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Sample records for calcium signaling controls

  1. Calcium Signalling: Fishing Out Molecules of Mitochondrial Calcium Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins — MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 — to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport.

  2. The control of calcium signaling in the heart | Eisner | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work on the role of calcium in the heart began in the nineteenth century with Ringer's demonstration that calcium is essential for cardiac contraction. This article provides a brief overview of the regulation of cardiac calcium signalling. Contraction results from the systolic rise of Ca concentration (the Ca transient). This occurs ...

  3. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  4. Calcium signalling: fishing out molecules of mitochondrial calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-10-26

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins - MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 - to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ethylene-mediated cross-talk between calcium-dependent protein kinase and MAPK signaling controls stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Andrea A; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Felix, Georg; Freymark, Gerald; Miersch, Otto; Wasternack, Claus; Boller, Thomas; Jones, Jonathan D G; Romeis, Tina

    2005-07-26

    Plants are constantly exposed to environmental changes and need to integrate multiple external stress cues. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are implicated as major primary Ca2+ sensors in plants. CDPK activation, like activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), is triggered by biotic and abiotic stresses, although distinct stimulus-specific stress responses are induced. To investigate whether CDPKs are part of an underlying mechanism to guarantee response specificity, we identified CDPK-controlled signaling pathways. A truncated form of Nicotiana tabacum CDPK2 lacking its regulatory autoinhibitor and calcium-binding domains was ectopically expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Infiltrated leaves responded to an abiotic stress stimulus with the activation of biotic stress reactions. These responses included synthesis of reactive oxygen species, defense gene induction, and SGT1-dependent cell death. Furthermore, N-terminal CDPK2 signaling triggered enhanced levels of the phytohormones jasmonic acid, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and ethylene but not salicylic acid. These responses, commonly only observed after challenge with a strong biotic stimulus, were prevented when the CDPK's intrinsic autoinhibitory peptide was coexpressed. Remarkably, elevated CDPK signaling compromised stress-induced MAPK activation, and this inhibition required ethylene synthesis and perception. These data indicate that CDPK and MAPK pathways do not function independently and that a concerted activation of both pathways controls response specificity to biotic and abiotic stress.

  7. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon...... appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...

  9. Redox-Dependent Calcium-Mediated Signaling Networks that Control the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Akshaya

    Cellular senescence has evolved as a protective mechanism to arrest growth of cells with oncogenic potential. While senescent cells have lost the ability to divide, they remain metabolically active and adapt a deleterious senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP) central to the progression of several age-associated disease pathologies. The SASP is mechanistically regulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha) whose expression and activity is responsive to the senescence associated (SA) oxidant production and the accompanying disruption of calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Using primary IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts as a model of replicative senescence, we explored the molecular underpinnings driving Ca2+ dysregulation in senescent cells. We establish that the redox-responsive Transient Receptor Potential TRPC6 channel is compromised due to desensitization owing to SA increases in steady state hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. SA dysregulation of Ca2+ is also accompanied by loss of response to H2O2-induced Ca2+ influx that can be rescued with catalase pre-treatments. Senescent cells are also insensitive to Ca2+ entry induced by hyperforin, a specific activator of TRPC6, that can be restored by catalase pre-treatments, further suggesting redox regulation of TRPC6 in senescence. Inhibition of TRPC6 channel activity restores the ability of senescent cells to respond to peroxide-induced Ca2+ in addition to suppressing SASP gene expression. Furthermore, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling regulates SASP by means of modulating TRPC6 channel expression. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that redox and mTOR-mediated regulation of TRPC6 channel modulate SASP gene expression. Further, the gain-of-function mutation of TRPC6 has pathological implications in several chronic pathologies and renders it a viable target in age-associated diseases.

  10. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  11. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Lauren; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, Michael J; Conway, Stuart J; Bootman, Martin D

    2004-12-15

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (approximately 2 microm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the subsarcolemmal calcium signal did not spread in a fully regenerative manner through the interior of a cell. Rather, there was a diminishing centripetal propagation of calcium. The lack of regeneration was due to mitochondria and SERCA pumps preventing the inward movement of calcium. Inhibiting these calcium buffering mechanisms allowed the globalisation of action potential-evoked responses. In addition, physiological positive inotropic agents, such as endothelin-1 and beta-adrenergic agonists, as well as enhanced calcium current, calcium store loading and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate infusion also led to regenerative global responses. The consequence of globalising calcium signals was a significant increase in cellular contraction. These data indicate how calcium signals and their consequences are determined by the interplay of multiple subcellular calcium management systems.

  12. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Decoding calcium signaling across the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Guimarães, Erika S; Andrade, Lídia M; Menezes, Gustavo B; Fatima Leite, M

    2014-09-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an important multifaceted second messenger that regulates a wide range of cellular events. A Ca(2+)-signaling toolkit has been shown to exist in the nucleus and to be capable of generating and modulating nucleoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. Within the nucleus, Ca(2+) controls cellular events that are different from those modulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). This review focuses on nuclear Ca(2+) signals and their role in regulating physiological and pathological processes. ©2014 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  14. Interorganellar Membrane Microdomains: Dynamic Platforms in the Control of Calcium Signaling and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra d'Azzo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic interplay among intracellular organelles occurs at specific membrane tethering sites, where two organellar membranes come in close apposition but do not fuse. Such membrane microdomains allow for rapid and efficient interorganelle communication that contributes to the maintenance of cell physiology. Pathological conditions that interfere with the proper composition, number, and physical vicinity of the apposing membranes initiate a cascade of events resulting in cell death. Membrane contact sites have now been identified that tether the extensive network of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes with the mitochondria, the plasma membrane (PM, the Golgi and the endosomes/lysosomes. Thus far, the most extensively studied are the MAMs, or mitochondria associated ER membranes, and the ER-PM junctions that share functional properties and crosstalk to one another. Specific molecular components that define these microdomains have been shown to promote the interaction in trans between these intracellular compartments and the transfer or exchange of Ca2+ ions, lipids, and metabolic signaling molecules that determine the fate of the cell.

  15. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B Wölwer

    Full Text Available Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation.

  16. The NFP locus of Medicago truncatula controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction upstream of a rapid calcium flux and root hair deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Besma Ben; Shaw, Sidney L; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Maillet, Fabienne; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas; Long, Sharon R; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2003-05-01

    Establishment of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis depends on a molecular dialogue, in which rhizobial nodulation (Nod) factors act as symbiotic signals, playing a key role in the control of specificity of infection and nodule formation. Using nodulation-defective (Nod-) mutants of Medicago truncatula to study the mechanisms controlling Nod factor perception and signalling, we have previously identified five genes that control components of a Nod factor-activated signal transduction pathway. Characterisation of a new M. truncatula Nod- mutant led to the identification of the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) locus. The nfp mutant has a novel phenotype among Nod- mutants of M. truncatula, as it does not respond to Nod factors by any of the responses tested. The nfp mutant thus shows no rapid calcium flux, the earliest detectable Nod factor response of wild-type plants, and no root hair deformation. The nfp mutant is also deficient in Nod factor-induced calcium spiking and early nodulin gene expression. While certain genes controlling Nod factor signal transduction also control the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, the nfp mutant shows a wild-type mycorrhizal phenotype. These data indicate that the NFP locus controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction, upstream of previously identified genes and specific to nodulation.

  17. Calcium signalling silencing in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiser, Maura

    2017-06-15

    Subcellular calcium signalling silencing is a novel and distinct cellular and molecular adaptive response to rapid cardiac activation. Calcium signalling silencing develops during short-term sustained rapid atrial activation as seen clinically during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is the first 'anti-arrhythmic' adaptive response in the setting of AF and appears to counteract the maladaptive changes that lead to intracellular Ca(2+) signalling instability and Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Calcium signalling silencing results in a failed propagation of the [Ca(2+) ]i signal to the myocyte centre both in patients with AF and in a rabbit model. This adaptive mechanism leads to a substantial reduction in the expression levels of calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves remains low. Less Ca(2+) release per [Ca(2+) ]i transient, increased fast Ca(2+) buffering strength, shortened action potentials and reduced L-type Ca(2+) current contribute to a substantial reduction of intracellular [Na(+) ]. These features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing are distinct and in contrast to the changes attributed to Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Some features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing prevail in human AF suggesting that the Ca(2+) signalling 'phenotype' in AF is a sum of Ca(2+) stabilizing (Ca(2+) signalling silencing) and Ca(2+) destabilizing (arrhythmogenic unstable Ca(2+) signalling) factors. Calcium signalling silencing is a part of the mechanisms that contribute to the natural progression of AF and may limit the role of Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity after the onset of AF. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  18. Calcium Signaling and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstrom, Andrew P; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2017-06-09

    There has been a significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which calcium (Ca2+) ions mediate various types of cardiac arrhythmias. A growing list of inherited gene defects can cause potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, congenital long QT syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In addition, acquired deficits of multiple Ca2+-handling proteins can contribute to the pathogenesis of arrhythmias in patients with various types of heart disease. In this review article, we will first review the key role of Ca2+ in normal cardiac function-in particular, excitation-contraction coupling and normal electric rhythms. The functional involvement of Ca2+ in distinct arrhythmia mechanisms will be discussed, followed by various inherited arrhythmia syndromes caused by mutations in Ca2+-handling proteins. Finally, we will discuss how changes in the expression of regulation of Ca2+ channels and transporters can cause acquired arrhythmias, and how these mechanisms might be targeted for therapeutic purposes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Calcium Signals from the Vacuole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Schönknecht

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The vacuole is by far the largest intracellular Ca2+ store in most plant cells. Here, the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of vacuolar Ca2+ release and Ca2+ uptake is summarized, and how different vacuolar Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ pumps may contribute to Ca2+ signaling in plant cells is discussed. To provide a phylogenetic perspective, the distribution of potential vacuolar Ca2+ transporters is compared for different clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. There are several candidates for vacuolar Ca2+ channels that could elicit cytosolic [Ca2+] transients. Typical second messengers, such as InsP3 and cADPR, seem to trigger vacuolar Ca2+ release, but the molecular mechanism of this Ca2+ release still awaits elucidation. Some vacuolar Ca2+ channels have been identified on a molecular level, the voltage-dependent SV/TPC1 channel, and recently two cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channels. However, their function in Ca2+ signaling still has to be demonstrated. Ca2+ pumps in addition to establishing long-term Ca2+ homeostasis can shape cytosolic [Ca2+] transients by limiting their amplitude and duration, and may thus affect Ca2+ signaling.

  20. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Extracellular ATP Induces Calcium Signaling in Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B M; Jo, H; Park, G; Kim, Y H; Park, C K; Jung, S J; Chung, G; Oh, S B

    2017-02-01

    Odontoblasts form dentin at the outermost surface of tooth pulp. An increasing level of evidence in recent years, along with their locational advantage, implicates odontoblasts as a secondary role as sensory or immune cells. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a well-characterized signaling molecule in the neuronal and immune systems, and its potential involvement in interodontoblast communications was recently demonstrated. In an effort to elaborate the ATP-mediated signaling pathway in odontoblasts, the current study performed single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescent detection to investigate the expression of ATP receptors related to calcium signal in odontoblasts from incisal teeth of 8- to 10-wk-old rats, and demonstrated an in vitro response to ATP application via calcium imaging experiments. While whole tissue RT-PCR analysis detected P2Y2, P2Y4, and all 7 subtypes (P2X1 to P2X7) in tooth pulp, single-cell RT-PCR analysis of acutely isolated rat odontoblasts revealed P2Y2, P2Y4, P2X2, P2X4, P2X6, and P2X7 expression in only a subset (23% to 47%) of cells tested, with no evidence for P2X1, P2X3, and P2X5 expression. An increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in response to 100μM ATP, which was repeated after pretreatment of thapsigargin or under the Ca(2+)-free condition, suggested function of both ionotropic and metabotropic ATP receptors in odontoblasts. The enhancement of ATP-induced calcium response by ivermectin and inhibition by 5-(3-bromophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzofuro[3,2-e]-1,4-diazepin-2-one (5-BDBD) confirmed a functional P2X4 subtype in odontoblasts. Positive calcium response to 2',3'-O-(benzoyl-4-benzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and negative response to α,β-methylene ATP suggested P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 as functional subunits in rat odontoblasts. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis of the cells with confirmed calcium response and immunofluorescent detection further corroborated the expression of P2X

  2. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau

    2007-01-01

    nodulation have been cloned in model legumes. Among them, Medicago truncatula DMI1 (DOESN'T MAKE INFECTIONS1) is required for the generation of nucleus-associated calcium spikes in response to the rhizobial signaling molecule Nod factor. DMI1 encodes a membrane protein with striking similarities...... to the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum potassium channel (MthK). The cytosolic C terminus of DMI1 contains a RCK (regulator of the conductance of K+) domain that in MthK acts as a calcium-regulated gating ring controlling the activity of the channel. Here we show that a dmi1 mutant lacking the entire C terminus acts...... as a dominant-negative allele interfering with the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules and abolishing the induction of calcium spikes by the G-protein agonist Mastoparan. Using both the full-length DMI1 and this dominant-negative mutant protein we show that DMI1 increases the sensitivity of a sodium...

