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Sample records for calcium-binding proteins

  1. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca2+ within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind 45Ca2+ and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein

  2. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  3. Mycobacterial PE_PGRS Proteins Contain Calcium-Binding Motifs with Parallel β-roll Folds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nandita; Bachhawat; Balvinder; Singh

    2007-01-01

    The PE_PGRS family of proteins unique to mycobacteria is demonstrated to con- rain multiple calcium-binding and glycine-rich sequence motifs GGXGXD/NXUX. This sequence repeat constitutes a calcium-binding parallel/3-roll or parallel β-helix structure and is found in RTX toxins secreted by many Gram-negative bacteria. It is predicted that the highly homologous PE_PGRS proteins containing multiple copies of the nona-peptide motif could fold into similar calcium-binding structures. The implication of the predicted calcium-binding property of PE_PGRS proteins in the Ught of macrophage-pathogen interaction and pathogenesis is presented.

  4. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  5. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  6. Identification of CP12 as a Novel Calcium-Binding Protein in Chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Gomes Rocha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays an important role in the regulation of several chloroplast processes. However, very little is still understood about the calcium fluxes or calcium-binding proteins present in plastids. Indeed, classical EF-hand containing calcium-binding proteins appears to be mostly absent from plastids. In the present study we analyzed the stroma fraction of Arabidopsis chloroplasts for the presence of novel calcium-binding proteins using 2D-PAGE separation followed by calcium overlay assay. A small acidic protein was identified by mass spectrometry analyses as the chloroplast protein CP12 and the ability of CP12 to bind calcium was confirmed with recombinant proteins. CP12 plays an important role in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle participating in the assembly of a supramolecular complex between phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that calcium signaling could play a role in regulating carbon fixation.

  7. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of calcium-binding protein 5 from Entamoeba histolytica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-binding protein 5 from E. histolytica was cloned, expressed in E. coli and purified. The purified protein crystallized in space group C222 and the crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amoebiasis. Phagocytosis is the major route of food intake by this parasite and is responsible for its virulence. Calcium and calcium-binding proteins play major roles in its phagocytosis. Calcium-binding protein 5 from E. histolytica (EhCaBP5) is a cytoplasmic protein; its expression is very sensitive to serum starvation and it seems to be involved in binding to myosin I. In this study, EhCaBP5 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. The purified protein crystallized in space group C222 and the crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. The Matthews coefficient indicated the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a VM of 2.35 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 47.7%

  8. Calcium-binding ability of soy protein hydrolysates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Lan Bao; Mei Song; Jing Zhang; Yang Chen; Shun Tang Guo

    2007-01-01

    This present study investigated the ability of various soy protein hydrolysates (SPHs) in binding calcium. It was demonstrated that the amount of Ca-bound depended greatly on the SPHs obtained using different proteases, which included: neutrase,flavourzyme, protease M and pepsin. The maximum level of Ca-bound (66.9 mg/g) occurred when protease M was used to hydrolyze soy protein. Peptide fragments exhibiting high Ca-binding capacity had molecular weights of either 14.4 or 8-9 kDa. The level of Ca-bound increased linearly with the increment of carboxyl content in SPHs, and further deamidation on SPHs from protease M improved Ca-binding of the hydrolysate.

  9. Aging-related changes in calcium binding proteins in rat perirhinal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Moyer, James R.; Furtak, Sharon C.; McGann, John P.; Brown, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been linked to neuropathological symptoms observed in aging and age-related disease. Alterations in the distribution and relative frequency of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs), which are important in regulating intracellular calcium levels, may contribute to disruption of calcium homeostasis. Here we examined the laminar distribution of three CaBPs in rat perirhinal cortex (PR) as a function of aging. Calbindin-D28k (CB), parvalbumin (PV)...

  10. Expression and Distribution of Calcium-Binding Protein S100P in Human Placenta during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-Yan Zhu; Xiao-Mei Tong; Xiao-Na Lin; Ling-Ying Jiang; Jun-Xia Wang; Song-Ying Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background: S100P is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins, and it participates in pathophysiological events, such as tumor growth and invasion. Based on the striking similarities between trophoblast cells and tumor cells with regard to proliferative and invasive properties, we raised the question of whether and how S100P expresses in trophoblast cells during development. This study aimed to investigate the expression pattern of S100P in the human placenta dur...

  11. Evolution and functional diversity of the Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee P Haynes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system (CNS exhibits a remarkable ability to process, store and transfer information. Key to these activities is the use of highly regulated and unique patterns of calcium signals encoded by calcium channels and decoded by families of specific calcium-sensing proteins. The largest family of eukaryotic calcium sensors are those related to the small EF-hand containing protein calmodulin (CaM. In order to maximise the usefulness of calcium as a signalling species and to permit the evolution and fine tuning of the mammalian CNS, families of related proteins have arisen that exhibit characteristic calcium binding properties and tissue-, cellular- and sub-cellular distribution profiles. The Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs represent one such family of vertebrate specific calmodulin like proteins that have emerged in recent years as important regulators of essential neuronal target proteins. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that the CaBPs consist of two subfamilies and that the ancestral members of these are CaBP1 and CaBP8. The CaBPs have distinct intracellular localisations based on different targeting mechanisms including a novel type-II transmembrane domain in CaBPs 7 and 8. Recent work has led to the identification of new target interactions and possible functions for the CaBPs suggesting that they have multiple physiological roles with relevance for the normal functioning of the CNS.

  12. NMR assignments, secondary structure, and global fold of calerythrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein from Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    OpenAIRE

    Aitio, H.; Annila, A; Heikkinen, S.; Thulin, E.; Drakenberg, T; Kilpeläinen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Calerythrin is a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein isolated from gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Based on amino acid sequence homology, it has been suggested that calerythrin belongs to the family of invertebrate sarcoplasmic EF-hand calcium-binding proteins (SCPs), and therefore it is expected to function as a calcium buffer. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain structural information on the protein in solution. Backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N assignments were obtai...

  13. Purification and characterisation of a glutamic acid-containing peptide with calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Li; Zhao, Li-Na; Cai, Xixi; Wang, Shao-Yun; Huang, Yi-Fan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2015-02-01

    The bioavailability of dietary ionised calcium is affected by intestinal basic environment. Calcium-binding peptides can form complexes with calcium to improve its absorption and bioavailability. The aim of this study was focused on isolation and characterisation of a calcium-binding peptide from whey protein hydrolysates. Whey protein was hydrolysed using Flavourzyme and Protamex with substrate to enzyme ratio of 25:1 (w/w) at 49 °C for 7 h. The calcium-binding peptide was isolated by DEAE anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A purified peptide of molecular mass 204 Da with strong calcium binding ability was identified on chromatography/electrospray ionisation (LC/ESI) tandem mass spectrum to be Glu-Gly (EG) after analysis and alignment in database. The calcium binding capacity of EG reached 67·81 μg/mg, and the amount increased by 95% compared with whey protein hydrolysate complex. The UV and infrared spectrometer analysis demonstrated that the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of glutamic acid. In addition, the amino group and peptide amino are also the related groups in the interaction between EG and calcium ion. Meanwhile, the sequestered calcium percentage experiment has proved that EG-Ca is significantly more stable than CaCl2 in human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. The findings suggest that the purified dipeptide has the potential to be used as ion-binding ingredient in dietary supplements. PMID:25592629

  14. Immunomicroscopic localization of the 10,000 molecular weight calcium-binding protein in the human enterocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, M; Friis, S; Dabelsteen, E; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1989-01-01

    The cellular localization of the 10,000 molecular weight calcium-binding protein (CaBP or Calbindin-D) in the small intestinal epithelium of man was investigated by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunogold staining). Indirect immunofluorescence on frozen sections showed...

  15. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization. PMID:26377206

  16. Solution structure and internal dynamics of NSCP, a compact calcium-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Ghada; Popescu, Razvan; Cox, Jos A; Engelborghs, Yves; Craescu, Constantin T

    2005-04-01

    The solution structure of Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (NSCP) in the calcium-bound form was determined by NMR spectroscopy, distance geometry and simulated annealing. Based on 1859 NOE restraints and 262 angular restraints, 17 structures were generated with a rmsd of 0.87 A from the mean structure. The solution structure, which is highly similar to the structure obtained by X-ray crystallography, includes two open EF-hand domains, which are in close contact through their hydrophobic surfaces. The internal dynamics of the protein backbone were determined by studying amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates and 15N nuclear relaxation. The two methods revealed a highly compact and rigid structure, with greatly restricted mobility at the two termini. For most of the amide protons, the free energy of exchange-compatible structural opening is similar to the free energy of structural stability, suggesting that isotope exchange of these protons takes place through global unfolding of the protein. Enhanced conformational flexibility was noted in the unoccupied Ca2+-binding site II, as well as the neighbouring helices. Analysis of the experimental nuclear relaxation and the molecular dynamics simulations give very similar profiles for the backbone generalized order parameter (S2), a parameter related to the amplitude of fast (picosecond to nanosecond) movements of N(H)-H vectors. We also noted a significant correlation between this parameter, the exchange rate, and the crystallographic B factor along the sequence. PMID:15819893

  17. Distribution and Morphology of Calcium-Binding Proteins Immunoreactive Neurons following Chronic Tungsten Multielectrode Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    Full Text Available The development of therapeutic approaches to improve the life quality of people suffering from different types of body paralysis is a current major medical challenge. Brain-machine interface (BMI can potentially help reestablishing lost sensory and motor functions, allowing patients to use their own brain activity to restore sensorimotor control of paralyzed body parts. Chronic implants of multielectrodes, employed to record neural activity directly from the brain parenchyma, constitute the fundamental component of a BMI. However, before this technique may be effectively available to human clinical trials, it is essential to characterize its long-term impact on the nervous tissue in animal models. In the present study we evaluated how chronic implanted tungsten microelectrode arrays impact the distribution and morphology of interneurons reactive to calcium-binding proteins calbindin (CB, calretinin (CR and parvalbumin (PV across the rat's motor cortex. Our results revealed that chronic microelectrode arrays were well tolerated by the nervous tissue, with recordings remaining viable for up to 6 months after implantation. Furthermore, neither the morphology nor the distribution of inhibitory neurons were broadly impacted. Moreover, restricted microglial activation was observed on the implanted sites. On the whole, our results confirm and expand the notion that tungsten multielectrodes can be deemed as a feasible candidate to future human BMI studies.

  18. Functional manipulation of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica guided by paramagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Ashok K; Patel, Sunita; Somlata; Shukla, Manish; Saraswathi, Deepa; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2013-08-01

    EhCaBP1, one of the calcium-binding proteins from Entamoeba histolytica, is a two-domain EF-hand protein. The two domains of EhCaBP1 are structurally and functionally different from each other. However, both domains are required for structural stability and a full range of functional diversity. Analysis of sequence and structure of EhCaBP1 and other CaBPs indicates that the C-terminal domain of EhCaBP1 possesses a unique structure compared with other family members. This had been attributed to the absence of a Phe-Phe interaction between highly conserved Phe residues at the -4 position in EF-hand III (F[-4]; Tyr(81)) and at the 13th position in EF-hand IV (F[+13]; Phe(129)) of the C-terminal domain. Against this backdrop, we mutated the Tyr residue at the -4th position of EF III to the Phe residue (Y81F), to bring in the Phe-Phe interaction and understand the nature of structural and functional changes in the protein by NMR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and biological assays, such as imaging and actin binding. The Y81F mutation in EhCaBP1 resulted in a more compact structure for the C-terminal domain of the mutant as in the case of calmodulin and troponin C. The compact structure is favored by the presence of a π-π interaction between Phe(81) and Phe(129) along with several hydrophobic interactions of Phe(81), which are not seen in the wild-type protein. Furthermore, the biological assays reveal preferential membrane localization of the mutant, loss of its colocalization with actin in the phagocytic cups, whereas retaining its ability to bind G- and F-actin. PMID:23782698

  19. Control of Neuronal Excitability by Calcium Binding Proteins: A New Mathematical Model for Striatal Fast-Spiking Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Don Patrick Bischop

    2012-01-01

    Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (PV), are abundantly expressed in distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly under-stood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, where PV is only expressed in the fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. FS interneurons form an inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN). So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS ne...

  20. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins : a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Don Patrick Bischop

    2012-01-01

    Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (PV), are abundantly expressed in distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, where PV is only expressed in the fast spiking (FS) interneurons. FS interneurons form an inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN). So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS n...

  1. Mechanism of Fluorescence and Conformational Changes of the Sarcoplasmic Calcium Binding Protein of the Sand Worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca2+ or Mg2+. Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of th...

  2. Localisation of calcium-binding proteins in ram spermatozoa using the immunofluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localization of two calcium-binding proteins (proteins A and B) believed to be involve in membrane fusion on whole spermatozoa were carried out in two stages; before and after the acrosome reaction, the reaction being a prerequisite to fertilization. Determination of the acrosome reaction and sperm viability is carried out using fluorescent dyes i.e., FITC-conjugated Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) and propidium iodide (PI) respectively. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits. Ejaculated semen was diluted in buffer and loaded into tubes. Acrosome reaction was induced with calcium ionophore A23187 at 390 degree C. PI was added to the sub-samples at time 0 and 45 minutes. Excess PI, ionophore and seminal plasma was filtered out with a syringe. Smears were made on slides and air-dried. The cells were pemeabilised with ethanol and rinsed in PBS. Batch 1 slides were incubated with FITC-PSA in the dark while batch H slides were incubated in 1% sheep serum. Batch II slides were then rinsed in PBS twice and incubated in both antiserum and pre-immune serum (negative control). These slides were then incubated in FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (anti-rabbit IgG) and kept in the dark. After final washing and mounted, both batches of slides were viewed immediately using fluorescence microscope. Results obtained before acrosome reaction showed localization of both antibodies to the whole sperm head, along the midpiece and tail. The acrosomes were also intact and cells were viable. After the acrosome reaction, localization of both antibodies were observed at the post-acrosomal region, midpiece, tail and the equatorial segment with no binding to the acrosome. Cells were mainly acrosome-reacted and dying. No binding was observed with pre-immune serum. Results indicate that the antigens were present in the acrosome and the change in binding suggests that the antigens have been redistributed after commencement of the acrosome reaction. The findings suggest that the proteins

  3. Structural and functional diversification in the teleost S100 family of calcium-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsching Sigrun I

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the EF-Hand calcium-binding proteins the subgroup of S100 proteins constitute a large family with numerous and diverse functions in calcium-mediated signaling. The evolutionary origin of this family is still uncertain and most studies have examined mammalian family members. Results We have performed an extensive search in several teleost genomes to establish the s100 gene family in fish. We report that the teleost S100 repertoire comprises fourteen different subfamilies which show remarkable similarity across six divergent teleost species. Individual species feature distinctive subsets of thirteen to fourteen genes that result from local gene duplications and gene losses. Eight of the fourteen S100 subfamilies are unique for teleosts, while six are shared with mammalian species and three of those even with cartilaginous fish. Several S100 family members are found in jawless fish already, but none of them are clear orthologs of cartilaginous or bony fish s100 genes. All teleost s100 genes show the expected structural features and are subject to strong negative selection. Many aspects of the genomic arrangement and location of mammalian s100 genes are retained in the teleost s100 gene family, including a completely conserved intron/exon border between the two EF hands. Zebrafish s100 genes exhibit highly specific and characteristic expression patterns, showing both redundancy and divergence in their cellular expression. In larval tissue expression is often restricted to specific cell types like keratinocytes, hair cells, ionocytes and olfactory receptor neurons as demonstrated by in situ hybridization. Conclusion The origin of the S100 family predates at least the segregation of jawed from jawless fish and some extant family members predate the divergence of bony from cartilaginous fish. Despite a complex pattern of gene gains and losses the total repertoire size is remarkably constant between species. On the expression

  4. Vitamin D-dependent rat renal calcium-binding protein: development of a radioimmunoassay, tissue distribution, and immunologic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive double antibody RIA has been developed for the 28,000 mol wt rat renal vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein. Using this assay, concentrations of calcium-binding protein (CaBP) as low as 30 ng can be measured. The assay is precise (intraassay variability, 5.0%) and reproductible (interassay variability, 8.2%). Measurements of renal CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the chelex resin assay and by polyacrylamide gel analysis by densitometric tracing using a purified CaBP marker. The concentration of CaBP in the vitamin D-replete rat kidney is 7.3 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM) micrograms/mg protein. In vitamin D-deficient rats the level of renal CaBP is 2.6 +/- 0.3 micrograms/mg protein. Tissue distribution of immunoreactive rat renal CaBP showed the highest concentration of CaBP in the rat cerebellum (38.3 +/- 5.1 micrograms/mg protein). Lower concentrations of immunoreactive CaBP were detected in several other rat tissues. No immunoreactive CaBP was detected in rat or human serum. In necropsy human kidney and cerebellum, high levels of immunoreactive CaBP were also detected (1.5 +/- 0.1 and 27.3 +/- 2.1 micrograms/mg protein, respectively). When extracts of rat kidney and brain and human cerebellum and kidney were assayed at several dilutions, immunodisplacement curves parallel to that of pure renal CaBP were observed, indicating immunochemical similarity. Fractionation of extracts of rat cerebellum, human kidney, and human cerebellum on Sephadex G-100 revealed immunoreactivity and calcium-binding activity in the 28,000 mol wt region similar to rat kidney

  5. Expresion of calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) in skeletal muscles of rats with altered thyroid status

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Escudero, Astrid; Říčný, Jan; Soukup, Tomáš

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 56, č. 3 (2007), 8P-8P ISSN 0862-8408. [Fyziologické dny /83./. 06.02.2007-08.02.2007, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant ostatní: MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * rat muscle phenotype * calcium binding protein * thyroid hormone effects Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  6. Juvenile hormone diol kinase, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Zhang, Qi-Rui; Xu, Wei-Hua; Schooley, David A

    2005-11-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) diol kinase (JHDK) is an important enzyme involved in the JH degradation pathway. Bombyx mori (Bommo)-JHDK cDNA (637bp) contains an open reading frame encoding a 183-amino acid protein, which reveals a high degree of identity to the two previously reported JHDKs. JHDK is similar to GTP-binding proteins with three conserved sequence elements involved in purine nucleotide binding, contains eight alpha-helices and three EF-hand motifs, and resembles the three-dimensional model of 2SCP and some other calcium-binding proteins. The Bommo-JHDK gene has only a single copy in the silkworm haploid genome, contains only one exon, and its 5'-upstream sequence does not have a JH response element. Although Bommo-JHDK is highly expressed in the gut of the silkworm, its mRNA expression remains at a constant level during larval development suggesting this enzyme is constitutive and not regulated by JH, at least at the transcriptional level. Recombinant Bommo-JHDK catalyzed the conversion of 10S-JH diol into JH diol phosphate, confirming its enzymatic function. Recombinant enzyme formed a dimer and had biochemical characteristics similar to other JHDKs. Bommo-JHDK, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, provides unique insights on how JH levels are regulated in the silkworm. PMID:16203205

  7. Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein FhCaBP2: structure of the dynein light chain-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J; van Raaij, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica causes an increasing burden on human and animal health, partly because of the spread of drug-resistant isolates. As a consequence, there is considerable interest in developing new drugs to combat liver fluke infections. A group of potential targets is a family of calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain with two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal domain with predicted similarity to dynein light chains (DLC-like domain). The function of these proteins is unknown, although in several species, they have been localised to the tegument, an important structure at the host-parasite interface. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the DLC-like domain of F. hepatica calcium-binding protein 2 (FhCaBP2), solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined at 2.3 Å resolution in two different crystal forms. The FhCaBP2 DLC-like domain has a structure similar to other DLC domains, with an anti-parallel β-sheet packed against an α-helical hairpin. Like other DLC domains, it dimerises through its β2-strand, which extends in an arch and forms the fifth strand in an extended β-sheet of the other monomer. The structure provides molecular details of the dimerisation of FhCaBP2, the first example from this family of parasite proteins. PMID:27083189

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the calcium-binding protein CalD from Streptomyces coelicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calcium-binding protein encoded by the CalD gene in S. coelicolor A3(2) has been crystallized as a prelude towards the determination of its three-dimensional structure by X-ray crystallography. Calcium ions play an important regulatory role in eukaryotes. However, the regulatory roles of Ca2+ in prokaryotes are poorly understood. CalD, an 18 kDa calcium-binding protein from the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), was purified and crystallized for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Crystals of CalD that were suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data were collected in-house to 1.56 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 32.9, b = 51.0, c = 87.0 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. There is one protein molecule per asymmetric unit

  9. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca2+-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number

  10. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca(2+)-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number. PMID:15325281

  11. Biophysical characterization and functional studies on calbindin-D28K: A vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein, or calbindin-D, is the principal protein induced in the intestine in response to the steroid hormone 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D3. A definitive role for calbindin-D in vitamin D3 mediated biological responses remains unclear. Biophysical and functional studies on chick intestinal calbindin-D28K (CaBP) were initiated so that some insight might be gained into its relevance to the process of intestinal calcium transport. Calbindin-D belongs to a class of high affinity calcium binding proteins which includes calmodulin, parvalbumin and troponin C. The Ca 2+ binding stoichiometry and binding constants for calbindin-D28K were quantitated by Quin 2 titration analysis. The protein was found to bind 5-6 Ca 2+ ions with a KD on the order of 10-8, in agreement with the 6 domains identified from the amino acid sequence. A slow Ca 2+ exchange rate (80 s-1) as assessed by 43Ca NMR and extensive calcium dependent conformational changes in 1H NMR spectra were also observed. Functional studies on chick intestinal CaBP were carried out by two different methods. Interactions between CaBP and intestinal cellular components were assessed via photoaffinity labeling techniques. Specific calcium dependent complexes for CaBP were identified with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase and brush border membrane proteins of 60 and 150 kD. CaBP was also found to co-migrate with the alkaline phosphatase activity of chick intestinal brush border membranes as evaluated by gel filtration chromatography. The second procedure for evaluating CaBP functionality has involved the quantitation of CaBP association with vesicular transport components as assessed by ELISA. CaBP, immunoreactivity was observed in purified lysosomes, microsomes and microtubules

  12. Calciomics:prediction and analysis of EF-hand calcium binding proteins by protein engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Jenny; Jie

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ plays a pivotal role in the physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotic and mammalian organisms.Viruses also utilize the universal Ca2+ signal to create a specific cellular environment to achieve coexistence with the host,and to propagate.In this paper we first describe our development of a grafting approach to understand site-specific Ca2+ binding properties of EF-hand proteins with a helix-loop-helix Ca2+ binding motif,then summarize our prediction and identification of EF-hand Ca2+ binding sites on a genome-wide scale in bacteria and virus,and next report the application of the grafting approach to probe the metal binding capability of predicted EF-hand motifs within the streptococcal hemoprotein receptor(Shr) of Streptococcus pyrogenes and the nonstructural protein 1(nsP1) of Sindbis virus.When methods such as the grafting approach are developed in conjunction with prediction algorithms we are better able to probe continuous Ca2+-binding sites that have been previously underrepresented due to the limitation of conventional methodology.

  13. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins: a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischop, D P; Orduz, D; Lambot, L; Schiffmann, S N; Gall, D

    2012-01-01

    Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (PV), are abundantly expressed in distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, where PV is only expressed in the fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. FS interneurons form an inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN). So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS neurons did not allow the study of the coupling between PV concentration and electrical activity. In the present paper, we propose a new mathematical model for the striatal FS interneurons that includes apamin-sensitive small conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels (SK) and the presence of a calcium buffer. Our results show that a variation in the concentration of PV can modulate substantially the intrinsic excitability of the FS interneurons and therefore may be involved in the information processing at the striatal level. PMID:22787441

  14. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins : a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Patrick Bischop

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin, are abundantly expressed in very distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, parvalbumin is only expressed in the fast spiking (FS interneurons, which form a inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN. So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS neurons did not allow the study of the the coupling between parvalbumin concentration and electrical activity. In the present paper, we propose a new mathematical model for the striatal FS interneurons that includes apamin-sensitive small conductance \\ca -dependent \\kk channels (SK and takes into account the presence of a calcium buffer. Our results demonstrate that a variation in the concentration of parvalbumin can modulate substantially the intrinsic excitability of the FS interneurons and therefore may be involved in the information processing at the striatal level.

  15. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90 degree C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and 45Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy

  16. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin·mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  17. Quantitative immunobinding assay for vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein (calbindin-D28k) using nitrocellulose filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive dot immunobinding assay has been developed for the quantitative determination of vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein (calbindin-D28k; CaBP) in rat and human kidney and brain. Protein samples are spotted onto nitrocellulose sheets, fixed, and then rinsed with Tris-buffered saline. The remaining protein binding sites are blocked with bovine serum albumin, gelatin, or nonfat dry milk protein and the filters are then incubated sequentially with antiserum to calbindin-D28k (1:500 dilution) and 125I-protein A (200,000 cpm/ml). After washing, the radioactivity bound to each sample is quantitated by counting in a gamma counter. The sensitivity of the assay is such that 10 ng calbindin-D28k can be accurately quantitated. The highest levels of CaBP were detected in kidney (7.8 +/- 0.5 micrograms/mg protein) and cerebellum (22.1 +/- 1.4 micrograms/mg protein). Ten micrograms calmodulin, lactalbumin, or parvalbumin and 100 micrograms liver extract showed no reactivity in the assay. The assay is precise (intraassay variability, 4.0%) and reproducible (interassay variability, 8.8%). There was good agreement between the data in this assay and the data we obtained using radioimmunoassay (RIA). The assay has several advantages over the RIA. Iodination of pure antigen is not required and it is possible to detect membrane-bound and insoluble antigens using this assay. Also, the antiserum and 125I-protein A solutions can be saved and reused. This assay represents a major modification of the original immunobinding assays which used the less sensitive peroxidase stain. It is also an improvement over previous 125I immunobinding assays which were not quantitative but were used as antigen spot tests or which required iodination of the antibody

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Ginseng against Alteration of Calcium Binding Proteins Immunoreactivity in the Mice Hippocampus after Radiofrequency Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Maskey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins (CaBPs such as calbindin D28-k, parvalbumin, and calretinin are able to bind Ca2+ with high affinity. Changes in Ca2+ concentrations via CaBPs can disturb Ca2+ homeostasis. Brain damage can be induced by the prolonged electromagnetic field (EMF exposure with loss of interacellular Ca2+ balance. The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of ginseng in regard to CaBPs immunoreactivity (IR in the hippocampus through immunohistochemistry after one-month exposure at 1.6 SAR value by comparing sham control with exposed and ginseng-treated exposed groups separately. Loss of dendritic arborization was noted with the CaBPs in the Cornu Ammonis areas as well as a decrease of staining intensity of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus after exposure while no loss was observed in the ginseng-treated group. A significant difference in the relative mean density was noted between control and exposed groups but was nonsignificant in the ginseng-treated group. Decrease in CaBP IR with changes in the neuronal staining as observed in the exposed group would affect the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit by alteration of the Ca2+ concentration which could be prevented by ginseng. Hence, ginseng could contribute as a radioprotective agent against EMF exposure, contributing to the maintenance of Ca2+ homeostasis by preventing impairment of intracellular Ca2+ levels in the hippocampus.

  19. Subdivisions of the auditory midbrain (n. mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis in zebra finches using calcium-binding protein immunocytochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Logerot

    Full Text Available The midbrain nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd is thought to be the avian homologue of the central nucleus of the mammalian inferior colliculus. As such, it is a major relay in the ascending auditory pathway of all birds and in songbirds mediates the auditory feedback necessary for the learning and maintenance of song. To clarify the organization of MLd, we applied three calcium binding protein antibodies to tissue sections from the brains of adult male and female zebra finches. The staining patterns resulting from the application of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin antibodies differed from each other and in different parts of the nucleus. Parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the whole nucleus, as defined by the totality of the terminations of brainstem auditory afferents; in other words parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity defines the boundaries of MLd. Staining patterns of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin defined two regions of MLd: inner (MLd.I and outer (MLd.O. MLd.O largely surrounds MLd.I and is distinct from the surrounding intercollicular nucleus. Unlike the case in some non-songbirds, however, the two MLd regions do not correspond to the terminal zones of the projections of the brainstem auditory nuclei angularis and laminaris, which have been found to overlap substantially throughout the nucleus in zebra finches.

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of the calcium-binding proteins calbindin D28K, calretinin, and parvalbumin in bat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hang-Gu; Gu, Ya-Nan; Lee, Kyoung-Pil; Lee, Ji-Gun; Kim, Chan-Wook; Lee, Ji-Won; Jeong, Tae-Hee; Jeong, Young-Wun; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2016-03-01

    It is a common misconception that bats are blind, and various studies have suggested that bats have visual abilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytoarchitecture of calbindin D28K (CB)-, calretinin (CR)-, and parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in the bat visual cortex using immunocytochemistry. The highest density of CB- and PV-IR neurons was located in layer IV of the visual cortex. The majority of CB- and PV-IR neurons were characterized by a stellate or round/oval shape. CR-IR neurons were predominantly located in layers II/III, and the cells were principally round/oval in shape. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that 65.96%, 24.24%, and 77.00% of the CB-, CR-, and PV-IR neurons, respectively, contained gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We observed calcium-binding protein (CBP)-IR neurons in specific layers of the bat visual cortex and in specific cell types. Many of the CBP-IR neurons were GABAergic interneurons. These data provide useful clues to aid in understanding the functional aspects of the bat visual system. PMID:26536416

  1. Nuclear Expression of S100A4 Calcium-Binding Protein Increases Cholangiocarcinoma Invasiveness and Metastasization

    OpenAIRE

    Fabris, Luca; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Moserle, Lidia; Dziura, James; Cong, Xiangyu; Sambado, Luisa; Nardo, Giorgia; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Colledan, Michele; Furlanetto, Alberto; Bassi, Nicolò; Massani, Marco; Cillo, Umberto; Mescoli, Claudia; Indraccolo, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) carries a severe prognosis because of its strong invasiveness and early metastasization. In several patients, otherwise eligible for surgical resection, micrometastasis are already present at the time of surgery. The mechanisms responsible for CCA invasiveness are unclear. S100A4, a member of the S100 family of small Ca2+-binding proteins, is expressed in mesenchymal cells, regulates cell motility in several cell types, and is expressed in some epithelial cancers. Thu...

  2. Purification of Regucalcin from the Seminal Vesicular Fluid: A Calcium Binding Multi-Functional Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishna, P; Shende, A M; Reena, K K; Thomas, Jobin; Bhure, S K

    2016-08-01

    Regucalcin is a multi-functional protein having roles in calcium homeostasis as well as in anti-apoptotic, anti-prolific and anti-oxidative functions. Recently, it has been reported from the male reproductive tract, but its role in male reproduction needs further investigation; for which the native regucalcin of reproductive origin will be more appropriate. The gel exclusion chromatography followed by diethyl aminoethane cellulose chromatography and two-dimentional cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis used for its purification are time consuming and less specific. Here, the regucalcin gene from buffalo testis has been cloned, expressed and purified in recombinant form, and subsequently used for raising hyper-immune serum. The Western blot of seminal vesicular fluid probed with anti-regucalcin polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies showed the presence of 28 and 34 kDa bands specific to regucalcin. Further, an affinity matrix has been prepared using anti-regucalcin polyclonal antibodies. An immuno-affinity chromatography method has been standardized to isolate regucalcin from seminal vesicular fluid. The initial complexity of the protein mixture in the seminal vesicular fluid has been reduced by a heat coagulation step. The purified protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band at 68 kDa that has been further confirmed as regucalcin by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The RGN purified from seminal vesicular fluid will be more appropriate for studying its possible role in male reproduction, especially sperm cell capacitation, hyperactivation, acrosome reaction and cryopreservation. The study can be applied in purifying regucalcin from different tissues or species with minor modifications in the methodology. PMID:27460579

  3. Mechanism of fluorescence and conformational changes of the sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-09-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of these mutants show a limited decrease of the affinity for calcium, but no alterations of the cooperativity. Upon adding calcium, Trp170 shows a strong fluorescence increase, Trp57 an extensive fluorescence decrease, and Trp4 shows no fluorescence change. Therefore mutant W4F/W170F is ideally suited to analyze the fluorescence titrations and to study the binding mechanism. Mutations of the calcium ligands at the z-position in the three binding sites show no effect at site I and a total loss of cooperativity at sites III and IV. The quenching of Trp57 upon calcium binding is dependent on the presence of arginine R25, but this residue is not just a simple dynamic quencher. The role of the salt bridge R25-D58 is also investigated. PMID:12944301

  4. Ectopic expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in mouse liver endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, M B; Berchtold, M W; Rülicke, T; Schwaller, B; Gotzos, V; Pinzani, M; Reichen, J; Celio, M R

    1997-01-01

    normal mice but virtually not affected in the transgenic animals. This suggests that ectopically expressed parvalbumin is involved in the regulation of Ca2+ signals in the sinusoidal endothelial cells. This animal model could be of interest to those working on the physiology of liver circulation.......To elucidate the physiological role of the Ca2+ binding protein parvalbumin, we have generated transgenic mice carrying the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of rat parvalbumin under the control of the heavy-metal inducible metallothionein IIA promoter. Immunohistochemical and biochemical...... methods have been used to detect the presence of ectopic parvalbumin expression in different tissues. Here we show the expression of parvalbumin in endothelial cells lining the liver sinusoids in situ and after isolation in vitro. The hemodynamic effects of endothelin 1, a peptide hormone mediating potent...

