tests. Advective parameters (i.e. mobile porosity, dispersivity) are generally more difficult to identify/estimate and the same may also be said about equilibrium sorption. Time-dependent processes, on the other hand, generally benefit from the flow reversibility, in principle even in the presence of heterogeneity. However, it may not always be possible to identify time-dependent processes, such as matrix diffusion, for expected conditions in Swedish bedrock. Experimental aims may be allowed to vary depending on the specific conditions (transmissivity, hydraulic gradient, etc.) in the tested borehole section

  8. Spacecraft at Small NEO

    CERN Document Server

    Scheeres, D

    2006-01-01

    The impact risk has been sharply curtailed for the largest km-sized Near Earth Objects (NEOs) through a concerted period of observation spanning the last decade. Thus the risk of impact has now migrated to the smaller and more numerous members of the Near Earth Object (NEO) population. Characterization and mitigation missions to these smaller objects become more complex from a spacecraft operations perspective, even as the prospects for nudging such lower mass bodies off course become more feasible. This paper details the challenges for spacecraft operations at small bodies and indicates areas where more research and analysis of this problem is needed.

  9. Revamping Spacecraft Operational Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The EPOXI flight mission has been testing a new commercial system, Splunk, which employs data mining techniques to organize and present spacecraft telemetry data in a high-level manner. By abstracting away data-source specific details, Splunk unifies arbitrary data formats into one uniform system. This not only reduces the time and effort for retrieving relevant data, but it also increases operational visibility by allowing a spacecraft team to correlate data across many different sources. Splunk's scalable architecture coupled with its graphing modules also provide a solid toolset for generating data visualizations and building real-time applications such as browser-based telemetry displays.

  10. Spacecraft Radiation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation interface in spacecrafts using radioisotope thermoelectric generators is studied. A Monte Carlo analysis of the radiation field that includes scattered radiation effects, produced neutron and gamma photon isoflux contours as functions of distance from the RTG center line. It is shown that the photon flux is significantly depressed in the RTG axial direction because of selfshielding. Total flux values are determined by converting the uncollided flux values into an equivalent RTG surface source and then performing a Monte Carlo analysis for each specific dose point. Energy distributions of the particle spectra completely define the radiation interface for a spacecraft model.

  11. The nature of single-ion activity coefficients calculated from potentiometric measurements on cells with liquid junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Problem of ionic activity coefficients, determined by potentiometry, is reconsidered. → They are found to be functions of mean activity coefficients and transport numbers of ions. → The finding is verified by calculations and comparing the results with reported data. → Calculations are performed for systems with single electrolytes and binary mixtures. - Abstract: Potentiometric measurements on cells with liquid junctions are sometimes used for calculations of single-ion activity coefficients in electrolyte solutions, the incidence of this being increased recently. As surmised by Guggenheim in the 1930s, such coefficients (of ions i), γi, are actually complicated functions of mean ionic activity coefficients, γ±, and transport numbers of ions, ti. In the present paper specific functions γi(γ±, ti) are derived for a number of cell types with an arbitrary mixture of strong electrolytes in a one-component solvent in the liquid-junction system. The cell types include cells with (i) identical electrodes, (ii) dissimilar electrodes reversible to the same ions, (iii) dissimilar electrodes reversible to ions of opposite charge signs, (iv) dissimilar electrodes reversible to different ions of the same charge sign, and (v) identical reference electrodes and an ion-selective membrane permeable to ions of only one type. Pairs of functions for oppositely charged ions are found to be consistent with the mean ionic activity coefficients as would be expected for pairs of the proper γi quantities by definition of γ±. The functions are tested numerically on some of the reported γi datasets that are the more tractable. A generally good agreement is found with data reported for cells with single electrolytes HCl and KCl in solutions, and with binary mixtures in the liquid-junction systems of KCl from the reference solutions and NaCl and HCl from the test solutions. It is found that values of γi(γ±, ti) functions, in general, do depend on the

  12. First-principles calculations on electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes for H2S gas sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, we performed first-principles calculations by means of density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the interaction of H2S gas on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In order to understand the effect of chirality to the electronic structure of SWNTs/H2S, the pristine SWNTs was varied to become SWNTs (5,0), (6,0), (7,0), (8,0), (9,0), and (10,0). From the calculation we found that after H2S adsorbed on surface of SWNTs, the electronic properties of system changes from semiconductor to metal but not vice versa. It was only SWNTs (5,0), (7,0), (8,0), and (10,0) occuring the changing on its electronic properties behavior, others were remain similar with its initial behavior. In the degassing process, metal return to semiconductor behavior, which is an indication that SWNTs is a good gas sensors, responsive and reversible

  13. Vibrational dynamics of single-crystal YVO4 studied by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Andrea; Giarola, Marco; Rossi, Barbara; Mariotto, Gino; Cazzanelli, Enzo; Speghini, Adolfo

    2012-12-01

    The vibrational properties of yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4) single crystals, with tetragonal zircon structure, have been investigated by means of polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Raman spectra were taken at different polarizations and orientations carefully set by the use of a micromanipulator, so that all of the twelve Raman-active modes, expected on the basis of the group theory, were selected in turn and definitively assigned in wave number and symmetry. In particular the Eg(4) mode, assigned incorrectly in previous literature, has been observed at 387 cm-1. Moreover, the very weak Eg(1) mode, peaked at about 137 cm-1, was clearly observed only under some excitation wavelengths, and its peculiar Raman excitation profile was measured within a wide region of the visible. Finally, ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory have been performed in order to determine both Raman and infrared vibrational modes and to corroborate the experimental results. The rather good agreement between computational and experimental frequencies is slightly better than in previous computational works and supports our experimental symmetry assignments.

  14. Multi-spacecraft observations of earthward flow bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA YuDuan; CAO JinBin; REME Henry; DANDOURAS Iannis; DUNLOP Malcolm; LUCEK Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the plasma,electric and magnetic fields jointly observed by Cluster and the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft in the Earth's magnetotail,we have investigated the earthward flow bursts by introducing the momentum equation in the X-direction in the ideal conditions of magneto hydrodynamics (MHD).One earthward flow burst with a peak in excess of 500 km/s was selected,when the four spacecraft of Cluster were located around -16 RE and TC-1 was located around -10 RE in the X-direction.The inter-spacecraft distances in Y and Z directions were smaller than the statistical spatial scales of the bursty bulk flows.When the Y components of E and -VxB were compared,there was no clear breakdown of the frozen-in condition during the earthward flow burst.With the measured plasma and magnetic parameters from two spacecraft at different positions in the magnetotail,the X component of the pressure gradient was calculated.Magnetic tension was calculated using the magnetic field measured at four points,which could be compared with the assumed constant in the past research with single satellite.When the pressure gradient and the magnetic tension were put into the MHD momentum equation,some samples of the earthward flow bursts were accelerated and some were decelerated.The braking process of the earthward flow burst was more complicated than what the past results had shown.The accelerated samples accounted for about one third of the whole earthward flow bursts and discontinuously located among the decelerated elements.The original single earthward flow burst event might be split into several short flow bursts when it was moving to the Earth.Our results may partly illustrate that the duration of fast flows during three phases of substorm becomes short near the Earth.The results are consistent with the past results that fast flows intrude to places earthward the typical braking region.

  15. Automating Trend Analysis for Spacecraft Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George; Cooter, Miranda; Updike, Clark; Carey, Everett; Mackey, Jennifer; Rykowski, Timothy; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft trend analysis is a vital mission operations function performed by satellite controllers and engineers, who perform detailed analyses of engineering telemetry data to diagnose subsystem faults and to detect trends that may potentially lead to degraded subsystem performance or failure in the future. It is this latter function that is of greatest importance, for careful trending can often predict or detect events that may lead to a spacecraft's entry into safe-hold. Early prediction and detection of such events could result in the avoidance of, or rapid return to service from, spacecraft safing, which not only results in reduced recovery costs but also in a higher overall level of service for the satellite system. Contemporary spacecraft trending activities are manually intensive and are primarily performed diagnostically after a fault occurs, rather than proactively to predict its occurrence. They also tend to rely on information systems and software that are oudated when compared to current technologies. When coupled with the fact that flight operations teams often have limited resources, proactive trending opportunities are limited, and detailed trend analysis is often reserved for critical responses to safe holds or other on-orbit events such as maneuvers. While the contemporary trend analysis approach has sufficed for current single-spacecraft operations, it will be unfeasible for NASA's planned and proposed space science constellations. Missions such as the Dynamics, Reconnection and Configuration Observatory (DRACO), for example, are planning to launch as many as 100 'nanospacecraft' to form a homogenous constellation. A simple extrapolation of resources and manpower based on single-spacecraft operations suggests that trending for such a large spacecraft fleet will be unmanageable, unwieldy, and cost-prohibitive. It is therefore imperative that an approach to automating the spacecraft trend analysis function be studied, developed, and applied to

  16. Spacecraft Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller

    2009-01-01

    In the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Russian Federal Space Agency, the National Space Agency of Ukraine, the China National Space Administration, and many other organizations representing spacefaring nations shall continue or newly implement robust space programs. Additionally, business corporations are pursuing commercialization of space for enabling space tourism and capital business ventures. Future space missions are likely to include orbiting satellites, orbiting platforms, space stations, interplanetary vehicles, planetary surface missions, and planetary research probes. Many of these missions will include humans to conduct research for scientific and terrestrial benefits and for space tourism, and this century will therefore establish a permanent human presence beyond Earth s confines. Other missions will not include humans, but will be autonomous (e.g., satellites, robotic exploration), and will also serve to support the goals of exploring space and providing benefits to Earth s populace. This section focuses on thermal management systems for human space exploration, although the guiding principles can be applied to unmanned space vehicles as well. All spacecraft require a thermal management system to maintain a tolerable thermal environment for the spacecraft crew and/or equipment. The requirements for human rating and the specified controlled temperature range (approximately 275 K - 310 K) for crewed spacecraft are unique, and key design criteria stem from overall vehicle and operational/programatic considerations. These criteria include high reliability, low mass, minimal power requirements, low development and operational costs, and high confidence for mission success and safety. This section describes the four major subsystems for crewed spacecraft thermal management systems, and design considerations for each. Additionally, some examples of specialized or advanced thermal system technologies are presented

  17. Dissertation Defense: Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    . The method accounts for all uncertainty terms from both numerical and input variables. Objective three is to compile a table of uncertainty parameters that could be used to estimate the error in a Computational Fluid Dynamics model of the Environmental Control System spacecraft system.Previous studies have looked at the uncertainty in a Computational Fluid Dynamics model for a single output variable at a single point, for example the re-attachment length of a backward facing step. For the flow regime being analyzed (turbulent, three-dimensional, incompressible), the error at a single point can propagate into the solution both via flow physics and numerical methods. Calculating the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to accurately predict airflow speeds around encapsulated spacecraft in is imperative to the success of future missions.

  18. Dissertation Defense Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    predictions. The method accounts for all uncertainty terms from both numerical and input variables. Objective three is to compile a table of uncertainty parameters that could be used to estimate the error in a Computational Fluid Dynamics model of the Environmental Control System /spacecraft system. Previous studies have looked at the uncertainty in a Computational Fluid Dynamics model for a single output variable at a single point, for example the re-attachment length of a backward facing step. For the flow regime being analyzed (turbulent, three-dimensional, incompressible), the error at a single point can propagate into the solution both via flow physics and numerical methods. Calculating the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to accurately predict airflow speeds around encapsulated spacecraft in is imperative to the success of future missions.

  19. PREDICTION OF THE GRAIN SIZE OF SUSPENDED SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR CALCULATING SUSPENDED SEDIMENT CONCENTRATIONS USING SINGLE FREQUENCY ACOUSTIC BACKSCATTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. A. KUHNLE; D. G. WREN; J. P. CHAMBERS

    2007-01-01

    Collection of samples of suspended sediment transported by streams and rivers is difficult and expensive. Emerging technologies, such as acoustic backscatter, have promise to decrease costs and allow more thorough sampling of transported sediment in streams and rivers. Acoustic backscatter information may be used to calculate the concentration of suspended sand-sized sediment given the vertical distribution of sediment size. Therefore, procedures to accurately compute suspended sediment size distributions from easily obtained river data are badly needed. In this study, techniques to predict the size of suspended sand are examined and their application to measuring concentrations using acoustic backscatter data are explored. Three methods to predict the size of sediment in suspension using bed sediment, flow criteria, and a modified form of the Rouse equation yielded mean suspended sediment sizes that differed from means of measured data by 7 to 50 percent. When one sample near the bed was used as a reference, mean error was reduced to about 5 percent. These errors in size determination translate into errors of 7 to 156 percent in the prediction of sediment concentration using backscatter data from 1 MHz single frequency acoustics.

  20. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  1. Plasmas for spacecraft propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review presents the basics of plasma discharges applied to electric spacecraft propulsion. It briefly reports on the mature and flown technologies of gridded ion thrusters and Hall thrusters before exploring the recent yet immature technology of plasma thrusters based on expansion from low pressure high density inductively coupled and wave-excited plasma sources, e.g. the radiofrequency helicon source. Prototype development of plasma engines for future space travel is discussed using the example of the helicon double layer thruster. A summary of highlights in electric propulsion based space missions gives some insight into the challenges of future high power missions in more remote regions of space. (topical review)

  2. Spacecraft Dynamic Characteristics While Deploying Flexible Beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程绪铎; 李俊峰; 樊勇; 王照林

    2002-01-01

    The attitude dynamic equations of a spacecraft while deploying two flexible beams and the beam equations were developed from momentum theory. The dynamic equations were solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta method to calculate the vibration amplitudes of the flexible beams and the attitude angular velocity. The results show that the vibration amplitudes increase as the beam length increases or as the initial attitude angular velocity increases. The results also show that the vibration amplitudes decrease as the deployment velocity increases.

  3. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT), were developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters were flown in space, though only PPT's were used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPT's is quite poor, providing only approximately 8 percent efficiency at approximately 1000 s specific impulse. However, laboratory PPT's yielding 34 percent efficiency at 2000 s specific impulse were extensively tested, and peak performance levels of 53 percent efficiency at 5170 s specific impulse were demonstrated. MPD thrusters were flown as experiments on the Japanese MS-T4 spacecraft and the Space Shuttle and were qualified for a flight in 1994. The flight MPD thrusters were pulsed, with a peak performance of 22 percent efficiency at 2500 s specific impulse using ammonia propellant. Laboratory MPD thrusters were demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 700 s specific impulse using lithium propellant. While the PIT thruster has never been flown, recent performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 to 8000 s. The fundamental operating principles, performance measurements, and system level design for the three types of electromagnetic thrusters are reviewed, and available data on flight tests are discussed for the PPT and MPD thrusters.

  4. Small Spacecraft Activities at JPL

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ross

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a brief technical description of some of the small spacecraft concepts prepared by JPL for various sponsors. Some of JPL's work in microspacecraft is presented. The paper contains brief technical descriptions of the following four small spacecraft conceptual designs: 1) Lunar GAS, 2) Polar Mesoscale Explorer, 3) DARPA SHF and 4) Discovery. Since 1986, JPL has studied more than 10 small spacecraft including those to be presented here.

  5. CAS Experiments Onboard Spacecraft Successful

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ The descent module of China's Shenzhou 3 spacecraft returned to Earth on April 1, 2002, one week after the spacecraft was launched at the Jiuquan Satellite Launching Center in Gansu Province. It was the third test flight of a prototype spacecraft expected to carry taikonauts (stemming from the Chinese words for outer space) into space in the near future since the first launch of the Shenzhou (Divine Vessel) series on November 20,1999.

  6. Real-time monitoring and calculation of the derating of single-phase transformers under nonsinusoidal operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batan, Tufan

    The extensive use of power electronic devices in the last two decades have degraded the quality of the power system by introducing voltage and current harmonics as well as DC excitations. Such phenomena cause additional losses in transformers, resulting in elevated temperatures of transformers above their rated temperatures. This added heat degrades the insulating material of the windings, decreasing the rated lifetime of transformers. For this reason, transformers feeding nonlinear loads must be derated; that is. by limiting either their output apparent or real power such that rated temperatures are not exceeded. It is of advantage to measure the derating of transformers which are already in service, for given nonlinear loads and to calculate the derating of large transformers that cannot readily be tested in laboratories. It is one of the objectives of this thesis to validate the computed derating values of transformers with corroborating measurements. A 25kVA 7200V/240V single-phase pole transformer is analyzed using two dimensional field analysis based on the diffusion equation, employing either rectangular or polycentric grid structures. Such a field analysis allows us to visualize the complex vector potential and flux density distributions inside the unsaturated transformer operating under short-circuit conditions. One can calculate the eddy currents within conducting materials, such as copper and aluminum windings, from complex vector potential values. Short-circuit tests applied to low and high voltage windings allow us to calculate the eddy currents inside each winding and consequently their eddy-current losses. The frequency dependent AC winding resistance RAC as well as the per-unit eddy-current loss coefficient PEC-R are computed. These values are used to determine the derating of transformers via either the K-factor as proposed by Underwriters Laboratory, Inc., or via the harmonic loss factor FHL, as favored by IEEE and IEC. A new digital data

  7. Operationally Responsive Spacecraft Subsystem Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Saber Astronautics proposes spacecraft subsystem control software which can autonomously reconfigure avionics for best performance during various mission...

  8. A Novel Attitude Determination Algorithm for Spinning Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a single frame algorithm for the spin-axis orientation-determination of spinning spacecraft that encounters no ambiguity problems, as well as a simple Kalman filter for continuously estimating the full attitude of a spinning spacecraft. The later algorithm is comprised of two low order decoupled Kalman filters; one estimates the spin axis orientation, and the other estimates the spin rate and the spin (phase) angle. The filters are ambiguity free and do not rely on the spacecraft dynamics. They were successfully tested using data obtained from one of the ST5 satellites.

  9. The Gravitational Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    D'Aquino, F

    1998-01-01

    There is a electromagnetic factor of correlation between gravitational mass and inertial mass, which in specific electromagnetic conditions, can be reduced, nullified, negated, and increased. This means that gravitational forces can be reduced, nullified, inverted and intensified by means of electromagnetic fields. Such control of the gravitational interaction can have a lot of practical applications. For example, a new concept of spacecraft and aerospace flight arises from the possibility of the electromagnetic control of the gravitational mass.Some theoretical consequences of the mentioned correlation are: the generalization of Newton=92s second law for the motion (New law for Inertia), the deduction of the differential equation for entropy (second law of Thermodynamics), unification of gravitational and electromagnetic interactions .

  10. Spacecraft stability and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Chris

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Today, satellite stability and control has become a higher priority. For a satellite design that is to have a life expectancy of 14 years, appropriate spacecraft flight control systems will be reviewed, stability requirements investigated, and an appropriate flight control system recommended in order to see the design process. Disturbance torques, including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques, will be assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torques can be determined. The control torques, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, and reaction control systems (RCSs), will be considered. Conditions for stability will also be considered.

  11. The ISO Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenez de Ferrin, S.

    1995-11-01

    ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) consists of two modules: the Payload module, which includes the telescope and the scientific instruments, and the Service Module, which houses the instruments electronics, the hydrazine propellant tank and all other classical spacecraft subsystems. To ensure that the telescope is kept near absolute zero and thus is the least disturbed by the effects of the infrared emissions from other elements of the system, the telescope is enclosed in a helium-cooled cryostat. The cryostat in turn is shaded by a Sun-shield to protect it from the heat of the direct Sun. The shield has a covering of solar cells that provide the electrical power needed for the mission.

  12. Small Spacecraft for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Bousquet, Pierre-W.; Vane, Gregg; Komarek, Tomas; Klesh, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    As planetary science continues to explore new and remote regions of the Solar system with comprehensive and more sophisticated payloads, small spacecraft offer the possibility for focused and more affordable science investigations. These small spacecraft or micro spacecraft (electronics, advanced manufacturing for lightweight structures, and innovative propulsion are making it possible to fly much more capable micro spacecraft for planetary exploration. While micro spacecraft, such as CubeSats, offer significant cost reductions with added capability from advancing technologies, the technical challenges for deep space missions are very different than for missions conducted in low Earth orbit. Micro spacecraft must be able to sustain a broad range of planetary environments (i.e., radiations, temperatures, limited power generation) and offer long-range telecommunication performance on a par with science needs. Other capabilities needed for planetary missions, such as fine attitude control and determination, capable computer and data handling, and navigation are being met by technologies currently under development to be flown on CubeSats within the next five years. This paper will discuss how micro spacecraft offer an attractive alternative to accomplish specific science and technology goals and what relevant technologies are needed for these these types of spacecraft. Acknowledgements: Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  13. Small Spacecraft for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Bousquet, Pierre-W.; Vane, Gregg; Komarek, Tomas; Klesh, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    As planetary science continues to explore new and remote regions of the Solar system with comprehensive and more sophisticated payloads, small spacecraft offer the possibility for focused and more affordable science investigations. These small spacecraft or micro spacecraft (science-grade sensors and electronics, advanced manufacturing for lightweight structures, and innovative propulsion are making it possible to fly much more capable micro spacecraft for planetary exploration. While micro spacecraft, such as CubeSats, offer significant cost reductions with added capability from advancing technologies, the technical challenges for deep space missions are very different than for missions conducted in low Earth orbit. Micro spacecraft must be able to sustain a broad range of planetary environments (i.e., radiations, temperatures, limited power generation) and offer long-range telecommunication performance on a par with science needs. Other capabilities needed for planetary missions, such as fine attitude control and determination, capable computer and data handling, and navigation are being met by technologies currently under development to be flown on CubeSats within the next five years. This paper will discuss how micro spacecraft offer an attractive alternative to accomplish specific science and technology goals and what relevant technologies are needed for these these types of spacecraft. Acknowledgements: Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  14. Interactions between SAS-C spacecraft nutations and spin control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossman, B. E.; Thayer, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The SAS-C spacecraft is stabilized by a momentum biased reaction wheel and passive nutation damper. A closed-loop low-speed spacecraft spin rate control system is included which uses a single-axis gyro and a variable speed range on the reaction wheel. Dynamic instability can result from interactions among the gyro, damper, and spacecraft dynamic unbalance. This instability may be aggravated by gyro angular misalignment, gyro error signals, and spacecraft nutations. Analytic eigenvector, and digital computer analyses of the coupled systems are presented. Mechanisms for instability are described as well as the effects that gyro error signal, tilt, and spacecraft dynamic unbalance produce on control system performance.

  15. Galileo spacecraft power management and distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been twelve years since two Voyager spacecraft began the direct route to the outer planets. In October 1989 a single Galileo spacecraft started the return to Jupiter. Conceived as a simple Voyager look-alike, the Galileo power management and distribution (PMAD) system has undergone many iterations in configuration. Major changes to the PMAD resulted from dual spun slip ring limitations, variations in launch vehicle thrust capabilities, and launch delays. Lack of an adequate launch vehicle for an interplanetary mission of Galileo's size has resulted in an extremely long flight duration. A Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist (VEEGA) tour, vital to attain the required energy, results in a 6 year trip to Jupiter and its moons. This paper provides a description of the Galileo PMAD and documents the design drivers that established the final as-built hardware

  16. Numerical Calculation of SAW Propagation Properties at the x-Cut of Ferroelectric PMN-33%PT Single Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; LI Xiu-Ming; ZHANG Rui; HUANG Nai-Xing; CAO Wen-Wu

    2009-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) properties at the x-cut of relaxor-based 0.67Pb(Mg1/3 Nb2/3) Oa-O.33Pb TiO3 (PMN-33%PT) ferroelectric single crystals are analyzed theoretically when poled along the[O01]c cubic direction.It can be found that PMN-33%PT single crystal is a kind of material with a low phase velocity and high electromechanical coupling coefficient,and the single crystal possesses some cuts with zero power flow angle.The results are based on the material parameters at room temperature.The conclusions provide device designers with a few ideal cuts of PMN-33%PT single crystals.Moreover,choosing an optimal cut will dramatically improve the performance of SAW devices,and corresponding results for crystal systems working at other temperatures could also be figured out by employing the method.

  17. Spacecraft contamination prediction and testing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, J. A.; Maag, C. R.; Morelli, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques used in the prediction of spacecraft contamination for the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter and in the determination of the effects of such contamination are presented. Following a quick-look assessment of the contributions of ground-based initial contaminant loading, launch vehicle interface effects, vacuum-exposed outgassing deposition and attitude control thruster impingement and venting to the spacecraft contamination burden, the evaluations centered on the effects of the attitude control thruster on the scan platform optics, including calculations of thruster flowfields and a high-fidelity computer simulation of contaminant distribution. The evaluations revealed a considerable problem with thruster contamination, which could be solved by the use of a thrust shield and the avoidance of thruster operation at certain scan platform orientations. The effects of the various possible contaminants on spacecraft thermal and optical system performances were also investigated in studies of the optical transmittance of deposited monomethyl hydrazine nitrate, vacuum optical degradation due to contaminant outgassing and re-emission outgassing, and an operational satellite contaminant monitor on the NOAA-C satellite. It is concluded that with a good evaluation and testing program, contamination control may become a necessary portion of system design procedures, and recommendations for the implementation of various practices and tests to minimize contamination effects are presented.

  18. Stability analysis of spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, S. M.; Grigsby, L. L.; Sheble, G. B.; Nelms, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The problems in applying standard electric utility models, analyses, and algorithms to the study of the stability of spacecraft power conditioning and distribution systems are discussed. Both single-phase and three-phase systems are considered. Of particular concern are the load and generator models that are used in terrestrial power system studies, as well as the standard assumptions of load and topological balance that lead to the use of the positive sequence network. The standard assumptions regarding relative speeds of subsystem dynamic responses that are made in the classical transient stability algorithm, which forms the backbone of utility-based studies, are examined. The applicability of these assumptions to a spacecraft power system stability study is discussed in detail. In addition to the classical indirect method, the applicability of Liapunov's direct methods to the stability determination of spacecraft power systems is discussed. It is pointed out that while the proposed method uses a solution process similar to the classical algorithm, the models used for the sources, loads, and networks are, in general, more accurate. Some preliminary results are given for a linear-graph, state-variable-based modeling approach to the study of the stability of space-based power distribution networks.

  19. Spacecraft early design validation using formal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size and complexity of software in spacecraft is increasing exponentially, and this trend complicates its validation within the context of the overall spacecraft system. Current validation methods are labor-intensive as they rely on manual analysis, review and inspection. For future space missions, we developed – with challenging requirements from the European space industry – a novel modeling language and toolset for a (semi-)automated validation approach. Our modeling language is a dialect of AADL and enables engineers to express the system, the software, and their reliability aspects. The COMPASS toolset utilizes state-of-the-art model checking techniques, both qualitative and probabilistic, for the analysis of requirements related to functional correctness, safety, dependability and performance. Several pilot projects have been performed by industry, with two of them having focused on the system-level of a satellite platform in development. Our efforts resulted in a significant advancement of validating spacecraft designs from several perspectives, using a single integrated system model. The associated technology readiness level increased from level 1 (basic concepts and ideas) to early level 4 (laboratory-tested)

  20. Finite element calculations on the single-domain limit of a ferromagnetic cube--a solution to μMAG Standard Problem No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero field states of the magnetization in a uniaxial ferromagnetic sample of cubic shape are calculated by means of micromagnetic finite element modeling. With increasing size the minimum energy arrangement changes from a single-domain configuration (flower state) to a vortex configuration. An intermediate arrangement (twisted flower state) between the flower state and the vortex state is observed. A further magnetization state resulting in the calculation is a vortex state with a singularity of the directional field of the magnetization. This work provides our solution to the micromagnetic Standard Problem No. 3 posed by the μMAG micromagnetic modeling activity group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  1. Advanced Spacecraft Thermal Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For spacecraft developers who spend millions to billions of dollars per unit and require 3 to 7 years to deploy, the LoadPath reduced-order (RO) modeling thermal...

  2. Spacecraft Environmental Interactions Technology, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    State of the art of environment interactions dealing with low-Earth-orbit plasmas; high-voltage systems; spacecraft charging; materials effects; and direction of future programs are contained in over 50 papers.

  3. Gravity Probe B spacecraft description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Norman R.; Burns, Kevin; Katz, Russell; Kirschenbaum, Jon; Mason, Gary; Shehata, Shawky

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B spacecraft, developed, integrated, and tested by Lockheed Missiles & Space Company and later Lockheed Martin Corporation, consisted of structures, mechanisms, command and data handling, attitude and translation control, electrical power, thermal control, flight software, and communications. When integrated with the payload elements, the integrated system became the space vehicle. Key requirements shaping the design of the spacecraft were: (1) the tight mission timeline (17 months, 9 days of on-orbit operation), (2) precise attitude and translational control, (3) thermal protection of science hardware, (4) minimizing aerodynamic, magnetic, and eddy current effects, and (5) the need to provide a robust, low risk spacecraft. The spacecraft met all mission requirements, as demonstrated by dewar lifetime meeting specification, positive power and thermal margins, precision attitude control and drag-free performance, reliable communications, and the collection of more than 97% of the available science data.

  4. Spacecraft Cabin Particulate Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and test an optical extinction monitor for the detection of spacecraft cabin particulates. This monitor will be sensitive to particle...

  5. Spacecraft Cabin Particulate Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have built and tested an optical extinction monitor for the detection of spacecraft cabin particulates. This sensor sensitive to particle sizes ranging from a...

  6. Simultaneous description of conductance and thermopower in single-molecule junctions from many-body ab initio calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the electronic conductance and thermopower of a single-molecule junction consisting of bis-(4-aminophenyl) acetylene (B4APA) connected to gold electrodes. We use nonequilibrium Green's function methods in combination with density-functional theory (DFT) and the many-body GW...

  7. Interplanetary spacecraft navigation using pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, X. P.; Hobbs, G.; You, X. P.; M. T. Li; Keith, M. J.; Shannon, R. M.; Coles, W.; Manchester, R. N.; J.H. Zheng; Yu, X. Z.; Gao, D.; Wu, X; Chen, D.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how observations of pulsars can be used to help navigate a spacecraft travelling in the solar system. We make use of archival observations of millisecond pulsars from the Parkes radio telescope in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight issues, such as pulsar spin irregularities, which need to be accounted for. We show that observations of four millisecond pulsars every seven days using a realistic X-ray telescope on the spacecraft throughout a journe...

  8. Intelligent spacecraft module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oungrinis, Konstantinos-Alketas; Liapi, Marianthi; Kelesidi, Anna; Gargalis, Leonidas; Telo, Marinela; Ntzoufras, Sotiris; Paschidi, Mariana

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the development of an on-going research project that focuses on a human-centered design approach to habitable spacecraft modules. It focuses on the technical requirements and proposes approaches on how to achieve a spatial arrangement of the interior that addresses sufficiently the functional, physiological and psychosocial needs of the people living and working in such confined spaces that entail long-term environmental threats to human health and performance. Since the research perspective examines the issue from a qualitative point of view, it is based on establishing specific relationships between the built environment and its users, targeting people's bodily and psychological comfort as a measure toward a successful mission. This research has two basic branches, one examining the context of the system's operation and behavior and the other in the direction of identifying, experimenting and formulating the environment that successfully performs according to the desired context. The latter aspect is researched upon the construction of a scaled-model on which we run series of tests to identify the materiality, the geometry and the electronic infrastructure required. Guided by the principles of sensponsive architecture, the ISM research project explores the application of the necessary spatial arrangement and behavior for a user-centered, functional interior where the appropriate intelligent systems are based upon the existing mechanical and chemical support ones featured on space today, and especially on the ISS. The problem is set according to the characteristics presented at the Mars500 project, regarding the living quarters of six crew-members, along with their hygiene, leisure and eating areas. Transformable design techniques introduce spatial economy, adjustable zoning and increased efficiency within the interior, securing at the same time precise spatial orientation and character at any given time. The sensponsive configuration is

  9. INVESTIGATION AND CALCULATION OF VALLEYS OF OUTGOING FROM SUBSTATION GROUNDING CONDUCTORS FOR SHORT-CIRCUIT IN SINGLE-PHASE SHORT OF ELECTRICAL GRID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Nizhevskyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Earthing device electrical substation in modern conditions must meet both the requirements of electrical safety of people and animals, as well as electromagnetic compatibility requirements established her electrical equipment. These requirements are intended to address issues of protection against surges and interference caused by lightning impulse currents and switching. Aim. To investigate the distribution of single-phase short-circuit current in the substation grounding devices. Task. On the basis of the proposed design scheme of substitution substation grounding device, consisting of a substation earthing system and «cable-supported» an algorithm for calculating the resistance of the grounding device substation and distribution of single-phase short-circuit current on the circuit elements. Method. Mathematical modeling and calculation engine. Results. On the basis of calculations and studies analyzed the current distribution of single-phase short-circuit between the substation earthing system and earthing «rope-reliance». Studies carried out for the actual range of variation of the circuit parameters, showed that the earthing resistance substation substantially affects the current distribution in the one-phase short circuit fault. For example, using the graph shows that with increasing resistance grounding system of "rope-supported" the proportion of single-phase short-circuit current flowing from the substation earthing increases, while the proportion of single-phase short-circuit current flowing from the grounding device supports decreases and vice versa. In addition, when rationing grounding systems at substations for the touch voltage is necessary to analyze all the possible modes of operation of the network, which is substationed. Conclusion. The results obtained are recommended to take into account in the design of grounding systems at substations.

  10. The application of gas chromatography fingerprint technique to calculating oil production allocation of single layer in the commingled well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Zhigang; ZHU Dan; TANG Youjun; LI Yuquan; ZHANG Guorong

    2005-01-01

    Gas chromatography fingerprint technique has the advantages of fast performance and low cost. It can be used to conduct analysis without interruption either in the field or at laboratory. This technique has been used successfully in such cases that conventional production logging techniques are powerless. Taking low-concentration anthracene as internal standard, we calculated the absolute concentrations of fingerprints, initially made some experiments directly on biodegradation of crude oils, and calculated production allocation in the Gudong Oil field. Compared with the production logging, this method has made up for the deficiencies of the former GC fingerprint technique. It will find wide applications in monitoring the trend of production in various oil-fields.

  11. Automated calculation of myocardial external efficiency from a single 11C-acetate PET/CT scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik;

    additional stroke volume (SV) and myocardial mass data, respectively, which are typically derived from a separate cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) scan. Dual scanning is logistically problematic and different loading conditions during PET and CMR scans can cause errors in MEE estimates. The aim of......). Conclusion: Myocardial efficiencycanbe derived directly andautomatically froma single dynamic 11C-acetate PET scan. This eliminates the need for a separate CMR scan and eliminates any potential errors due to different loading conditions between CMR and PETscans....

  12. Complete calculations of Wb anti b and Wb anti b + jet production at Tevatron and LHC: probing anomalous Wtb couplings in single-top production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a complete tree-level calculation of the processes pp(anti p)→Wb anti b and Wb anti b+jet that includes the single-top signal and all irreducible backgrounds simultaneously. In order to probe the structure of the Wtb coupling with the highest possible accuracy and to look for possible deviations from standard model predictions, we identify sensitive observables and propose an optimal set of cuts which minimizes the background, as compared to the signal. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the single-top and the single-antitop rates are different, and the corresponding asymmetry yields additional information. The analysis shows that the sensitivity for anomalous couplings will be improved at the LHC by a factor of 2-3, as compared to the expectations for the first measurements at the upgraded Tevatron. Still, the bounds on anomalous couplings obtained at hadron colliders will remain 2-8 times larger than those from high-energy γe colliders; however, these will not be available for some time. All basic calculations have been carried out using the computer package CompHEP. The known next-to-leading-order corrections to the single-top rate have been taken into account. (orig.)

  13. Reconfigurability Analysis Method for Spacecraft Autonomous Control

    OpenAIRE

    Dayi Wang; Chengrui Liu

    2014-01-01

    As a critical requirement for spacecraft autonomous control, reconfigurability should be considered in design stage of spacecrafts by involving effective reconfigurability analysis method in guiding system designs. In this paper, a novel reconfigurability analysis method is proposed for spacecraft design. First, some basic definitions regarding spacecraft reconfigurability are given. Then, based on function tree theory, a reconfigurability modeling approach is established to properly describe...

  14. Spacecraft Fire Experiment (Saffire) Development Status

    OpenAIRE

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David L.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita,Osamu; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    The status is presented of a spacecraft fire safety research project that is underdevelopment to reduce the uncertainty and risk in the design of spacecraft fire safety systems for exploration missions. The Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project is developing three Spacecraft Fire Experiments (Saffire-I, -II, and -III) to conduct a series of material flammability tests at a length scale that is realistic for a serious spacecraft fire in low-gravity. The objectives of these experiments a...

  15. Spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    procedures. The method described generates, based on a single camera and a priory information about the target vehicle and orbit data, all necessary guidance information for closed-loop autonomous navigation, from first detection at far distance, to a close up a hold point. Furthermore, the system provide...... been based entirely on direct human supervision and control. This paper describes a vision-based system and methodology, that autonomously generates accurate guidance information that may assist a human operator in performing the tasks associated with both the rendezvous and docking navigation...

  16. Spacecraft Attitude Determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas

    determination based on simple, reliable sensors. Meeting these objectives with a single vector magnetometer is difficult and requires temporal fusion of data in order to avoid local observability problems. In order to guaranteed globally nonsingular solutions, quaternions are generally the preferred attitude...... specifier. This thesis makes four main contributions. The first is the development of a quaternion based Kalman filter, which is linearized using an exponential map of the correction quaternion. The state space is reduced in dimension, and a covariance singularity is avoided. The second contributions is a...