  4. Can calcium signaling be harnessed for cancer immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence shows the importance of the immune system in controlling tumor appearance and growth. Immunotherapy is defined as the treatment of a disease by inducing, enhancing or suppressing an immune response. In the context of cancer treatment, it involves breaking tolerance to a cancer-specific self-antigen and/or enhancing the existing anti-tumor immune response, be it specific or not. Part of the complexity in developing such treatment is that cancers are selected to escape adaptive or innate immune responses. These escape mechanisms are numerous and they may cumulate in one cancer. Moreover, different cancers of a same type may present different combinations of escape mechanisms. The limited success of immunotherapeutics in the clinic as stand-alone products may in part be explained by the fact that most of them only activate one facet of the immune response. It is important to identify novel methods to broaden the efficacy of immunotherapeutics. Calcium signaling is central to numerous cellular processes, leading to immune responses, cancer growth and apoptosis induced by cancer treatments. Calcium signaling in cancer therapy and control will be integrated to current cancer immunotherapy approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium Signaling in Health and Disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium wave signaling in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARKASH, JAI; ASOTRA, KAMLESH

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ functions as an important signaling messenger right from beginning of the life to final moment of the end of the life. Ca2+ is needed at several steps of the cell cycle such as early G1, at the G1/S, and G2/M transitions. The Ca2+ signals in the form of time-dependent changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, [Ca2+]i, are presented as brief spikes organized into regenerative Ca2+ waves. Ca2+-mediated signaling pathways have also been shown to play important roles in carcinogenesis such as transformation of normal cells to cancerous cells, tumor formation and growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Since the global Ca2+ oscillations arise from Ca2+ waves initiated locally, it results in stochastic oscillations because although each cell has many IP3Rs and Ca2+ ions, the law of large numbers does not apply to the initiating event which is restricted to very few IP3Rs due to steep Ca2+ concentration gradients. The specific Ca2+ signaling information is likely to be encoded in a calcium code as the amplitude, duration, frequency, waveform or timing of Ca2+ oscillations and decoded again at a later stage. Since Ca2+ channels or pumps involved in regulating Ca2+ signaling pathways show altered expression in cancer, one can target these Ca2+ channels and pumps as therapeutic options to decrease proliferation of cancer cells and to promote their apoptosis. These studies can provide novel insights into alterations in Ca2+ wave patterns in carcinogenesis and lead to development of newer technologies based on Ca2+ waves for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. PMID:20875431

  6. Astrocyte calcium signalling orchestrates neuronal synchronization in organotypic hippocampal slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tomoe; Abe, Reimi; Nakayama, Ryota; Asada, Akiko; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are thought to detect neuronal activity in the form of intracellular calcium elevations; thereby, astrocytes can regulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. Little is known, however, about how the astrocyte calcium signal regulates the activity of neuronal populations. In this study, we addressed this issue using functional multineuron calcium imaging in hippocampal slice cultures. Under normal conditions, CA3 neuronal networks exhibited temporally correlated activity patterns, occasionally generating large synchronization among a subset of cells. The synchronized neuronal activity was correlated with astrocyte calcium events. Calcium buffering by an intracellular injection of a calcium chelator into multiple astrocytes reduced the synaptic strength of unitary transmission between pairs of surrounding pyramidal cells and caused desynchronization of the neuronal networks. Uncaging the calcium in the astrocytes increased the frequency of neuronal synchronization. These data suggest an essential role of the astrocyte calcium signal in the maintenance of basal neuronal function at the circuit level. PMID:24710057

  7. Calcium signals and oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Takeda, Noriyo; Stricker, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    In various oocytes and eggs of animals, transient elevations in cytoplasmic calcium ion concentrations are known to regulate key processes during fertilization and the completion of meiosis. However, whether or not calcium transients also help to reinitiate meiotic progression at the onset of oocyte maturation remains controversial. This article summarizes reports of calcium signals playing essential roles during maturation onset (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in several kinds of marine invertebrate oocytes. Conversely, other data from the literature, as well as previously unpublished findings for jellyfish oocytes, fail to support the view that calcium signals are required for GVBD. In addition to assessing the effects of calcium transients on GVBD in marine invertebrate oocytes, the ability of maturing oocytes to enhance their calcium-releasing capabilities after GVBD is also reviewed. Furthermore, possible explanations are proposed for the contradictory results that have been obtained regarding calcium signals during oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

  8. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  9. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  10. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  11. Calcium signaling in plant cells in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E.

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2 + concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2 + signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in eighties, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2 + changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumably specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2 + ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravis ensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane

  12. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    OpenAIRE

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nuc...

  13. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    When there is an extracellular change, cells get the message either by introduction of calcium ions into ... as it precipitates phosphate, the established energy currency of cells. Prolonged high intracellular calcium ... trigger proteins upon binding with free calcium ion(s) change their confirmation to modulate enzymes and ion ...

  14. Insulin induces calcium signals in the nucleus of rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Michele A; Gomes, Dawidson A; Andrade, Viviane A; Leite, M Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-11-01

    Insulin is an hepatic mitogen that promotes liver regeneration. Actions of insulin are mediated by the insulin receptor, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase. It is currently thought that signaling via the insulin receptor occurs at the plasma membrane, where it binds to insulin. Here we report that insulin induces calcium oscillations in isolated rat hepatocytes, and that these calcium signals depend upon activation of phospholipase C and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, but not upon extracellular calcium. Furthermore, insulin-induced calcium signals occur in the nucleus, and are temporally associated with selective depletion of nuclear phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and translocation of the insulin receptor to the nucleus. These findings suggest that the insulin receptor translocates to the nucleus to initiate nuclear, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium signals in rat hepatocytes. This novel signaling mechanism may be responsible for insulin's effects on liver growth and regeneration.

  15. When Neurons Encounter Nanoobjects: Spotlight on Calcium Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lovisolo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized objects are increasingly present in everyday life and in specialized technological applications. In recent years, as a consequence of concern about their potential adverse effects, intense research effort has led to a better understanding of the physicochemical properties that underlie their biocompatibility or potential toxicity, setting the basis for a rational approach to their use in the different fields of application. Among the functional parameters that can be perturbed by interaction between nanoparticles (NPs and living structures, calcium homeostasis is one of the key players and has been actively investigated. One of the most relevant biological targets is represented by the nervous system (NS, since it has been shown that these objects can access the NS through several pathways; moreover, engineered nanoparticles are increasingly developed to be used for imaging and drug delivery in the NS. In neurons, calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through a complex set of mechanisms controlling both calcium increases and recovery to the basal levels, and even minor perturbations can have severe consequences on neuronal viability and function, such as excitability and synaptic transmission. In this review, we will focus on the available knowledge about the effects of NPs on the mechanisms controlling calcium signalling and homeostasis in neurons. We have taken into account the data related to environmental NPs, and, in more detail, studies employing engineered NPs, since their more strictly controlled chemical and physical properties allow a better understanding of the relevant parameters that determine the biological responses they elicit. The literature on this specific subject is all quite recent, and we have based the review on the data present in papers dealing strictly with nanoparticles and calcium signals in neuronal cells; while they presently amount to about 20 papers, and no related review is available, the field is

  16. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  17. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events. PMID:17663775

  18. Calcium Signaling in Interstitial Cells: Focus on Telocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mihaela Radu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we describe the current knowledge on calcium signaling pathways in interstitial cells with a special focus on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs, interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs, and telocytes. In detail, we present the generation of Ca2+ oscillations, the inositol triphosphate (IP3/Ca2+ signaling pathway and modulation exerted by cytokines and vasoactive agents on calcium signaling in interstitial cells. We discuss the physiology and alterations of calcium signaling in interstitial cells, and in particular in telocytes. We describe the physiological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the pacemaking activity (e.g., intestinal, urinary, uterine or vascular pacemaking activity and to the reproductive function. We also present the pathological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the aortic valve calcification or intestinal inflammation. Moreover, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by calcium signaling in telocytes in the uterine, cardiac and urinary physiology, and also in various pathologies, including immune response, uterine and cardiac pathologies.

  19. DMPD: Calcium signaling in lymphocytes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 Jun;20(3):250-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Calcium signaling in lymphocytes. PubmedID 18515054 Ti...):250-8. Pathway - PNG File (.png) SVG File (.svg) HTML File (.html) CSML File (.

  20. Signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiupeng; Ito, Atsuo; Li, Xia; Sogo, Yu; Oyane, Ayako

    2011-06-01

    In this review, the current knowledge of signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating are described. Although signal molecules regulate a variety of cellular processes, it is difficult to sustain the regulation activity for a long term when the signal molecules are only injected in a free form. The signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation on a substrate surface is a very promising process to achieve sustained regulation activity of the signal molecules by controlled and localized delivery of the signal molecules to specific body sites (implantation sites). However, the significance of immobilizing signal molecules with calcium phosphate coatings and their biomedical application are not systematically illustrated. For this purpose, the presently existing coprecipitation methods and strategies on biomedical application are summarized and discussed.

  1. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation. PMID:25322156

  2. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    into biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate...... whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally...... different mechanisms for this propagation. One mechanism involves the secretion of a nucleotide, possibly ATP, acting in an autocrine action to purinergic P2Y2 receptors on the neighboring cells, leading to intracellular IP3 generation and subsequent release of calcium from intracellular stores. The other...

  3. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    component of the calcium signalling repertoire within motile growth cones, regulating guidance-cue-induced calcium release and maintaining basal cytosolic calcium.

  4. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Bannai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria calcium signaling in hepatic metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in glucose homeostasis, and both metabolic inflexibility and insulin resistance predispose to the development of hepatic metabolic diseases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which play a key role in the control of hepatic metabolism, also interact at contact points defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), in order to exchange metabolites and calcium (Ca 2+ ) and regulate cellular homeostasis and signaling. Here, we overview the role of the liver in the control of glucose homeostasis, mainly focusing on the independent involvement of mitochondria, ER and Ca 2+ signaling in both healthy and pathological contexts. Then we focus on recent data highlighting MAM as important hubs for hormone and nutrient signaling in the liver, thus adapting mitochondria physiology and cellular metabolism to energy availability. Lastly, we discuss how chronic ER-mitochondria miscommunication could participate to hepatic metabolic diseases, pointing MAM interface as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Proliferation, cell cycle exit, and onset of terminal differentiation in cultured keratinocytes: pre-programmed pathways in control of C-Myc and Notch1 prevail over extracellular calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolly, Carine; Suter, Maja M; Müller, Eliane J

    2005-05-01

    So far it was reported that a switch from low to high extracellular calcium induces growth arrest and terminal differentiation in cultured human and mouse keratinocytes. We had observed that both canine and mouse keratinocytes proliferate in high (1.8 mM, respectively, 1.2 mM) or low (0.09 and 0.06 mM) calcium-containing medium. In-depth analysis of this phenomenon revealed, as reported here, that the switch between proliferation and terminal differentiation occurred irrespective of calcium conditions when the canine and murine keratinocytes reach confluency. The "confluency switch" coincided with transcriptional upregulation of cell cycle inhibitors p21(WAF1) and p27(KIP1) as well as proteins marking onset of terminal differentiation. It was further accompanied by downregulation and nuclear clearance of c-Myc, and conversely activation of Notch1, which are shown to be critical determinants of this process. Together, this study demonstrates that even in the absence of and similar to their in vivo environment, cultured canine and mouse keratinocytes follow a pre-defined differentiation program. This program is in control of c-Myc and Notch1 and does not require complementary signals for onset of terminal differentiation except those given by cell-cell contact. Once triggered, completion of the terminal differentiation process depends on elevated extracellular calcium to stabilize intercellular junctions and components of the cornified envelope.

  7. Nuclear Calcium Signaling Induces Expression of the Synaptic Organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Stefanie N.; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2–4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. PMID:25527504

  8. Nuclear calcium signaling induces expression of the synaptic organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Stefanie N; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-02-27

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2-4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Nuclear calcium signalling in the regulation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bading, Hilmar

    2013-09-01

    Synaptic activity initiates biochemical processes that have various outcomes, including the formation of memories, increases in neuronal survival and the development of chronic pain and addiction. Virtually all activity-induced, long-lasting adaptations of brain functions require a dialogue between synapses and the nucleus that results in changes in gene expression. Calcium signals that are induced by synaptic activity and propagate into the nucleus are a major route for synapse-to-nucleus communication. Recent findings indicate that diverse forms of neuroadaptation require calcium transients in the nucleus to switch on the necessary genomic programme. Deficits in nuclear calcium signalling as a result of a reduction in synaptic activity or increased extrasynaptic NMDA receptor signalling may underlie the aetiologies of various diseases, including neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction.

  10. CBL-CIPK network for calcium signaling in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Sheng

    Plants sense their environment by signaling mechanisms involving calcium. Calcium signals are encoded by a complex set of parameters and decoded by a large number of proteins including the more recently discovered CBL-CIPK network. The calcium-binding CBL proteins specifi-cally interact with a family of protein kinases CIPKs and regulate the activity and subcellular localization of these kinases, leading to the modification of kinase substrates. This represents a paradigm shift as compared to a calcium signaling mechanism from yeast and animals. One example of CBL-CIPK signaling pathways is the low-potassium response of Arabidopsis roots. When grown in low-K medium, plants develop stronger K-uptake capacity adapting to the low-K condition. Recent studies show that the increased K-uptake is caused by activation of a specific K-channel by the CBL-CIPK network. A working model for this regulatory pathway will be discussed in the context of calcium coding and decoding processes.

  11. Calcium signaling induced by angiotensin II in the pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, D C; Sarosi, G A; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature and mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling in AR42J cells. Cytosolic calcium concentrations were determined using fura-2-based microfluorimetry. Angiotensin II causes elevations in free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in the rat pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J. The mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling were examined using fura-2-based fluorescent digital microscopy. Angiotensin II caused dose-dependent increments in [Ca2+]i over a concentration range of 0.1-1,000 nM, with an average increment of 243 +/- 16 nM at an angiotensin II concentration of 1,000 nM. Dup753, an AT1-specific antagonist, inhibited angiotensin II-evoked signaling, whereas the AT2 antagonist PD123,319 had no effect. Preincubation with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 reduced the response in [Ca2+]i to 25% of that of the control. Thapsigargin abolished angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist heparin introduced by radiofrequency electroporation inhibited responses to 46 +/- 6% of controls. Angiotensin II-evoked signals were reduced in magnitude and duration by elimination of Ca2+ from the extracellular buffer. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) had no effect. Angiotensin II did not stimulate cyclic AMP or suppress vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulated cyclic AMP production over the concentration range that caused Ca2+ signaling.

  12. Calcium, calcium-sensing receptor and growth control in the colonic mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    A role for calcium in epithelial growth control is well-established in the colon and other tissues. In the colon, Ca2+ “drives” the differentiation process. This results in sequestration of ß-catenin in the cell surface / cytoskeletal complex, leaving ß-catenin unavailable to serve as a growth-promoting transcription enhancer in the nucleus. The signaling events that lead from Ca2+ stimulation to differentiation are not fully understood. A critical role for the extracellular calcium-sensing r...

  13. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... The idea that ``a node whose function is dependant on maximum number of other nodes tends to be the center of a sub network” is used to divide a large signalling network into smaller sub networks. Inclusion of node(s) into sub networks(s) is dependant on the outdegree of the node(s). Here outdegree of ...