  5. Calcium-binding Protein Calretinin Immunoreactivity in the Dog Superior Colliculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied calretinin-immunoreactive (IR) fibers and cells in the canine superior colliculus (SC) and studied the distribution and effect of enucleation on the distribution of this protein. Localization of calretinin was immunocytochemically observed. A dense plexus of anti-calretinin-IR fibers was found within the upper part of the superficial gray layer (SGL). Almost all of the labeled fibers were small in diameter with few varicosities. The intermediate and deep layers contained many calretinin-IR neurons. Labeled neurons within the intermediate gray layer (IGL) formed clusters in many sections. By contrast, labeled neurons in the deep gray layer (DGL) did not form clusters. Calretinin-IR neurons in the IGL and DGL varied in morphology and included round/oval, vertical fusiform, stellate, and horizontal neurons. Neurons with varicose dendrites were also labeled in the IGL. Most of the labeled neurons were small to medium in size. Monocular enucleation produced an almost complete reduction of calretinin-IR fibers in the SC contralateral to the enucleation. However, many calretinin-IR cells appeared in the contralateral superficial SC. Enucleation appeared to have no effect on the distribution of calretinin-IR neurons in the contralateral intermediate and deep layers of the SC. The calretinin-IR neurons in the superficial dog SC were heterogeneous small- to medium-sized neurons including round/oval, vertical fusiform, stellate, pyriform, and horizontal in shape. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that no cells in the dog SC expressed both calretinin and GABA. Many horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled retinal ganglion cells were seen after injections into the superficial layers. The vast majority of the double-labeled cells (HRP and calretinin) were small cells. The present results indicate that antibody to calretinin labels subpopulations of neurons in the dog SC, which do not express GABA. The results also suggest that the calretinin-IR afferents in the

  6. Limited proteolysis combined with isotope labeling and quantitative LC-MALDI MS for monitoring protein conformational changes: a study on calcium-binding sites of cardiac Troponin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are important for understanding biological functions of proteins. A new technique based on the partial proteolysis of proteins combined with quantitative mass spectrometry is developed as a means of tracking structural changes after the formation of a protein-ligand complex. In this technique, a protein of interest with and without the binding of a ligand is digested with an enzyme to generate a set of peptides, followed by separation of the peptides by liquid chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is used to identify chromatographically separated peptides, and locate their sequence alignments in the parent protein. Using an isotopically labeled protein as a sample against an unlabeled protein standard, quantitative information can be gathered. This overcomes the inherent lack of quantitative capability of MALDI MS. The utility of the technique to investigate protein-ligand interactions is demonstrated in a model system involving calcium binding to cardiac Troponin C (cTnC). Using this technique, the general location of the three calcium-binding sites of cTnC can be determined by using several different enzymes to generate overlapping peptide maps of cTnC

  7. Comparative distribution of relaxin-3 inputs and calcium-binding protein-positive neurons in rat amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio N Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or ‘hubs’ within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin, calretinin and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST and in the endopiriform

  8. Comparative Distribution of Relaxin-3 Inputs and Calcium-Binding Protein-Positive Neurons in Rat Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fabio N; Pereira, Celia W; Sánchez-Pérez, Ana M; Otero-García, Marcos; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E

    2016-01-01

    The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or "hubs") within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI) in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals) within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR) and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and in the endopiriform nucleus. In

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of calcium-binding protein-2 from Entamoeba histolytica and its complexes with strontium and the IQ1 motif of myosin V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Two domains with four canonical EF-hand-containing calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) have been identified from E. histolytica. Even though they have very high sequence similarity, these bind to different target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner, leading to different functional pathways. Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.74, b = 68.83, c = 113.25 Å, β = 116.7°. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. The crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.18, b = 112.03, c = 93.42 Å, β = 92.8°. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. This complex was crystallized with MPD and ethanol as precipitating agents. These crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.5, b = 69.86, c = 86.5 Å, β = 97.9°

  10. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. PMID:27095404

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of calcium-binding protein-2 from Entamoeba histolytica and its complexes with strontium and the IQ1 motif of myosin V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourinath, S., E-mail: sgourinath@mail.jnu.ac.in; Padhan, Narendra; Alam, Neelima; Bhattacharya, Alok [School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2005-04-01

    Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Two domains with four canonical EF-hand-containing calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) have been identified from E. histolytica. Even though they have very high sequence similarity, these bind to different target proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner, leading to different functional pathways. Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.74, b = 68.83, c = 113.25 Å, β = 116.7°. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.18, b = 112.03, c = 93.42 Å, β = 92.8°. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. This complex was crystallized with MPD and ethanol as precipitating agents. These crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.5, b = 69.86, c = 86.5 Å, β = 97.9°.

  12. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  13. Antisense expression of a gene encoding a calcium-binding protein in transgenic tobacco leads to altered morphology and enhanced chlorophyll

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girdhar K Pandey; Amita Pandey; Vanga Siva Reddy; Renu Deswal; Alok Bhattacharya; Kailash C Upadhyaya; Sudhir K Sopory

    2007-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica contains a novel calcium-binding protein like calmodulin, which was discovered earlier, and we have reported the presence of its homologue(s) and a dependent protein kinase in plants. To understand the functions of these in plants, a cDNA encoding a calcium-binding protein isolated from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP) was cloned into vector pBI121 in antisense orientation and transgenic tobacco plants were raised. These plants showed variation in several phenotypic characters, of which two distinct features, more greenness and leaf thickness, were inherited in subsequent generations. The increase in the level of total chlorophyll in different plants ranged from 60% to 70%. There was no major change in chloroplast structure and in the protein level of D1, D2, LHCP and RuBP carboxylase. These morphological changes were not seen in antisense calmodulin transgenic tobacco plants, nor was the calmodulin level altered in EhCaBP antisense plants.

  14. Flexibility of EF-hand motifs: structural and thermodynamic studies of Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica with Pb2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EF-hand proteins can be activated by the binding of various heavy metals other than calcium, and such complexes can disturb the calcium-signaling pathway and cause toxicity and disease causing state. So far, no comprehensive study has been done to understand different heavy metals binding to calcium signaling proteins. Energetically, Ca2+ is preferred in three sites, while in one site Ba2+ has better binding energy. The Sr2+-coordination in the EF hand motifs is similar to that of the native Ca2+ bound structure, except for the lack of water coordination. Sr2+-coordination seems to be a pre-formed in nature since all seven coordinating atoms are from the protein itself, which also correlates with entropy contributions in Sr2+ binding. These findings improve our understanding of metal association with calcium binding proteins and of metal induced conformational changes.

  15. A novel method for evaluating microglial activation using ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 staining: cell body to cell size ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Bertha Hovens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to validate a newly developed methodology of semi-automatic image analysis to analyze microglial morphology as marker for microglial activation in ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 (IBA-1 stained brain sections. Methods: The novel method was compared to currently used analysis methods, visual characterization of activation stage and optical density measurement, in brain sections of young and aged rats that had undergone surgery or remained naοve. Results: The cell body to cell size ratio of microglia was strongly correlated to the visual characterization activation stage. In addition, we observed specific surgery and age-related changes in cell body size, size of the dendritic processes and cell body to cell size ratio. Conclusion: The novel analysis method provides a sensitive marker for microglial activation in the rat brain, which is quick and easy to perform and provides additional information about microglial morphology.

  16. Molecular cloning and expression of EgTCTP, encoding a calcium binding protein, enhances the growth of callus in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis, Jacq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Nakkaew

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP has now been identified in evolutionarily diverse organisms and isthought to play an important role in cell growth and cell division. We have identified an EgTCTP gene from Elaeis guineensisJacq. It is a putative protein of 168 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 19.2 kDa. EgTCTP has a high homology(84% - 91% identity at the amino acid level to other plant TCTPs from Hevea brasiliensis, Arachis hypogaea and Glycinemax. The recombinant EgTCTP protein is a calcium binding protein. Transgenic embryonic calli overexpressing EgTCTP havea faster growth rate than non-transformed and empty vector transformed calli. The results show that the enhancement ofEgTCTP gene expression in oil palm embryogenic calli may result in faster multiplication of the embryogenic calli. EgTCTPacts as another Ca2+-modulated protein that is involved in the cell cycle progression.

  17. Flexibility of EF-hand motifs: structural and thermodynamic studies of Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica with Pb2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Shivesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EF-hand proteins can be activated by the binding of various heavy metals other than calcium, and such complexes can disturb the calcium-signaling pathway and cause toxicity and disease causing state. So far, no comprehensive study has been done to understand different heavy metals binding to calcium signaling proteins. Results In this work, the flexibility of the EF-hand motifs are examined by crystallographic and thermodynamic studies of binding of Pb2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+ to Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP1. The structures of the EhCaBP1- heavy metal complexes are found to be overall similar, nevertheless specific differences in metal coordination, and small differences in the coordination distances between the metal and the ligands in the metal binding loop. The largest such distances occur for the Ba2+- EhCaBP1 complex, where two bariums are bound with partial occupancy at the EF2 motif. Thermodynamic studies confirm that EhCaBP1 has five binding sites for Ba2+ compared to four binding sites for the other metals. These structures and thermodynamic studies reveal that the EF-hand motifs can accommodate several heavy atoms with similar binding affinities. The binding of Ca2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites and the binding of Ba2+ to the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th sites are both enthalpically and entropically driven, whereas the binding of Sr2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites are simply enthalpy driven, interestingly in agreement with ITC data, Sr2+ do not coordinate with water in this structure. For all the metals, binding to the 3rd site is only entropy driven. Conclusion Energetically, Ca2+ is preferred in three sites, while in one site Ba2+ has better binding energy. The Sr2+-coordination in the EF hand motifs is similar to that of the native Ca2+ bound structure, except for the lack of water coordination. Sr2+ coordination seems to be a pre-formed in nature since all seven coordinating atoms are from the

  18. A calcium-binding protein, rice annexin OsANN1, enhances heat stress tolerance by modulating the production of H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bei; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Dongliang; Wang, Haiqi; Yin, Jingya; Wang, Rui; He, Mengli; Cui, Meng; Shang, Zhonglin; Wang, Dekai; Zhu, Zhengge

    2015-09-01

    OsANN1 is a member of the annexin protein family in rice. The function of this protein and the mechanisms of its involvement in stress responses and stress tolerance are largely unknown. Here it is reported that OsANN1 confers abiotic stress tolerance by modulating antioxidant accumulation under abiotic stress. OsANN1-knockdown [RNA interference (RNAi)] plants were more sensitive to heat and drought stresses, whereas OsANN1-overexpression (OE) lines showed improved growth with higher expression of OsANN1 under abiotic stress. Overexpression of OsANN1 promoted SOD (superoxide dismutase) and CAT (catalase) activities, which regulate H2O2 content and redox homeostasis, suggesting the existence of a feedback mechanism between OsANN1 and H2O2 production under abiotic stress. Higher expression of OsANN1 can provide overall cellular protection against abiotic stress-induced damage, and a significant accumulation of OsANN1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) signals was found in the cytosol after heat shock treatment. OsANN1 also has calcium-binding and ATPase activities in vitro, indicating that OsANN1 has multiple functions in rice growth. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays demonstrated that OsANN1 interacts with OsCDPK24. This cross-talk may provide additional layers of regulation in the abiotic stress response. PMID:26085678

  19. Characterization, Evolution and Tissue-specific Expression of AmphiCalbin, a Novel Gene Encoding EF-hand Calcium-binding Protein in Amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LUAN; Shicui ZHANG; Zhenhui LIU; Chunxin FAN; Guangdong JI; Lei LI

    2007-01-01

    An amphioxus full-length cDNA, AmphiCalbin, encoding a novel EF-hand calcium-binding protein (EFCaBP), was isolated from the gut cDNA library of amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri. It consists of 1321 bp with a 636 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 211 amino acids with a molecular mass of approximately 24.5 kDa. The phylogenetic analysis offers two interesting inferences. First, AmphiCalbin clusters with a group of unnamed EFCaBPs that are differentiated from other identified EFCaBPs. Second,AmphiCalbin falls at the base of the vertebrate unnamed EFCaBPs clade, probably representing their prototype.This is also corroborated by the fact that AmphiCalbin has an exon-intron organization identical to that of vertebrate unnamed EFCaBP genes. Both tissue-section in situ hybridization and whole-mount in situ hybridization prove a tissue-specific expression pattern of AmphiCalbin, with high levels of expression in the digestive system and gonads. It is proposed that AmphiCalbin might play a role in the digestive system and gonads. These observations lay the foundation for further understanding of the function of the unnamed EFCaBPs.

  20. Studies on the mode of action of calciferol. XIII. Development of a radioimmunoassay for vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal calcium-binding protein and tissue distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A RIA for chick intestinal calcium-binding protein (CaBP) has been developed with a sensitivity of 1 ng. The antiserum was generated in rabbits injected with highly purified vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal CaBP. The assay employs the double antibody technique, and 125I-labeled CaBP was prepared using chloramine T. Low molecular weight peptide hormones and normal rabbit, rat, and human serum proteins show no cross-reactivity in the assay. Measurements of chick intestinal and kidney CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the radial immunodiffusion method. The assay is reproducible (interassay variability, 16.3%) and precise (intraassay variability, 4.0%). The concentration of immunoreactive CaBP (iCaBP) in chick serum (2.7 ng/ml serum) can now be measured as early as 8 h after the administration of 6.5 nmol 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; a maximum of 11 ng/ml is reached at 20 h. The level of CaBP in chick serum was found to be dependent on the dose of vitamin D3 or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 administered to the animal

  1. Studies on the mode of action of calciferol. XIII. Development of a radioimmunoassay for vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal calcium-binding protein and tissue distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christakos, S.; Friedlander, E.J.; Frandsen, B.R.; Norman, A.W.

    1979-05-01

    A RIA for chick intestinal calcium-binding protein (CaBP) has been developed with a sensitivity of 1 ng. The antiserum was generated in rabbits injected with highly purified vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal CaBP. The assay employs the double antibody technique, and /sup 125/I-labeled CaBP was prepared using chloramine T. Low molecular weight peptide hormones and normal rabbit, rat, and human serum proteins show no cross-reactivity in the assay. Measurements of chick intestinal and kidney CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the radial immunodiffusion method. The assay is reproducible (interassay variability, 16.3%) and precise (intraassay variability, 4.0%). The concentration of immunoreactive CaBP (iCaBP) in chick serum (2.7 ng/ml serum) can now be measured as early as 8 h after the administration of 6.5 nmol 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/; a maximum of 11 ng/ml is reached at 20 h. The level of CaBP in chick serum was found to be dependent on the dose of vitamin D/sub 3/ or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ administered to the animal.

  2. FhCaBP2: a Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2015-09-01

    FhCaBP2 is a Fasciola hepatica protein which belongs to a family of helminth calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain containing two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal dynein light chain-like (DLC-like) domain. Its predicted structure showed two globular domains joined by a flexible linker. Recombinant FhCaBP2 interacted reversibly with calcium and manganese ions, but not with magnesium, barium, strontium, copper (II), colbalt (II), iron (II), nickel, lead or potassium ions. Cadmium (II) ions appeared to bind non-site-specifically and destabilize the protein. Interaction with either calcium or magnesium ions results in a conformational change in which the protein's surface becomes more hydrophobic. The EF-hand domain alone was able to interact with calcium and manganese ions; the DLC-like domain was not. Alteration of a residue (Asp-58 to Ala) in the second EF-hand motif in this domain abolished ion-binding activity. This suggests that the second EF-hand is the one responsible for ion-binding. FhCaBP2 homodimerizes and the extent of dimerization was not affected by calcium ions or by the aspartate to alanine substitution in the second EF-hand. The isolated EF-hand and DLC-like domains are both capable of homodimerization. FhCaBP2 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, thiamylal and W7. Interestingly, while chlorpromazine and thiamylal interacted with the EF-hand domain (as expected), trifluoperazine and W7 bound to the DLC-like domain. Overall, FhCaBP2 has distinct biochemical properties compared with other members of this protein family from Fasciola hepatica, a fact which supports the hypothesis that these proteins have different physiological roles. PMID:26152524

  3. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  4. Distribution of NADPH-diaphorase in the superior colliculus of Cebus monkeys, and co-localization with calcium-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, J G M; Mendez-Otero, R; Gattass, Ricardo

    2003-08-01

    We examined the distribution of the enzyme dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the superior colliculus (SC) of the New World monkey Cebus apella, and the co-localization of this enzyme with the calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) calbindin-D28K, parvalbumin and calretinin. Despite the intensely labeled neuropil, rare NADPH-d-positive cells were observed in the stratum griseum superficiale (SGS). Most of the labeled cells in the SC were found in the intermediate layers, with a great number also in the deeper layers. This pattern is very similar to that described in the opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) and in the cat, and different from the pattern found in the rat, which shows labeled cells mainly in the SGS. Cells doubly stained for NADPH-d and CaBPs were observed throughout the SC, although in a small number. Of the NADPH-d-positive cells, 20.3% were doubly labeled for NADPH-d and parvalbumin, 10.2% revealed co-localization with calretinin, and 5.6% with calbindin. The low number of double-stained cells for NADPH-d and the CaBPs indicates that these molecules must participate in different functional circuits within the SC. PMID:12871769

  5. Effects of altered gravity on the expression of Calcium -binding and matrix proteins in the inner ear of developing fish following ∆g-expositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Reinhard; Hendrik Anken, Ralf; Weigele, Jochen

    The results of the Foton-M3 mission (OmegaHab) give evidence that the otoliths of the fish form OmegaHab were larger as compared to the ground control. Additionally the shape (raphe) and morphology especially the mode of crystallization of the otoliths were affected during growth in weightlessness. The reason for these changes is assumed to originate from changes in the composition of the otolith matrix and Ca-binding proteins (OMP). The OMPs play an important role in controlling the crystallization process and additionally the morphology of crystals, determining the crystallpolymorph and the strength of the crystals. The matrix of otoliths is a complex functional structure containing several calcium-binding proteins, structural proteins and protease inhibitors. Furthermore it is composed of otolith matrix protein-1, Otolin, Otoconin, SPARC and Neuroserpin, which is a specific expression in the otolth matrix for chichlid fish. During embryonic development of the fish inner ear, these proteins show a spacial and temporal expression pattern. The formation of the inner ear -including otoliths and sensory cells -starting from the otocyst-anlage -can be subdivided in several major developmental stages e.g. the forming of the otic cavity (stage 7/8), the tetha cell or seeding stage (stage 8, 9), the development of the semicircular channels (stage 12), the transition to further daily growth (post stage15) and the development of the third otolith, asteriscus (stage 23). These developmental phases contain different constitutions or involvements of matrix proteins. We investigated the matrixprotein composition of the chichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and found that the otolith matrix differentiate between other fishes. In this case some matrix proteins seem to be uniform in fishes, other known matrix proteins are lacking and we have also references to new candidates for matrix proteins chichlids. In this case we investigated the expression of the matrix proteins otolith

  6. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  7. High resolution solution structure of apo calcyclin and structural variations in the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional solution structure of apo rabbit lung calcyclin has been refined to high resolution through the use of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy and 13C,15N- enriched protein. Upon completing the assignment of virtually all of the 15N, 13C and 1H NMR resonances, the solution structure was determined from a combination of 2814 NOE- derived distance constraints, and 272 torsion angle constraints derived from scalar couplings. A large number of critical inter- subunit NOEs (386) were identified from 13C- select,13C-filtered NOESY experiments, providing a highly accurate dimer interface. The combination of distance geometry and restrained molecular dynamics calculations yielded structures with excellent agreement with the experimental data and high precision (rmsd from the mean for the backbone atoms in the eight helices: 0.33 A). Calcyclin exhibits a symmetric dimeric fold of two identical 90 amino acid subunits, characteristic of the S100 subfamily of EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins. The structure reveals a readily identified pair of putative sites for binding of Zn2+. In order to accurately determine the structural features that differentiate the various S100 proteins, distance difference matrices and contact maps were calculated for the NMR structural ensembles of apo calcyclin and rat and bovine S100B. These data show that the most significant variations among the structures are in the positioning of helix III and in loops, the regions with least sequence similarity. Inter-helical angles and distance differences for the proteins show that the positioning of helix III of calcyclin is most similar to that of bovine S100B, but that the helix interfaces are more closely packed in calcyclin than in either S100B structure. Surprisingly large differences were found in the positioning of helix III in the two S100B structures, despite there being only four non-identical residues, suggesting that one or both of the S100B structures requires further refinement

  8. Bioinformatic analysis and molecular modelling of human ameloblastin suggest a two-domain intrinsically unstructured calcium-binding protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vymětal, Jiří; Slabý, I.; Spahr, A.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Lyngstadaas, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 2 (2008), s. 124-134. ISSN 0909-8836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0009; GA ČR GA203/06/1727; GA MŠk LC512 Grant ostatní: EU(XE) QLK3-CT-2001-00090 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ameloblastin * bioinformatic modelling * calcium * intrinsically unstructured protein Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2008

  9. Expression of calcium-binding proteins and selected neuropeptides in the human, chimpanzee, and crab-eating macaque claustrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea ePirone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The claustrum is present in all mammalian species examined so far and its morphology, chemoarchitecture, physiology, phylogenesis and ontogenesis are still a matter of debate. Several morphologically distinct types of immunostained cells were described in different mammalian species. To date, a comparative study on the neurochemical organization of the human and non-human primates claustrum has not been fully described yet, partially due to technical reasons linked to the postmortem sampling interval. The present study analyzes the localization and morphology of neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV, calretinin (CR, NPY, and somatostatin (SOM in the claustrum of man (# 5, chimpanzee (# 1 and crab-eating monkey (#3. Immunoreactivity for the used markers was observed in neuronal cell bodies and processes distributed throughout the anterior-posterior extent of human, chimpanzee and macaque claustrum. Both CR- and PV-immunoreactive (ir neurons were mostly localized in the central and ventral region of the claustrum of the three species while SOM- and NPY-ir neurons seemed to be equally distributed throughout the ventral-dorsal extent. In the chimpanzee claustrum SOM-ir elements were not observed. No co-localization of PV with CR was found, thus suggesting the existence of two non-overlapping populations of PV and CR-ir interneurons. The expression of most proteins (CR, PV, NPY, was similar in all species. The only exception was the absence of SOM-ir elements in the claustrum of the chimpanzee, likely due to species specific variability. Our data suggest a possible common structural organization shared with the adjacent insular region, a further element that emphasizes a possible common ontogeny of the claustrum and the neocortex.

  10. S100 calcium binding protein B as a biomarker of delirium duration in the intensive care unit – an exploratory analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan BA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Babar A Khan,1–3 Mark O Farber,1 Noll Campbell,2–5 Anthony Perkins,2,3 Nagendra K Prasad,6 Siu L Hui,1–3 Douglas K Miller,1–3 Enrique Calvo-Ayala,1 John D Buckley,1 Ruxandra Ionescu,1 Anantha Shekhar,1 E Wesley Ely,7,8 Malaz A Boustani1–3 1Indiana University School of Medicine, 2Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 3Regenstrief Institute, Inc., 4Wishard Health Services, Indianapolis, 5Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, 6Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, 7Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 8VA Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center (GRECC, Nashville, TN, USA Background: Currently, there are no valid and reliable biomarkers to identify delirious patients predisposed to longer delirium duration. We investigated the hypothesis that elevated S100 calcium binding protein B (S100β levels will be associated with longer delirium duration in critically ill patients. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was performed in the medical, surgical, and progressive intensive care units (ICUs of a tertiary care, university affiliated, and urban hospital. Sixty-three delirious patients were selected for the analysis, with two samples of S100β collected on days 1 and 8 of enrollment. The main outcome measure was delirium duration. Using the cutoff of <0.1 ng/mL and $0.1 ng/mL as normal and abnormal levels of S100β, respectively, on day 1 and day 8, four exposure groups were created: Group A, normal S100β levels on day 1 and day 8; Group B, normal S100β level on day 1 and abnormal S100β level on day 8; Group C, abnormal S100β level on day 1 and normal on day 8; and Group D, abnormal S100β levels on both day 1 and day 8. Results: Patients with abnormal levels of S100β showed a trend towards higher delirium duration (P=0.076; Group B (standard deviation (7.0 [3.2] days, Group C (5.5 [6.3] days, and Group D

  11. Calcium binding to beta-2-microglobulin at physiological pH drives the occurrence of conformational changes which cause the protein to precipitate into amorphous forms that subsequently transform into amyloid aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhdeep Kumar

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic methods, we demonstrate that calcium binds to beta-2-microglobulin (β2m under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength, in biological buffers, causing a conformational change associated with the binding of up to four calcium atoms per β2m molecule, with a marked transformation of some random coil structure into beta sheet structure, and culminating in the aggregation of the protein at physiological (serum concentrations of calcium and β2m. We draw attention to the fact that the sequence of β2m contains several potential calcium-binding motifs of the DXD and DXDXD (or DXEXD varieties. We establish (a that the microscopic aggregation seen at physiological concentrations of β2m and calcium turns into actual turbidity and visible precipitation at higher concentrations of protein and β2m, (b that this initial aggregation/precipitation leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates, (c that the formation of the amorphous aggregates can be partially reversed through the addition of the divalent ion chelating agent, EDTA, and (d that upon incubation for a few weeks, the amorphous aggregates appear to support the formation of amyloid aggregates that bind to the dye, thioflavin T (ThT, resulting in increase in the dye's fluorescence. We speculate that β2m exists in the form of microscopic aggregates in vivo and that these don't progress to form larger amyloid aggregates because protein concentrations remain low under normal conditions of kidney function and β2m degradation. However, when kidney function is compromised and especially when dialysis is performed, β2m concentrations probably transiently rise to yield large aggregates that deposit in bone joints and transform into amyloids during dialysis related amyloidosis.

  12. Calcium binding to calmodulin by molecular dynamics with effective polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 22 (2014), s. 3964-3969. ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : EF-hand motif * free energy calculations * charge scaling * calcium-binding protein * umbrella sampling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.458, year: 2014

  13. Immunoselection of cDNAs to avian intestinal calcium binding protein 28K and a novel calmodulin-like protein: assessment of mRNA regulation by the Vitamin D hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium's role in a variety of cellular processes has been well documented. The storage, distribution, and delivery of calcium are regulated by a family of binding proteins including troponin C, calmodulin, parvalbumin, and vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP-28), all of which have evolved from a common ancestral gene. To evaluate vitamin D regulation of gene transcription, a CaBP-28 cDNA (767 base pairs) was isolated from a chicken intestine λgt11 library utilizing a polyvalent CaBP-28 antibody as a probe. Coincident with the identification of the CaBP-28 cDNA, a group of cDNAs also was isolated (with the anti-CaBP-28 antibody) that demonstrated 84% nucleotide homology and 99% deduced amino acid homology with chicken brain calmodulin (CaM). This new CaM-like cDNA was named neoCaM. There is little nucleotide homology between the CaBP-28 cDNA and neoCaM. The CaBP-28 cDNA hybridizes with three transcripts of 2000, 2900, and 3300 bases which are dramatically induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], while the neoCaM cDNA recognizes three distinct (from CaBP-28) transcripts. Two of these mRNAs are 1400 and 1800 bases as described for brain CaM, but another large 4000-base transcript is detected with neoCaM. Neither the CaM nor the neoCaM transcript reveals any modulation by 1,25(OH)2D3. Herein, the authors discuss the possible significance of not only the isolation of both cDNAs with a single antibody but also the relation of neoCaM to other well-characterized CaM cDNAs

  14. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing 45Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH2-terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 μM and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 μM and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 μM. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that β-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids

  15. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennick, A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario); McLaughlin, A.C.; Grey, A.A.; Madapallimattam, G.

    1981-05-25

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing /sup 45/Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH/sub 2/-terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 ..mu..M and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 ..mu..M and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 ..mu..M. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that ..beta..-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids.

  16. Cloning, characterization, and heterologous expression of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea (Streptomyces erythraeus) gene encoding an EF-hand calcium-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, D G; Cortes, J; Hale, R S; Leadlay, P F

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory effects of Ca2+ in eucaryotic cells are mostly mediated by a superfamily of Ca2+-binding proteins (CABs) that contain one or more characteristic Ca2+-binding structural motifs, referred to as EF hands. We have cloned and sequenced the structural gene for an authentic EF-hand CAB from the spore-forming gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea (formerly Streptomyces erythraeus). When the gene was introduced into Streptomyces lividans on the high-copy plasmid vector pIJ...