  17. ISP33 Natural single and two phase flow in PACTEL blind calculation using RELAP5/Mod3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD/CSNI standard problem ISP33 aimed at adding information about natural circulation phenomena which are of particular importance during shut down of a reactor. The experiment performed in the Finnish PACTEL facility was carried out at a constant low core power simulating about 3.4% residual heat. The coolant inventory was stepwise reduced at 900 s intervals by about 10%. Thus effects of the various contents of steam in the primary could be studied during time intervals with semi-steady natural one- and two-phase circulation driven by the core rest heating. Results obtained in a blind calculation compare generally well with the experiment which shows that the RELAP5/Mod3 code is capable of predicting natural circulation phenomena. Exceptions are pressure peaks after the second drain and delayed final core heat-up which could be explained by inadequacies in certain measured data such as the core power. 10 refs

  18. Spin asymmetry calculations of the TMR-V curves in single and double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-10-01

    Spin-polarization asymmetry is the key parameter in asymmetric voltage behavior (AVB) of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in magnetic tunnel junctions. In this paper, we study the value of the TMR as a function of the applied voltage Va in the single as well as double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (SMTJ & DMTJ, which are constructed from CoFeB/MgO interfaces) and numerically estimate the possible difference of the TMR-V a curves for negative and positive voltages in the homojunctions. As a result, we found that AVB may help to determine the exact values of Fermi wave vectors for minority and majority conducting spin sub-bands. Moreover, significant asymmetry of the experimental TMR-Va curves, which arises due to different annealing regimes, is explained by different heights of the tunnel barriers and values of the spin asymmetry. The numerical TMR-V a data are in good agreement with experimental ones. © 2011 IEEE.

  19. The Spacecraft Materials Selector: An Artificial Intelligence System for Preliminary Design Trade Studies, Materials Assessments, and Estimates of Environments Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, H. G.; Woll, S. L. B.

    2000-01-01

    Institutions need ways to retain valuable information even as experienced individuals leave an organization. Modern electronic systems have enough capacity to retain large quantities of information that can mitigate the loss of experience. Performance information for long-term space applications is relatively scarce and specific information (typically held by a few individuals within a single project) is often rather narrowly distributed. Spacecraft operate under severe conditions and the consequences of hardware and/or system failures, in terms of cost, loss of information, and time required to replace the loss, are extreme. These risk factors place a premium on appropriate choice of materials and components for space applications. An expert system is a very cost-effective method for sharing valuable and scarce information about spacecraft performance. Boeing has an artificial intelligence software package, called the Boeing Expert System Tool (BEST), to construct and operate knowledge bases to selectively recall and distribute information about specific subjects. A specific knowledge base to evaluate the on-orbit performance of selected materials on spacecraft has been developed under contract to the NASA SEE program. The performance capabilities of the Spacecraft Materials Selector (SMS) knowledge base are described. The knowledge base is a backward-chaining, rule-based system. The user answers a sequence of questions, and the expert system provides estimates of optical and mechanical performance of selected materials under specific environmental conditions. The initial operating capability of the system will include data for Kapton, silverized Teflon, selected paints, silicone-based materials, and certain metals. For situations where a mission profile (launch date, orbital parameters, mission duration, spacecraft orientation) is not precisely defined, the knowledge base still attempts to provide qualitative observations about materials performance and likely

  20. Electromagnetic braking for Mars spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Aerobraking concepts are being studied to improve performance and cost effectiveness of propulsion systems for Mars landers and Mars interplanetary spacecraft. Access to megawatt power levels (nuclear power coupled to high-storage inductive or capacitive devices) on a manned Mars interplanetary spacecraft may make feasible electromagnetic braking and lift modulation techniques which were previously impractical. Using pulsed microwave and magnetic field technology, potential plasmadynamic braking and hydromagnetic lift modulation techniques have been identified. Entry corridor modulation to reduce loads and heating, to reduce vertical descent rates, and to expand horizontal and lateral landing ranges are possible benefits. In-depth studies are needed to identify specific design concepts for feasibility assessments. Standing wave/plasma sheath interaction techniques appear to be promising. The techniques may require some tailoring of spacecraft external structures and materials. In addition, rapid response guidance and control systems may require the use of structurally embedded sensors coupled to expert systems or to artificial intelligence systems.

  1. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner; Jessner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  2. Conductive spacecraft materials development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to provide design criteria, techniques, materials, and test methods to ensure control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft surfaces. The control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft cannot be effected without the development of new and improved or modified materials or techniques that will provide electrical continuity over the surface of the spacecraft. The materials' photoemission, secondary emission, thermooptical, physical, and electrical properties in the space vacuum environment both in the presence and absence of electrical stress and ultraviolet, electron, and particulate radiation, are important to the achievement of charge control. The materials must be stable or have predictable response to exposure to the space environment for long periods of time. The materials of interest include conductive polymers, paints, transparent films and coatings as well as fabric coating interweaves.

  3. Scandium and Titanium Containing Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage: a Thermodynamic and First Principle Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananghaya, Michael; Yu, Dennis; Santos, Gil Nonato; Rodulfo, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) to density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the highly localized states derived from the defects of nitrogen doped carbon nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CNxNT) contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings, which prevent metal aggregation. Comparison of the H2 adsorption capability of Sc over Ti-decorated 4ND-CNxNT shows that Ti cannot be used for reversible H2 storage due to its inherent high adsorption energy. The Sc/4ND-CNxNT possesses favorable adsorption and consecutive adsorption energy at the local-density approximation (LDA) and GGA level. Molecular dynamics (MD) study confirmed that the interaction between molecular hydrogen and 4ND-CNxNT decorated with scandium is indeed favorable. Simulations indicate that the total amount of adsorption is directly related to the operating temperature and pressure. The number of absorbed hydrogen molecules almost logarithmically increases as the pressure increases at a given temperature. The total excess adsorption of hydrogen on the (Sc/4ND)10-CNxNT arrays at 300 K is within the range set by the department of energy (DOE) with a value of at least 5.85 wt%.

  4. Gravity-gradient dynamics experiments performed in orbit utilizing the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE-1) spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, H.

    1973-01-01

    Six dynamic experiments were performed in earth orbit utilizing the RAE spacecraft in order to test the accuracy of the mathematical model of RAE dynamics. The spacecraft consisted of four flexible antenna booms, mounted on a rigid cylindrical spacecraft hub at center, for measuring radio emissions from extraterrestrial sources. Attitude control of the gravity stabilized spacecraft was tested by using damper clamping, single lower leading boom operations, and double lower boom operations. Results and conclusions of the in-orbit dynamic experiments proved the accuracy of the analytic techniques used to model RAE dynamical behavior.

  5. Enhancement of antioxidant activity of green tea epicatechins in β-cyclodextrin cavity: Single-crystal X-ray analysis, DFT calculation and DPPH assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aree, Thammarat; Jongrungruangchok, Suchada

    2016-10-20

    Green tea catechins are potent antioxidant for prevention of various free radical-related diseases. Their antioxidant properties can be improved by encapsulation in cyclodextrins (CDs). Four inclusion complexes of β-CD with (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) have been investigated using single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis combined with full geometry optimization by DFT/B3LYP calculation and the DPPH assay, aiming to deepen the understanding on their structure-antioxidant activity relationship. Scrutinizing the inclusion structures and conformational changes of the four encapsulated epicatechins reveals the common host-guest stabilization scheme and the epicatechin conformational flexibility facilitating the enhancement of activity. Thermodynamic stability order derived from DFT calculation in vacuum fairly agrees with the order of improved antioxidant capacity deduced from the DPPH assay, β-CD-EGCG>β-CD-ECG>β-CD-EGC≈β-CD-EC. PMID:27474665

  6. X-ray Single Crystal Structure, DFT Calculations and Biological Activity of 2-(3-Methyl-5-(pyridin-2'-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl) Ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Smaail; Attayibat, Ahmed; El-Massaoudi, Mohamed; Salhi, Amin; Eddike, Driss; Tillard, Monique; Mabkhot, Yahia N

    2016-01-01

    A pyridylpyrazole bearing a hydroxyethyl substituent group has been synthesized by condensation of (Z)-4-hydroxy-4-(pyridin-2-yl)but-3-en-2-one with 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine. The compound was well characterized and its structure confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Density functional calculations have been performed using DFT method with 6-31G* basis set. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap, binding energies and electron deformation densities are calculated at the DFT (BLYP, PW91, PWC) level. The electrophilic f(-) and nucleophilic f(+) Fukui functions and also the electrophilic and nucleophilic Parr functions are well adapted to find the electrophile and nucleophile centers in the molecule. The title compound has been tested for its DPPH radical scavenging activity which is involved in aging processes, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and wound healing activity. Compound is also found with a significant antioxidant activity, probably due to the ability to donate a hydrogen atom to the DPPH radical. PMID:27527141

  7. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  8. Software Architecture for Autonomous Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jimmy S.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis objective is to design an autonomous spacecraft architecture to perform both deliberative and reactive behaviors. The Autonomous Small Planet In-Situ Reaction to Events (ASPIRE) project uses the architecture to integrate several autonomous technologies for a comet orbiter mission.

  9. Optimal Reorientation Of Spacecraft Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelnokov Yuriy Nikolaevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimal reorientation of the spacecraft orbit is considered. For solving the problem we used quaternion equations of motion written in rotating coordinate system. The use of quaternion variables makes this consideration more efficient. The problem of optimal control is solved on the basis of the maximum principle. An example of numerical solution of the problem is given.

  10. Propulsion Challenges for Small Spacecraft: 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vadim Zakirov; LI Luming

    2006-01-01

    Small (<100 kg) spacecrafts are being developed in many countries but their propulsion systems still have many challenges. Although there is demand for small spacecraft propulsion, the number of missions at present is small due to several commercial and technical reasons. Poor performance of existing small spacecraft propulsion systems is one of the main reasons for the small number of missions. Several reasons are given for the poor performance of existing small spacecraft propulsion. Suggested improvements focus on small spacecraft and propulsion hardware mass optimization rather than on specific impulse enhancement. Propellantless propulsion systems are also recommended for small spacecraft interplanetary missions.

  11. Neural optimal control of flexible spacecraft slew maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, M. Reza Dehghan; Alasty, Aria; Daneshjou, Kamran

    2004-11-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal large-angle single-axis maneuvers of a flexible spacecraft with simultaneous vibration suppression of elastic modes. A spacecraft model with a cylindrical hub and one flexible appendage and tip mass is considered. Gravity gradient torque is considered as a disturbance torque. Multilayer perceptron neural networks are used to design a Neural Optimal Controller (NOC) for this multivariable non-linear maneuver. For NOC training, an off-line training procedure based on backpropagation through time algorithm is developed to minimize the general quadratic cost function in forward and backward pass stages. The proposed controller is also applicable to simultaneous multi-axis reorientation of a flexible spacecraft. Simulation results are presented to show that very fast reference pitch angle trajectory tracking and vibration suppression are accomplished.

  12. Multi-spacecraft observations of quasiperiodic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Frantisek; Pickett, Jolene S.; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Bezdekova, Barbora; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Parrot, Michel; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig

    2016-04-01

    Whistler mode electromagnetic waves observed in the inner magnetosphere at frequencies of a few kilohertz sometimes exhibit a nearly periodic modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation periods may range from several tens of seconds up to a few minutes, and such emissions are usually called quasiperiodic (QP) emissions. The origin of these events is still unclear, but it seems that their generation might be related to compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations which periodically modulate resonance conditions in the source region. From an observational point of view, single-point measurements are quite insufficient, as they do not allow us to distinguish between spatial and temporal variations of the emissions. Multipoint observations of these events are, on the other hand, rather rare. We present several QP wave events observed simultaneously by several different spacecraft (Cluster, Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, DEMETER). We demonstrate that although the quasiperiodic modulation is observed over a huge spatial region, individual spacecraft do not see the QP elements at exactly the same times. Moreover, when an event is observed simultaneously on the dawnside and on the duskside, the modulation period observed on the duskside is about twice larger than the modulation period observed on the dawnside. We present a qualitative explanation of these phenomena.

  13. Model of spacecraft atomic oxygen and solar exposure microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Pippin, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Computer models of environmental conditions in Earth orbit are needed for the following reasons: (1) derivation of material performance parameters from orbital test data, (2) evaluation of spacecraft hardware designs, (3) prediction of material service life, and (4) scheduling spacecraft maintenance. To meet these needs, Boeing has developed programs for modeling atomic oxygen (AO) and solar radiation exposures. The model allows determination of AO and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposures for spacecraft surfaces (1) in arbitrary orientations with respect to the direction of spacecraft motion, (2) overall ranges of solar conditions, and (3) for any mission duration. The models have been successfully applied to prediction of experiment environments on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and for analysis of selected hardware designs for deployment on other spacecraft. The work on these models has been reported at previous LDEF conferences. Since publication of these reports, a revision has been made to the AO calculation for LDEF, and further work has been done on the microenvironments model for solar exposure.

  14. Multiple-scattering calculations for 1s photoelectron angular distributions from single oriented molecules in the energy region above 50 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazama, Misato, E-mail: misato-k@graduate.chiba-u.jp [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Shinotsuka, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Takashi [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Stener, Mauro; Decleva, Piero [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Adachi, Jun-ichi; Mizuno, Tomoya; Yagishita, Akira [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculate X-ray photoelectron angular distributions for oriented molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare these results with DFT theory and experimental data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multiple-scattering theory well reproduces experimental angular distributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our theory is powerful to describe photoelectron angular distributions above 50 eV. -- Abstract: 1s photoelectron angular distributions from fixed-in-space CO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, BF{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}F molecules have been calculated by X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) theory with muffin-tin-type molecular potential. For all the molecules, the calculated results show good agreements with those by density functional theory in the energy region Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 100 eV. Furthermore, for all the molecules experimental data on the angular distributions in such energy region are well reproduced by the XPD theory. These intensive studies lead to a rather general rule that the XPD theory is an adequate tool to describe high-energy photoelectron angular distributions for any single oriented molecules.

  15. Quick Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For spacecraft design and development teams concerned with cost and schedule, the Quick Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Tool (QuickSTAT) is an innovative software suite...

  16. Service Oriented Spacecraft Modeling Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The I-Logix team proposes development of the Service Oriented Spacecraft Modeling Environment (SOSME) to allow faster and more effective spacecraft system design...

  17. Calculation of Single Scattering Parameters in Vector Radiative Transfer Equation%辐射传输方程中的单次散射参数计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海华; 孙贤明; 刘万强; 申晋; 刘伟

    2011-01-01

    Based on Mie theory, the single scattering characteristics of a cluster of polydisperse spherical aerosols are calculated. The size distribution of particles is Gamma distribution and effective radii are 5.56, 7, 11 μm,respectively. The average extinction coefficients, average scattering coefficients, single scattering albedos,asymmetry parameters and elements of single scattering phase matrix in the spectral range of 0.4 ~ 100 μm are analyzed. The numerical results show that the single scattering properties of aerosols are seldom affected by particle effective radius in visual light waveband, but greater at higher waveband. The single scattering albedo approximately equals 1 at visual light waveband and the characteristics of single scattering albedo are opposite to the imagery part of refraction index. The polarization ratios of single scattering phase matrix are more sensitive to particle size than phase functions.%根据米氏(Mie)理论,计算了多分散球形气溶胶粒子的单次散射特性.粒子的尺寸分布为伽马分布,有效半径分别为5.56.7和11 μm,分析了0.4-100 μm光谱范围内气溶胶粒子的平均消光系数、平均散射系数、单次散射反照率、不对称因子以及相矩阵与粒子的尺寸参数以及折射率的关系.结果表明,在可见光波段,粒子的有效半径对粒子的散射特性影响较小,在更长的波段上其影响较大;单次散射反照率在可见光范围内近似为1,随波长的变化和水滴折射率虚部随波长的变化曲线正好相反,这说明影响其大小的主要因素为粒子的折射率,即虚部越大则反照率越小;且极化率对粒子的尺寸比相函数更敏感.

  18. SAS-A spacecraft magnetic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    Magnetic tests were conducted on the spacecraft for: (1) alignment, compensation, calibration, and bias determination for the spacecraft three-axis vector magnetometer; (2) determination of permanent, induced, and stray magnetic moments of the spacecraft and compensation of permanent magnetic moments by permanent magnets; and (3) evaluation of the spin and attitude control system.

  19. Spacecraft and their Boosters. Aerospace Education I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, provides a description of some of the discoveries that spacecraft have made possible and of the experience that American astronauts have had in piloting spacecraft. The basic principles behind the operation of spacecraft and their boosters are explained. Descriptions are also included on…

  20. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  1. Anomalous Earth flybys of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2015-07-01

    A small deviation from the potential is expected for the gravitational interaction of extended bodies. It is explained as a consequence of a recently proposed gravitational impact model (Wilhelm et al. in Astrophys. Space Sci. 343:135-144, 2013) and has been applied to anomalous perihelion advances by Wilhelm and Dwivedi (New Astron. 31:51-55, 2014). The effect—an offset of the effective gravitational centre from the geometric centre of a spherical symmetric body—might also be responsible for the observed anomalous orbital energy gains and speed increases during Earth flybys of several spacecraft. However, close flybys would require detailed considerations of the orbit geometry. In this study, an attempt is made to explain the anomalous Earth flybys of the Galileo, NEAR Shoemaker and Rosetta spacecraft.

  2. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiravalle, Vincent P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these devices have been used to accomplish two recent space missions. The microwave thruster is then described and it is explained how the thrust and specific impulse of the thruster can be measured. Calculations of the gas temperature and plasma properties in the microwave thruster are discussed. In addition a potential mission for the microwave thruster involving the orbit raising of a space station is explored.

  3. The Near Spacecraft Telecommunications System

    OpenAIRE

    Bokulic, R.S.; Jensen, J R; McKnight, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission, first in NASA's Discovery series, is designed to gather scientific data about the near-Earth asteroid 433 Eros. Due to launch in February 1996, the spacecraft will rendezvous with and eventually orbit the asteroid. The telecommunications system is centered about two redundant X-band transponder systems that provide the command, telemetry, and tracking functions. Although the mission has a very tight development schedule, a significant amount ...

  4. Energy Storage Flywheels on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Robert O.; Brown, Gary; Levinthal, Joel; Brodeur, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    With advances in carbon composite material, magnetic bearings, microprocessors, and high-speed power switching devices, work has begun on a space qualifiable Energy Momentum Wheel (EMW). An EMW is a device that can be used on a satellite to store energy, like a chemical battery, and manage angular momentum, like a reaction wheel. These combined functions are achieved by the simultaneous and balanced operation of two or more energy storage flywheels. An energy storage flywheel typically consists of a carbon composite rotor driven by a brushless DC motor/generator. Each rotor has a relatively large angular moment of inertia and is suspended on magnetic bearings to minimize energy loss. The use of flywheel batteries on spacecraft will increase system efficiencies (mass and power), while reducing design-production time and life-cycle cost. This paper will present a discussion of flywheel battery design considerations and a simulation of spacecraft system performance utilizing four flywheel batteries to combine energy storage and momentum management for a typical LEO satellite. A proposed set of control laws and an engineering animation will also be presented. Once flight qualified and demonstrated, space flywheel batteries may alter the architecture of most medium and high-powered spacecraft.

  5. EVA dosimetry in manned spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) will become a large part of the astronaut's work on board the International Space Station (ISS). It is already well known that long duration space missions inside a spacecraft lead to radiation doses which are high enough to be a significant health risk to the crew. The doses received during EVA, however, have not been quantified to the same degree. This paper reviews the space radiation environment and the current dose limits to critical organs. Results of preliminary radiation dosimetry experiments on the external surface of the BION series of satellites indicate that EVA doses will vary considerably due to a number of factors such as EVA suit shielding, temporal fluctuations and spacecraft orbit and shielding. It is concluded that measurement of doses to crew members who engage in EVA should be done on board the spacecraft. An experiment is described which will lead the way to implementing this plan on the ISS. It is expected that results of this experiment will help future crew mitigate the risks of ionising radiation in space

  6. An exact, closed-form expression of the integral chord-length distribution for the calculation of single-event upsets induced by cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Keung L.; Buehler, Martin G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of an exact closed-form expression of the integral chord-length distribution for the calculation of single-event upsets (SEUs) in an electronic memory cell, caused by cosmic rays. Results computed for two rectangular parallelepipeds using this exact expression are compared with those computed with Bradford's (1979) semiexact expression of C(x). It is found that the values of C(x) are identical for x equal or smaller than b but are vastly different for x greater than b. Moreover, while C(x) of Bradford gives reasonably accurate values of SEU rate for certain sets of computational parameters, it gives values more than 10 times larger than the correct values for other sets of parameters.

  7. Ab initio LCAO-MO cluster-type calculation of the self-consistent electronic screening charge density around a single hydrogen impurity in a nickel crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure for a Ni atom cluster embedded in bulk Ni by use of a spin-averaged local exchange SCF Ni crystal potential is calculated with an ab initio LCAO-Mo variational method. A single hydrogen impurity is added at the cluster center (fcc octahedral interstitial site) and the electronic structure computed iteratively until the change in electron density from the pure Ni cluster density is self-consistent. The H-Ni6 self-consistent density change is compared to the charge density around a free hydrogen atom and to the initial-response density change in H-Ni14 and H-Ni38 clusters. 14 references

  8. Ni(NiO)/single-walled carbon nanotubes composite: Synthesis of electro-deposition, gas sensing property for NO gas and density functional theory calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Guo; Chen, Lei [Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Process and Technology for High-efficiency Conversion, College of Heilongjiang Province, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Bi, Hong-Mei [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Shi, Ke-Ying, E-mail: shikeying2008@yahoo.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The Ni(NiO)/semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes composite collected from the cathode after electro-deposition shows a high sensitivity to low-concentration NO gas at room temperature (18 °C). Display Omitted Highlights: ► Ni(NiO) nanoparticles were deposited on semiconducting SWCNTs by electro-deposition. ► Ni(NiO)/semiconducting SWCNTs film shows a high sensitivity to NO gas at 18 °C. ►Theoretical calculation reveals electron transfer from SWCNTs to NO via Ni. -- Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes which contains metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) and semiconducting SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs) have been obtained under electric arc discharge. Their separation can be effectively achieved by the electro-deposition method. The Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite was found on cathode where Ni was partially oxidized to NiO at ambient condition with Ni(NiO) nanoparticles deposited uniformly on the bundles of SWCNTs. These results were confirmed by Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis–NIR and TG characterizations. Furthermore, investigation of the gas sensing property of Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite film to NO gas at 18 °C demonstrated the sensitivity was approximately 5% at the concentration of 97 ppb. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to explore the sensing mechanism which suggested the adsorption of NO molecules onto the composite through N–Ni interaction as well as the proposition of electron transfer mechanisms from SWCNTs to NO via the Ni medium.

  9. Maneuver analysis for spinning thrusting spacecraft and spinning tethered spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kaela M.

    During axial thrusting of a spin-stabilized spacecraft undergoing orbital injections or control maneuvers, misalignments and center-of-mass offset create undesired body-fixed torques. The effects of the body-fixed torques, which in turn cause velocity pointing errors, can be reduced by ramping up (and then ramping down) the thruster. The first topic discussed in this thesis derives closed-form solutions for the angular velocity, Euler angles, inertial velocity, and inertial displacement solutions with nonzero initial conditions. Using the closed-form solutions, the effect of variations in the spin-axis moment of inertia and spin-rate on the spacecraft velocity pointing error are shown. The analytical solutions closely match numerical simulations. The next topic considers various ramp-up profiles (including parabolic, cosine, logarithmic, exponential, and cubic) to heuristically find a suboptimal solution to reduce the velocity pointing error. Some of the considered cosine, logarithmic, exponential, parabolic, and cubic profiles drive the velocity pointing error to nearly zero and hence qualify as effective solutions. The third topic examines a large tethered spacecraft that produces artificial gravity with the propulsion system on one end of the tether. Instead of thrusting through the center of mass, the offset thrust occurs at an angle to the tether which is held in the desired direction by changing the spin rate to compensate for decreasing propellant mass. The dynamics and control laws of the system are derived for constant, time-varying, planar, and non-planar thrust as well as spin-up maneuvers. The final topic discusses how the Bodewadt solution of a self-excited rigid body is unable to accurately predict the motion compared to a numerical integration of the equations of motion.

  10. Calculation of two-photon absorption strengths with the approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles model CC2 using the resolution-of-identity approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Daniel H; Hättig, Christof; Ruud, Kenneth

    2012-01-21

    An implementation of two-photon absorption matrix elements using the approximate second-order coupled-cluster singles and doubles model CC2 is presented. In this implementation we use the resolution-of-the-identity approximation for the two-electron repulsion integrals to reduce the computational cost. To avoid storage of large arrays we introduce in addition a numerical Laplace transformation of orbital energy denominators for the response of the doubles amplitudes. The error due to the numerical Laplace transformation is found to be negligible. Using this new implementation, we performed a series of benchmark calculations on substituted benzene and azobenzene derivatives to get reference values for TD-DFT results. We show that results obtained with the Coulomb-attenuated B3LYP functional are in reasonable agreement with the coupled-cluster results, whereas other density functionals which do not have a long-range correction give considerably less accurate results. Applications to the AF240 dye molecule and a weakly bound molecular tweezer complex demonstrate that this new RI-CC2 implementation allows for the first time to compute two-photon absorption cross sections with a correlated wave function method for molecules with more than 70 atoms and to apply this method for benchmarking TD-DFT calculations on molecules which are of particular relevance for experimental studies of two-photon absorption. PMID:22130199

  11. First-principles calculations on electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes for H{sub 2}S gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muliyati, Dewi, E-mail: dmuliyati@unj.ac.id [Computational Science Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Negeri Jakarta (Indonesia); Wella, Sasfan A.; Wungu, Triati D. K., E-mail: triati@fi.itb.ac.id; Suprijadi, E-mail: supri@fi.itb.ac.id [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    In this research, we performed first-principles calculations by means of density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the interaction of H{sub 2}S gas on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In order to understand the effect of chirality to the electronic structure of SWNTs/H{sub 2}S, the pristine SWNTs was varied to become SWNTs (5,0), (6,0), (7,0), (8,0), (9,0), and (10,0). From the calculation we found that after H{sub 2}S adsorbed on surface of SWNTs, the electronic properties of system changes from semiconductor to metal but not vice versa. It was only SWNTs (5,0), (7,0), (8,0), and (10,0) occuring the changing on its electronic properties behavior, others were remain similar with its initial behavior. In the degassing process, metal return to semiconductor behavior, which is an indication that SWNTs is a good gas sensors, responsive and reversible.

  12. Cu diffusion in single-crystal and polycrystalline TiN barrier layers: A high-resolution experimental study supported by first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense single-crystal and polycrystalline TiN/Cu stacks were prepared by unbalanced DC magnetron sputter deposition at a substrate temperature of 700 °C and a pulsed bias potential of −100 V. The microstructural variation was achieved by using two different substrate materials, MgO(001) and thermally oxidized Si(001), respectively. Subsequently, the stacks were subjected to isothermal annealing treatments at 900 °C for 1 h in high vacuum to induce the diffusion of Cu into the TiN. The performance of the TiN diffusion barrier layers was evaluated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping and atom probe tomography. No Cu penetration was evident in the single-crystal stack up to annealing temperatures of 900 °C, due to the low density of line and planar defects in single-crystal TiN. However, at higher annealing temperatures when diffusion becomes more prominent, density-functional theory calculations predict a stoichiometry-dependent atomic diffusion mechanism of Cu in bulk TiN, with Cu diffusing on the N sublattice for the experimental N/Ti ratio. In comparison, localized diffusion of Cu along grain boundaries in the columnar polycrystalline TiN barriers was detected after the annealing treatment. The maximum observed diffusion length was approximately 30 nm, yielding a grain boundary diffusion coefficient of the order of 10−16 cm2 s−1 at 900 °C. This is 10 to 100 times less than for comparable underdense polycrystalline TiN coatings deposited without external substrate heating or bias potential. The combined numerical and experimental approach presented in this paper enables the contrasting juxtaposition of diffusion phenomena and mechanisms in two TiN coatings, which differ from each other only in the presence of grain boundaries

  13. Spacecraft transformer and inductor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The conversion process in spacecraft power electronics requires the use of magnetic components which frequently are the heaviest and bulkiest items in the conversion circuit. This handbook pertains to magnetic material selection, transformer and inductor design tradeoffs, transformer design, iron core dc inductor design, toroidal power core inductor design, window utilization factors, regulation, and temperature rise. Relationships are given which simplify and standardize the design of transformers and the analysis of the circuits in which they are used. The interactions of the various design parameters are also presented in simplified form so that tradeoffs and optimizations may easily be made.

  14. Spreadsheet Calculations for Jets in Crossflow: Opposed Rows of Inline and Staggered Holes and Single and Opposed Rows with Alternating Hole Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdeman, James D.; Clisset, James R.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this jet-in-crossflow study was to calculate expected results for two configurations for which limited or no experimental results have been published: (1) cases of opposed rows of closely-spaced jets from inline and staggered round holes and (2) rows of jets from alternating large and small round holes. Simulations of these configurations were performed using an Excel (Microsoft Corporation) spreadsheet implementation of a NASA-developed empirical model which had been shown in previous publications to give excellent representations of mean experimental scalar results suggesting that the NASA empirical model for the scalar field could confidently be used to investigate these configurations. The supplemental Excel spreadsheet is posted with the current report on the NASA Glenn Technical Reports Server (http://gltrs.grc.nasa.gov) and can be accessed from the Supplementary Notes section as TM-2010-216100-SUPPL1.xls. Calculations for cases of opposed rows of jets with the orifices on one side shifted show that staggering can improve the mixing, particularly for cases where jets would overpenetrate slightly if the orifices were in an aligned configuration. The jets from the larger holes dominate the mixture fraction for configurations with a row of large holes opposite a row of smaller ones although the jet penetration was about the same. For single and opposed rows with mixed hole sizes, jets from the larger holes penetrated farther. For all cases investigated, the dimensionless variance of the mixture fraction decreased significantly with increasing downstream distance. However, at a given downstream distance, the variation between cases was small.

  15. Electromagnetic load calculation of the ITER machine using a single finite element model including narrow slits of the in-vessel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Electromagnetic (EM) loads were calculated on the ITER machine for various disruption scenarios. • Plenty of narrow slits in the in-vessel components were numerically modeled without increase of the computation memory. • Time-varying plasma data obtained from plasma simulation were precisely converted to the finite element model. • We investigated the worst disruption case and its consequent design-driving force for each ITER system. • Effect of the narrow slits on EM loads was also investigated. -- Abstract: We evaluate electromagnetic (EM) loads on the main systems of the ITER machine using a single finite element model. The 20° sector of the full ITER machine includes the main in-vessel components as well as the vacuum vessel. Narrow slits of the in-vessel components are effectively modeled by using the element splitting method without significant increase of computation memory and time as well as without sacrificing the accuracy. Furthermore, the halo current is taken into account at the same time together with the plasma current. To apply both currents concurrently, dedicated conversion codes are utilized to transfer the plasma simulation results by DINA to the electromagnetic analysis by ANSYS-EMAG used here. The electromagnetic loads on the ITER machine are calculated for various disruption scenarios. Investigation on the analysis results is made to find the worst plasma disruption case and the design-driving load component for each system as well as to compare load contribution from eddy and halo currents. The effect of the narrow slits on load reduction is also examined

  16. Quantitative excited state spectroscopy of a single InGaAs quantum dot molecule through multi-million-atom electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic electronic structure calculations are performed to study the coherent inter-dot couplings of the electronic states in a single InGaAs quantum dot molecule. The experimentally observed excitonic spectrum by Krenner et al (2005) Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 057402 is quantitatively reproduced, and the correct energy states are identified based on a previously validated atomistic tight binding model. The extended devices are represented explicitly in space with 15-million-atom structures. An excited state spectroscopy technique is applied where the externally applied electric field is swept to probe the ladder of the electronic energy levels (electron or hole) of one quantum dot through anti-crossings with the energy levels of the other quantum dot in a two-quantum-dot molecule. This technique can be used to estimate the spatial electron-hole spacing inside the quantum dot molecule as well as to reverse engineer quantum dot geometry parameters such as the quantum dot separation. Crystal-deformation-induced piezoelectric effects have been discussed in the literature as minor perturbations lifting degeneracies of the electron excited (P and D) states, thus affecting polarization alignment of wavefunction lobes for III-V heterostructures such as single InAs/GaAs quantum dots. In contrast, this work demonstrates the crucial importance of piezoelectricity to resolve the symmetries and energies of the excited states through matching the experimentally measured spectrum in an InGaAs quantum dot molecule under the influence of an electric field. Both linear and quadratic piezoelectric effects are studied for the first time for a quantum dot molecule and demonstrated to be indeed important. The net piezoelectric contribution is found to be critical in determining the correct energy spectrum, which is in contrast to recent studies reporting vanishing net piezoelectric contributions.

  17. Reconfigurability Analysis Method for Spacecraft Autonomous Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a critical requirement for spacecraft autonomous control, reconfigurability should be considered in design stage of spacecrafts by involving effective reconfigurability analysis method in guiding system designs. In this paper, a novel reconfigurability analysis method is proposed for spacecraft design. First, some basic definitions regarding spacecraft reconfigurability are given. Then, based on function tree theory, a reconfigurability modeling approach is established to properly describe system’s reconfigurability characteristics, and corresponding analysis procedure based on minimal cut set and minimal path set is further presented. In addition, indexes of fault reconfigurable degree and system reconfigurable rate for evaluating reconfigurability are defined, and the methodology for analyzing system’s week links is also constructed. Finally, the method is verified by a spacecraft attitude measuring system, and the results show that the presented method cannot only implement the quantitative reconfigurability evaluations but also find the weak links, and therefore provides significant improvements for spacecraft reconfigurability design.

  18. Active control of electric potential of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for controlling the potential of a spacecraft by means of devices which release appropriate charged particles from the spacecraft to the environment. Attention is given to electron emitters, ion emitters, a basic electron emitter arrangement, techniques for sensing electric field or potential, and flight experiments on active potential control. It is recommended to avoid differential charging on spacecraft surfaces because it can severely affect the efficacy of emitters. Discharging the frame of a spacecraft with dielectric surfaces involves the risk of stressing the dielectric material excessively. The spacecraft should, therefore, be provided with grounded conductive surfaces. It is pointed out that particles released by control systems can return to the spacecraft.

  19. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  20. Pointing compensation system for spacecraft instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A closed loop system reduces pointing errors in one or more spacecraft instruments. Associated with each instrument is a electronics package (3) for commanding motion in that instrument and a pointing control system (5) for imparting motion in that instrument in response to a command (4) from the commanding package (3). Spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) compensates for instrument pointing errors caused by instrument-motion-induced spacecraft motion. Any finite number of instruments can be so compensated, by providing each pointing control system (5) and each commanding package (3), for the instruments desired to be compensated, with a link to the spacecraft motion compensation logic (25). The spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) is an electronic manifestation of the algebraic negative of a model of the dynamics of motion of the spacecraft. An example of a suitable model, and computer-simulated results, are presented.

  1. Timeline as Unifying Concept for Spacecraft Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholtz, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    The notion of Timeline has been used informally in spacecraft operations software for some time, but it has not heretofore been formalized and unified either syntactically or semantically. We have formalized and unified the Timeline so that the commonality can be exploited to reduce the cost of developing and using spacecraft operations software. The Timeline can then be used as the common data structure for storage and communications between spacecraft planning and operations software elements.

  2. Spacecraft electronics design for radiation tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spacecraft electronics design for radiation tolerance is a complex subject, involving a detailed understanding of environment, component hardening, and design susceptibility. This paper describes current design practices and discusses future trends in spacecraft electronics which are likely to alter traditional approaches. A summary of radiation effects and radiation tolerance requirements typically levied on spacecraft designs is provided. Methods of dealing with radiation are then described, followed with testability issues

  3. Cu diffusion in single-crystal and polycrystalline TiN barrier layers: A high-resolution experimental study supported by first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mühlbacher, Marlene, E-mail: marlene.muehlbacher@unileoben.ac.at [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Bochkarev, Anton S. [Materials Center Leoben Forschung GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Institute of Physics, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Mendez-Martin, Francisca; Schalk, Nina; Mitterer, Christian [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Sartory, Bernhard; Chitu, Livia; Popov, Maxim N.; Spitaler, Jürgen [Materials Center Leoben Forschung GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Puschnig, Peter [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Ding, Hong [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road 1, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-08-28

    Dense single-crystal and polycrystalline TiN/Cu stacks were prepared by unbalanced DC magnetron sputter deposition at a substrate temperature of 700 °C and a pulsed bias potential of −100 V. The microstructural variation was achieved by using two different substrate materials, MgO(001) and thermally oxidized Si(001), respectively. Subsequently, the stacks were subjected to isothermal annealing treatments at 900 °C for 1 h in high vacuum to induce the diffusion of Cu into the TiN. The performance of the TiN diffusion barrier layers was evaluated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping and atom probe tomography. No Cu penetration was evident in the single-crystal stack up to annealing temperatures of 900 °C, due to the low density of line and planar defects in single-crystal TiN. However, at higher annealing temperatures when diffusion becomes more prominent, density-functional theory calculations predict a stoichiometry-dependent atomic diffusion mechanism of Cu in bulk TiN, with Cu diffusing on the N sublattice for the experimental N/Ti ratio. In comparison, localized diffusion of Cu along grain boundaries in the columnar polycrystalline TiN barriers was detected after the annealing treatment. The maximum observed diffusion length was approximately 30 nm, yielding a grain boundary diffusion coefficient of the order of 10{sup −16} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} at 900 °C. This is 10 to 100 times less than for comparable underdense polycrystalline TiN coatings deposited without external substrate heating or bias potential. The combined numerical and experimental approach presented in this paper enables the contrasting juxtaposition of diffusion phenomena and mechanisms in two TiN coatings, which differ from each other only in the presence of grain boundaries.

  4. A spacecraft for the Earth observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Raynor L.; Bordi, Francesco

    1995-04-01

    The space segment of NASA's Earth observing system (EOS) includes three series of intermediate-sized spacecraft, plus two smaller spacecraft. The EOS-AM spacecraft is the first of the intermediate-sized spacecraft. EOS-AM accommodates sensors that measure cloud and aerosol radiative properties, and that provide data to study the water and energy cycles. Scheduled for launch in the late 1990s, the EOS-AM spacecraft is designed for a 5-year mission. The spacecraft will be launched from the Western Space and Missile Center (California) into a polar, Sun-synchronous, low-Earth orbit with a 16-day repeat cycle. In its flight configuration, the spacecraft is almost 20 ft long (including instruments mounted at the fore end of the spacecraft) and 6 ft wide (in its widest dimension), has a mass of about 13,000 Ibs and uses about 3000 W of electrical power. The spacecraft is compatible with the Atlas IIAS launch vehicle. EOS-AM has on-board storage for at least two orbits of science data. These data will be transmitted to the ground via the tracking and data relay satellite system (using data structures and protocols in compliance with the recommendations of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems). A direct downlink system to support distributed users will also be available.