  14. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    mechanism involves the passage of a small messenger through gap junctions to the cytoplasm of the neighboring cells, inducing depolarization of the plasma membrane with subsequent opening of membrane bound voltage-operated calcium channels. Next, we found that osteoblasts can propagate these signals...

  15. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nucle...

  16. Localization of calcium signals by a mobile calcium buffer in frog saccular hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W M

    1994-05-01

    A recent study (Roberts, 1993) of saccular hair cells from grass frogs (Rana pipiens) has suggested a mechanism by which the unusually high concentrations of calcium-binding proteins found in certain sensory receptors and neurons, particularly in the auditory system, can influence short-range intracellular calcium signaling. In frog saccular hair cells, the mechanism operates within arrays of calcium channels and calcium-activated potassium channels that are involved in the cells' electrical resonance and synaptic transmission. The present study tests the hypothesis that calbindin-D28k, one of the most abundant proteins in these cells, can serve as a mobile calcium buffer that reduces and localizes changes in the intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) by shuttling calcium away from the channel arrays. Based upon theoretical analysis and computer modeling, it is shown that [Ca2+]i near one or more open channels quickly reaches a steady-state level determined primarily by two properties of the buffer, the mean time (tau c) before it captures a free-calcium ion and a replenishment factor (R), which are related to the buffer's diffusional mobility (DBu), association rate constant (kon), and concentration (Bo) by tau c = (konB0)-1 and R = B0DBu. Simulation of calcium entry through a channel array showed that approximately 1.5 mM of a molecule with the diffusional and binding properties expected for calbindin-D28k (Bo approximately 8 mM calcium-binding sites) is needed to reproduce the previous experimental results. A lower concentration (B0 = 2 mM) was almost completely depleted within the channel array by a modest calcium current (8 pA = 12% of calcium channels open), but still had two important effects: it caused [Ca2+]i to fall steeply with distance outside the array (space constant < 50 nm), and returned [Ca2+]i quickly to the resting level after the channels closed. A high concentration of calbindin-D28k can thus influence the cell's electrical

  17. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  18. Calcium signaling in the cochlea – Molecular mechanisms and physiopathological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceriani Federico

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium ions (Ca2+ regulate numerous and diverse aspects of cochlear and vestibular physiology. This review focuses on the Ca2+ control of mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission in sensory hair cells, as well as on Ca2+ signalling in non-sensory cells of the developing cochlea.

  19. Calcium sensing receptor signalling in physiology and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sarah C; Thiem, Ursula; Roth, Susanne; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Fetahu, Irfete Sh; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Gomes, Ana Rita; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Bruggeman, Frank; Mentaverri, Romuald; Riccardi, Daniela; Kallay, Enikö

    2013-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a class C G-protein-coupled receptor that is crucial for the feedback regulation of extracellular free ionised calcium homeostasis. While extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) is considered the primary physiological ligand, the CaSR is activated physiologically by a plethora of molecules including polyamines and l-amino acids. Activation of the CaSR by different ligands has the ability to stabilise unique conformations of the receptor, which may lead to preferential coupling of different G proteins; a phenomenon termed 'ligand-biased signalling'. While mutations of the CaSR are currently not linked with any malignancies, altered CaSR expression and function are associated with cancer progression. Interestingly, the CaSR appears to act both as a tumour suppressor and an oncogene, depending on the pathophysiology involved. Reduced expression of the CaSR occurs in both parathyroid and colon cancers, leading to loss of the growth suppressing effect of high Ca(2+)o. On the other hand, activation of the CaSR might facilitate metastasis to bone in breast and prostate cancer. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving CaSR signalling in different tissues, aided by a systems biology approach, will be instrumental in developing novel drugs that target the CaSR or its ligands in cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 12th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemkova, Hana; Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Aguilera, Greti; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the tdimer2(12) form of Discosoma red fluorescent protein under control of the proopiomelanocortin gene's regulatory elements are a useful model for studying corticotrophs. Using these mice, we studied the ion channels and mechanisms controlling corticotroph excitability. Corticotrophs were either quiescent or electrically active, with a 22-mV difference in the resting membrane potential (RMP) between the 2 groups. In quiescent cells, CRH depolarized the membrane, leading to initial single spiking and sustained bursting; in active cells, CRH further facilitated or inhibited electrical activity and calcium spiking, depending on the initial activity pattern and CRH concentration. The stimulatory but not inhibitory action of CRH on electrical activity was mimicked by cAMP independently of the presence or absence of arachidonic acid. Removal of bath sodium silenced spiking and hyperpolarized the majority of cells; in contrast, the removal of bath calcium did not affect RMP but reduced CRH-induced depolarization, which abolished bursting electrical activity and decreased the spiking frequency but not the amplitude of single spikes. Corticotrophs with inhibited voltage-gated sodium channels fired calcium-dependent action potentials, whereas cells with inhibited L-type calcium channels fired sodium-dependent spikes; blockade of both channels abolished spiking without affecting the RMP. These results indicate that the background voltage-insensitive sodium conductance influences RMP, the CRH-depolarization current is driven by a cationic conductance, and the interplay between voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels plays a critical role in determining the status and pattern of electrical activity and calcium signaling.

  1. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Phytohormone Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Wuwu Xu; Wenchao Huang

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs/CDPKs) are Ca2+-sensors that decode Ca2+ signals into specific physiological responses. Research has reported that CDPKs constitute a large multigene family in various plant species, and play diverse roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. Although numerous CDPKs have been exhaustively studied, and many of them have been found to be involved in plant hormone biosynthesis and response mechanisms, a comprehensive overview of the manner i...

  2. Calcium signaling in synapse-to-nucleus communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenston, Anna M; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-11-01

    Changes in the intracellular concentration of calcium ions in neurons are involved in neurite growth, development, and remodeling, regulation of neuronal excitability, increases and decreases in the strength of synaptic connections, and the activation of survival and programmed cell death pathways. An important aspect of the signals that trigger these processes is that they are frequently initiated in the form of glutamatergic neurotransmission within dendritic trees, while their completion involves specific changes in the patterns of genes expressed within neuronal nuclei. Accordingly, two prominent aims of research concerned with calcium signaling in neurons are determination of the mechanisms governing information conveyance between synapse and nucleus, and discovery of the rules dictating translation of specific patterns of inputs into appropriate and specific transcriptional responses. In this article, we present an overview of the avenues by which glutamatergic excitation of dendrites may be communicated to the neuronal nucleus and the primary calcium-dependent signaling pathways by which synaptic activity can invoke changes in neuronal gene expression programs.

  3. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Smaili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+ and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+ are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes maylead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.Aumentos transientes no cálcio citosólico (Ca c2+ e mitocondrial (Ca m2+ são elementos essenciais no controle de muitos processos fisiológicos. No entanto, aumentos sustentados do Ca c2+ e do Ca m2+ podem contribuir para o estresse oxidativo ea morte celular. Muitos eventos estão relacionados ao aumentono Ca c2+, incluindo a regulação e ativação de várias enzimas dependentes de Ca2+ como as fosfolipases, proteases e nucleases. A mitocôndria e o retículo endoplasmático têm um papel central na manutenção da homeostase intracellular de Ca c2+ e na regulação da morte celular. Várias evidências mostraram que, na presença de certos estímulos apoptóticos, a ativação dos processos mitocondriais pode promover a liberação de citocromo c, seguida da ativação de caspases, fragmentação nuclear e morte celular por apoptose. O objetivo desta revisão é mostrar como aumentos na sinalização de

  4. Distinct molecular regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha isozyme controlled by its N-terminal region: functional role in calcium/calpain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Yaffe, Yakey; Licht-Murava, Avital; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Jacek; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Hirschberg, Koret; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2011-04-15

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is expressed as two isozymes α and β. They share high similarity in their catalytic domains but differ in their N- and C-terminal regions, with GSK-3α having an extended glycine-rich N terminus. Here, we undertook live cell imaging combined with molecular and bioinformatic studies to understand the distinct functions of the GSK-3 isozymes focusing on GSK-3α N-terminal region. We found that unlike GSK-3β, which shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, GSK-3α was excluded from the nucleus. Deletion of the N-terminal region of GSK-3α resulted in nuclear localization, and treatment with leptomycin B resulted in GSK-3α accumulation in the nucleus. GSK-3α rapidly accumulated in the nucleus in response to calcium or serum deprivation, and accumulation was strongly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. This nuclear accumulation was not mediated by cleavage of the N-terminal region or phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Rather, we show that calcium-induced GSK-3α nuclear accumulation was governed by GSK-3α binding with as yet unknown calpain-sensitive protein or proteins; this binding was mediated by the N-terminal region. Bioinformatic and experimental analyses indicated that nuclear exclusion of GSK-3α was likely an exclusive characteristic of mammalian GSK-3α. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of GSK-3α reduced the nuclear pool of β-catenin and its target cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that the N-terminal region of GSK-3α is responsible for its nuclear exclusion and that binding with a calcium/calpain-sensitive product enables GSK-3α nuclear retention. We further uncovered a novel link between calcium and nuclear GSK-3α-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  5. T-type calcium channel: a privileged gate for calcium entry and control of adrenal steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Florian Rossier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular calcium plays a crucial role in modulating a variety of functions such as muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression or cell growth. Calcium signaling has been however shown to be more complex than initially thought. Indeed, it is confined within cell microdomains and different calcium channels are associated with different functions, as shown by various channelopathies.Sporadic mutations on voltage-operated L-type calcium channels in adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown recently to be the second most prevalent genetic abnormalities present in human aldosterone-producing adenoma. The observed modification of the threshold of activation of the mutated channels not only provides an explanation for this gain of function but reminds us on the importance of maintaining adequate electrophysiological characteristics to make channels able to exert specific cellular functions. Indeed, the contribution to steroid production of the various calcium channels expressed in adrenocortical cells is not equal and the reason has been investigated for a long time. Given the very negative resting potential of these cells, and the small membrane depolarization induced by their physiological agonists, low threshold T-type calcium channels are particularly well suited for responding under these conditions and conveying calcium into the cell, at the right place for controlling steroidogenesis. In contrast, high threshold L-type channels are normally activated by much stronger cell depolarizations. The fact that dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, specific for L-type channels, are poorly efficient for reducing aldosterone secretion either in vivo or in vitro, strongly supports the view that these two types of channels differently affect steroid biosynthesis.Whether a similar analysis is transposable to fasciculata cells and cortisol secretion is one of the questions addressed in the present review. No similar mutations on L-type or T

  6. Calcium signatures and signaling events orchestrate plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peiguo; Jauregui, Edgard; Du, Liqun; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Poovaiah, B W

    2017-08-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) acts as an essential second messenger connecting the perception of microbe signals to the establishment of appropriate immune and symbiotic responses in plants. Accumulating evidence suggests that plants distinguish different microorganisms through plasma membrane-localized pattern recognition receptors. The particular recognition events are encoded into Ca2+ signatures, which are sensed by diverse intracellular Ca2+ binding proteins. The Ca2+ signatures are eventually decoded to distinct downstream responses through transcriptional reprogramming of the defense or symbiosis-related genes. Recent observations further reveal that Ca2+-mediated signaling is also involved in negative regulation of plant immunity. This review is intended as an overview of Ca2+ signaling during immunity and symbiosis, including Ca2+ responses in the nucleus and cytosol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  8. Excessive Signal Transduction of Gain-of-Function Variants of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Are Associated with Increased ER to Cytosol Calcium Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mise, Annarita; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA) and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA). Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt) and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K) variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate) receptor inputs to cell function. PMID:24244430

  9. The microRNA mir-71 inhibits calcium signaling by targeting the TIR-1/Sarm1 adaptor protein to control stochastic L/R neuronal asymmetry in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Hsieh

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans left and right AWC olfactory neurons communicate to establish stochastic asymmetric identities, AWC(ON and AWC(OFF, by inhibiting a calcium-mediated signaling pathway in the future AWC(ON cell. NSY-4/claudin-like protein and NSY-5/innexin gap junction protein are the two parallel signals that antagonize the calcium signaling pathway to induce the AWC(ON fate. However, it is not known how the calcium signaling pathway is downregulated by nsy-4 and nsy-5 in the AWC(ON cell. Here we identify a microRNA, mir-71, that represses the TIR-1/Sarm1 adaptor protein in the calcium signaling pathway to promote the AWC(ON identity. Similar to tir-1 loss-of-function mutants, overexpression of mir-71 generates two AWC(ON neurons. tir-1 expression is downregulated through its 3' UTR in AWC(ON, in which mir-71 is expressed at a higher level than in AWC(OFF. In addition, mir-71 is sufficient to inhibit tir-1 expression in AWC through the mir-71 complementary site in the tir-1 3' UTR. Our genetic studies suggest that mir-71 acts downstream of nsy-4 and nsy-5 to promote the AWC(ON identity in a cell autonomous manner. Furthermore, the stability of mature mir-71 is dependent on nsy-4 and nsy-5. Together, these results provide insight into the mechanism by which nsy-4 and nsy-5 inhibit calcium signaling to establish stochastic asymmetric AWC differentiation.

  10. Local perinuclear calcium signals associated with mitosis-entry in early sea urchin embryos

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Using calcium-sensitive dyes together with their dextran conjugates and confocal microscopy, we have looked for evidence of localized calcium signaling in the region of the nucleus before entry into mitosis, using the sea urchin egg first mitotic cell cycle as a model. Global calcium transients that appear to originate from the nuclear area are often observed just before nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB). In the absence of global increases in calcium, confocal microscopy using Calcium Green- 1...

  11. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    resulted in faster repolarization and increased AP related calcium signals relative to the control (i. e. in the absence of the extra conductance at the same membrane potential. In conclusion, our results revealed that activation of potassium currents can profoundly enhance dendritic bAP-evoked calcium signals in GC dendrites, thus providing a previously unknown state-dependent modulatory mechanism in dendritic signalization.

  12. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T; Zipfel, Warren R; Nathanson, Michael H

    2003-05-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus.