  17. Preparation and identification of water-soluble calcium-binding protein from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds%葡萄籽中水溶性钙结合蛋白的分离和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕晨艳; 赵广华

    2015-01-01

    grape seed protein by the ammonium sulfate sediment was approximately 3-fold larger than that by the traditional method, demonstrating that the ammonium sulfate sediment was a better way to isolate mineral-containing protein as compared to the traditional method. A high yield of calcium by the ammonium sulfate sediment could be derived from its mild condition, whereas acid and alkaline used in the alkali extraction and acid precipitation possibly inhibits the binding of calcium ions with grape seed protein. The following FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) study showed that the prominent band of apo grape seed protein attributed to random coils turns (1 666 cm−1) was shifted to lower wave number (1 660 cm−1) with a marked decreased in intensity upon calcium binding with the protein and indicated that the binding of calcium to the protein stabilizes the secondary structure of WGSP by changing state of C=O. Moreover, the abundant amino acid residues were found in WGSP to be glutamic and aspartic acids, which accounted for about 26.7% and 9.0% of the total amino acid, respectively, and these amino acids might be beneficial for calcium binding. This study could provide a foundation for the preparation of mineral-containing protein in food industry. This method may have a potential use in food industry for isolation of mineral-containing protein from other sources.%为了开发植物源葡萄籽补钙制剂,该研究通过亚细胞定位试验表明,葡萄籽的胚乳中含有大量的钙元素。通过电泳分析发现,葡萄籽的水溶性蛋白包括2种主要成分,其中一种是11 S球蛋白(蛋白质B),也是最主要的钙结合蛋白,另一种是表观分子量为670 kDa的蛋白质A。在蛋白质组成相同的情况下,用传统的碱溶酸沉法来分离葡萄籽蛋白会导致大量的钙流失。但用30%~50%硫酸铵沉淀法得到的蛋白质得率是(22.5±0.02)g/kg,蛋白质中钙质量分数(3.47%)

  18. Calcium Binding by Ro 60 Multiple Antigenic Peptides on PVDF Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Bachmann, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies directed against ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles are observed in systemic lupus erythematosus. Ro RNP particle is one such target. It is composed of a 60 kDa protein (Ro 60 or SS-A) that is non-covalently associated with at least one of the four short uridine-rich RNAs (the hY RNAs). Previously, we showed that multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) made from the sequence of the Ro 60 autoantigen could be used, using double-immunodiffusion studies, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, affinity chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance, to show intramolecular and intermolecular protein-protein interaction within the Ro 60 RNP particle. We also observed that calcium is important in mediating this interaction. We hypothesized, therefore, that 60 kDa Ro is a calcium-binding protein. To investigate this, we electrophoresed 60 kDa Ro MAPs, transferred them to PVDF membrane, and assayed calcium binding using the Quin-2 system. Several Ro 60 MAPs were found to bind calcium using this assay, as well as bovine serum albumin, another calcium-binding protein. However, a MAP constructed from the Sm autoantigen did not bind to calcium. These data, along with our observation regarding the involvement of calcium in protein-protein interaction occurring between Ro 60 antigen and Ro 60 MAPs, makes us propose that Ro 60 antigen is a calcium-binding protein. PMID:26139264

  19. The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal, degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse%The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal,degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhengyu; XIONG Liang; HUANG Xiaolin; ZHOU Ning; Kozlova-Aldskogius Elena

    2008-01-01

    目的:研究止常、退行性病变以及脱髓鞘小鼠脊髓内Mtsl/S100A4蛋白的表达模式,及其对胶质细胞反应的影响.方法:以野生型和Mtsl/S100A4基因敲除型小鼠为试验动物,采用背根损伤、坐骨神经损伤、溴乙啶局部微量注射的方法复制退行性病变及脱髓鞘脊髓动物模型,应用免疫荧光技术,检测S100A4、GFAP、NG2、Mac1的表达情况.结果:野生型小鼠脊髓内,仅白质星型胶质细胞表达S100A4蛋白,且主要分布于Lissauer束:背根或坐骨神经损伤后,白质星形胶质细胞内的S100A4及GFAP表达上调.野生型与S100A4基因敲除小鼠GFAP表达量无显著差异;溴乙啶注射7d后,野生型小鼠脊髓脱髓鞘区域内她S100A4呈云雾状分布,胶质细胞反应局限于注射侧,并且形成清晰的胶质瘢痕,而S100A4基凶敲除小鼠则未见上述病理变化.结论:S100A4蛋白在小鼠脊髓内的表达模式与大鼠相似;退行性变的脊髓内,细胞内上调的S100A4蛋白并不影响胶质细胞的反应;脱髓鞘脊髓内,细胞外的S100A4蛋白明显影响胶质细胞反应,包括胶质瘢痕的形成.%Objective:To investigate the expression pattern of Mtsl/S100A4 in mouse spinal cord;to investigate the effects of Mtsl/S100A4 on glial cell responses.Method:The study was carried out on Mtsl/S100A4 wild type and knock-out mice.The degenerative spinal cord model was established by dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury.The de-myelinated spinal cord model was established by ethidium bromide injections.Then the expressions of S100A4,GFA P,NG2 and Mael were measured.Result:The expressions of Mtsl/S100A4 in mice spinal cord were similar to that in rats.In WT mice this protein expressed in a thin layer of fiber bundles in the tract of Lissauer,and in white matter astrocytes.There was intracellular up-regulation of Mtsl/S100A4 in white matter astrocytes of WT mice after dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury,with no difference in glial cell response

  20. Calcium binding protects E-cadherin from cleavage by Helicobacter pylori HtrA

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Thomas P.; Goetz, Camilla; Huemer, Markus; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    Background The cell adhesion and tumor suppressor protein E-cadherin is an important factor in the establishment and maintenance of epithelial integrity. E-cadherin is a single transmembrane protein, which consists of an intracellular domain (IC), a transmembrane domain (TD), and five extracellular domains (EC). EC domains form homophilic interactions in cis and trans that require calcium binding to the linker region between the EC domains. In our previous studies, we identified the serine pr...

  1. High-capacity calcium-binding chitinase III from pomegranate seeds (Punica granatum Linn.) is located in amyloplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Chenyan; Masuda, Taro; Yang, Haixia; Sun, Lei; Zhao, Guanghua

    2011-01-01

    We have recently identified a new class III chitinase from pomegranate seeds (PSC). Interestingly, this new chitinase naturally binds calcium ions with high capacity and low affinity, suggesting that PSC is a Ca-storage protein. Analysis of the amino acid sequence showed that this enzyme is rich in acidic amino acid residues, especially Asp, which are responsible for calcium binding. Different from other known chitinases, PSC is located in the stroma of amyloplasts in pomegranate seeds. Trans...

  2. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  3. Calcium-Binding Capacity of Centrin2 Is Required for Linear POC5 Assembly but Not for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Tiago J.; Daly, Owen M.; Conroy, Pauline C.; Tomas, Martin; Wang, Yifan; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Morrison, Ciaran G.

    2013-01-01

    Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC), stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER. PMID:23844208

  4. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  5. Calcium binding to low molecular weight compounds and health promoting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavrusova, Martina

    absorption. Therefore, calcium as an essential nutrient should not be underestimated in our diet. Milk and dairy products are good sources of bioavailable calcium due to specific protein binding. Other sources of calcium, apart from a balanced and healthy diet, are calcium supplements and calcium fortified...... food. Therefore, an understanding of the basic chemistry of calcium binding to low molecular weight compounds can contribute to a general knowledge about calcium bioavailability and also to product improvement. Calcium precipitation with palmitate was described by a first-order reaction for conditions...... calcium Dgluconate only slowly precipitated after a lag phase. On the other hand, the slow dissolution of calcium D-gluconate by sodium L-lactate in aqueous solution with the reverse lactate/gluconate ratio did not result in a similar solution since fast precipitation prevented formation of a homogenous...

  6. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R.; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Kaftan, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  7. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Kaftan, Edward J; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  8. Calprotectin S100A9 Calcium-binding Loops I and II Are Essential for Keratinocyte Resistance to Bacterial Invasion*

    OpenAIRE

    Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Sappington, Kaia J.; Guenther, Brian D.; Ross, Karen F.; Herzberg, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells expressing calprotectin, a heterodimer of S100A8 and S100A9 proteins, are more resistant to bacterial invasion. To determine structural motifs that affect resistance to bacterial invasion, mutations were constructed in S100A9 targeting the calcium-binding loops I and II (E36Q, E78Q, E36Q,E78Q) and the C terminus (S100A91–99 and S100A91–112), which contains putative antimicrobial zinc-binding and phosphorylation sites. The S100A8 and mutated S100A9 enco...

  9. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  10. Cloning of a Calcium Binding Protein Gene from Citrus sinensis and Construction of Sense and Antisense Expression Vectors%柑桔钙离子结合蛋白基因克隆及植物表达载体构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贝学军; 钟广炎

    2012-01-01

    以伏令夏橙叶片中分离的总RNA为模板,经RT-PCR扩增到一条约600 bp、含钙离子结 合蛋白基因(CsCaBP)的片段,将此片段克隆到pMD-19T中,经测序分析该片段与甜橙基因组中的对应序列完全吻合.设计2对带有限制性内切酶位点的特异性引物,以cDNA为模板扩增到2个CsCaBP片段,并连接到TA克隆载体pMD-19T上;经双酶切消化后,分别以正反2个方向插入到植物表达载体pFGC5941的查耳酮合成酶(CHSA)内含子两侧,构建成功CsCaBP的RNA干扰载体,但未获得转基因植株.将CsCaBP的正向片段定向克隆到具有CaMV35S启动子的pFGC5941表达质粒上,构建成功CsCaBP过量表达载体.将构建好的表达载体导入根癌农杆菌LBA4404菌株,转化酸橙下胚轴,经PCR检测,获得9株过量表达转基因植株,荧光定量PCR验证发现目的基因在转基因植株中有不同程度的表达.%A calcium binding protein gene (CsCaBP) was amplified by Reverse Transcription Polymerse Chain Reaction (RT-PCR)from Citrus sinensis cv. 'Valencia', and a 600 bp-long PCR product was obtained and cloned into pMD-19T plasmid. Sequence analysis showed that the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was exactly the same as the corresponding genomic sequence. Two PCR products were re-amplified from cDNA and inserted in inverted orientations into the RNAi vector at the two sides of the intron of chalcone synthase gene. The over-expression construct was obtained by inserting the full-length CsCaBP cDNA into pF(iC5941 under the control of 35S promoter. Both constructs were verified by PCR and sequencing. The constructs were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the transformants were tested positive by PCR. Transformation of Citrus auantittm hypocotyledon segments by co-culturing the segments with the bacteria followed by regeneration of transgenic plants yielded only the overexpression transgenic plants but not the RNAi plant.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10-3 M H2O2. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10-3M H2O2 oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H2O2 utilising 45calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H2O2-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo

  12. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca2+ ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  13. Sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments, secondary structure, and location of the calcium binding site in the first epidermal growth factor like domain of blood coagulation factor IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factor IX is a blood clotting protein that contains three regions, including a γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two tandemly connected epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, and a serine protease region. The protein exhibits a high-affinity calcium binding site in the first EGF0like domain, in addition to calcium binding in the Gla domain. The first EGF-like domain, factor IX (45-87), has been synthesized. Sequence-specific resonance assignment of the peptide has been made by using 2D NMR techniques, and its secondary structure has been determined. The protein is found to have two antiparallel β-sheets, and preliminary distance geometry calculations indicate that the protein has two domains, separated by Trp28, with the overall structure being similar to that of EGF. An NMR investigation of the calcium-bound first EGF-like domain indicates the presence and location of a calcium binding site involving residues on both strands of one of the β-sheets as well as the N-terminal region of the peptide. These results suggest that calcium binding in the first EGF-like domain could induce long-range (possibly interdomain) conformational changes in factor IX, rather than causing structural alterations in the EGF-like domain itself

  14. Increased absolute calcium binding to albumin in hypoalbuminaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; Caro, J F

    1981-01-01

    The amount of calcium bound to protein was measured in 30 patients with differing diseases and varying degrees of hypoalbuminaemia. Total serum calcium increased directly with both serum albumin and ultrafilterable calcium concentrations. The estimated amount of calcium bound per gram of albumin varied inversely with the albumin concentration, decreasing from 2.1 to 1.0 mg calcium/g albumin as albumin concentration increased from 1.7 to 3.1 g/dl. Circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentr...

  15. Presence of calcium-binding motifs in PilY1 homologs correlates with Ca-mediated twitching motility and evolutionary history across diverse bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Cruz, Luisa F; Evans, Michael R; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2015-02-01

    Twitching motility, involving type IV pili, is essential for host colonization and virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. Studies of PilY1, a tip-associated type IV pili protein, indicate that PilY1 functions as a switch between pilus extension and retraction, resulting in twitching motility. Recent work detected a calcium-binding motif in PilY1 of some animal bacterial pathogens and demonstrated that binding of calcium to PilY1 with this motif regulates twitching. Though studies of PilY1 in non-animal pathogens are limited, our group demonstrated that twitching motility in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, which contains three PilY1 homologs, is increased by calcium supplementation. A study was conducted to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between multiple PilY1 homologs, the presence of calcium-binding motifs therein, and calcium-mediated twitching motility across diverse bacteria. Strains analyzed contained one to three PilY1 homologs, but phylogenetic analyses indicated that PilY1 homologs containing the calcium-binding motif Dx[DN]xDGxxD are phylogenetically divergent from other PilY1 homologs. Plant-associated bacteria included in these analyses were then examined for a calcium-mediated twitching response. Results indicate that bacteria must have at least one PilY1 homolog containing the Dx[DN]xDGxxD motif to display a calcium-mediated increase in twitching motility, which likely reflects an adaption to environmental calcium concentrations. PMID:25688068

  16. Structural and biochemical characterization reveals LysGH15 as an unprecedented "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding phage lysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Gu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lysin LysGH15, which is derived from the staphylococcal phage GH15, demonstrates a wide lytic spectrum and strong lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Here, we find that the lytic activity of the full-length LysGH15 and its CHAP domain is dependent on calcium ions. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, the structures of three individual domains of LysGH15 were determined. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure of the LysGH15 CHAP domain reveals an "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding site near the Cys-His-Glu-Asn quartet active site groove. To date, the calcium-binding site in the LysGH15 CHAP domain is unique among homologous proteins, and it represents the first reported calcium-binding site in the CHAP family. More importantly, the calcium ion plays an important role as a switch that modulates the CHAP domain between the active and inactive states. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the amidase-2 domain reveals that both the zinc ion and E282 are required in catalysis and enable us to propose a catalytic mechanism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and titration-guided mutagenesis identify residues (e.g., N404, Y406, G407, and T408 in the SH3b domain that are involved in the interactions with the substrate. To the best of our knowledge, our results constitute the first structural information on the biochemical features of a staphylococcal phage lysin and represent a pivotal step forward in understanding this type of lysin.

  17. An explicitly solvated full atomistic model of the cardiac thin filament and application on the calcium binding affinity effects from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy linked mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The previous version of our cardiac thin filament (CTF) model consisted of the troponin complex (cTn), two coiled-coil dimers of tropomyosin (Tm), and 29 actin units. We now present the newest revision of the model to include explicit solvation. The model was developed to continue our study of genetic mutations in the CTF proteins which are linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Binding of calcium to the cTnC subunit causes subtle conformational changes to propagate through the cTnC to the cTnI subunit which then detaches from actin. Conformational changes propagate through to the cTnT subunit, which allows Tm to move into the open position along actin, leading to muscle contraction. Calcium disassociation allows for the reverse to occur, which results in muscle relaxation. The inclusion of explicit TIP3 water solvation allows for the model to get better individual local solvent to protein interactions; which are important when observing the N-lobe calcium binding pocket of the cTnC. We are able to compare in silica and in vitro experimental results to better understand the physiological effects from mutants, such as the R92L/W and F110V/I of the cTnT, on the calcium binding affinity compared to the wild type.

  18. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Bioquimica

    2009-07-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca{sup 2+} ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  19. Effect of albumin and free calcium concentrations on calcium binding in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; DeGuzman, A; Swanson, J W

    1981-01-01

    In vivo equilibrium dialysis studies were performed to define further the characteristics of calcium binding to bovine albumin. The concentration range for albumin (1 to 9 g/dl) as well as ultrafilterable calcium (0.5 to 2.5 mM) studied encompassed those that might be ordinarily encountered in most clinical situations. Major differences in the regressions of total calcium on ultrafilterable calcium occurred at albumin concentrations of 1, 2, and 9 g/dl but only small differences at albumin co...

  20. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  1. Structural investigations of calcium binding and its role in activity and activation of outer membrane phospholipase A from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, H.J.; Kingma, R.L.; Kalk, K.H.; Egmond, M.R.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Outer membrane phospholipase A (OMPLA) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of phospholipids. Enzymatic activity is regulated by reversible dimerisation and calcium-binding. We have investigated the role of calcium by X-ray crystallography. In monomeric OMPLA, one calcium ion

  2. The effects of rehabilitative training on neural function and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 after traumatic brain injury%康复训练对脑损伤后大鼠神经功能及胶原纤维酸性蛋白和离子钙接头分子表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘苏; 沈光宇; 吴勤峰; 张志军; 郭爱松; 李欣嫄; 邹玉婷

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究康复功能训练对大鼠脑损伤神经功能恢复及损伤边缘皮质胶原纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)和离子钙接头分子(Iba-1)表达的影响.方法 SD大鼠131只,按随机数字表法选取30只为假手术组,其余101只制作脑损伤模型.剔除制模未达标大鼠11只,余90只按随机数字表法分为康复训练组、制动组和自由活动组,每组30只大鼠.康复训练组于术后第4天开始每天给予平衡、旋转、行走等功能训练,每项15min,共训练45min,每周6d;制动组置于网状笼内固定;自由活动组和假手术组置于普通笼内饲养.在术后第3天及术后1、2、3和4周对上述4组分别进行神经和运动功能评估,观察其恢复状况;同时采用免疫荧光染色观察损伤区边缘皮质GFAP和Iba-1的表达.结果 康复训练组术后2、3和4周在功能评估方面优于制动组和自由活动组(P<0.05);术后4周自由活动组较制动组的神经运动功能也有所恢复(P<0.05).脑损伤术后2、3和4周康复训练组GFAP阳性细胞灰度值和术后3、4周康复训练组Iba-1阳性细胞平均灰度值均明显低于制动组和自由活动组(P<0.01).结论 康复功能训练可促进大鼠脑损伤的神经功能恢复,其机制可能与损伤区边缘皮质星形胶质细胞和小胶质细胞的活化数目减少有关.%Objective To study the effectsof rehabilitative training on neural function and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1) in rats after traumatic brain injury.Methods A left hemisphere traumatic brain injury model was established in ninety Sprague-Dawley rats.They were then randomly divided into a rehabilitation training group,an immobilization group and a free-running group,with 30 rats in each group.Another thirty rats received sham injury as the shamoperated group.Beginning 4 days post-operation the rats of the rehabilitation training group were given

  3. Use of technical biochemical in combination for the detection of proteins of union to calcium in Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium plays a fundamental role in the development of Plasmodium falciparum, the intracellular parasite that causes malaria. With the purpose of understanding the mechanism by which calcium acts in this parasite, calcium-binding proteins were detected in this organism the combined use of the metachromatic dye Stains-all and the 45Ca overlay assay allowed the identification, in mature parasites. Of 9 calcium - binding proteins. 6 of which seem to be different from any reported calcium-binding protein. Additionally, it was determined that the combined use of these techniques can be useful for the detection and purification of calcium-binding proteins

  4. Changes of calcium binding protein expression in spinothalamic tract neurons after peripheral inflammation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sojka, David; Zachařová, Gisela; Špicarová, Diana; Paleček, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2010), s. 1011-1017. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA305/09/1228 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : pain * parvalbumin * calbindin Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  5. Calsequestrinlike calcium-binding protein is expressed in calcium-accumulating cells of Pistia stratiotes.

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschi, V R; Li, X; Zhang, D.(Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America); Okita, T W

    1993-01-01

    To contend with high calcium (Ca) levels in the environment, many plant species contain crystal idioblasts, specialized cells which accumulate large amounts of Ca as oxalate crystals. The biochemical processes involved in the accumulation of Ca in crystal idioblasts are unknown, as these cells constitute only a minor proportion of the total plant tissue. To address how crystal idioblasts buffer cytosolic Ca during crystal formation, we purified these cells from water lettuce and assessed thei...

  6. Expression of Calcium Binding Proteins in Skeletal and Heart Muscles of Rats with Altered Thyroid Status

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Pavel; Marková, Vladimíra; Sulimenko, Vadym; Soukup, Tomáš

    Kyoto, Japan: Physiological society, 2009. s. 5-5. [International congress of Physiological Sciences /36./. 27.07.2009-01.08.2009, Kyoto] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : calsequestrin * muscle * thyroid status Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  8. The PEF family proteins sorcin and grancalcin interact in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian; Tarabykina, Svetlana; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Lollike, Karsten; Berchtold, Martin W

    The penta-EF hand (PEF) family of calcium binding proteins includes grancalcin, peflin, sorcin, calpain large and small subunits as well as ALG-2. Systematic testing of the heterodimerization abilities of the PEF proteins using the yeast two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays r...... be a way to regulate and fine tune processes mediated by calcium binding proteins of the penta-EF hand type....

  9. Assembly and Calcium Binding Properties of Quantum Dot-Calmodulin Calcium Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Su-yong; Nguyen-ta, Kim; Yoo, Hoon; Silva, Gabriel A; Kim, Soon-jong

    2016-02-01

    We have developed the first nanoengineered quantum dot molecular complex designed to measure changes of calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration at high spatial and temporal resolutions in real time. The sensor is ratiometric and composed of three components: a quantum dot (QD) emitting at 620 nm as a fluorescence donor, an organic dye (Alexa Fluor 647) as a fluorescence acceptor, and a calmodulin-M13 (CaM-M13) protein part as a calcium sensing component. In this work, we have determined the maximal number of CaM-M13 required for saturating a single QD particle to be approximately 16. The dissociation constant, Kd of the QD-based calcium ion sensor was also estimated to be around 30 microM. PMID:27433729

  10. Calcium binding in α-amylases: An X-ray diffraction study at 2.1-angstrom resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-angstrom resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca2+ with an unusually high number of eight ligands. A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) α-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-angstrom resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and addition kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites

  11. Calcium-binding affinity and calcium-enhanced activity of Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvaux, S; Beguin, P; Aubert, J P; Bhat, K M; Gow, L A; Wood, T M; Bairoch, A

    1990-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase D (EC 3.2.1.4: EGD), which is encoded by the celD gene, was found to bind Ca2+ with an association constant of 2.03 x 10(6) M-1. Ca2+ stimulated the activity of EGD towards swollen Avicel by 2-fold. In the presence of Ca2+, the Kd of the enzyme towards p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-cellobioside and carboxymethylcellulose was decreased by 4-fold. Furthermore, Ca2+ increased the half-life of the enzyme at 75 degrees C from 13 to 47 min. Since the 3' sequence of celD encodes a duplicated region sharing similarities with the Ca2+-binding site of several Ca2+-binding proteins, a deleted clone was constructed and used to purify a truncated form of the enzyme which no longer contained the duplicated region. The truncated enzyme was very similar to EGD expressed from the intact gene with respect to activity, Ca2(+)-binding kinetics and Ca2+ effects on substrate binding and thermostability. Thus the latter parameters do not appear to be mediated through the duplicated conserved region. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2302168

  12. Calcium-binding properties of troponin C in detergent-skinned heart muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain information with regard to behavior of the Ca2+ receptor, troponin C (TnC), in intact myofilament lattice of cardiac muscle, we investigated Ca2+-binding properties of canine ventricular muscle fibers skinned with Triton X-100. Analysis of equilibrium Ca2+-binding data of the skinned fibers in ATP-free solutions suggested that there were two distinct classes of binding sites which were saturated over the physiological range of negative logarithm of free calcium concentration (pCa): class I (KCa = 7.4 X 10(7) M-1, KMg = 0.9 X 10(3) M-1) and class II (KCa = 1.2 X 10(6) M-1, KMg = 1.1 X 10(2) M-1). The class I and II were considered equivalent, respectively, to the Ca2+-Mg2+ and Ca2+-specific sites of TnC. The assignments were supported by TnC content of the skinned fibers determined by electrophoresis and 45Ca autoradiograph of electroblotted fiber proteins. Dissociation of rigor complexes by ATP caused a downward shift of the binding curve between pCa 7 and 5, an effect which could be largely accounted for by lowering of KCa of the class II sites. When Ca2+ binding and isometric force were measured simultaneously, it was found that the threshold pCa for activation corresponds to the range of pCa where class II sites started to bind Ca2+ significantly. We concluded that the low affinity site of cardiac TnC plays a key role in Ca2+ regulation of contraction under physiological conditions, just as it does in the regulation of actomyosin ATPase. Study of kinetics of 45Ca washout from skinned fibers and myofibrils revealed that cardiac TnC in myofibrils contains Ca2+-binding sites whose off-rate constant for Ca2+ is significantly lower than the Ca2+ off-rate constant hitherto documented for the divalent ion-binding sites of either cardiac/slow muscle TnC or fast skeletal TnC

  13. Mutations in the SPARC-Related Modular Calcium-Binding Protein 1 Gene, SMOC1, Cause Waardenburg Anophthalmia Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Abouzeid, Hana; Boisset, Gaëlle; Favez, Tatiana; Youssef, Mohamed; Marzouk, Iman; Shakankiry, Nihal; Bayoumi, Nader; Descombes, Patrick; Agosti, Céline; Munier, Francis L.; Schorderet, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome, also known as microphthalmia with limb anomalies, ophthalmoacromelic syndrome, and anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare autosomal-recessive developmental disorder that has been mapped to 10p11.23. Here we show that this disease is heterogeneous by reporting on a consanguineous family, not linked to the 10p11.23 locus, whose two affected children have a homozygous mutation in SMOC1. Knockdown experiments of the zebrafish smoc1 revealed that smoc1 is important i...

  14. Four novel FBN1 mutations: Significance for mutant transcript level and EGF-like domain calcium binding in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, H.C.; McIntosh, I.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Francomano, C.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Sakai, L.Y.; Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Defects of fibrillin (FBN1), a glycoprotein component of the extracellular microfibril, cause Marfan syndrome. This disorder is characterized by marked inter- and intrafamilial variation in phenotypic severity. To understand the molecular basis for this clinical observation, the authors have screened the fibrillin gene (FBN1) on chromosome 15, including the newly cloned 5[prime] coding sequence, for disease-producing alterations in a panel of patients with a wide range of manifestations and clinical severity. All the missense mutations identified to date, including two novel mutations discussed here, are associated with classic and moderate to severe disease and occur at residues with putative significance for calcium binding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. In contrast, two new mutations that create premature signals for termination of translation of mRNA and are associated with reduction in the amount of mutant allele transcript produce a range of phenotypic severity. The patient with the lowest amount of mutant transcript has the mildest disease. These data support a role for altered calcium binding to EGF-like domains in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome and suggest a dominant negative mechanism for the pathogenesis of this disorder. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Time dependent correlation between dihedral angles as probe for long range communication in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit; Ghosh, Mahua; Chakrabarti, J.

    2016-02-01

    We calculate the time dependent correlation functions (TDCF) between the dihedral angles of a protein calmodulin (CaM), an important protein involved in calcium ion binding in eukaryotic cells. The linker between the calcium binding domains of CaM shows structural changes due to calcium binding at far distances which enables the protein to function. We show that the TDCF between the dihedral angles in these regions are correlated temporally prior to ion binding which are lost upon ion binding. Thus the TDCFs connect the structural changes with ion binding, and can be useful to understand coupled phenomena in bio-macromolecules.

  16. S100 protein in breast tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, F; X Men; Zhang, W

    2014-01-01

    S100 protein is the largest subtribe in calcium binding protein family. According to recent researches, abnormal expression of S100 protein is often related to tumor, including breast tumor. Breast tumor is the most common malignant disease in female with high mortality mainly due to metastasis. Estimating early diagnostic and prognostic markers are helpful to conduct treatment for patients with breast cancer. Accumulating investigations focused on the role of S100 proteins in breast tumor de...

  17. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  18. PlcR1 and PlcR2 are putative calcium-binding proteins required for secretion of the hemolytic phospholipase C of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Cota-Gomez, A; Vasil, A I; Kadurugamuwa, J; Beveridge, T J; Schweizer, H. P.; Vasil, M L

    1997-01-01

    The plcHR operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa includes the structural gene for the hemolytic phospholipase C,plcH (previously known as plcS), and two overlapping, in-phase, genes designated plcR1 and plcR2. Hemolytic and phospholipase C (PLC) activities produced by Escherichia coli and P. aeruginosa T7 expression systems were measured in strains carrying both plcH and plcR genes and in strains carrying each gene separately. When plcH was expressed by itself in the E. coli T7 system, the area of ...

  19. Visual and motor connectivity and the distribution of calcium-binding proteins in macaque frontal eye field: implications for saccade target selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A Crowder

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The frontal eye field (FEF contributes to directing visual attention and saccadic eye movement through intrinsic processing, interactions with extrastriate visual cortical areas (e.g. V4, and projections to subcortical structures (e.g. superior colliculus; SC. Several models have been proposed to describe the relationship between the allocation of visual attention and the production of saccades. We obtained anatomical information that might provide useful constraints on these models by evaluating two characteristics of FEF. First, we investigated the laminar distribution of efferent connections from FEF to visual areas V4 + TEO and to SC. Second, we examined the laminar distribution of different populations of GABAergic neurons in FEF. We found that the neurons in FEF that project to V4 + TEO are located predominantly in the supragranular layers, colocalized with the highest density of calbindin- and calretinin-immunoreactive inhibitory interneurons. In contrast, the cell bodies of neurons that project to SC are found only in layer 5 of FEF, colocalized primarily with parvalbumin inhibitory interneurons. None of the neurons in layer 5 that project to V4 + TEO also project to SC. These results provide useful constraints for cognitive models of visual attention and saccade production by indicating that different populations of neurons project to extrastriate visual cortical areas and to SC. This finding also suggests that FEF neurons projecting to visual cortex and superior colliculus are embedded in different patterns of intracortical circuitry.

  20. Co-existence of calcium-binding proteins and γ-aminobutyric acid or glycine in neurons of the rat medullary dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文; 武胜昔; 李云庆

    2004-01-01

    Background We investigated the co-expression of calbindin-D28k (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV, a combination of the three is referred to as CaBPs) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glycine in neurons of the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH).Methods Immunofluorescence histochemical double-staining for CaBPs and GABA or glycine was performed on the sections from rat MDH.Results CB-, CR-, PV-, GABA- and glycine-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons were differentially observed in all layers of the MDH, but particularly in lamina Ⅱ. Neurons that exhibited immunoreactivity for both CaBPs and GABA or glycine were also observed mainly in lamina Ⅱ. A few of them were found in laminae I and III. The percentages of neurons which co-expressed CB/GABA or CB/glycine out of the total numbers of CB- and GABA-LI neurons or CB- and glycine-LI neurons were 5.3% and 12.1% or 4.1% and 10.0%, respectively. The ratios of CR/GABA or CR/glycine co-existing neurons out of the total numbers of CR- and GABA-LI neurons or CR- and glycine-LI neurons were 5.8% and 7.6% or 4.4% and 7.1%, respectively. The rates of PV/GABA or PV/glycine co-localized neurons out of the total numbers of PV- and GABA-LI neurons or PV- and glycine-LI neurons were 11.1% and 5.1% or 9.9% and 5.1%, respectively. Conclusion The results indicate that some neurons in the MDH contain both CaBPs and GABA or glycine.

  1. Localization of Nitric Oxide Synthase-containing Neurons in the Bat Visual Cortex and Co-localization with Calcium-binding Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microchiroptera (microbats) is a suborder of bats thought to have degenerated vision. However, many recent studies have shown that they have visual ability. In this study, we labeled neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)—the synthesizing enzyme of the gaseous non-synaptic neurotransmitter nitric oxide—and co-localized it with calbindin D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV) in the visual cortex of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, a species of microbats). nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were found in all layers of the visual cortex. Intensely labeled neurons were most common in layer IV, and weakly labeled neurons were most common in layer VI. Majority of the nNOS-IR neurons were round- or oval-type neurons; no pyramidal-type neurons were found. None of these neurons co-localized with CB, CR, or PV. However, the synthesis of nitric oxide in the bat visual cortex by nNOS does not depend on CB, CR, or PV

  2. Calcium absorption and calcium binding protein synthesis in the chick: evidence for a 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like factor in solanum malacoxylon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, R.H.; Bar, A.; Corradino, R.A.; Taylor, A.N.; Peterlik, M.

    1974-01-01

    Some properties of the vitamin D dependent CaBP have been briefly summarized. In addition to providing possible insight into the molecular basis of vitamin D action, the measurement of intestinal CaBP in animals subjected to different conditions and treatments has proven useful in assessing the effective vitamin D status of that animal. Using measurements of both the degree of intestinal /sup 47/Ca absorption in situ and duodenal CaBP levels, some aspects of the vitamin D-like factor in the South American plant Solanum malacoxylon were investigated. A vitamin D assay based on CaBP as end point indicated that the plant contains about 1.3 x 10/sup 5/ IU vitamin D/sub 3/ equivalents per kg. The Solanum factor, together with an adequate calcium intake, are necessary conditions for the product of gross toxic symptoms in the chick. Using experimental conditions that inhibit the conversion of 25-(OH)D/sub 3/ to 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ by the kidney enzyme system (i.e., a high stable strontium diet), it was shown that the Solanum factor can cause a reversal of this inhibition. This suggested that the Solanum factor mimics the action of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/, and this was confirmed by Walling and Kimberg (personal communication) since, in their hands, the administration of S. malacoxylon extract to nephrectomized rats was able to stimulate intestinal calcium transport in vitro. Similar results were brought forth at this meeting by Dr. Mautalen of Argentina. The Solanum factor was effective in an intestinal organ culture system, indicating that the factor acts directly on the gut and, if modification of the factor is needed for biological activity, the necessary enzymes are present in the intestinal tissue.

  3. Calcineurin homologous protein: a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Di Sole, Francesca; Vadnagara, Komal; MOE, ORSON W.; Babich, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved Ca2+-binding protein subfamily. The CHP subfamily is composed of CHP1, CHP2, and CHP3, which in vertebrates share significant homology at the protein level with each other and between other Ca2+-binding proteins. The CHP structure consists of two globular domains containing from one to four EF-hand structural motifs (calcium-binding regions composed of two helixes, E and F, joined by a loop), the myristoylation, a...