  5. Formation Flying Spacecraft Concept for Heliophysics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Davila, Joseph; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Shah, Neerav; Li, Steven X.

    2016-05-01

    A number of space-based heliophysics instruments would benefit from formation flying spacecraft. An occulter or a focusing optic such as a photon sieve could be mounted on a separate spacecraft rather than at the end of a boom. This would enable science measurements to be made on smaller, less expensive spacecraft. To accomplish this goal, the relative position of the spacecraft must be monitored and controlled to high precision. We describe two separate optical sensing systems that monitor relative position of the spacecraft to the level required for a photon sieve mission concept wherein the photon sieve is mounted on one spacecraft while the imaging detector is mounted on another. The first system employs a novel time of flight measurement of a laser beam that includes imbedded optical data packets. The contents of the returning data packet can be compared to the departing data packet to provide an extremely high resolution distance measurement. Employing three such systems allows measurement of pitch and yaw in addition to longitudinal separation. The second optical system monitors lateral motion. A mildy divergent laser beam is transmitted from one spacecraft to a sensor array on the second spacecraft. Monitoring the position of the brightest portion of the beam on the sensor array provides a direct measurement of lateral relative motion. Employing at least two such systems enables monitoring roll of the spacecraft as well as centration. We will also discuss low force thruster systems required for high precision station keeping.

  6. Outer planet spacecraft temperature testing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Avila, A.

    2002-01-01

    Unmanned spacecraft flown on missions to the outer planets of the solar system have included flybys, planetary orbiters, and atmospheric probes during the last three decades. The thermal design, test, and analysis approach applied to these spacecraft evolved from the passive thermal designs applied to the earlier lunar and interplanetary spacecraft. The inflight temperature data from representative sets of engineering subsystems and science instruments from a subset of these spacecraft are compared to those obtained during the ground test programs and from the prelaunch predictions. Several lessons are presented with specific recommendations for considerations for new projects to aid in the planning of cost effective temperature design, test, and analysis programs.

  7. Optimizing Spacecraft Placement for Liaison Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, C. Channing; Villac, Benjamin F.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    A navigation and communications network is proposed to support an anticipated need for infrastructure in the Earth-Moon system. Periodic orbits will host the constellations while a novel, autonomous navigation strategy will guide the spacecraft along their path strictly based on satellite-to-satellite telemetry. In particular, this paper investigates the second stage of a larger constellation optimization scheme for multi-spacecraft systems. That is, following an initial orbit down-selection process, this analysis provides insights into the ancillary problem of spacecraft placement. Two case studies are presented that consider configurations of up to four spacecraft for a halo orbit and a cycler trajectory.

  8. Experimental radiative lifetimes for highly excited states and calculated oscillator strengths for lines of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt (Co II)

    CERN Document Server

    Quinet, P; Palmeri, P; Engstrom, L; Hartman, H; Lundberg, H; Nilsson, H

    2016-01-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes and calculated oscillator strengths for transitions of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt. More pre- cisely, nineteen radiative lifetimes in Co+ have been measured with the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique using one- and two-step excitations. Out of these, seven belonging to the high lying 3d$^7$($^4$F)4d configuration in the energy range 90697 - 93738 cm$^{-1}$ are new, and the other twelve from th3d$^7$($^4$F)F)4p configuration with energies between 45972 and 49328 cm$^{-1}$1 are compared with previous measurements. In addition, a relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization e?ects has been employed to compute transition rates. Supported by the good agreement between theory and experiment for the lifetimes, new reliable transition probabilities and os- cillator strengths have been deduced for 5080 Co II transitions in the spectral range 114 - 8744 nm.

  9. Close shell interactions in 3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy-6-methoxymethyleneoxy-1-methyl-2-quinolone: 100 K single crystal neutron diffraction study and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, C. G.; Fantoni, A. C.; Goeta, A. E.; Wilson, C. C.; Autino, J. C.; Punte, G.

    2005-10-01

    The molecular and crystal structures of the title compound have been determined from a single crystal neutron diffraction experiment at 100 K. A comparison between the main geometrical features and related properties of the in-crystal and the ab initio optimized free molecule structures has shown that crystal packing induces a significant distortion in the molecular geometry. Packing instead would only have a moderate effect on the observed intramolecular resonance assisted hydrogen bond. Supermolecular ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been performed on the six different dimers one molecule forms with its nine nearest neighbours. The obtained results clearly show that dispersion contributions dominate in the most strongly interacting dimers, in good qualitative accord with the predictions made by using different empirical potentials. A qualitative description of the most prominent inductive effects determined from the electron density deformation upon dimer formation is presented. Topological analyses of the dimers charge densities have been performed in the framework of the Bader's AIM theory and all the intermolecular bond critical points have been identified. An attempt to determine some of the interaction energies only from topological quantities made evident the practical limitations of such an approach.

  10. Comparison of 99mTc-MAG3 plasma clearance calculating methods [Bubeck and Russell (1996) methods] by single blood sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was a comparison of the Bubeck and Russell (1996) methods, both of which are used to calculate 99mTc-MAG3 plasma clearance by single blood sampling in consideration of the distribution volume of patients. Quadratic polynominal approximation showed a strong correlation between the plasma clearance values obtained by the two methods. The quantitative values obtained by the Bubeck method tended to be lower than those obtained by the Russell (1996) method in the high clearance range. However, in the low to medium clearance range (below 250 ml/min/1.73 m2), there was almost no difference between the values, and the relationship between the values obtained by the two methods could be expressed by a straight regression line. A comparison of plasma clearance values according to difference in blood sampling time (35 min and 44 min sampling) in adults showed that there was no significant change in clearance regardless of the state of renal function. Correlation of the renal uptake rate obtained by the Bubeck method using a gamma camera could be expressed by a good straight regression line that passed around the origin of the coordinates. The results showed that, although the plasma clearance values obtained by the Bubeck method tended to be underestimated in the high clearance range compared with the values obtained by the Russell (1996) method, there was a very good correlation between the values obtained by the Bubeck method and renal uptake rate. (author)

  11. Estimation of Nutation Time Constant Model Parameters for On-Axis Spinning Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Keith; Sudermann, James

    2008-01-01

    Calculating an accurate nutation time constant for a spinning spacecraft is an important step for ensuring mission success. Spacecraft nutation is caused by energy dissipation about the spin axis. Propellant slosh in the spacecraft fuel tanks is the primary source for this dissipation and can be simulated using a forced motion spin table. Mechanical analogs, such as pendulums and rotors, are typically used to simulate propellant slosh. A strong desire exists for an automated method to determine these analog parameters. The method presented accomplishes this task by using a MATLAB Simulink/SimMechanics based simulation that utilizes the Parameter Estimation Tool.

  12. Robustness and Actuator Bandwidth of MRP-Based Sliding Mode Control for Spacecraft Attitude Control Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Jung-Hoon; Ra, Sung-Woong

    2009-12-01

    Nonlinear sliding surface design in variable structure systems for spacecraft attitude control problems is studied. A robustness analysis is performed for regular form of system, and calculation of actuator bandwidth is presented by reviewing sliding surface dynamics. To achieve non-singular attitude description and minimal parameterization, spacecraft attitude control problems are considered based on modified Rodrigues parameters (MRP). It is shown that the derived controller ensures the sliding motion in pre-determined region irrespective of unmodeled effects and disturbances.

  13. Laboratory investigation of antenna signals from dust impacts on spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Collette, Andrew; Malaspina, David M.; Thayer, Frederick

    2016-04-01

    Electric field and plasma wave instruments act as dust detectors picking up voltage pulses induced by impacts of particulates on the spacecraft body. These signals enable the characterization of cosmic dust environments even with missions without dedicated dust instruments. For example, the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft performed the first detection of dust particles near Uranus, Neptune, and in the outer solar system [Gurnett et al., 1987, 1991, 1997]. The two STEREO spacecraft observed distinct signals at high rate that were interpreted as nano-sized particles originating from near the Sun and accelerated to high velocities by the solar wind [MeyerVernet et al, 2009a, Zaslavsky et al., 2012]. The MAVEN spacecraft is using the antennas onboard to characterize the dust environment of Mars [Andersson et al., 2014] and Solar Probe Plus will do the same in the inner heliosphere. The challenge, however, is the correct interpretation of the impact signals and calculating the mass of the dust particles. The uncertainties result from the incomplete understanding of the signal pickup mechanisms, and the variation of the signal amplitude with impact location, the ambient plasma environment, and impact speed. A comprehensive laboratory study of impact generated antenna signals has been performed recently using the IMPACT dust accelerator facility operated at the University of Colorado. Dust particles of micron and submicron sizes with velocities of tens of km/s are generated using a 3 MV electrostatic analyzer. A scaled down model spacecraft is exposed to the dust impacts and one or more antennas, connected to sensitive electronics, are used to detect the impact signals. The measurements showed that there are three clearly distinct signal pickup mechanisms due to spacecraft charging, antenna charging and antenna pickup sensing space charge from the expanding plasma cloud. All mechanisms vary with the spacecraft and antenna bias voltages and, furthermore, the latter two

  14. A CFD Approach to Modeling Spacecraft Fuel Slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsell, Brandon; Gangadharan, Sathya; Chatman, Yadira; Sudermann, James; Schlee, Keith; Ristow, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Energy dissipation and resonant coupling from sloshing fuel in spacecraft fuel tanks is a problem that occurs in the design of many spacecraft. In the case of a spin stabilized spacecraft, this energy dissipation can cause a growth in the spacecrafts' nutation (wobble) that may lead to disastrous consequences for the mission. Even in non-spinning spacecraft, coupling between the spacecraft or upper stage flight control system and an unanticipated slosh resonance can result in catastrophe. By using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver such as Fluent, a model for this fuel slosh can be created. The accuracy of the model must be tested by comparing its results to an experimental test case. Such a model will allow for the variation of many different parameters such as fluid viscosity and gravitational field, yielding a deeper understanding of spacecraft slosh dynamics. In order to gain a better understanding of the dynamics behind sloshing fluids, the Launch Services Program (LSP) at the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is interested in finding ways to better model this behavior. Thanks to past research, a state-of-the-art fuel slosh research facility was designed and fabricated at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU). This test facility has produced interesting results and a fairly reliable parameter estimation process to predict the necessary values that accurately characterize a mechanical pendulum analog model. The current study at ERAU uses a different approach to model the free surface sloshing of liquid in a spherical tank using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods. Using a software package called Fluent, a model was created to simulate the sloshing motion of the propellant. This finite volume program uses a technique called the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to model the interaction between two fluids [4]. For the case of free surface slosh, the two fluids are the propellant and air. As the fuel sloshes around in the tank, it naturally

  15. High-Speed Solution of Spacecraft Trajectory Problems Using Taylor Series Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James R.; Martini, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    It has been known for some time that Taylor series (TS) integration is among the most efficient and accurate numerical methods in solving differential equations. However, the full benefit of the method has yet to be realized in calculating spacecraft trajectories, for two main reasons. First, most applications of Taylor series to trajectory propagation have focused on relatively simple problems of orbital motion or on specific problems and have not provided general applicability. Second, applications that have been more general have required use of a preprocessor, which inevitably imposes constraints on computational efficiency. The latter approach includes the work of Berryman et al., who solved the planetary n-body problem with relativistic effects. Their work specifically noted the computational inefficiencies arising from use of a preprocessor and pointed out the potential benefit of manually coding derivative routines. In this Engineering Note, we report on a systematic effort to directly implement Taylor series integration in an operational trajectory propagation code: the Spacecraft N-Body Analysis Program (SNAP). The present Taylor series implementation is unique in that it applies to spacecraft virtually anywhere in the solar system and can be used interchangeably with another integration method. SNAP is a high-fidelity trajectory propagator that includes force models for central body gravitation with N X N harmonics, other body gravitation with N X N harmonics, solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag (for Earth orbits), and spacecraft thrusting (including shadowing). The governing equations are solved using an eighth-order Runge-Kutta Fehlberg (RKF) single-step method with variable step size control. In the present effort, TS is implemented by way of highly integrated subroutines that can be used interchangeably with RKF. This makes it possible to turn TS on or off during various phases of a mission. Current TS force models include central body

  16. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  17. Several key problems in automatic layout design of spacecraft modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhiguo; TENG Hongfei; LIU Zhanwei

    2003-01-01

    Computer-aided layout design of spacecraft modules, such as satellite modules and manned spaceship modules, is of great significance and egregious complexity. It is known as a combinatorial optimization and NPC problem in mathematics, a conceptual design and complex system in engineering. The main difficulties include representation and formulation of the problem in mathematics and the solution strategy and pragmatic approaches in engineering practice. After a brief survey of the state-of-the-art in relevant fields, this paper summarizes the research work of the authors' group on automatic layout design of spacecraft modules in the last 15 years, mainly focusing on 5 key problems. They are modeling and problem-solving algorithms, interference calculation, theory and applications of layout topological pattern, decision-making in layout design, and their pragmatic approaches in engineering practice.

  18. Optical properties of pure and TM-doped single-walled ZnO nanotubes (8,0) (TM = V and Co) by first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendi, R. Taghavi; Sarmazdeh, M. Majidiyan; Boochani, A.; Elahi, S. M.; Naderi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, some optical properties of pure and transition metal-doped (TM = Co and V) single-walled ZnO nanotubes (8,0) (SWZnONT(8,0)) such as, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function, optical conductivity, refractive index and optical reflectivity, were investigated. The calculations have been performed within framework of the density functional theory (DFT) using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The results show that, optical properties of SWZnONT(8,0) are anisotropic, especially at low energies and this anisotropy at low energies increases with doping of V in SWZnONT(8,0) while the Co-doped SWZnONT(8,0) behaves like pure SWZnONT(8,0). Doping of ZnO nanotubes has a significant impact on the value of the dielectric constant, so that due to the presence of V atom, the dielectric constant is increased up to three times. Study of the imaginary part of the dielectric function and optical conductivity showed that the important energy range for absorption processes and optical transitions is low energy range to 15 eV. The optical transitions have been studied based on band structure and density of states. The results of the optical reflectivity showed that these nanotubes are transparent in a wide energy ranges which provide them for using in transparent coatings. In addition, due to the reported magnetic properties for V- and Co-doped ZnO nanotubes, these nanotubes are suitable for using in spintronics and magneto-optic devices.

  19. A mobile transporter concept for EVA assembly of future spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Judith J.; Bush, Harold G.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Lake, Mark S.; Jensen, J. Kermit

    1990-01-01

    This paper details the ground test program for the NASA Langley Research Center Mobile Transporter concept. The Mobile Transporter would assist EVA astronauts in the assembly of the Space Station Freedom. 1-g and simulated O-g (neutral buoyancy) tests were conducted to evaluate the use of the Mobile Transporter. A three-bay (44 struts) orthogonal tetrahedral truss configuration with a 15-foot-square cross section was repeatedly assembled by a single pair of pressure suited test subjects working from the Mobile Transporter astronaut positioning devices. The average unit assembly time was 28 seconds/strut. The results of these tests indicate that the use of a Mobile Transporter for EVA assembly of Space Station size structure is viable and practical. Additionally, the Mobile Transporter could be used to construct other spacecraft such as the submillimeter astronomical laboratory, space crane, and interplanetary (i.e., Mars and lunar) spacecraft.

  20. Secure communications with low-orbit spacecraft using quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, Charles G.; Simmons, Charles M.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for secure communication between an earth station and spacecraft. A laser outputs single pulses that are split into preceding bright pulses and delayed attenuated pulses, and polarized. A Pockels cell changes the polarization of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses according to a string of random numbers, a first polarization representing a "1," and a second polarization representing a "0." At the receiving station, a beamsplitter randomly directs the preceding bright pulses and the polarized delayed attenuated pulses onto longer and shorter paths, both terminating in a beamsplitter which directs the preceding bright pulses and a first portion of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses to a first detector, and a second portion of the polarized delayed attenuated pulses to a second detector to generate a key for secure communication between the earth station and the spacecraft.

  1. Method for Calculating Through Capacity of Single and Double Track Railway Section%单双线区段通过能力计算方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱名军; 李引珍

    2014-01-01

    Building double-track insertion interval or double-track interval in the single track sec-tion is one of the effective measures to enhance the through capacity and increase the train trave-ling speed of the railway section.Firstly,the conceptions of the adjacent section outside the double-track insertion or the double-track interval,the double-track insertion unit and the double-track interval unit (both can be called as a double track unit),and the adaptive ranges of the train schedule circle for the trains both in the up and down directions to pass through the unit are re-vised and put forward.Secondly,it is figured out that the through capacity of the unit is a variable depending on the section's conditions;the basic characteristics for the unit to achieve the maximum through capacity are that all the train schedule circles of the intervals in the unit are equal;the sit-uations for the trains of both the two directions to pass through the double-track unit can happen only when the train schedule circles in the section are in certain ranges and the ranges of up and down directions are different.On this research basis,the method for calculating the through ca-pacity of the single and double track section is proposed.The conclusions of this paper can be used as a theoretical basis for designing the projects expanding through capacity and organizing the op-erations of the single track sections.%在单线区段的困难区间修建双线插入段或双线区间是增强区段通过能力和提高列车旅行速度的有效措施。修正了“外包区间”的概念、提出了“双插段单元”和“双线区间单元”(统称“双线单元”)以及在双线单元实现列车双通过周期适应范围的概念;指出双线单元的通过能力是取决于区段条件的变量,取得最大通过能力的基本特征是单元内各区间的周期相等,双线单元只能在一定的运行图周期范围内实现列车双通过且适应的周期范

  2. TTEthernet for Integrated Spacecraft Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Aerospace projects have traditionally employed federated avionics architectures, in which each computer system is designed to perform one specific function (e.g. navigation). There are obvious downsides to this approach, including excessive weight (from so much computing hardware), and inefficient processor utilization (since modern processors are capable of performing multiple tasks). There has therefore been a push for integrated modular avionics (IMA), in which common computing platforms can be leveraged for different purposes. This consolidation of multiple vehicle functions to shared computing platforms can significantly reduce spacecraft cost, weight, and design complexity. However, the application of IMA principles introduces significant challenges, as the data network must accommodate traffic of mixed criticality and performance levels - potentially all related to the same shared computer hardware. Because individual network technologies are rarely so competent, the development of truly integrated network architectures often proves unreasonable. Several different types of networks are utilized - each suited to support a specific vehicle function. Critical functions are typically driven by precise timing loops, requiring networks with strict guarantees regarding message latency (i.e. determinism) and fault-tolerance. Alternatively, non-critical systems generally employ data networks prioritizing flexibility and high performance over reliable operation. Switched Ethernet has seen widespread success filling this role in terrestrial applications. Its high speed, flexibility, and the availability of inexpensive commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components make it desirable for inclusion in spacecraft platforms. Basic Ethernet configurations have been incorporated into several preexisting aerospace projects, including both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). However, classical switched Ethernet cannot provide the high level of network

  3. Advanced nickel-hydrogen spacecraft battery development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dwaine K.; Fox, Chris L.; Standlee, D. J.; Grindstaff, B. K.

    1994-02-01

    Eagle-Picher currently has several advanced nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) cell component and battery designs under development including common pressure vessel (CPV), single pressure vessel (SPV), and dependent pressure vessel (DPV) designs. A CPV NiH2 battery, utilizing low-cost 64 mm (2.5 in.) cell diameter technology, has been designed and built for multiple smallsat programs, including the TUBSAT B spacecraft which is currently scheduled (24 Nov. 93) for launch aboard a Russian Proton rocket. An advanced 90 mm (3.5 in.) NiH2 cell design is currently being manufactured for the Space Station Freedom program. Prototype 254 mm (10 in.) diameter SPV batteries are currently under construction and initial boilerplate testing has shown excellent results. NiH2 cycle life testing is being continued at Eagle-Picher and IPV cells have currently completed more than 89,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 15% DOD, 49,000 real-time LEO cycles at 30 percent DOD, 37,800 cycles under a real-time LEO profile, 30 eclipse seasons in accelerated GEO, and 6 eclipse seasons in real-time GEO testing at 75 percent DOD maximum. Nickel-metal hydride battery development is continuing for both aerospace and electric vehicle applications. Eagle-Picher has also developed an extensive range of battery evaluation, test, and analysis (BETA) measurement and control equipment and software, based on Hewlett-Packard computerized data acquisition/control hardware.

  4. Generalized Frequency Domain State-Space Models for Analyzing Flexible Rotating Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James D.; Elgohary, Tarek A.

    2012-06-01

    The mathematical model for a flexible spacecraft that is rotating about a single axis rotation is described by coupled rigid and flexible body degrees-of-freedom, where the equations of motion are modeled by integro-partial differential equations. Beam-like structures are often useful for analyzing boom-like flexible appendages. The equations of motion are analyzed by introducing generalized Fourier series that transform the governing equations into a system of ordinary differential equations. Though technically straightforward, two problems arise with this approach: (1) the model is frequency-truncated because a finite number of series terms are retained in the model, and (2) computationally intense matrix-valued transfer function calculations are required for understanding the frequency domain behavior of the system. Both of these problems are resolved by: (1) computing the Laplace transform of the governing integro-partial differential equation of motion; and (2) introducing a generalized state space (consisting of the deformational coordinate and three spatial partial derivatives, as well as single and double spatial integrals of the deformational coordinate). The resulting math model is cast in the form of a linear state-space differential equation that is solved in terms of a matrix exponential and convolution integral. The structural boundary conditions defined by Hamilton's principle are enforced on the closed-form solution for the generalized state space. The generalized state space model is then manipulated to provide analytic scalar transfer function models for original integro-partial differential system dynamics. Symbolic methods are used to obtain closed-form eigen decomposition- based solutions for the matrix exponential/convolution integral algorithm. Numerical results are presented that compare the classical series based approach with the generalized state space approach for computing representative spacecraft transfer function models.

  5. Single particle calculations for a Woods-Saxon potential with triaxial deformations, and large Cartesian oscillator basis (TRIAXIAL 2014, Third version of the code Triaxial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Azizi, B.; Medjadi, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    , WINDOWS 7, LINUX. RAM: 256 Mb (depending on nmax). Swap file: 4Gb (depending on nmax) Classification: 17.7. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADSK_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 176 (2007) 634 Nature of problem: The Single particle energies and the single particle wave functions are calculated from one-body Hamiltonian including a central field of Woods-Saxon type, a spin-orbit interaction, and the Coulomb potential for the protons. We consider only ellipsoidal (triaxial) shapes. The deformation of the nuclear shape is fixed by the usual Bohr parameters (β,γ). Solution method: The representative matrix of the Hamiltonian is built by means of the Cartesian basis of the anisotropic harmonic oscillator, and then diagonalized by a set of subroutines of the EISPACK library. Two quadrature methods of Gauss are employed to calculate respectively the integrals of the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian, and the integral defining the Coulomb potential. Two quantum numbers are conserved: the parity and the signature. Due to the Kramers degeneracy, only positive signature is considered. Therefore, calculations are made for positive and negative parity separately (with positive signature only). Reasons for new version: Now, there are several ways to obtain the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions. The eigenvalues can be obtained from the subroutine ‘eigvals’ or from the array ‘energies’ or also from the formatted files ‘valuu.dat’, ‘eigenvalo.dat’, ‘eigenva.dat’ or better from the unformatted file ‘eigenvaunf.dat’. The eigenfunctions can be obtained straightforwardly in configuration space from the subroutine ‘eigfunc’ or by their components on the oscillator basis from the subroutine ‘compnts’. The latter are also recorded on a formatted file ‘componento.dat’ or on an unformatted file ‘componentounf.dat’. Summary of revisions: This version is

  6. Spacecraft Systems Engineering, 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortescue, Peter; Stark, John; Swinerd, Graham

    2003-03-01

    Following on from the hugely successful previous editions, the third edition of Spacecraft Systems Engineering incorporates the most recent technological advances in spacecraft and satellite engineering. With emphasis on recent developments in space activities, this new edition has been completely revised. Every chapter has been updated and rewritten by an expert engineer in the field, with emphasis on the bus rather than the payload. Encompassing the fundamentals of spacecraft engineering, the book begins with front-end system-level issues, such as environment, mission analysis and system engineering, and progresses to a detailed examination of subsystem elements which represent the core of spacecraft design - mechanical, electrical, propulsion, thermal, control etc. This quantitative treatment is supplemented by an appreciation of the interactions between the elements, which deeply influence the process of spacecraft systems design. In particular the revised text includes * A new chapter on small satellites engineering and applications which has been contributed by two internationally-recognised experts, with insights into small satellite systems engineering. * Additions to the mission analysis chapter, treating issues of aero-manouevring, constellation design and small body missions. In summary, this is an outstanding textbook for aerospace engineering and design students, and offers essential reading for spacecraft engineers, designers and research scientists. The comprehensive approach provides an invaluable resource to spacecraft manufacturers and agencies across the world.

  7. Maneuver planning of a rigid spacecraft with two skew control moment gyros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Haichao; Jin, Lei; Xu, Shijie

    2014-11-01

    The attitude maneuver planning of a rigid spacecraft using two skew single-gimbal control moment gyros (CMGs) is investigated. First, two types of restrictions are enforced on the gimbal motions of two skew CMGs, with each restriction yielding continuous control torque along a principal axis of the spacecraft. Then, it is proved that any axis fixed to the spacecraft can be pointed along an arbitrary inertial direction by at most two sequent rotations around the two actuated axes. Given this fact, a two-step eigenaxis rotation strategy, executing by the two single-axis torques respectively, is designed to point a given body-fixed axis along a desired direction. Furthermore, a three-step eigenaxis rotation strategy is constructed to achieve an arbitrary rest-to-rest attitude maneuver. The rotation angles required for the single-axis pointing and arbitrary attitude maneuver schemes are all analytically solved. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  8. Spacecraft exploration of Phobos and Deimos

    OpenAIRE

    Duxbury, Thomas C.; Zakharov, Alexander; Hoffmann, Harald; Guinness, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We review the previous exploration of Phobos and Deimos by spacecraft. The first close-up images of Phobos and Deimos were obtained by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1971, followed by much image data from the two Viking orbiters at the end of the 70s, which formed the basis for early Phobos and Deimos shape and dynamic models. The Soviet Phobos 2 spacecraft came within 100 km of landing on Phobos in 1988. Mars Global Surveyor (1996–2006) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (since 2005) made close-up...

  9. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  10. Gaussian pigeon-inspired optimization approach to orbital spacecraft formation reconfiguration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shujian; Duan Haibin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of space technology, orbital spacecraft formation has received great attention from international and domestic academics and industry. Compared with a single monolithic, the orbital spacecraft formation system has many advantages. This paper pre-sents an improved pigeon-inspired optimization (PIO) algorithm for solving the optimal formation reconfiguration problems of multiple orbital spacecraft. Considering that the uniform distribution random searching system in PIO has its own weakness, a modified PIO model adopting Gaussian strategy is presented and the detailed process is also given. Comparative experiments with basic PIO and particle swarm optimization (PSO) are conducted, and the results have verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed Gaussian PIO (GPIO) in solving orbital spacecraft formation reconfiguration problems.

  11. 220kV单相牵引变压器短路阻抗数值仿真计算%Numerical Simulation and Calculation of Short Circuit Impedance of 220kV Single-Phase Traction Transformer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯世勇; 董景义; 李杰; 段玉柱

    2011-01-01

    The short circuit impedance of 220kV single-phase traction transformer is simulated and calculated with field-circuit coupling method.%采用场-路耦合方法对220kV单相牵引变压器短路阻抗进行了仿真计算。

  12. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  13. Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, and phase function calculations to assumptions on physical and chemical properties of aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    In coupled chemistry-meteorology simulations, the calculation of aerosol optical properties is an important task for the inclusion of the aerosol effects on the atmospheric radiative budget. However, the calculation of these properties from an aerosol profile is not uniquely defi...

  14. Spacecraft Water Exposure Guidelines for Selected Contaminants. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station is a closed and complex environment, so some contamination of its internal atmosphere and water system is expected. To protect space crews from contaminants in potable and hygiene water, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance on how to develop water exposure guidelines and review NASA s development of the exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. NASA selects water contaminants for which spacecraft water exposure guidelines (SWEGs) will be established; this involves identifying toxicity effects relevant to astronauts and calculating exposure concentrations on the basis of those end points. SWEGs are established for exposures of 1, 10, 100, and 1,000 days. This report is the second volume in the series, Spacecraft Water Exposure Guidelines for Selected Chemicals. SWEG reports for acetone, alkylamines, ammonia, barium, cadmium, caprolactam, formate, formaldehyde, manganese, total organic carbon, and zinc are included in this report. The committee concludes that the SWEGs developed for these chemicals are scientifically valid based on the data reviewed by NASA and are consistent with the NRC (2000) report, Methods for Developing Spacecraft Water Exposure Guidelines. SWEG reports for additional chemicals will be presented in a subsequent volume.

  15. SpaceX's Dragon America's next generation spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2016-01-01

    This book describes Dragon V2, a futuristic vehicle that not only provides a means for NASA to transport its astronauts to the orbiting outpost but also advances SpaceX’s core objective of reusability. A direct descendant of Dragon, Dragon V2 can be retrieved, refurbished and re-launched. It is a spacecraft with the potential to completely revolutionize the economics of an industry where equipment costing hundreds of millions of dollars is routinely discarded after a single use. It was presented by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk in May 2014 as the spaceship that will carry NASA astronauts to the International Space Station as soon as 2016 SpaceX’s Dragon – America’s Next Generation Spacecraft describes the extraordinary feats of engineering and human achievement that have placed this revolutionary spacecraft at the forefront of the launch industry and positioned it as the precursor for ultimately transporting humans to Mars. It describes the design and development of Dragon, provides mission highlights of the f...

  16. The monopropellant hydrazine propulsion subsystem for the Pioneer Venus spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter and the Multiprobe spacecraft propulsion subsystems and their performance are presented. Monopropellant hydrazine subsystems on each spacecraft provided the capability to spin up the spacecraft after separation and perform all spin rate, velocity, and attitude changes required by the control subsystem to satisfy mission objectives. The propulsion subsystem provides thrust on demand by supplying anhydrous hydrazine from the propellant tanks through manifolds, filters and valves to the thrust chamber assemblies where the hydrazine is catalytically decomposed and expanded in a conical nozzle. The subsystems consist of seven 1 lbf thrusters for the Orbiter and six 1 lbf thrusters for the multiprobe which are isolated by two latch valves from the two propellant tanks so that two redundant thruster clusters are provided to ensure mission completion in the event of a single point failure. The propellant feed system is of all-welded construction to minimize weight and leakage and titanium is used as the primary material of construction. The multiprobe burned up on entering the Venus atmosphere with enough propellant left for the mission and the Orbiter was inserted into Venus orbit with enough propellant remaining for more than 2 earth years of orbital operations.

  17. DFT study of NH3 adsorption on the (5,0), (8,0), (5,5) and (6,6) single-walled carbon nanotubes. Calculated binding energies, NMR and NQR parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behavior of a single NH3 molecule adsorbed on external surface of H-capped (5,5), (6,6), (5,0), and (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied via DFT calculations. Binding energies clearly exhibit adsorption dependence on tube diameter. 13C, 15N and 1H chemical shielding tensors are calculated at the B3LYP level using GIAO method. NMR calculations reveal that 13C chemical shielding of (8,0) is more sensitive to NH3 adsorption compared to (5,5), (6,6) and (5,0) tubes. 15N and 1H chemical shielding correlate noticeably with diameter of the nanotubes. 14N and 2H nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, CQ, and asymmetry parameter, η, reveal the remarkable effect of NH3 adsorption on electronic structure of the SWCNTs.

  18. A Sustainable Spacecraft Component Database Solution Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerous spacecraft component databases have been developed to support NASA, DoD, and contractor design centers and design tools. Despite the clear utility of...

  19. Fermi FT2 Spacecraft Pointing Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This utility permits you to download the most current version of the spacecraft (FT2) file predicting the LAT's pointing for a given mission week. The FT2 file is a...

  20. A stochastic bioburden model for spacecraft sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Development of a stochastic model of the probability distribution for the random variable representing the number of microorganisms on a surface as a function of time. The first basic principle associated with bioburden estimation is that viable particles are removed from surfaces. The second notion important to the analysis is that microorganisms in environments and on surfaces occur in clumps. The last basic principle relating to bioburden modeling is that viable particles are deposited on a surface. The bioburden on a spacecraft is determined by the amount and kind of control exercised on the spacecraft assembly location, the shedding characteristics of the individuals in the vicinity of the spacecraft, its orientation, the geographical location in which the assembly takes place, and the steps in the assembly procedure. The model presented has many of the features which are desirable for its use in the spacecraft sterilization programs currently being planned by NASA.

  1. Mirage Fire Sensor for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft fires create exception risks to crew members. There is usually no place to escape. Even small amounts of hardware damage can compromise a mission. The...

  2. Spacecraft Magnetic Cleanliness Prediction and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikert, S.; Mehlem, K.; Wiegand, A.

    2012-05-01

    The paper describes a sophisticated and realistic control and prediction method for the magnetic cleanliness of spacecraft, covering all phases of a project till the final system test. From the first establishment of the so-called magnetic moment allocation list the necessary boom length can be determined. The list is then continuously updated by real unit test results with the goal to ensure that the magnetic cleanliness budget is not exceeded at a given probability level. A complete example is described. The synthetic spacecraft modeling which predicts only quite late the final magnetic state of the spacecraft is also described. Finally, the most important cleanliness verification, the spacecraft system test, is described shortly with an example. The emphasis of the paper is put on the magnetic dipole moment allocation method.

  3. Passive Wireless Sensors for Spacecraft Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New classes of sensors are needed on spacecraft that can be interrogated remotely using RF signals and respond with the sensor's identity as well as the...

  4. Chaos in attitude dynamics of spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yanzhu

    2013-01-01

    Attitude dynamics is the theoretical basis of attitude control of spacecrafts in aerospace engineering. With the development of nonlinear dynamics, chaos in spacecraft attitude dynamics has drawn great attention since the 1990's. The problem of the predictability and controllability of the chaotic attitude motion of a spacecraft has a practical significance in astronautic science. This book aims to summarize basic concepts, main approaches, and recent progress in this area. It focuses on the research work of the author and other Chinese scientists in this field, providing new methods and viewpoints in the investigation of spacecraft attitude motion, as well as new mathematical models, with definite engineering backgrounds, for further analysis. Professor Yanzhu Liu was the Director of the Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China. Dr. Liqun Chen is a Professor at the Department of Mechanics, Shanghai University, China.

  5. Odor Control in Spacecraft Waste Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft and lunar bases generate a variety of wastes containing water, including food wastes, feces, and brines. Disposal of these wastes, as well as recovery of...

  6. The heterogeneous anti-radiation shield for spacecraft*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, S. V.; Draganyuk, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with modeling of elemental composition and properties of heterogeneous layers in multilayered shields to protect spacecraft onboard equipment from radiation emitted by the natural Earth’s radiation belt. This radiation causes malfunctioning of semiconductor elements in electronic equipment and may result in a failure of the spacecraft as a whole. We consider four different shield designs and compare them to the most conventional radiation-protective material for spacecraft - aluminum. Out of light and heavy chemical elements we chose the materials with high reaction cross sections and low density. The mass attenuation coefficient of boron- containing compounds is 20% higher than that of aluminum. Heterogeneous shields consist of three layers: a glass cloth, borated material, and nickel. With a protective shield containing heavy metal the output bremsstrahlung can be reduced. The amount of gamma rays that succeed to penetrate the shield is 4 times less compared to aluminum. The shields under study have the thicknesses of 5.95 and 6.2 mm. A comparative analysis of homogeneous and multilayered protective coatings of the same chemical composition has been performed. A heterogeneous protective shield has been found to be advantageous in weight and shielding properties over its homogeneous counterparts and aluminum. The dose characteristics and transmittance were calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of our study lead us to conclude that a three-layer boron carbide shield provides the most effective protection from radiation. This shield ensures twice as low absorbed dose and 4 times less the number of penetrated gamma-ray photons compared to its aluminum analogue. Moreover, a heterogeneous shield will have a weight 10% lighter than aluminum, with the same attenuation coefficient of the electron flux. Such heterogeneous shields can be used to protect spacecraft launched to geostationary orbit. Furthermore, a protective boron-containing and

  7. SIF – Yet Another Spacecraft Interconnection Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Doug

    2006-01-01

    SIF is a Standard InterFace for spacecraft electronics. It combines a number of existing standards+28 V avionics power, ISO 11898-3 fault-tolerant Control Area Network (CAN), and the CANopen software protocol. Terminals are connected into a closed loop by identical cables. The resulting network is fail-operational and is easy to modify even late in satellite integration. SpaceQuest experience building a large spacecraft with SIF avionics has demonstrated the cost and schedule savings inherent...

  8. Lunar Scout Two spacecraft gravity experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Andrew F.

    1993-01-01

    Measurement of the gravity field of the Moon has a high science priority because of its implications for the internal structure and thermal history of the Moon, and it has a high priority for future exploration activities because of the influence of lunar gravity on spacecraft navigation and orbit maintenance. The current state of knowledge in the lunar gravity field (and the uncertainty in the knowledge) is based primarily on data accumulated from the Lunar Orbiter and Apollo programs. Data are sparse and emphasize the equatorial band (+/- 30 deg) on the near side of the Moon. There are no tracking data on the far side and only the Lunar Orbiter 5 provides a small amount of high inclination data. A host of gravity models developed from different combinations of tracking data have large discrepancies in their predictions of spacecraft motion and orbit lifetimes. There are also large disagreements in the Mercator projections of the gravity acceleration from each model, especially on the far side, where the contours tend to have no obvious relationship with the local topography. The science and engineering requirements for global gravity field mapping will be satisfied with continuous radio metric tracking of Lunar Scout 1 in a low polar orbit using the Deep Space Network and Lunar Scout 2 in a high elliptical orbit. The gravity field of the Moon will be mapped during the Scout Program using a two spacecraft concept. In the two spacecraft concept, one spacecraft is placed in a high altitude eccentric orbit while the second spacecraft is in a low altitude polar orbit. The gravity experiment requires a radio frequency that will permit two-way Doppler tracking between the spacecraft and the Deep Space Network (DSN). Both spacecraft carry NASA standard transponder systems for data transmission to Earth as well as for tracking and orbit determination. Data sufficient to produce a gravity field map could be acquired within one month with this system.