  13. CASK regulates CaMKII autophosphorylation in neuronal growth, calcium signalling and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Michael Gillespie

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII activity plays a fundamental role in learning and memory. A key feature of CaMKII in memory formation is its ability to be regulated by autophosphorylation, which switches its activity on and off during synaptic plasticity. The synaptic scaffolding protein CASK (calcium (Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM associated serine kinase is also important for learning and memory, as mutations in CASK result in intellectual disability and neurological defects in humans. We show that in Drosophila larvae, CASK interacts with CaMKII to control neuronal growth and calcium signalling. Furthermore, deletion of the CaMK-like and L27 domains of CASK (CASK β null or expression of overactive CaMKII (T287D produced similar effects on synaptic growth and Ca2+ signalling. CASK overexpression rescues the effects of CaMKII overactivity, consistent with the notion that CASK and CaMKII act in a common pathway that controls these neuronal processes. The reduction in Ca2+ signalling observed in the CASK β null mutant caused a decrease in vesicle trafficking at synapses. In addition, the decrease in Ca2+ signalling in CASK mutants was associated with an increase in Ether-à-go-go (EAG potassium (K+ channel localisation to synapses. Reducing EAG restored the decrease in Ca2+ signalling observed in CASK mutants to the level of wildtype, suggesting that CASK regulates Ca2+ signalling via EAG. CASK knockdown reduced both appetitive associative learning and odour evoked Ca2+ responses in Drosophila mushroom bodies, which are the learning centres of Drosophila. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation.

  14. CASK regulates CaMKII autophosphorylation in neuronal growth, calcium signaling, and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, John M.; Hodge, James J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activity plays a fundamental role in learning and memory. A key feature of CaMKII in memory formation is its ability to be regulated by autophosphorylation, which switches its activity on and off during synaptic plasticity. The synaptic scaffolding protein CASK (calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) associated serine kinase) is also important for learning and memory, as mutations in CASK result in intellectual disability and neurological defects in humans. We show that in Drosophila larvae, CASK interacts with CaMKII to control neuronal growth and calcium signaling. Furthermore, deletion of the CaMK-like and L27 domains of CASK (CASK β null) or expression of overactive CaMKII (T287D) produced similar effects on synaptic growth and Ca2+ signaling. CASK overexpression rescues the effects of CaMKII overactivity, consistent with the notion that CASK and CaMKII act in a common pathway that controls these neuronal processes. The reduction in Ca2+ signaling observed in the CASK β null mutant caused a decrease in vesicle trafficking at synapses. In addition, the decrease in Ca2+ signaling in CASK mutants was associated with an increase in Ether-à-go-go (EAG) potassium (K+) channel localization to synapses. Reducing EAG restored the decrease in Ca2+ signaling observed in CASK mutants to the level of wildtype, suggesting that CASK regulates Ca2+ signaling via EAG. CASK knockdown reduced both appetitive associative learning and odor evoked Ca2+ responses in Drosophila mushroom bodies, which are the learning centers of Drosophila. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation. PMID:24062638

  15. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Grant

    Full Text Available Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium.

  16. Thapsigargin-induced nuclear calcium signals in rat basophilic leukaemia cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Horikoshi, Y; Furuno, T; Teshima, R; Sawada, J; Nakanishi, M

    1994-01-01

    By a confocal fluorescence microscope with an argon-ion laser (488 nm) and a He-Cd laser (325 nm) we have studied thapsigargin-induced calcium signals in individual rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells. In the presence or absence of external calcium ions, thapsigargin-induced calcium signals were transferred to the nucleus as well as to the cytoplasm of RBL-2H3 cells. The calcium signals were generally much stronger in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. However, some of the RBL-2H3 cells ...

  17. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  18. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E. L.

    2003-10-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca 2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80 th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface

  19. The Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter controls skeletal muscle trophism in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, Cristina; Gherardi, Gaia; Zamparo, Ilaria; Raffaello, Anna; Boncompagni, Simona; Chemello, Francesco; Cagnin, Stefano; Braga, Alessandra; Zanin, Sofia; Pallafacchina, Giorgia; Zentilin, Lorena; Sandri, Marco; De Stefani, Diego; Protasi, Feliciano; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Summary Muscle atrophy contributes to the poor prognosis of many pathophysiological conditions, but pharmacological therapies are still limited. Muscle activity leads to major swings in mitochondrial [Ca2+] which control aerobic metabolism, cell death and survival pathways. We have investigated in vivo the effects of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle function and trophism, by overexpressing or silencing the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU). The results demonstrate that both in developing and in adult muscles MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake has a marked trophic effect that does not depend on aerobic control, but impinges on two major hypertrophic pathways of skeletal muscle, PGC-1α4 and IGF1-AKT/PKB. In addition, MCU overexpression protects from denervation-induced atrophy. These data reveal a novel Ca2+-dependent organelle-to-nucleus signaling route, which links mitochondrial function to the control of muscle mass and may represent a possible pharmacological target in conditions of muscle loss. PMID:25732818

  20. Plasma membrane calcium pump and sodium-calcium exchanger in maintenance and control of calcium concentrations in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juska, Alfonsas

    2010-01-29

    The purpose of this research was to elucidate the activity of the mechanisms responsible for control of cytosolic calcium concentration in platelets by modeling the time-course of the concentration changing in response to discharge of the intracellular stores or store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). The parameters estimated as a result of model fitting to experimental data are related to physiological or pathological state of the cells. It has been shown that: (a) the time-course is determined by the passive calcium fluxes and activities of the corresponding mechanisms; (b) the decline in the concentration (after its rise) develops due to activity of plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) both in the case of discharge of the stores of platelets contained in calcium-free medium and in the case of SOCE; (c) impulsive extrusion of calcium in response to its sudden influx, presumably, is the main function of PMCA; (d) the function of sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) is to extrude calcium excess by permanent counteracting its influx. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting...... in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal......43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium....

  3. Identification of a Calcium Signalling Pathway of S-[6]-Gingerol in HuH-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium signals in hepatocytes control cell growth, proliferation, and death. Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily are candidate calcium influx channels. NFκB activation strictly depends on calcium influx and often induces antiapoptotic genes favouring cell survival. Previously, we reported that S-[6]-gingerol is an efficacious agonist of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1 in neurones. In this study, we tested the effect of S-[6]-gingerol on HuH-7 cells using the Fluo-4 calcium assay, RT-qPCR, transient cell transfection, and luciferase measurements. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced a transient rise in [Ca2+]i in HuH-7 cells. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by S-[6]-gingerol was abolished by preincubation with EGTA and was also inhibited by the TRPV1 channel antagonist capsazepine. Expression of TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells was confirmed by mRNA analysis as well as a test for increase of [Ca2+]i by TRPV1 agonist capsaicin and its inhibition by capsazepine. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced rapid NFκB activation through TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells. Furthermore, S-[6]-gingerol-induced NFκB activation was dependent on the calcium gradient and TRPV1. The rapid NFκB activation by S-[6]-gingerol was associated with an increase in mRNA levels of NFκB-target genes: cIAP-2, XIAP, and Bcl-2 that encode antiapoptotic proteins.

  4. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2013-11-27

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (I T) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I H) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with I T generating a rebound burst and I H controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing I H to increase the efficacy of I T and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  5. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D.T. Engbers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs. In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH are activated during trains of IPSPs. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT, and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum generates calcium signalling microdomains around the nucleus and spindle in syncytial Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, H; McDougall, A; Whitaker, M

    2006-06-01

    Cell cycle calcium signals are generated by inositol trisphosphate-mediated release of calcium from internal stores [Ciapa, Pesando, Wilding and Whitaker (1994) Nature (London) 368, 875-878; Groigno and Whitaker (1998) Cell 92, 193-204]. The major internal calcium store is the ER (endoplasmic reticulum): the spatial organization of the ER during mitosis is important in defining a microdomain around the nucleus and mitotic spindle in early Drosophila embryos [Parry, McDougall and Whitaker (2005) J. Cell Biol. 171, 47-59]. Nuclear divisions in syncytial Drosophila embryos are accompanied by both cortical and nuclear localized calcium transients. Mitosis is prevented by the InsP(3) antagonists Xestospongin C and heparin. Nuclear-localized transients and cortical transients rely on extraembryonic calcium, suggesting that ER calcium levels are maintained by calcium influx.

  7. The calcium feedback loop and T cell activation: how cytoskeleton networks control intracellular calcium flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Noah; Reicher, Barak; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2014-02-01

    During T cell activation, the engagement of a T cell with an antigen-presenting cell (APC) results in rapid cytoskeletal rearrangements and a dramatic increase of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration, downstream to T cell antigen receptor (TCR) ligation. These events facilitate the organization of an immunological synapse (IS), which supports the redistribution of receptors, signaling molecules and organelles towards the T cell-APC interface to induce downstream signaling events, ultimately supporting T cell effector functions. Thus, Ca(2+) signaling and cytoskeleton rearrangements are essential for T cell activation and T cell-dependent immune response. Rapid release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, e.g. the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggers the opening of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, residing in the plasma membrane. These channels facilitate a sustained influx of extracellular Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane in a process termed store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Because CRAC channels are themselves inhibited by Ca(2+) ions, additional factors are suggested to enable the sustained Ca(2+) influx required for T cell function. Among these factors, we focus here on the contribution of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. The TCR-mediated increase in intracellular Ca(2+) evokes a rapid cytoskeleton-dependent polarization, which involves actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) reorientation. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of Ca(2+) flux and cytoskeletal rearrangements, and further describe the way by which the cytoskeletal networks feedback to Ca(2+) signaling by controlling the spatial and temporal distribution of Ca(2+) sources and sinks, modulating TCR-dependent Ca(2+) signals, which are required for an appropriate T cell response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters

  8. [SIGNAL MEDIATORS IN PLANTS RESPONSES AGAINST ABIOTIC STRESSORS: CALCIUM, REACTIVE OXYGEN AND NITROGEN SPECIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolupaev, Yu E; Karpets, Yu V; Dmitriev, O P

    2015-01-01

    The perception of signals of abiotic stressors by plant cells is accompanied by the increase of cytosolic calcium concentration, content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) which execute the role of signal mediators at the activation of gene expression, supervising protective reactions. Calcium ions, ROS, and NO are in the multiple functional interactions which provides the intensifying and transduction of signals into genetic apparatus as well as their attenuation. The increase of content, at least, of one of these signal mediators in cells can cause activation of some signal cascades and formation of plant adaptive reactions.

  9. Effects of Staphylococcus aureus-hemolysin A on calcium signalling in immortalized human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichstaedt, Stefanie; Gäbler, Karoline; Below, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Kohler, Christian; Engelmann, Susanne; Hildebrandt, Petra; Völker, Uwe; Hecker, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2009-02-01

    Part of the innate defence of bronchial epithelia against bacterial colonization is secretion of salt and water which generally depends on coordinated actions of receptor-mediated cAMP- and calcium signalling. The hypothesis that Staphylococcus aureus-virulence factors interfere with endogenous signals in host cells was tested by measuring agonist-mediated changes in [Ca(2+)](i) in S9 cells upon pre-incubation with bacterial secretory products. S9 cells responded to mAChR-activation with calcium release from intracellular stores and capacitative calcium influx. Treatment of cells with culture supernatants of S. aureus (COL) or with recombinant alpha-hemolysin (Hla) resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in [Ca(2+)](i). High concentrations of Hla (2000 ng/ml) resulted in elevations in [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by accelerated calcium influx. A general Hla-mediated permeabilization of S9 cell membranes to small molecules, however, did not occur. Lower concentrations of Hla (200 ng/ml) induced a reduction in [Ca(2+)](i)-levels during the sustained plateau phase of receptor-mediated calcium signalling which was abolished by pre-incubation of cells with carboxyeosin, an inhibitor of the plasma membrane calcium-ATPase. This indicates that low concentrations of Hla change calcium signalling by accelerating pump-driven extrusion of Ca(2+) ions. In vivo, such a mechanism may result in attenuation of calcium-mediated cellular defence functions and facilitation of bacterial adherence to the bronchial epithelium.

  10. Calcium carbonates: induced biomineralization with controlled macromorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Aileen; Kastner, Anne; Harries, Dennis; Wierzbicka-Wieczorek, Maria; Majzlan, Juraj; Büchel, Georg; Kothe, Erika

    2017-11-01

    Biomineralization of (magnesium) calcite and vaterite by bacterial isolates has been known for quite some time. However, the extracellular precipitation has hardly ever been linked to different morphologies of the minerals that are observed. Here, isolates from limestone-associated groundwater, rock and soil were shown to form calcite, magnesium calcite or vaterite. More than 92 % of isolates were indeed able to form carbonates, while abiotic controls failed to form minerals. The crystal morphologies varied, including rhombohedra, prisms and pyramid-like macromorphologies. Different conditions like varying temperature, pH or media components, but also cocultivation to test for collaborative effects of sympatric bacteria, were used to differentiate between mechanisms of calcium carbonate formation. Single crystallites were cemented with bacterial cells; these may have served as nucleation sites by providing a basic pH at short distance from the cells. A calculation of potential calcite formation of up to 2 g L-1 of solution made it possible to link the microbial activity to geological processes.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in oxidative stress : On the impact of neuronal KCa channels & calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honrath, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondriale dysfunctie in oxidatieve stress – over de impact van neuronale KCa kanalen en calcium signalering in neurodegeneratie (246 words) Neurodegeneratieve ziektes, zoals de ziekte van Alzheimer of Parkinson, worden gekarakteriseerd door een verlies van neuronen in verschillende

  12. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway: e0144392

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jinxiang Wang; Pingping Zhang; Na Liu; Qian Wang; Jixian Luo; Lan Wang

    2015-01-01

      Calcium ion (Ca2+) is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd...

  13. Human osteoblastic cells propagate intercellular calcium signals by two different mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Henriksen, Z; Brot, C

    2000-01-01

    Effective bone remodeling requires the coordination of bone matrix deposition by osteoblastic cells, which may occur via soluble mediators or via direct intercellular communication. We have previously identified two mechanisms by which rat osteoblastic cell lines coordinate calcium signaling amon...