  4. The Effect of Calcium on the Binding of Calmodulin to Calcium/Calmodulin Protein Kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Angela R.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a follow-up laboratory experiment demonstrating the formation change when calcium binds to calmodulin. This conformation change allows this complex to bind to a target protein. Presents the necessary information to conduct the experiment and discusses the results. (YDS)

  5. Calbindin and S100 protein expression in the developing inner ear in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buckiová, Daniela; Syka, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 513, č. 5 (2009), s. 469-482. ISSN 0021-9967 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/07/1336; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Calcium binding proteins * Immunohistochemistry * Development Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.718, year: 2009

  6. Protein kinase C interaction with calcium: a phospholipid-dependent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bazzi, M D

    1990-08-21

    The calcium-binding properties of calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were investigated by equilibrium dialysis in the presence and the absence of phospholipids. Calcium binding to PKC displayed striking and unexpected behavior; the free proteins bound virtually no calcium at intracellular calcium concentrations and bound limited calcium (about 1 mol\\/mol of PKC) at 200 microM calcium. However, in the presence of membranes containing acidic phospholipids, PKC bound at least eight calcium ions per protein. The presence of 1 microM phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) in the dialysis buffer had little effect on these calcium-binding properties. Analysis of PKC-calcium binding by gel filtration under equilibrium conditions gave similar results; only membrane-associated PKC bound significant amounts of calcium. Consequently, PKC is a member of what may be a large group of proteins that bind calcium in a phospholipid-dependent manner. The calcium concentrations needed to induce PKC-membrane binding were similar to those needed for calcium binding (about 40 microM calcium at the midpoint). However, the calcium concentration required for PKC-membrane binding was strongly influenced by the phosphatidylserine composition of the membranes. Membranes with higher percentages of phosphatidylserine required lower concentrations of calcium. These properties suggested that the calcium sites may be generated at the interface between PKC and the membrane. Calcium may function as a bridge between PKC and phospholipids. These studies also suggested that calcium-dependent PKC-membrane binding and PKC function could be regulated by a number of factors in addition to calcium levels and diacylglycerol content of the membrane.

  7. Peptide P5 (residues 628–683, comprising the entire membrane proximal region of HIV-1 gp41 and its calcium-binding site, is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavel François

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The membrane proximal region (MPR of the transmembrane subunit, gp41, of the HIV envelope glycoprotein plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection of CD4+ target cells and CD4-independent mucosal entry. It contains continuous epitopes recognized by neutralizing IgG antibodies 2F5, 4E10 and Z13, and is therefore considered to be a promising target for vaccine design. Moreover, some MPR-derived peptides, such as T20 (enfuvirtide, are in clinical use as HIV-1 inhibitors. We have shown that an extended MPR peptide, P5, harbouring the lectin-like domain of gp41 and a calcium-binding site, is implicated in the interaction of HIV with its mucosal receptor. We now investigate the potential antiviral activities of P5 and other such long MPR-derived peptides. Structural studies of gp41 MPR-derived peptides using circular dichroism showed that the peptides P5 (a.a.628–683, P1 (a.a.648–683, P5L (a.a.613–683 and P7 (a.a.613–746 displayed a well-defined α-helical structure. Peptides P5 inhibited HIV-1 envelope mediated cell-cell fusion and infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by both X4- and R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, whereas peptides P5 mutated in the calcium binding site or P1 lacked antiviral activity, when P5L blocked cell fusion in contrast to P7. Strikingly, P5 inhibited CD4-dependent infection by T20-resistant R5-tropic HIV-1 variants. Cell-cell fusion studies indicated that the anti-HIV-1 activity of P5, unlike T20, could not be abrogated in the presence of the N-terminal leucine zipper domain (LZ. These results suggested that P5 could serve as a potent fusion inhibitor.

  8. Metastasis-associated protein Mts1 (S100A4) inhibits CK2-mediated phosphorylation and self-assembly of the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriajevska, M; Bronstein, I B; Scott, D J; Tarabykina, S; Fischer-Larsen, M; Issinger, O; Lukanidin, E

    A role for EF-hand calcium-binding protein Mts1 (S100A4) in the phosphorylation and the assembly of myosin filaments was studied. The nonmuscle myosin molecules form bipolar filaments, which interact with actin filaments to produce a contractile force. Phosphorylation of the myosin plays a regula...

  9. Designing proteins to combat disease: Cardiac troponin C as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan P; Shettigar, Vikram; Tikunova, Svetlana B; Little, Sean C; Liu, Bin; Siddiqui, Jalal K; Janssen, Paul M L; Ziolo, Mark T; Walton, Shane D

    2016-07-01

    Throughout history, muscle research has led to numerous scientific breakthroughs that have brought insight to a more general understanding of all biological processes. Potentially one of the most influential discoveries was the role of the second messenger calcium and its myriad of handling and sensing systems that mechanistically control muscle contraction. In this review we will briefly discuss the significance of calcium as a universal second messenger along with some of the most common calcium binding motifs in proteins, focusing on the EF-hand. We will also describe some of our approaches to rationally design calcium binding proteins to palliate, or potentially even cure cardiovascular disease. Considering not all failing hearts have the same etiology, genetic background and co-morbidities, personalized therapies will need to be developed. We predict designer proteins will open doors for unprecedented personalized, and potentially, even generalized medicines as gene therapy or protein delivery techniques come to fruition. PMID:26901433

  10. Significance of calcium binding, tyrosine phosphorylation, and lysine trimethylation for the essential function of calmodulin in vertebrate cells analyzed in a novel gene replacement system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panina, Svetlana; Stephan, Alexander; la Cour, Jonas M;

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was shown to be essential for survival of lower eukaryotes by gene deletion experiments. So far, no CaM gene deletion was reported in higher eukaryotes. In vertebrates, CaM is expressed from several genes, which encode an identical protein, making it difficult to generate a model...

  11. Correction of the N-terminal sequences of the human plastin isoforms by using anchored polymerase chain reaction: identification of a potential calcium-binding domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, C. S.; Aebersold, R H; Leavitt, J

    1990-01-01

    Plastins are a family of at least three cytoplasmic protein isoforms that are expressed differentially between cells of the hematopoietic lineages and cells of solid tissues. Expression of the L-plastin isoform appears to be restricted to replicating blood cells, and the two T-plastin isoforms appear to be restricted to replicating cells of solid tissues. However, L-plastin is induced in many human solid tumor-derived cells. We used the anchored polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify ...

  12. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  13. Calcium ion binding properties and the effect of phosphorylation on the intrinsically disordered Starmaker protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, Magdalena; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Poznar, Monika; Maciejewska, Marta; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2015-10-27

    Starmaker (Stm) is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in otolith biomineralization in Danio rerio. Stm controls calcium carbonate crystal formation in vivo and in vitro. Phosphorylation of Stm affects its biomineralization properties. This study examined the effects of calcium ions and phosphorylation on the structure of Stm. We have shown that CK2 kinase phosphorylates 25 or 26 residues in Stm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that Stm's affinity for calcium binding is dependent on its phosphorylation state. Phosphorylated Stm (StmP) has an estimated 30 ± 1 calcium binding sites per protein molecule with a dissociation constant (KD) of 61 ± 4 μM, while the unphosphorylated protein has 28 ± 3 sites and a KD of 210 ± 22 μM. Calcium ion binding induces a compaction of the Stm molecule, causing a significant decrease in its hydrodynamic radius and the formation of a secondary structure. The screening effect of Na(+) ions on calcium binding was also observed. Analysis of the hydrodynamic properties of Stm and StmP showed that Stm and StmP molecules adopt the structure of native coil-like proteins. PMID:26445027

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 230616 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GLGLAHPHDNGGGSPIYPGVTSPFRSLGNLGLNQGIYTTMSYNSGFYSQNGNQEKLGYGLESTPMAFDIAAIQYLYGPNNSYKTGNDTYYLPSVNQSGTSYS...CIWDAGGVDTINGISAQSDVTIDLNDASLNTAQDGAGAGGYVSSAKGIFGGFTIANSVVIENATGSNFNDQIIGNEFSNSLVGNDGN...type calcium-binding region Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 MARTTTLPVAQKPLTNNVYIDGILWGGKYYSSSGSSVTRIDYSFWNSTAAS...DTIDGGAGSDTINGGNGNDRLIGRAGSDRLTGGTGNDVLIGGAGNDVLLGGTGADRFLYDTEGAFARADVGQDTISDFNRSQGDKIVLDRTTFTVLSSTSGNSLAANDFAIAGLDILGIPLTGELLNAKIVYNSTNGSLYYNQNGTAVGFGSGGLFATLSNEPTLAASDFIVQA ... ...FDDPYKNKATNPNDWFPEGKDSLIKALDAWAAVANIQFVDAGDNKESATLGFYNLNNADLGDYLFGEFSPPGENGQGIGYFNREALGGNVAGAPGTLNFAVLIHELGH

  15. Glial protein S100B modulates long-term neuronal synaptic plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    NISHIYAMA, HIROSHI; Knöpfel, Thomas; Endo, Shogo; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2002-01-01

    Glial cells are traditionally regarded as elements for structural support and ionic homeostasis, but have recently attracted attention as putative integral elements of the machinery involved in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that calcium-binding protein S100B, which is synthesized in considerable amounts in astrocytes (a major glial cell subtype), modulates long-term synaptic plasticity. Mutant mice devoid of S100B developed normally and had no detectable abnormali...

  16. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  17. Recognition of protein folds via dipolar couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alignment of proteins in dilute liquid crystalline medium gives rise to residual dipolar couplings which provide orientational information of vectors connecting the interacting nuclei. Considering that proteins are mainly composed of regular secondary structures in a finite number of different mutual orientations, main chain dipolar couplings appear sufficient to reveal structural resemblance. Similarity between dipolar couplings measured from a protein and corresponding values computed from a known structure imply homologous structures. For dissimilar structures the agreement between experimental and calculated dipolar couplings remains poor. In this way protein folds can be readily recognized prior to a comprehensive structure determination. This approach has been demonstrated by showing the similarity in fold between the hitherto unknown structure of calerythrin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins from Nereis diversicolor and Branchiostoma lanceolatum with known crystal structures

  18. Recognition of protein folds via dipolar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annila, Arto [VTT Chemical Technology (Finland); Aitio, Helena [University of Helsinki, Institute of Biotechnology (Finland); Thulin, Eva [University of Lund, Department of Physical Chemistry 2 (Sweden); Drakenberg, Torbjoern [VTT Chemical Technology (Finland)

    1999-07-15

    Alignment of proteins in dilute liquid crystalline medium gives rise to residual dipolar couplings which provide orientational information of vectors connecting the interacting nuclei. Considering that proteins are mainly composed of regular secondary structures in a finite number of different mutual orientations, main chain dipolar couplings appear sufficient to reveal structural resemblance. Similarity between dipolar couplings measured from a protein and corresponding values computed from a known structure imply homologous structures. For dissimilar structures the agreement between experimental and calculated dipolar couplings remains poor. In this way protein folds can be readily recognized prior to a comprehensive structure determination. This approach has been demonstrated by showing the similarity in fold between the hitherto unknown structure of calerythrin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins from Nereis diversicolor and Branchiostoma lanceolatum with known crystal structures.

  19. 食管癌中特异表达的人类omega蛋白(Igll3)基因的序列分析及意义%Expression and Structure Analysis of Calcium Binding Protein 1 (Cabin1) in Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李峰; 蒋志华; 闻燕; 吕欢

    2012-01-01

    目的 筛选食管癌中差异表达的基因,进一步了解食管癌发生的分子机制.方法 利用荧光差异显示技术( DD-PCR)从食管癌组织相对癌旁组织中获得差异表达片段,对这些片段进行克隆和序列分析.通过在GenBank中同源性检索,查找差异片段相对应的同源基因.利用定量PCR检测验证该基因表达的差异性.设计引物获得该基因全长.结果 通过DD-PCR得到3个差异片段,分别为人类10号常染色体上的开放阅读框99;人类信号转导和激活转录因子2及人类omega蛋白(Igll3).定量PCR验证的结果表明,Igll3在食管癌组织中的表达量高于癌旁组织.设计引物得到该基因全长,测序表明该基因长为711 bp,编码236aa.结论 Igll3在食管癌组织中异常表达,可能在食管癌发生过程中起着重要的作用.%Objective To further investigate the molecular mechanism of esnphageal earcinogenesis and screen out the genes expressed differentially in esophageal cancer. Methods mRNA differential display (DD-PCR) was employed to search differentially expressed fragments, some of which were cloned and sequenced. For example: Homo sapiens chromosome 10 open reading frame 99 (C10orf99),Homo sapiens signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2),Homo sapiens immunoglobulin lambda -like polypeptide 3 by homology analysis in GenBank, corresponding homologous genes of those fragments were found. The corresponding genes of those differentially expressed fragments were validated by real -time quantitative PCR. Results By DD-PCR, four differentially expressed fragments were obtained, with one corresponding to immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide 3 (Igll3). The result of real-time quantitative PCR showed that the expression level of Igll3 in esophageal cancer tissue was significantly higher than that in normal tissue. The ORF of Igll3 was 711 base pairs long and encoded 236 amino acids. Conclusion The over-expression of Igll3 in esophageal cancer may indicate an important role in esophageal carcinogenesis.

  20. Annexins V and VI: major calcium-dependent atrial secretory granule-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubell, A F; Bester, A J; Thibault, G

    1991-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is stored by atrial myocytes in secretory granules, known as atrial specific granules, and is released from these granules by exocytosis. We have isolated a group of atrial proteins by affinity chromatography that bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner. The two major proteins isolated (32.5 kd and 67 kd) are calcium-binding proteins and have been identified as annexins V and VI by immunoblotting with specific antisera. The calcium dependence of their binding to atrial specific granules has been characterized in vitro and indicates that this interaction takes place at micromolar levels of calcium. In addition, the group of proteins isolated includes another calcium-binding protein of 20 kd, as well as GTP-binding proteins of 22 to 26 kd. Membrane interactions during exocytosis are presumably mediated by the interaction of specific proteins with the granule membrane. The properties of the proteins described here, and their ability to bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner, make them likely candidates in the search for regulatory proteins mediating atrial natriuretic peptide secretion. PMID:1834552

  1. A step toward the prediction of the fluorescence lifetimes of tryptophan residues in proteins based on structural and spectral data.

    OpenAIRE

    Sillen, A.; Díaz, J. F.; Engelborghs, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A method is presented that allows the calculation of the lifetimes of tryptophan residues on the basis of spectral and structural data. It is applied to two different proteins. The calcium binding protein from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor (NSCP) changes its conformation upon binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. NSCP contains three tryptophan residues at position 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The fluorescence lifetimes of W57 are investigated in a mutant in which W4 a...

  2. Identification of a novel matrix protein contained in a protein aggregate associated with collagen in fish otoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohse, Hidekazu; Takagi, Yasuaki; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2008-05-01

    In the biomineralization processes, proteins are thought to control the polymorphism and morphology of the crystals by forming complexes of structural and mineral-associated proteins. To identify such proteins, we have searched for proteins that may form high-molecular-weight (HMW) aggregates in the matrix of fish otoliths that have aragonite and vaterite as their crystal polymorphs. By screening a cDNA library of the trout inner ear using an antiserum raised against whole otolith matrix, a novel protein, named otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64), was identified. The protein was found to have a molecular mass of 64 kDa, and to contain two tandem repeats and a Glu-rich region. The structure of the protein and that of its DNA are similar to those of starmaker, a protein involved in the polymorphism control in the zebrafish otoliths [Söllner C, Burghammer M, Busch-Nentwich E, Berger J, Schwarz H, Riekel C & Nicolson T (2003) Science302, 282-286]. (45)Ca overlay analysis revealed that the Glu-rich region has calcium-binding activity. Combined analysis by western blotting and deglycosylation suggested that OMM-64 is present in an HMW aggregate with heparan sulfate chains. Histological observations revealed that OMM-64 is expressed specifically in otolith matrix-producing cells and deposited onto the otolith. Moreover, the HMW aggregate binds to the inner ear-specific short-chain collagen otolin-1, and the resulting complex forms ring-like structures in the otolith matrix. Overall, OMM-64, by forming a calcium-binding aggregate that binds to otolin-1 and forming matrix protein architectures, may be involved in the control of crystal morphology during otolith biomineralization. PMID:18410381

  3. Conformational and thermodynamic properties of peptide binding to the human S100P protein

    OpenAIRE

    Gribenko, Alexey V.; Guzmán-Casado, Mercedes; Lopez, Maria M.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2002-01-01

    S100P is a member of the S100 subfamily of calcium-binding proteins that are believed to be associated with various diseases, and in particular deregulation of S100P expression has been documented for prostate and breast cancer. Previously, we characterized the effects of metal binding on the conformational properties of S100P and proposed that S100P could function as a Ca2+ conformational switch. In this study we used fluorescence and CD spectroscopies and isothermal titration calorimetry to...

  4. Beneficial Immune Effects of Myeloid-Related Proteins in Kidney Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekers, N V; Bajema, I M; Mallat, M J K; Petersen, B; Anholts, J D H; Swings, G M J S; van Miert, P P M C; Kerkhoff, C; Roth, J; Popp, D; van Groningen, M C; Baeten, D; Goemaere, N; Kraaij, M D; Zandbergen, M; Heidt, S; van Kooten, C; de Fijter, J W; Claas, F H J; Eikmans, M

    2016-05-01

    Acute rejection is a risk factor for inferior long-term kidney transplant survival. Although T cell immunity is considered the main effector in clinical acute rejection, the role of myeloid cells is less clear. Expression of S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) and S100A9 was evaluated in 303 biopsies before and after transplantation from 190 patients. In two independent cohorts of patients with acute rejection (n = 98 and n = 11; mostly cellular rejections), high expression of S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) and A9 (S100A9) was related to improved graft outcome. Mechanisms of action of the S100 molecules were investigated. In the graft and peripheral blood cells, S100A8 and S100A9 expression correlated with myeloid-derived suppressor markers. In line with this finding, recombinant S100A8 and S100A9 proteins inhibited maturation and the allogeneic T cell stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells. S100A9 enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species by macrophages, which suppressed T cell activity at low concentrations in the form of hydrogen peroxide. Intragraft S100A8 and S100A9 expression linked to reduced expression of T cell immunity and tissue injury markers and higher expression of immune regulatory molecules. This study sheds new light on the importance of myeloid cell subsets in directing the outcome of T cell-mediated acute rejection. PMID:26607974

  5. Crystal structure of tetranectin, a trimeric plasminogen-binding protein with an alpha-helical coiled coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B B; Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H;

    1997-01-01

    to a long alpha-helix. Tetranectin has been classified in a distinct group of the C-type lectin superfamily but has structural similarity to the proteins in the group of collectins. Tetranectin has three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Two of these are conserved in the C-type lectin superfamily......, whereas the third is present only in long-form CRDs. Tetranectin represents the first structure of a long-form CRD with intact calcium-binding sites. In tetranectin, the third disulfide bridge tethers the CRD to the long helix in the coiled coil. The trimerization of tetranectin as well as the fixation of...

  6. Serca1 Truncated Proteins Unable to Pump Calcium Reduce the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Concentration and Induce Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chami, Mounia; Gozuacik, Devrim; Lagorce, David; Brini, Marisa; Falson, Pierre; Peaucellier, Gérard; Pinton, Paolo; Lecoeur, Hervé; Gougeon, Marie-Lyse; le Maire, Marc; Rizzuto, Rosario; Bréchot, Christian; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia

    2001-01-01

    By pumping calcium from the cytosol to the ER, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in the control of calcium signaling. We describe two SERCA1 splice variants (S1Ts) characterized by exon 4 and/or exon 11 splicing, encoding COOH terminally truncated proteins, having only one of the seven calcium-binding residues, and thus unable to pump calcium. As shown by semiquantitative RT-PCR, S1T transcripts are differentially expressed in several adult and fetal human...

  7. Electrostatic interactions in protein solution--a comparison between Poisson-Boltzmann and Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, M; Svensson, B; Jönsson, B; Woodward, C E

    1991-09-01

    The accuracy of the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) approximation and its linearized version is investigated by comparison to results obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. The dependence of the calcium binding constant of the protein calbindin as a function of salt concentration and mutation is used as a test case. The protein is modeled as a collection of charged and neutral spheres immersed in the electrolyte solution. The PB equation is solved using a finite difference technique on a grid in a spherical polar coordinate system, which is the preferred choice for a globular protein like calbindin. Both MC and PB give quantitative agreement with experimental results. The linearized PB equation is almost as accurate, but it becomes less reliable in systems with divalent ions. However, the linearized PB equation fails to describe the concentration profiles for cations and anions outside the protein even in a 1:1 salt solution. PMID:1790295

  8. Biochemical analysis of a Ca2+-dependent membrane-membrane interaction mediated by the sea urchin yolk granule protein, toposome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Michael; Perera, Aruni; Robinson, John J

    2006-08-01

    Toposome, a high molecular mass protein, is an abundant component of the yolk granule in the sea urchin egg and embryo. Toposome is composed of a 160 kDa polypeptide that is proteolytically processed into smaller species of 120 and 90 kDa during embryonic development. The exact biological function of toposome during early development is unknown. In this study we have examined calcium binding to toposome and the effect of this binding on the secondary and tertiary structural characteristics of the purified protein. Initially, we used equilibrium dialysis to quantify calcium binding to toposome. Monophasic binding of up to 600 M of calcium per mole of protein was detected with an intrinsic dissociation constant (calcium) of 240 microm. Increasing concentrations of calcium resulted in an increase in alpha helical content from 3.0 to 22.0%, which occurred with an apparent dissociation constant (calcium) of 25 microm. In parallel experiments, toposome binding to liposomes required similar concentrations of calcium; an apparent dissociation constant (calcium) of 25 microm was recorded. Endogenous tryptophan fluorescence measurements, both in the presence and absence of liposomes, demonstrated that the tertiary structure is sensitive to increasing concentrations of calcium with an apparent dissociation constant (calcium) of 240 microm. Toposome-driven, liposome aggregation assays revealed a similar calcium requirement. Collectively, these results define a two-step model for calcium modulation of toposome structure and function. PMID:16872453

  9. Ca2+ Binding Protein S100A1 Competes with Calmodulin and PIP2 for Binding Site on the C-Terminus of the TPRV1 Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryčová, Lenka; Holendová, Blanka; Lánský, Zdeněk; Bumba, Ladislav; Jirků, Michaela; Boušová, Kristýna; Teisinger, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2015), s. 386-392. ISSN 1948-7193 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1159; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : TRPV1 * vanilloid receptor * calmodulin * S100A1 * calcium binding protein * surface plasmon resonance * fluorescence anisotropy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.362, year: 2014

  10. Finding protein sites using machine learning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Leonardo Bobadilla Molina

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of protein three-dimensional (3D structures determined by x-ray and NMR technologies as well as structures predicted by computational methods results in the need for automated methods to provide inital annotations. We have developed a new method for recognizing sites in three-dimensional protein structures. Our method is based on a previosly reported algorithm for creating descriptions of protein microenviroments using physical and chemical properties at multiple levels of detail. The recognition method takes three inputs: 1. A set of control nonsites that share some structural or functional role. 2. A set of control nonsites that lack this role. 3. A single query site. A support vector machine classifier is built using feature vectors where each component represents a property in a given volume. Validation against an independent test set shows that this recognition approach has high sensitivity and specificity. We also describe the results of scanning four calcium binding proteins (with the calcium removed using a three dimensional grid of probe points at 1.25 angstrom spacing. The system finds the sites in the proteins giving points at or near the blinding sites. Our results show that property based descriptions along with support vector machines can be used for recognizing protein sites in unannotated structures.

  11. A novel antilithiatic protein from Tribulus terrestris having cytoprotective potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anshu; Tandon, Simran; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2012-08-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals to kidney cells is a key event in kidney stones associated with marked hyperoxaluria. As the propensity of stone recurrence and persistent side effects are not altered by surgical techniques available, phytotherapeutic agents could be useful as an adjuvant therapy. The present study is aimed at examining the antilithiatic potency of the protein biomolecules of Tribulus terrestris, a plant which is a common constituent of herbal marketed preparations to treat urolithiasis. Various biochemical methods with mass spectrometry were used to purify and characterize the purified protein. The protective potency of the protein was tested on the oxalate induced injury on renal epithelial cell lines (NRK 52E). An antilithiatic protein having molecular weight of ~ 60kDa was purified. This purified protein showed similarities with Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7 (CCD7) of Arabidopsis thaliana after matching peptide mass fingerprints in MASCOT search engine. An EF hand domain was identified in CCD7 by SCAN PROSITE. Presence of an EF hand domain, a characteristic feature of calcium binding proteins and a role in the synthesis of retinol which is transported by retinol binding protein, a protein found in kidney stone matrix; of CCD7 support the role of TTP as an antilithiatic protein. The protective potency of TTP on NRK 52E was quite comparable to the aqueous extract of cystone. Our findings suggest that this purified protein biomolecule from Tribulus terrestris could open new vista in medical management of urolithiasis. PMID:22702898

  12. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na+ and Ca2+ for [CaCl2] ranging from 10−8 to 10−2 M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant

  13. Effects of ATP on calcium binding to synaptic plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of labeled norepinephrine from preloaded synaptosomes requires the presence of potassium and calcium. ATP-dependent binding of calcium to synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) may provide a means of maintaining the cation in a readily available pool for the triggering of transmitter release. A high Ca-binding capacity was demonstrated in SPM. The Km for calcium is 5.5 X 10(-5) M. The dependence of the system on the gamma phosphate of ATP was demonstrated by an increase in Ca-binding with increasing ATP concentration and by competitive inhibition of binding by ADP and AMP. Magnesium is also required for ATP-dependent Ca-binding. The optimum pH for the Ca binding was 7.0. Pretreatment of SPM with phospholipase A2 lowered the binding capacity. Sulfhydryl groups are also critical for ATP-dependent Ca binding to occur. A model for ATP-dependent Ca-binding was proposed

  14. EDTA-insoluble, calcium-binding proteoglycan in bovine bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Lester, G. E.; Caterson, B.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A calcium ion precipitable, trypsin-generated proteoglycan fragment has been isolated from the demineralized, EDTA-insoluble matrices of bone. The demineralized matrix was completely digested with trypsin, increasing concentrations of CaCl2 were added to the supernatant, and the resulting precipitates were analyzed. The amount of precipitate gradually increased with higher concentrations of calcium and was reversibly solubilized by EDTA. After molecular sieve and anion exchange chromatography, a proteoglycan-containing peak was obtained. Immunochemical analysis showed that this peak contained chondroitin 4-sulfate and possibly keratan sulfate. Amino acid analysis showed that this proteoglycan contained high amounts of aspartic acid/asparagine (Asx), serine (Ser), glutamic acid/glutamine (Glx), proline (Pro), and glycine (Gly); however, it contained little leucine (Leu) which suggests that it is not a member of the leucine-rich small proteoglycan family. In addition, significant amounts of phosphoserine (P-Ser) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) were identified in hydrolysates of this fraction. A single band (M(r) 59 kDa) was obtained on SDS-PAGE that stained with Stains-all but not with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250. If bone powder was trypsinized prior to demineralization, this proteoglycan-containing fraction was not liberated. Collectively, these results indicate that a proteoglycan occurs in the demineralized matrix that is precipitated with CaCl2 and is closely associated with both mineral and collagen matrices. Such a molecule might facilitate the structural network for the induction of mineralization in bone.

  15. Protein-specific localization of a rhodamine-based calcium-sensor in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Marcel; Porth, Isabel; Hauke, Sebastian; Braun, Felix; Herten, Dirk-Peter; Wombacher, Richard

    2016-06-28

    A small synthetic calcium sensor that can be site-specifically coupled to proteins in living cells by utilizing the bio-orthogonal HaloTag labeling strategy is presented. We synthesized an iodo-derivatized BAPTA chelator with a tetramethyl rhodamine fluorophore that allows further modification by Sonogashira cross-coupling. The presented calcium sensitive dye shows a 200-fold increase in fluorescence upon calcium binding. The derivatization with an aliphatic linker bearing a terminal haloalkane-function by Sonogashira cross-coupling allows the localization of the calcium sensor to Halo fusion proteins which we successfully demonstrate in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The herein reported highly sensitive tetramethyl rhodamine based calcium indicator, which can be selectively localized to proteins, is a powerful tool to determine changes in calcium levels inside living cells with spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:27072883

  16. Differential expression of calcium-related genes in gastric cancer cells transfected with cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Luo, Guanhong; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Shi, Yongquan; Zhai, Huihong; Sun, Shiren; Jin, Haifeng; Liu, Zhenxiong; Zhang, Faming; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yunping; Chen, Xiong; Zhang, Hongbo; Guo, Xuegang; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming

    2007-06-01

    The prion protein (PrPC) has a primary role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which causes prion disorders partially due to Ca2+ dysregulation. In our previous work, we found that overexpressed PrPC in gastric cancer was involved in apoptosis, cell proliferation, and metastasis of gastric cancer. To better understand how PrPC acts in gastric cancer, a human microarray was performed to select differentially regulated genes that correlate with the biological function of PrPC. The microarray data were analyzed and revealed 3798 genes whose expression increased at least 2-fold in gastric cancer cells transfected with PrPC. These genes encode proteins involved in several aspects of cell biology, among which, we specially detected molecules related to calcium, especially the S100 calcium-binding proteins, and found that PrPC upregulates S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P but downregulates CacyBP in gastric cancer cells. We also found that intracellular Ca2+ levels in cells transfected with PrPC increased, whereas these levels decreased in knockdowns of these cells. Taken together, PrPC might increase intracellular Ca2+, partially through calcium-binding proteins, or PrPC might upregulate the expression of S100 proteins, partially through stimulating the intracellular calcium level in gastric cancer. Though the underlying mechanisms need further exploration, this study provides a new insight into the role of PrPC in gastric cancer and enriches our knowledge of prion protein. PMID:17612632

  17. Role of S100 Proteins in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Moravkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The family of S100 proteins represents 25 relatively small (9–13 kD calcium binding proteins. These proteins possess a broad spectrum of important intracellular and extracellular functions. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men (after lung and prostate cancer and the second most frequent cancer in women (after breast cancer worldwide. S100 proteins are involved in the colorectal carcinogenesis through different mechanisms: they enable proliferation, invasion, and migration of the tumour cells; furthermore, S100 proteins increase angiogenesis and activate NF-κβ signaling pathway, which plays a key role in the molecular pathogenesis especially of colitis-associated carcinoma. The expression of S100 proteins in the cancerous tissue and serum levels of S100 proteins might be used as a precise diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with suspected or already diagnosed colorectal neoplasia. Possibly, in the future, S100 proteins will be a therapeutic target for tailored anticancer therapy.

  18. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH3) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally 13C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally 13C-labeling the rest. A 2D [13C-1H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  19. A protein involved in the assembly of an extracellular calcium storage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-04-23

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBank data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:20150428

  20. Protein expression profile in the differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells into Schwann cell-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade,increasing evidence suggested that bone marrow stromal cells(MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into neural lineages.Many studies have reported that MSCs showed morphological changes and expressed a limited number of neural proteins under experimental conditions.However,no proteomic studies on MSCs differentiated into Schwann cell-like cells have been reported.In this study,we isolated MSCs from adult Sprague-Dawley rat femur and tibia bone marrows and induced the cells in vitro under specific conditions.By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis(2-DE),we compared the protein profiles of MSCs before and after induced differentiation.We obtained 792 protein spots in the protein profile by 2-DE,and found that 74 spots changed significantly before and after the differentiation using PDQuest software,with 43 up-regulated and 31 down-regulated.We analyzed these 74 spots by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry(MALDI-TOF-MS) and by database searching,and found that they could be grouped into various classes,including cytoskeleton and structure proteins,growth factors,metabolic proteins,chaperone proteins,receptor proteins,cell cycle proteins,calcium binding proteins,and other proteins.These proteins also include neural and glial proteins,such as BDNF,CNTF and GFAP.The results may provide valuable proteomic information about the differentiation of MSCs into Schwann cell-like cells.

  1. Protein expression analysis of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC development. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in protein expression between CRC and the surrounding nontumorous colonic tissues in the mice that received azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS using a proteomic analysis. Materials and Methods: Male ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight, followed by 2% (w/v DSS in their drinking water for seven days, starting one week after the AOM injection. Colonic adenocarcinoma developed after 20 weeks and a proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraflex TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was conducted in the cancerous and nontumorous tissue specimens. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues in comparison to the nontumorous tissues. There were five markedly increased proteins (beta-tropomyosin, tropomyosin 1 alpha isoform b, S100 calcium binding protein A9, and an unknown protein and 16 markedly decreased proteins (Car1 proteins, selenium-binding protein 1, HMG-CoA synthase, thioredoxin 1, 1 Cys peroxiredoxin protein 2, Fcgbp protein, Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit Va, ETHE1 protein, and 7 unknown proteins. Conclusions: There were 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues of the mice that received AOM and DSS. Their functions include metabolism, the antioxidant system, oxidative stress, mucin production, and inflammation. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis and the establishment of novel therapies and preventative strategies to treat carcinogenesis in the inflamed colon.