  9. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs;

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...... validation experiment are crucial to the ultimate goal of the project, which is the development of predictive tools that should be capable of selecting an adaptive response to fire spread in any manned spacecraft....

  10. Applications of Multifunctional Structures to Small Spacecraft

    OpenAIRE

    DiPalma, John; Preble, Jeff; Schoenoff, Mike; Motoyama, Stephen; Guerrero, James; Burks, Capt. Russell

    2004-01-01

    A process for the design and fabrication of multifunctional structures has been developed to increase the utility and efficiency of spacecraft. The process addresses the unique requirements associated with small spacecraft and other highly integrated systems. By integrating items such as electrical conductors for signals and power, thermal control elements, and materials for radiation and EMI shielding, these multifunctional structures offer benefits in terms of mass savings, reduced parts co...

  11. An Evolutionary Optimization System for Spacecraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, A.; Stechert, A.

    1997-01-01

    Spacecraft design optimization is a domian that can benefit from the application of optimization algorithms such as genetic algorithms. In this paper, we describe DEVO, an evolutionary optimization system that addresses these issues and provides a tool that can be applied to a number of real-world spacecraft design applications. We describe two current applications of DEVO: physical design if a Mars Microprobe Soil Penetrator, and system configuration optimization for a Neptune Orbiter.

  12. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  13. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  14. Calculation and experiment methods for pumping performance of a single vane vacuum pump%贯穿式旋片真空泵的性能计算与实验分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝伟

    2014-01-01

    The working principle of a single vane vacuum pump is fully described .The geometry analysis of vane vacuum pump is fully studied,including cylinder profile and intake volume .Meanwhile,the calculation methods for pumping speed ,maximum vac-uum and the relationship between time and vacuum are established .The characteristics of a single vane vacuum pump are test with a benchmark test rig ,and the experimental data are compared with the calculated results .The comparison validates the calcu-lation methods for pumping performance of a single vane vacuum pump presented .The calculation methods for a single vane vacu-um pump are useful for designing the single vane vacuum pump .%介绍了贯穿式旋片真空泵的结构及工作原理,建立了贯穿式旋片真空泵的几何模型,讨论了贯穿式旋片真空泵泵腔型线的建立以及工作腔的容积计算,精选了贯穿式旋片真空泵的性能计算,包括抽速、极限真空度以及真空度与时间的关系。最后测试某一贯穿式旋片真空泵的抽气性能,将测试值与计算值进行对比分析,验证了建立的贯穿式旋片真空泵性能的计算方法。关于贯穿式旋片真空泵的几何分析以及抽气性能的计算,对贯穿式旋片真空泵的设计分析具有一定的参考意义。

  15. An LDEF follow-on spacecraft concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Vernon; Breazeale, Larry; Perkinson, Don; Kinard, William H.

    1995-02-01

    The successful flight, retrieval, and analyses of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiments demonstrated the value of long duration space exposure for a broad spectrum of science and engineering investigations. The original LDEF was an excellent gravity gradient spacecraft, but because of its 9 m length and 9,700 kg mass it was difficult to manifest on the Shuttle, for either launch or retrieval, in conjunction with other payloads. This paper discusses an LDEF follow-on spacecraft concept whose short stowed length (approximately 3 m) greatly improves Shuttle manifesting opportunities while still providing very large surface area exposure for experiments. Deployable 'wings' on each end of the short, 'cylindrical' main body of this new spacecraft provide the means for gravity gradient stabilization while greatly increasing the spacecraft surface area. The center section of the spacecraft is oriented with the end faces of the twelve sided, 4.2 m diameter 'cylinder' perpendicular to the velocity vector thus providing large areas for experiments in both the ram and anti-ram directions as well as additional exposure area around the periphery of the cylinder. When deployed and properly oriented with the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS), both wings of the spacecraft are oriented edge on to the direction of motion and lie in the plane which contains the local gravity vector. The relatively thin wings readily accommodate dual side exposure of glass plate stacks for cosmic ray detection. Flat surfaces mounted normal to and on the periphery of the wings provide additional areas in both the ram and anti-ram directions for cosmic dust, micrometeoroid, and orbital debris collection free of contamination from 'splatter' off secondary surfaces. The baseline concept provides enhancements not available on the original LDEF such as solar array generated electrical power and data telemetry. Status of the efforts to promote support for and ultimately space flight

  16. Study of the mode of angular velocity damping for a spacecraft at non-standard situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, A. A.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2012-07-01

    Non-standard situation on a spacecraft (Earth's satellite) is considered, when there are no measurements of the spacecraft's angular velocity component relative to one of its body axes. Angular velocity measurements are used in controlling spacecraft's attitude motion by means of flywheels. The arising problem is to study the operation of standard control algorithms in the absence of some necessary measurements. In this work this problem is solved for the algorithm ensuring the damping of spacecraft's angular velocity. Such a damping is shown to be possible not for all initial conditions of motion. In the general case one of two possible final modes is realized, each described by stable steady-state solutions of the equations of motion. In one of them, the spacecraft's angular velocity component relative to the axis, for which the measurements are absent, is nonzero. The estimates of the regions of attraction are obtained for these steady-state solutions by numerical calculations. A simple technique is suggested that allows one to eliminate the initial conditions of the angular velocity damping mode from the attraction region of an undesirable solution. Several realizations of this mode that have taken place are reconstructed. This reconstruction was carried out using approximations of telemetry values of the angular velocity components and the total angular momentum of flywheels, obtained at the non-standard situation, by solutions of the equations of spacecraft's rotational motion.

  17. An Attitude Control of Flexible Spacecraft Using Fuzzy-PID Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Oh; Im, Young-Do

    This primary objective of this study is to demonstrate simulation and ground-based experiment for the attitude control of flexible spacecraft. A typical spacecraft structure consists of the rigid body and flexible appendages which are large flexible solar panels, parabolic antennas built from light materials in order to reduce their weight. Therefore the attitude control has a big problem because these appendages induce structural vibration under the excitation of external forces. A single-axis rotational simulator with a flexible arm is constructed with on-off air thrusters and reaction wheel as actuation. The simulator is also equipped with payload pointing capability by simultaneous thruster and DC servo motor actuation. The experiment of flexible spacecraft attitude control is performed using only the reaction wheel. Using the reaction wheel the performance of the fuzzy-PID controller is illustrated by simulation and experimental results for a single-axis rotational simulator.

  18. Precise Orbit Determination for LEO Spacecraft Using GNSS Tracking Data from Multiple Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Da; Bertiger, William; Desai, Shailen; Haines, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    To support various applications, certain Earth-orbiting spacecrafts (e.g., SRTM, COSMIC) use multiple GNSS antennas to provide tracking data for precise orbit determination (POD). POD using GNSS tracking data from multiple antennas poses some special technical issues compared to the typical single-antenna approach. In this paper, we investigate some of these issues using both real and simulated data. Recommendations are provided for POD with multiple GNSS antennas and for antenna configuration design. The observability of satellite position with multiple antennas data is compared against single antenna case. The impact of differential clock (line biases) and line-of-sight (up, along-track, and cross-track) on kinematic and reduced-dynamic POD is evaluated. The accuracy of monitoring the stability of the spacecraft structure by simultaneously performing POD of the spacecraft and relative positioning of the multiple antennas is also investigated.

  19. Development of methods for calculating basic features of the nuclear contribution to single event upsets under the effect of protons of moderately high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a continuation and a development of previous studies of our group that were devoted to the investigation of nuclear reactions induced by protons of moderately high energy (between 10 and 400 MeV) in silicon, aluminum, and tungsten atoms, the results obtained by exploring nuclear reactions on atoms of copper, which is among the most important components in materials for contact pads and pathways in modern and future ultralarge-scale integration circuits, especially in three-dimensional topology, are reported in the present article. The nuclear reactions in question lead to the formation of the mass and charge spectra of recoil nuclei ranging fromheavy target nuclei down to helium and hydrogen. The kineticenergy spectra of reaction products are calculated. The results of the calculations based on the procedure developed by our group are compared with the results of calculations and experiments performed by other authors

  20. Attitude coordination for spacecraft formation with multiple communication delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yaohua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Communication delays are inherently present in information exchange between spacecraft and have an effect on the control performance of spacecraft formation. In this work, attitude coordination control of spacecraft formation is addressed, which is in the presence of multiple communication delays between spacecraft. Virtual system-based approach is utilized in case that a constant reference attitude is available to only a part of the spacecraft. The feedback from the virtual systems to the spacecraft formation is introduced to maintain the formation. Using backstepping control method, input torque of each spacecraft is designed such that the attitude of each spacecraft converges asymptotically to the states of its corresponding virtual system. Furthermore, the backstepping technique and the Lyapunov–Krasovskii method contribute to the control law design when the reference attitude is time-varying and can be obtained by each spacecraft. Finally, effectiveness of the proposed methodology is illustrated by the numerical simulations of a spacecraft formation.

  1. Spacecraft to Spacecraft Coherent Laser Tracking as a Xylophone Interferometer Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, M.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for gravitational radiation can be performed in space with two spacecraft tracking each other with coherent laser light. This experimental technique could be implemented with two spacecraft carrying an appropriate optical payload, or with the proposed broad-band, space-based laser interferometer detectors of gravitational waves operated in this non-interferometric mode.

  2. Simulator for Testing Spacecraft Separation Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Nick; Gaines, Joe; Bryan, Tom

    2006-01-01

    A report describes the main features of a system for testing pyrotechnic and mechanical devices used to separate spacecraft and modules of spacecraft during flight. The system includes a spacecraft simulator [also denoted a large mobility base (LMB)] equipped with air thrusters, sensors, and data-acquisition equipment. The spacecraft simulator floats on air bearings over an epoxy-covered concrete floor. This free-flotation arrangement enables simulation of motion in outer space in three degrees of freedom: translation along two orthogonal horizontal axes and rotation about a vertical axis. The system also includes a static stand. In one application, the system was used to test a bolt-retraction system (BRS) intended for separation of the lifting-body and deorbit-propulsion stages of the X- 38 spacecraft. The LMB was connected via the BRS to the static stand, then pyrotechnic devices that actuate the BRS were fired. The separation distance and acceleration were measured. The report cites a document, not yet published at the time of reporting the information for this article, that is said to present additional detailed information.

  3. Line drawing titled 'TDRS Spacecraft On-Orbit Configuration'

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Line drawing titled 'TDRS Spacecraft On-Orbit Configuration' identifies the various tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) components (solar arrays, C-Band antenna, K-Band antenna, space ground link (SGL) antenna, single access antennas, multiple access antenna, omni antenna, solar sail). A TDRS will be deployed during the STS-26 mission. Including the space shuttle, the TDRS will be equipped to support up to 26 user spacecraft simultaneously. It will provide two types of service: 1) multiple access which can relay data from as many as 20 low data rate (100 bits per second to 50 kilobits per second) user satellites simultaneously and; 2) single access which will provide two high data rate (to 300 megabits per second) communication relays. The TDRS is three-axis stabilizrd with the body fixed antennas pointing constantly at the Earth while the solar arrays track the Sun. TDR satellites do no processing of user traffic in either direction. Rather, they operate as 'bent pipe' repeaters,

  4. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  5. Following electron impact excitations of single Os, Pt, Hg, Pb and Po atom L subshells ionization cross section calculations by using Lotz's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinol, M.; Aydeniz, D.

    2016-03-01

    L shell ionization cross section and Li subshells ionization cross sections of Os, Pt, Hg, Pb, Po atoms calculated. For each atom, ten different electron impacty energy values Eoi used. Calculations carried out by using nonrelativistic Lotz equation in Matlab. Ionization cross section values obtained for Eoi values in the energy range of ELi ≤Eoi≤4ELi for each atom. Starting allmost from Eoi = ELi (i = 1,2,3) values of the each subshell ionization threshold energy, ionization cross section are increasing rapidly with Eoi. For a fixed Eoi = 3. ELi values, while Z increases from Z = 76 to Z = 84, ionization cross section are decrease. These results help to understand some results which obtained from other electron-sigle atom impact studies on σLi subshells.

  6. Goal Structured Notation in a Radiation Hardening Safety Case for COTS-Based Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witulski, Arthur; Austin, Rebekah; Reed, Robert; Karsai, Gabor; Mahadevan, Nag; Sierawski, Brian; Evans, John; LaBel, Ken

    2016-01-01

    A systematic approach is presented to constructing a radiation assurance case using Goal Structured Notation (GSN) for spacecraft containing COTS parts. The GSN paradigm is applied to an SRAM single-event upset experiment board designed to fly on a CubeSat November 2016. Construction of a radiation assurance case without use of hardened parts or extensive radiation testing is discussed.

  7. Autonomous Spacecraft Communication Interface for Load Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Timothy P.; May, Ryan D.; Morris, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based controllers can remain in continuous communication with spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) with near-instantaneous communication speeds. This permits near real-time control of all of the core spacecraft systems by ground personnel. However, as NASA missions move beyond LEO, light-time communication delay issues, such as time lag and low bandwidth, will prohibit this type of operation. As missions become more distant, autonomous control of manned spacecraft will be required. The focus of this paper is the power subsystem. For present missions, controllers on the ground develop a complete schedule of power usage for all spacecraft components. This paper presents work currently underway at NASA to develop an architecture for an autonomous spacecraft, and focuses on the development of communication between the Mission Manager and the Autonomous Power Controller. These two systems must work together in order to plan future load use and respond to unanticipated plan deviations. Using a nominal spacecraft architecture and prototype versions of these two key components, a number of simulations are run under a variety of operational conditions, enabling development of content and format of the messages necessary to achieve the desired goals. The goals include negotiation of a load schedule that meets the global requirements (contained in the Mission Manager) and local power system requirements (contained in the Autonomous Power Controller), and communication of off-plan disturbances that arise while executing a negotiated plan. The message content is developed in two steps: first, a set of rapid-prototyping "paper" simulations are preformed; then the resultant optimized messages are codified for computer communication for use in automated testing.

  8. Estimating Accurate Relative Spacecraft Angular Position from DSN VLBI Phases Using X-Band Telemetry or DOR Tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Durgadas S.; Majid, Walid

    2009-01-01

    At present spacecraft angular position with Deep Space Network (DSN) is determined using group delay estimates from very long baseline interferometer (VLBI) phase measurements employing differential one way ranging (DOR) tones. As an alternative to this approach, we propose estimating position of a spacecraft to half a fringe cycle accuracy using time variations between measured and calculated phases as the Earth rotates using DSN VLBI baseline(s). Combining fringe location of the target with the phase allows high accuracy for spacecraft angular position estimate. This can be achieved using telemetry signals of at least 4-8 MSamples/sec data rate or DOR tones.

  9. Investigation and calculation of valleys of outgoing from substation grounding conductors for short-circuit in single-phase short of electrical grid

    OpenAIRE

    V.I. Nizhevskyi; I.V. Nizhevskyi; Ynoyatov, B.; Nasryddyny, S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Earthing device electrical substation in modern conditions must meet both the requirements of electrical safety of people and animals, as well as electromagnetic compatibility requirements established her electrical equipment. These requirements are intended to address issues of protection against surges and interference caused by lightning impulse currents and switching. Aim. To investigate the distribution of single-phase short-circuit current in the substation grounding devic...

  10. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Noll, Daniel; Stancari, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Single-particle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is...

  11. Following electron impact excitations of Rn, Ra, Th, U and Pu single atom L sub-shells ionization cross section calculations by using Lotz's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayinol, M.; Aydeniz, D.

    2016-03-01

    L shell ionization cross section and Li subshells ionization cross sections of Rn, Ra, Th, U, Pu atoms calculated. For each of atoms, ten different electron impact energy values (Eo) are used. Calculations carried out by using Lotz equation in Matlab. First, calculations done for non-relativistic case by using non-relativistic Lotz equation then repeated with relativistic Lotz equation. σL total and σLi(i = 1,2,3) subshells ionisation cross section values obtained for Eo values in the energy range of ELi

  12. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Jomaas, Grunde

    2012-01-01

    -supply vehicle like the ATV or Orbital’s Cygnus, a series of supporting experiments are being planned and conducted by the team members. In order to answer the appropriate scientific and engineering problems relevant for spacecraft fire safety, a canonical scenario that can improve the understanding of flame...... terms of their relevance for the flame spread problem. Further, it is explained how the results can be combined to enhance the understanding of fire spread in the real scale configuration and thus improve the fire safety onboard spacecrafts. The results and particularly the ones from the large scale...

  13. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier;

    2012-01-01

    to the complexity, cost and risk associ-ated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short......Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due...

  14. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  15. Spacecraft Attitude Control in Hamiltonian Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give a design scheme for attitude control algorithms of a generic spacecraft. Along with the system model formulated in the Hamilton's canonical form the algorithm uses information about a required potential energy and a dissipative term. The control action is the...... sum of the gradient of the potential energy and the dissipative force. It is shown that this control law makes the system uniformly asymptotically stable to the desired reference point. Three problems were addressed in the paper: spacecraft stabilization in the inertial frame, libration damping with...

  16. Architectures for fault-tolerant spacecraft computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennels, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a long-term research program in fault-tolerant computing for spacecraft on-board processing. In response to changing device technology this program has progressed from the design of a fault-tolerant uniprocessor to the development of fault-tolerant distributed computer systems. The unusual requirements of spacecraft computing are described along with the resulting real-time computer architectures. The following aspects of these designs are discussed: (1) architectural features to minimize complexity in the distributed computer system, (2) fault-detection and recovery, (3) techniques to enhance reliability and testability, and (4) design approaches for LSI implementation.

  17. Low-energy cross-section calculations of single molecules by electron impact: a classical Monte Carlo transport approach with quantum mechanical description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present state of modeling radio-induced effects at the cellular level does not account for the microscopic inhomogeneity of the nucleus from the non-aqueous contents (i.e. proteins, DNA) by approximating the entire cellular nucleus as a homogenous medium of water. Charged particle track-structure calculations utilizing this approximation are therefore neglecting to account for approximately 30% of the molecular variation within the nucleus. To truly understand what happens when biological matter is irradiated, charged particle track-structure calculations need detailed knowledge of the secondary electron cascade, resulting from interactions with not only the primary biological component—water-–but also the non-aqueous contents, down to very low energies. This paper presents our work on a generic approach for calculating low-energy interaction cross-sections between incident charged particles and individual molecules. The purpose of our work is to develop a self-consistent computational method for predicting molecule-specific interaction cross-sections, such as the component molecules of DNA and proteins (i.e. nucleotides and amino acids), in the very low-energy regime. These results would then be applied in a track-structure code and thereby reduce the homogenous water approximation. The present methodology—inspired by seeking a combination of the accuracy of quantum mechanics and the scalability, robustness, and flexibility of Monte Carlo methods—begins with the calculation of a solution to the many-body Schrödinger equation and proceeds to use Monte Carlo methods to calculate the perturbations in the internal electron field to determine the interaction processes, such as ionization and excitation. As a test of our model, the approach is applied to a water molecule in the same method as it would be applied to a nucleotide or amino acid and compared with the low-energy cross-sections from the GEANT4-DNA physics package of the Geant4 simulation toolkit

  18. Low-energy cross-section calculations of single molecules by electron impact: a classical Monte Carlo transport approach with quantum mechanical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J. R.; Akabani, G.

    2014-05-01

    The present state of modeling radio-induced effects at the cellular level does not account for the microscopic inhomogeneity of the nucleus from the non-aqueous contents (i.e. proteins, DNA) by approximating the entire cellular nucleus as a homogenous medium of water. Charged particle track-structure calculations utilizing this approximation are therefore neglecting to account for approximately 30% of the molecular variation within the nucleus. To truly understand what happens when biological matter is irradiated, charged particle track-structure calculations need detailed knowledge of the secondary electron cascade, resulting from interactions with not only the primary biological component—water--but also the non-aqueous contents, down to very low energies. This paper presents our work on a generic approach for calculating low-energy interaction cross-sections between incident charged particles and individual molecules. The purpose of our work is to develop a self-consistent computational method for predicting molecule-specific interaction cross-sections, such as the component molecules of DNA and proteins (i.e. nucleotides and amino acids), in the very low-energy regime. These results would then be applied in a track-structure code and thereby reduce the homogenous water approximation. The present methodology—inspired by seeking a combination of the accuracy of quantum mechanics and the scalability, robustness, and flexibility of Monte Carlo methods—begins with the calculation of a solution to the many-body Schrödinger equation and proceeds to use Monte Carlo methods to calculate the perturbations in the internal electron field to determine the interaction processes, such as ionization and excitation. As a test of our model, the approach is applied to a water molecule in the same method as it would be applied to a nucleotide or amino acid and compared with the low-energy cross-sections from the GEANT4-DNA physics package of the Geant4 simulation toolkit

  19. Science Benefits of Onboard Spacecraft Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangahuala, Al; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Owen, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Primitive bodies (asteroids and comets), which have remained relatively unaltered since their formation, are important targets for scientific missions that seek to understand the evolution of the solar system. Often the first step is to fly by these bodies with robotic spacecraft. The key to maximizing data returns from these flybys is to determine the spacecraft trajectory relative to the target body-in short, navigate the spacecraft- with sufficient accuracy so that the target is guaranteed to be in the instruments' field of view. The most powerful navigation data in these scenarios are images taken by the spacecraft of the target against a known star field (onboard astrometry). Traditionally, the relative trajectory of the spacecraft must be estimated hours to days in advance using images collected by the spacecraft. This is because of (1)!the long round-trip light times between the spacecraft and the Earth and (2)!the time needed to downlink and process navigation data on the ground, make decisions based on the result, and build and uplink instrument pointing sequences from the results. The light time and processing time compromise navigation accuracy considerably, because there is not enough time to use more accurate data collected closer to the target-such data are more accurate because the angular capability of the onboard astrometry is essentially constant as the distance to the target decreases, resulting in better "plane-of- sky" knowledge of the target. Excellent examples of these timing limitations are high-speed comet encounters. Comets are difficult to observe up close; their orbits often limit scientists to brief, rapid flybys, and their coma further restricts viewers from seeing the nucleus in any detail, unless they can view the nucleus at close range. Comet nuclei details are typically discernable for much shorter durations than the roundtrip light time to Earth, so robotic spacecraft must be able to perform onboard navigation. This onboard

  20. Pyroshock Environments Characterized for Spacecraft Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    1999-01-01

    Pyrotechnic shock, or pyroshock, is the transient response of a structure to loading induced by the ignition of pyrotechnic (explosive or propellant activated) devices. These devices are typically used to separate structural systems (e.g., separate a spacecraft from a launch vehicle) and deploy appendages (e.g., solar panels). Pyroshocks are characterized by high peak acceleration, high-frequency content, and short duration. Because of their high acceleration and high-frequency, pyroshocks can cause spaceflight hardware to fail. Verifying by test that spaceflight hardware can withstand the anticipated shock environment is considered essential to mission success. The Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 spacecraft for NASA's Mission to Planet Earth is scheduled to be launched on an Atlas IIAS vehicle in 1999, and the NASA Lewis Research Center is the launch vehicle integrator for this NASA Goddard Space Flight Center spacecraft. The EOS spacecraft was subjected to numerous ground shock tests to verify that its scientific instruments and avionics components will withstand the shock-induced vibration produced when the spacecraft separates from the launch vehicle. Shock test data from these tests represent the third largest available pyroshock database in the United States. Future spacecraft missions will directly benefit from the knowledge gained from these tests. The payload separation system used for EOS is a new system that operates by firing six separation nuts. This system was tested to verify its functional operation and to characterize the resulting shock levels. The launch vehicle contractor (Lockheed Martin Astronautics) and spacecraft contractor (Lockheed Martin Missiles & Space) completed 16 separation test firings. This resulted in an unusually large amount of pyroshock data. Typically, only one or two pyroshock test firings are performed for a spacecraft mission. Because of the size of this separation system shock database, engineers were able to perform

  1. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, Daniel [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  2. Measurement and Calculation of Absolute Single and Multiple Charge Exchange Cross Sections for Fe^(q+) Ions Impacting H_2O

    OpenAIRE

    Simcic, J.; Schultz, D R; Mawhorter, R.J.; greenwood, jason; Winstead, C.; McKoy, B. V.; S. J. Smith; Chutjian, A.

    2010-01-01

    Charge exchange (CE) plays a fundamental role in the collisions of solar- and stellar-wind ions with lunar and planetary exospheres, comets, and circumstellar clouds. Reported herein are absolute cross sections for single, double, triple, and quadruple CE of Fe^(q+) (q = 5-13) ions with H_2O at a collision energy of 7q keV. One measured value of the pentuple CE is also given for Fe^(9+) ions. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used to provide currents of the highly charged Fe ions....

  3. A statistical comparison of solar wind propagation delays derived from multi-spacecraft techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Case, Nathan; Wild, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a large-scale statistical study of the solar wind prop- agnation delay between NASA’s Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft and ESA’s Cluster 1 spacecraft. This study focuses on those periods when Cluster was within the unimpeded solar wind, upstream of the bow shock nose, between 2001 and 2010. Using a cross-correlation method to compare the ACE and Cluster data, nearly 5000 propagation delays have been calculated and compared to both corresponding propagation delays in the OMN...

  4. Migration of Single Iridium Atoms and Tri-iridium Clusters on MgO Surfaces. Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging and ab-initio Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang W. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Iddir, Hakim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Uzun, Alper [Koc Univ., Instanbul (Turkey); Curtiss, Larry A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ortalan, Volkan [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-06

    To address the challenge of fast, direct atomic-scale visualization of the diffusion of atoms and clusters on surfaces, we used aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high scan speeds (as little as ~0.1 s per frame) to visualize the diffusion of (1) a heavy atom (Ir) on the surface of a support consisting of light atoms, MgO(100), and (2) an Ir3 cluster on MgO(110). Sequential Z-contrast images elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, including the hopping of Ir1 and the rotational migration of Ir3 as two Ir atoms remain anchored to the surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided estimates of the diffusion energy barriers and binding energies of the iridium species to the surfaces. The results show how the combination of fast-scan STEM and DFT calculations allow real-time visualization and fundamental understanding of surface diffusion phenomena pertaining to supported catalysts and other materials.

  5. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J.; Fulda, P.; Howard, D.; Ritter, J.; Levan, M.

    2007-01-01

    The design and testing of a vacuum-swing adsorption process to remove metabolic 'water and carbon dioxide gases from NASA's Orion crew exploration vehicle atmosphere is presented. For the Orion spacecraft, the sorbent-based atmosphere revitalization (SBAR) system must remove all metabolic water, a technology approach 1Lhathas not been used in previous spacecraft life support systems. Design and testing of a prototype SBAR in sub-scale and full-scale configurations is discussed. Experimental and analytical investigations of dual-ended and single-ended vacuum desorption are presented. An experimental investigation of thermal linking between adsorbing and desorbing columns is also presented.

  6. Sextant measures spacecraft altitude without gravitational reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Horizon-sensing sextant measures the altitude of an orbiting spacecraft without gravitational reference by optically measuring the dip angle to the horizon along a line of sight in each of two planes. The sextant scans over a relatively limited field of view.

  7. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  8. Reengineering the JPL Spacecraft Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, C.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation describes the factors that have emerged in the evolved process of reengineering the unmanned spacecraft design process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Topics discussed include: New facilities, new design factors, new system-level tools, complex performance objectives, changing behaviors, design integration, leadership styles, and optimization.

  9. Fault Tolerant Techniques for Spacecraft Data Recorders

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Scott

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the techniques for improving system reliability which SEAKR Engineering employs in the design of their spacecraft solid state data recorders. Briefly, these techniques include Hamming code error correction, periodic memory scrubbing, latch-up protection, excessive capacity, redundant power supplies/control/bus circuits, microcode protection, and shielding.

  10. Spacecraft Charging Sensitivity to Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating spacecraft charging behavior of a vehicle in the space environment requires knowledge of the material properties relevant to the charging process. Implementing surface and internal charging models requires a user to specify a number of material electrical properties including electrical resistivity parameters (dark and radiation induced), dielectric constant, secondary electron yields, photoemission yields, and breakdown strength in order to correctly evaluate the electric discharge threat posed by the increasing electric fields generated by the accumulating charge density. In addition, bulk material mass density and/or chemical composition must be known in order to analyze radiation shielding properties when evaluating internal charging. We will first describe the physics of spacecraft charging and show how uncertainties in material properties propagate through spacecraft charging algorithms to impact the results obtained from charging models. We then provide examples using spacecraft charging codes to demonstrate their sensitivity to material properties. The goal of this presentation is to emphasize the importance in having good information on relevant material properties in order to best characterize on orbit charging threats.

  11. Apollo experience report: Spacecraft pyrotechnic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, M. J.; Robinson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Pyrotechnic devices were used successfully in many systems of the Apollo spacecraft. The physical and functional characteristics of each device are described. The development, qualification, and performance tests of the devices and the ground-support equipment are discussed briefly. Recommendations for pyrotechnic devices on future space vehicles are given.

  12. How Spacecraft Fly Spaceflight Without Formulae

    CERN Document Server

    Swinerd, Graham

    2009-01-01

    About half a century ago a small satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched. The satellite did very little other than to transmit a radio signal to announce its presence in orbit. However, this humble beginning heralded the dawn of the Space Age. Today literally thousands of robotic spacecraft have been launched, many of which have flown to far-flung regions of the Solar System carrying with them the human spirit of scientific discovery and exploration. Numerous other satellites have been launched in orbit around the Earth providing services that support our technological society on the ground. How Spacecraft Fly: Spaceflight Without Formulae by Graham Swinerd focuses on how these spacecraft work. The book opens with a historical perspective of how we have come to understand our Solar System and the Universe. It then progresses through orbital flight, rocket science, the hostile environment within which spacecraft operate, and how they are designed. The concluding chapters give a glimpse of what the 21st century may ...

  13. AIM: Ames Imaging Module Spacecraft Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The AIM camera is a small, lightweight, low power, low cost imaging system developed at NASA Ames. Though it has imaging capabilities similar to those of $1M plus spacecraft cameras, it does so on a fraction of the mass, power and cost budget.

  14. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier;

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due...

  15. Gravity gradient torque of spacecraft orbiting asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a full fourth-order model of the gravity gradient torque of spacecraft around asteroids by taking into consideration of the inertia integrals of the spacecraft up to the fourth order, which is an improvement of the previous fourth-order model of the gravity gradient torque. Design, methodology and approach: The fourth-order gravitational potential of the spacecraft is derived based on Taylor expansion. Then the expression of the gravity gradient torque in terms of gravitational potential derivatives is derived. By using the formulation of the gravitational potential, explicit formulations of the full fourth-order gravity gradient torque are obtained. Then a numerical simulation is carried out to verify our model. Findings: We find that our model is more sound and precise than the previous fourth-order model due to the consideration of higher-order inertia integrals of the spacecraft. Numerical simulation results show that the motion of the previous fourth-order model is quite diff...

  16. Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A NASA engineer with the Commercial Remote Sensing Program (CRSP) at Stennis Space Center works with students from W.P. Daniels High School in New Albany, Miss., through NASA's Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative Program. CRSP is teaching students to use remote sensing to locate a potential site for a water reservoir to offset a predicted water shortage in the community's future.

  17. Software for Engineering Simulations of a Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shireman, Kirk; McSwain, Gene; McCormick, Bernell; Fardelos, Panayiotis

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft Engineering Simulation II (SES II) is a C-language computer program for simulating diverse aspects of operation of a spacecraft characterized by either three or six degrees of freedom. A functional model in SES can include a trajectory flight plan; a submodel of a flight computer running navigational and flight-control software; and submodels of the environment, the dynamics of the spacecraft, and sensor inputs and outputs. SES II features a modular, object-oriented programming style. SES II supports event-based simulations, which, in turn, create an easily adaptable simulation environment in which many different types of trajectories can be simulated by use of the same software. The simulation output consists largely of flight data. SES II can be used to perform optimization and Monte Carlo dispersion simulations. It can also be used to perform simulations for multiple spacecraft. In addition to its generic simulation capabilities, SES offers special capabilities for space-shuttle simulations: for this purpose, it incorporates submodels of the space-shuttle dynamics and a C-language version of the guidance, navigation, and control components of the space-shuttle flight software.

  18. Heat capacity mapping radiometer for AEM spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnek, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The operation, maintenance, and integration of the applications explorer mission heat capacity mapping radiometer is illustrated in block diagrams and detail schematics of circuit functions. Data format and logic timing diagrams are included along with radiometric and electronic calibration data. Mechanical and electrical configuration is presented to provide interface details for integration of the HCMR instrument to AEM spacecraft.

  19. The role of volume charging of dielectrics in the occurrence of electrostatic discharges on spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirskaia, Natalia; Novikov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    Most recent works consider the occurrence of electrostatic discharges (ESD) on the surface of the spacecraft due to spacecraft charging as a consequence of its surface interaction with the surrounding space plasma and solar radiation [1]. At the same time, low-orbit spacecraft are simultaneously exposed to the hot magnetospheric plasma with the typical energies of the particles ~ 0.1 - 50 keV and to the particles of the Earth radiation belts (ERB) with a typical energy in the range of 0.1-10 MeV. Electrons of ERB with these energies penetrate into spacecraft dielectrics on the order of a few millimeters in depth and create an embedded charge with their own electric field. It has been shown in a number of papers that exactly a volume charge of the electrons of ERB can be the cause of ESD on spacecraft [2,3]. In this work we present the results of calculation of the dose rate and, correspondingly, the radiation conductivity in a typical spacecraft dielectrics, arising under the action of the hot magnetospheric plasma and electrons of ERB. Using software packages based on Monte Carlo methods and on the solution of equations of charge transport in spacecraft dielectrics, it is shown that in a number of areas of the Earth's magnetosphere the ESD can occur under the action of the ERB electrons. The results of present work can provide a basis for creation of the standard, characterizing the emergence of ESR on spacecraft due to volume charging of dielectrics and describing the methods of laboratory tests of spacecraft dielectrics. L.S. Novikov, A.A. Makletsov, and V.V. Sinolits, Comparison of Coulomb-2, NASCAP-2K, MUSCAT and SPIS codes for geosynchronous spacecraft charging, Advances in Space Research, 2016, V. 57, Is. 2, pp. 671-680. Wrenn G.L., Smith R.J.K. The ESD Threat to GEO Satellites: Empirical Models for Observed Effects Due to Both Surface and Internal Charging. Proc. ESA Symp. "Environment Modelling for Space-based Applications", ESTEC Noordwijk, The

  20. Application of Space Environmental Observations to Spacecraft Pre-Launch Engineering and Spacecraft Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Janet L.; Xapsos, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the effects of the space environment on spacecraft systems and applying this knowledge to spacecraft pre-launch engineering and operations. Particle radiation, neutral gas particles, ultraviolet and x-rays, as well as micrometeoroids and orbital debris in the space environment have various effects on spacecraft systems, including degradation of microelectronic and optical components, physical damage, orbital decay, biasing of instrument readings, and system shutdowns. Space climate and weather must be considered during the mission life cycle (mission concept, mission planning, systems design, and launch and operations) to minimize and manage risk to both the spacecraft and its systems. A space environment model for use in the mission life cycle is presented.

  1. Optimal Control for a Cooperative Rendezvous Between Two Spacecraft from Determined Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiming; Han, Liping; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Di; Yang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    The mathematical model of a far-distance cooperative rendezvous between two spacecraft in a non-Keplerian orbit was established. Approximate global optimization was performed by a type of hybrid algorithm consisting of particle swarm optimization and differential evolution. In this process, the double-fitness function was established according to the objective function and the constraints; the double-fitness function was used to enable a better choice between the solutions obtained by the two algorithms at every iteration. In addition, the costate variables obtained were set as the initial values of the sequential quadratic programming to greatly increase the possibility of finding the approximate global optimal solution. After performing the calculations and simulations, it was concluded that the fuel required for orbiting was not influenced by the initial positions of the two spacecraft if the initial orbits of the two spacecraft were determined. However, the time consumption is strongly influenced in this situation.

  2. Simulation and emulation of orbit parameters of spacecraft based on satellite passive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihua; Xu, Kun; Bao, Yuhai; Li, Jijun; Yan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The medium-low orbit satellite is used as observation satellite to make parameters estimation and error analysis of the spacecraft orbit. Based on the variable mass particle dynamics, the simplified motion equation of observation satellite was numerically solved by the Runge-Kutta method, and the position of the observation satellite at any time was calculated more accurately. Based on the variable mass particle dynamics, the orbit estimation equation of the spacecraft was given, and the position and the velocity data of the spacecraft at any time were numerically solved by the Runge- Kutta method, and then the fitting curves of these data were obtained. The residual analysis was made to test the output from the model, which indicated that this model is acceptable and valid.

  3. Charged particle activation studies on the surface of LDEF spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy proton induced nuclear reaction products are examined using seven elements, namely: Al, Si, Ni, Co, Zr, Ta, and W. Activities were detected due to Na-22 from Al, Co-56 from Ni, Co-58 from Cu, and Y-88 from Zr targets. No induced activity was observed in Si, Ta, and W, most probably due to the long cooling times. Only Zr sample contained a weak Be-7 peak, although Ta and W were also located at the leading edge of the spacecraft. Gamma rays of individual isotopes were measured using high resolution Ge(Li) solid state detector coupled to 4096 multichannel analyzer. Activities were calculated for Co-56 (846 keV) and Co-57 (122 and 136 keV's) at the time of the entry of the spacecraft and found to be 0.014 + or - c/sec g, 0.018 + or - 0.002 c/sec g, and 0.0024 + or - 0.0007 c/sec g, respectively

  4. Charged particle activation studies on the surface of LDEF spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmez, Ilhan; Burns, Forest; Sagalyn, Paul

    1993-01-01

    High energy proton induced nuclear reaction products are examined using seven elements, namely, Aluminum, Silicon, Nickel, Copper, Zirconium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. The samples were in the form of plates, 2 x 2 x 1/8 inches. Activities due to Na-22 from Al, Co-56 and Co-57 from Ni, Co-58 from Cu, and Y-88 from Zr targets were detected. No induced activity was observed in Si, Ta, and W, most probably due to the long cooling times. Only the Zr sample contained a weak Be-7 peak, although Ta and W were also located at the leading edge of the spacecraft. Gamma-rays of individual isotopes were measured using high-resolution Ge(Li) solid state detector coupled to 4096-multichannel analyzer. Activities were calculated for Co-56 (846 keV) and Co-57 (122 and 136 keV's) at the time of the entry of the spacecraft and found to be 0.014 plus or minus 0.005 c/sec. g, 0.018 plus or minus 0.002 c/sec. g, and 0.0024 plus or minus 0.0007 c/sec. g, respectively.