  14. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  15. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  16. Novel strategies in drug discovery of the calcium-sensing receptor based on biased signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Smajilovic, Sanela; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic kidney disease is hyperphosphatemia due to renal phosphate retention. Prolonged parathyroid gland exposure to hyperphosphatemia leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by hyperplasia of the glands and excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which cause...... by virtue of it not affecting calcitonin secretion. The present review will focus on recent advancements in understanding signaling and biased signaling of the CaSR, and how that may be utilized to discover new and smarter drugs targeting the CaSR....... targeting the CaSR and can be used to effectively control and reduce PTH secretion in PTH-related diseases. Cinacalcet is a positive allosteric modulator of the CaSR and affects PTH secretion from parathyroid glands by shifting the calcium-PTH concentration-response curve to the left. One major disadvantage...

  17. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  18. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn to calcium-fortified (or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look for calcium-fortified orange juice, soy or rice milk, breads, and cereal. Beans. You can get decent ...

  19. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. L-type calcium channel targeting and local signalling in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Robin M; Colecraft, Henry M

    2013-05-01

    In the heart, Ca(2+) influx via Ca(V)1.2 L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) is a multi-functional signal that triggers muscle contraction, controls action potential duration, and regulates gene expression. The use of LTCC Ca(2+) as a multi-dimensional signalling molecule in the heart is complicated by several aspects of cardiac physiology. Cytosolic Ca(2+) continuously cycles between ~100 nM and ~1 μM with each heartbeat due to Ca(2+) linked signalling from LTCCs to ryanodine receptors. This rapid cycling raises the question as to how cardiac myocytes distinguish the Ca(2+) fluxes originating through L-type channels that are dedicated to contraction from Ca(2+) fluxes originating from other L-type channels that are used for non-contraction-related signalling. In general, disparate Ca(2+) sources in cardiac myocytes such as current through differently localized LTCCs as well as from IP3 receptors can signal selectively to Ca(2+)-dependent effectors in local microdomains that can be impervious to the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) transients that drive contraction. A particular challenge for diversified signalling via cardiac LTCCs is that they are voltage-gated and, therefore, open and presumably flood their microdomains with Ca(2+) with each action potential. Thus spatial localization of Cav1.2 channels to different types of microdomains of the ventricular cardiomyocyte membrane as well as the existence of particular macromolecular complexes in each Cav1.2 microdomain are important to effect different types of Cav1.2 signalling. In this review we examine aspects of Cav1.2 structure, targeting and signalling in two specialized membrane microdomains--transverse tubules and caveolae.

  1. Moringa oleifera-rich diet and T cell calcium signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attakpa, E S; Bertin, G A; Chabi, N W; Ategbo, J-M; Seri, B; Khan, N A

    2017-11-24

    Moringa oleifera is a plant whose fruits, roots and leaves have been advocated for traditional medicinal uses. The physicochemical analysis shows that Moringa oleifera contains more dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than saturated fatty acids (SFA). The consumption of an experimental diet enriched with Moringa oleifera extracts lowered blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats as compared to rats fed an unsupplemented control diet. Anti-CD3-stimulated T cell proliferation was diminished in both strains of rats fed the Moringa oleifera. The experimental diet lowered secretion of interleukin-2 in SHR, but not in WKY rats compared with rats fed the control diet. Studies of platelets from patients with primary hypertension and from SHR support the notion that the concentration of intracellular free calcium [Ca(2+)](i) is modified in both clinical and experimental hypertension. We observed that the basal, [Ca(2+)](i) was lower in T cells of SHR than in those of WKY rats fed the control diet. Feeding the diet with Moringa oleifera extracts to WKY rats did not alter basal [Ca(2+)](i) in T cells but increased basal [Ca(2+)](i) in SHR. Our study clearly demonstrated that Moringa oleifera exerts antihypertensive effects by inhibiting the secretion of IL-2 and modulates T cell calcium signaling in hypertensive rats.

  2. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Involvement of calcium and calmodulin signaling in adaptation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heat stress is a common form of stress suffered by plants. Therefore, plants have evolved mechanisms to cope with the problems caused by high temperatures. In this study, the involvement of calcium ion and calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM) in the protection against heat stress-induced oxidative damage in tomato (Solanum ...

  4. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  5. Rapid, Long-Distance Electrical and Calcium Signaling in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Gyu; Hilleary, Richard; Swanson, Sarah J; Kim, Su-Hwa; Gilroy, Simon

    2016-04-29

    Plants integrate activities throughout their bodies using long-range signaling systems in which stimuli sensed by just a few cells are translated into mobile signals that can influence the activities in distant tissues. Such signaling can travel at speeds well in excess of millimeters per second and can trigger responses as diverse as changes in transcription and translation levels, posttranslational regulation, alterations in metabolite levels, and even wholesale reprogramming of development. In addition to the use of mobile small molecules and hormones, electrical signals have long been known to propagate throughout the plant. This electrical signaling network has now been linked to waves of Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species that traverse the plant and trigger systemic responses. Analysis of cell type specificity in signal propagation has revealed the movement of systemic signals through specific cell types, suggesting that a rapid signaling network may be hardwired into the architecture of the plant.

  6. Differential and chaotic calcium signatures in the symbiosis signaling pathway of legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuta, Sonja; Hazledine, Saul; Sun, Jongho; Miwa, Hiroki; Morris, Richard J; Downie, J Allan; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2008-07-15

    Understanding how the cell uses a limited set of proteins to transduce very different signals into specific cellular responses is a central goal of cell biology and signal transduction disciplines. Although multifunctionality in signal transduction is widespread, the mechanisms that allow differential modes of signaling in multifunctional signaling pathways are not well defined. In legume plants, a common symbiosis signaling pathway composed of at least seven proteins mediates infection by both mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobial bacteria. Here we show that the symbiosis signaling pathway in legumes differentially transduces both bacterial and fungal signals (inputs) to generate alternative calcium responses (outputs). We show that these differential calcium responses are dependent on the same proteins, DMI1 and DMI2, for their activation, indicating an inherent flexibility in this signaling pathway. By using Lyapunov and other mathematical analyses, we discovered that both bacterial-induced and fungal-induced calcium responses are chaotic in nature. Chaotic systems require minimal energy to produce a wide spectrum of outputs in response to marginally different inputs. The flexibility provided by chaotic systems is consistent with the need to transduce two different signals, one from rhizobial bacteria and one from mycorrhizal fungi, by using common components of a single signaling pathway.

  7. Retinoic acid affects calcium signaling in adult molluscan neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesprini, Nicholas D.; Dawson, Taylor F.; Yuan, Ye; Bruce, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid, the active metabolite of vitamin A, is important for nervous system development, regeneration, as well as cognitive functions of the adult central nervous system. These central nervous system functions are all highly dependent on neuronal activity. Retinoic acid has previously been shown to induce changes in the firing properties and action potential waveforms of adult molluscan neurons in a dose- and isomer-dependent manner. In this study, we aimed to determine the cellular pathways by which retinoic acid might exert such effects, by testing the involvement of pathways previously shown to be affected by retinoic acid. We demonstrated that the ability of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) to induce electrophysiological changes in cultured molluscan neurons was not prevented by inhibitors of protein synthesis, protein kinase A or phospholipase C. However, we showed that atRA was capable of rapidly reducing intracellular calcium levels in the same dose- and isomer-dependent manner as shown previously for changes in neuronal firing. Moreover, we also demonstrated that the transmembrane ion flux through voltage-gated calcium channels was rapidly modulated by retinoic acid. In particular, the peak current density was reduced and the inactivation rate was increased in the presence of atRA, over a similar time course as the changes in cell firing and reductions in intracellular calcium. These studies provide further evidence for the ability of atRA to induce rapid effects in mature neurons. PMID:25343782

  8. Filamin and phospholipase C-ε are required for calcium signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismar Kovacevic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue.

  9. Calcium homeostasis and signaling in fungi and their relevance for pathogenicity of yeasts and filamentous fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tisi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Though fungi show peculiarities in the purposes and specific traits of calcium signaling pathways, the general scheme and the most important players are well conserved if compared to higher eukaryotes. This provides a powerful opportunity either to investigate shared features using yeast as a model or to exploit fungal specificities as potential targets for antifungal therapies. The sequenced genomes from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa were already published more than ten years ago. More recently the genome sequences of filamentous fungi of Aspergillus genus, some of which threatening pathogens, and dimorphic fungi Ustilago maydis were published, giving the chance to identify several proteins involved in calcium signaling based on their homology to yeast or mammalian counterparts. Nonetheless, unidentified calcium transporters are still present in these organisms which await to be molecularly characterized. Despite the relative simplicity in yeast calcium machinery and the availability of sophisticated molecular tools, in the last years, a number of new actors have been identified, albeit not yet fully characterized. This review will try to describe the state of the art in calcium channels and calcium signaling knowledge in yeast, with particular attention to the relevance of this knowledge with respect to pathological fungi.

  10. The impact of mitochondrial endosymbiosis on the evolution of calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2015-03-01

    At high concentrations, calcium has detrimental effects on biological systems. Life likely arose in a low calcium environment, and the first cells evolved mechanisms to maintain this environment internally. Bursts of calcium influx followed by efflux or sequestration thus developed in a functional context. For example, in proto-cells with exterior energy-converting membranes, such bursts could be used to depolarize the membrane. In this way, proto-cells could maintain maximal phosphorylation (metabolic state 3) and moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while avoiding the resting state (metabolic state 4) and high levels of ROS. This trait is likely a shared primitive characteristic of prokaryotes. When eukaryotes evolved, the α-proteobacteria that gave rise to proto-mitochondria inhabited a novel environment, the interior of the proto-eukaryote that had a low calcium concentration. In this environment, metabolic homeostasis was difficult to maintain, and there were inherent risks from ROS, yet depolarizing the proto-mitochondrial membrane by calcium influx was challenging. To maintain metabolic state 3, proto-mitochondria were required to congregate near calcium influx points in the proto-eukaryotic membrane. This behavior, resulting in embryonic forms of calcium signaling, may have occurred immediately after the initiation of the endosymbiosis. Along with ROS, calcium may have served as one of the key forms of crosstalk among the community of prokaryotes that led to the eukaryotic cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PKA controls calcium influx into motor neurons during a rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels.

  12. Mitochondrial calcium signaling mediates rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation in suprachiasmatic nucleus astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkeen, Jeff F; Womac, Alisa D; Earnest, David J; Zoran, Mark J

    2011-06-08

    The master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls neural and neuroendocrine rhythms in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are abundant in the SCN, and this cell type displays circadian rhythms in clock gene expression and extracellular accumulation of ATP. Still, the intracellular signaling pathways that link the SCN clockworks to circadian rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation remain unclear. Because ATP release from astrocytes is a calcium-dependent process, we investigated the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) and ATP accumulation and have demonstrated that intracellular Ca(2+) levels fluctuate in an antiphase relationship with rhythmic ATP accumulation in rat SCN2.2 cell cultures. Furthermore, mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels were rhythmic and maximal in precise antiphase with the peak in cytosolic Ca(2+). In contrast, our finding that peak mitochondrial Ca(2+) occurred during maximal extracellular ATP accumulation suggests a link between these cellular rhythms. Inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter disrupted the rhythmic production and extracellular accumulation of ATP. ATP, calcium, and the biological clock affect cell division and have been implicated in cell death processes. Nonetheless, rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation was not disrupted by cell cycle arrest and was not correlated with caspase activity in SCN2.2 cell cultures. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial Ca(2+) mediates SCN2.2 rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation and suggest a role for circadian gliotransmission in SCN clock function.

  13. Astrocytic Calcium Waves Signal Brain Injury to Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kraft

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries, such as stroke or trauma, induce neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ to a neurogenic response. Very little is known about the molecular cues that signal tissue damage, even over large distances, to the SVZ. Based on our analysis of gene expression patterns in the SVZ, 48 hr after an ischemic lesion caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion, we hypothesized that the presence of an injury might be transmitted by an astrocytic traveling calcium wave rather than by diffusible factors or hypoxia. Using a newly established in vitro system we show that calcium waves induced in an astrocytic monolayer spread to neural stem and progenitor cells and increase their self-renewal as well as migratory behavior. These changes are due to an upregulation of the Notch signaling pathway. This introduces the concept of propagating astrocytic calcium waves transmitting brain injury signals over long distances.

  14. Purinergic and Calcium Signaling in Macrophage Function and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal N Desai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to a fundamental role in cellular bioenergetics, the purine nucleotide adenosine triphosphate (ATP plays a crucial role in the extracellular space as a signaling molecule. ATP and its metabolites serve as ligands for a family of receptors that are collectively referred to as purinergic receptors. These receptors were first described and characterized in the nervous system but it soon became evident that they are expressed ubiquitously. In the immune system, purinergic signals regulate the migration and activation of immune cells and they may also orchestrate the resolution of inflammation (1, 2. The intracellular signal transduction initiated by purinergic receptors is strongly coupled to Ca2+-signaling and coordination of these pathways plays a critical role in innate immunity. In this review, we provide an overview of purinergic and Ca2+-signaling in the context of macrophage phenotypic polarization and discuss the implications on macrophage function in physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Comparative genomics of MAP kinase and calcium-calcineurin signalling components in plant and human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispail, Nicolas; Soanes, Darren M; Ant, Cemile; Czajkowski, Robert; Grünler, Anke; Huguet, Romain; Perez-Nadales, Elena; Poli, Anna; Sartorel, Elodie; Valiante, Vito; Yang, Meng; Beffa, Roland; Brakhage, Axel A; Gow, Neil A R; Kahmann, Regine; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Lenasi, Helena; Perez-Martin, José; Talbot, Nicholas J; Wendland, Jürgen; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway control fundamental aspects of fungal growth, development and reproduction. Core elements of these signalling pathways are required for virulence in a wide array of fungal pathogens of plants and mammals. In this review, we have used the available genome databases to explore the structural conservation of three MAPK cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway in ten different fungal species, including model organisms, plant pathogens and human pathogens. While most known pathway components from the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae appear to be widely conserved among taxonomically and biologically diverse fungi, some of them were found to be restricted to the Saccharomycotina. The presence of multiple paralogues in certain species such as the zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae and the incorporation of new functional domains that are lacking in S. cerevisiae signalling proteins, most likely reflect functional diversification or adaptation as filamentous fungi have evolved to occupy distinct ecological niches.