  2. Imidazole-assisted catalysis of luminescence reaction in blue fluorescent protein from the photoprotein aequorin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue fluorescent protein from the calcium-binding photoprotein aequorin (BFP-aq) is a dissociable complex of Ca2+-bound apoaequorin and coelenteramide, and is identified as a luciferase that catalyzes the oxidation of coelenterazine by molecular oxygen to emit light. Based on the chemical luminescence of coelenterazine oxidation by an acid-base mechanism, we found that the luminescence activity of BFP-aq was stimulated by imidazole at concentrations of 30-300 mM with coelenterazine and its analogues. The kinetic analyses indicate that imidazole has no effect on the binding affinity of coelenterazine to BFP-aq and may act as a catalytic base, accepting a proton from the -NH- group of coelenterazine and stimulating luminescence activity

  3. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Chary, K.V.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-03-15

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH{sub 3}) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally {sup 13}C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally {sup 13}C-labeling the rest. A 2D [{sup 13}C-{sup 1}H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH{sub 3} groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing of Protein-Coding and Long Non-protein-Coding RNAs in Two Types of Exosomes Derived from Human Whole Saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuko; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Yanoshita, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles containing microRNAs and mRNAs that are produced by various types of cells. We previously used ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate two types of human salivary exosomes (exosomes I, II) that are different in size and proteomes. We showed that salivary exosomes contain large repertoires of small RNAs. However, precise information regarding long RNAs in salivary exosomes has not been fully determined. In this study, we investigated the compositions of protein-coding RNAs (pcRNAs) and long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) of exosome I, exosome II and whole saliva (WS) by next-generation sequencing technology. Although 11% of all RNAs were commonly detected among the three samples, the compositions of reads mapping to known RNAs were similar. The most abundant pcRNA is ribosomal RNA protein, and pcRNAs of some salivary proteins such as S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (protein S100-A8) were present in salivary exosomes. Interestingly, lncRNAs of pseudogenes (presumably, processed pseudogenes) were abundant in exosome I, exosome II and WS. Translationally controlled tumor protein gene, which plays an important role in cell proliferation, cell death and immune responses, was highly expressed as pcRNA and pseudogenes in salivary exosomes. Our results show that salivary exosomes contain various types of RNAs such as pseudogenes and small RNAs, and may mediate intercellular communication by transferring these RNAs to target cells as gene expression regulators. PMID:27582331

  5. [Regulatory proteins of vertebrate eye tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, M S; Grigorian, E N; Iamskova, V P; Boguslavskiĭ, D V; Iamskov, I A

    2003-01-01

    In our work the new proteins likely belonged to the microenvironment of pigmented epithelium cells and retinal neurons in mammalian eye were studied. We attempted to understand the role of these proteins in the maintenance of normal morphological and functional state of these eye tissues. Earlier for the first time we identified the adhesion molecules with physico-chemical and biological properties much different from other known cell adhesion molecules of bovine eye. Probably, they represent one family of low molecular weigh, highly glicosylated proteins, that express biological activity in extremely low doses--10(-10) mg/ml. The homogeneity of studying proteins is confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. It is shown also that these proteins are N-glycosylated, because they contain mannose and N-acetilglucosamine residues. They demonstrate as well a high calcium-binding activity, with Kd corresponded to 10(-4)-10(-6) mg/ml. For a study of the biological effect of these glycoproteins in extremely low doses, a new experimental model was proposed and developed. It was the cultivation in vitro of the posterior part of the eye obtained from the newt Pleurodeles waltl. In short-time culture system it was demonstrated that the studied glycoproteins could stabilize pigment epithelium cell differentiation and cellular interactions in the neural retina in vitro. In addition, glycoproteins, obtained from the pigmented epithelium of bovine eye could decrease the rate of bipolar cell apoptosis in the neural retina. Therefore, the novel adhesion glycoproteins, expressing their biological activity in extremely low doses, pretend to be the regulatory molecules with vivid gomeostatic effects necessary for the delicate adjustment of cell behavior action and function in sensory tissues. PMID:12881976

  6. Identification of the secreted watery saliva proteins of the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) by transcriptome and Shotgun LC-MS/MS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Hanyu; Zhao, Jing; Hua, Hongxia; He, Yueping

    2016-06-01

    The rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), a major rice insect pest in Asia, is a vascular bundle-feeder that ejects gelling and watery saliva during the feeding process. Although major proteins in the salivary glands of N. lugens have been identified using 2D PAGE, very little is known about the secreted saliva of this insect. In this study, we identified the major proteins in the secreted watery saliva of N. lugens, via collecting from a sucrose diet that adult planthoppers had fed upon through a membrane of stretched parafilm, and using shotgun LC-MS/MS analysis with reference to transcriptome database of salivary glands of N. lugens. A total of 107 proteins were identified in the watery saliva of N. lugens, over 80% of which showed significant similarity to known proteins. When annotated by the Blast2GO suite, 29 proteins had catalytic activity and 24 proteins were binding proteins. The saliva enzymes included oxidoreductases, hydrolases, phosphatases, peptidases (proteases), kinases, transferases, and lyases. Binding proteins in N. lugens watery saliva included ATP-binding, lipophorin, calcium-binding, actin-binding and DNA-, RNA-, and chromatin-binding proteins. Other non-enzymatic proteins, such as ubiquitins, heat shock proteins, ribosomal proteins, and immunoglobulin proteins were also found in N. lugens watery saliva. This is the first study to identify, characterize and list the proteins in watery saliva of N. lugens, which might be involved in planthopper-rice interactions. PMID:27080912

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of calexcitin from Loligo pealei: a neuronal protein implicated in learning and memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant squid calexcitin has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in the orthorhombic space group P212121. The neuronal protein calexcitin from the long-finned squid Loligo pealei has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Calexcitin is a 22 kDa calcium-binding protein that becomes up-regulated in invertebrates following Pavlovian conditioning and is likely to be involved in signal transduction events associated with learning and memory. Recombinant squid calexcitin has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in the orthorhombic space group P212121. The unit-cell parameters of a = 46.6, b = 69.2, c = 134.8 Å suggest that the crystals contain two monomers per asymmetric unit and have a solvent content of 49%. This crystal form diffracts X-rays to at least 1.8 Å resolution and yields data of high quality using synchrotron radiation

  8. Classification and evolution of EF-hand proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, H.; Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-five distinct subfamilies of EF-hand proteins have been identified. They contain from two to eight EF-hands that are recognizable by amino acid sequence as being statistically similar to other EF-hand domains. All proteins within one subfamily are congruent to one another, i.e. the dendrogram computed from one of the EF-hand domains is similar, within statistical error, to the dendrogram computed from another(s) domain. Thirteen subfamilies--including Calmodulin, Troponin C, Essential light chain, Regulatory light chain--referred to collectively as CTER, are congruent with one another. They appear to have evolved from a single ur-domain by two cycles of gene duplication and fusion. The subfamilies of CTER subsequently evolved by gene duplications and speciations. The remaining 32 subfamilies do not show such general patterns of congruence; however, some--such as S100, intestinal calcium binding protein (calbindin 9 kd), and trichohylin--do not form congruent clusters of subfamilies. Nearly all of the domains 1, 3, 5, and 7 are most similar to other ODD domains. Correspondingly the EVEN numbered domains of all 45 subfamilies most closely resemble EVEN domains of other subfamilies. Many sequence and chemical characteristics do not show systemic trends by subfamily or species of host organisms; such homoplasy is widespread. Eighteen of the subfamilies are heterochimeric; in addition to multiple EF-hands they contain domains of other evolutionary origins.

  9. Taxonomy and conformational analysis of loops in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, C S; Kneller, D G; Langridge, R; Cohen, F E

    1992-04-01

    We propose a general classification scheme for loops, aperiodic segments of protein structure. In an effort to avoid the geometric complexity created by non-repeating phi psi angles, a morphologic definition that focuses upon the linearity and planarity of loops is utilized. Out of 432 loops (4 to 20 residues in length) extracted from 67 proteins, 205 are classified as linear (straps), 133 as non-linear and planar (omegas), and 86 as non-linear and non-planar (zetas). The remaining 8 are classified as compound loops because they contain a combination of strap, omega, and zeta morphologies. We introduce a structural alphabet as a shorthand notation for describing local conformation. The symbols of this alphabet are based on the virtual dihedral angle joining four consecutive alpha carbons. The notation is used to provide a compact description of loop motifs in phosphate binding and calcium binding proteins. Since similar loop conformations form similar "words", the structural sequence facilitates the search for common structural motifs in a family of loops. Contrary to the view of loops as "random coils", we find loops to have positional preferences for amino acid residues analogous to those previously described for beta-turns. PMID:1569550

  10. Serotonin binding in vitro by releasable proteins from human blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the substances released from human blood platelets are serotonin and various proteins. It was hypothesized that one of these proteins binds serotonin and that serotonin might be important to the protein's function or that the protein might be important to serotonin's function. Two platelet-specific proteins, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and β-thromboglobulin (βTG) were found to bind serotonin in vitro. Endogenous PF4 was isolated by serotonin-affinity chromatography and was identified by radioimmunoassay. Purified [125I] -PF4 and native PF4 bound to and eluted from a serotonin-affinity column similarly. Ultrafiltration of the homologous protein, βTG, with [14C]-serotonin demonstrated binding of about 8 moles serotonin per mole tetrameric βTG with a dissociation constant of about 4 X 10(sup-8) M. Equilibrium dialysis of PF4 with radiolabelled serotonin was attempted, but no binding constant values were obtained because serotonin apparently bound to the dialysis membrane. Since EDTA was one of the two agents that eluted PF4 from the serotonin-affinity gel, calcium binding by PF4 was investigated by equilibrium dialysis. Evidence was obtained for positively cooperative binding of calcium ions by PF4. It is concluded that PF4 and βTG bind serotonin in vitro, that they may also bind in vivo when platelets undergo release, and that the functions of serotonin, PF4 and βTG may be mediated in part by serotonin-protein associations

  11. Pathophysiological mechanism and therapeutic role of S100 proteins in cardiac failure: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbalzano, Egidio; Mandraffino, Giuseppe; Casciaro, Marco; Quartuccio, Sebastiano; Saitta, Antonino; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2016-09-01

    S100 proteins are a family of highly acidic calcium-binding proteins involved in calcium handling in many tissues and organs. Some of these proteins are highly expressed in cardiac tissue, and an impairment of some specific S100 proteins has been related to heart failure. To check this hypothesis, we decided to review the literature since 2008 until May 2015. According to the studies collected, recovering S100A1 levels may enhance contractile/relaxing performance in heart failure, reverse negative force-frequency relationship, improve contractile reserve, reverse diastolic dysfunction and protect against pro-arrhythmic reductions of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium. The safety profile of gene therapy was also confirmed. Increased S100B protein levels were related to a worse outcome in chronic heart failure. S100A8/A9 complex plasma levels, as well as other inflammatory biomarkers, were significantly higher in chronic heart failure patients. S100A2 seems to increase both contractile and relaxation performance in animal cardiomyocytes. Otherwise, S100A6 cardiac expression seems to have no effects on contractility. S100A4 KO mice showed reduced cardiac interstitial fibrosis. Data collected encourage a potential prospective application in human. These proteins could be exploited as biomarkers in stadiation and prognosis of chronic heart failure, as well as therapeutic target to rescue failing heart. Registration details The study protocol has been registered in PROSPERO ( http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/ ) under registration number CRD42015027932. PMID:26833319

  12. Effect of parasitism on plasma sex-specific proteins in Cyphocarax gilbert (Teleost, Curimatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, L Gomes; Azevedo, J S; Silva-Neto, M A; Lima, N R Wille; Dansa-Petretski, M

    2005-06-01

    Cyphocarax gilbert (Szidat, L., 1948) is a fish commonly found in coastal drainage of eastern Brazil. This fish is sometimes caught with signs of infection by the crustacean Riggia paranensis, a haematophagous parasite. A remarkable feature of infected fish is that they lack gonads. In this paper we have analysed the frequency of parasitism, the gonadal development of non-infected fish and the profile of plasma proteins in both infected and non-infected specimens. Two reproductive periods/year were observed, beginning in February and August. On average, 40% of fish were infected, in the Itabapoana River (Brazil). Sex-specific proteins were identified by electrophoresis. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that a 143 kDa female-specific glycolipoprotein (FSP) is a calcium-binding phosphoprotein. FSP was isolated through ultracentrifugation and SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the native protein is composed of three polypeptides of 143, 100 and 70 kDa. Both FSP and a 33 kDa male-specific protein (MSP) are absent from infected fish plasma. FSP levels in female plasma changes with the developmental stage of gonads. Altogether these data suggest that the FSP corresponds to fish vitellogenin. Furthermore, the absence of the above-mentioned proteins in infected fish suggests that R. paranensis might interfere with the regular hormonal process of fish vitellogenesis. PMID:15977902

  13. Structural domains of vault proteins: a role for the coiled coil domain in vault assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zon, Arend; Mossink, Marieke H; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-03-01

    Vaults consist of multiple copies of three proteins (MVP, VPARP, and TEP1) and several untranslated RNAs. The function of vaults is unknown but the typical and evolutionary conserved structure indicates a role in intracellular transport. Although all vault components have been identified and characterized, not much is known about vault protein assembly. In this study we identified and analyzed structural domains involved in vault assembly with emphasis on protein-protein interactions. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we demonstrate within MVP an intramolecular binding site and show that MVP molecules interact with each other via their coiled coil domain. We show that purified MVP is able to bind calcium, most likely at calcium-binding EF-hands. No interactions could be detected between TEP1 and other vault proteins. However, the N-terminal half of MVP binds to a specific domain in the C-terminus of VPARP. Furthermore, VPARP contains amino acid stretches mediating intramolecular binding. PMID:11855821

  14. SERCA1 truncated proteins unable to pump calcium reduce the endoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration and induce apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, M; Gozuacik, D; Lagorce, D; Brini, M; Falson, P; Peaucellier, G; Pinton, P; Lecoeur, H; Gougeon, M L; le Maire, M; Rizzuto, R; Bréchot, C; Paterlini-Bréchot, P

    2001-06-11

    By pumping calcium from the cytosol to the ER, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in the control of calcium signaling. We describe two SERCA1 splice variants (S1Ts) characterized by exon 4 and/or exon 11 splicing, encoding COOH terminally truncated proteins, having only one of the seven calcium-binding residues, and thus unable to pump calcium. As shown by semiquantitative RT-PCR, S1T transcripts are differentially expressed in several adult and fetal human tissues, but not in skeletal muscle and heart. S1T proteins expression was detected by Western blot in nontransfected cell lines. In transiently transfected cells, S1T homodimers were revealed by Western blot using mildly denaturing conditions. S1T proteins were shown, by confocal scanning microscopy, to colocalize with endogenous SERCA2b into the ER membrane. Using ER-targeted aequorin (erAEQ), we have found that S1T proteins reduce ER calcium and reverse elevation of ER calcium loading induced by SERCA1 and SERCA2b. Our results also show that SERCA1 variants increase ER calcium leakage and are consistent with the hypothesis of a cation channel formed by S1T homodimers. Finally, when overexpressed in liver-derived cells, S1T proteins significantly induce apoptosis. These data reveal a further mechanism modulating Ca(2+) accumulation into the ER of nonmuscle cells and highlight the relevance of S1T proteins to the control of apoptosis. PMID:11402072

  15. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  16. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1. PMID:26281765

  17. Quantitative analysis of differentially expressed saliva proteins in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Nawei; Zhang, Zhenyu [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Feng, Shan [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Wang, Qingtao [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Malamud, Daniel [NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Deng, Haiteng, E-mail: dht@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-04-24

    Highlights: ► A high-throughput method for profiling and quantification of the differentially expressed proteins in saliva samples was developed. ► Identified that DMBT1, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and alpha defensin were up-regulated in saliva from HIV-1 seropositive patients. ► Established analytical strategies are translatable to the clinical setting. -- Abstract: In the present study, we have established a new methodology to analyze saliva proteins from HIV-1-seropositive patients before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and seronegative controls. A total of 593 and 601 proteins were identified in the pooled saliva samples from 5 HIV-1 subjects and 5 controls, respectively. Forty-one proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed salivary proteins showed an increase of antimicrobial proteins and decrease of protease inhibitors upon HIV-1 infection. To validate some of these differentially expressed proteins, a high-throughput quantitation method was established to determine concentrations of 10 salivary proteins in 40 individual saliva samples from 20 seropositive patients before HAART and 20 seronegative subjects. This method was based on limited protein separation within the zone of the stacking gel of the 1D SDS PAGE and using isotope-coded synthetic peptides as internal standards. The results demonstrated that a combination of protein profiling and targeted quantitation is an efficient method to identify and validate differentially expressed salivary proteins. Expression levels of members of the calcium-binding S100 protein family and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) were up-regulated while that of Mucin 5B was down-regulated in HIV-1 seropositive saliva samples, which may provide new perspectives for monitoring HIV-infection and understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 infectivity.

  18. Quantitative analysis of differentially expressed saliva proteins in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A high-throughput method for profiling and quantification of the differentially expressed proteins in saliva samples was developed. ► Identified that DMBT1, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and alpha defensin were up-regulated in saliva from HIV-1 seropositive patients. ► Established analytical strategies are translatable to the clinical setting. -- Abstract: In the present study, we have established a new methodology to analyze saliva proteins from HIV-1-seropositive patients before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and seronegative controls. A total of 593 and 601 proteins were identified in the pooled saliva samples from 5 HIV-1 subjects and 5 controls, respectively. Forty-one proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed salivary proteins showed an increase of antimicrobial proteins and decrease of protease inhibitors upon HIV-1 infection. To validate some of these differentially expressed proteins, a high-throughput quantitation method was established to determine concentrations of 10 salivary proteins in 40 individual saliva samples from 20 seropositive patients before HAART and 20 seronegative subjects. This method was based on limited protein separation within the zone of the stacking gel of the 1D SDS PAGE and using isotope-coded synthetic peptides as internal standards. The results demonstrated that a combination of protein profiling and targeted quantitation is an efficient method to identify and validate differentially expressed salivary proteins. Expression levels of members of the calcium-binding S100 protein family and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) were up-regulated while that of Mucin 5B was down-regulated in HIV-1 seropositive saliva samples, which may provide new perspectives for monitoring HIV-infection and understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 infectivity

  19. Proteome-wide Identification of Novel Ceramide-binding Proteins by Yeast Surface cDNA Display and Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Ha, Kevin; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Although the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide is an important cell signaling molecule, relatively few direct ceramide-interacting proteins are known. We used an approach combining yeast surface cDNA display and deep sequencing technology to identify novel proteins binding directly to ceramide. We identified 234 candidate ceramide-binding protein fragments and validated binding for 20. Most (17) bound selectively to ceramide, although a few (3) bound to other lipids as well. Several novel ceramide-binding domains were discovered, including the EF-hand calcium-binding motif, the heat shock chaperonin-binding motif STI1, the SCP2 sterol-binding domain, and the tetratricopeptide repeat region motif. Interestingly, four of the verified ceramide-binding proteins (HPCA, HPCAL1, NCS1, and VSNL1) and an additional three candidate ceramide-binding proteins (NCALD, HPCAL4, and KCNIP3) belong to the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF hand-containing proteins. We used mutagenesis to map the ceramide-binding site in HPCA and to create a mutant HPCA that does not bind to ceramide. We demonstrated selective binding to ceramide by mammalian cell-produced wild type but not mutant HPCA. Intriguingly, we also identified a fragment from prostaglandin D2synthase that binds preferentially to ceramide 1-phosphate. The wide variety of proteins and domains capable of binding to ceramide suggests that many of the signaling functions of ceramide may be regulated by direct binding to these proteins. Based on the deep sequencing data, we estimate that our yeast surface cDNA display library covers ∼60% of the human proteome and our selection/deep sequencing protocol can identify target-interacting protein fragments that are present at extremely low frequency in the starting library. Thus, the yeast surface cDNA display/deep sequencing approach is a rapid, comprehensive, and flexible method for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, particularly for the study of non-protein ligands. PMID

  20. Hepatitis B virus-induced calreticulin protein is involved in IFN resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Fanpeng; Liu, Shi; Wu, Jianguo; Ren, Wendan; Zhu, Ying

    2012-07-01

    IFN-α is a widely used treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and IFN resistance caused by viral and/or host factors is currently a challenging clinical problem. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying IFN immunotherapy in the treatment of viral infection would be very beneficial clinically and is of immense clinical importance. Calreticulin (CRT) is an endoplasmic reticulum luminal calcium-binding chaperone that is involved in the regulation of calcium homoeostasis, the folding of newly synthesized proteins, and many other cellular functions. However, little is known about the role of CRT in HBV infection. In this study, we observed high levels of CRT expression in the sera and PBMCs of patients with HBV relative to those of healthy individuals. HBV upregulated the expression of CRT at the transcriptional level. Further investigation showed that HBV-induced CRT enhanced HBV replication by antagonizing the IFN pathway. CRT suppressed the production of endogenous IFN-α by reducing the nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor-7 but not IFN regulatory factor-3. Furthermore, CRT also suppressed the antiviral activity of IFN-α by inhibiting the phosphorylation of STAT1 and decreasing the expression of two IFN-α downstream effectors, protein kinase R and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase. Our results offer new insights into the pathogenesis of HBV infection and may provide potential targets for anti-HBV therapy. PMID:22661095

  1. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  2. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  3. A Caleosin-Like Protein with Peroxygenase Activity Mediates Aspergillus flavus Development, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Seed Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Blee, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Caleosins are a small family of calcium-binding proteins endowed with peroxygenase activity in plants. Caleosin-like genes are present in fungi; however, their functions have not been reported yet. In this work, we identify a plant caleosin-like protein in Aspergillus flavus that is highly expressed during the early stages of spore germination. A recombinant purified 32-kDa caleosin-like protein supported peroxygenase activities, including co-oxidation reactions and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Deletion of the caleosin gene prevented fungal development. Alternatively, silencing of the gene led to the increased accumulation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides and antioxidant activities but to a reduction of fungal growth and conidium formation. Two key genes of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway, aflR and aflD, were downregulated in the strains in which A. flavus PXG (AfPXG) was silenced, leading to reduced aflatoxin B1 production in vitro. Application of caleosin/peroxygenase-derived oxylipins restored the wild-type phenotype in the strains in which AfPXG was silenced. PXG-deficient A. flavus strains were severely compromised in their capacity to infect maize seeds and to produce aflatoxin. Our results uncover a new branch of the fungal oxylipin pathway and may lead to the development of novel targets for controlling fungal disease. PMID:26116672

  4. Pupal X-ray irradiation influences protein expression in adults of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiou Ling; Villalun, MaryAnn; Geib, Scott M; Goodman, Cynthia L; Ringbauer, Joseph; Stanley, David

    2015-05-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a pest of fruit in the Asia-Pacific region and also, due to quarantine restrictions, a threat to California fruit production. Area-wide suppression of B. dorsalis integrated several approaches including the sterile insect technique (SIT). SIT involves exposing juveniles to gamma radiation and releasing sterile males in substantial numbers, where they successfully compete for wild females. The resulting infertile eggs lead to reduction of the pest populations. Although these protocols are well documented, arising issues about the international transport and distribution of radioactive products is creating difficulties in use of radioactive sources for sterilizing radiation. This led to a shift toward use of X-ray irradiation, which also sterilizes male and female insects. However, use of X-ray technologies is in its infancy and there is virtually no information on the effects of irradiation, other than sterilization, at the physiological and molecular levels of fruit fly biology. We posed the hypothesis that sterilizing male oriental fruit flies via radiation treatment also influences protein expression in the flies. We found that exposing pupae to X-ray irradiation impacted expression of 26 proteins in adult females and 31 proteins in adult males. Seven proteins (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, larval cuticle protein 2, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein alpha-B and A chains, general odorant-binding protein 99b, polyubiquitin, and protein disulfide-isomerase) were impacted in both sexes. Some of the proteins act in central energy-generating and in pheromone-signal processing pathways; we infer that males sterilized by X-ray irradiation may be enfeebled in their ability to compete with wild males for females in nature. PMID:25772096

  5. A tracked approach for automated NMR assignments in proteins (TATAPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel automated approach for the sequence specific NMR assignments of 1HN, 13Cα, 13Cβ, 13C'/1Hα and 15N spins in proteins, using triple resonance experimental data, is presented. The algorithm, TATAPRO (Tracked AuTomated Assignments in Proteins) utilizes the protein primary sequence and peak lists from a set of triple resonance spectra which correlate 1HN and 15N chemical shifts with those of 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C'/1Hα. The information derived from such correlations is used to create a 'masterlist' consisting of all possible sets of 1HNi, 15Ni, 13Cαi, 13Cβi, 13C'i/1Hαi, 13Cαi-1, 13Cβi-1 and 13C'i-1/ 1Hαi-1 chemical shifts. On the basis of an extensive statistical analysis of 13Cα and 13Cβ chemical shift data of proteins derived from the BioMagResBank (BMRB), it is shown that the 20 amino acid residues can be grouped into eight distinct categories, each of which is assigned a unique two-digit code. Such a code is used to tag individual sets of chemical shifts in the masterlist and also to translate the protein primary sequence into an array called ppsarray. The program then uses the masterlist to search for neighbouring partners of a given amino acid residue along the polypeptide chain and sequentially assigns a maximum possible stretch of residues on either side. While doing so, each assigned residue is tracked in an array called assigarray, with the two-digit code assigned earlier. The assigarray is then mapped onto the ppsarray for sequence specific resonance assignment. The program has been tested using experimental data on a calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP, 15 kDa) having substantial internal sequence homology and using published data on four other proteins in the molecular weight range of 18-42 kDa. In all the cases, nearly complete sequence specific resonance assignments (> 95%) are obtained. Furthermore, the reliability of the program has been tested by deleting sets of chemical shifts randomly from the masterlist

  6. Protein profiling of paraquat-exposed rat lungs following treatment with Acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) berry extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Jung, Hana; Zerin, Tamanna; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2013-03-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium chloride, PQ) is a non-selective herbicide, and PQ poisoning by accidental or intentional ingestion is a cause of numerous fatalities around the world every year. Although a great deal of research has been conducted into the development of an acceptable treatment for PQ poisoning, no effective guidelines for patients have been developed thus far. Acai berry extract and juice have been highlighted in this regard, due to their observed antioxidant effects in various diseases. Furthermore, the acai berry has been used in dietary supplements, as it contains a variety of nutrients, including proteins, lipids, vitamins A, C and E and polyphenols. In this study, we conducted proteomic analysis of PQ-poisoned rat lungs to evaluate the changes in protein expression induced by PQ and to identify any protective effects of acai berry on the PQ poisoning. Our data revealed that the expression of the calcium signaling-related proteins calcium binding protein 1 (CaBP1), FK506 binding protein 4 (FKBP4), S100A6 and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc, also known as osteonectin) were induced by PQ treatment and downregulated by acai berry treatment. However, the levels of protein kinase C substrate 80K-H were shown to be downregulated as the result of PQ treatment. Our results indicated that these proteins may function as biomarkers for acute poisoning by PQ exposure. Further studies may be necessary to understand their clinical relevance with regard to PQ poisoning. PMID:23291665

  7. Calcineurin-B-Like Protein CBL9 Interacts with Target Kinase CIPK3 in the Regulation of ABA Response in Seed Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Girdhar K.Pandey; John J.Grant; Yong Hwa Cheong; Beom-Gi Kim; Le Gong Li; Sheng Luan

    2008-01-01

    Calcium plays a vital role as a second messenger in many signaling pathways in plants.The calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs) represent a family of plant calcium-binding proteins that function in calcium signaling by interacting with their interacting protein kinases (CIPKs).In our previous study,we have reported a role for one of the CBLs (CBL9) and one of the CIPKs (CIPK3) in ABA signaling.Here,we have shown that CBL9 and CIPK3 physically and functionally interact with each other in regulating the ABA responses.The CBL9 and CIPK3 proteins interacted with each other in the yeast twohybrid system and when expressed in plant cells.The double mutant cbl9cipk3 showed the similar hypersensitive response to ABA as observed in single mutants (cbl9 or cipk3).The constitutively active form of CIPK3 genetically complemented the cbl9 mutant,indicating that CIPK3 function downstream of CBL9.Based on these findings,we conclude that CBL9 and CIPK3 act together in the same pathway for regulating ABA responses.

  8. NMR Solution Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Vibrio harveyi Acyl Carrier Protein A75H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David I.; Chu, Byron C. H.; Lau, Cheryl K. Y.; Hunter, Howard N.; Byers, David M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a highly anionic, 9 kDa protein that functions as a cofactor protein in fatty acid biosynthesis. Escherichia coli ACP is folded at neutral pH and in the absence of divalent cations, while Vibrio harveyi ACP, which is very similar at 86% sequence identity, is unfolded under the same conditions. V. harveyi ACP adopts a folded conformation upon the addition of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ and a mutant, A75H, was previously identified that restores the folded conformation at pH 7 in the absence of divalent cations. In this study we sought to understand the unique folding behavior of V. harveyi ACP using NMR spectroscopy and biophysical methods. The NMR solution structure of V. harveyi ACP A75H displays the canonical ACP structure with four helices surrounding a hydrophobic core, with a narrow pocket closed off from the solvent to house the acyl chain. His-75, which is charged at neutral pH, participates in a stacking interaction with Tyr-71 in the far C-terminal end of helix IV. pH titrations and the electrostatic profile of ACP suggest that V. harveyi ACP is destabilized by anionic charge repulsion around helix II that can be partially neutralized by His-75 and is further reduced by divalent cation binding. This is supported by differential scanning calorimetry data which indicate that calcium binding further increases the melting temperature of V. harveyi ACP A75H by ∼20 °C. Divalent cation binding does not alter ACP dynamics on the ps-ns timescale as determined by 15N NMR relaxation experiments, however, it clearly stabilizes the protein fold as observed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies. Finally, we demonstrate that the E. coli ACP H75A mutant is similarly unfolded as wild-type V. harveyi ACP, further stressing the importance of this particular residue for proper protein folding. PMID:20659901

  9. Calcium binding-mediated sustained release of minocycline from hydrophilic multilayer coatings targeting infection and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Zhang

    Full Text Available Infection and inflammation are common complications that seriously affect the functionality and longevity of implanted medical implants. Systemic administration of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs often cannot achieve sufficient local concentration to be effective, and elicits serious side effects. Local delivery of therapeutics from drug-eluting coatings presents a promising solution. However, hydrophobic and thick coatings are commonly used to ensure sufficient drug loading and sustained release, which may limit tissue integration and tissue device communications. A calcium-mediated drug delivery mechanism was developed and characterized in this study. This novel mechanism allows controlled, sustained release of minocycline, an effective antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug, from nanoscale thin hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers for over 35 days at physiologically relevant concentrations. pH-responsive minocycline release was observed as the chelation between minocycline and Ca(2+ is less stable at acidic pH, enabling 'smart' drug delivery in response to infection and/or inflammation-induced tissue acidosis. The release kinetics of minocycline can be controlled by varying initial loading, Ca(2+ concentration, and Ca(2+ incorporation into different layers, enabling facile development of implant coatings with versatile release kinetics. This drug delivery platform can potentially be used for releasing any drug that has high Ca(2+ binding affinity, enabling its use in a variety of biomedical applications.