  5. Stability-based SDRE controller for spacecraft momentum management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengping; Xu, Shijie

    2013-08-01

    Momentum management of spacecraft aims to avoid the angular momentum accumulation of control momentum gyros through real-time attitude adjustment. An attitude control/momentum management controller based on state-dependent Riccati equation is developed for attitude-stabilized spacecraft. The governing equations of the system are formulated as three-axis coupled with full moment of inertia, which fully capture the nonlinearity of the system and are valid for systems with significant products of inertia or strong pitch to roll/yaw coupling. The state-dependent Riccati equation algorithm brings the nonlinear system to a linear structure having state dependent coefficients matrices and minimizing a quadratic-like performance index. The system equations are nondimensionalized, which avoid numerical problems at the same time make the weighting matrix more predictable. To guarantee closed-loop system stability, the state-dependent Riccati equation algorithm is also modified based on pole placement technique. The state-dependent Riccati equation is online calculated through the computational-efficient θ-D technique which reaches a tradeoff between control optimality and computation load. The dynamic characteristics of the system at torque equilibrium attitude are analyzed. Constraints on moment of inertia for successful momentum management are provided. Simulations demonstrate the excellent performance of the controller.

  6. The trajectory prediction of spacecraft by grey method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiyue; Zhang, Zili; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Yanqing; Zhou, Weihu

    2016-08-01

    The real-time and high-precision trajectory prediction of a moving object is a core technology in the field of aerospace engineering. The real-time monitoring and tracking technology are also significant guarantees of aerospace equipment. A dynamic trajectory prediction method called grey dynamic filter (GDF) which combines the dynamic measurement theory and grey system theory is proposed. GDF can use coordinates of the current period to extrapolate coordinates of the following period. At meantime, GDF can also keep the instantaneity of measured coordinates by the metabolism model. In this paper the optimal model length of GDF is firstly selected to improve the prediction accuracy. Then the simulation for uniformly accelerated motion and variably accelerated motion is conducted. The simulation results indicate that the mean composite position error of GDF prediction is one-fifth to that of Kalman filter (KF). By using a spacecraft landing experiment, the prediction accuracy of GDF is compared with the KF method and the primitive grey method (GM). The results show that the motion trajectory of spacecraft predicted by GDF is much closer to actual trajectory than the other two methods. The mean composite position error calculated by GDF is one-eighth to KF and one-fifth to GM respectively.

  7. Large scale collective modeling the final 'freeze out' stages of energetic heavy ion reactions and calculation of single particle measurables from these models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyiri, Agnes

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop the already existing, but far not complete Multi Module Model, specially focusing on the last module which describes the final stages of a heavy ion collision, as this module was still missing. The major original achievements summarized in this thesis correspond to the freeze out problem and calculation of an important measurable, the anisotropic flow. Summary of results: Freeze out: The importance of freeze out models is that they allow the evaluation of observables, which then can be compared to the experimental results. Therefore, it is crucial to find a realistic freeze out description, which is proved to be a non-trivial task. Recently, several kinetic freeze out models have been developed. Based on the earlier results, we have introduced new ideas and improved models, which may contribute to a more realistic description of the freeze out process. We have investigated the applicability of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) to describe dynamical freeze out. We have introduced the so-called Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation, which has a form very similar to that of the BTE, but takes into account those characteristics of the FO process which the BTE can not handle, e.g. the rapid change of the phase-space distribution function in the direction normal to the finite FO layer. We have shown that the main features of earlier ad hoc kinetic FO models can be obtained from BTE and MBTE. We have discussed the qualitative differences between the two approaches and presented some quantitative comparison as well. Since the introduced modification of the BTE makes it very difficult to solve the FO problem from the first principles, it is important to work out simplified phenomenological models, which can explain the basic features of the FO process. We have built and discussed such a model. Flow analysis: The other main subject of this thesis has been the collective flow in heavy ion collisions. Collective flow from ultra

  8. Large scale collective modeling the final 'freeze out' stages of energetic heavy ion reactions and calculation of single particle measurables from these models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop the already existing, but far not complete Multi Module Model, specially focusing on the last module which describes the final stages of a heavy ion collision, as this module was still missing. The major original achievements summarized in this thesis correspond to the freeze out problem and calculation of an important measurable, the anisotropic flow. Summary of results: Freeze out: The importance of freeze out models is that they allow the evaluation of observables, which then can be compared to the experimental results. Therefore, it is crucial to find a realistic freeze out description, which is proved to be a non-trivial task. Recently, several kinetic freeze out models have been developed. Based on the earlier results, we have introduced new ideas and improved models, which may contribute to a more realistic description of the freeze out process. We have investigated the applicability of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) to describe dynamical freeze out. We have introduced the so-called Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation, which has a form very similar to that of the BTE, but takes into account those characteristics of the FO process which the BTE can not handle, e.g. the rapid change of the phase-space distribution function in the direction normal to the finite FO layer. We have shown that the main features of earlier ad hoc kinetic FO models can be obtained from BTE and MBTE. We have discussed the qualitative differences between the two approaches and presented some quantitative comparison as well. Since the introduced modification of the BTE makes it very difficult to solve the FO problem from the first principles, it is important to work out simplified phenomenological models, which can explain the basic features of the FO process. We have built and discussed such a model. Flow analysis: The other main subject of this thesis has been the collective flow in heavy ion collisions. Collective flow from ultra

  9. Nano-Satellite Secondary Spacecraft on Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesh, Andrew T.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2012-01-01

    NanoSat technology has opened Earth orbit to extremely low-cost science missions through a common interface that provides greater launch accessibility. They have also been used on interplanetary missions, but these missions have used one-off components and architectures so that the return on investment has been limited. A natural question is the role that CubeSat-derived NanoSats could play to increase the science return of deep space missions. We do not consider single instrument nano-satellites as likely to complete entire Discovery-class missions alone,but believe that nano-satellites could augment larger missions to significantly increase science return. The key advantages offered by these mini-spacecrafts over previous planetary probes is the common availability of advanced subsystems that open the door to a large variety of science experiments, including new guidance, navigation and control capabilities. In this paper, multiple NanoSat science applications are investigated, primarily for high risk/high return science areas. We also address the significant challenges and questions that remain as obstacles to the use of nano-satellites in deep space missions. Finally, we provide some thoughts on a development roadmap toward interplanetary usage of NanoSpacecraft.

  10. Probabilistic Analysis Techniques Applied to Complex Spacecraft Power System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Electric power system performance predictions are critical to spacecraft, such as the International Space Station (ISS), to ensure that sufficient power is available to support all the spacecraft s power needs. In the case of the ISS power system, analyses to date have been deterministic, meaning that each analysis produces a single-valued result for power capability because of the complexity and large size of the model. As a result, the deterministic ISS analyses did not account for the sensitivity of the power capability to uncertainties in model input variables. Over the last 10 years, the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed advanced, computationally fast, probabilistic analysis techniques and successfully applied them to large (thousands of nodes) complex structural analysis models. These same techniques were recently applied to large, complex ISS power system models. This new application enables probabilistic power analyses that account for input uncertainties and produce results that include variations caused by these uncertainties. Specifically, N&R Engineering, under contract to NASA, integrated these advanced probabilistic techniques with Glenn s internationally recognized ISS power system model, System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE).

  11. Combined control of fast attitude maneuver and stabilization for large complex spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Jing-Rui

    2013-12-01

    In remote sensing or laser communication space missions, spacecraft need fast maneuver and fast stabilization in order to accomplish agile imaging and attitude tracking tasks. However, fast attitude maneuvers can easily cause elastic deformations and vibrations in flexible appendages of the spacecraft. This paper focuses on this problem and deals with the combined control of fast attitude maneuver and stabilization for large complex spacecraft. The mathematical model of complex spacecraft with flexible appendages and momentum bias actuators on board is presented. Based on the plant model and combined with the feedback controller, modal parameters of the closed-loop system are calculated, and a multiple mode input shaper utilizing the modal information is designed to suppress vibrations. Aiming at reducing vibrations excited by attitude maneuver, a quintic polynomial form rotation path planning is proposed with constraints on the actuators and the angular velocity taken into account. Attitude maneuver simulation results of the control systems with input shaper or path planning in loop are separately analyzed, and based on the analysis, a combined control strategy is presented with both path planning and input shaper in loop. Simulation results show that the combined control strategy satisfies the complex spacecraft's requirement of fast maneuver and stabilization with the actuators' torque limitation satisfied at the same time.

  12. Lunar Module 5 mated with Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter (SLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Interior view of the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Manned Spacecraft Operations Building showing Lunar Module 5 mated to its Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter (SLA). LM-5 is scheduled to be flown on the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  13. High-Performance Fire Detector for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The danger from fire aboard spacecraft is immediate with only moments for detection and suppression. Spacecraft are unique high-value systems where the cost of...

  14. Spacecraft Formation Orbit Estimation Using WLPS-Based Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ting Goh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the implementation of a novel wireless local positioning system (WLPS for spacecraft formation flying to maintain high-performance spacecraft relative and absolute position estimation. A WLPS equipped with antenna arrays allows each spacecraft to measure the relative range and coordinate angle(s of other spacecraft located in its coverage area. The dynamic base station and the transponder of WLPS enable spacecraft to localize each other in the formation. Because the signal travels roundtrip in WLPS, and due to the high spacecraft velocities, the signal transmission time delay reduces the localization performance. This work studies spacecraft formation positions estimation performance assuming that only WLPS is available onboard. The feasibility of estimating the spacecraft absolute position using only one-dimensional antenna array is also investigated. The effect of including GPS measurements in addition to WLPS is studied and compared to a GPS standalone system.

  15. Thermally activated cation ordering in ZnGa2Se4 single crystals studied by Raman scattering, optical absorption, and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order–disorder phase transitions induced by thermal annealing have been studied in the ordered-vacancy compound ZnGa2Se4 by means of Raman scattering and optical absorption measurements. The partially disordered as-grown sample with tetragonal defect stannite (DS) structure and I 4-bar 2 m space group has been subjected to controlled heating and cooling cycles. In situ Raman scattering measurements carried out during the whole annealing cycle show that annealing the sample to 400 °C results in a cation ordering in the sample, leading to the crystallization of the ordered tetragonal defect chalcopyrite (DC) structure with I 4-bar space group. On decreasing temperature the ordered cation scheme of the DC phase can be retained at ambient conditions. The symmetry of the Raman-active modes in both DS and DC phases is discussed and the similarities and differences between the Raman spectra of the two phases emphasized. The ordered structure of annealed samples is confirmed by optical absorption measurements and ab initio calculations, that show that the direct bandgap of DC-ZnGa2Se4 is larger than that of DS-ZnGa2Se4. (paper)

  16. NASA 4005: The LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2006-01-01

    Power systems with voltages higher than about 55 volts may charge in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) enough to cause destructive arcing. The NASA 4005 LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard will help spacecraft designers prevent arcing and other deleterious effects on LEO spacecraft. The appendices, based on the popular LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines by Ferguson and Hillard, serve as a useful information handbook to explain and accompany the standard.

  17. NASA STD-4005: The LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2006-01-01

    Power systems with voltages higher than about 55 volts may charge in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) enough to cause destructive arcing. The NASA STD-4005 LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Standard will help spacecraft designers prevent arcing and other deleterious effects on LEO spacecraft. The Appendices, an Information Handbook based on the popular LEO Spacecraft Charging Design Guidelines by Ferguson and Hillard, serve as a useful explanation and accompaniment to the Standard.

  18. On the spacecraft attitude stabilization in the orbital frame

    OpenAIRE

    Antipov Kirill A.; Tikhonov Alexey A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with spacecraft in the circular near-Earth orbit. The spacecraft interacts with geomagnetic field by the moments of Lorentz and magnetic forces. The octupole approximation of the Earth’s magnetic field is accepted. The spacecraft electromagnetic parameters, namely the electrostatic charge moment of the first order and the eigen magnetic moment are the controlled quasiperiodic functions. The control algorithms for the spacecraft electromagnetic parameters, which allows to...

  19. X-ray photoelectron study and first principle calculations of the electronic structure of PbFe1/2Nb1/2O3 single crystal in the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •PbFe1/2Nb1/2O3 (PFN) single crystals were grown by a flux method. •XPS spectra of PFN crystal in paraelectric and ferroelectric phases were measured. •A shift of Pb6s-peak at ferroelectric–paraelectric phase transition was observed. •The density of states of PFN was calculated using the FEFF9 code. •The observed shift of Pb6s-peak is confirmed by first principle calculations. -- Abstract: The present study is the first in which the theoretical prediction of the changes in the density of states of single crystal of PbFe1/2Nb1/2O3 (PFN) multiferroic depending on a temperature at the ferroelectric – paraelectric transition is experimentally confirmed by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band XPS spectra of PFN single-crystal at three temperatures T1 = 297 K (monoclinic phase), T2 = 368 K (tetragonal) and T3 = 403 K (cubic) were obtained by X-ray photoelectron study using ESCALAB 250. It is found out that the experimental valence band XPS spectra of PFN single-crystals in ferroelectric and paraelectric phases consist of two main peaks with a difference in relative intensity and energy position of the second peak. The density of states of PFN was calculated for tetragonal ferroelectric (368 K) and cubic paraelectric (403 K) phases. The first main peak corresponds to strongly hybridized Fe3d, Nb3d and O2p states while the second peak is mainly composed of Pb6s states. According to the experimental data, the position of the second main peak of the total density of states of PFN in the ferroelectric monoclinic phase is shifted toward the first peak relatively to its position in the paraelectric phase by 0.28 eV and for the tetragonal phase by 0.15 eV, the latter value coincides well with the calculated value equal to 0.17 eV

  20. Wireless Intra-Spacecraft Communication: The Benefits and the Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Will H.; Armstrong, John T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of how intra-spacecraft wireless communication can be adopted to various subsystems of the spacecraft including C&DH (Command & Data Handling), Telecom, Power, Propulsion, and Payloads, and the interconnects between them. We discuss the advantages of intra-spacecraft wireless communication and the disadvantages and challenges and a proposal to address them.

  1. Gravity Gradient Tensor Eigendecomposition for Spacecraft Positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Pei; Han, Chao

    2016-01-01

    In this Note, a new approach to spacecraft positioning based on GGT inversion is presented. The gravity gradient tensor is initially measured in the gradiometer reference frame (GRF) and then transformed to the Earth-Centered Earth-Fixed (ECEF) frame via attitude information as well as Earth rotation parameters. Matrix Eigen-Decomposition is introduced to directly translate GGT into position based on the fact that the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of GGT are simplespecific functions of spherical coordinates of the observation position. without the need of an initial position. Unlike the strategy of inertial navigation aiding, no prediction or first guess of the spacecraft position is needed. The method makes use of the J2 gravity model, and is suitable for space navigation where higher frequency terrain contributions to the GGT signals can be neglected.

  2. Kalman filtering for spacecraft attitude estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefferts, E. J.; Markley, F. L.; Shuster, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Several schemes in current use for sequential estimation of spacecraft attitude using Kalman filters are examined. These differ according to their treatment of the attitude error, namely: using the complete four-component quaternion; using a truncated quaternion in which one of the components has been eliminated; or using a quaternion referred to approximate body-fixed axes. These schemes are examined for the case of a spacecraft carrying line-of-sight attitude sensors and three-axis gyros whose measurements are corrupted by noise on both the drift rate and the drift-rate ramp. The analysis of the covariance is carried out in detail. The historical development of Kalman filtering of attitude is reviewed.

  3. FORTE spacecraft vibration mitigation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maly, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents work that was performed by CSA Engineering, Inc., for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to reduce vibrations of the FORTE spacecraft by retrofitting damped structural components into the spacecraft structure. The technical objective of the work was reduction of response at the location of payload components when the structure is subjected to the dynamic loading associated with launch and proto-qualification testing. FORTE is a small satellite that will be placed in orbit in 1996. The structure weighs approximately 425 lb, and is roughly 80 inches high and 40 inches in diameter. It was developed and built by LANL in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque for the United States Department of Energy. The FORTE primary structure was fabricated primarily with graphite epoxy, using aluminum honeycomb core material for equipment decks and solar panel substrates. Equipment decks were bonded and bolted through aluminum mounting blocks to adjoining structure.

  4. Fundamentals of spacecraft attitude determination and control

    CERN Document Server

    Markley, F Landis

    2014-01-01

    This book explores topics that are central to the field of spacecraft attitude determination and control. The authors provide rigorous theoretical derivations of significant algorithms accompanied by a generous amount of qualitative discussions of the subject matter. The book documents the development of the important concepts and methods in a manner accessible to practicing engineers, graduate-level engineering students and applied mathematicians. It includes detailed examples from actual mission designs to help ease the transition from theory to practice, and also provides prototype algorithms that are readily available on the author’s website. Subject matter includes both theoretical derivations and practical implementation of spacecraft attitude determination and control systems. It provides detailed derivations for attitude kinematics and dynamics, and provides detailed description of the most widely used attitude parameterization, the quaternion. This title also provides a thorough treatise of attitu...

  5. Comments on 'Hamiltonian adaptive control of spacecraft'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossen, Thor I.

    1993-04-01

    In the adaptive scheme presented by Slotine and Benedetto (1990) for attitude tracking control of rigid spacecraft, the spacecraft is parameterized in terms of the inertial frame. This note shows how a parameterization in body coordinates considerably simplifies the representation of the adaptation scheme. The new symbolic expression for the regressor matrix is easy to find even for 6-degrees of freedom (DOF) Hamiltonian systems with a large number of unknown parameters. If the symbolic expression for the regressor matrix is known in advance, the computational complexity is approximately equal for both representations. In the scheme presented by Slotine and Benedetto this is not trivial because the transformation matrix between the inertial frame and the body coordinates is included in the expression for the regressor matrix. Hence, implementation for higher DOF systems is strongly complicated. An example illustrates the advantage of the new representation when modeling a simple three-DOF model of the lateral motion of a space shuttle.

  6. Close-Range Photogrammetry & Next Generation Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is focusing renewed attention on the topic of large, ultra-lightweight space structures, also known as 'gossamer' spacecraft. Nearly all of the details of the giant spacecraft are still to be worked out. But it's already clear that one of the most challenging aspects will be developing techniques to align and control these systems after they are deployed in space. A critical part of this process is creating new ground test methods to measure gossamer structures under stationary, deploying and vibrating conditions for validation of corresponding analytical predictions. In addressing this problem, I considered, first of all, the possibility of simply using conventional displacement or vibration sensor that could provide spatial measurements. Next, I turned my attention to photogrammetry, a method of determining the spatial coordinates of objects using photographs. The success of this research and development has convinced me that photogrammetry is the most suitable method to solve the gossamer measurement problem.

  7. Nanocomposites in Multifuntional Structures for Spacecraft Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, J.; Mendizabal, M.; Elizetxea, C.; Florez, S.; Atxaga, G.; Del Olmo, E.

    2012-07-01

    The integration of functionalities as electrical, thermal, power or radiation shielding inside carrier electronic boxes, solar panels or platform structures allows reducing weight, volume, and harness for spacecraft. The multifunctional structures represent an advanced design approach for space components and subsystems. The development of such multifunctional structures aims the re-engineering traditional metallic structures by composites in space, which request to provide specific solutions for thermal conductivity, EMI-EMC, radiation shielding and integration. The use of nanomaterials as CNF and nano-adds to reinforce composite structures allows obtaining local solutions for improving electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and radiation shielding. The paper summarises the results obtained in of three investigations conducted by Tecnalia based on carbon nanofillers for improving electro-thermal characteristics of spacecraft platform, electronic substrates and electronics boxes respectively.

  8. Fault analysis of multichannel spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Lollar, Louis F.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center proposes to implement computer-controlled fault injection into an electrical power system breadboard to study the reactions of the various control elements of this breadboard. Elements under study include the remote power controllers, the algorithms in the control computers, and the artificially intelligent control programs resident in this breadboard. To this end, a study of electrical power system faults is being performed to yield a list of the most common power system faults. The results of this study will be applied to a multichannel high-voltage DC spacecraft power system called the large autonomous spacecraft electrical power system (LASEPS) breadboard. The results of the power system fault study and the planned implementation of these faults into the LASEPS breadboard are described.

  9. Spacecraft attitude control momentum requirements analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Brent P.; Heck, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between attitude and angular momentum control requirements is derived for a fixed attitude, Earth orbiting spacecraft with large area articulating appendages. Environmental effects such as gravity gradient, solar radiation pressure, and aerodynamic forces arising from a dynamic, rotating atmosphere are examined. It is shown that, in general, each environmental effect contributes to both cyclic and secular momentum requirements both within and perpendicular to the orbit plane. The gyroscopic contribution to the angular momentum control requirements resulting from a rotating, Earth oriented spacecraft is also discussed. Special conditions are described where one or more components of the angular momentum can be made to vanish, or become purely cyclical. Computer generated plots for a candidate space station configuration are presented to supplement the analytically derived results.

  10. DAMPING COMPUTATION OF LIQUID SLOSHING IN CONTAINERS ABOARD SPACECRAFT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宝音贺西; 李俊峰; 高云峰; 王照林

    2003-01-01

    Under the non-rotating assumption, a method for the calculation of damping of fuel sloshing with small amplitude in containers aboard spacecraft is proposed in the present paper. And we have presented an eigen-value equation for sloshing damping and frequency computation. This equation may be solved by Ritz or Galerkin methods for a container of simple geometry or by finite element method for a container of arbitrary geometric shape even with rigid baffles. The simulated results show that the equivalent damping coefficients is directly proportional to fuel's viscosity, whereas it almost exhibits no influence on sloshing frequencies. The drawback of the proposed method lies in expensive computation cost. Thus far, it hasn't yet be applied to a container with elastic baffles.

  11. Control capability analysis for complex spacecraft thruster configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The set of forces and moments that can be generated by thrusters of a spacecraft is called the"control capability"with respect to the thruster configuration.If the control capability of a thruster configuration is adequate to fulfill a given space mission,we say this configuration is a feasible one with respect to the task.This study proposed a new way to analyze the control capability of the complex thruster configuration.Precise mathematical definitions of feasibility were proposed,based on which a criterion to judge the feasibility of the thruster configuration was presented through calculating the shortest distance to the boundary of the controllable region as a function of the thruster configuration.Finally,control capability analysis for the complex thruster configuration based on its feasibility with respect to the space mission was given followed by a 2-D thruster configuration example to demonstrate its validity.

  12. Reliability Considerations of ULP Scaled CMOS in Spacecraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; MacNeal, Kristen; Cooper, Mark

    2012-01-01

    NASA, the aerospace community, and other high reliability (hi-rel) users of advanced microelectronic products face many challenges as technology continues to scale into the deep sub-micron region. Decreasing the feature size of CMOS devices not only allows more components to be placed on a single chip, but it increases performance by allowing faster switching (or clock) speeds with reduced power compared to larger scaled devices. Higher performance, and lower operating and stand-by power characteristics of Ultra-Low Power (ULP) microelectronics are not only desirable, but also necessary to meet low power consumption design goals of critical spacecraft systems. The integration of these components in such systems, however, must be balanced with the overall risk tolerance of the project.

  13. Optimal control of spin-stabilized spacecraft with telescoping appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Sellappan, R.

    1976-01-01

    The control of a spin-stabilized spacecraft consisting of a rigid central hub and one or two movable offset telescoping booms (with end masses) is considered. The equations of rotational motion are linearized about either of two desired final states. A control law for the boom end mass position is sought such that a quadratic cost functional involving the weighted components of angular velocity plus the control is minimized when the final time is unspecified and involves the solution of the matrix Riccati algebraic equation. For three axis control more than one offset boom (orthogonal to each other) is required. For two-axis control with a single boom offset from a symmetrical hub, an analytic solution is obtained; when this system is used for nutation decay the time constant is one order of magnitude smaller than previously achieved using nonoptimal control logic. For the general case results are obtained numerically.

  14. Spacecraft Fire Experiment (Saffire) Development Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David L.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos;

    2014-01-01

    -g flammability limits compared to those obtained in NASA’s normal gravity material flammability screening test. The experiments will be conducted in Orbital Science Corporation’s Cygnus vehicle after it has deberthed from the International Space Station. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety...... paper along with a brief look at future experiments that could further enhance NASA’s approach to spacecraft fire safety....

  15. Artificial Intelligence and Spacecraft Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugel-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1997-01-01

    This talk will present the work which has been done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center involving the use of Artificial Intelligence to control the power system in a spacecraft. The presentation will include a brief history of power system automation, and some basic definitions of the types of artificial intelligence which have been investigated at MSFC for power system automation. A video tape of one of our autonomous power systems using co-operating expert systems, and advanced hardware will be presented.

  16. Building the Small Spacecraft Technology Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Reuther, Dr. James

    2011-01-01

    Biography - Dr. Reuther currently serves as the Acting Director for Crosscutting Capability Demonstrations in the Office of Chief Technologist of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters. Previously, Dr. Reuther served as the Lead of the Test and Verification (T&V) Office for the Orion spacecraft development. After graduating from the University of California Davis with a Bachelors, Masters, and Ph.D. in mechanical and aeronautical engineering, Dr. Reuther perform...

  17. Additive Manufacturing: Ensuring Quality for Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore; Stephenson, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Reliable manufacturing requires that material properties and fabrication processes be well defined in order to insure that the manufactured parts meet specified requirements. While this issue is now relatively straightforward for traditional processes such as subtractive manufacturing and injection molding, this capability is still evolving for AM products. Hence, one of the principal challenges within AM is in qualifying and verifying source material properties and process control. This issue is particularly critical for applications in harsh environments and demanding applications, such as spacecraft.

  18. THE FUTURE OF SPACECRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the advantages of space nuclear power and propulsion systems. It describes the actual status of international power level dependent spacecraft nuclear propulsion missions, especially the high power EU-Russian MEGAHIT study including the Russian Megawatt-Class Nuclear Power Propulsion System, the NASA GRC project and the low and medium power EU DiPoP study. Space nuclear propulsion based mission scenarios of these studies are sketched as well.

  19. The Future of Spacecraft Nuclear Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, F.

    2014-06-01

    This paper summarizes the advantages of space nuclear power and propulsion systems. It describes the actual status of international power level dependent spacecraft nuclear propulsion missions, especially the high power EU-Russian MEGAHIT study including the Russian Megawatt-Class Nuclear Power Propulsion System, the NASA GRC project and the low and medium power EU DiPoP study. Space nuclear propulsion based mission scenarios of these studies are sketched as well.

  20. Nonlinear Robust Control for Spacecraft Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear robust control of the spacecraft attitude with the existence of external disturbances is considered. A robust attitude controller is designed based on the passivity approach the quaternion representation, which introduces the suppression vector of external disturbance into the control law and does not need angular velocity measurement. Stability conditions of the robust attitude controller are given. And the numerical simulation results show the effectiveness of the attitude controller.

  1. Space Robotics: What is a Robotic Spacecraft?

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Ellery

    2004-01-01

    In this first of three short papers, I introduce some of the basic concepts of space engineering with an emphasis on some specific challenging areas of research that are peculiar to the application of robotics to space development and exploration. The style of these short papers is pedagogical and this paper stresses the unique constraints that space application imposes. This first paper is thus a general introduction to the nature of spacecraft engineering and its application to robotic spac...

  2. Investigations of an integrated angular velocity measurement and attitude control system for spacecraft using magnetically suspended double-gimbal CMGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiqiang; Han, Bangcheng

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated angular velocity measurement and attitude control system of spacecraft using magnetically suspended double-gimbal control moment gyros (MSDGCMGs). The high speed rotor of MSDGCMG is alleviated by a five-degree-of-freedom permanent magnet biased AMB control system. With this special rotor supported manner, the MSDGCMG has the function of attitude rate sensing as well as attitude control. This characteristic provides a new approach to a compact light-weight spacecraft design, which can combine these two functions into a single device. This paper discusses the principles and implementations of AMB-based angular velocity measurement. Spacecraft dynamics with DGMSCMG actuators, including the dynamics of magnetically suspended high-speed rotor, the dynamics of inner gimbal and outer gimbal, as well as the determination method of spacecraft angular velocity are modeled, respectively. The effectiveness of the proposed integrated system is also validated numerically and experimentally.

  3. Time Delay Interferometry with Moving Spacecraft Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Tinto, M; Armstrong, J W; Tinto, Massimo; Estabrook, Frank B.; Armstrong, adn J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Space-borne interferometric gravitational wave detectors, sensitive in the low-frequency (millihertz) band, will fly in the next decade. In these detectors the spacecraft-to-spacecraft light-travel-times will necessarily be unequal, time-varying, and (due to aberration) have different time delays on up- and down-links. Reduction of data from moving interferometric laser arrays in solar orbit will in fact encounter non-symmetric up- and downlink light time differences that are about 100 times larger than has previously been recognized. The time-delay interferometry (TDI) technique uses knowledge of these delays to cancel the otherwise dominant laser phase noise and yields a variety of data combinations sensitive to gravitational waves. Under the assumption that the (different) up- and downlink time delays are constant, we derive the TDI expressions for those combinations that rely only on four inter-spacecraft phase measurements. We then turn to the general problem that encompasses time-dependence of the light...

  4. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  5. Solar thermal vacuum tests of Magellan spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, James C.

    1990-01-01

    The Magellen solar/thermal/vacuum test involved a number of unique requirements and approaches. Because of the need to operate in orbit around Venus, the solar intensity requirement ranged up to 2.3 suns or Earth equivalent solar constants. Extensive modification to the solar simulator portion of the test facility were required to achieve this solar intensity. Venus albedo and infrared emission were simulated using temperature controlled movable louver panels to allow the spacecraft to view either a selectable temperature black heat source with closed louvers, or the chamber coldwall behind open louvers. The test conditions included widely varying solar intensities, multiple sun angles, alternate hardware configurations, steady state and transient cases, and cruise and orbital power profiles. Margin testing was also performed, wherein supplemental heaters were mounted to internal thermal blankets to verify spacecraft performance at higher than expected temperatures. The test was successful, uncovering some spacecraft anomalies and verifying the thermal design. The test support equipment experienced some anomalous behavior and a significant failure during the test.

  6. Relative tracking of multiple spacecraft by interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Border, James S.; Kahn, Robert D.

    An analysis is conducted of earth-based radiometric tracking of one spacecraft relative to an angularly nearby second spacecraft. Two cases are studied: relative positioning between a lander and a rover on the surface of Mars and relative tracking between a Mars lander and a Mars orbiter. All spacecraft signals are simultaneously received in the same beamwidth of an earth tracking antenna. Differential interferometric measurement errors are predicted. Errors which scale with angular separation between sources and errors which scale with temporal separation between measurement epochs are reduced virtually to zero. System thermal noise and systematic phase shifts introduced by receiver electronics typically dominate the error budget. Solar plasma delays become dominant for signal paths which pass close to the sun. Precise line-of-sight range measurements, differenced between stations, are also considered. Meter-level accuracy is obtained for lander/rover relative position by combining interferometric and precise range measurements. Either data type alone, for geometries where earth is not near zero declination as seen from Mars and Mars is not near zero declination as seen from earth, can provide accuracy at the 10-100-m level.

  7. N° 28-1998: SOHO spacecraft contacted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contact has been re-established with the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) following six weeks of silence. Signals sent yesterday through the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) station at Canberra, Australia, were answered at 22:51 GMT in the form of bursts of signal lasting from 2 to 10 seconds. These signals were recorded both by the NASA DSN station and the ESA Perth station. Contact is being maintained through the NASA DSN stations at Goldstone (California), Canberra and Madrid (Spain). Although the signals are intermittent and do not contain any data information, they show that the spacecraft is still capable of receiving and responding to ground commands. The slow process of regaining control of the spacecraft and restoring it to an operational attitude will commence immediately, with attempts to initiate data transmissions in order to perform an initial assessment of the spacecraft on-board conditions. Radio contact with SOHO, a joint mission of the European Space Agency and NASA, was interrupted on 25 June (see ESA press releases N°24,25 and 26-98). More information on SOHO, including mission status reports is available on the Internet at http://sohowww.estec.esa.nl or via the new ESA science website: http://sci.esa.int

  8. Ontological Modeling for Integrated Spacecraft Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Current spacecraft work as a cooperative group of a number of subsystems. Each of these requiresmodeling software for development, testing, and prediction. It is the goal of my team to create anoverarching software architecture called the Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA) to aid in deploying the discrete subsystems' models. Such a plan has been attempted in the past, and has failed due to the excessive scope of the project. Our goal in this version of ISCA is to use new resources to reduce the scope of the project, including using ontological models to help link the internal interfaces of subsystems' models with the ISCA architecture.I have created an ontology of functions specific to the modeling system of the navigation system of a spacecraft. The resulting ontology not only links, at an architectural level, language specificinstantiations of the modeling system's code, but also is web-viewable and can act as a documentation standard. This ontology is proof of the concept that ontological modeling can aid in the integration necessary for ISCA to work, and can act as the prototype for future ISCA ontologies.

  9. Robust multivariable controller design for flexible spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Armstrong, Ernest S.

    1986-01-01

    Large, flexible spacecraft are typically characterized by a large number of significant elastic modes with very small inherent damping, low, closely spaced natural frequencies, and the lack of accurate knowledge of the structural parameters. Summarized here is some recent research on the design of robust controllers for such spacecraft, which will maintain stability, and possible performance, despite these problems. Two types of controllers are considered, the first being the linear-quadratic-Gaussian-(LQG)-type. The second type utilizes output feedback using collocated sensors and actuators. The problem of designing robust LQG-type controllers using the frequency domain loop transfer recovery (LTR) method is considered, and the method is applied to a large antenna model. Analytical results regarding the regions of stability for LQG-type controllers in the presence of actuator nonlinearities are also presented. The results obtained for the large antenna indicate that the LQG/LTR method is a promising approach for control system design for flexible spacecraft. For the second type of controllers (collocated controllers), it is proved that the stability is maintained in the presence of certain commonly encountered nonlinearities and first-order actuator dynamics. These results indicate that collocated controllers are good candidates for robust control in situations where model errors are large.

  10. Time to stabilization in single leg drop jump landings: an examination of calculation methods and assessment of differences in sample rate, filter settings and trial length on outcome values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransz, Duncan P; Huurnink, Arnold; de Boode, Vosse A; Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-01-01

    Time to stabilization (TTS) is the time it takes for an individual to return to a baseline or stable state following a jump or hop landing. A large variety exists in methods to calculate the TTS. These methods can be described based on four aspects: (1) the input signal used (vertical, anteroposterior, or mediolateral ground reaction force) (2) signal processing (smoothed by sequential averaging, a moving root-mean-square window, or fitting an unbounded third order polynomial), (3) the stable state (threshold), and (4) the definition of when the (processed) signal is considered stable. Furthermore, differences exist with regard to the sample rate, filter settings and trial length. Twenty-five healthy volunteers performed ten 'single leg drop jump landing' trials. For each trial, TTS was calculated according to 18 previously reported methods. Additionally, the effects of sample rate (1000, 500, 200 and 100 samples/s), filter settings (no filter, 40, 15 and 10 Hz), and trial length (20, 14, 10, 7, 5 and 3s) were assessed. The TTS values varied considerably across the calculation methods. The maximum effect of alterations in the processing settings, averaged over calculation methods, were 2.8% (SD 3.3%) for sample rate, 8.8% (SD 7.7%) for filter settings, and 100.5% (SD 100.9%) for trial length. Differences in TTS calculation methods are affected differently by sample rate, filter settings and trial length. The effects of differences in sample rate and filter settings are generally small, while trial length has a large effect on TTS values. PMID:25242295

  11. Calculation and Protection Selection of Single-phase Short-circuit Current for the City Road Lighting%城市道路照明单相短路电流的计算和保护选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨喜云

    2015-01-01

    This paper expounds the importance of the single-phase ( grounding) short-circuit current calculation and protection selection for the road lighting.And through the instance of the single-phase (grounding) short-circuit current calculation and the instance of choosing low-voltage circuit-breakers, this paper introduces the effective protective measures towards the problem of the low-voltage circuit-breaker’s lack of action sensitivity in practical use.%阐述了道路照明单相(接地)短路故障电流计算和保护选择的重要性,并通过单相(接地)短路故障电流计算和低压断路器的选择实例,简单介绍了在实际运用中,针对低压断路器动作灵敏性不足的问题采取的比较有效的保护措施。

  12. Contemporary state of spacecraft/environment interaction research

    CERN Document Server

    Novikov, L S

    1999-01-01

    Various space environment effects on spacecraft materials and equipment, and the reverse effects of spacecrafts and rockets on space environment are considered. The necessity of permanent updating and perfection of our knowledge on spacecraft/environment interaction processes is noted. Requirements imposed on models of space environment in theoretical and experimental researches of various aspects of the spacecraft/environment interaction problem are formulated. In this field, main problems which need to be solved today and in the nearest future are specified. The conclusion is made that the joint analysis of both aspects of spacecraft/environment interaction problem promotes the most effective solution of the problem.

  13. Influence of Natural Environments in Spacecraft Design, Development, and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft are growing in complexity and sensitivity to environmental effects. The spacecraft engineer must understand and take these effects into account in building reliable, survivable, and affordable spacecraft. Too much protections, however, means unnecessary expense while too little will potentially lead to early mission loss. The ability to balance cost and risk necessitates an understanding of how the environment impacts the spacecraft and is a critical factor in its design. This presentation is intended to address both the space environment and its effects with the intent of introducing the influence of the environment on spacecraft performance.