  16. Calcium signalling through L-type calcium channels: role in pathophysiology of spinal nociceptive transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Lapirot, Olivier; Radwani, Houda; Aby, Franck; Nagy, Frédéric; Landry, Marc; Fossat, Pascal

    2017-02-18

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitous channels in the CNS. L-type calcium channels (LTCs) are mostly post-synaptic channels regulating neuronal firing and gene expression. They play a role in important physio-pathological processes such as learning and memory, Parkinson's disease, autism and, as recognized more recently, in the pathophysiology of pain processes. Classically, the fundamental role of these channels in cardiovascular functions has limited the use of classical molecules to treat LTC-dependent disorders. However, when applied locally in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the three families of LTC pharmacological blockers - dihydropyridines (nifedipine), phenylalkylamines (verapamil) and benzothiazepines (diltiazem) - proved effective in altering short-term sensitization to pain, inflammation-induced hyperexcitability and neuropathy-induced allodynia. Two subtypes of LTCs, Cav 1.2 and Cav 1.3, are expressed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, where Cav 1.2 channels are localized mostly in the soma and proximal dendritic shafts, and Cav 1.3 channels are more distally located in the somato-dendritic compartment. Together with their different kinetics and pharmacological properties, this spatial distribution contributes to their separate roles in shaping short- and long-term sensitization to pain. Cav 1.3 channels sustain the expression of plateau potentials, an input/output amplification phenomenon that contributes to short-term sensitization to pain such as prolonged after-discharges, dynamic receptive fields and windup. The Cav 1.2 channels support calcium influx that is crucial for the excitation-transcription coupling underlying nerve injury-induced dorsal horn hyperexcitability. These subtype-specific cellular mechanisms may have different consequences in the development and/or the maintenance of pathological pain. Recent progress in developing more specific compounds for each subunit will offer new opportunities to modulate LTCs

  17. Ascorbic Acid Induces Necrosis in Human Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma via ROS, PKC, and Calcium Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Min-Woo; Cho, Heui-Seung; Kim, Sun-Hun; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2017-02-01

    Ascorbic acid induces apoptosis, autophagy, and necrotic cell death in cancer cells. We investigated the mechanisms by which ascorbic acid induces death in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma Hep2 cells. Ascorbic acid markedly reduced cell viability and induced death without caspase activation and an increase in cytochrome c. Hep2 cells exposed to ascorbic acid exhibited membrane rupture and swelling, the morphological characteristics of necrotic cell death. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in Hep2 cells treated with ascorbic acid, and pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine blocked ascorbic acid-induced cell death. Ascorbic acid also stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) signaling, especially PKC α/β activation, and subsequently increased cytosolic calcium levels. However, ascorbic acid-induced necrotic cell death was inhibited by Ro-31-8425 (PKC inhibitor) and BAPTA-AM (cytosolic calcium-selective chelator). ROS scavenger NAC inhibited PKC activation induced by ascorbic acid and Ro-31-8425 suppressed the level of cytosolic calcium increased by ascorbic acid, indicating that ROS is represented as an upstream signal of PKC pathway and PKC activation leads to the release of calcium into the cytosol, which ultimately regulates the induction of necrosis in ascorbic acid-treated Hep2 cells. These data demonstrate that ascorbic acid induces necrotic cell death through ROS generation, PKC activation, and cytosolic calcium signaling in Hep2 cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 417-425, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Targeting Calcium Signaling Induces Epigenetic Reactivation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Lee, Justin T; Wang, Youjun; Beaudry, Annie; Madireddi, Priyanka; Garriga, Judith; Malouf, Gabriel G; Dumont, Sarah; Dettman, Elisha J; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Chung, Woonbok; Childers, Wayne E; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Cui, Ying; Baylin, Stephen B; Gill, Donald L; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2016-03-15

    Targeting epigenetic pathways is a promising approach for cancer therapy. Here, we report on the unexpected finding that targeting calcium signaling can reverse epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In a screen for drugs that reactivate silenced gene expression in colon cancer cells, we found three classical epigenetic targeted drugs (DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and 11 other drugs that induced methylated and silenced CpG island promoters driving a reporter gene (GFP) as well as endogenous TSGs in multiple cancer cell lines. These newly identified drugs, most prominently cardiac glycosides, did not change DNA methylation locally or histone modifications globally. Instead, all 11 drugs altered calcium signaling and triggered calcium-calmodulin kinase (CamK) activity, leading to MeCP2 nuclear exclusion. Blocking CamK activity abolished gene reactivation and cancer cell killing by these drugs, showing that triggering calcium fluxes is an essential component of their epigenetic mechanism of action. Our data identify calcium signaling as a new pathway that can be targeted to reactivate TSGs in cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Controls on Calcium Isotope Fractionation in Cultured Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisakurek, B.; Boehm, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Hathorne, E.; Garbe-Schoenberg, D.; Erez, J.

    2008-12-01

    Calcium isotopes have recently emerged as an important tool to study the biomineralization pathways and processes in foraminifera. We analyzed calcium isotopes in planktonic and benthic foraminifera grown under controlled laboratory conditions at different salinity, temperature and pH values. Our results indicate that calcium isotope fractionation in foraminifera is controlled by more than one environmental parameter, requiring a common mechanism to explain the observed trends. There is a significant negative correlation between calcium isotope fractionation and the distribution coefficient of strontium in planktonic foraminifera, which has the same slope (within error) as that in inorganic calcite (Tang et al, 2008). In analogy to these inorganic experiments, calcium isotopic fractionation and Sr/Ca ratios in planktonic foraminifera appear to be mainly controlled by the precipitation rate. However, the two regressions (inorganic vs. foraminiferal) have a small but constant offset from each other by about 0.2 permil in delta(44Ca/40Ca) for a given D(Sr). This offset is presumably due to a vital effect that can be modeled via Rayleigh distillation from an internal biomineralization reservoir (Elderfield et al., 1996). Our preliminary results suggest that such a reservoir behaves as a semi-open system, wherein only less than 25 percent of the calcium taken up from seawater is being utilized for calcification. Elderfield, H., Bertram, C.J., Erez, J. 1996. A biomineralization model for the incorporation of trace elements into foraminiferal calcium carbonate. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 142:409-423. Tang J., Dietzel M., Boehm F., Koehler S.J., Eisenhauer A. 2008. Sr2+/Ca2+ and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during inorganic calcite formation: II. Ca isotopes. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 72:3733-3745.

  20. Reciprocal Interaction of Dendrite Geometry and Nuclear Calcium-VEGFD Signaling Gates Memory Consolidation and Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemstedt, Thekla J; Bengtson, C Peter; Ramírez, Omar; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-07-19

    Nuclear calcium is an important signaling end point in synaptic excitation-transcription coupling that is critical for long-term neuroadaptations. Here, we show that nuclear calcium acting via a target gene, VEGFD, is required for hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation and extinction in mice. Nuclear calcium-VEGFD signaling upholds the structural integrity and complexity of the dendritic arbor of CA1 neurons that renders those cells permissive for the efficient generation of synaptic input-evoked nuclear calcium transients driving the expression of plasticity-related genes. Therefore, the gating of memory functions rests on the reciprocally reinforcing maintenance of an intact dendrite geometry and a functional synapse-to-nucleus communication axis. In psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic application of VEGFD may help to stabilize dendritic structures and network connectivity, which may prevent cognitive decline and could boost the efficacy of extinction-based exposure therapies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study uncovers a reciprocal relationship between dendrite geometry, the ability to generate nuclear calcium transients in response to synaptic inputs, and the subsequent induction of expression of plasticity-related and dendritic structure-preserving genes. Insufficient nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 hippocampal neurons and, consequently, reduced expression of the nuclear calcium target gene VEGFD, a dendrite maintenance factor, leads to reduced-complexity basal dendrites of CA1 neurons, which severely compromises the animals' consolidation of both memory and extinction memory. The structure-protective function of VEGFD may prove beneficial in psychiatric disorders as well as neurodegenerative and aging-related conditions that are associated with loss of neuronal structures, dysfunctional excitation-transcription coupling, and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376946-10$15.00/0.

  1. Consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars to improve dietary calcium intake of healthy women: randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Lee

    Full Text Available Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day (intervention to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control. At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P <0.0001 or control diets (775 mg/d, P = 0.0001 periods. Furthermore, the addition of 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily for the 3 week intervention did not significantly increase total energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  2. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  3. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron-astrocyte networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Koreshkov, R.N.; Brazhe, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission...... in astrocytic-neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally....

  4. Role of local vitamin D signaling and cellular calcium transport system in bone homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Ritsuko

    2014-01-01

    Mouse genetic studies have demonstrated that the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] endocrine system is required for calcium (Ca(2+)) and bone homeostasis. These studies reported severe hypocalcemia and impaired bone mineralization associated with rickets in mutant mice. Specific phenotypes of these mice with an engineered deletion of 1,25(OH)2D cell signaling resemble the features observed in humans with the same congenital disease or severe 1,25(OH)2D deficiency. Decreased active intestinal Ca(2+) absorption because of reduced expression of epithelial Ca(2+) channels is a crucial mechanism that contributes to the major phenotypes observed in the mutant mice. The importance of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption supported by 1,25(OH)2D-mediated transport was further emphasized by the observation that Ca(2+) supplementation rescues hypocalcemia and restores bone mineralization in both patients and mice lacking 1,25(OH)2D signaling. This observation questions the direct role of 1,25(OH)2D signaling in bone tissue. Studies regarding tissue-specific manipulation of 1,25(OH)2D function have provided a consensus on this issue by demonstrating a direct action of 1,25(OH)2D on cells in bone tissue through bone metabolism and mineral homeostasis. In addition, movement of Ca(2+) from the bone as a result of osteoclastic bone resorption also provides a large Ca(2+) supply in Ca(2+) homeostasis; however, the system controlling Ca(2+) homeostasis in osteoclasts has not been fully identified. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 mediates Ca(2+) influx during the late stage of osteoclast differentiation, thereby regulating the Ca(2+) signaling essential for cellular events during osteoclast differentiation; however, the system-modifying effect of TRPV4 activity should be determined. Furthermore, it remains unknown how local Ca(2+) metabolism participates in systemic Ca(2+) homeostasis through bone remodeling. New insights are therefore required to understand this issue.

  5. Intercellular calcium signaling occurs between human osteoblasts and osteoclasts and requires activation of osteoclast P2X7 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Henriksen, Zanne; Sørensen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    that human osteoclasts expressed functional P2Y1 receptors, but, unexpectedly, desensitization of P2Y1 did not block calcium signaling to osteoclasts. We also found that osteoclasts expressed functional P2X7 receptors and showed that pharmacological inhibition of these receptors blocked calcium signaling...

  6. Fluoxetine suppresses calcium signaling in human T lymphocytes through depletion of intracellular calcium stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, V; De Bock, M; Broeckx, B J G; Kiselinova, M; De Spiegelaere, W; Vandekerckhove, L; Van Steendam, K; Leybaert, L; Deforce, D

    2015-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, have recently been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Although the effects on cytokine secretion, proliferation and viability of T lymphocytes have been extensively characterized, little is known about the mechanism behind these effects. It is well known that Ca(2+) signaling is an important step in the signaling transduction pathway following T cell receptor activation. Therefore, we investigated if fluoxetine interferes with Ca(2+) signaling in Jurkat T lymphocytes. Fluoxetine was found to suppress Ca(2+) signaling in response to T cell receptor activation. Moreover, fluoxetine was found to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores, thereby leaving less Ca(2+) available for release upon IP3- and ryanodine-receptor activation. The Ca(2+)-modifying effects of fluoxetine are not related to its capability to block the serotonin transporter, as even a large excess of 5HT did not abolish the effects. In conclusion, these data show that fluoxetine decreases IP3- and ryanodine-receptor mediated Ca(2+) release in Jurkat T lymphocytes, an effect likely to be at the basis of the observed immunosuppression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. L-type calcium channels regulate filopodia stability and cancer cell invasion downstream of integrin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Baghirov, Habib; Georgiadou, Maria; Sihto, Harri; Peuhu, Emilia; Cettour-Janet, Pierre; He, Tao; Perälä, Merja; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-12-02

    Mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest an important role for filopodia in driving cancer cell invasion. Using a high-throughput microscopic-based drug screen, we identify FDA-approved calcium channel blockers (CCBs) as potent inhibitors of filopodia formation in cancer cells. Unexpectedly, we discover that L-type calcium channels are functional and frequently expressed in cancer cells suggesting a previously unappreciated role for these channels during tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that, at filopodia, L-type calcium channels are activated by integrin inside-out signalling, integrin activation and Src. Moreover, L-type calcium channels promote filopodia stability and maturation into talin-rich adhesions through the spatially restricted regulation of calcium entry and subsequent activation of the protease calpain-1. Altogether we uncover a novel and clinically relevant signalling pathway that regulates filopodia formation in cancer cells and propose that cycles of filopodia stabilization, followed by maturation into focal adhesions, directs cancer cell migration and invasion.

  8. Scrophularia orientalis extract induces calcium signaling and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LANGE, INGO; MOSCHNY, JULIA; TAMANYAN, KAMILLA; KHUTSISHVILI, MANANA; ATHA, DANIEL; BORRIS, ROBERT P.; KOOMOA, DANA-LYNN

    2016-01-01

    Effective neuroblastoma (NB) treatments are still limited despite treatment options available today. Therefore, this study attempted to identify novel plant extracts that have anticancer effects. Cytotoxicity and increased intracellular calcium levels were determined using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and Fluo4-AM (acetoxymethyl) staining and fluorescence microscopy in NB cells in order to screen a library of plant extracts. The current study examined the anticancer effects of a dichloromethane extract from Scrophularia orientalis L. (Scrophulariaceae), a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. This extract contained highly potent agents that significantly reduced cell survival and increased calcium levels in NB cells. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by this extract was associated with intracellular calcium release, opening of the MPTP, caspase 3- and PARP-cleavage suggesting that this extract induced aberrant calcium signaling that resulted in apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, agents from Scrophularia orientalis may have the potential to lead to new chemo therapeutic anticancer drugs. Furthermore, targeting intracellular calcium signaling may be a novel strategy to develop more effective treatments for NB. PMID:26848085

  9. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent, P., E-mail: pascal.sirvent@univ-bpclermont.fr [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l' Exercice en conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques (AME2P), BP 80026, F-63171 Aubière cedex (France); Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Hillaire-Buys, D. [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  10. Calcium signaling alterations, oxidative stress, and autophagy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Rodrigo Portes; Rocha, Katiucha Karolina; Lopes, Guiomar Silva; Bincoletto, Cláudia; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi

    2014-07-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that may be associated with several functional and structural deficits which can evolve into degenerative diseases. In this review, we present data that may depict an expanded view of molecular aging theories, beginning with the idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major effectors in this process. In addition, we have correlated the importance of autophagy as a neuroprotective mechanism and discussed a link between age-related molecules, Ca(2+) signaling, and oxidative stress. There is evidence suggesting that alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis, including mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and alterations in electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, which increase cell vulnerability, are linked to oxidative stress in aging. As much as Ca(2+) signaling is altered in aged cells, excess ROS can be produced due to an ineffective coupling of mitochondrial respiration. Damaged mitochondria might not be removed by the macroautophagic system, which is hampered in aging by lipofuscin accumulation, boosting ROS generation, damaging DNA, and, ultimately, leading to apoptosis. This process can lead to altered protein expression (such as p53, Sirt1, and IGF-1) and progress to cell death. This cycle can lead to increased cell vulnerability in aging and contribute to an increased susceptibility to degenerative processes. A better understanding of Ca(2+) signaling and molecular aging alterations is important for preventing apoptosis in age-related diseases. In addition, caloric restriction, resveratrol and autophagy modulation appear to be predominantly cytoprotective, and further studies of this process are promising in age-related disease therapeutics.