  10. Calcium-binding sites of calmodulin and electron transfer by inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribovskaja, Irena; Brownlow, Kaleb C; Dennis, Sam J; Rosko, Andrew J; Marletta, Michael A; Stevens-Truss, Regina

    2005-05-24

    Like that of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the binding of Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin (CaM) also regulates the activity of the inducible isoform (iNOS). However, the role of each of the four Ca(2+)-binding sites of CaM in the activity of iNOS is unclear. Using a series of single-point mutants of Drosophila melanogaster CaM, the effect that mutating each of the Ca(2+)-binding sites plays in the transfer of electrons within iNOS has been examined. The same Glu (E) to Gln (Q) mutant series of CaM used previously [Stevens-Truss, R., Beckingham, K., and Marletta, M. A. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 12337-12345] to study the role of the Ca(2+)-binding sites in the activity of nNOS was used for these studies. We demonstrate here that activity of iNOS is dependent on Ca(2+) being bound to sites II (B2Q) and III (B3Q) of CaM. Nitric oxide ((*)NO) producing activity (as measured using the hemoglobin assay) of iNOS bound to the B2Q and B3Q CaMs was found to be 41 and 43% of the wild-type activity, respectively. The site I (B1Q) and site IV (B4Q) CaM mutants only minimally affected (*)NO production (95 and 90% of wild-type activity, respectively). These results suggest that NOS isoforms, although all possessing a prototypical CaM binding sequence and requiring CaM for activity, interact with CaM differently. Moreover, iNOS activation by CaM, like nNOS, is not dependent on Ca(2+) being bound to all four Ca(2+)-binding sites, but has specific and distinct requirements. This novel information, in addition to helping us understand NOS, should aid in our understanding of CaM target activation. PMID:15896003

  11. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by phosphate rich organic matrix proteins and by single phosphoamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Shmuel; Weil, Simy; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a unique material produced naturally exclusively as a biomineral. It was demonstrated that proteins extracted from biogenic stable ACC induce and stabilize synthetic ACC in vitro. Polyphosphate molecules were similarly shown to induce amorphous calcium carbonate formation in vitro. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that biogenic ACC induction and stabilization is mediated by the phosphorylated residues of phosphoproteins. We show that extracellular organic matrix extracted from gastroliths of the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus induce stable ACC formation in vitro. The proteinaceous fraction of this organic matrix is highly phosphorylated and is incorporated into the ACC mineral phase during precipitation. We have identified the major phosphoproteins of the organic matrix and showed that they have high calcium binding capacity. Based on the above, in vitro precipitation experiments with single phosphoamino acids were performed, indicating that phosphoserine or phosphothreonine alone can induce the formation of highly stable ACC. The results indicate that phosphoproteins may play a major role in the control of ACC formation and stabilization and that their phosphoamino acid moieties are key components in this process. PMID:20416381

  12. Olopatadine Suppresses the Migration of THP-1 Monocytes Induced by S100A12 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Olopatadine hydrochloride (olopatadine is an antiallergic drug with histamine H 1 receptor antagonistic activity. Recently, olopatadine has been shown to bind to S100A12 which is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins, and exerts multiple proinflammatory activities including chemotaxis for monocytes and neutrophils. In this study, we examined the possibility that the interaction of olopatadine with S100A12 inhibits the proinflammatory effects of S100A12. Pretreatment of olopatadine with S100A12 reduced migration of THP-1, a monocyte cell line, induced by S100A12 alone, but did not affect recombinant human regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES-induced migration. Amlexanox, which also binds to S100A12, inhibited the THP-1 migration induced by S100A12. However, ketotifen, another histamine H 1 receptor antagonist, had little effect on the activity of S100A12. These results suggest that olopatadine has a new mechanism of action, that is, suppression of the function of S100A12, in addition to histamine H 1 receptor antagonistic activity.

  13. Calcium-Driven Folding of RTX Domain β-Rolls Ratchets Translocation of RTX Proteins through Type I Secretion Ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumba, Ladislav; Masin, Jiri; Macek, Pavel; Wald, Tomas; Motlova, Lucia; Bibova, Ilona; Klimova, Nela; Bednarova, Lucie; Veverka, Vaclav; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I; Barinka, Cyril; Sebo, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-binding RTX proteins are equipped with C-terminal secretion signals and translocate from the Ca(2+)-depleted cytosol of Gram-negative bacteria directly into the Ca(2+)-rich external milieu, passing through the "channel-tunnel" ducts of type I secretion systems (T1SSs). Using Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin, we solved the structure of an essential C-terminal assembly that caps the RTX domains of RTX family leukotoxins. This is shown to scaffold directional Ca(2+)-dependent folding of the carboxy-proximal RTX repeat blocks into β-rolls. The resulting intramolecular Brownian ratchets then prevent backsliding of translocating RTX proteins in the T1SS conduits and thereby accelerate excretion of very large RTX leukotoxins from bacterial cells by a vectorial "push-ratchet" mechanism. Successive Ca(2+)-dependent and cosecretional acquisition of a functional RTX toxin structure in the course of T1SS-mediated translocation, through RTX domain folding from the C-terminal cap toward the N terminus, sets a paradigm that opens for design of virulence inhibitors of major pathogens. PMID:27058787

  14. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Best Protein Choices The best choices are: Plant-based proteins ...

  15. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers. The...

  16. Dicty_cDB: SSF489 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available scoideum calcium-binding protein mRNA, complete cds. 163 e-111 4 AF303741 |AF303741.1 Chilo iridescen...s) Value N AB070449 |AB070449.1 Dictyostelium discoideum cbpG mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP7, complete...ideum cbpF mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP6, complete cds, clone:SSA631. 252 e-147 5 AF076972 |AF076972.1 Dictyostelium di...scoideum chromosome 2 map 3108975-3191114 strain AX4, complete sequence. 38 0.003 8 AB063522 |AB063522.2 Wigglesworthia glossinidi... Value (Q54QT9) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F; AltName: Full=... 202 7e-53 (Q54QU0) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein

  17. Dicty_cDB: SSH669 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g significant alignments: (bits) Value N U55379 |U55379.1 Dictyostelium discoideum calcium-binding protein... Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value ( P54653 ) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein..... 42 0.006 (Q54QU0) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F-like; AltName: ... 42 0.008 FB334902_1( FB334902 |pid:none) Sequen... 2; &S62881(S6288... 147 8e-35 (Q54QT7) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein... C; AltName: Full=... 46 4e-04 (Q54QT9) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F; AltName: Full

  18. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex associated with the bacterial type VI secretion system of P. aeruginosa has been solved and refined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structural basis of the recognition of the muramidase effector and its inactivation by its cognate immunity protein is revealed. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a β-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair

  19. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK21 Functions in Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Franz; Britta Ehlert; Anja Liese; Joachim Kurth; Anne-Claire Cazalé; Tina Romeis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases(CDPKs)comprise a family of plant serine/threonine protein kinases in which the calcium sensing domain and the kinase effector domain are combined within one molecule.So far,a biological function in abiotic stress signaling has only been reported for few CDPK isoforms,whereas the underlying biochemical mechanism for these CDPKs is still mainly unknown.Here,we show that CPK21 from Arabidopsis thaliana is biochemically activated in vivo in response to hyperosmotic stress.Loss-of-function seedlings of cpk21 are more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress and mutant plants show increased stress responses with respect to marker gene expression and metabolite accumulation.In transgenic Arabidopsis complementation lines in the cpk21 mutant background,in which either CPK21 wildtype,or a full-length enzyme variant carrying an amino-acid substitution were stably expressed,stress responsitivity was restored by CPK21 but not with the kinase inactive variant.The biochemical characterization of in planta synthesized and purified CPK21 protein revealed that within the calcium-binding domain,N-terminal EF1- and EF2-motifs compared to C-terminal EF3- and EF4-motifs differ in their contribution to calcium-regulated kinase activity,suggesting a crucial role for the N-terminal EF-hand pair.Our data provide evidence for CPK21 contributing in abiotic stress signaling and suggest that the N-terminal EF-hand pair is a calcium-sensing determinant controlling specificity of CPK21 function.

  20. : Protein flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bornot, Aurélie; Offmann, Bernard; De Brevern, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    Protein structures and protein structural models are great tools to reach protein function and provide very relevant information for drug design. Nevertheless, protein structures are not rigid entities. Cutting-edge bioinformatics methods tend to take into account the flexibility of these macromolecules. We present new approaches used to define protein structure flexibility.

  1. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  2. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    OpenAIRE

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for ...

  3. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  4. Tranilast Blocks the Interaction between the Protein S100A11 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) V Domain and Inhibits Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Kai; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-07-01

    The human S100 calcium-binding protein A11 (S100A11) is a member of the S100 protein family. Once S100A11 proteins bind to calcium ions at EF-hand motifs, S100A11 changes its conformation, promoting interaction with target proteins. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) consists of three extracellular domains, including the V domain, C1 domain, and C2 domain. In this case, the V domain is the target for mutant S100A11 (mS100A11) binding. RAGE binds to the ligands, resulting in cell proliferation, cell growth, and several signal transduction cascades. We used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to demonstrate the interactions between mS100A11and RAGE V domain. The tranilast molecule is a drug used for treating allergic disorders. We discovered that the RAGE V domain and tranilast would interact with mS100A11 by using (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR titrations. According to the results, we obtained two binary complex models from the HADDOCK program, S100A11-RAGE V domain and S100A11-tranilast, respectively. We overlapped two binary complex models with the same orientation of S100A11 homodimer and demonstrated that tranilast would block the binding site between S100A11 and the RAGE V domain. We further utilized a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay to confirm this result. We think that the results will be potentially useful in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27226584

  5. A tracked approach for automated NMR assignments in proteins (TATAPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Sahu, S.C.; Chary, K.V.R.; Govil, Girjesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2000-06-15

    experimental data on a calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP, 15 kDa) having substantial internal sequence homology and using published data on four other proteins in the molecular weight range of 18-42 kDa. In all the cases, nearly complete sequence specific resonance assignments (> 95%) are obtained. Furthermore, the reliability of the program has been tested by deleting sets of chemical shifts randomly from the master{sub l}ist created for the test proteins.

  6. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  7. Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  8. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased...... concentration of tau protein in CSF from patients with relapsing-remitting MS and patients monosymptomatic at onset who progressed to MS, but interestingly no increased tau protein concentration in monosymptomatic ON. The concentration of tau protein was significantly correlated to Expanded Disability Status...

  9. Protein politics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijver, Marike

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of the program of the interdisciplinary research group Profetas (protein foods, environment, technology and society). Profetas consists of technological, environmental and socio-economic research projects on protein food systems which result in the development of scenarios and strategies for guiding a shift towards a more plant protein based diet. The different research projects focus on the goal of identifying viable options for a more sustainable food system. Profetas aro...

  10. Principles of protein-protein interactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, S; Thornton, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    This review examines protein complexes in the Brookhaven Protein Databank to gain a better understanding of the principles governing the interactions involved in protein-protein recognition. The factors that influence the formation of protein-protein complexes are explored in four different types of protein-protein complexes--homodimeric proteins, heterodimeric proteins, enzyme-inhibitor complexes, and antibody-protein complexes. The comparison between the complexes highlights differences tha...

  11. Dicty_cDB: SSC302 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ylvtys*sshlv tnlslslsnslkkfstiisgaiasglflftqlhtssheilpslsvs*pfkkllqmlliaf cnffaatsalwp*isfieiipslslsre...ue ( P54653 ) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein 2; &S62881(S6288... 78 2e-13 (Q966Q9) RecName: Full=Cal...cium-binding protein H; AltName: Full=... 69 9e-11 (Q869S9) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding ... 3e-10 (Q54RF4) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein 4a; 68 3e-10 ( P09485 ) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein LPS1-al...O64943 ) RecName: Full=Polcalcin Jun o 2; AltName: Full=Calcium-... 55 2e-06 protein update 2009. 6. 9 PSORT psg: 0.81 gvh: 0.61 al

  12. Carboxyethylester-polyrotaxanes as a new calcium chelating polymer: synthesis, calcium binding and mechanism of trypsin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooya, Tooru; Eguchi, Masaru; Ozaki, Atsushi; Yui, Nobuhiko

    2002-08-21

    A carboxyethylester-polyrotaxane was synthesized as a novel calcium chelating polymer in the field of oral drug delivery and characterized in terms of mechanism of trypsin inhibition. Here, carboxyethylester (CEE) groups are introduced to all the primary hydroxyl groups in alpha-cyclodextrins (alpha-CDs), which are threaded onto a poly(ethylene glycol) chain capped with bulky end-groups (polyrotaxane). The solubility of the CEE-polyrotaxane in physiological conditions increased with pH, indicating ionization-related solubility similar to conventional polyacrylates. The ability of calcium (Ca2+) chelation was found to increase in the order of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)>CEE-polyrotaxanez.Gt;CEE-alpha-CD, suggesting that the increased density of carboxyl groups enhances the Ca2+ chelating ability. The activity of trypsin was inhibited by these compounds in the same order of the calcium chelation. However, the inhibitory effect of CEE-polyrotaxane was reduced by adding excess Ca2+ without precipitation that was observed in the presence of PAA. Such the reduced inhibition and precipitation by CEE-alpha-CD was not observed. Therefore, the inhibitory effect of CEE-polyrotaxane is due to Ca2+ chelation from trypsin without non-specific interaction. PMID:12176224

  13. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from the moss Funaria hygrometrica under nutritional starvation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doyel Mitra; Man Mohan Johri

    2000-12-01

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss Funaria hygrometrica, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach was adopted to clone the gene. Using degenerate PCR primers against conserved regions of CDPKs, a 900 bp amplicon was obtained from the genomic DNA of Funaria. Southern hybridization under low stringency conditions indicated the presence of several CDPK related sequences in the Funaria genome. This observation is consistent with reports of multigene families of CDPKs in other plants. The 900 bp fragment was subsequently used to isolate a 2.2 kb partial genomic clone of the CDPK gene from Funaria. The genomic clone encodes an open reading frame (ORF) of 518 amino acids. Interestingly, unlike other CDPK genes from plants, the entire 1.5 kb ORF is not interrupted by introns. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Funaria gene shows extensive homology with CDPKs from higher plants, 73% identity with the Fragaria CDPK and 71% identity with CDPK isoform 7 of Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Funaria CDPK is closer to the CDPKs from higher plants like strawberry and Arabidopsis as compared to those from lower plants such as the liverwort Marchantia, the green alga Chlamydomonas or another moss Tortula. Northern analysis shows enhanced expression of the CDPK transcript within 24–48 h of starvation for nitrogen, phosphorus or sulphur. So far the only other kinase which is known to be induced by nutrient starvation in plants is the wpk 4 which is a snf-1 related kinase (SnRKs). To our knowledge this is the first report that implicates a CDPK in the starvation response.

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES PARVALBUMIN EXPRESSION IN GABAERGIC NEURONS OF CORTEX AND HIPPOCAMPUS: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL FINDINGS AND FUNCTIONAL CORRELATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GABAergic interneurons comprise the bulk of local inhibitory neuronal circuitry in cortex and hippocampus and a subpopulation of these interneurons contain the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). A previous report indicated that severe hypothyroidism reduced PV immunoreact...

  15. Dicty_cDB: SSF479 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein H; AltName: Full=... 45 0.001 (Q2TBI5) RecName: Full=Calcineurin subunit...ficant alignments: (bits) Value (Q54QT9) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F; Alt... CpG Islands. 38 0.004 7 AB063522 |AB063522.2 Wigglesworthia glossinidia end...eum cbpG mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP7, complete cds, clone:SSM207. 634 0.0 4 AB070448 |AB070448.1 Dictyostelium di...scoideum cbpF mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP6, complete cds, clone:SSA631. 252 e-144 4

  16. Dicty_cDB: SSJ723 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g significant alignments: (bits) Value N AB070449 |AB070449.1 Dictyostelium discoideum cbpG mRNA for calcium bin...ficant alignments: (bits) Value (Q54QT9) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F; AltName: Fu...AB070448 |AB070448.1 Dictyostelium discoideum cbpF mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP6, complete cds, clon...e:SSA631. 250 e-159 5 AF076972 |AF076972.1 Dictyostelium discoideum calcium-binding protein mRNA, complete c...ll=... 226 4e-58 (Q54QU0) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F-like; AltName:

  17. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware...

  18. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality of life in people with mitochondrial diseases. Ovarian cysts (Polycystic ovarian syndrome). Early research suggests that taking ... weight, fat mass, and cholesterol in people with ovarian cysts. However, whey protein does not improve blood sugar ...

  19. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  20. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  1. Arabinogalactan proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoch, Eva; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Geshi, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant...

  2. Structural characterization of S100A15 reveals a novel zinc coordination site among S100 proteins and altered surface chemistry with functional implications for receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Jill I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S100 proteins are a family of small, EF-hand containing calcium-binding signaling proteins that are implicated in many cancers. While the majority of human S100 proteins share 25-65% sequence similarity, S100A7 and its recently identified paralog, S100A15, display 93% sequence identity. Intriguingly, however, S100A7 and S100A15 serve distinct roles in inflammatory skin disease; S100A7 signals through the receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE in a zinc-dependent manner, while S100A15 signals through a yet unidentified G-protein coupled receptor in a zinc-independent manner. Of the seven divergent residues that differentiate S100A7 and S100A15, four cluster in a zinc-binding region and the remaining three localize to a predicted receptor-binding surface. Results To investigate the structural and functional consequences of these divergent clusters, we report the X-ray crystal structures of S100A15 and S100A7D24G, a hybrid variant where the zinc ligand Asp24 of S100A7 has been substituted with the glycine of S100A15, to 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Remarkably, despite replacement of the Asp ligand, zinc binding is retained at the S100A15 dimer interface with distorted tetrahedral geometry and a chloride ion serving as an exogenous fourth ligand. Zinc binding was confirmed using anomalous difference maps and solution binding studies that revealed similar affinities of zinc for S100A15 and S100A7. Additionally, the predicted receptor-binding surface on S100A7 is substantially more basic in S100A15 without incurring structural rearrangement. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that S100A15 retains the ability to coordinate zinc through incorporation of an exogenous ligand resulting in a unique zinc-binding site among S100 proteins. The altered surface chemistry between S100A7 and S100A15 that localizes to the predicted receptor binding site is likely responsible for the differential recognition of distinct

  3. Identification of immune genes and proteins involved in the response of bovine mammary tissue to Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuocolo Tony

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastitis in dairy cattle results from infection of mammary tissue by a range of micro-organisms but principally coliform bacteria and Gram positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. The former species are often acquired by environmental contamination while S. aureus is particularly problematic due to its resistance to antibiotic treatments and ability to reside within mammary tissue in a chronic, subclinical state. The transcriptional responses within bovine mammary epithelial tissue subjected to intramammary challenge with S. aureus are poorly characterised, particularly at the earliest stages of infection. Moreover, the effect of infection on the presence of bioactive innate immune proteins in milk is also unclear. The nature of these responses may determine the susceptibility of the tissue and its ability to resolve the infection. Results Transcriptional profiling was employed to measure changes in gene expression occurring in bovine mammary tissues sampled from three dairy cows after brief and graded intramammary challenges with S. aureus. These limited challenges had no significant effect on the expression pattern of the gene encoding β-casein but caused coordinated up-regulation of a number of cytokines and chemokines involved in pro-inflammatory responses. In addition, the enhanced expression of two genes, S100 calcium-binding protein A12 (S100A12 and Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 corresponded with significantly increased levels of their proteins in milk from infected udders. Both genes were shown to be expressed by mammary epithelial cells grown in culture after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. There was also a strong correlation between somatic cell count, a widely used measure of mastitis, and the level of S100A12 in milk from a herd of dairy cows. Recombinant S100A12 inhibited growth of Escherichia coli in vitro and recombinant PTX3 bound to E. coli as well as C1q, a subunit of the first component of the complement

  4. Ameloblastin, an Extracellular Matrix Protein, Affects Long Bone Growth and Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuanyu; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Evans, Carla A; Diekwisch, Thomas Gh; Luan, Xianghong

    2016-06-01

    Matrix molecules such as the enamel-related calcium-binding phosphoprotein ameloblastin (AMBN) are expressed in multiple tissues, including teeth, bones, and cartilage. Here we have asked whether AMBN is of functional importance for timely long bone development and, if so, how it exerts its function related to osteogenesis. Adolescent AMBN-deficient mice (AMBN(Δ5-6) ) suffered from a 33% to 38% reduction in femur length and an 8.4% shorter trunk spinal column when compared with WT controls, whereas there was no difference between adult animals. On a cellular level, AMBN truncation resulted in a shortened growth plate and a 41% to 49% reduction in the number of proliferating tibia chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from AMBN mutant mice displayed defects in proliferation and differentiation potential as well as cytoskeleton organization. Osteogenesis-related growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and BMP7, were also significantly (46% to 73%) reduced in AMBN-deficient BMSCs. Addition of exogenous AMBN restored cytoskeleton structures in AMBN mutant BMSCs and resulted in a dramatic 400% to 600% increase in BMP2, BMP7, and Col1A expression. Block of RhoA diminished the effect of AMBN on osteogenic growth factor and matrix protein gene expression. Addition of exogenous BMP7 and IGF1 rescued the proliferation and differentiation potential of AMBN-deficient BMSCs. Confirming the effects of AMBN on long bone growth, back-crossing of mutant mice with full-length AMBN overexpressors resulted in a complete rescue of AMBN(Δ5-6) bone defects. Together, these data indicate that AMBN affects extracellular matrix production and cell adhesion properties in the long bone growth plate, resulting in altered cytoskeletal dynamics, increased osteogenesis-related gene expression, as well as osteoblast and chondrocyte proliferation. We propose that AMBN facilitates rapid long bone growth and an important growth spurt during the

  5. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Related to Protein Complexes Based on Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Liu; Lei Yang; Daming Shi; Xianglong Tang

    2015-01-01

    A method for predicting protein-protein interactions based on detected protein complexes is proposed to repair deficient interactions derived from high-throughput biological experiments. Protein complexes are pruned and decomposed into small parts based on the adaptive k-cores method to predict protein-protein interactions associated with the complexes. The proposed method is adaptive to protein complexes with different structure, number, and size of nodes in a protein-protein interaction net...

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05451-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 357348 |pid:none) Schistosoma mansoni genome sequen... 64 1e-09 (Q6NYZ6) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier.... 91 1e-17 (Q9UJS0) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier pro... 91 1e-17 AK222864_1( AK222864 |pid:none) Homo sapien...Q5RBC8) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier pro... 91 1e-17 BC166365_1( BC166365 |pid:none) Xen...o... 62 6e-09 (Q66L49) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier pro... 62 6e-09 AM435328_5( AM435328 |pid:none) Vitis vin...851_1( BC062851 |pid:none) Danio rerio solute carrier family ... 52 5e-06 (Q9VQG4) RecName: Full=Congested-like trachea protein

  7. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  8. Detecting overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nepusz, Tamás; Yu, Haiyuan; Paccanaro, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We introduce clustering with overlapping neighborhood expansion (ClusterONE), a method for detecting potentially overlapping protein complexes from protein-protein interaction data. ClusterONE-derived complexes for several yeast data sets showed better correspondence with reference complexes in the Munich Information Center for Protein Sequence (MIPS) catalog and complexes derived from the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) than the results of seven popular methods. The results also showed a...

  9. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  10. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  11. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  12. Protein-protein complexation in bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Titushin, Maxim S.; Feng, Yingang; Lee, John; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Liu, Zhi-jie

    2011-01-01

    In this review we summarize the progress made towards understanding the role of protein-protein interactions in the function of various bioluminescence systems of marine organisms, including bacteria, jellyfish and soft corals, with particular focus on methodology used to detect and characterize these interactions. In some bioluminescence systems, protein-protein interactions involve an “accessory protein” whereby a stored substrate is efficiently delivered to the bioluminescent enzyme lucife...

  13. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Van Drie

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery.

  14. Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis by Docking

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Ederer; Florian Fink; Wolfram Gronwald

    2009-01-01

    Based on a protein-protein docking approach we have developed a procedure to verify or falsify protein-protein interactions that were proposed by other methods such as yeast-2-hybrid assays. Our method currently utilizes intermolecular energies but can be expanded to incorporate additional terms such as amino acid based pair-potentials. We show some early results that demonstrate the general applicability of our approach.

  15. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  16. Protein and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recognition & Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Protein and Heart Health Updated:May 5,2015 Protein ... said. What’s the harm in getting too much protein? The main problem is that often the extra ...

  17. SPIDer: Saccharomyces protein-protein interaction database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhenbo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since proteins perform their functions by interacting with one another and with other biomolecules, reconstructing a map of the protein-protein interactions of a cell, experimentally or computationally, is an important first step toward understanding cellular function and machinery of a proteome. Solely derived from the Gene Ontology (GO, we have defined an effective method of reconstructing a yeast protein interaction network by measuring relative specificity similarity (RSS between two GO terms. Description Based on the RSS method, here, we introduce a predicted Saccharomyces protein-protein interaction database called SPIDer. It houses a gold standard positive dataset (GSP with high confidence level that covered 79.2% of the high-quality interaction dataset. Our predicted protein-protein interaction network reconstructed from the GSPs consists of 92 257 interactions among 3600 proteins, and forms 23 connected components. It also provides general links to connect predicted protein-protein interactions with three other databases, DIP, BIND and MIPS. An Internet-based interface provides users with fast and convenient access to protein-protein interactions based on various search features (searching by protein information, GO term information or sequence similarity. In addition, the RSS value of two GO terms in the same ontology, and the inter-member interactions in a list of proteins of interest or in a protein complex could be retrieved. Furthermore, the database presents a user-friendly graphical interface which is created dynamically for visualizing an interaction sub-network. The database is accessible at http://cmb.bnu.edu.cn/SPIDer/index.html. Conclusion SPIDer is a public database server for protein-protein interactions based on the yeast genome. It provides a variety of search options and graphical visualization of an interaction network. In particular, it will be very useful for the study of inter-member interactions

  18. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator

    OpenAIRE

    Tina, KG; Bhadra, R.; Srinivasan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bo...

  19. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  20. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  1. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  2. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Using Protein Signature Profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood; A.; Mahdavi; Yen-Han; Lin

    2007-01-01

    Protein domains are conserved and functionally independent structures that play an important role in interactions among related proteins. Domain-domain inter- actions have been recently used to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI). In general, the interaction probability of a pair of domains is scored using a trained scoring function. Satisfying a threshold, the protein pairs carrying those domains are regarded as "interacting". In this study, the signature contents of proteins were utilized to predict PPI pairs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis ele- gans, and Homo sapiens. Similarity between protein signature patterns was scored and PPI predictions were drawn based on the binary similarity scoring function. Results show that the true positive rate of prediction by the proposed approach is approximately 32% higher than that using the maximum likelihood estimation method when compared with a test set, resulting in 22% increase in the area un- der the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. When proteins containing one or two signatures were removed, the sensitivity of the predicted PPI pairs in- creased significantly. The predicted PPI pairs are on average 11 times more likely to interact than the random selection at a confidence level of 0.95, and on aver- age 4 times better than those predicted by either phylogenetic profiling or gene expression profiling.

  3. Calcium titration of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin and its structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Wanda; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda

    2014-07-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin is a highly conserved calcium binding protein belonging to the EF-hand superfamily. Centrin, like other calcium binding proteins, changes conformation upon calcium binding. In addition, the calcium binding sites are comprised mainly of aspartates and glutamates which would serve as probes for a calcium binding event. 2D IR correlation spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable technique to determine the differences in the molecular behavior of the EF-hand domains within centrin. Moreover, the differences in affinity for calcium displayed by these domains were correlated to differences in the molecular behavior of these EF-hand domains when compared with each other and the full-length protein. We were able to confirm the nature of the two independent domains within centrin. Furthermore, we established the mechanism of aggregation was self-association due to adsorption of centrin to the ZnSe ATR crystal and estimated the extent of aggregation of the full-length protein.

  4. Dicty_cDB: SSD683 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein mRNA, complete cds. 163 e-111 4 AB063522 |AB063522.2 Wigglesworthia glossinidia end... AB070449 |AB070449.1 Dictyostelium discoideum cbpG mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP7, complete cds, clo...ne:SSM207. 632 0.0 3 AB070448 |AB070448.1 Dictyostelium discoideum cbpF mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP6, complete... cds, clone:SSA631. 252 e-142 4 AF076972 |AF076972.1 Dictyostelium discoideum calcium-bindin...s) Value (Q54QT9) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F; AltName: Full=.

  5. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  6. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  7. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species, the...... longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  8. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  9. Discover protein sequence signatures from protein-protein interaction data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haasl Ryan J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of high-throughput technologies such as yeast two-hybrid systems and mass spectrometry technologies has made it possible to generate large protein-protein interaction (PPI datasets. Mining these datasets for underlying biological knowledge has, however, remained a challenge. Results A total of 3108 sequence signatures were found, each of which was shared by a set of guest proteins interacting with one of 944 host proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Approximately 94% of these sequence signatures matched entries in InterPro member databases. We identified 84 distinct sequence signatures from the remaining 172 unknown signatures. The signature sharing information was then applied in predicting sub-cellular localization of yeast proteins and the novel signatures were used in identifying possible interacting sites. Conclusion We reported a method of PPI data mining that facilitated the discovery of novel sequence signatures using a large PPI dataset from S. cerevisiae genome as input. The fact that 94% of discovered signatures were known validated the ability of the approach to identify large numbers of signatures from PPI data. The significance of these discovered signatures was demonstrated by their application in predicting sub-cellular localizations and identifying potential interaction binding sites of yeast proteins.

  10. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  11. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  12. Dicty_cDB: SSE532 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eces. 36 8e-04 8 AB063522 |AB063522.2 Wigglesworthia glossinidia endosymbiont of Glossina brevipalpis DNA, complete gen...ficant alignments: (bits) Value (Q54QT9) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding protein F; Al....25 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N AB070449 |AB070449.1 Dictyostelium di...scoideum cbpG mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP7, complete cds, clone:SSM207. 634 0.0 4 A...B070448 |AB070448.1 Dictyostelium discoideum cbpF mRNA for calcium binding protein CBP6, complete cds, clone

  13. AcEST: DK955523 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available HA0|SCMC1_XENTR Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier protein SCaMC-1 OS=Xenopus tropicalis GN=slc25a24 PE=2 SV=1 Len...ce. DK955523 - Show DK955523 Clone id TST39A01NGRL0023_F06 Library TST39 Length 625 Definition Adiantum capillus-ven...------SKDLLAGGVAAAVSKTAVAPIERVK 46 >sp|Q6GQS1|SCMC3_MOUSE Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier protein SCaM... Sbjct: 186 KQLVAGAVAGAVSRTGTAPLDRLK 209 >sp|Q9BV35|SCMC3_HUMAN Calcium-binding mitochond...k to BlastX Result : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id P29518 Definition sp|P29518|BT1_MAIZE Protein brittl

  14. Protein Dynamics in an RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Using ^15N NMR relaxation measurements, analyzed with the Lipari-Szabo formalism, we have found that the human U1A RNA binding protein has ps-ns motions in those loops that make contact with RNA. Specific mutations can alter the extent and pattern of motions, and those proteins inevitably lose RNA binding affinity. Proteins with enhanced mobility of loops and termini presumably lose affinity due to increased conformational sampling by those parts of the protein that interact directly with RNA. There is an entropic penalty associated with locking down those elements upon RNA binding, in addition to a loss of binding efficiency caused by the increased number of conformations adopted by the protein. However, in addition to local conformational heterogeneity, analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Reorientational Eigenmode Dynamics reveals that loops of the wild type protein undergo correlated motions that link distal sites across the binding surface. Mutations that disrupt correlated motions result in weaker RNA binding, implying that there is a network of interactions across the surface of the protein. (KBH was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Al Redfield from 1985-1990). This work was supported by the NIH (to KBH) and NSF (SAS).

  15. Anisotropic Contributions to Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Leigh J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2014-02-11

    The anisotropy of shape and functionality of proteins complicates the prediction of protein-protein interactions. We examine the distribution of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic contributions to these interactions for two globular proteins, lysozyme and chymosin B, which differ in molecular weight by about a factor of 2. The interaction trends for these proteins are computed in terms of contributions to the osmotic second virial coefficient that are evaluated using atomistic models of the proteins. Our emphasis is on identifying the orientational configurations that contribute most strongly to the overall interactions due to high-complementarity interactions, and on calculating the effect of ionic strength on such interactions. The results emphasize the quantitative importance of several features of protein interactions, notably that despite differences in their frequency of occurrence, configurations differing appreciably in interaction energy can contribute meaningfully to overall interactions. However, relatively small effects due to charge anisotropy or specific hydration can affect the overall interaction significantly only if they contribute to strongly attractive configurations. The results emphasize the necessity of accounting for detailed anisotropy to capture actual experimental trends, and the sensitivity of even very detailed atomistic models to subtle solution contributions. PMID:26580057

  16. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  17. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 360792 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007146453.1 1117:17211 1161:2741 1162:3098 56106:1490 142864:1490 56107:1490 putative stress ... protein (general stress ... protein 26) Cylindrospermum stagnale PCC 7417 MTTS ...