  14. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Tien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Toth, Balazs; Jomaas, Grunde

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due to the complexity, cost and risk associated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short duration ground-based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity is at present not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety, has been established with its cornerstone being the development of an experiment (Fire Safety 1) to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Cygnus after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. A computer modelling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the possibility of examining fire behaviour on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This unprecedented opportunity will expand the understanding of the fundamentals of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The experiment is being

  15. Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Organization Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Miller, Sharon K.; Porter, Ron; Schneider, Todd A.; Spann, James F.; Xapsos, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a course to expand human presence beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) while also expanding its mission to explore the solar system. Destinations such as Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), Mars and its moons, and the outer planets are but a few of the mission targets. Each new destination presents an opportunity to increase our knowledge of the solar system and the unique environments for each mission target. NASA has multiple technical and science discipline areas specializing in specific space environments disciplines that will help serve to enable these missions. To complement these existing discipline areas, a concept is presented focusing on the development of a space environments and spacecraft effects (SENSE) organization. This SENSE organization includes disciplines such as space climate, space weather, natural and induced space environments, effects on spacecraft materials and systems and the transition of research information into application. This space environment and spacecraft effects organization will be composed of Technical Working Groups (TWG). These technical working groups will survey customers and users, generate products, and provide knowledge supporting four functional areas: design environments, engineering effects, operational support, and programmatic support. The four functional areas align with phases in the program mission lifecycle and are briefly described below. Design environments are used primarily in the mission concept and design phases of a program. Engineering effects focuses on the material, component, sub-system and system-level selection and the testing to verify design and operational performance. Operational support provides products based on real time or near real time space weather to mission operators to aid in real time and near-term decision-making. The programmatic support function maintains an interface with the numerous programs within NASA, other federal

  16. NASCAP Modeling of GEO Satellites--Spacecraft Charging is Back!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chock, R.; Ferguson, D. C.; Synder, D. B.

    2004-01-01

    During the last few years of Solar Minimum, GEO spacecraft charging design practices may have become lax because of paucity of spacecraft charging events. Unfortunately, this has also been the time of great changes in spacecraft design, because of the new emphases on higher power arrays and lower costs. Also unfortunate is the fact that spacecraft charging may lead to failures of solar array strings, panels, or entire spacecraft. One way to prevent satellite failures die to spacecraft charging events is to simulate the effects with a charging code, such as the venerable NASCAP/GEO code. We will discuss the use of NASCAP on the ACTS satellite as well as a newer application dealing with typical recent spacecraft charging anomalies.

  17. SHARP: Automated monitoring of spacecraft health and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David J.; James, Mark L.; Martin, R. Gaius

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discussed here are the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Some of the difficulties associated with the existing technology used in mission operations are highlighted. A new automated system based on artificial intelligence technology is described which seeks to overcome many of these limitations. The system, called the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP), is designed to automate health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. The system has proved to be effective for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems by performing real-time analysis of spacecraft and ground data systems engineering telemetry. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft was the initial focus for evaluation of the system in real-time operations during the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Neptune in August 1989.

  18. SHARP - Automated monitoring of spacecraft health and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David J.; James, Mark L.; Martin, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly discussed here are the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Some of the difficulties associated with the existing technology used in mission operations are highlighted. A new automated system based on artificial intelligence technology is described which seeks to overcome many of these limitations. The system, called the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP), is designed to automate health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. The system has proved to be effective for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems by performing real-time analysis of spacecraft and ground data systems engineering telemetry. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft was the initial focus for evaluation of the system in real-time operations during the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Neptune in August 1989.

  19. Single leg mini squat: an inter-tester reproducibility study of children in the age of 9–10 and 12–14 years presented by various methods of kappa calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junge Tina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple studies suggest that reduced postural orientation is a possible risk factor for both patello-femoral joint pain (PFP and rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. In order to prevent PFP and ACL injuries in adolescent athletes, it is necessary to develop simple and predictive screening tests to identify those at high risk. Single Leg Mini Squat (SLMS is a functional and dynamic real-time screening test, which has shown good validity and reproducibility in evaluation of postural orientation of the knee in an adult population. The aim of this study was to determine the inter-tester reproducibility of SLMS in the age group of 9–10 and 12–14 years by evaluating postural orientation of the ankle, knee, hip and trunk. Further on, this study exemplify the divergence of kappa values when using different methods of calculating kappa for the same dataset. Methods A total of 72 non-injured children were included in the study. Postural orientation of the ankle, knee, hip and trunk for both legs was determined by two testers using a four-point scale (ordinal, 0–3. Prevalence, overall agreement as well as four different methods for calculating kappa were evaluated: linear weighted kappa in comparison with un-weighted kappa, prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK and quadratic weighted kappa. Results The linear weighted kappa values ranged between 0.54-0.86 (overall agreement 0.86-0.97, reflecting a moderate to almost perfect agreement. When calculating un-weighted kappa (with and without PABAK and quadratic weighted kappa, the results spread between 0.46-0.88, 0.50-0.94, and 0.76-0.95, reflecting the various results when using different methods of kappa calculation. Conclusions The Single Leg Mini Squat test has moderate to almost perfect reproducibility in children aged 9–10 and 12–14 years when evaluating postural orientation of the ankles, knees, hips and trunk, based on the excellent strength of

  20. 考虑桩端土成层性的位移协调法单桩沉降计算%A Calculation Method for Settlement Analysis of the Single Pile Considered with the Stress Dispersion of Pile End Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗永健

    2014-01-01

    该文基于位移协调法,提出了一种成层地基中考虑桩端土应力扩散效应的单桩沉降计算方法。通过与传统计算方法对比,该计算方法与实测值较吻合,能反映桩顶荷载沉降变化趋势,可以简捷应用到实际工程中。%Pile foundation is a common form of deep foundation , which is widely used in various types of buildings and structures . While the calculation of pile settlement has been studied quite thoroughly , the underlying soil-pile interaction is not yet .Based on displacement coordinating method , a calculation method discussed in this paper is for settlement analysis of the single pile embedded in layered soils , which can be considered in the stress dispersion of pile end soil .Contrasting with the traditional method , the calcu-lating method in this paper is consistent with the measured value;reflect the load on pile top settlement trend .It can be well applied to practical engineering .

  1. 基于蒙特卡洛和器件仿真的单粒子翻转计算方法%Calculation of single event upset based on Monte Carlo and device simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓晗; 郭红霞; 雷志锋; 郭刚; 张科营; 高丽娟; 张战刚

    2014-01-01

    文章提出了一种基于蒙特卡洛和器件仿真的存储器单粒子翻转截面获取方法,可以准确计算存储器单粒子效应,并定位单粒子翻转的灵敏区域。基于该方法,计算了国产静态存储器和现场可编程门阵列(FPGA)存储区的单粒子效应的截面数据,仿真结果和重离子单粒子效应试验结果符合较好。仿真计算揭示了器件单粒子翻转敏感程度与器件n, p 截止管区域面积相关的物理机理,并获得了不同线性能量转移(LET)值下单粒子翻转灵敏区域分布。采用蒙特卡洛方法计算了具有相同LET、不同能量的离子径迹分布,结果显示高能离子的电离径迹半径远大于低能离子,而低能离子径迹中心的能量密度却要高约两到三个数量级。随着器件特征尺寸的减小,这种差别的影响将会越来越明显,阈值LET和饱和截面将不能完全描述器件单粒子效应结果。%An extraction method for single event upset cross section based on Monte Carlo code and device simulation is proposed, which can be used to calculate single event effects and sensitive regions in memories accurately. Single event upset cross sections of domestic static random access memory (SRAM) and field programmatic gate array (FPGA) devices are calculated, and results agree well with these from heavy ion test. Simulation results reveal the physical mechanism of the relationship between single event upset sensitivity and surface area of off-state NMOSFET and PMOSFET. Sensitive regions of single event upset under different linear energy transfer (LET) values are obtained. The radial ionization profiles of heavy ions with different energy, but the same LET, are also calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The track radius of high-energy ion is significantly larger than that of low-energy ion, while the charge density at the track center of low-energy ion is higher by two or three orders of magnitude. With decreasing technology

  2. 基于蒙特卡洛和器件仿真的单粒子翻转计算方法%Calculation of single event upset based on Monte Carlo and device simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓晗; 郭红霞; 雷志锋; 郭刚; 张科营; 高丽娟; 张战刚

    2014-01-01

    An extraction method for single event upset cross section based on Monte Carlo code and device simulation is proposed, which can be used to calculate single event effects and sensitive regions in memories accurately. Single event upset cross sections of domestic static random access memory (SRAM) and field programmatic gate array (FPGA) devices are calculated, and results agree well with these from heavy ion test. Simulation results reveal the physical mechanism of the relationship between single event upset sensitivity and surface area of off-state NMOSFET and PMOSFET. Sensitive regions of single event upset under different linear energy transfer (LET) values are obtained. The radial ionization profiles of heavy ions with different energy, but the same LET, are also calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The track radius of high-energy ion is significantly larger than that of low-energy ion, while the charge density at the track center of low-energy ion is higher by two or three orders of magnitude. With decreasing technology scaling, the impact of these differences on single event effects will be more pronounced, and the threshold LET and saturated cross-section will not be capable of describing the single event response completely.%文章提出了一种基于蒙特卡洛和器件仿真的存储器单粒子翻转截面获取方法,可以准确计算存储器单粒子效应,并定位单粒子翻转的灵敏区域。基于该方法,计算了国产静态存储器和现场可编程门阵列(FPGA)存储区的单粒子效应的截面数据,仿真结果和重离子单粒子效应试验结果符合较好。仿真计算揭示了器件单粒子翻转敏感程度与器件n, p 截止管区域面积相关的物理机理,并获得了不同线性能量转移(LET)值下单粒子翻转灵敏区域分布。采用蒙特卡洛方法计算了具有相同LET、不同能量的离子径迹分布,结果显示高能离子的电离径迹半径远大于低能离子,而低能离子径迹

  3. Cluster PEACE observations of electrons of spacecraft origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szita

    Full Text Available The two PEACE (Plasma Electron And Current Experiment sensors on board each Cluster spacecraft sample the electron velocity distribution across the full 4 solid angle and the energy range 0.7 eV to 26 keV with a time resolution of 4 s. We present high energy and angular resolution 3D observations of electrons of spacecraft origin in the various environments encountered by the Cluster constellation, including a lunar eclipse interval where the spacecraft potential was reduced but remained positive, and periods of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control operation which reduced the spacecraft potential. We demonstrate how the spacecraft potential may be found from a gradient change in the PEACE low energy spectrum, and show how the observed spacecraft electrons are confined by the spacecraft potential. We identify an intense component of the spacecraft electrons with energies equivalent to the spacecraft potential, the arrival direction of which is seen to change when ASPOC is switched on. Another spacecraft electron component, observed in the sunward direction, is reduced in the eclipse but unaffected by ASPOC, and we believe this component is produced in the analyser by solar UV. We find that PEACE anodes with a look direction along the spacecraft surfaces are more susceptible to spacecraft electron contamination than those which look perpendicular to the surface, which justifies the decision to mount PEACE with its field-of-view radially outward rather than tangentially.

    Key words. Magnetosheric physics (general or miscellaneous Space plasma physics (spacecraft sheaths, wakes, charging

  4. MEMS Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  5. Large scale GW calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present GW calculations of molecules, ordered and disordered solids and interfaces, which employ an efficient contour deformation technique for frequency integration and do not require the explicit evaluation of virtual electronic states nor the inversion of dielectric matrices. We also present a parallel implementation of the algorithm, which takes advantage of separable expressions of both the single particle Green's function and the screened Coulomb interaction. The method can be used starting from density functional theory calculations performed with semilocal or hybrid functionals. The newly developed technique was applied to GW calculations of systems of unprecedented size, including water/semiconductor interfaces with thousands of electrons

  6. Thermal considerations in the use of solid state power amplifiers on the GOES spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallette, L.; Darby, S.; Baatz, M.; Ujihara, K.

    1984-01-01

    The use of solid state power amplifiers (SSPA) in satellites has been quite prevalent in several frequency bands. This trend is evidenced by the use of SSPAs at Hughes in the UHF band (Leasat/Syncom IV), S band (GOES), C band (Telstar), and SHF band. The junction temperature of the transistor is the driving requirement which determines the lifetime of the transistor, SSPA, and the payload. This temperature is determined by the transistor characteristics, use of the device, and mounting temperature of the SSPA. The temperature of the spacecraft in the area of the SSPA can be controlled by active or passive means. The various factors and interrelationships used to calculate and control the temperatures of SSPAs are described. The thermal design and calculation of junction temperatures are exemplified with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite spacecraft.

  7. Spacecraft Thermal and Optical Modeling Impacts on Estimation of the GRAIL Lunar Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Park, Ryan S.; Yuan, Dah-Ning; Konopliv, Alex S.

    2012-01-01

    We summarize work performed involving thermo-optical modeling of the two Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft. We derived several reconciled spacecraft thermo-optical models having varying detail. We used the simplest in calculating SRP acceleration, and used the most detailed to calculate acceleration due to thermal re-radiation. For the latter, we used both the output of pre-launch finite-element-based thermal simulations and downlinked temperature sensor telemetry. The estimation process to recover the lunar gravity field utilizes both a nominal thermal re-radiation accleration history and an apriori error model derived from that plus an off-nominal history, which bounds parameter uncertainties as informed by sensitivity studies.

  8. Spacecraft fabrication and test MODIL. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T.T.

    1994-05-01

    This report covers the period from October 1992 through the close of the project. FY 92 closed out with the successful briefing to industry and with many potential and important initiatives in the spacecraft arena. Due to the funding uncertainties, we were directed to proceed as if our funding would be approximately the same as FY 92 ($2M), but not to make any major new commitments. However, the MODIL`s FY 93 funding was reduced to $810K and we were directed to concentrate on the cryocooler area. The cryocooler effort completed its demonstration project. The final meetings with the cryocooler fabricators were very encouraging as we witnessed the enthusiastic reception of technology to help them reduce fabrication uncertainties. Support of the USAF Phillips Laboratory cryocooler program was continued including kick-off meetings for the Prototype Spacecraft Cryocooler (PSC). Under Phillips Laboratory support, Gill Cruz visited British Aerospace and Lucas Aerospace in the United Kingdom to assess their manufacturing capabilities. In the Automated Spacecraft & Assembly Project (ASAP), contracts were pursued for the analysis by four Brilliant Eyes prime contractors to provide a proprietary snap shot of their current status of Integrated Product Development. In the materials and structure thrust the final analysis was completed of the samples made under the contract (``Partial Automation of Matched Metal Net Shape Molding of Continuous Fiber Composites``) to SPARTA. The Precision Technologies thrust funded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to prepare a plan to develop a Computer Aided Alignment capability to significantly reduce the time for alignment and even possibly provide real time and remote alignment capability of systems in flight.

  9. Spacecraft computer technology at Southwest Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has developed and delivered spacecraft computers for a number of different near-Earth-orbit spacecraft including shuttle experiments and SDIO free-flyer experiments. We describe the evolution of the basic SwRI spacecraft computer design from those weighing in at 20 to 25 lb and using 20 to 30 W to newer models weighing less than 5 lb and using only about 5 W, yet delivering twice the processing throughput. Because of their reduced size, weight, and power, these newer designs are especially applicable to planetary instrument requirements. The basis of our design evolution has been the availability of more powerful processor chip sets and the development of higher density packaging technology, coupled with more aggressive design strategies in incorporating high-density FPGA technology and use of high-density memory chips. In addition to reductions in size, weight, and power, the newer designs also address the necessity of survival in the harsh radiation environment of space. Spurred by participation in such programs as MSTI, LACE, RME, Delta 181, Delta Star, and RADARSAT, our designs have evolved in response to program demands to be small, low-powered units, radiation tolerant enough to be suitable for both Earth-orbit microsats and for planetary instruments. Present designs already include MIL-STD-1750 and Multi-Chip Module (MCM) technology with near-term plans to include RISC processors and higher-density MCM's. Long term plans include development of whole-core processors on one or two MCM's.

  10. High Energy Failure Containment for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektas, Pete; Baker, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper will be to investigate advancements and any commonality between spacecraft debris containment and the improvements being made in ballistic protection. Scope: This paper will focus on cross application of protection devices and methods, and how they relate to protecting humans from failures in spacecraft. The potential gain is to reduce the risk associated with hardware failure, while decreasing the weight and size of energy containment methods currently being used by the government and commercial industry. Method of Approach: This paper will examine testing that has already been accomplished in regards to the failure of high energy rotating hardware and compare it to advancements in ballistic protection. Examples are: DOT research and testing of turbine containment as documented in DOT/FAA/AR-96/110, DOT/FAA/AR-97/82, DOT/FAA/AR-98/22. It will also look at work accomplished by companies such as ApNano and IBD Deisenroth in the development of nano ceramics and nanometric steels. Other forms of energy absorbent materials and composites will also be considered and discussed. New Advances in State of the Art: There have been numerous advances in technology in regards to high energy debris containment and in the similar field of ballistic protection. This paper will discuss methods such as using impregnated or dry Kevlar, ceramic, and nano-technology which have been successfully tested but are yet to be utilized in spacecraft. Reports on tungsten disulfide nanotubes claim that they are 4-5 times stronger than steel and reports vary about the magnitude increase over Kevlar, but it appears to be somewhere in the range of 2-6 times stronger. This technology could also have applications in the protection of pressure vessels, motor housings, and hydraulic component failures.

  11. Electromagnetic Dissociation and Spacecraft Electronics Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    2016-01-01

    When protons or heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or solar particle events (SPE) interact with target nuclei in spacecraft, there can be two different types of interactions. The more familiar strong nuclear interaction often dominates and is responsible for nuclear fragmentation in either the GCR or SPE projectile nucleus or the spacecraft target nucleus. (Of course, the proton does not break up, except possibly to produce pions or other hadrons.) The less familiar, second type of interaction is due to the very strong electromagnetic fields that exist when two charged nuclei pass very close to each other. This process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) and primarily results in the emission of neutrons, protons and light ions (isotopes of hydrogen and helium). The cross section for particle production is approximately defined as the number of particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions or other types of reactions. (There are various kinematic and other factors which multiply the particle number to arrive at the cross section.) Strong, nuclear interactions usually dominate the nuclear reactions of most interest that occur between GCR and target nuclei. However, for heavy nuclei (near Fe and beyond) at high energy the EMD cross section can be much larger than the strong nuclear interaction cross section. This paper poses a question: Are there projectile or target nuclei combinations in the interaction of GCR or SPE where the EMD reaction cross section plays a dominant role? If the answer is affirmative, then EMD mechanisms should be an integral part of codes that are used to predict damage to spacecraft electronics. The question can become more fine-tuned and one can ask about total reaction cross sections as compared to double differential cross sections. These issues will be addressed in the present paper.

  12. MEMS device for spacecraft thermal control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theordore D. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A micro-electromechanical device that comprises miniaturized mechanical louvers, referred to as Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) louvers are employed to achieve a thermal control function for spacecraft and instruments. The MEMS louvers are another form of a variable emittance control coating and employ micro-electromechanical technology. In a function similar to traditional, macroscopic thermal louvers, the MEMS louvers of the present invention change the emissivity of a surface. With the MEMS louvers, as with the traditional macroscopic louvers, a mechanical vane or window is opened and closed to allow an alterable radiative view to space.

  13. Phase change materials for spacecraft thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of this investigation were to determine the capabilities of certain phase change materials (PCM) in pellet form to buffer heat loads immediately following short term peak thermal input as part of a spacecraft thermal management system (SCTMS). Two types of PCMs demonstrated potential for SCTMS were encapsulated inorganic salt hydrate, calcium chloride hexahydrate, and the form-stable crystalline polymer, high density polyethylene. The PCM properties examined for the design of experimental packed bed heat exchangers included: packed bed porosity, mass density, pellet diameter, melting point, etc

  14. Impulsive orbit control for spacecraft around asteroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔祜涛; 崔平远; 栾恩杰

    2003-01-01

    An impulse feedback control law to change the mean orbit elements of spacecraft around asteroid is presented. First, the mean orbit elements are transferred to the osculating orbit elements at the burning time.Then, the feedback control law based on Gauss' s perturbation equations of motion is given. And the impulse control for targeting from the higher circulation orbit to the specified periapsis is developed. Finally, the numerical simulation is performed and the simulation results show that the presented impulse control law is effective.

  15. Effects of Spacecraft Landings on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The rocket exhaust of spacecraft landing on the Moon causes a number of observable effects that need to be quantified, including: disturbance of the regolith and volatiles at the landing site; damage to surrounding hardware such as the historic Apollo sites through the impingement of high-velocity ejecta; and levitation of dust after engine cutoff through as-yet unconfirmed mechanisms. While often harmful, these effects also beneficially provide insight into lunar geology and physics. Some of the research results from the past 10 years is summarized and reviewed here.

  16. SHARP: Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The planetary spacecraft mission OPS as applied to SHARP is studied. Knowledge systems involved in this study are detailed. SHARP development task and Voyager telecom link analysis were examined. It was concluded that artificial intelligence has a proven capability to deliver useful functions in a real time space flight operations environment. SHARP has precipitated major change in acceptance of automation at JPL. The potential payoff from automation using AI is substantial. SHARP, and other AI technology is being transferred into systems in development including mission operations automation, science data systems, and infrastructure applications.

  17. Fault Detection and Isolation for Spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2002-01-01

    This article realizes nonlinear Fault Detection and Isolation for actuators, given there is no measurement of the states in the actuators. The Fault Detection and Isolation of the actuators is instead based on angular velocity measurement of the spacecraft and knowledge about the dynamics of the...... satellite. The algorithms presented in this paper are based on a geometric approach to achieve nonlinear Fault Detection and Isolation. The proposed algorithms are tested in a simulation study and the pros and cons of the algorithms are discussed....

  18. Loading operations for spacecraft propulsion subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, G. P.; Nordeng, H. O.; Ellison, J. R.

    1992-07-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of loading operations for pressurized blowdown monopropellant and pressure regulated integral bipropellant propulsion subsystems used in geosynchronous communication satellites. Propellant chemical composition, cleanliness, processing, and handling requirements are addressed. Ground servicing equipment (GSE) and propellant transfer procedures for the various loading configurations are discussed. Effects of helium solubility and helium saturation levels in both GSE carts and propellant tanks are examined. Predicted equilibrium pressures for actual postload tank pressures are compared against extensive loading data on Hughes bipropellant spacecraft. Helium tank pressurization and manifold pressurization practices are described. Propellant loading facility requirements and safety requirements are discussed.

  19. Studies of influence of various factors on dose quantities measured with CR-39 detectors onboard spacecraft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jadrníčková, Iva; Yasuda, N.; Kawashima, H.; Kurano, M.; Kodaira, S.; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Akatov, YU.; Shurshakov, V.; Kobayashi, I.; Koguchi, Y.; Spurný, František

    Krakow: Institute of Nuclear Physics, 2008. s. 37-37. [Workshop on Radiation Monitoring for the International Space Station /13./. 08.09.2008-10.09.2008, Krakow] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CR-39 detectors onboard spacecraft * measurements * calculation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  20. Goal Structuring Notation in a Radiation Hardening Assurance Case for COTS-Based Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rebekah; Evans, John; Mahadevan, Nag; Karsai, Gabor; Sierawski, Brian; Schrimpf, Ron; Witulski, Arthur; LaBel, Ken; Reed, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A systematic approach is presented to constructing a radiation assurance case using Goal Structuring Notation (GSN) for spacecraft containing commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts. The GSN paradigm is applied to an SRAM single-event upset experiment board designed to fly on a CubeSat November 2016. Construction of a radiation assurance case without use of hardened parts or extensive radiation testing is discussed.

  1. Development and testing of model predictive control strategies for spacecraft formation flying

    OpenAIRE

    Valmorbida, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Satellite Formation Flying (SFF) is a key technology for several future missions, since, with respect to a single spacecraft, it allows better performances, new capabilities, more flexibility and robustness to failure and cost reduction. Despite these benefits, however, this new concept poses several signicant design challenges and requires new technologies. The Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) system is a key element in the SFF concept since it must be reliable in coordinating all the ...

  2. Calculations of single particle displacement damage currents in ultra-low leakage current diode%超低泄漏电流二极管单粒子位移损伤电流计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐杜; 贺朝会; 熊涔; 张晋新; 臧航; 李永宏; 张鹏; 谭鹏康

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to calculate the single particle displacement damage currents in ultra-low leak-age current diode.The spatial distribution of primary knock-on atoms in the diode is simulated with SRIM.Based on the SRIM results,the SPDD current steps in the diode irradiated by 25 2 Cf are calculated with Shockley-Read-Hall theory.The theoretical calculations of single particle displacement damage currents conduce to good agreements with experimental data.A stratified con-stant-gradient method is proposed to approximately describe the non-uniform distribution of electric field in the depletion region, therefore,the contributions of defects created in different positions in the depletion region to the increased leakage current can be calculated independently.The results show that the carriers emission is most significantly enhanced by electric field near the PN junction.Compared to the calculated results without considering the field-enhanced emission effect,the contribution of single de-fect near the PN junction to the increase of leakage current is two orders of magnitude higher when the electric field-enhanced e-mission effect is taken into consideration.Besides,the SPDD currents induced by 80 MeV Nd ions are generally higher than that by 106 MeV Cd ions.The SPDD currents induced by these ions are mainly between 1 fA to 1 pA.%提出了一种计算超低泄漏电流硅二极管的单粒子位移损伤电流的方法。采用 SRIM 软件计算了252 Cf 源的裂变碎片入射二极管产生的初级撞出原子的分布,并采用 Shockley-Read-Hall 复合理论探讨了单粒子位移损伤电流值与缺陷参数的关系,计算了252 Cf 源辐照引起的单粒子位移损伤电流台阶值,计算结果与实验结果一致。针对耗尽区电场非均匀的特点,提出电场分层近似方法来考虑处于耗尽区中不同位置的初级撞出原子产生的缺陷对泄漏电流的影响。结果表明,PN 结附近电场增强载流子产生

  3. Design and control of multiple spacecraft formation flying in elliptical orbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-ji; YANG Di

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft formation flying is an attractive new concept in international aeronautic fields because of its powerful functions and low cost. In this paper, the formation design and PD closed-loop control of spacecraft formation flying in elliptical orbits are discussed. Based on two-body relative dynamics, the true anomaly is applied as independent variable instead of the variable of time. Since the apogee is considered as the starting point, the six integrating constants are calculated. Therefore, the algebraic solution is obtained for the relative motion in elliptical orbits. Moreover, the formation design is presented and both circular formation and line formation are provided in terms of an algebraic solution. This paper also discusses the PD-closed loop control for precise formation control in elliptical orbits. In this part, the error-type state equation is put forward and the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) method is used to calculate PD parameters. Though the gain matrix calculated from LQR is time-variable because the error-type state equation is time variable, the PD parameters are also considered as constants because of their small changes in simulation. Finally, taking circular formation as an example, the initial orbital elements are achieved for three secondary spacecraft. And the numerical simulation is analyzed under PD formation control with initial errors and J2 perturbation. The simulation results demonstrate the validity of PD closed-loop control scheme.

  4. Processing Images of Craters for Spacecraft Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew E.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    A crater-detection algorithm has been conceived to enable automation of what, heretofore, have been manual processes for utilizing images of craters on a celestial body as landmarks for navigating a spacecraft flying near or landing on that body. The images are acquired by an electronic camera aboard the spacecraft, then digitized, then processed by the algorithm, which consists mainly of the following steps: 1. Edges in an image detected and placed in a database. 2. Crater rim edges are selected from the edge database. 3. Edges that belong to the same crater are grouped together. 4. An ellipse is fitted to each group of crater edges. 5. Ellipses are refined directly in the image domain to reduce errors introduced in the detection of edges and fitting of ellipses. 6. The quality of each detected crater is evaluated. It is planned to utilize this algorithm as the basis of a computer program for automated, real-time, onboard processing of crater-image data. Experimental studies have led to the conclusion that this algorithm is capable of a detection rate >93 percent, a false-alarm rate <5 percent, a geometric error <0.5 pixel, and a position error <0.3 pixel.

  5. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  6. High temperature thruster technology for spacecraft propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    A technology program has been underway since 1985 to develop high temperature oxidation-resistant thrusters for spacecraft applications. The successful development of this technology will provide the basis for the design of higher performance satellite engines with reduced plume contamination. Alternatively, this technology program will provide a material with high thermal margin to operate at conventional temperatures and provide increased life for refuelable or reusable spacecraft. The new chamber material consists of a rhenium substrate coated with iridium for oxidation protection. This material increases the operating temperature of thrusters to 2200°C, a significant increase over the 1400°C of the silicide-coated niobium chambers currently used. Stationkeeping class 22 N engines fabricated from iridium-coated rhenium have demonstrated steady state specific impulses 20 to 25 seconds higher than niobium chambers. Ir-Re apogee class 440 N engines are expected to deliver an additional 10 to 15 seconds. These improved performances are obtained by reducing or eliminating the fuel film cooling requirements in the combustion chamber while operating at the same overall mixture ratio as conventional engines. The program is attempting to envelope flight qualification requirements to reduce the potential risks and costs of flight qualification programs.

  7. Spacecraft Angular Rates Estimation with Gyrowheel Based on Extended High Gain Observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaokun; Yao, Yu; Ma, Kemao; Zhao, Hui; He, Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    A gyrowheel (GW) is a kind of electronic electric-mechanical servo system, which can be applied to a spacecraft attitude control system (ACS) as both an actuator and a sensor simultaneously. In order to solve the problem of two-dimensional spacecraft angular rate sensing as a GW outputting three-dimensional control torque, this paper proposed a method of an extended high gain observer (EHGO) with the derived GW mathematical model to implement the spacecraft angular rate estimation when the GW rotor is working at large angles. For this purpose, the GW dynamic equation is firstly derived with the second kind Lagrange method, and the relationship between the measurable and unmeasurable variables is built. Then, the EHGO is designed to estimate and calculate spacecraft angular rates with the GW, and the stability of the designed EHGO is proven by the Lyapunov function. Moreover, considering the engineering application, the effect of measurement noise in the tilt angle sensors on the estimation accuracy of the EHGO is analyzed. Finally, the numerical simulation is performed to illustrate the validity of the method proposed in this paper. PMID:27089347

  8. Spacecraft Angular Rates Estimation with Gyrowheel Based on Extended High Gain Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokun Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A gyrowheel (GW is a kind of electronic electric-mechanical servo system, which can be applied to a spacecraft attitude control system (ACS as both an actuator and a sensor simultaneously. In order to solve the problem of two-dimensional spacecraft angular rate sensing as a GW outputting three-dimensional control torque, this paper proposed a method of an extended high gain observer (EHGO with the derived GW mathematical model to implement the spacecraft angular rate estimation when the GW rotor is working at large angles. For this purpose, the GW dynamic equation is firstly derived with the second kind Lagrange method, and the relationship between the measurable and unmeasurable variables is built. Then, the EHGO is designed to estimate and calculate spacecraft angular rates with the GW, and the stability of the designed EHGO is proven by the Lyapunov function. Moreover, considering the engineering application, the effect of measurement noise in the tilt angle sensors on the estimation accuracy of the EHGO is analyzed. Finally, the numerical simulation is performed to illustrate the validity of the method proposed in this paper.

  9. Optimum Guidance Law and Information Management for a Large Number of Formation Flying Spacecrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yuichi; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    In recent years, formation flying technique is recognized as one of the most important technologies for deep space and orbital missions that involve multiple spacecraft operations. Formation flying mission improves simultaneous observability over a wide area, redundancy and reconfigurability of the system with relatively small and low cost spacecrafts compared with the conventional single spacecraft mission. From the viewpoint of guidance and control, realizing formation flying mission usually requires tight maintenance and control of the relative distances, speeds and orientations between the member satellites. This paper studies a practical architecture for formation flight missions focusing mainly on guidance and control, and describes a new guidance algorithm for changing and keeping the relative positions and speeds of the satellites in formation. The resulting algorithm is suitable for onboard processing and gives the optimum impulsive trajectory for satellites flying closely around a certain reference orbit, that can be elliptic, parabolic or hyperbolic. Based on this guidance algorithm, this study introduces an information management methodology between the member spacecrafts which is suitable for a large formation flight architecture. Routing and multicast communication based on the wireless local area network technology are introduced. Some mathematical analyses and computer simulations will be shown in the presentation to reveal the feasibility of the proposed formation flight architecture, especially when a very large number of satellites join the formation.

  10. Multi-Spacecraft Investigation of Terrestrial Bow Shock: Cluster Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruparova, O.; Krupar, V.; Santolik, O.; Soucek, J.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Nemec, F.; Maksimovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere, a permanent collisionless bow shock (BS) is formed in front of the nose of the magnetopause. We investigate a large number of BS crossings observed by the Cluster spacecraft between years 2001 and 2015. The FGM instruments provide us with magnetic field measurements sampled at 22 Hz, which is sufficient for a precise identification of BS crossings. We compare observed BS locations with distances predicted by gas dynamical models based on upstream plasma parameters in the solar wind. We achieve a very good agreement in a case of a paraboloid with the Earth fixed in a focus point. We use a simple timing method for the estimation of a BS normal and velocity along this normal. We found that the deviations of calculated BS normals from the paraboloid shape are within 20 degrees. We compare calculated BS velocities with several upstream parameters. We also investigate BS ramp thickness which is comparable to the Larmor radius in the case of quasi-perpendicular BS crossings.

  11. An Efficient Nonlinear Filter for Spacecraft Attitude Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the computational efficiency of attitude estimation is a critical problem related to modern spacecraft, especially for those with limited computing resources. In this paper, a computationally efficient nonlinear attitude estimation strategy based on the vector observations is proposed. The Rodrigues parameter is chosen as the local error attitude parameter, to maintain the normalization constraint for the quaternion in the global estimator. The proposed attitude estimator is performed in four stages. First, the local attitude estimation error system is described by a polytopic linear model. Then the local error attitude estimator is designed with constant coefficients based on the robust H2 filtering algorithm. Subsequently, the attitude predictions and the local error attitude estimations are calculated by a gyro based model and the local error attitude estimator. Finally, the attitude estimations are updated by the predicted attitude with the local error attitude estimations. Since the local error attitude estimator is with constant coefficients, it does not need to calculate the matrix inversion for the filter gain matrix or update the Jacobian matrixes online to obtain the local error attitude estimations. As a result, the computational complexity of the proposed attitude estimator reduces significantly. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed attitude estimation strategy.

  12. Spacecraft Dynamics Should be Considered in Kalman Filter Attitude Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaguang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Kalman filter based spacecraft attitude estimation has been used in some high-profile missions and has been widely discussed in literature. While some models in spacecraft attitude estimation include spacecraft dynamics, most do not. To our best knowledge, there is no comparison on which model is a better choice. In this paper, we discuss the reasons why spacecraft dynamics should be considered in the Kalman filter based spacecraft attitude estimation problem. We also propose a reduced quaternion spacecraft dynamics model which admits additive noise. Geometry of the reduced quaternion model and the additive noise are discussed. This treatment is more elegant in mathematics and easier in computation. We use some simulation example to verify our claims.

  13. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The aurorae on Jupiter are like the Aurorae Borealis and Australis on the Earth, although visible only by ultraviolet light. They flicker in a similar way in response to variations in the solar wind of charged particles blowing from the Sun. While Galileo monitored the changing environment of particles and magnetism in Jupiter's vicinity, IUE recorded surprisingly large and rapid variations in the overall strength of the auroral activity. IUE's main 45-centimetre telescope did not supply images,but broke up the ultraviolet rays into spectra, like invisible rainbows, from which astrophysicists could deduce chemical compositions, motions and temperatures in the cosmic objects under examination. In the case of Jupiter's aurorae, the strongest emission came from activated hydrogen atoms at a wavelength of 1216 angstroms. The Hubble Space Telescope's contributions to the International Jupiter Watch included images showing variations in the form of the aurorae, and "close-up" spectra of parts of the auroral ovals. Astronomers will compare the flickering aurorae on Jupiter with concurrent monitoring of the Sun and the solar wind by the ESA-NASA SOHO spacecraft and several satellites of the Interagency Solar-Terrestrial Programme. It is notable that changes in auroral intensity by a factor of two or three occurred during the 1996 observational period, even though the Sun was in an exceptionally quiet phase, with very few sunspots. In principle, a watch on Jupiter's aurorae could become a valuable means of checking the long-range effects of solar activity, which also has important consequences for the Earth. The situation at Jupiter is quite different from the Earth's, with the moons strongly influencing the planet's space environment. But with Hubble busy with other work, any such Jupiter-monitoring programme will have to await a new ultraviolet space observatory. IUE observed Jupiter intensively in 1979-80 in conjunction with the visits of NASA's Voyager spacecraft, and

  14. Investigation of HZETRN 2010 as a Tool for Single Event Effect Qualification of Avionics Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2014-01-01

    NASA's future missions are focused on long-duration deep space missions for human exploration which offers no options for a quick emergency return to Earth. The combination of long mission duration with no quick emergency return option leads to unprecedented spacecraft system safety and reliability requirements. It is important that spacecraft avionics systems for human deep space missions are not susceptible to Single Event Effect (SEE) failures caused by space radiation (primarily the continuous galactic cosmic ray background and the occasional solar particle event) interactions with electronic components and systems. SEE effects are typically managed during the design, development, and test (DD&T) phase of spacecraft development by using heritage hardware (if possible) and through extensive component level testing, followed by system level failure analysis tasks that are both time consuming and costly. The ultimate product of the SEE DD&T program is a prediction of spacecraft avionics reliability in the flight environment produced using various nuclear reaction and transport codes in combination with the component and subsystem level radiation test data. Previous work by Koontz, et al.1 utilized FLUKA, a Monte Carlo nuclear reaction and transport code, to calculate SEE and single event upset (SEU) rates. This code was then validated against in-flight data for a variety of spacecraft and space flight environments. However, FLUKA has a long run-time (on the order of days). CREME962, an easy to use deterministic code offering short run times, was also compared with FLUKA predictions and in-flight data. CREME96, though fast and easy to use, has not been updated in several years and underestimates secondary particle shower effects in spacecraft structural shielding mass. Thus, this paper will investigate the use of HZETRN 20103, a fast and easy to use deterministic transport code, similar to CREME96, that was developed at NASA Langley Research Center primarily for

  15. Reliability Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kurt Erling

    1986-01-01

    probabilistic approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis...... of very complex systems. In order to increase the applicability of the programs variance reduction techniques can be applied to speed up the calculation process. Variance reduction techniques have been studied and procedures for implementation of importance sampling are suggested....