  11. The Effect Of Glycemic Control On Serum Lipids And Calcium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control levels in type 2 diabetic patients on the serum lipids and lipoprotein profiles and the serum levels of calcium, phosphate and some other electrolytes. The study was conducted on 81 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who were attending the Outpatient Diabetic and Endocrine Clinic in. King Khaled Hospital, Hail, ...

  12. Calcium signalling indicates bilateral power balancing in the Drosophila flight muscle during manoeuvring flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf; Skandalis, Dimitri A; Berthé, Ruben

    2013-05-06

    Manoeuvring flight in animals requires precise adjustments of mechanical power output produced by the flight musculature. In many insects such as fruit flies, power generation is most likely varied by altering stretch-activated tension, that is set by sarcoplasmic calcium levels. The muscles reside in a thoracic shell that simultaneously drives both wings during wing flapping. Using a genetically expressed muscle calcium indicator, we here demonstrate in vivo the ability of this animal to bilaterally adjust its calcium activation to the mechanical power output required to sustain aerodynamic costs during flight. Motoneuron-specific comparisons of calcium activation during lift modulation and yaw turning behaviour suggest slightly higher calcium activation for dorso-longitudinal than for dorsoventral muscle fibres, which corroborates the elevated need for muscle mechanical power during the wings' downstroke. During turning flight, calcium activation explains only up to 54 per cent of the required changes in mechanical power, suggesting substantial power transmission between both sides of the thoracic shell. The bilateral control of muscle calcium runs counter to the hypothesis that the thorax of flies acts as a single, equally proportional source for mechanical power production for both flapping wings. Collectively, power balancing highlights the precision with which insects adjust their flight motor to changing energetic requirements during aerial steering. This potentially enhances flight efficiency and is thus of interest for the development of technical vehicles that employ bioinspired strategies of power delivery to flapping wings.

  13. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  14. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from dietary supplements are linked to a greater risk of kidney stones, especially among older adults. But calcium from foods does not appear to cause kidney stones. For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have ...

  15. Plants, symbiosis and parasites: a calcium signalling connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jeffrey F; Harmon, Alice

    2005-07-01

    A unique family of protein kinases has evolved with regulatory domains containing sequences that are related to Ca(2+)-binding EF-hands. In this family, the archetypal Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have been found in plants and some protists, including the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Recent genetic evidence has revealed isoform-specific functions for a CDPK that is essential for Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis, and for a related chimeric Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) that is essential to the formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of 42 isoforms of CDPK and related kinases is expected to delineate Ca(2+) signalling pathways in all aspects of plant biology.

  16. Characterization of NAADP-mediated calcium signaling in human spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Tusie, A.A. [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Vasudevan, S.R.; Churchill, G.C. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QT, England (United Kingdom); Nishigaki, T. [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Treviño, C.L., E-mail: ctrevino@ibt.unam.mx [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Human sperm cells synthesize NAADP. •NAADP-AM mediates [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases in human sperm in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. •Human sperm have two acidic compartments located in the head and midpiece. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} signaling in spermatozoa plays a crucial role during processes such as capacitation and release of the acrosome, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a potent Ca{sup 2+}-releasing second messenger in a variety of cellular processes. The presence of a NAADP synthesizing enzyme in sea urchin sperm has been previously reported, suggesting a possible role of NAADP in sperm Ca{sup 2+} signaling. In this work we used in vitro enzyme assays to show the presence of a novel NAADP synthesizing enzyme in human sperm, and to characterize its sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} and pH. Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence imaging studies demonstrated that the permeable form of NAADP (NAADP-AM) induces intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}] increases in human sperm even in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Using LysoTracker®, a fluorescent probe that selectively accumulates in acidic compartments, we identified two such stores in human sperm cells. Their acidic nature was further confirmed by the reduction in staining intensity observed upon inhibition of the endo-lysosomal proton pump with Bafilomycin, or after lysosomal bursting with glycyl-L-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide. The selective fluorescent NAADP analog, Ned-19, stained the same subcellular regions as LysoTracker®, suggesting that these stores are the targets of NAADP action.

  17. The calcium: An early signal that initiate the formation of the nervous system during embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eLeclerc

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The calcium (Ca2+ signalling pathways have crucial roles in development from fertilization through differentiation to organogenesis. In the nervous system, Ca2+ signals are important regulators for various neuronal functions, including formation and maturation of neuronal circuits and long-term memory. However, Ca2+ signals are also involved in the earliest steps of nervous system development including neural induction, differentiation of neural progenitors into neurons, and the neuro-glial switch. This review examines when and how Ca2+ signals are generated during each of these steps with examples taken from in vivo studies in vertebrate embryos and from in vitro assays using embryonic and neural stem cells. Also discussed is the highly specific nature of the Ca2+ signalling pathway and its interaction with the other signalling pathways involved in early neural development.

  18. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome enables monocytes and macrophages to release high levels of interleukin-1ß during inflammatory responses. Concentrations of extracellular calcium can increase at sites of infection, inflammation or cell activation. Here we show that increased extracellular...... calcium activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via stimulation of G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors. Activation is mediated by signalling through the calcium-sensing receptor and GPRC6A via the phosphatidyl inositol/Ca(2+) pathway. The resulting increase in the intracellular calcium concentration...

  19. Effect of TGFβ on calcium signaling in megakaryocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jing [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Schmid, Evi [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Department of Pediatric Surgery and Pediatric Urology, University Children' s Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Almilaji, Ahmad; Shumilina, Ekaterina [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Borst, Oliver [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Department of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Laufer, Stefan [Department of Pharmacy, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Gawaz, Meinrad [Department of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Lang, Florian, E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    TGFβ is a powerful regulator of megakaryocyte maturation and platelet formation. As previously shown for other cell types, TGFβ may up-regulate the expression of the serum & glucocorticoid inducible kinase SGK1, an effect requiring p38 kinase. SGK1 has in turn recently been shown to participate in the regulation of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in megakaryocytes and platelets. SGK1 phosphorylates the IκB kinase (IKKα/β), which in turn phosphorylates the inhibitor protein IκBα resulting in nuclear translocation of nuclear factor NFκB. Genes up-regulated by NFκB include Orai1, the pore forming ion channel subunit accomplishing store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). The present study explored whether TGFβ influences Ca{sup 2+} signaling in megakaryocytes. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was determined by Fura-2 fluorescence and SOCE from the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} following re-addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} after store depletion by removal of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} and inhibition of the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca{sup 2+} ATPase (SERCA) with thapsigargin (1 μM). As a result, TGFβ (60 ng, 24 h) increased SOCE, an effect significantly blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L (1 μM), SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683 (50 μM) and NFκB inhibitor wogonin (100 μM). In conclusion, TGFβ is a powerful regulator of store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry into megakaryocytes, an effect mediated by a signaling cascade involving p38 kinase, SGK1 and NFκB. - Highlights: • TGFβ up-regulates store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) in megakaryocytes. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is virtually abrogated by SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is almost abolished by NFκB inhibitor wogonin. • The effect of TGFβ is expected to enhance sensitivity of platelets to activation.

  20. Computational modeling of calcium signaling from the nanoscale to multicellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim

    Calcium signaling is one of the most important signaling mechanisms controlling e.g. the contraction of muscle cells, the release of neurotransmitter from neurons and astrocytes, transcription inside the nucleus and metabolic processes in liver and pancreas [8, 44, 36]. Due to the general importance in cell biology, Ca2+ signals of a variety of forms have been the subject of much recent experimental research. A recent and particularly powerful approach towards the understanding of Ca2+ signaling is the combination of highly resolved fluorescent imaging methods and detailed mathematical modeling. Models for Ca2+ signaling are probably the most advanced and realistic modes in all areas of biological physics. Hence theoretical predictions are quantitative in nature and allow direct comparison with experiments. Ca2+ signaling patterns exhibit a hierarchical structure varying from single-channel release events (10's of nanometers) to Ca2+ waves sweeping over entire organs like the liver to globally orchestrate the efficient release of enzymes [48]. This multi-scale organization renders it an ideal tool for studying basic concepts of pattern formation, especially since access to the most important experimental parameters is given. The aim of this dissertation is to develop mathematical models that quantitatively describe the characteristics of elementary Ca2+ elements (called Ca2+ -puffs) on the nano-scale as well as the organization of global waves and oscillations on the cell and organ scale. We used oocytes, eggs and astrocytes as model cells for our theoretical studies. Particularly on the microscopic scale we report significant progress in modeling Ca 2+ release events that are accurate in time course and spatial shape. Experimental investigations have revealed recently that Ca 2+ signaling differentiates during the development of oocytes into mature eggs. The fertilization specific Ca2+ signal in mature eggs is characterized by a fast rise of intracellular Ca2+ and

  1. TRPV5: an ingeniously controlled calcium channel.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, T. de; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Body Ca(2+) homeostasis is tightly controlled and slight disturbances in renal Ca(2+) reabsorption can lead to excessive urine Ca(2+) excretion and promote kidney stone formation. The epithelial Ca(2+) channel TRPV5 constitutes the rate-limiting step of active Ca(2+) reabsorption in the kidney.

  2. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  3. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  4. Calcium signaling of in situ chondrocytes in articular cartilage under compressive loading: Roles of calcium sources and cell membrane ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Mengxi; Zhou, Yilu; Chen, Xingyu; Han, Lin; Wang, Liyun; Lu, X Lucas

    2017-10-05

    Mechanical loading on articular cartilage can induce many physical and chemical stimuli on chondrocytes residing in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+ ]i ) signaling is among the earliest responses of chondrocytes to physical stimuli, but the [Ca2+ ]i signaling of in situ chondrocytes in loaded cartilage is not fully understood due to the technical challenges in [Ca2+ ]i imaging of chondrocytes in a deforming ECM. This study developed a novel bi-directional microscopy loading device that enables the record of transient [Ca2+ ]i responses of in situ chondrocytes in loaded cartilage. It was found that compressive loading significantly promoted [Ca2+ ]i signaling in chondrocytes with faster [Ca2+ ]i oscillations in comparison to the non-loaded cartilage. Seven [Ca2+ ]i signaling pathways were further investigated by treating the cartilage with antagonists prior to and/or during the loading. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ ions completely abolished the [Ca2+ ]i responses of in situ chondrocytes, suggesting the indispensable role of extracellular Ca2+ sources in initiating the [Ca2+ ]i signaling in chondrocytes. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, inhibition of PLC-IP3 pathway, and block of purinergic receptors on plasma membrane led to significant reduction in the responsive rate of cells. Three types of ion channels that are regulated by different physical signals, TRPV4 (osmotic and mechanical stress), T-type VGCCs (electrical potential), and mechanical sensitive ion channels (mechanical loading) all demonstrated critical roles in controlling the [Ca2+ ]i responses of in situ chondrocyte in the loaded cartilage. This study provided new knowledge about the [Ca2+ ]i signaling and mechanobiology of chondrocytes in its natural residing environment. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of nicotine on exocytotic pancreatic secretory response: role of calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Parimal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a risk factor for pancreatitis resulting in loss of pancreatic enzyme secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of nicotine-induced secretory response measured in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from Male Sprague Dawley rats. The study examines the role of calcium signaling in the mechanism of the enhanced secretory response observed with nicotine exposure. Methods Isolated and purified pancreatic acinar cells were subjected to a nicotine exposure at a dose of 100 μM for 6 minutes and then stimulated with cholecystokinin (CCK for 30 min. The cell’s secretory response was measured by the percent of amylase released from the cells in the incubation medium Calcium receptor antagonists, inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers, mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors and specific nicotinic receptor antagonists were used to confirm the involvement of calcium in this process. Results Nicotine exposure induced enhanced secretory response in primary cells. These responses remained unaffected by mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK’s inhibitors. The effects, however, have been completely abolished by nicotinic receptor antagonist, calcium channel receptor antagonists and inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers. Conclusions The data suggest that calcium activated events regulating the exocytotic secretion are affected by nicotine as shown by enhanced functional response which is inhibited by specific antagonists… The results implicate the role of nicotine in the mobilization of both intra- and extracellular calcium in the regulation of stimulus-secretory response of enzyme secretion in this cell system. We conclude that nicotine plays an important role in promoting enhanced calcium levels inside the acinar cell.

  6. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Birkedal, Henrik; Olsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Caries is caused by acid production in biofilms on dental surfaces. Preventing caries therefore involves control of microorganisms and/or the acid produced. Here, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles are presented as a new approach to caries control. The particles are made by co......-precipitation and designed to bind to bacteria in biofilms, impede biofilm build-up without killing the microflora, and release phosphate ions to buffer bacterial acid production if the pH decreases below 6. Analysis of biofilm formation and pH in a five-species biofilm model for dental caries showed that treatment......H always remained above 5.5. Hence, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles show potential for applications in caries control....