  19. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  20. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymczak, Piotr [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Cieplak, Marek, E-mail: piotr.szymczak@fuw.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. (topical review)

  1. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  2. Protein: CAD [Trypanosomes Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CAD carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotaseCAD trifunct ... ional protein carbamoylphosphate synthetase 2/aspartate transcarb ... amylase/dihydroorotasemultifunctional protein ... CAD H.sapiens 47458828 18105007 790 P27708 CAD_(ge ...

  3. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need from peanuts alone, but if you have peanut butter on whole-grain bread, you're set. Likewise, ... protein in a day: 2 tablespoons (15 milliliters) peanut butter (7 grams protein) 1 cup (240 milliliters) low- ...

  4. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented. PMID:15556277

  5. In Vitro Analysis of Roles of a Disulfide Bridge and a Calcium Binding Site in Activation of Pseudomonas sp. Strain KWI-56 Lipase

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Junhao; Kobayashi, Koei; Iwasaki, Yugo; Nakano, Hideo; Yamane, Tsuneo

    2000-01-01

    The expression of lipase from Pseudomonas sp. strain KWI-56 (recently reclassified as Burkholderia cepacia) had been found to be dependent on an activator gene (act) downstream of its structural gene (lip). In this work, the mature lipase was synthesized in an enzymatically active form with a cell-free Escherichia coli S30 coupled transcription-translation system by expressing a recombinant lipase gene (rlip) encoding the mature lipase in the presence of its purified activator or by coexpress...

  6. Electrophoretic Separation of Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Chakavarti, Bulbul; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoresis is used to separate complex mixtures of proteins (e.g., from cells, subcellular fractions, column fractions, or immunoprecipitates), to investigate subunit compositions, and to verify homogeneity of protein samples. It can also serve to purify proteins for use in further applications. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins migrate in response to an electrical field through pores in a polyacrylamide gel matrix; pore size decreases with increasing acrylamide concentrati...

  7. 1,25(OH)2D3 and Ca-binding protein in fetal rats: Relationship to the maternal vitamin D status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The autonomy and functional role of fetal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] were investigated in nondiabetic and diabetic BB rats fed diets containing 0.85% calcium-0.7% phosphorus or 0.2% calcium and phosphorus and in semistarved rats on the low calcium-phosphorus diet. The changes in maternal and fetal plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 were similar: the levels were increased by calcium-phosphorus restriction and decreased by diabetes and semistarvation. Maternal and fetal 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were correlated. The vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding proteins (CaBP9K and CaBP28K) were measured in multiple maternal and fetal tissues and in the placenta of nondiabetic, diabetic, and calcium-phosphorus-restricted rats. The distributions of CaBP9K and CaBP28K in the pregnant rat were similar to that of the growing rat. The increased maternal plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 levels in calcium-phosphorus-restricted rats were associated with higher duodenal CaBP9K and renal CaBPs, but placental CaBP9K was not different. In diabetic pregnant rats, duodenal CaBP9K was not different. In diabetic pregnant rats, duodenal CaBP9K tended to be lower, while renal CaBPs were normal; placental CaBP9K was decreased. The results indicate that in the rat fetal 1,25(OH)2D3 depends on maternal 1,25(OH)2D3 or on factors regulating maternal 1,25(OH)2D3. The lack of changes in fetal CaBP in the presence of altered fetal plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 levels confirms earlier data showing that 1,25(H)2D3 has a limited hormonal function during perinatal development in the rat

  8. Simulations of protein folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and colel rop (1ROP). Our code folds both proteins to within 5 A rms of their native structures

  9. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  10. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  11. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 mg/dL. Note: mg/dL = ...

  12. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  13. Protein - Which is Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  14. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  15. Protein hydration and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic neutron scattering can measure the protein thermal fluctuations under the physiological aqueous environment, especially it is powerful to observe the low-energy protein dynamics in THz region, which are revealed theoretically to be coupled with solvations. Neutron enables the selective observation of protein and hydration water by deuteration. The complementary analysis with molecular dynamics simulation is also effective for the study of protein hydration. Some examples of the application toward the understanding of molecular basis of protein functions will be introduced. (author)

  16. Protein crystallization with paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  17. Protein and vegetarian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kate A; Munn, Elizabeth A; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    A vegetarian diet can easily meet human dietary protein requirements as long as energy needs are met and a variety of foods are eaten. Vegetarians should obtain protein from a variety of plant sources, including legumes, soy products, grains, nuts and seeds. Eggs and dairy products also provide protein for those following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. There is no need to consciously combine different plant proteins at each meal as long as a variety of foods are eaten from day to day, because the human body maintains a pool of amino acids which can be used to complement dietary protein. The consumption of plant proteins rather than animal proteins by vegetarians may contribute to their reduced risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. PMID:25369930

  18. 血清蛋白因子水平对精神分裂症诊断价值的探索%AN EXPLORATION ON THE ROLE OF EIGHT KINDS OF SERUM PROTEIN FACTOR LEVELS IN DIAGNOSING SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾勇; 吴秋霞; 熊鹏; 余敏; 姜林伶; 李国华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of scrum nerve grovvlh factor ( NGF ),brain -derived neurotrophic factor ( BDNF ), interleukin 6( 1L - β), tumor necrosis factor alpha ( TNF-α ), interferon gamma( TFN -γ ), calcium binding protein ( S100β ), myelin basic protein ( MBP ) and glial fibrillary acidic proLein ( GFAP )level and evaluaLe their diagnosLic value in schizophrenia. Methods The concentraLions of eighL kinds of serum proLein factor in 106 patients vvith schizophrenia, 105 patients with depression and 120 normal controls were assessed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay( ELISA). The diagnostic value of eight factors were evaluated with receiver operaLing chat'acteristic( ROC )curve. Results Serum NGF concentration in schizophrenic patients was lower than that in patients wiLh depression and normal control group [ (32.55 ±2. 12)ng/L vs (38.90 ±10.47 )ng/L,(40.54 ±6.71 )ng/L],and tho differences were statistically significant ( P < 0. 01 ). In schizophrenic patients group, a serum NGF diagnostic cutoff value of 35. 73 ng / L was chosen to maximize sensitivity at 86. 7% with a corresponding specificity of 92. 5% ( 95% Cl = 0. 68 ~0. 95 ). In depression group, a serum NGF diagnostic cutoff value of 36. 04 ng/L was chosen to maximize sensitivity at 85. 8% with a corresponding specificity of 49. 5% ( 95% Cl = 0. 50~0. 66 ). The corresponding areas under the curve( AUC ) were 0. 91 and 0. 58, respectively. Stepwise discriminant analysis ( SDA ) were used to reclassify the data and create Lhe fiuing discriminant scores. Ⅱ was found that NGF, 1L - 6, S100 β, MBP and GFAP make a greater contrihution in assisLing the diagnosis of schizophrenia, and the diagnosis value of comhination of five factors were higher than thaL in any protein factor. Conclusion It is feasible to assist the diagnosis of schizophrenia with the protein concentrations, and it is expected to further provide new thinking on ohjective lahoratory examination in schizophrenia.%目的

  19. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09731-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cella nidulans acuH gene. 104 3e-21 (Q3MHI3) RecName: Full=Putative mitochondrial carrier protein...12 (Q9VA73) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier pro... 75 2e-12 AK091071_1( AK091071 |pid:none) Homo sapien...( CR382136 |pid:none) Debaryomyces hansenii strain CBS7... 63 1e-08 ( P38702 ) RecName: Full=Mitochondrial carrier protein... CLIB1... 75 3e-12 (Q5RBC8) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier pro...... (Q8BH59) RecName: Full=Calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier pro... 71 4e-11 BT0

  1. Protein Electrophoresis/Immunofixation Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Protein Electrophoresis Immunofixation Electrophoresis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Protein Electrophoresis; Protein ELP; SPE; SPEP; Urine Protein Electrophoresis; ...

  2. Protein: FEB6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEB6 Photoresponse regulatory proteins HD1 SE1 Zinc finger protein HD1 Protein CONSTANS-like, Pr ... otein HEADING DATE 1, Protein PHOTOPERIOD SENSITIVITY ... 1 39947 Oryza sativa subsp. japonica 4340746 Q9FDX ...

  3. Identifying novel protein phenotype annotations by hybridizing protein-protein interactions and protein sequence similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Studies of protein phenotypes represent a central challenge of modern genetics in the post-genome era because effective and accurate investigation of protein phenotypes is one of the most critical procedures to identify functional biological processes in microscale, which involves the analysis of multifactorial traits and has greatly contributed to the development of modern biology in the post genome era. Therefore, we have developed a novel computational method that identifies novel proteins associated with certain phenotypes in yeast based on the protein-protein interaction network. Unlike some existing network-based computational methods that identify the phenotype of a query protein based on its direct neighbors in the local network, the proposed method identifies novel candidate proteins for a certain phenotype by considering all annotated proteins with this phenotype on the global network using a shortest path (SP) algorithm. The identified proteins are further filtered using both a permutation test and their interactions and sequence similarities to annotated proteins. We compared our method with another widely used method called random walk with restart (RWR). The biological functions of proteins for each phenotype identified by our SP method and the RWR method were analyzed and compared. The results confirmed a large proportion of our novel protein phenotype annotation, and the RWR method showed a higher false positive rate than the SP method. Our method is equally effective for the prediction of proteins involving in all the eleven clustered yeast phenotypes with a quite low false positive rate. Considering the universality and generalizability of our supporting materials and computing strategies, our method can further be applied to study other organisms and the new functions we predicted can provide pertinent instructions for the further experimental verifications. PMID:26728152

  4. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott;

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding the...... relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... scientists from academia, government, and industry participated in the symposium. Experts provided overviews on known mechanisms by which proteins in food may cause sensitization, discussed experimental models to predict protein sensitizing potential, and explored whether such experimental techniques may be...

  5. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarnath Chtterjee; Ashutosh Kumar; Jeetender Chugh; Sudha Srivastava; Neel S Bhavesh; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2005-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either wholly or in specific regions. It appears that this disorder may be important for regulatory functions of the proteins, on the one hand, and may help in directing the folding process to reach the compact native state, on the other. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has over the last two decades emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In this review, we first discuss the significance of disorder in proteins and then describe the recent developments in NMR methods for their characterization. A brief description of the results obtained on several disordered proteins is presented at the end.

  6. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together......Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part of...

  7. Protein Models Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Widera, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    The process of comparison of computer generated protein structural models is an important element of protein structure prediction. It has many uses including model quality evaluation, selection of the final models from a large set of candidates or optimisation of parameters of energy functions used in template free modelling and refinement. Although many protein comparison methods are available online on numerous web servers, their ability to handle a large scale model comparison is often very limited. Most of the servers offer only a single pairwise structural comparison, and they usually do not provide a model-specific comparison with a fixed alignment between the models. To bridge the gap between the protein and model structure comparison we have developed the Protein Models Comparator (pm-cmp). To be able to deliver the scalability on demand and handle large comparison experiments the pm-cmp was implemented "in the cloud". Protein Models Comparator is a scalable web application for a fast distributed comp...

  8. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  9. Proteins at interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption is a fundamental and ubiquitous phenomenon, which has severe implications in the fields of biomaterials as well as bio- and nanotechnology, e.g., in drug delivery, biofouling, the biocompatibility of implants, food chemistry, and biosensors. Therefore, the mechanisms of protein adsorption and controlling the interfacial affinity of proteins have become intriguing and interdisciplinary research topics. In this work, X-ray and neutron reflectometry are the main...

  10. Protein-surfactant interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Valstar, Ank

    2000-01-01

    Protein-surfactant interactions in aqueous media have been investigated. The globular proteins lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA) served as model proteins. Several ionic and non-ionic surfactants were used. Fluorescence probe measurements showed that at low sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration (< 0.1 M) one micelle-like SDS cluster is bound to lysozyme. From dynamic light scattering (DLS) results it was observed that lysozyme in the complex does not correspond to the fully unfol...

  11. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  12. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enz...

  13. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with oth...

  14. Trisulfides in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus W.; Tachibana, Christine; Hansen, Niels Erik;

    2011-01-01

    post-translational modification, and the number of proteins in which a trisulfide has been unambiguously identified is small. Nevertheless, we believe that its prevalence may be underestimated, particularly with the increasing evidence for significant pools of sulfides in living tissues and their...... possible roles in cellular metabolism. This review focuses on examples of proteins that are known to contain a trisulfide bridge, and gives an overview of the chemistry of trisulfide formation, and the methods by which it is detected in proteins....

  15. Staining Proteins in Gels

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Sean; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Following separation by electrophoretic methods, proteins in a gel can be detected by several staining methods. This unit describes protocols for detecting proteins by four popular methods. Coomassie blue staining is an easy and rapid method. Silver staining, while more time consuming, is considerably more sensitive and can thus be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive th...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068782 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available containing transmembrane protein 1 [Homo sapiens] GI:4235226; contains Pfam profile PF00036: EF hand 0.0 ... ...AK068782 J013159H18 At1g65540.1 calcium-binding EF hand family protein similar to leucine zipper-EF-hand

  17. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  18. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups. PMID:25338074

  19. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kicinska

    Full Text Available STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil, a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups.

  20. Consensus protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  1. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  2. Simulations of Protein Folding

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, M; Cahill, K E; Cahill, Michael; Fleharty, Mark; Cahill, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and cole1 rop (1ROP). Our code folded the 36-residue villin headpiece to a mean rms distance of less than 5 A from its native structure as revealed by NMR; it folded a 56-residue fragment of the protein cole1 rop to within 11 A of its native structure. The denatured starting configurations of these two proteins were, respectively, 29 A and 55 A distant from their native structures.

  3. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  4. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    OpenAIRE

    Garma, Leonardo; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Protein quaternary structure universe” refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the pro...

  5. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Garma; Srayanta Mukherjee; Pralay Mitra; Yang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    "Protein quaternary structure universe" refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the pro...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 286011 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007057271.1 1117:4890 1161:684 1185:224 373984:129 373994:129 histidine kinase,PAS ... domain-con ... taining protein,PAS ... domain-containing protein,histidine kinase,GAF dom ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357488463 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003614519.1 33090:2423 35493:1202 131221:1202 3193:1202 58023:2056 78536:1595 58024:1595 3398 ... 938 3814:1938 163742:3028 3877:3028 3880:3028 Cyst nematode ... resistance protein-like protein Medicago truncatul ...

  8. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 186478918 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001117362.1 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 145336153 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_174031.2 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 71 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 186478920 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001117363.1 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18396209 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_564271.1 33090:264 35493:490 131221:490 3193:490 58023:763 78536:5554 58024:5554 3398:5554 71 ... 88 3699:588 3700:588 980083:588 3701:588 3702:2514 StaR -like protein domain-containing protein Arabidopsis ...

  13. Proteins in biomass streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study is to give an overview of traditional and new biomasses and biomass streams that contain proteins. When information was available, the differences in molecular structure and physical and chemical properties for the different proteins is given. For optimal biomass use, isolati

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187726 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515693.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MHKIPVT ...

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187721 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515086.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MSGINQQ ...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187724 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00514782.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MQIVDKK ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187722 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515750.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MTPLNFN ...

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 187723 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_00515087.1 1117:3739 1118:294 263510:556 263511:556 165597:1102 Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P ... 47K:Cobalamin synthesis ... protein/P47K Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501 MTRLDFN ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15240110 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_201488.1 33090:325 35493:1944 131221:1944 3193:1944 58023:3713 78536:2650 58024:2650 3398:265 ... :1852 LOB domain-containing protein 36 (ASYMMETRIC LEAVES ... 2-like protein 1) Arabidopsis thaliana MASSSSPCAAC ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357505877 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003623227.1 33090:2309 35493:2314 131221:2314 3193:2314 58023:1780 78536:1486 58024:1486 3398 ... 163742:9849 3877:9849 3880:9849 Cell cycle control crn ... (Crooked neck) protein-like protein Medicago trunc ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357472389 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003606479.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAETSSSNN ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357472385 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003606477.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAETSSSNN ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357440307 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003590431.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAGTSSKIP ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357444551 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003592553.1 33090:29954 35493:20452 131221:20452 3193:20452 58023:15679 78536:15788 58024:157 ... 2228 163742:12813 3877:12813 3880:12813 Defects in morphology ... protein-like protein Medicago truncatula MAGTSSKIP ...

  5. C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body. It is one of a group of proteins called "acute phase reactants" that go up in response to inflammation. ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18414878 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_567527.1 33090:1722 35493:20777 131221:20777 3193:20777 58023:13588 78536:13546 58024:13546 3 ... 83:5979 3701:5979 3702:6150 Tryptophan RNA-binding attenuator ... protein-like protein Arabidopsis thaliana MAAPFFST ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 238480800 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001154247.1 33090:1722 35493:20777 131221:20777 3193:20777 58023:13588 78536:13546 58024:1354 ... 83:5979 3701:5979 3702:6150 Tryptophan RNA-binding attenuator ... protein-like protein Arabidopsis thaliana MAAPFFST ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 238480798 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001154246.1 33090:1722 35493:20777 131221:20777 3193:20777 58023:13588 78536:13546 58024:1354 ... 83:5979 3701:5979 3702:6150 Tryptophan RNA-binding attenuator ... protein-like protein Arabidopsis thaliana MAAPFFST ...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 305313 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_09781770.1 1117:5986 1150:1684 35823:2516 376219:684 Cytochrome b6-f complex iron -sulfur subu ... nit 1 (Rieske iron -sulfur protein 1) (Plastohydroquinone:plastocyanin ... oxidoreductase iron -sulfur protein 1) (ISP 1) (RISP 1) Arthrospira sp. ...

  10. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery. PMID:25815400

  11. Protein sequence databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  12. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates

  13. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz;

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...... characteristics of a miP. In this opinion article, we clearly state the characteristics of a miP as evidenced by known proteins that fit the definition; we explain why modulatory proteins misrepresented as miPs do not qualify as true miPs. We also discuss the evolutionary history of miPs, and how the miP concept...... can extend beyond transcription factors (TFs) to encompass different non-TF proteins that require dimerization for full function....

  14. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  15. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  16. An Algorithm for Finding Functional Modules and Protein Complexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Guangyu Cui; Yu Chen; De-Shuang Huang; Kyungsook Han

    2008-01-01

    Biological processes are often performed by a group of proteins rather than by individual proteins, and proteins in a same biological group form a densely connected subgraph in a protein-protein interaction network. Therefore, finding a densely connected subgraph provides useful information to predict the function or protein complex of uncharacterized proteins in the highly connected subgraph. We have developed an efficient algorithm and program for finding cliques and near-cliques in a prote...

  17. Quantification of the Influence of Protein-Protein Interactions on Adsorbed Protein Structure and Bioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Yang; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Latour, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    While protein-surface interactions have been widely studied, relatively little is understood at this time regarding how protein-surface interaction effects are influenced by protein-protein interactions and how these effects combine with the internal stability of a protein to influence its adsorbed-state structure and bioactivity. The objectives of this study were to develop a method to study these combined effects under widely varying protein-protein interaction conditions using hen egg-whit...

  18. New approach for predicting protein-protein interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of vital importance for virtually all processes of a living cell. The study of these associations of protein molecules could improve people's understanding of diseases and provide basis for therapeutic approaches.

  19. Analysis of correlations between protein complex and protein-protein interaction and mRNA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lun; XUE Hong; LU Hongchao; ZHAO Yi; ZHU Xiaopeng; BU Dongbo; LING Lunjiang; CHEN Runsheng

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction is a physical interaction of two proteins in living cells. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, large-scale protein-protein interaction data have been obtained through high-throughput yeast two-hybrid systems (Y2H) and protein complex purification techniques based on mass-spectrometry. Here, we collect 11855 interactions between total 2617 proteins. Through seriate genome-wide mRNA expression data, similarity between two genes could be measured. Protein complex data can also be obtained publicly and can be translated to pair relationship that any two proteins can only exist in the same complex or not. Analysis of protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data can elucidate correlations between them. The results show that proteins that have interactions or similar expression patterns have a higher possibility to be in the same protein complex than randomized selected proteins, and proteins which have interactions and similar expression patterns are even more possible to exist in the same protein complex. The work indicates that comprehensive integration and analysis of public large-scale bioinformatical data, such as protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data, may help to uncover their relationships and common biological information underlying these data. The strategies described here may help to integrate and analyze other functional genomic and proteomic data, such as gene expression profiling, protein-localization mapping and large-scale phenotypic data, both in yeast and in other organisms.

  20. Piezoelectric allostery of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins. PMID:27575163

  1. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  2. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  3. Human Protein Z.

    OpenAIRE

    Broze, G J; Miletich, J P

    1984-01-01

    Protein Z was purified from human plasma by a four-step procedure which included barium citrate adsorption, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, and blue agarose chromatography with a yield of 20%. It is a 62,000 mol wt protein with an extinction coefficient of 12.0. The concentration of Protein Z in pooled, citrated plasma is 2.2 micrograms/ml and its half-life in patients starting warfarin anticoagulation therapy is estimated to be less than 2.5 d. The NH2-terminal...

  4. Evolution of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of proteins from living organisms are dealt with. The structure of proteins is first discussed; the variation in this structure from one biological group to another is illustrated by the first halves of the sequences of cytochrome c, and a phylogenetic tree is derived from the cytochrome c data. The relative geological times associated with the events of this tree are discussed. Errors which occur in the duplication of cells during the evolutionary process are examined. Particular attention is given to evolution of mutant proteins, globins, ferredoxin, and transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNA's). Finally, a general outline of biological evolution is presented.

  5. The characterisation and prediction of protein-protein interfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir, T.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding how proteins interact with each other is of fundamental importance and is one of the most important goals of molecular biology. In order to study the characteristics of protein-protein interaction sites datasets of non-homologous protein-complexes have been compiled. These datasets include 142 obligate homocomplexes, 20 obligate hetero-complexes, 20 enzyme-inhibitor complexes, 15 antibody-antigen complexes, and 10 signaling complexes. Overall, the protein-protein interfaces of o...

  6. Whey Protein- The Role of Protein Supplementation in Resistance Training

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Adequate protein intake is an important concern for many athletes who are undergoing strength-training programs. Many athletes choose to take a protein supplement, such as whey protein, in order to help them build lean muscle mass more efficiently. But the benefit of very high levels of dietary protein in resistance training remains questionable. This paper examines the effectiveness of whey protein, and other forms of protein supplements, in helping athletes augment their muscle mass. A comp...

  7. Protein-protein interaction databases: keeping up with growing interactomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lehne Benjamin; Schlitt Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Over the past few years, the number of known protein-protein interactions has increased substantially. To make this information more readily available, a number of publicly available databases have set out to collect and store protein-protein interaction data. Protein-protein interactions have been retrieved from six major databases, integrated and the results compared. The six databases (the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets [BioGRID], the Molecular INTeraction ...

  8. AcEST: BP920913 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000143_C08 485 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000143_C08. BP920913 - Show ... 4F8 Definition sp|Q9H4F8|SMOC1_HUMAN SPARC-related modular ... calcium-binding protein 1 OS=Homo sapiens Align le ... : (bits) Value sp|Q9H4F8|SMOC1_HUMAN SPARC-related modular ... calcium-binding prot... 33 0.59 sp|Q9STK5|PP269_AR ...

  9. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  10. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 292092 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_11392515.1 1117:5087 1150:2441 44887:135 864702:135 PAS ... domain type 3-containing protein,PAS ... STISDITSQKRTEAALQRSTARYENLASNIPGMIYQVVLETNGHFRFAYASPAS REIFGLEPEQLMKSAALGMTVIHPDDVVSFRQSIAQSAKTLQTQLGKLPK ...

  12. Protein turnover in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable advances have been made in the knowledge of the mechanisms and control of synthesis and degradation of proteins in animal tissues during the last decade. Most of the work on the measurement of synthetic and degradative rates of the mixed protein fraction from tissues has been conducted in the rat. There have, unfortunately, been few publications describing results of protein turnover studies with ruminants. Consideration is given here to the techniques used to measure protein turnover, and some of the results obtained, particularly with sheep, are summarized. No attempt has been made to discuss directly the situation in parasitized animals; rather the aim is to provide background information which complements other work dealing with the effects of parasites on the nitrogen metabolism of ruminants. (author)

  13. Engineered Proteins for Bioelectrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad Safwan; Rehman, Jawad Ur; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-06-01

    It is only in the past two decades that excellent protein engineering tools have begun to meet parallel advances in materials chemistry, nanofabrication, and electronics. This is revealing scenarios from which synthetic enzymes can emerge, which were previously impossible, as well as interfaces with novel electrode materials. That means the control of the protein structure, electron transport pathway, and electrode surface can usher us into a new era of bioelectrochemistry. This article reviews the principle of electron transfer (ET) and considers how its application at the electrode, within the protein, and at a redox group is directing key advances in the understanding of protein structure to create systems that exhibit better efficiency and unique bioelectrochemistry.

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308813231 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003083922.1 33090:9527 3041:5078 1035538:3664 13792:3664 70447:4128 70448:5494 Protein requir ... ed for actin cytoskeleton organization ... and cell cycle progression (ISS) Ostreococcus taur ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308808566 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003081593.1 33090:6182 3041:4098 1035538:2508 13792:2508 70447:3211 70448:4097 Mitochondrial ... inheritance and actin cytoskeleton organization ... protein (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MPPKKPPPPPPDAKSYP ...

  16. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255084748 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002504805.1 33090:7862 3041:6362 1035538:5159 13792:5159 38832:5340 296587:5427 DUF1244/molyb ... denum cofactor synthesis ... fusion protein Micromonas sp. RCC299 MASTRTEIEAYAF ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 303283029 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003060806.1 33090:7862 3041:6362 1035538:5159 13792:5159 38832:5340 38833:5093 564608:5093 mo ... lybdenum cofactor synthesis ... protein Micromonas pusilla CCMP1545 MVDAQTTEKIEAYA ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308812183 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003083399.1 33090:12970 3041:5897 1035538:4613 13792:4613 70447:1628 70448:5196 Glycosylphosp ... hatidylinositol anchor synthesis ... protein (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MSARRASFQSRFNDSSQ ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308810647 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003082632.1 33090:15674 3041:5296 1035538:3911 13792:3911 70447:3635 70448:4717 senescence-in ... ducible chloroplast stay-green ... protein (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MDRATTSSRASTARTFH ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308811905 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003083260.1 33090:255 3041:4962 1035538:3528 13792:3528 70447:3840 70448:5111 T08009 probable ... ribosomal protein L5-green ... alga (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MGKRRQKRKSQSVAKTTAYQ ...

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28423 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_10226597.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1160279:627 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins leader ... pept ... ide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis sp. T ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 360784 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007097029.1 1117:17211 1118:17546 217161:1718 1173032:1718 1173020:1718 putative stress ... prote ... in (general stress ... protein 26) Chamaesiphon minutus PCC 6605 MANATENQ ...

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 392180 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_07113914.1 1117:24513 1150:7038 1158:3915 272129:3709 Bifunctional protein birA (Includes: Biotin ... otin operon repressor; Biotin --(acetyl-CoA-carboxylase) synthetase (Biotin --prot ...

  5. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308811366 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003082991.1 33090:1951 3041:1340 1035538:592 13792:592 70447:610 70448:205 Transporter, ABC s ... uperfamily (Breast cancer ... resistance protein) (ISS), partial Ostreococcus ta ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308810513 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003082565.1 33090:8864 3041:8803 1035538:7822 13792:7822 70447:3615 70448:4680 Predicted memb ... rane protein (associated with esophageal cancer ... in humans) (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MTSSRKLCAFVRDA ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308804289 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079457.1 33090:1951 3041:1340 1035538:592 13792:592 70447:610 70448:205 Transporter, ABC s ... uperfamily (Breast cancer ... resistance protein) (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MASRV ...

  9. Untying knots in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2010-10-13

    A shoelace can be readily untied by pulling its ends rather than its loops. Attempting to untie a native knot in a protein can also succeed or fail depending on where one pulls. However, thermal fluctuations induced by the surrounding water affect conformations stochastically and may add to the uncertainty of the outcome. When the protein is pulled by the termini, the knot can only get tightened, and any attempt at untying results in failure. We show that, by pulling specific amino acids, one may easily retract a terminal segment of the backbone from the knotting loop and untangle the knot. At still other amino acids, the outcome of pulling can go either way. We study the dependence of the untying probability on the way the protein is grasped, the pulling speed, and the temperature. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying this dependence is critical for a successful experimental realization of protein knot untying. PMID:20857930

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308806666 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003080644.1 33090:21099 3041:5360 1035538:3986 13792:3986 70447:3049 70448:3532 COG3310: Unch ... aracterized protein conserved in bacteria ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MRRTCASRNLARSPVAARERCRQMV ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308803575 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079100.1 33090:20519 3041:4460 1035538:2940 13792:2940 70447:2035 70448:2555 COG4399: Unch ... aracterized protein conserved in bacteria ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MKALQRLVLRGSTDGVRPACERAMA ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308804123 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079374.1 33090:20519 3041:4460 1035538:2940 13792:2940 70447:2035 70448:2555 COG4399: Unch ... aracterized protein conserved in bacteria ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MDSLATSRRRRLARAGAAIATALAL ...

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255077633 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002502450.1 33090:20956 3041:5145 1035538:3740 13792:3740 38832:3722 296587:3525 isocitrate d ... ehydrogenase (NADP+), bacteria -like protein Micromonas sp. RCC299 MAAASAGGKIQAAPM ...

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 228257 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_09784859.1 1117:4333 1150:1533 35823:3512 376219:3411 Protein ushA precursor (Includes: UDP-sugar ... ugar hydrolase (UDP-sugar ... pyrophosphatase) (UDP-sugar ... diphosphatase); 5'-nuc ...

  15. Protein folding and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    González-Diáz, P F

    1997-01-01

    Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308804764 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003079694.1 33090:24290 3041:9393 1035538:8433 13792:8433 70447:5209 70448:2928 probable memb ... rane protein YCR013c-yeast ... (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MQLREVKERLRAYFSSSAATPGRTR ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 338848 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_007172477.1 1117:11758 1118:7408 13034:1671 292566:1671 13035:1671 cell envelope-related func ... tion transcriptional attenuator ... common domain protein Dactylococcopsis salina PCC ...

  18. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition to the......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  19. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  20. Interactive protein manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures

  1. Egg protein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, van A.; Beelen, M.J.C.; Wolbers, L.A.M.; Gilst, van W.H.; Buikema, J.H.; Nelissen, J.W.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides egg-protein hydrolysates with DPP-IV inhibitory activity which are particularly suited for the treatment of diabetes. Particularly advantageous is to use hydrolysate of lysozyme for the treatment of diabetes.

  2. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunoglobulin light chains - urine; Urine Bence-Jones protein ... Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when ...

  3. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  4. Fish protein hydrolysates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, I.M.

    1982-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes now available in commercial quantities can be used to liquefy the fish and fish waste presently considered suitable for conversion to fish meal. The products obtained are readily dispersed or dissolved in water and have a high nutritional value. They have been satisfactorily used as substitutes for milk proteins in milk replacers for young animals. Further research is necessary on means of controlling the degree of hydrolysis to give protein preparations with acceptable functional properties as human food supplements. (Refs. 21).

  5. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  6. Untying Knots in Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2010-01-01

    A shoelace can be readily untied by pulling its ends rather than its loops. Attempting to untie a native knot in a protein can also succeed or fail depending on where one pulls. However, thermal fluctuations induced by the surrounding water affect conformations stochastically and may add to the uncertainty of the outcome. When the protein is pulled by the termini, the knot can only get tightened, and any attempt at untying results in failure. We show that, by pulling specific amino acids, ...

  7. Digestibility of sorghum proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Axtell, J D; Kirleis, A. W.; Hassen, M M; D'Croz Mason, N; Mertz, E T; Munck, L.