  16. Study on Space Debris and Impact Effect on Spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space debris is increasingly concerned by aerospace engineers and scientists. The evolution of an orbital debris cloud, the collision probability between of debris and a spacecraft, and the damage evaluation of spacecraft when impacted by space debris are studied in this work. A hypervelocity impact model for honeycomb panel is proposed. Under considering secondary debris, the survivability of spacecraft impacted by space debris is finally investigated

  17. Measuring Charge Storage Decay Time and Resistivity of Spacecraft Insulators

    OpenAIRE

    Brunson, Jerilyn; Dennison, JR

    2005-01-01

    An informal discussion of how accurate measurements of resistivity and increasing understanding of the behavior of insulating materials used on spacecraft is fundamental to advancing the design and utility of the spacecraft. Build up of charge can vary between different areas of the spacecraft, with excess charge accumulating and leading to functional anomalies or component failure. The most important parameter in determining how charge will decay through an insulator is the resistivity of th...

  18. Harmonic analysis of nonlinear devices on spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Frank; Sheble, Gerald B.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear device modeling algorithm (NOLID) has been developed for use in spacecraft power system analysis. This algorithm is designed to explore the effects of nonlinear devices and loads on a spacecraft power system. Application of this harmonic modeling algorithm in spacecraft power system management programs such as harmonic power flow analysis packages is discussed. It is shown that the NOLID algorithm can be applied in conjunction with a harmonic power flow to give a more accurate description of system state.

  19. Study on Space Debris and Impact Effect on Spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Hai; Jia Guanghui; Dong Yunfeng [School of Astronautics, Beihang University (BUAA), Xueyuan Road No.37, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-04-15

    Space debris is increasingly concerned by aerospace engineers and scientists. The evolution of an orbital debris cloud, the collision probability between of debris and a spacecraft, and the damage evaluation of spacecraft when impacted by space debris are studied in this work. A hypervelocity impact model for honeycomb panel is proposed. Under considering secondary debris, the survivability of spacecraft impacted by space debris is finally investigated.

  20. Ab initio calculations on SnCl2 and Franck-Condon factor simulations of its ÖX˜ and B˜-X˜ absorption and single-vibronic-level emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edmond P. F.; Dyke, John M.; Mok, Daniel K. W.; Chow, Wan-ki; Chau, Foo-tim

    2007-07-01

    Minimum-energy geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and relative electronic energies of some low-lying singlet and triplet electronic states of stannous dichloride, SnCl2, have been computed employing the complete-active-space self-consistent-field/multireference configuration interaction (CASSCF/MRCI) and/or restricted-spin coupled-cluster single-double plus perturbative triple excitations [RCCSD(T)] methods. The small core relativistic effective core potential, ECP28MDF, was used for Sn in these calculations, together with valence basis sets of up to augmented correlation-consistent polarized-valence quintuple-zeta (aug-cc-pV5Z) quality. Effects of outer core electron correlation on computed geometrical parameters have been investigated, and contributions of off-diagonal spin-orbit interaction to relative electronic energies have been calculated. In addition, RCCSD(T) or CASSCF/MRCI potential energy functions of the X˜A11, ãB13, and B˜B11 states of SnCl2 have been computed and used to calculate anharmonic vibrational wave functions of these three electronic states. Franck-Condon factors between the X˜A11 state, and the ãB13 and B˜B11 states of SnCl2, which include anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation, were then computed, and used to simulate the ÖX˜ and B˜-X˜ absorption and corresponding single-vibronic-level emission spectra of SnCl2 which are yet to be recorded. It is anticipated that these simulated spectra will assist spectroscopic identification of gaseous SnCl2 in the laboratory and/or will be valuable in in situ monitoring of SnCl2 in the chemical vapor deposition of SnO2 thin films in the semiconductor gas sensor industry by laser induced fluorescence and/or ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, when a chloride-containing tin compound, such as tin dichloride or dimethyldichlorotin, is used as the tin precursor.

  1. Requirements analysis for a multi-spacecraft flight system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. M.; O'Quinn, C. F.; Porter, B. S.

    2002-01-01

    The StarLight mission scheduled to launch June 2006, will demonstrate the separated spacecraft technologies of formation flying, precision formation, estimation, and long baseline stellar interferometry.

  2. Concurrent engineering: Spacecraft and mission operations system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landshof, J. A.; Harvey, R. J.; Marshall, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Despite our awareness of the mission design process, spacecraft historically have been designed and developed by one team and then turned over as a system to the Mission Operations organization to operate on-orbit. By applying concurrent engineering techniques and envisioning operability as an essential characteristic of spacecraft design, tradeoffs can be made in the overall mission design to minimize mission lifetime cost. Lessons learned from previous spacecraft missions will be described, as well as the implementation of concurrent mission operations and spacecraft engineering for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) program.

  3. Monte Carlo Technique Used to Model the Degradation of Internal Spacecraft Surfaces by Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is one of the predominant constituents of Earth's upper atmosphere. It is created by the photodissociation of molecular oxygen (O2) into single O atoms by ultraviolet radiation. It is chemically very reactive because a single O atom readily combines with another O atom or with other atoms or molecules that can form a stable oxide. The effects of atomic oxygen on the external surfaces of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can have dire consequences for spacecraft life, and this is a well-known and much studied problem. Much less information is known about the effects of atomic oxygen on the internal surfaces of spacecraft. This degradation can occur when openings in components of the spacecraft exterior exist that allow the entry of atomic oxygen into regions that may not have direct atomic oxygen attack but rather scattered attack. Openings can exist because of spacecraft venting, microwave cavities, and apertures for Earth viewing, Sun sensors, or star trackers. The effects of atomic oxygen erosion of polymers interior to an aperture on a spacecraft were simulated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by using Monte Carlo computational techniques. A two-dimensional model was used to provide quantitative indications of the attenuation of atomic oxygen flux as a function of the distance into a parallel-walled cavity. The model allows the atomic oxygen arrival direction, the Maxwell Boltzman temperature, and the ram energy to be varied along with the interaction parameters of the degree of recombination upon impact with polymer or nonreactive surfaces, the initial reaction probability, the reaction probability dependence upon energy and angle of attack, degree of specularity of scattering of reactive and nonreactive surfaces, and the degree of thermal accommodation upon impact with reactive and non-reactive surfaces to be varied to allow the model to produce atomic oxygen erosion geometries that replicate actual experimental results from space. The degree of

  4. Electromagnetic thrusters for spacecraft prime propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, L. K.; King, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    The benefits of electromagnetic propulsion systems for the next generation of US spacecraft are discussed. Attention is given to magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) and arc jet thrusters, which form a subset of a larger group of electromagnetic propulsion systems including pulsed plasma thrusters, Hall accelerators, and electromagnetic launchers. Mission/system study results acquired over the last twenty years suggest that for future prime propulsion applications high-power self-field MPD thrusters and low-power arc jets have the greatest potential of all electromagnetic thruster systems. Some of the benefits they are expected to provide include major reductions in required launch mass compared to chemical propulsion systems (particularly in geostationary orbit transfer) and lower life-cycle costs (almost 50 percent less). Detailed schematic drawings are provided which describe some possible configurations for the various systems.

  5. Spacecraft Doppler tracking with a VLBI antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoretto, G.; Iess, L.; Bertotti, B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Horton, T.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from Doppler-shift measurements to the Voyager-2 spacecraft at a distance of 26 AU, obtained using the 32-m VLBI antenna at Medicina (Italy) during July and August 1988. The apparatus comprises the el-az antenna, an S-X-band receiver, a hydrogen maser to generate the reference signal, a Mark III VLBI terminal, and a digital tone extractor capable of isolating a tone of known frequency from a noisy signal and giving its phase and amplitude. A signal transmitted in S-band from the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) station in Australia and retransmitted coherently in X-band by Voyager, was received 7 h 6 min later at Medicina and at the DSN station in Madrid. Sample data are presented graphically and shown to be of generally high quality; further in-depth analysis is under way.

  6. Electrochromic emissivity modulator for spacecraft thermal management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Moorehead, David [Eclipse Energy Systems, Inc., 2345 Anvil Street North, St. Petersburg, FL 33710 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    A novel electrochromic device (ECD) working in mid- to long-wave infrared (IR) region is presented, comprising of a solid-state monolithic thin film system for adjusting heat rejection/receiving levels on attached surfaces. The system is an electrically controllable active emissivity modulator. EclipseVED trademark, variable-emissivity ECD, is designed for satellite and spacecraft thermal control, using an active ECD system for long-wave infrared (LWIR) modulation and a passive cold mirror for solar rejection. Emissivity modulation of the system is 0.8 for 7-12 {mu}m region while average solar rejection is 80% in the vis-NIR region. Device properties and initial space test results are also presented. (author)

  7. Raytracing for Multi-Spacecraft Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The numerical simulation of in-situ instruments allows the instrument design to be optimized for particle throughput and allows for the iteration of the design parameters before fabrication. This effort leads to greater efficiency since the hardware itself does not have to be machined and fabricated to test each design change. More importantly for multi-spacecraft missions, the numerical raytracing allows the assessment of manufacturing tolerances so that a low relative accuracy can be obtained between the instruments. We will discuss our experience in optimizing and raytracing our charged particle instruments, obtaining the geometry factor from these simulations, and the comparison with the results of laboratory testing. This discussion with others will support the ISSI Scientific Report on Calibration Techniques for In-Situ Plasma Instrumentation.

  8. Kepler & K2: One spacecraft, Two Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natalie

    2015-12-01

    This year, we mark twenty years of exploring the diversity of planets and planetary systems orbiting main sequence stars. Exoplanet discoveries spill into the thousands, and the sensitivity boundaries continue to expand. NASA's Kepler Mission unveiled a galaxy replete with small planets and revealed populations that don't exist in our own solar system. The mission has yielded a sample sufficient for computing planet occurrence rates as a function of size, orbital period, and host star properties. We've learned that every late-type star has at least one planet on average, that terrestrial-sized planets are more common than larger planets within 1 AU, and that the nearest, potentially habitable earth-sized planet is likely within 5pc. After four years of continuous observations, the Kepler prime mission ended in May 2013 with the loss of a second reaction wheel. Thanks to innovative engineering, the spacecraft gained a second lease on life and emerged as the ecliptic surveyor, K2. In many regards, K2 is a distinctly new mission, not only by pointing at new areas of the sky but also by focusing on community-driven goals that diversify the science yield. For exoplanets, this means targeting bright and low mass stars -- the populations harboring planets amenable to dynamical and atmospheric characterization. To date, the mission has executed 7 observing campaigns lasting ~80 days each and has achieved a 6-hour photometric precision of 30 ppm. A couple dozen planets have been confirmed, including two nearby (watch-list for future JWST campaigns. While Kepler prime is setting the stage for the direct imaging missions of the future, K2 is easing us into an era of atmospheric characterization -- one spacecraft, two missions, and a bright future for exoplanet science.

  9. Double Cusp Observed By The Cluster Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C. P.; Bosqued, J. M.; Berchem, J.; Anderson, P. C.; Fehringer, M.; Laakso, H.; Reme, H.

    The polar cusp is characterised by a direct entry of solar wind plasma into the magne- tosphere. Depending on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), Bz positive or negative, the precipitation of the ions in the cusp presents a dispersion in energy directed poleward or equatorward. In addition the polar cusp moves in latitude according to the IMF, from about 75 deg. ILAT for Bz negative to about 82 deg. ILAT for Bz positive. The Cluster spacecraft are crossing the mid-altitude polar cusp, in a "string of pearl" configuration, and are therefore the ideal tool to study the motion and evolution of the cusp on time scale of a few minutes up to 45 min. On 30 August 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft crossed the mid-altitude polar cusp (4-6 Re) around 12.5 H local time with SC4 entering the cusp at 1532 UT, SC2 following 1.5 min later, SC1, 3 min later and finally SC3, 45 min later. SC4 and SC1 observed a typical poleward dispersion associated with Bz negative. SC3 observed first the same disper- sion starting at about 74 deg. ILAT, however at 81 deg. ILAT a second dispersion was observed. The IMF was southward during the dispersion and became slightly positive during the second dispersion. Two hypothesis can be proposed, a fast motion of the cusp poleward during the SC3 crossing or a double injection in the cusp. Preliminary analysis of DMSP satellites, although not exactly in the same sector, indicates that the cusp moved poleward around that time. Cluster observations will be compared with the results from a global MHD simulation model to investigate the geometry of the reconnection between the IMF and the Earth magnetic field.

  10. SPEI Calculator

    OpenAIRE

    Beguería, Santiago; Vicente Serrano, Sergio M.

    2009-01-01

    [EN] *Objectives: The program calculates time series of the Standardised Precipitation-Evapotransporation Index (SPEI). *Technical Characteristics: The program is executed from the Windows console. From an input data file containing monthly time series of precipitation and mean temperature, plus the geographic coordinates of the observatory, the program computes the SPEI accumulated at the time interval specified by the user, and generates a new data file with the SPEI time serie...

  11. Burnout calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviewed is the effect of heat flux of different system parameters on critical density in order to give an initial view on the value of several parameters. A thorough analysis of different equations is carried out to calculate burnout is steam-water flows in uniformly heated tubes, annular, and rectangular channels and rod bundles. Effect of heat flux density distribution and flux twisting on burnout and storage determination according to burnout are commended

  12. Investigation of HZETRN 2010 as a Tool for Single Event Effect Qualification of Avionics Systems - Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An accurate prediction of spacecraft avionics single event effect (SEE) radiation susceptibility is key to ensuring a safe and reliable vehicle. This is particularly important for long-duration deep space missions for human exploration where there is little or no chance for a quick emergency return to Earth. Monte Carlo nuclear reaction and transport codes such as FLUKA can be used to generate very accurate models of the expected in-flight radiation environment for SEE analyses. A major downside to using a Monte Carlo-based code is that the run times can be very long (on the order of days). A more popular choice for SEE calculations is the CREME96 deterministic code, which offers significantly shorter run times (on the order of seconds). However, CREME96, though fast and easy to use, has not been updated in several years and underestimates secondary particle shower effects in spacecraft structural shielding mass. Another modeling option to consider is the deterministic code HZETRN 20104, which includes updates to address secondary particle shower effects more accurately. This paper builds on previous work by Rojdev, et al. to compare the use of HZETRN 2010 against CREME96 as a tool to verify spacecraft avionics system reliability in a space flight SEE environment. This paper will discuss modifications made to HZETRN 2010 to improve its performance for calculating SEE rates and compare results with both in-flight SEE rates and other calculation methods.

  13. Generalized Analysis Tools for Multi-Spacecraft Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanteur, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis tools for multi-spacecraft missions like CLUSTER or MMS have been designed since the end of the 90's to estimate gradients of fields or to characterize discontinuities crossed by a cluster of spacecraft. Different approaches have been presented and discussed in the book "Analysis Methods for Multi-Spacecraft Data" published as Scientific Report 001 of the International Space Science Institute in Bern, Switzerland (G. Paschmann and P. Daly Eds., 1998). On one hand the approach using methods of least squares has the advantage to apply to any number of spacecraft [1] but is not convenient to perform analytical computation especially when considering the error analysis. On the other hand the barycentric approach is powerful as it provides simple analytical formulas involving the reciprocal vectors of the tetrahedron [2] but appears limited to clusters of four spacecraft. Moreover the barycentric approach allows to derive theoretical formulas for errors affecting the estimators built from the reciprocal vectors [2,3,4]. Following a first generalization of reciprocal vectors proposed by Vogt et al [4] and despite the present lack of projects with more than four spacecraft we present generalized reciprocal vectors for a cluster made of any number of spacecraft : each spacecraft is given a positive or nul weight. The non-coplanarity of at least four spacecraft with strictly positive weights is a necessary and sufficient condition for this analysis to be enabled. Weights given to spacecraft allow to minimize the influence of some spacecraft if its location or the quality of its data are not appropriate, or simply to extract subsets of spacecraft from the cluster. Estimators presented in [2] are generalized within this new frame except for the error analysis which is still under investigation. References [1] Harvey, C. C.: Spatial Gradients and the Volumetric Tensor, in: Analysis Methods for Multi-Spacecraft Data, G. Paschmann and P. Daly (eds.), pp. 307-322, ISSI

  14. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    an indirect cause of the observed Pc5 pulsations. During the same interval, two flux transfer events were also observed in the magnetosphere near the oscillating magnetopause. Their ground signatures were identified in the CANOPUS data. The time delays of the FTE signatures from the Polar spacecraft to the ground stations enable us to estimate that the longitudinal extent of the reconnection X-line at the magnetopause was ~43° or ~5.2 RE. The coordinated in-situ and ground-based observations suggest that FTEs are produced by transient reconnection taking place along a single extended X-line at the magnetopause, as suggested in the models by Scholer (1988 and Southwood et al. (1988. The observations from this study suggest that the reconnection occurred in two different forms simultaneously in the same general region at the dayside magnetopause: 1 continuous reconnection with a pulsed reconnection rate, and 2 transient reconnection as flux transfer events.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; MHD waves and instabilities

  15. Development of a Deployable Nonmetallic Boom for Reconfigurable Systems of Small Modular Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    Launch vehicle payload capacity and the launch environment represent two of the most operationally limiting constraints on space system mass, volume, and configuration. Large-scale space science and power platforms as well as transit vehicles have been proposed that greatly exceed single-launch capabilities. Reconfigurable systems launched as multiple small modular spacecraft with the ability to rendezvous, approach, mate, and conduct coordinated operations have the potential to make these designs feasible. A key characteristic of these proposed systems is their ability to assemble into desired geometric (spatial) configurations. While flexible and sparse formations may be realized by groups of spacecraft flying in close proximity, flyers physically connected by active structural elements could continuously exchange power, fluids, and heat (via fluids). Configurations of small modular spacecraft temporarily linked together could be sustained as long as needed with minimal propellant use and reconfigured as often as needed over extended missions with changing requirements. For example, these vehicles could operate in extremely compact configurations during boost phases of a mission and then redeploy to generate power or communicate while coasting and upon reaching orbit. In 2005, NASA funded Phase 1 of a program called Modular Reconfigurable High-Energy Technology Demonstrator Assembly Testbed (MRHE) to investigate reconfigurable systems of small spacecraft. The MRHE team was led by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and included Lockheed Martin's Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto and its subcontractor, ATK. One of the goals of Phase 1 was to develop an MRHE concept demonstration in a relevant 1-g environment to highlight a number of requisite technologies. In Phase 1 of the MRHE program, Lockheed Martin devised and conducted an automated space system assembly demonstration featuring multipurpose free-floating robots representing Spacecraft in the newly

  16. Test effectiveness study report: An analytical study of system test effectiveness and reliability growth of three commercial spacecraft programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Failure data from 16 commercial spacecraft were analyzed to evaluate failure trends, reliability growth, and effectiveness of tests. It was shown that the test programs were highly effective in ensuring a high level of in-orbit reliability. There was only a single catastrophic problem in 44 years of in-orbit operation on 12 spacecraft. The results also indicate that in-orbit failure rates are highly correlated with unit and systems test failure rates. The data suggest that test effectiveness estimates can be used to guide the content of a test program to ensure that in-orbit reliability goals are achieved.

  17. A localized swarm of low-resource CubeSat-class spacecraft for auroral ionospheric science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R.; Lynch, K. A.; Gayetsky, L.; Guinther, J.; Slagle, A.; Currey, S.

    2012-12-01

    In interesting and dynamic auroral ionospheric plasmas, single-point in situ measurements are insufficient. Changes in measurements recorded from a single probe can be ascribed to either changes in position or to changes over time, and gradient scales can only be inferred. A localized array of sensors deployed as a low-resource swarm from a main deployer, can address these issues. We consider two aspects of designing such a swarm: (a) maintaining the localization in a low-cost manner, and (b) creating an extremely low-resource spacecraft by taking advantage of commercially available technologies. For a few-week low-altitude mission, STK (SatelliteToolKit) studies show that with proper deployment, an array of CubeSat-class spacecraft near 350 km altitude can regroup once per orbit to within a few 10s of km. Kepler's laws and Hill's equations allow us to put constraints on the capability of the deployer needed, in order to deploy the array with a minimal component of the ejection velocity along the orbital track. In order to keep the cost of each spacecraft low, we are exploring commercially available technologies such as Arduino controllers and video-game sensors. The Arduino on each payload will take in information from the sensors on the payload, and will send the information to a DNT-900MHz local area communications system. We show an example experiment measuring river flows on the Connecticut river, and discuss the design of our payload swarm.

  18. Microbial diversity on spacecraft and in spacecraft assembly and testing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, P.; Nellen, J.; Fritze, D.; Verbarg, S.; Stackebrandt, E.; Kminek, G.

    Planetary protection measures are necessary for all space flight missions involved with life detection and or sample return procedures to avoid the contamination of critical spacecraft hardware components with terrestrial organisms Spacecraft are assembled in clean rooms under defined and controlled environmental conditions These conditions might be considered as extreme with respect to controlled air circulation low relative humidity moderately high constant temperature and low nutrient conditions and represent a special artificial environment for microorganisms In the ESA-Project MiDiv the bioburden and the microbial diversity of three different spacecraft assembly and testing facilities has been investigated in periods where the facilities have been in full operation with the assembly and test of European satellites For the selected satellite missions SMART-1 and ROSETTA however no strict planetary protection measures like those required for a landing mission on Mars COSPAR Planetary Protection Category IV have been necessary and taken into consideration The result of this investigation therefore reflects the normal microbial conditions in standard class 100 000 clean rooms used by employees without any special training in planetary protection The investigation in the MiDiv project was restricted to so-called cultivable microorganisms in particular to those microorganisms that are able to grow under the selected conditions The analysis of the samples included cultivation on different media at different pH values and

  19. Application of the NASCAP Spacecraft Simulation Tool to Investigate Electrodynamic Tether Current Collection in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi; HabashKrause, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Recent interest in using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) for orbital maneuvering in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) has prompted the development of the Marshall ElectroDynamic Tether Orbit Propagator (MEDTOP) model. The model is comprised of several modules which address various aspects of EDT propulsion, including calculation of state vectors using a standard orbit propagator (e.g., J2), an atmospheric drag model, realistic ionospheric and magnetic field models, space weather effects, and tether librations. The natural electromotive force (EMF) attained during a radially-aligned conductive tether results in electrons flowing down the tether and accumulating on the lower-altitude spacecraft. The energy that drives this EMF is sourced from the orbital energy of the system; thus, EDTs are often proposed as de-orbiting systems. However, when the current is reversed using satellite charged particle sources, then propulsion is possible. One of the most difficult challenges of the modeling effort is to ascertain the equivalent circuit between the spacecraft and the ionospheric plasma. The present study investigates the use of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) to calculate currents to and from the tethered satellites and the ionospheric plasma. NASCAP is a sophisticated set of computational tools to model the surface charging of three-dimensional (3D) spacecraft surfaces in a time-varying space environment. The model's surface is tessellated into a collection of facets, and NASCAP calculates currents and potentials for each one. Additionally, NASCAP provides for the construction of one or more nested grids to calculate space potential and time-varying electric fields. This provides for the capability to track individual particles orbits, to model charged particle wakes, and to incorporate external charged particle sources. With this study, we have developed a model of calculating currents incident onto an electrodynamic tethered satellite system, and first results are shown

  20. An application of modern control theory to an elastic spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, V.; Likins, P. W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented to illustrate the application of established procedures of linear, quadratic, Gaussian optimal estimation and control to a spacecraft with dynamically significant elastic appendages. Interpretations are provided in both time domain and frequency domain, and conclusions are drawn for a wide class of problems of flexible spacecraft attitude control.

  1. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft using geomagnetic Lorentz force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attitude stabilization of a charged rigid spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit using torques due to Lorentz force in pitch and roll directions is considered. A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth's magnetic field will be subject to perturbations from the Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft's orientation. We assume that the spacecraft is moving in the Earth's magnetic field in an elliptical orbit under the effects of gravitational, geomagnetic and Lorentz torques. The magnetic field of the Earth is modeled as a non-tilted dipole. A model incorporating all Lorentz torques as a function of orbital elements has been developed on the basis of electric and magnetic fields. The stability of the spacecraft orientation is investigated both analytically and numerically. The existence and stability of equilibrium positions is investigated for different values of the charge to mass ratio (α*). Stable orbits are identified for various values of α*. The main parameters for stabilization of the spacecraft are α* and the difference between the components of the moment of inertia for the spacecraft. (research papers)

  2. Drawing of American ASTP crewmen searching for Soviet Soyuz spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The American Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crewmen search the skies for the Soviet Soyuz spacecraft in this humorous artwork by Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov. Astronauts Vance D. Brand, Donald K. Slayton and Thomas P. Stafford (left to right) sit astride the Apollo spacecraft and Docking Module ready to lasso Soyuz. Leonov, an accomplished artist, specializes in painting on space subjects.

  3. Autonomous control system reconfiguration for spacecraft with non-redundant actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Walter

    1995-01-01

    The Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI) 'CLARK' spacecraft is required to be single-failure tolerant, i.e., no failure of any single component or subsystem shall result in complete mission loss. Fault tolerance is usually achieved by implementing redundant subsystems. Fault tolerant systems are therefore heavier and cost more to build and launch than non-redundent, non fault-tolerant spacecraft. The SSTI CLARK satellite Attitude Determination and Control System (ADACS) achieves single-fault tolerance without redundancy. The attitude determination system system uses a Kalman Filter which is inherently robust to loss of any single attitude sensor. The attitude control system uses three orthogonal reaction wheels for attitude control and three magnetic dipoles for momentum control. The nominal six-actuator control system functions by projecting the attitude correction torque onto the reaction wheels while a slower momentum management outer loop removes the excess momentum in the direction normal to the local B field. The actuators are not redundant so the nominal control law cannot be implemented in the event of a loss of a single actuator (dipole or reaction wheel). The spacecraft dynamical state (attitude, angular rate, and momentum) is controllable from any five-element subset of the six actuators. With loss of an actuator the instantaneous control authority may not span R(3) but the controllability gramian integral(limits between t,0) Phi(t, tau)B(tau )B(prime)(tau) Phi(prime)(t, tau)d tau retains full rank. Upon detection of an actuator failure the control torque is decomposed onto the remaining active axes. The attitude control torque is effected and the over-orbit momentum is controlled. The resulting control system performance approaches that of the nominal system.

  4. Controlling Charging and Arcing on a Solar Powered Auroral Orbiting Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Rhee, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement satellite (GPM) will be launched into a high inclination (65 degree) orbit to monitor rainfall on a global scale. Satellites in high inclination orbits have been shown to charge to high negative potentials, with the possibility of arcing on the solar arrays, when three conditions are met: a drop in plasma density below approximately 10,000 cm(exp -3), an injection of energetic electrons of energy more that 7-10 keV, and passage through darkness. Since all of these conditions are expected to obtain for some of the GPM orbits, charging calculations were done using first the Space Environment and Effects (SEE) Program Interactive Spacecraft Charging Handbook, and secondly the NASA Air-force Spacecraft Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP-2k). The object of the calculations was to determine if charging was likely for the GPM configuration and materials, and specifically to see if choosing a particular type of thermal white paint would help minimize charging. A detailed NASCAP-2k geometrical model of the GPM spacecraft was built, with such a large number of nodes that it challenged the capability of NASCAP-2k to do the calculations. The results of the calculations were that for worst-case auroral charging conditions, charging to levels on the order of -120 to -230 volts could occur on GPM during night-time, with differential voltages on the solar arrays that might lead to solar array arcing. In sunlit conditions, charging did not exceed -20 V under any conditions. The night-time results were sensitive to the spacecraft surface materials chosen. For non-conducting white paints, the charging was severe, and could continue unabated throughout the passage of GPM through the auroral zone. Somewhat conductive (dissipative) white paints minimized the night-time charging to levels of -120 V or less, and thus were recommended for GPM thermal control. It is shown that the choice of thermal control paints is important to prevent arcing on high

  5. Analysis of three-spacecraft data using planar reciprocal vectors: methodological framework and spatial gradient estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vogt

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the context of ESA's Cluster mission, four-point array techniques are widely used to analyze space plasma phenomena such as shocks and discontinuities, waves and turbulence, and spatial gradients. Due to failures of single instruments on the Cluster spacecraft fleet, there is also need for array processing of three-point measurements. In this paper we identify planar reciprocal vectors as a generic tool for this purpose. The class of three-point techniques introduced here includes methods for discontinuity analysis, wave identification, and spatial gradient determination. Parameter vectors can be resolved fully in the spacecraft plane but further assumptions or physical constraints have to be specified to estimate the normal components. We focus on the gradient estimation problem where we check and illustrate our approach using Cluster measurements.

  6. Evaluation of the Educational Impact of Participation Time in a Small Spacecraft Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Straub

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The value of the duration of participation in a small spacecraft program has not previously been sufficiently characterized. This work seeks to determine whether most relevant benefits are received by participants quickly (suggesting that participant education would be best achieved by shorter duration exposure to multiple domains or accrues over time (suggesting that prolonged work on a single project would be most beneficial. The experiences of the student participants in the OpenOrbiter Small Spacecraft Development Initiative at the University of North Dakota are analyzed in an attempt to answer this question. To this end, correlation between the duration of program participation and the level of benefit received (across five categories is assessed herein.

  7. Improved optimal steering law for SGCMG and adaptive attitude control of flexible spacecraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Wang; Yu Guo; Liping Wu; Qingwei Chen

    2015-01-01

    The issue of attitude maneuver of a flexible spacecraft is investigated with single gimbaled control moment gyroscopes (SGCMGs) as an actuator. To solve the inertia uncertainty of the system, an adaptive attitude control algorithm is designed by ap-plying a radial basis function (RBF) neural network. An improved steering law for SGCMGs is proposed to achieve the optimal out-put torque. It enables the SGCMGs not only to avoid singularity, but also to output more precise torque. In addition, global, uniform, ultimate bounded stability of the attitude control system is proved via the Lyapunov technique. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new steering law and the algorithm of attitude maneuver of the flexible spacecraft.

  8. A robust strong tracking cubature Kalman filter for spacecraft attitude estimation with quaternion constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Xie, Hongsheng; Shen, Chen; Li, Jinpeng

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers a robust strong tracking nonlinear filtering problem in the case there are model uncertainties including the model mismatch, unknown disturbance and status mutation in the spacecraft attitude estimation system with quaternion constraint. Two multiple fading factor matrices are employed to regulate the prediction error covariance matrix, which guarantees its symmetry. The spherical-radial cubature rule is developed to deal with the multi-dimensional integrals. The quaternion constraint is maintained by utilizing the gain correction method. Therefore a robust strong tracking cubature Kalman filter (RSTCKF) is formed for the spacecraft attitude estimation with quaternion constraint. Unlike adopting a single fading factor in the traditional strong tracking filter, the presented filter uses two multiple fading factor matrices to make different channels have respective filter adjustment capability, which improves the tracking performance of this algorithm. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed RSTCKF.

  9. A Survey of Research on Service-Spacecraft Orbit Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue; ZHANG Jian-xin; ZHANG Qiang; WEI Xiao-peng

    2013-01-01

    On-orbit service spacecraft orbit problem has been addressed for decades. The research of on-orbit service spacecraft orbit can be roughly divided into orbit design and orbit optimization. The paper mainly focuses on the orbit design problem. We simply summarize of the previous works, and point out the main content of the on-orbit service spacecraft orbit design. We classify current on-orbit service spacecraft orbit design problem into parking-orbit design, maneuvering-orbit design and servicing-orbit design. Then, we give a detail description of the three specific orbits, and put forward our own ideas on the existed achievements. The paper will provide a meaningful reference for the on-orbit service spacecraft orbital design research.

  10. Asteroid Deflection Using a Spacecraft in Restricted Keplerian Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Ketema, Yohannes

    2016-01-01

    A method for asteroid deflection that makes use of a spacecraft moving back and forth on a segment of an appropriate Keplerian orbit about the asteroid is described and evaluated. It is shown that, on average, the spacecraft describing such a trajectory can exert a significantly larger force on the asteroid than e.g. a stationary gravity tractor, thereby reducing the time needed to effect a desired velocity change for the asteroid. Furthermore, the current method does not require canted thrusters on the spacecraft (unlike a stationary gravity tractor), markedly reducing the amount of fuel needed to create a given change in the asteroid velocity. In addition, the method allows for the simultaneous use of several spacecraft, further strengthening the overall tugging effect on the asteroid, and distributing the thrust requirement among the spacecraft.

  11. A Near-Term Mars Sample Return Spacecraft Design Utilizing Solar Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J.; Hoffman, S.; Rachocki, K.; Edgett, L.; Dow, S.; Herman, A.

    2002-01-01

    In support of advanced planning activities for a potential Mars sample return (MSR) mission, a spacecraft design concept was developed and various mission implementation options were assessed. The baseline 760 kg wet solar electric propulsion (SEP) spacecraft was configured to transport a 20 kg sample canister from low Mars orbit (LMO) to low Earth orbit (LEO) in approximately 2 yr. A shuttle orbiter carrying a specially engineered containment vault would then be used to bring the sample and spacecraft to a safe and controlled Earth runway landing. The spacecraft architecture is largely dual-string with high projected reliability to address planetary protection concerns. Off-the-shelf or near-term system components and technologies were assumed. A nominal 10 kWe (at 1.0 AU) solar array powers two 30 cm or 40 cm xenon ion thrusters, providing efficient primary propulsion and modest propellant need. Two innovative features of the design include reaction control via xenon resistojets, allowing a single inert propellant to serve both primary and auxiliary propulsion, and use of the internal xenon tank as primary load-bearing structure. The above results in an efficient and low mass solution for return of Mars samples, as well as a compact spacecraft (1.2 m dia x 2.3 m stowed) capable of being returned to earth entirely contained within a shuttle- carried vault. Alternative mission architecture options were also explored. In Option 1, a heavy Delta II was used to inject a 1300 kg wet variant of the baseline to a slightly positive C3, allowing the spacecraft to be "self- delivered" to Mars in 2 yr. Option 2 emplaced a 1600 kg wet variant into LEO, allowing reduction in launch vehicle size to a smaller "Med-Lite" Delta II, at the expense of a now 3 yr outbound leg to Mars. Other options explored the ability of the SEP vehicle to ferry the 2900 kg Mars lander and ascent vehicle. It was found that SEP could enable an entire MSR mission to be injected on a single Delta IV

  12. Calculator calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McCarty, George

    1982-01-01

    How THIS BOOK DIFFERS This book is about the calculus. What distinguishes it, however, from other books is that it uses the pocket calculator to illustrate the theory. A computation that requires hours of labor when done by hand with tables is quite inappropriate as an example or exercise in a beginning calculus course. But that same computation can become a delicate illustration of the theory when the student does it in seconds on his calculator. t Furthermore, the student's own personal involvement and easy accomplishment give hi~ reassurance and en­ couragement. The machine is like a microscope, and its magnification is a hundred millionfold. We shall be interested in limits, and no stage of numerical approximation proves anything about the limit. However, the derivative of fex) = 67.SgX, for instance, acquires real meaning when a student first appreciates its values as numbers, as limits of 10 100 1000 t A quick example is 1.1 , 1.01 , 1.001 , •••• Another example is t = 0.1, 0.01, in the functio...

  13. Reliability calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either during the design process or during the operation time, with the purpose to improve the safety or the reliability. Due to plant complexity and safety and availability requirements, sophisticated tools, which are flexible and efficient, are needed. Such tools have been developed in the last 20 years and they have to be continuously refined to meet the growing requirements. Two different areas of application were analysed. In structural reliability probabilistic approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis of very complex systems. In order to increase the applicability of the programs variance reduction techniques can be applied to speed up the calculation process. Variance reduction techniques have been studied and procedures for implementation of importance sampling are suggested. (author)

  14. The Study on New Method of Single Flight Contour Calculation%单次飞行事件噪声等值线计算新方法的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程国勇; 王巍

    2011-01-01

    针对现行单次飞行事件噪声等值线计算中存在的需要布点、插值繁琐等缺点,提出单次飞行事件噪声等值线的分段函数计算模型,将航迹各分段产生的噪声等值线表示成函数形式.该模型具有在计算单次飞行事件噪声影响等值线时不需要布点、程序设计简单等优点.根据某型飞机的基础飞行数据,将分段函数模型与常规模型的计算结果进行了对比,结果表明两种模型的计算误差在±1%之内,从而验证单次飞行事件噪声等值线分段函数模型的有效性.该方法在机场噪声影响范围评价中值得推广.%To overcome the defects of stationing needs and the bothersome interpolation in current noise contour calculation for single flight event, a sub-function mathematical model is proposed.In this model, the aircraft noise contour of different flight path subsection is expressed as several sub-functions.This model has such advantages that stationing is not necessary and it is easy for programming and designing in the process of noise contours calculation.Using a certain type aircraft flight data, the noise contour is computed based on the sub-function model.And the result of computation is compared with that using the current noise contour calculation method.The relative difference between them is less than 1%.Thus, the validity of the new model is proved.This new model is worth promoting in evaluation of aircraft noise.

  15. Reconstruction of spacecraft rotational motion using a Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, V. A.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-static microaccelerations of four satellites of the Foton series (nos. 11, 12, M-2, M-3) were monitored as follows. First, according to measurements of onboard sensors obtained in a certain time interval, spacecraft rotational motion was reconstructed in this interval. Then, along the found motion, microacceleration at a given onboard point was calculated according to the known formula as a function of time. The motion was reconstructed by the least squares method using the solutions to the equations of satellite rotational motion. The time intervals in which these equations make reconstruction possible were from one to five orbital revolutions. This length is increased with the modulus of the satellite angular velocity. To get an idea on microaccelerations and satellite motion during an entire flight, the motion was reconstructed in several tens of such intervals. This paper proposes a method for motion reconstruction suitable for an interval of arbitrary length. The method is based on the Kalman filter. We preliminary describe a new version of the method for reconstructing uncontrolled satellite rotational motion from magnetic measurements using the least squares method, which is essentially used to construct the Kalman filter. The results of comparison of both methods are presented using the data obtained on a flight of the Foton M-3.

  16. Evaluation of Brine Processing Technologies for Spacecraft Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Hali L.; Flynn, Michael; Wisniewski, Richard; Lee, Jeffery; Jones, Harry; Delzeit, Lance; Shull, Sarah; Sargusingh, Miriam; Beeler, David; Howard, Jeanie; Howard, Kevin; Harris, Linden; Parodi, Jurek; Kawashima, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Brine drying systems may be used in spaceflight. There are several advantages to using brine processing technologies for long-duration human missions including a reduction in resupply requirements and achieving high water recovery ratios. The objective of this project was to evaluate four technologies for the drying of spacecraft water recycling system brine byproducts. The technologies tested were NASA's Forward Osmosis Brine Drying (FOBD), Paragon's Ionomer Water Processor (IWP), NASA's Brine Evaporation Bag (BEB) System, and UMPQUA's Ultrasonic Brine Dewatering System (UBDS). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the hardware using feed streams composed of brines similar to those generated on board the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration missions. The brine formulations used for testing were the ISS Alternate Pretreatment and Solution 2 (Alt Pretreat). The brines were generated using the Wiped-film Rotating-disk (WFRD) evaporator, which is a vapor compression distillation system that is used to simulate the function of the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). Each system was evaluated based on the results from testing and Equivalent System Mass (ESM) calculations. A Quality Function Deployment (QFD) matrix was also developed as a method to compare the different technologies based on customer and engineering requirements.

  17. Radioisotope AMTEC power system designs for spacecraft applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) system is an exceptional candidate for high performance spacecraft power systems including small systems powered by General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS). The AMTEC converter is best described as a thermally regenerative electrochemical concentration cell. AMTEC is a static energy conversion device and can operate at efficiencies between 15% and 30%. The single tube, remote condensed, wick return minicell design has been incorporated into a radioisotope powered system model. Reported cell efficiencies used for these system design studies ranged from 15% to 25%. This efficiency is significantly higher than other static conversion systems operating at the same temperatures. Savings in mass and cost, relative to other more conventional static conversion systems, have also been shown. The minicell used for this system study has many advanced features not combined in previous designs, including wick return, remote condensing, and hot zone feedthroughs. All of these features significantly enhance the performance of the AMTEC cell. Additionally, the cell end provides enough area for adequate heat transfer from the GPHS module, eliminating the need for a ''hot shoe'', and reducing the complexity and weight of the system. This paper describes and compares small (two module) and larger (16 module) AMTEC radioisotope powered systems and describes the computer model developed to predict their performance

  18. Spacecraft Electrical Connector Selection and Application Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannello, Chris; Davis, Mitchell I; Kichak, Robert A.; Slenski, George

    2009-01-01

    This assessment was initiated by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) after a number of recent "high profile" connector problems, the most visible and publicized of these being the problem with the Space Shuttle's Engine Cut-Off System cryogenic feed-thru connector. The NESC commissioned a review of NASA's connector selection and application processes for space flight applications, including how lessons learned and past problem records are fed back into the processes to avoid recurring issues. Team members were primarily from the various NASA Centers and included connector and electrical parts specialists. The commissioned study was conducted on spacecraft connector selection and application processes at NASA Centers. The team also compared the NASA spacecraft connector selection and application process to the military process, identified recent high profile connector failures, and analyzed problem report data looking for trends and common occurrences. The team characterized NASA's connector problem experience into a list of top connector issues based on anecdotal evidence of a system's impact and commonality between Centers. These top issues are as follows, in no particular rank order: electrically shorted, bent and/or recessed contact pins, contact pin/socket contamination leading to electrically open or intermittencies, connector plating corrosion or corrosion of connector components, low or inadequate contact pin retention forces, contact crimp failures, unmated connectors and mis-wiring due to workmanship errors during installation or maintenance, loose connectors due to manufacturing defects such as wavy washer and worn bayonet retention, damaged connector elastomeric seals and cryogenic connector failure. A survey was also conducted of SAE Connector AE-8C1 committee members regarding their experience relative to the NASA concerns on connectors. The most common responses in order of occurrence were contact retention, plating issues, worn-out or damaged

  19. Quaternion normalization in spacecraft attitude determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, J.; Markley, F. L.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1993-01-01

    Attitude determination of spacecraft usually utilizes vector measurements such as Sun, center of Earth, star, and magnetic field direction to update the quaternion which determines the spacecraft orientation with respect to some reference coordinates in the three dimensional space. These measurements are usually processed by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) which yields an estimate of the attitude quaternion. Two EKF versions for quaternion estimation were presented in the literature; namely, the multiplicative EKF (MEKF) and the additive EKF (AEKF). In the multiplicative EKF, it is assumed that the error between the correct quaternion and its a-priori estimate is, by itself, a quaternion that represents the rotation necessary to bring the attitude which corresponds to the a-priori estimate of the quaternion into coincidence with the correct attitude. The EKF basically estimates this quotient quaternion and then the updated quaternion estimate is obtained by the product of the a-priori quaternion estimate and the estimate of the difference quaternion. In the additive EKF, it is assumed that the error between the a-priori quaternion estimate and the correct one is an algebraic difference between two four-tuple elements and thus the EKF is set to estimate this difference. The updated quaternion is then computed by adding the estimate of the difference to the a-priori quaternion estimate. If the quaternion estimate converges to the correct quaternion, then, naturally, the quaternion estimate has unity norm. This fact was utilized in the past to obtain superior filter performance by applying normalization to the filter measurement update of the quaternion. It was observed for the AEKF that when the attitude changed very slowly between measurements, normalization merely resulted in a faster convergence; however, when the attitude changed considerably between measurements, without filter tuning or normalization, the quaternion estimate diverged. However, when the

  20. A Low Cost Spacecraft Architecture for Robotic Lunar Exploration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Lawrence G.; Gonzales, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    A program of frequent, capable, but affordable lunar robotic missions prior to return of humans to the moon can contribute to the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) NASA is tasked to execute. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and its secondary payload are scheduled to orbit the moon, and impact it, respectively, in 2008. It is expected that the sequence of missions occurring for approximately the decade after 2008 will place an increasing emphasis on soft landed payloads. These missions are requited to explore intrinsic characteristics of the moon, such as hydrogen distribution in the regolith, and levitated dust, to demonstrate the ability to access and process in-situ resources, and to demonstrate functions critical to supporting human presence, such as automated precision navigation and landing. Additional factors governing the design of spacecraft to accomplish this diverse set of objectives are: operating within a relatively modest funding profile, the need tb visit multiple sites (both polar and equatorial) repeatedly, and to use the current generation of launch vehicles. In the US, this implies use of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles, or EELVs, although this design philosophy may be extended to launch vehicles of other nations, as well. Many of these factors are seemingly inconsistent with each other. For example, the cost of a spacecraft usually increases with mass; therefore the desire to fly frequent, modestly priced spacecraft seems to imply small spacecraft (autonomous navigation and soft landing) also usually increases cost. A strategy for spacecraft design that meets these conflicting requirements is presented. Taken together, spacecraft structure and propulsion subsystems constitute the majority of spacecraft mass; saving development and integration cost on these elements is critical to controlling cost. Therefore, a low cost, modular design for spacecraft structure and propulsion subsystems is presented which may be easily scaled up or

  1. Covariant Calculation of General Relativistic Effects in an Orbiting Gyroscope Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Will, Clifford M.

    2002-01-01

    We carry out a covariant calculation of the measurable relativistic effects in an orbiting gyroscope experiment. The experiment, currently known as Gravity Probe B, compares the spin directions of an array of spinning gyroscopes with the optical axis of a telescope, all housed in a spacecraft that rolls about the optical axis. The spacecraft is steered so that the telescope always points toward a known guide star. We calculate the variation in the spin directions relative to readout loops rig...

  2. An AFDX Network for Spacecraft Data Handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deredempt, Marie-Helene; Kollias, Vangelis; Sun, Zhili; Canamares, Ernest; Ricco, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    In aeronautical domain, ARINC-664 Part 7 specification (AFDX) [4] provides the enabling technology for interfacing equipment in Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) architectures. The complementary part of AFDX for a complete interoperability - Time and Space Partitioning (ARINC 653) concepts [1]- was already studied as part of space domain ESA roadmap (i.e. IMA4Space project) Standardized IMA based architecture is already considered in aeronautical domain as more flexible, reliable and secure. Integration and validation become simple, using a common set of tools and data base and could be done by part on different means with the same definition (hardware and software test benches, flight control or alarm test benches, simulator and flight test installation). In some area, requirements in terms of data processing are quite similar in space domain and the concept could be applicable to take benefit of the technology itself and of the panel of hardware and software solutions and tools available on the market. The Mission project (Methodology and assessment for the applicability of ARINC-664 (AFDX) in Satellite/Spacecraft on-board communicatION networks), as an FP7 initiative for bringing terrestrial SME research into the space domain started to evaluate the applicability of the standard in space domain.

  3. Humidity Testing for Human Rated Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    Determination that equipment can operate in and survive exposure to the humidity environments unique to human rated spacecraft presents widely varying challenges. Equipment may need to operate in habitable volumes where the atmosphere contains perspiration, exhalation, and residual moisture. Equipment located outside the pressurized volumes may be exposed to repetitive diurnal cycles that may result in moisture absorption and/or condensation. Equipment may be thermally affected by conduction to coldplate or structure, by forced or ambient air convection (hot/cold or wet/dry), or by radiation to space through windows or hatches. The equipment s on/off state also contributes to the equipment s susceptibility to humidity. Like-equipment is sometimes used in more than one location and under varying operational modes. Due to these challenges, developing a test scenario that bounds all physical, environmental and operational modes for both pressurized and unpressurized volumes requires an integrated assessment to determine the "worst-case combined conditions." Such an assessment was performed for the Constellation program, considering all of the aforementioned variables; and a test profile was developed based on approximately 300 variable combinations. The test profile has been vetted by several subject matter experts and partially validated by testing. Final testing to determine the efficacy of the test profile on actual space hardware is in the planning stages. When validation is completed, the test profile will be formally incorporated into NASA document CxP 30036, "Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Testing Requirements (CEQATR)."

  4. A Technology Program that Rescues Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.; Lesh, J. R.

    2004-03-01

    There has never been a long-duration deep space mission that did not have unexpected problems during operations. JPL's Interplanetary Network Directorate (IND) Technology Program was created to develop new and improved methods of communication, navigation, and operations. A side benefit of the program is that it maintains a cadre of human talent and experimental systems that can be brought to bear on unexpected problems that may occur during mission operations. Solutions fall into four categories: applying new technology during operations to enhance science performance, developing new operational strategies, providing domain experts to help find solutions, and providing special facilities to trouble-shoot problems. These are illustrated here using five specific examples of spacecraft anomalies that have been solved using, at least in part, expertise or facilities from the IND Technology Program: Mariner 10, Voyager, Galileo, SOHO, and Cassini/Huygens. In this era of careful cost management, and emphasis on returns-on-investment, it is important to recognize this crucial additional benefit from such technology program investments.

  5. Medical Significance of Microorganisms in Spacecraft Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms can spoil food supplies, contaminate drinking water, release noxious volatile compounds, initiate allergic responses, contaminate the environment, and cause infectious diseases. International acceptability limits have been established for bacterial and fungal contaminants in air and on surfaces, and environmental monitoring is conducted to ensure compliance. Allowable levels of microorganism in water and food have also been established. Environmental monitoring of the space shuttle, the Mir, and the ISS have allowed for some general conclusions. Generally, the bacteria found in air and on interior surfaces are largely of human origin such as Staphylococcus spp., Micrococcus spp. Common environmental genera such as Bacillus spp. are the most commonly isolated bacteria from all spacecraft. Yeast species associated with humans such as Candida spp. are commonly found. Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and Cladosporium spp. are the most commonly isolated filamentous fungi. Microbial levels in the environment differ significantly depending upon humidity levels, condensate accumulation, and availability of carbon sources. However, human "normal flora" of bacteria and fungi can result in serious, life-threatening diseases if human immunity is compromised. Disease incidence is expected to increase as mission duration increases.

  6. Radioisotopic heater units warm an interplanetary spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe, which were successfully launched on October 15, 1997, constitute NASA's last grand-scale interplanetary mission of this century. The mission, which consists of a four-year, close-up study of Saturn and its moons, begins in July 2004 with Cassini's 60 orbits of Saturn and about 33 fly-bys of the large moon Titan. The Huygens probe will descend and land on Titan. Investigations will include Saturn's atmosphere, its rings and its magnetosphere. The atmosphere and surface of Titan and other icy moons also will be characterized. Because of the great distance of Saturn from the sun, some of the instruments and equipment on both the orbiter and the probe require external heaters to maintain their temperature within normal operating ranges. These requirements are met by Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs) designed, fabricated and safety tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. An improved gas tungsten arc welding procedure lowered costs and decreased processing time for heat units for the Cassini spacecraft

  7. Spacecraft with gradual acceleration of solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merhav, Tamir R. (Inventor); Festa, Michael T. (Inventor); Stetson, Jr., John B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A spacecraft (8) includes a movable appendage such as solar panels (12) operated by a stepping motor (28) driven by pulses (311). In order to reduce vibration andor attitude error, the drive pulses are generated by a clock down-counter (312) with variable count ratio. Predetermined desired clock ratios are stored in selectable memories (314a-d), and the selected ratio (R) is coupled to a comparator (330) together with the current ratio (C). An up-down counter (340) establishes the current count-down ratio by counting toward the desired ratio under the control of the comparator; thus, a step change of solar panel speed never occurs. When a direction change is commanded, a flag signal generator (350) disables the selectable memories, and enables a further store (360), which generates a count ratio representing a very slow solar panel rotational rate, so that the rotational rate always slows to a low value before direction is changed. The principles of the invention are applicable to any movable appendage.

  8. NASA Medical Response to Human Spacecraft Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlach, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's role in the response to spacecraft accidents that involve human fatalities or injuries. Particular attention is given to the work of the Mishap Investigation Team (MIT), the first response to the accidents and the interface to the accident investigation board. The MIT does not investigate the accident, but the objective of the MIT is to gather, guard, preserve and document the evidence. The primary medical objectives of the MIT is to receive, analyze, identify, and transport human remains, provide assistance in the recovery effort, and to provide family Casualty Coordinators with latest recovery information. The MIT while it does not determine the cause of the accident, it acts as the fact gathering arm of the Mishap Investigation Board (MIB), which when it is activated may chose to continue to use the MIT as its field investigation resource. The MIT membership and the specific responsibilities and tasks of the flight surgeon is reviewed. The current law establishing the process is also reviewed.

  9. Kalman Filter for Spinning Spacecraft Attitude Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Sedlak, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a Kalman filter using a seven-component attitude state vector comprising the angular momentum components in an inertial reference frame, the angular momentum components in the body frame, and a rotation angle. The relatively slow variation of these parameters makes this parameterization advantageous for spinning spacecraft attitude estimation. The filter accounts for the constraint that the magnitude of the angular momentum vector is the same in the inertial and body frames by employing a reduced six-component error state. Four variants of the filter, defined by different choices for the reduced error state, are tested against a quaternion-based filter using simulated data for the THEMIS mission. Three of these variants choose three of the components of the error state to be the infinitesimal attitude error angles, facilitating the computation of measurement sensitivity matrices and causing the usual 3x3 attitude covariance matrix to be a submatrix of the 6x6 covariance of the error state. These variants differ in their choice for the other three components of the error state. The variant employing the infinitesimal attitude error angles and the angular momentum components in an inertial reference frame as the error state shows the best combination of robustness and efficiency in the simulations. Attitude estimation results using THEMIS flight data are also presented.

  10. Applying a cloud computing approach to storage architectures for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, Sue A.; Quiroz, Carlos; Wood, Paul

    As sensor technologies, processor speeds, and memory densities increase, spacecraft command, control, processing, and data storage systems have grown in complexity to take advantage of these improvements and expand the possible missions of spacecraft. Spacecraft systems engineers are increasingly looking for novel ways to address this growth in complexity and mitigate associated risks. Looking to conventional computing, many solutions have been executed to solve both the problem of complexity and heterogeneity in systems. In particular, the cloud-based paradigm provides a solution for distributing applications and storage capabilities across multiple platforms. In this paper, we propose utilizing a cloud-like architecture to provide a scalable mechanism for providing mass storage in spacecraft networks that can be reused on multiple spacecraft systems. By presenting a consistent interface to applications and devices that request data to be stored, complex systems designed by multiple organizations may be more readily integrated. Behind the abstraction, the cloud storage capability would manage wear-leveling, power consumption, and other attributes related to the physical memory devices, critical components in any mass storage solution for spacecraft. Our approach employs SpaceWire networks and SpaceWire-capable devices, although the concept could easily be extended to non-heterogeneous networks consisting of multiple spacecraft and potentially the ground segment.

  11. Time Frequency Analysis of Spacecraft Propellant Tank Spinning Slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Steven T.; Burkey, Russell C.; Sudermann, James

    2010-01-01

    Many spacecraft are designed to spin about an axis along the flight path as a means of stabilizing the attitude of the spacecraft via gyroscopic stiffness. Because of the assembly requirements of the spacecraft and the launch vehicle, these spacecraft often spin about an axis corresponding to a minor moment of inertia. In such a case, any perturbation of the spin axis will cause sloshing motions in the liquid propellant tanks that will eventually dissipate enough kinetic energy to cause the spin axis nutation (wobble) to grow further. This spinning slosh and resultant nutation growth is a primary design problem of spinning spacecraft and one that is not easily solved by analysis or simulation only. Testing remains the surest way to address spacecraft nutation growth. This paper describes a test method and data analysis technique that reveal the resonant frequency and damping behavior of liquid motions in a spinning tank. Slosh resonant frequency and damping characteristics are necessary inputs to any accurate numerical dynamic simulation of the spacecraft.

  12. RFP to work on formation flying capabilities for spacecrafts for the GRACE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Thuesen, Gøsta; Kilsgaard, Søren;

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Agency of USA, NASA, are working on formation flying capabilities for spacecrafts, GRACE Project. IAU and JPL are developing the inter spacecraft attitude link to be used on the two spacecrafts.......The National Aeronautics and Space Agency of USA, NASA, are working on formation flying capabilities for spacecrafts, GRACE Project. IAU and JPL are developing the inter spacecraft attitude link to be used on the two spacecrafts....

  13. Calculation of thermal diffuse scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Nicklow, R. M.; Katano, S.; Ishii, Y.; Child, H. R.; Smith, H. G.; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.

    We have developed a computer program to calculate the thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) intensity distribution for single-crystal specimens in a diffractometer with no energy analysis. We assumed that the phonon frequencies are approximated by those of elastic waves and that the elastic constants, density and lattice parameters of the system under study are known. The results of the calculations were compared to experimental data obtain for single crystals of Si, diamond and NiAl at the wide-angle neutron diffractometer (WAND) at the HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Excellent agreement was found between the calculations and the experimental observations.

  14. Calculation of thermal diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors developed a computer program to calculate the thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) intensity distribution for single crystal specimens in a diffractometer with no energy analysis. They assumed that the phonon frequencies are approximated by those of elastic waves and that the elastic constants, density and lattice parameters of the system under study are known. The results of the calculations were compared to experimental data obtained for single crystals of Si, diamond and NiAl at the Wide Angle neutron Diffractometer at the HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Excellent agreement was found between the calculations and the experimental observations

  15. Application of DSN spacecraft tracking technology to experimental gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. D.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1978-01-01

    Spacecraft tracking technology of the Deep Space Net (DSN) has been used in the past to measure the general-relativistic increase in round-trip group delay between earth and a spacecraft. As the DSN technology continues to improve, other gravitational experiments will become possible. Two possibilities are discussed in this paper. The first concerns the application of solar-system dynamics to the testing of general relativity. The second involves the detection of VLF gravitational radiation (0.1 to 0.0001 Hz) by means of Doppler tracking of spacecraft.

  16. Preliminary thermal design of the COLD-SAT spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Hugh

    1991-01-01

    The COLD-SAT free-flying spacecraft was to perform experiments with LH2 in the cryogenic fluid management technologies of storage, supply and transfer in reduced gravity. The Phase A preliminary design of the Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) for the spacecraft exterior and interior surfaces and components of the bus subsystems is described. The TCS was composed of passive elements which were augmented with heaters. Trade studies to minimize the parasitic heat leakage into the cryogen storage tanks are described. Selection procedure for the thermally optimum on-orbit spacecraft attitude was defined. TRASYS-2 and SINDA'85 verification analysis was performed on the design and the results are presented.

  17. Dynamics of a spinning spacecraft during extension of flexible appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J.; Keat, J.; Messac, A.

    1984-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of analyzing the deployment of flexible appendages from a central rigid hub of a spinning spacecraft. The rigorous mathematical modeling of mass flow and changing structural configuration of the spacecraft during deployment, while the vehicle experiences small elastic deflection and small angular rate, is presented. The equations of motion are obtained in terms of integro-partial differential equations. An approximate solution for the equations of motion is obtained by using a Raleigh-Ritz method and numerical results are presented for several deployment strategies. For every instantaneous physical configuration of the spacecraft, that extension rate which will lead to unstable behavior is also determined.

  18. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  19. Spacecraft Computers on the SeaStar Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Tantiphanwadi, Sawat

    1999-01-01

    The SeaStar spacecraft requires a high performance computer system to handle its various requirements. It must process not only the high-rate data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) instrument, but also the spacecraft ground interface system and the attitude control system data. This paper will describe the spacecraft computer architecture and its hardware. With minimum peripheral changes, the same computer can be configured to perform the payload, or the ground interfac...

  20. The Near Earth Object (NEO) Scout Spacecraft: A Low-cost Approach to In-situ Characterization of the NEO Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeppel, Eric A.; Balsamo, James M.; Fischer, Karl J.; East, Matthew J.; Styborski, Jeremy A.; Roche, Christopher A.; Ott, Mackenzie D.; Scorza, Matthew J.; Doherty, Christopher D.; Trovato, Andrew J.; Volk, Christopher P.; Koontz, Steven L.; Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Swenson, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a microsatellite spacecraft with supporting mission profile and architecture, designed to enable preliminary in-situ characterization of a significant number of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) at reasonably low cost. The spacecraft will be referred to as the NEO-Scout. NEO-Scout spacecraft are to be placed in Geosynchronous Equatorial Orbit (GEO), cis-lunar space, or on earth escape trajectories as secondary payloads on launch vehicles headed for GEO or beyond, and will begin their mission after deployment from the launcher. A distinguishing key feature of the NEO-Scout system is to design the spacecraft and mission timeline so as to enable rendezvous with and landing on the target NEO during NEO close approach (<0.3 AU) to the Earth-Moon system using low-thrust/high-impulse propulsion systems. Mission durations are on the order 100 to 400 days. Mission feasibility and preliminary design analysis are presented, along with detailed trajectory calculations.

  1. X-Ray Detection and Processing Models for Spacecraft Navigation and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Suneel; Hanson, John

    2013-01-01

    timing model. A discrepancy provides an estimate of the spacecraft position offset, since an error in position will relate to the measured time offset of a pulse along the line of sight to the pulsar. XNAV researchers have been developing additional enhanced approaches to process the photon TOAs to arrive at an estimate of spacecraft position, including those using maximum-likelihood estimation, digital phase locked loops, and "single photon processing" schemes that utilize all available time data associated with each photon. Using pulsars from separate, non-coplanar locations provides range and range-rate measurements in each pulsar s direction. Combining these different pulsar measurements solves for offsets in position and velocity in three dimensions, and provides accurate overall navigation for deep space vehicles.

  2. Error modeling and analysis of star cameras for a class of 1U spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, David M.

    As spacecraft today become increasingly smaller, the demand for smaller components and sensors rises as well. The smartphone, a cutting edge consumer technology, has impressive collections of both sensors and processing capabilities and may have the potential to fill this demand in the spacecraft market. If the technologies of a smartphone can be used in space, the cost of building miniature satellites would drop significantly and give a boost to the aerospace and scientific communities. Concentrating on the problem of spacecraft orientation, this study sets ground to determine the capabilities of a smartphone camera when acting as a star camera. Orientations determined from star images taken from a smartphone camera are compared to those of higher quality cameras in order to determine the associated accuracies. The results of the study reveal the abilities of low-cost off-the-shelf imagers in space and give a starting point for future research in the field. The study began with a complete geometric calibration of each analyzed imager such that all comparisons start from the same base. After the cameras were calibrated, image processing techniques were introduced to correct for atmospheric, lens, and image sensor effects. Orientations for each test image are calculated through methods of identifying the stars exposed on each image. Analyses of these orientations allow the overall errors of each camera to be defined and provide insight into the abilities of low-cost imagers.

  3. Magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity filtering estimation for attitude changing spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an improved real-time sequential filter (IRTSF) for magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity estimation of spacecraft during its attitude changing (including fast and large angular attitude maneuver, rapidly spinning or uncontrolled tumble). In this new magnetometer-only attitude determination technique, both attitude dynamics equation and first time derivative of measured magnetic field vector are directly leaded into filtering equations based on the traditional single vector attitude determination method of gyroless and real-time sequential filter (RTSF) of magnetometer-only attitude estimation. The process noise model of IRTSF includes attitude kinematics and dynamics equations, and its measurement model consists of magnetic field vector and its first time derivative. The observability of IRTSF for small or large angular velocity changing spacecraft is evaluated by an improved Lie-Differentiation, and the degrees of observability of IRTSF for different initial estimation errors are analyzed by the condition number and a solved covariance matrix. Numerical simulation results indicate that: (1) the attitude and angular velocity of spacecraft can be estimated with sufficient accuracy using IRTSF from magnetometer-only data; (2) compared with that of RTSF, the estimation accuracies and observability degrees of attitude and angular velocity using IRTSF from magnetometer-only data are both improved; and (3) universality: the IRTSF of magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity estimation is observable for any different initial state estimation error vector.

  4. Maneuver and vibration reduction of flexible spacecraft using sliding mode/command shaping technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qing-lei; MA Guang-fu; ZHANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    A generalized scheme based on the sliding mode and component synthesis vibration suppression (CSVS) method has been proposed for the rotational maneuver and vibration suppression of an orbiting spacecraft with flexible appendages. The proposed control design process is twofold: design of the attitude controller followed by the design of a flexible vibration attenuator. The attitude controller using only the attitude and the rate information for the flexible spacecraft (FS) is designed to serve two purposes: it forces the attitude motion onto a pre-selected sliding surface and then guides it to the state space origin. The shaped command input controller based on the CSVS method is designed for the reduction of the flexible mode vibration, which only requires information about the natural frequency and damping of the closed system. This information is used to discretize the input so that minimum energy is injected via the controller to the flexible nodes of the spacecraft. Additionally, to extend the CSVS method to the system with the on-off actuators, the pulse-width pulse-frequency ( PWPF) modulation is introduced to control the thruster firing and integrated with the CSVS method. PWPF modulation is a control method that provides pseudo-linear operation for an on-off thruster. The proposed control strategy has been implemented on a FS, which is a hub with symmetric cantilever flexible beam appendages and can undergo a single axis rotation. The results have been proven the potential of this technique to control FS.

  5. Degradation of Spacecraft Materials in the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    When we think of space, we typically think of a vacuum containing very little matter that lies between the Earth and other planetary and stellar bodies. However, the space above Earth's breathable atmosphere and beyond contains many things that make designing durable spacecraft a challenge. Depending on where the spacecraft is flyng, it may encounter atomic oxygen, ultraviolet and other forms of radiation, charged particles, micrormeteoroids and debris, and temperature extremes. These environments on their own and in combination can cause degradation and failure of polymers, composites, paints and other materials used on the exterior of spacecraft for thermal control, structure, and power generation. This article briefly discusses and gives examples of some of the degradation experienced on spacecraft and night experiments as a result of the space environment and the use of ground and space data to predict durability.

  6. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop a high throughput, nominal 100 W Hall Effect Thruster (HET). This HET will be sized for small spacecraft (< 180 kg), including...

  7. Applicability of ISO 16697 Data to Spacecraft Fire Fighting Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation Agenda: (1) Selected variables affecting oxygen consumption during spacecraft fires, (2) General overview of ISO 16697, (3) Estimated amounts of material consumed during combustion in typical ISS enclosures, (4) Discussion on potential applications.

  8. Artificial charging of spacecraft due to electron beam emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beams on a spacecraft can be used to simulate positive charging from energetic ions whether natural (Jovian) or artificial (particle beams). Plasma environment dependent charging effects during electron beam operations on SCATHA are discussed

  9. Diagnosing Faults in Electrical Power Systems of Spacecraft and Aircraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrical power systems play a critical role in spacecraft and aircraft, and they exhibit a rich variety of failure modes. This paper discusses electrical power...

  10. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation Based on Pulsar Timing Information

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhardt, Mike Georg; Prinz, Tobias; Breithuth, Ferdinand Maximilian; Walter, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of an autonomous navigation system for spacecraft that is based on pulsar timing data. Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars that are observable as variable celestial sources of electromagnetic radiation. Their periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board the spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at some reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously with accuracies on the order of 5 kilometres. For a spacecraft at a distance of 10 astronomical units from Earth (e.g., Earth-Saturn), this means an improvement by a factor of 8 compared to conventional methods. Therefore this new technology is an alternative to standard navigation based on radio tracking by ground stations, without the disadvantages of uncertainty in...

  11. The Impact of Autonomy Technology on Spacecraft Software Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, E. B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomy technology for high-level, closed-loop control of spacecraft offers considerable benefits to space-flight projects. Those benefits can enable whole new classes of missions; however, they are not without cost.

  12. Novel Metal Organic Framework Synthesis for Spacecraft Oxygen Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek and University of Utah propose to develop novel metal organic framework (MOF) material to efficiently capture oxygen in spacecraft cabin environment. The...

  13. Interactive systems design and synthesis of future spacecraft concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, R. L.; Deryder, D. D.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive systems design and synthesis is performed on future spacecraft concepts using the Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced spacecraft (IDEAS) computer-aided design and analysis system. The capabilities and advantages of the systems-oriented interactive computer-aided design and analysis system are described. The synthesis of both large antenna and space station concepts, and space station evolutionary growth is demonstrated. The IDEAS program provides the user with both an interactive graphics and an interactive computing capability which consists of over 40 multidisciplinary synthesis and analysis modules. Thus, the user can create, analyze and conduct parametric studies and modify Earth-orbiting spacecraft designs (space stations, large antennas or platforms, and technologically advanced spacecraft) at an interactive terminal with relative ease. The IDEAS approach is useful during the conceptual design phase of advanced space missions when a multiplicity of parameters and concepts must be analyzed and evaluated in a cost-effective and timely manner.

  14. Periodic H-2 Synthesis for Spacecraft Attitude Control with Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    A control synthesis for a spacecraft equipped with a set of magnetorquer coils is addressed. The electromagnetic actuation is particularly attractive for small low-cost spacecraft missions, due to their relatively low price, high reliability, light weight, and low power consumption. The interacti....... A linear matrix inequality-based algorithm is proposed for attitude control synthesis. Simulation results are provided, showing the prospect of the concept for onboard implementation.......A control synthesis for a spacecraft equipped with a set of magnetorquer coils is addressed. The electromagnetic actuation is particularly attractive for small low-cost spacecraft missions, due to their relatively low price, high reliability, light weight, and low power consumption. The interaction...

  15. A Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A spacecraft thermal control system must keep the cabin (both air and its structure if manned) and electronic equipment within a narrow temperature range even...

  16. Nuclear-powered Hysat spacecraft: comparative design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study shows that the all-nuclear spacecraft can have a substantial weight advantage over a hybrid (nuclear/solar) or all-solar spacecraft, owing to a further reduction in power requirement, and to the elimination of such equipment as the sensor gimbal and rotating joint assemblies. Because the need for a sun-oriented section is eliminated, the all-nuclear spacecraft can be designed as a monolithic structure, with the sensor and other payload firmly secured in a fixed position on the structure. This enhances attitude stability while minimizing structural weight and eliminating the need for flexible fluid lines. Sensor motion can be produced, varied, and controlled within the limits specified by the study contractors by moving the entire spacecraft in the prescribed pattern. A simple attitude control system using available hardware suffices to meet all requirements

  17. Wireless Data and Power Transfer on Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achieving low-cost space missions implies lowering all phases of mission development, including spacecraft design, assembly, integration and test. The concept of...

  18. Advanced Portable Fine Water Mist Fire Extinguisher for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fine water mist (FWM) is a promising replacement technology for fire suppression on the next generation of manned spacecraft. It offers advantages in performance,...

  19. Spacecraft Water Regeneration by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to develop advanced catalysts for a volatile removal assembly used to purify spacecraft water. The innovation of the proposed...

  20. Foil Gas Bearing Supported Quiet Fan for Spacecraft Ventilation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Developing a quiet fan for Environmental Control and Life Support systems to enhance the livable environment within the spacecraft has been a challenge. A Foil Gas...

  1. A Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A spacecraft thermal control system must keep the vehicle, avionics and atmosphere (if crewed) within a defined temperature range. Since water is non-toxic and good...

  2. Hard-real-time resource management for autonomous spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tickets, a computational mechanism for hard-real-time autonomous resource management. Autonomous spacecraftcontrol can be considered abstractly as a computational process whose outputs are spacecraft commands.

  3. Passive Devices for Advanced Fluid Management aboard Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acute challenges are faced by the designers of fluid systems for spacecraft because of the persistently unfamiliar and unforgiving low-g environment. For example,...

  4. Trace Contaminant Monitor for Air in Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A need exists for analyzers that can measure trace contaminants in air on board spacecraft. Toxic gas buildup can endanger the crew particularly during long...

  5. Distributed Control Architectures for Precision Spacecraft Formations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LaunchPoint Technologies, Inc. (LaunchPoint) proposes to develop synthesis methods and design architectures for distributed control systems in precision spacecraft...

  6. Micro GC's for Contaminant Monitoring in Spacecraft Air Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to create new gas chromatographs (GCs) for contaminant monitoring in spacecraft air that do not require any reagents or special...

  7. Spacecraft control section for the improved Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    The upgraded spacecraft control section for the Small Astronomy Satellite is able to point its thrust axis to any direction in space; it can also spin or slow its outer body rotation to zero for star-locked pointing of side viewing experiments. A programmable telemetry system and delayed command system enhance the inherent capability of a spacecraft designed to be used for a variety of experiments, each of which can be built independently and attached just prior to final acceptance testing and launch. The design of this new spacecraft, whose first launch is scheduled for 1975, is provided in sufficient detail to permit the reader to ascertain its suitability for specific experiments. A summary of the spacecraft characteristics, project reliability requirements, and environmental test conditions are included in the appendices.

  8. Charge Dissipating Transparent Conformal Coatings for Spacecraft Electronics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The space environment poses significant challenges to spacecraft electronics in the form of electrostatic discharge (ESD) as a result of exposure to highly charged...

  9. Triple3 Redundant Spacecraft Subsystems (T3RSS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Redefine Technologies, along with researchers at the University of Colorado, will use three redundancy methods to decrease the susceptibility of a spacecraft, on a...

  10. High-Performance Contaminant Monitor for Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Vision for Space Exploration demands increasing reliance on real-time trace gas monitors onboard spacecraft. Present grab samples and badges will be inadequate...

  11. Investigation of Correction Method of the Spacecraft Low Altitude Ranging

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jing-Lei; Wu, Shi-Tong; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    gamma ray altitude control system is an important equipment for deep space exploration and sample return mission, its main purpose is a low altitude measurement of the spacecraft based on Compton Effect at the moment when it lands on extraterrestrial celestial or sampling returns to the Earth land, and an ignition altitude correction of the spacecraft retrograde landing rocket at different landing speeds. This paper presents an ignition altitude correction method of the spacecraft at different landing speeds, based on the number of particles gamma ray reflected field gradient graded. Through the establishment of a theoretical model, its algorithm feasibility is proved by a mathematical derivation and verified by an experiment, and also the adaptability of the algorithm under different parameters is described. The method provides a certain value for landing control of the deep space exploration spacecraft landing the planet surface.

  12. Spacecraft Thermal Control System Not Requiring Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal management of spacecraft would be enhanced by dynamic control over surface emissivity in the mid-infrared. In this SBIR program, Triton Systems proposes...

  13. Aerogel Insulation for the Thermal Protection of Venus Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of NASA's primary goals for the next decade is the design, development and launch of a spacecraft aimed at the in-situ exploration of the deep atmosphere and...

  14. Application and use of nuclear power for future spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent plans for growth of civil and military applications of spacecraft and satellites has intensified interest in the use of nuclear power in space. Potential developers of nuclear power reactors and/or conversion systems have provided past papers describing various particular design aspects of their respective systems. This paper provides potential power system users with spacecraft integration concepts and limited data, that may help them identify where and how nuclear power may best be used to meet spacecraft systems power requirements. The paper discusses overall power system size, mass, thermal management, spacecraft configuration, and shielding of unmanned man-visited and continuously-manned systems. Discussion relative to safety imposed limitations and orbital maintenance limitations are included. 6 references

  15. The application and use of nuclear power for future spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent plans for growth of civil and military applications of spacecraft and satellites has intensified interest in the use of nuclear power in space. Potential developers of nuclear power reactors and/or conversion systems have provided past papers describing various particular design aspects of their respective systems. This paper provides potential power system users with spacecraft integration concepts and limited data, that may help them identify where and how nuclear power may best be used to meet spacecraft systems power requirements. The paper discusses overall power system size, mass, thermal management, spacecraft configuration, and shielding of unmanned, manvisited and continuously-manned systems. Discussion relative to safety imposed limitations and orbital maintenance limitations are included

  16. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek is developing a high throughput nominal 100-W Hall Effect Thruster. This device is well sized for spacecraft ranging in size from several tens of kilograms to...

  17. Autonomous Supervisory Engine for Multi-Spacecraft Formation Flying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to develop an onboard, autonomous Multi-spacecraft Supervisory Engine (MSE) for formation-flying guidance, navigation and...

  18. A Data Abstraction Architecture for Spacecraft Autonomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft generate huge amounts of data. A significant challenge for both human operators and autonomous control systems is ensuring that the right data (and...

  19. Modeling Vacuum Arcs On Spacecraft Solar Panel Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft charging and subsequent vacuum arcing poses a significant threat to satellites in LEO and GEO plasma conditions. Localized arc discharges can cause a...

  20. Reactor/Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are currently underway to assess the technological feasibility of a nuclear-reactor-powered spacecraft propelled by electric thrusters. The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information on a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system