    1981-01-01

    Published information indicates that rice, maize, and wheat proteins are much more digestible in children than sorghum proteins are (66-81% compared with 46%). However, this digestibility difference cannot be demonstrated with the weanling rat, which gave digestibility values of 80% for cooked and 85% for uncooked sorghum gruels. Therefore, a search was made for a laboratory system sensitive to the digestibility differences between sorghum and other cereals. We found that porcine pepsin in vi...

  8. Identifying Unknown Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Winona C.; Dayhoff, Margaret O.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we discuss ways to identify a protein, both when its amino acid sequence is known and, particularly, prior to the determination of the complete sequence. If a similar sequence is in the Protein Sequence Database, an unknown may be identified on the basis of partial or ambiguous sequence data, or on the basis of amino acid composition. Identification in the early stages of structural determination can save time and scarce resources by preventing duplicate effort or by suggesting ...

  9. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, Dalibor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 31-32. ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : pokeweed antiviral protein * flavodoxin-like protein * PSII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals. PMID:26242922

  11. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  12. Protein Functionality in Food Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Panpan

    2010-01-01

    The structure,shape,color,smell and taste of food were decided by protein functionality.The utilization of protein will improve by changing the protein functionality.Protein functionality is also advantage to maintain and utilize the nutrition of food.This paper summarized the nature,classification,factors and prospect of protein functionality.It ccn provide a theoretical basis for application of protein in food industry.

  13. Protein Databases on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Dong

    2004-01-01

    Protein databases have become a crucial part of modern biology. Huge amounts of data for protein structures, functions, and particularly sequences are being generated. Searching databases is often the first step in the study of a new protein. Comparison between proteins or between protein families provides information about the relationship between proteins within a genome or across different species, and hence offers much more information than can be obtained by studying only an isolated pro...

  14. More protein in cereals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  15. Stretching to Understand Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2007-03-01

    Mechanical stretching of single proteins has been studied experimentally for about 50 proteins yielding a variety of force patterns and values of the peak forces. We have performed a theoretical survey of 7749 proteins of known native structure and map out the landscape of possible dynamical behaviors unders stretching at constant speed. The model used is constructed based on the native geometry. It is solved by methods of molecular dynamics and validated by comparing the theoretical predictions to experimental results. We characterize the distribution of peak forces and on correlations with the system size and with the structure classification as characterized by the CATH scheme. We identify proteins with the biggest forces and show that they belong to few topology classes. We determine which protein segments act as mechanical clamps and show that, in most cases, they correspond to long stretches of parallel beta-strands, but other mechanisms are also possible. We then consider stretching by fluid flows. We show that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  16. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Zhirong; Liu Ke; Chen Hu; Zhang Song

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to pre...

  17. ADSORPTION OF PROTEIN ON NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qi

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of protein on nanoparticles was studied by using dynamic light scattering to measure the hydrodynamic size of both pure protein and nanoparticles adsorbed with different amounts of protein. The thickness of the adsorbed protein layer increases as protein concentration, but decreases as the initial size of nanoparticles. After properly scaling the thickness with the initial diameter, we are able to fit all experimental data with a single master curve. Our experimental results suggest that the adsorbed proteins form a monolayeron the nanoparticle surface and the adsorbed protein molecules are attached to the particle surface at many points through a possible hydrogen-bonding. Our results also indicate that as protein concentration increases, the overall shape of the adsorbed protein molecule continuously changes from a flat layer on the particle surface to a stretched coil extended into water. During the change, the hydrodynamic volume of the adsorbed protein increases linearly with protein concentration.

  18. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  19. Histophilus somni Surface Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, Lynette B

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen surface is usually the first site of interaction with the host. Histophilus somni was earlier thought to only have an outer membrane on its surface. Now it is known that the surface is composed of many virulence factors, including outer membrane proteins, lipooligosaccharide or endotoxin, a fibrillar network, and an exopolysaccharide. Outer membrane blebs, endotoxin, the fibrillar network, and the exopolysaccharide are also shed from the surface. This review will focus on the surface proteins of this pathogen that may colonize the mucosal surface of ruminants as a commensal or may cause pneumonia, septicemia, myocarditis, thrombotic meningoencephalitis, arthritis, and/or abortion. The major outer membrane protein has been well studied. Since its size and epitopes vary from strain to strain, it may be useful for typing strains. Iron-regulated OMPs have also received much attention because of their role in iron uptake for in vivo growth of H. somni. Other OMPs may be protective, based on passive immunization with monospecific antibodies and active immunization experiments. The surface and shed fibrillar network has been shown to be an immunoglobulin-binding protein in that it binds bovine IgG2 by the Fc portion. Two repeat domains (DR1 and DR2) have cytotoxic Fic motifs. Vaccine studies with recombinant DR2 are promising. Studies of the bacterial genome as well as comparison of surface proteins of different strains from the various H. somni syndromes and carrier states will be discussed and have provided much insight into pathogenesis and protection. PMID:26728061

  20. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Zhihao; Lin Hongfei; Xu Bo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity metho...

  1. Identifying Protein-Protein Interaction Sites Using Covering Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Song; Jiaxing Cheng; Xiuquan Du

    2009-01-01

    Identification of protein-protein interface residues is crucial for structural biology. This paper proposes a covering algorithm for predicting protein-protein interface residues with features including protein sequence profile and residue accessible area. This method adequately utilizes the characters of a covering algorithm which have simple, lower complexity and high accuracy for high dimension data. The covering algorithm can achieve a comparable performance (69.62%, Complete dataset; 60....

  2. Protein-Protein Interaction Detection: Methods and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    V. Srinivasa Rao; Srinivas, K.; Sujini, G. N.; G. N. Sunand Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction plays key role in predicting the protein function of target protein and drug ability of molecules. The majority of genes and proteins realize resulting phenotype functions as a set of interactions. The in vitro and in vivo methods like affinity purification, Y2H (yeast 2 hybrid), TAP (tandem affinity purification), and so forth have their own limitations like cost, time, and so forth, and the resultant data sets are noisy and have more false positives to annotate t...

  3. Protein Microarray On-Demand: A Novel Protein Microarray System

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Deb K.; Sitaraman, Kalavathy; Baptista, Cassio; Hartley, James; Hill, Thomas M.; David J. Munroe

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel, simple and low-cost protein microarray strategy wherein the microarrays are generated by printing expression ready plasmid DNAs onto slides that can be converted into protein arrays on-demand. The printed expression plasmids serve dual purposes as they not only direct the synthesis of the protein of interest; they also serve to capture the newly synthesized proteins through a high affinity DNA-protein interaction. To accomplish this we have exploited the high-affinity bin...

  4. Binding of calcium in the EF-hand of Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt35 is important for stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, Erik J. van; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt35 contains a single metal ion-binding site that resembles EF-hand calcium-binding sites. The Slt35 EF-hand is only the second observation of such a domain in a prokaryotic protein. Two crystal structures at 2.1 Å resolution show that both Ca2+ ions and

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of full-length Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro, Elisa; del Valle Sosa, Liliana; Sanoguet, Zuleika; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-01-01

    C. reinhardtii centrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein localized to the microtubule-organizing center of eukaryotic organisms, has been crystallized in the presence of the model peptide melittin. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution.

  6. Calretinin and parvalbumin immunoreactive interneurons in the retrosplenial cortex of the rat brain: Qualitative and quantitative analyses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Salaj, M.; Druga, Rastislav; Cerman, J.; Kubová, Hana; Barinka, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1627, Nov 19 (2015), s. 201-215. ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : retrosplenial cortex * calretinin * parvalbumin * interneurons * calcium-binding proteins * perirhinal cortex Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.843, year: 2014

  7. Distribution of GABAergic Interneurons and Dopaminergic Cells in the Functional Territories of the Human Striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Bernacer, J. (Javier); Prensa, L. (Lucía); Gimenez-Amaya, J.M. (José Manuel)

    2012-01-01

    The afferent projections of the striatum (caudate nucleus and putamen) are segregated in three territories: associative, sensorimotor and limbic. Striatal interneurons are in part responsible for the integration of these different types of information. Among them, GABAergic interneurons are the most abundant, and can be sorted in three populations according to their content in the calcium binding proteins calretinin (CR), parvalbumin (PV) and cal...

  8. Main: 1TIZ [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rminal Domain; Engineered: Yes Calcium-Binding Protein J.Song, Q.Zhao, S.Thao, R.O.Frederick, J.L.Markley, C...enter For Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (Cesg) J.Song, Q.Zhao, S.Thao, R.O.Frederick

  9. EF-hands at atomic resolution: The structure of human psoriasin (S100A7) solved by MAD phasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov; Etzerodt, Michael; Madsen, Peder Søndergaard; Thøgersen, Hans Christian; Celis, J. E.; Nyborg, Jens; Kjeldgaard, Morten

    1998-01-01

    holmium-substituted psoriasin has been determined by multiple anomalous wavelength dispersion (MAD) phasing and refined to atomic resolution (1.05 A). The structure represents the most accurately determined structure of a calcium-binding protein. Although the overall structure of psoriasin is similar to...

  10. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Polarizable protein packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Albert H; Snow, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol(-1)] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. PMID:21264879

  12. Electron transfer in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  13. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms that...... regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...... in the protein; a putative lipid‐associating domain termed the DDHD domain that is defined by the four amino acid motif that gives the domain its name; and a ubiquitously found domain termed Sterile α‐motif (SAM), which is mostly associated with oligomerization and polymerization. We first show, that...

  14. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids....... These are early days, and it still remains to be proven that this method has any advantage over other methods, but at least it is fun to do and the harmonies produced invoke an eerie sounding futuristic landscape...

  15. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite their...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  16. SOY PROTEIN NANOPARTICLES AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) is obtained from soybean by removing soybean oil and soy carbohydrates. SPI contains more than 90% protein. Structurally, SPI is a globular protein and its aggregates in water consist of sphere-like protein particles. The number average aggregate size of SPI at pH=5.2 is...

  17. The Formation of Protein Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins.......Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins....

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author)

  19. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  20. Mining protein structure data

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, José Carlos Almeida

    2006-01-01

    The principal topic of this work is the application of data mining techniques, in particular of machine learning, to the discovery of knowledge in a protein database. In the first chapter a general background is presented. Namely, in section 1.1 we overview the methodology of a Data Mining project and its main algorithms. In section 1.2 an introduction to the proteins and its supporting file formats is outlined. This chapter is concluded with section 1.3 which defines that main problem we...

  1. Protein-based ferrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Puja; Hart, Cassidy; Romano, Siena; El-Magbri, Mariam; Esson, Moira M; Ibeh, Trisha; Knowlton, Elizabeth D; Zhang, Ming; Wagner, Michael J; Hartings, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel synthesis in which hemoglobin and Fe(2+) react, in the presence of KNO3 and KOH, to produce protein microgels that contain magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The synthesis results in microgels with polymer properties (denaturing and glass transition temperatures) that are consistent with the dried protein. The iron oxide nanoparticles that exhibit an average diameter of 22nm, are ferrimagnetic, and display properties consistent with Fe3O4. The multiple functional capabilities displayed by these materials: biocompatibility, magnetism, dye uptake and controlled release, and other properties archetypal of hydrogels, will make the magnetic hydrogels attractive for a number of biomedical applications. PMID:26901627

  2. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591

  3. Chirality and Protein Folding

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiecinska, Joanna I.; Cieplak, Marek

    2004-01-01

    There are several simple criteria of folding to a native state in model proteins. One of them involves crossing of a threshold value of the RMSD distance away from the native state. Another checks whether all native contacts are established, i.e. whether the interacting amino acids come closer than some characteristic distance. We use Go-like models of proteins and show that such simple criteria may prompt one to declare folding even though fragments of the resulting conformations have a wron...

  4. Conformation Distributions in Adsorbed Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.; Vrettos, John S.; Smith, Jackson R.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2007-03-01

    While the structural basis of protein function is well understood in the biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, few methods for the characterization and comparison of protein conformation distributions are available. New methods capable of measuring the stability of protein conformations and the integrity of protein-protein, protein-ligand and protein-surface interactions both in solution and on surfaces are needed to help the development of protein-based products. We are developing infrared spectroscopy methods for the characterization and comparison of molecular conformation distributions in monolayers and in solutions. We have extracted an order parameter describing the orientational and conformational variations of protein functional groups around the average molecular values from a single polarized spectrum. We will discuss the development of these methods and compare them to amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods for albumin in solution and on different polymer surfaces to show that our order parameter is related to protein stability.

  5. G Protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Elliott M.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors and heterotrimeric G proteins can diffuse laterally in the plasma membrane such that one receptor can catalyze the activation (GDP/GTP exchange) of multiple G proteins. In some cases, these processes are fast enough to support molecular signal amplification, where a single receptor maintains the activation of multiple G proteins at steady-state. Amplification in cells is probably highly regulated. It depends upon the identities of the G receptor and G protein - som...

  6. Protein stability, flexibility and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2011-01-01

    Proteins rely on flexibility to respond to environmental changes, ligand binding and chemical modifications. Potentially, a perturbation that changes the flexibility of a protein may interfere with its function. Millions of mutations have been performed on thousands of proteins in quests for a...... data presented is it clear that there are specific sites (flexibility hotspots) in proteins that are important for both binding and stability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Dynamics: Experimental and Computational Approaches....

  7. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...... may not only induce quality losses but may be desirable in some type of foods, such as salted herring....

  8. Measuring protein breakdown in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjær, Michael

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo. RECENT FINDINGS: None of the available methods for determining protein breakdown can...... be used to determine the breakdown rate of specific proteins and, therefore, do not keep up to the preceding methodological demands in physiological research. A newly developed approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of single proteins seems promising. Its conceptual advantage is that the...... proteins of interest are the site of measurement. Hence, the application initially demands the proteins to be labeled with stable isotopically labeled amino acids. Subsequently, the loss of label from the proteins will be dependent on the protein breakdown rate when no labeled amino acids are...

  9. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact with......-domain proteins catalyse the formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, whereas others appear to target ubiquitinated proteins for degradation and interact with chaperones. Hence, by binding to the 26S proteasome the UBL-domain proteins seem to tailor and direct the basic proteolytic functions of the particle to...... 26S proteasomes. The 26S proteasome is a multisubunit protease which is responsible for the majority of intracellular proteolysis in eukaryotic cells. Before degradation commences most proteins are first marked for destruction by being coupled to a chain of ubiquitin molecules. Some UBL...

  10. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  11. HIV protein sequence hotspots for crosstalk with host hub proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sarmady

    Full Text Available HIV proteins target host hub proteins for transient binding interactions. The presence of viral proteins in the infected cell results in out-competition of host proteins in their interaction with hub proteins, drastically affecting cell physiology. Functional genomics and interactome datasets can be used to quantify the sequence hotspots on the HIV proteome mediating interactions with host hub proteins. In this study, we used the HIV and human interactome databases to identify HIV targeted host hub proteins and their host binding partners (H2. We developed a high throughput computational procedure utilizing motif discovery algorithms on sets of protein sequences, including sequences of HIV and H2 proteins. We identified as HIV sequence hotspots those linear motifs that are highly conserved on HIV sequences and at the same time have a statistically enriched presence on the sequences of H2 proteins. The HIV protein motifs discovered in this study are expressed by subsets of H2 host proteins potentially outcompeted by HIV proteins. A large subset of these motifs is involved in cleavage, nuclear localization, phosphorylation, and transcription factor binding events. Many such motifs are clustered on an HIV sequence in the form of hotspots. The sequential positions of these hotspots are consistent with the curated literature on phenotype altering residue mutations, as well as with existing binding site data. The hotspot map produced in this study is the first global portrayal of HIV motifs involved in altering the host protein network at highly connected hub nodes.

  12. Characterization of Protein Complexes and Subcomplexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Nazar Zaki; Elfadil A. Mohamed; Antonio Mora

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of protein complexes implicated in protein-protein interaction data are crucial to the understanding of the molecular events under normal and abnormal physiological conditions. This paper provides a novel characterization of subcomplexes in protein interaction databases, stressing definition and representation issues, quantification, biological validation, network metrics, motifs, modularity, and gene ontology (GO) terms. The paper introduces the concep...

  13. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiqiang Yu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1 using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2 revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3 prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4 obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  14. Transient protein-protein interactions visualized by solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Tang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Proteins interact with each other to establish their identities in cell. The affinities for the interactions span more than ten orders of magnitude, and KD values in μM-mM regimen are considered transient and are important in cell signaling. Solution NMR including diamagnetic and paramagnetic techniques has enabled atomic-resolution depictions of transient protein-protein interactions. Diamagnetic NMR allows characterization of protein complexes with KD values up to several mM, whereas ultraweak and fleeting complexes can be modeled with the use of paramagnetic NMR especially paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). When tackling ever-larger protein complexes, PRE can be particularly useful in providing long-range intermolecular distance restraints. As NMR measurements are averaged over the ensemble of complex structures, structural information for dynamic protein-protein interactions besides the stereospecific one can often be extracted. Herein the protein interaction dynamics are exemplified by encounter complexes, alternative binding modes, and coupled binding/folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further integration of NMR with other biophysical techniques should allow better visualization of transient protein-protein interactions. In particular, single-molecule data may facilitate the interpretation of ensemble-averaged NMR data. Though same structures of proteins and protein complexes were found in cell as in diluted solution, we anticipate that the dynamics of transient protein protein-protein interactions be different, which awaits awaits exploration by NMR. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25896389

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308810769 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003082693.1 33090:1723 3041:2182 1035538:123 13792:123 70447:3706 70448:4753 K+-channel ERG a ... nd related proteins, contain PAS /PAC sensor domain (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MHFNADL ...

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308809165 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003081892.1 33090:2400 3041:801 1035538:331 13792:331 70447:681 70448:136 K+-channel ERG and ... related proteins, contain PAS /PAC sensor domain (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MPSTAGM ...

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357507515 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003624046.1 33090:6310 35493:7221 131221:7221 3193:7221 58023:3109 78536:1898 58024:1898 3398 ... 803:6139 3814:6139 163742:7708 3877:7708 3880:7708 Nematode ... resistance-like protein Medicago truncatula MTLPLA ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 225448363 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002268520.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... 667:4453 3602:4453 3603:4453 29760:4453 PREDICTED: nematode ... resistance protein-like HSPRO2 isoform 1 Vitis vin ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 226529483 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001151109.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... 0:6136 147369:6136 147429:6136 4575:6020 4577:6020 nematode -resistance protein Zea mays MATPDLSPVSPVRRDDKQCAPS ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357125930 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003564642.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... :4262 147385:4262 15367:4262 15368:4262 PREDICTED: nematode ... resistance protein-like HSPRO1-like Brachypodium d ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 356553794 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003545237.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... 14:9870 163735:3769 3846:3769 3847:3769 PREDICTED: nematode ... resistance protein-like HSPRO2-like Glycine max MV ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357492609 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003616593.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... :9870 3814:9870 163742:15503 3877:15503 3880:15503 Nematode ... resistance HS1pro1 protein Medicago truncatula MVD ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 351726303 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001236610.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... 803:9870 3814:9870 163735:3769 3846:3769 3847:3769 nematode ... resistance HS1pro1 protein Glycine max MVDLDWQTKMV ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 350537949 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001234063.1 33090:6270 35493:2337 131221:2337 3193:2337 58023:2583 78536:1868 58024:1868 3398 ... 4 424574:154 4107:154 49274:154 4081:154 root-knot nematode ... resistance protein Solanum lycopersicum MEKRKDIEEA ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 356568543 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003552470.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... 14:9870 163735:3769 3846:3769 3847:3769 PREDICTED: nematode ... resistance protein-like HSPRO2-like Glycine max MV ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 356560204 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003548384.1 33090:30695 35493:21281 131221:21281 3193:21281 58023:14619 78536:14658 58024:146 ... 14:9870 163735:3769 3846:3769 3847:3769 PREDICTED: nematode ... resistance protein-like HSPRO2-like, partial Glyci ...

  7. Combinable protein crop production

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Isobel

    2008-01-01

    This research topic review aims to summarise research knowledge and observational experience of combinable protein crop production in organic farming systems for the UK. European research on peas, faba beans and lupins is included; considering their role in the rotation, nitrogen fixation, varieties, establishment, weed control, yields, problems experienced and intercropping with cereals.

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 226531780 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001147196.1 33090:20715 35493:21884 131221:21884 3193:21884 58023:14330 78536:14347 58024:143 ... 470 4575:5441 4577:5441 deleted in split hand/splt foot ... protein 1 Zea mays MAAAPADAKAEAAKMDLLEDDDEFEEFEIDQ ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159468784 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_001692554.1 33090:22049 3041:6770 3166:4229 3042:4229 3051:3540 3052:3540 3055:3540 coenzyme ... ing protein, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii WTPEQ LYAVVSRVEDYHLFVPWCQ KSRPAAREAGDYMEAELEVGFQ LLVERYTSQ I ... YLTPGRAVRSAVPDSSLFDHLDSTWTMEPGPAPATCWLSFHVDFAFRSQ LHGYLADLFFSEVVKQ MSNAFEGRCARLYGPSS ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18395564 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_027545.1 33090:256 35493:21220 131221:21220 3193:21220 58023:13487 78536:13436 58024:13436 33 ... 0:5421 980083:5421 3701:5421 3702:5521 SPFH/Band 7/PHB ... domain-containing membrane-associated protein Arab ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15239547 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_200221.1 33090:255 35493:10960 131221:10960 3193:10960 58023:6871 78536:476 58024:476 3398:47 ... 0:2583 980083:2583 3701:2583 3702:1873 SPFH/Band 7/PHB ... domain-containing membrane-associated protein Arab ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18417021 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_567778.1 33090:255 35493:10960 131221:10960 3193:10960 58023:6871 78536:476 58024:476 3398:47 ... 0:2583 980083:2583 3701:2583 3702:1873 SPFH/Band 7/PHB ... domain-containing membrane-associated protein Arab ...

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 42571103 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_973625.1 33090:14975 35493:14487 131221:14487 3193:14487 58023:10069 78536:8383 58024:8383 33 ... 980083:5566 3701:5566 3702:5685 protein sodium-and lithium -tolerant 1 Arabidopsis thaliana MENMYMWVFKERPENALG ...

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18404463 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_565864.1 33090:14975 35493:14487 131221:14487 3193:14487 58023:10069 78536:8383 58024:8383 33 ... 980083:5566 3701:5566 3702:5685 protein sodium-and lithium -tolerant 1 Arabidopsis thaliana MENHHPSTLLSMDSSASS ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255590528 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002535292.1 33090:897 35493:1400 131221:1400 3193:1400 58023:1784 78536:1198 58024:1198 3398: ... 5629:537 235880:537 3987:537 3988:537 Protein BABY BOOM , putative Ricinus communis MKHMTRQEFVASIRRKSSGFSRG ...

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 226500350 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001147535.1 33090:897 35493:1400 131221:1400 3193:1400 58023:1784 78536:1198 58024:1198 3398: ... 7369:454 147429:454 4575:168 4577:168 protein BABY BOOM ... 1 Zea mays MASANNWLGFSLSGQDNPQPNQDSSPAAGIDISGASDFY ...

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255585676 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002533523.1 33090:897 35493:1400 131221:1400 3193:1400 58023:1784 78536:1198 58024:1198 3398: ... 5629:537 235880:537 3987:537 3988:537 Protein BABY BOOM , putative Ricinus communis MAPATTNWLSFSLSPMEMLRSST ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308807062 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003080842.1 33090:2448 3041:440 1035538:347 13792:347 70447:323 70448:86 FTSH1_SYNY3 Cell ... div ... ision protein ftsH homolog 1 dbj|BAA10230.1| cell ... division prot (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MRAHFRASVRA ...

  19. Protein Thin Film Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Federici, Stefania; Oliviero, Giulio; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Bergese, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    We report the first example of microcantilever beams that are reversibly driven by protein thin film machines fuelled by cycling the salt concentration of the surrounding solution. We also show that upon the same salinity stimulus the drive can be completely reversed in its direction by introducing a surface coating ligand. Experimental results are throughout discussed within a general yet simple thermodynamic model.

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255541926 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002512027.1 33090:26381 35493:16326 131221:16326 3193:16326 58023:13222 78536:13135 58024:131 ... 7:4031 235629:4031 235880:4031 3987:4031 3988:4031 Ethanol ... tolerance protein GEKO1, putative Ricinus communis ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 30693285 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_198682.3 33090:122 35493:14455 131221:14455 3193:14455 58023:10070 78536:8442 58024:8442 3398 ... 83:3647 3701:3647 3702:3409 protein acclimation of photosynthesis ... to environment Arabidopsis thaliana MGSITVAPGTTVLF ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 334188069 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001190435.1 33090:122 35493:14455 131221:14455 3193:14455 58023:10070 78536:8442 58024:8442 3 ... 83:3647 3701:3647 3702:3409 protein acclimation of photosynthesis ... to environment Arabidopsis thaliana MGSITVAPGTTVLF ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15233302 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_191115.1 33090:10299 35493:193 131221:193 3193:193 58023:114 78536:2677 58024:2677 3398:2677 ... 083:3094 3701:3094 3702:2636 AT-hook protein of GA feedback ... 2 Arabidopsis thaliana MANPWWVGNVAIGGVESPVTSSAPSLH ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 30690333 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_195265.2 33090:10299 35493:193 131221:193 3193:193 58023:114 78536:2677 58024:2677 3398:2677 ... 083:3094 3701:3094 3702:2636 AT-hook protein of GA feedback ... 1 Arabidopsis thaliana MSSYMHPLLGQELHLQRPEDSRTPPDQ ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357439925 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003590240.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... 249 3803:249 3814:249 163742:554 3877:554 3880:554 CRM ... domain-containing protein, putative Medicago trunc ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15232195 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_189392.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 71 ... :2768 3701:2768 3702:2151 RNA-binding CRS1 / YhbY (CRM ) domain protein Arabidopsis thaliana MNQVFKGWSRGMS ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357439975 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003590265.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... 249 3803:249 3814:249 163742:554 3877:554 3880:554 CRM ... domain-containing protein, putative Medicago trunc ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15226402 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_180415.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 71 ... :2768 3701:2768 3702:2151 RNA-binding CRS1 / YhbY (CRM ) domain protein Arabidopsis thaliana MAIAFARGLRKAS ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 225448146 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002263852.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... :525 3603:525 29760:525 PREDICTED: uncharacterized CRM ... domain-containing protein At3g25440, chloroplastic ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 79417439 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_189171.2 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 71 ... 68 980083:2768 3701:2768 3702:2151 uncharacterized CRM ... domain-containing protein Arabidopsis thaliana MGF ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 145332683 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001078207.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... 68 980083:2768 3701:2768 3702:2151 uncharacterized CRM ... domain-containing protein Arabidopsis thaliana MWN ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 240254502 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_179731.4 33090:11082 35493:11019 131221:11019 3193:11019 58023:8723 78536:6595 58024:6595 339 ... :4699 3701:4699 3702:4683 RNA-binding CRS1 / YhbY (CRM ) domain protein Arabidopsis thaliana MATAKSSTLTNLI ...

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 42566743 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_193043.2 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 71 ... :2768 3701:2768 3702:2151 RNA-binding CRS1 / YhbY (CRM ) domain protein Arabidopsis thaliana MLALGYAKEIAQR ...

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15229636 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_188468.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 71 ... :2768 980083:2768 3701:2768 3702:2151 CRS1 / YhbY (CRM ) domain-containing protein Arabidopsis thaliana MA ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 225444203 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002270373.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... :525 3603:525 29760:525 PREDICTED: uncharacterized CRM ... domain-containing protein At3g25440, chloroplastic ...

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357478871 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003609721.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... 249 3803:249 3814:249 163742:554 3877:554 3880:554 CRM ... domain-containing protein, putative Medicago trunc ...

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 334187011 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_194704.2 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 71 ... :2768 980083:2768 3701:2768 3702:2151 CRS1 / YhbY (CRM ) domain-containing protein Arabidopsis thaliana MA ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357167884 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003581379.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... 6 15367:4086 15368:4086 PREDICTED: uncharacterized CRM ... domain-containing protein At3g25440, chloroplastic ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357521229 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003630903.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... 249 3803:249 3814:249 163742:554 3877:554 3880:554 CRM ... domain-containing protein, putative Medicago trunc ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357124470 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003563923.1 33090:207 35493:345 131221:345 3193:345 58023:188 78536:6156 58024:6156 3398:6156 ... 6 15367:4086 15368:4086 PREDICTED: uncharacterized CRM ... domain-containing protein At3g25440, chloroplastic ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357467665 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003604117.1 33090:7684 35493:9413 131221:9413 3193:9413 58023:4125 78536:6265 58024:6265 3398 ... :7265 3814:7265 163742:15887 3877:15887 3880:15887 StAR -related lipid transfer protein Medicago truncatula ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 15236909 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_194422.1 33090:7490 35493:1858 131221:1858 3193:1858 58023:4234 78536:3190 58024:3190 3398:31 ... 22 3699:122 3700:122 980083:122 3701:122 3702:1780 StAR -related lipid-transfer protein Arabidopsis thalian ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357464181 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003602372.1 33090:7684 35493:9413 131221:9413 3193:9413 58023:4125 78536:6265 58024:6265 3398 ... :7265 3814:7265 163742:15887 3877:15887 3880:15887 StAR -related lipid transfer protein Medicago truncatula ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357464183 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003602373.1 33090:7684 35493:9413 131221:9413 3193:9413 58023:4125 78536:6265 58024:6265 3398 ... :7265 3814:7265 163742:15887 3877:15887 3880:15887 StAR -related lipid transfer protein Medicago truncatula ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357467663 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003604116.1 33090:7684 35493:9413 131221:9413 3193:9413 58023:4125 78536:6265 58024:6265 3398 ... :7265 3814:7265 163742:15887 3877:15887 3880:15887 StAR -related lipid transfer protein Medicago truncatula ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255568289 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002525119.1 33090:1951 35493:1293 131221:1293 3193:1293 58023:2877 78536:1422 58024:1422 3398 ... 977:13 235629:13 235880:13 3987:13 3988:13 Adaptin ear -binding coat-associated protein, putative Ricinus ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 18410992 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_567071.1 33090:1951 35493:1293 131221:1293 3193:1293 58023:2877 78536:1422 58024:1422 3398:14 ... 239 3700:239 980083:239 3701:239 3702:5411 Adaptin ear -binding coat-associated protein 1 NECAP-1 Arabidop ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255577954 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002529849.1 33090:1951 35493:1293 131221:1293 3193:1293 58023:2877 78536:1422 58024:1422 3398 ... 977:13 235629:13 235880:13 3987:13 3988:13 Adaptin ear -binding coat-associated protein, putative Ricinus ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 226509020 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001152713.1 33090:451 35493:523 131221:523 3193:523 58023:837 78536:8759 58024:8759 3398:8759 ... 147369:5146 147429:5146 4575:1047 4577:1047 MFT2 - Corn ... MFT-like protein Zea mays MARFVDPLVVGRVIGEVVDLFVPS ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 226532395 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001147266.1 33090:451 35493:523 131221:523 3193:523 58023:837 78536:8759 58024:8759 3398:8759 ... 147369:5146 147429:5146 4575:1047 4577:1047 MFT2 - Corn ... MFT-like protein Zea mays MARFVDPLVVGRVIGEVVDLFVPS ...

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28418 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18827726.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 1160281:2759 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins ... leader ... peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28422 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18817031.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 1160280:2213 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins ... leader ... peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28419 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18835633.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 1160283:2051 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins ... leader ... peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28417 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18822668.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 1160286:2656 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins ... leader ... peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28421 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18849476.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 721123:1760 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins leader ... eader peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28415 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18831825.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 213618:2396 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins leader ... eader peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28416 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18841888.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 1160284:2857 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins ... leader ... peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28420 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18844408.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 1160285:1581 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins ... leader ... peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 28414 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_16388674.1 1117:517 1118:7626 1125:2051 1126:2469 1160282:309 Type 4 prepilin-like proteins leader ... eader peptide-processing enzyme (Includes: Leader ... peptidase ; N-methyltransferase) Microcystis aerug ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 359494868 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_003634859.1 33090:7785 35493:2083 131221:2083 3193:2083 58023:1440 78536:1643 58024:1643 3398 ... 403667:299 3602:299 3603:299 29760:299 PREDICTED: influenza ... virus NS1A-binding protein homolog Vitis vinifera ...