  7. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian

    -phosphate-osteopontin particles are a new promising therapeutic approach to caries control. They are designed to bind to dental biofilms and interfere with biofilm build-up, lowering the bacterial burden on the tooth surface without affecting bacterial viability in the oral cavity. Moreover, they dissolve when pH in the biofilm......Oftentimes caries lesions develop in protected sites that are difficult to access by self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning. At present, there is a growing interest in chemical adjuncts to mechanical procedures of oral hygiene that aim at biofilm control rather than biofilm eradication. Calcium...... drops to 6 or below and release buffering phosphate ions that stabilize biofilm pH above the critical level for enamel dissolution. With that twofold approach, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles may make a relevant contribution to clinical caries control....

  8. Computational analysis of calcium signaling and membrane electrophysiology in cerebellar Purkinje neurons associated with ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Sherry-Ann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER calcium channel Inositol Trisphosphate Receptor type 1 (IP3R1 in humans with the motor function coordination disorders Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 15 and 16 (SCA15/16 and in a corresponding mouse model, the IP3R1delta18/delta18 mice, lead to reduced IP3R1 levels. We posit that increasing IP3R1 sensitivity to IP3 in ataxias with reduced IP3R1 could restore normal calcium response. On the other hand, in mouse models of the human polyglutamine (polyQ ataxias, SCA2, and SCA3, the primary finding appears to be hyperactive IP3R1-mediated calcium release. It has been suggested that the polyQ SCA1 mice may also show hyperactive IP3R1. Yet, SCA1 mice show downregulated gene expression of IP3R1, Homer, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR, smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATP-ase (SERCA, calbindin, parvalbumin, and other calcium signaling proteins. Results We create a computational model of pathological alterations in calcium signaling in cerebellar Purkinje neurons to investigate several forms of spinocerebellar ataxia associated with changes in the abundance, sensitivity, or activity of the calcium channel IP3R1. We find that increasing IP3R1 sensitivity to IP3 in computational models of SCA15/16 can restore normal calcium response if IP3R1 abundance is not too low. The studied range in IP3R1 levels reflects variability found in human and mouse ataxic models. Further, the required fold increases in sensitivity are within experimental ranges from experiments that use IP3R1 phosphorylation status to adjust its sensitivity to IP3. Results from our simulations of polyglutamine SCAs suggest that downregulation of some calcium signaling proteins may be partially compensatory. However, the downregulation of calcium buffer proteins observed in the SCA1 mice may contribute to pathology. Finally, our model suggests that the calcium-activated voltage-gated potassium channels may provide an

  9. Mutual independence of alkaline- and calcium-mediated signalling in Aspergillus fumigatus refutes the existence of a conserved druggable signalling nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Omar; Bertuzzi, Margherita; Yan, Yu; Fedorova, Natalie; McCann, Bethany L; Armstrong-James, Darius; Espeso, Eduardo A; Read, Nick D; Nierman, William C; Bignell, Elaine M

    2017-09-18

    Functional coupling of calcium- and alkaline responsive signalling occurs in multiple fungi to afford efficient cation homeostasis. Host microenvironments exert alkaline stress and potentially toxic concentrations of Ca(2+) , such that highly conserved regulators of both calcium- (Crz) and pH- (PacC/Rim) responsive signalling are crucial for fungal pathogenicity. Drugs targeting calcineurin are potent antifungal agents but also perturb human immunity thereby negating their use as anti-infectives, abrogation of alkaline signalling has therefore been postulated as an adjunctive antifungal strategy. We examined the interdependency of pH- and calcium-mediated signalling in Aspergillus fumigatus and found that calcium chelation severely impedes hyphal growth indicating a critical requirement for this ion independently of ambient pH. Transcriptomic responses to alkaline pH or calcium excess exhibited minimal similarity. Mutants lacking calcineurin, or its client CrzA, displayed normal alkaline tolerance, and nuclear translocation of CrzA was unaffected by ambient pH. Expression of a highly conserved, alkaline-regulated, sodium ATPase was tolerant of genetic or chemical perturbations of calcium-mediated signalling, but abolished in null mutants of the pH-responsive transcription factor PacC, and PacC proteolytic processing occurred normally during calcium excess. Taken together our data demonstrate that in A. fumigatus the regulatory hierarchy governing alkaline tolerance circumvents calcineurin signalling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Astrocytic Calcium Waves Signal Brain Injury to Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Anna; Jubal, Eduardo Rosales; von Laer, Ruth; Döring, Claudia; Rocha, Adriana; Grebbin, Moyo; Zenke, Martin; Kettenmann, Helmut; Stroh, Albrecht; Momma, Stefan

    2017-03-14

    Brain injuries, such as stroke or trauma, induce neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) to a neurogenic response. Very little is known about the molecular cues that signal tissue damage, even over large distances, to the SVZ. Based on our analysis of gene expression patterns in the SVZ, 48 hr after an ischemic lesion caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion, we hypothesized that the presence of an injury might be transmitted by an astrocytic traveling calcium wave rather than by diffusible factors or hypoxia. Using a newly established in vitro system we show that calcium waves induced in an astrocytic monolayer spread to neural stem and progenitor cells and increase their self-renewal as well as migratory behavior. These changes are due to an upregulation of the Notch signaling pathway. This introduces the concept of propagating astrocytic calcium waves transmitting brain injury signals over long distances. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o homeostasis and many (pathophysiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR’s cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics.

  12. Volume control device for digital signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Daniel; van Tuijl, Adrianus Johannes Maria; Nuijten, Petrus A.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    A digital volume control device comprises a logic unit for volume control of digital input signals. Successively supplied m-bits words with maximally k bits active, derived from the output signals of or supplied by a volume control (4) with a quantizer (5) element the filtered m-bits workds are

  13. Calcium signals and caspase-12 participated in paraoxon-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Cao, Zhiheng; Jia, Pengfei; Wang, Ziren

    2010-04-01

    In order to investigate whether calcium signals participate in paraoxon (POX)-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells, real-time laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to detect Ca(2+) changes during the POX application. Apoptotic rates of EL4 cells and caspase-12 expression were also evaluated. POX (1-10nM) increased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in EL4 cells in a dose-dependent manner at early stage (0-2h) of POX application, and apoptotic rates of EL4 cells after treatment with POX for 16h were also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with EGTA, heparin or procaine attenuated POX-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation and apoptosis. Additionally, POX up-regulated caspase-12 expression in a dose-dependent manner, and pre-treatment with EGTA, heparin or procaine significantly inhibited POX-induced increase of caspase-12 expression. Our results suggested that POX induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation in EL4 cells at the early stage of POX-induced apoptosis, which might involve Ca(2+) efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular medium. Calcium signals and caspase-12 were important upstream messengers in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells. The ER-associated pathway possibly operated in this apoptosis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ATP Releasing Connexin 30 Hemichannels Mediate Flow-Induced Calcium Signaling in the Collecting Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per eSvenningsen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30-/- mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs from wild type and Cx30-/- mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca2+]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30-/- CCDs ([Ca2+]i increased only 1.2-fold, p

  15. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiang Wang

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd is a toxic environmental pollutant that can disturb cell functions and even lead to cell death. Recently, we have found that Cd induced apoptosis in gill cells of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense via caspase activation. In the present study, we further investigated the role of calcium signaling in the Cd-induced apoptosis in the animals. Our data showed that Cd triggered gill cell apoptosis which is evidenced by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, activations of caspases-3, -8 and -9 and the presence of apoptotic morphological features. Moreover, Cd elevated the intracellular concentration of Ca2+, the protein concentration of calmodulin (CaM and the activity of Ca2+-ATPase in the gill cells of the crabs. Pretreatment of the animals with ethylene glycol-bis-(b-aminoethyl ether-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, Ca2+ chelator, inhibited Cd-induced activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 as well as blocked the Cd-triggered apoptotic DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic morphological features were no longer observed in gill cells pretreated with the Ca2+ signaling inhibitors before Cd treatment. Our results indicate that Cd evokes gill cell apoptosis through activating Ca2+-CaM signaling transduction pathway.

  16. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Schaal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  17. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaal, Courtney [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Padmanabhan, Jaya [Department of Molecular Medicine and USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute, University of South Florida, 4001 E. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Chellappan, Srikumar, E-mail: Srikumar.Chellappan@moffitt.org [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Cognitive Control Signals for Neural Prosthetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S. Musallam; B. D. Corneil; B. Greger; H. Scherberger; R. A. Andersen

    2004-01-01

    Recent development of neural prosthetics for assisting paralyzed patients has focused on decoding intended hand trajectories from motor cortical neurons and using this signal to control external devices...

  19. Use of multiple singular value decompositions to analyze complex intracellular calcium ion signals

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, Josue G.

    2009-12-01

    We compare calcium ion signaling (Ca(2+)) between two exposures; the data are present as movies, or, more prosaically, time series of images. This paper describes novel uses of singular value decompositions (SVD) and weighted versions of them (WSVD) to extract the signals from such movies, in a way that is semi-automatic and tuned closely to the actual data and their many complexities. These complexities include the following. First, the images themselves are of no interest: all interest focuses on the behavior of individual cells across time, and thus, the cells need to be segmented in an automated manner. Second, the cells themselves have 100+ pixels, so that they form 100+ curves measured over time, so that data compression is required to extract the features of these curves. Third, some of the pixels in some of the cells are subject to image saturation due to bit depth limits, and this saturation needs to be accounted for if one is to normalize the images in a reasonably un-biased manner. Finally, the Ca(2+) signals have oscillations or waves that vary with time and these signals need to be extracted. Thus, our aim is to show how to use multiple weighted and standard singular value decompositions to detect, extract and clarify the Ca(2+) signals. Our signal extraction methods then lead to simple although finely focused statistical methods to compare Ca(2+) signals across experimental conditions.

  20. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  1. Nuclear calcium controls the apoptotic-like cell death induced by d-erythro-sphinganine in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaud, Christophe; Da Silva, Daniel; Cotelle, Valérie; Thuleau, Patrice; Xiong, Tou Cheu; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Graziana, Annick; Bellec, Yannick; Faure, Jean-Denis; Ranjeva, Raoul; Mazars, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies performed in animals have highlighted the major role of sphingolipids in regulating the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Sphingolipids have also been shown to induce cell death in plants via calcium-based signalling pathways but the contribution of free cytosolic and/or nuclear calcium in the overall process has never been evaluated. Here, we show that increase in tobacco BY-2 cells of the endogenous content of Long Chain Bases (LCBs) caused by external application of d-erythro-sphinganine (DHS) is followed by immediate dose-dependent elevations of cellular free calcium concentration within the first minute in the cytosol and 10min later in the nucleus. Cells challenged with DHS enter a death process through apoptotic-like mechanisms. Lanthanum chloride, a general blocker of calcium entry, suppresses the cellular calcium variations and the PCD induced by DHS. Interestingly, dl-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5) and [(+)-dizocilpine] (MK801), two inhibitors of animal and plant ionotropic glutamate receptors, suppress DHS-induced cell death symptoms by selectively inhibiting the variations of nuclear calcium concentration. The selective action of these compounds demonstrates the crucial role of nuclear calcium signature in controlling DHS-induced cell death in tobacco cells. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selective regulation of clathrin-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and endocytosis by phospholipase C and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Bautista, Stephen; Lucarelli, Stefanie; Bone, Leslie N; Dayam, Roya M; Abousawan, John; Botelho, Roberto J; Antonescu, Costin N

    2017-10-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a major regulator of cell-surface protein internalization. Clathrin and other proteins assemble into small invaginating structures at the plasma membrane termed clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) that mediate vesicle formation. In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is regulated by its accumulation within CCPs. Given the diversity of proteins regulated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, how this process may distinctly regulate specific receptors is a key question. We examined the selective regulation of clathrin-dependent EGFR signaling and endocytosis. We find that perturbations of phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1), Ca 2+ , or protein kinase C (PKC) impair clathrin-mediated endocytosis of EGFR, the formation of CCPs harboring EGFR, and EGFR signaling. Each of these manipulations was without effect on the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR). EGFR and TfR were recruited to largely distinct clathrin structures. In addition to control of initiation and assembly of CCPs, EGF stimulation also elicited a Ca 2+ - and PKC-dependent reduction in synaptojanin1 recruitment to clathrin structures, indicating broad control of CCP assembly by Ca 2+ signals. Hence EGFR elicits PLCγ1-calcium signals to facilitate formation of a subset of CCPs, thus modulating its own signaling and endocytosis. This provides evidence for the versatility of CCPs to control diverse cellular processes. © 2017 Delos Santos et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Calcium carbonate scale control in once-through cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.M.; McDowell, J.F. (Betz Lab., Inc., The Woodlands, TX (US)); Heflin, R.F. (Betz Industrial, Bismark, ND (US)); Karlovich, D.N. (Beltz Industrial, Trevosa, PA (US)); Bloom, M.F. (Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc., Grand Forks, ND (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a laboratory-scale model surface condenser used to design a successful once-through cooling water treatment program for calcium carbonate scale inhibition at Young Station. The treatment program has maintained the station's condenser cleanliness factor at approximately 100% for the duration of the treatment. The model surface condensers simulate cycled systems as well as once-through cooling systems. They are fully automated with computer-controlled chemical feed, flow, heat flux, makeup, and blowdown and data acquisition systems.

  4. Calcium signaling through CaMKII regulates hepatic glucose production in fasting and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Lale; Wong, Catherine C.L.; Li, Gang; Xu, Tao; Pajvani, Utpal; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Wronska, Anetta; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Backs, Johannes; Singer, Harold A.; Yates, John R.; Accili, Domenico; Tabas, Ira

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatic glucose production (HGP) is crucial for glucose homeostasis, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that a calcium-sensing enzyme, CaMKII, is activated in a calcium- and IP3R-dependent manner by cAMP and glucagon in primary HCs and by glucagon and fasting in vivo. Genetic deficiency or inhibition of CaMKII blocks nuclear translocation of FoxO1 by affecting its phosphorylation, impairs fasting- and glucagon/cAMP-induced glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, and lowers blood glucose levels, while constitutively active CaMKII has the opposite effects. Importantly, the suppressive effect of CaMKII deficiency on glucose metabolism is abrogated by transduction with constitutively nuclear FoxO1, indicating that the effect of CaMKII deficiency requires nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. This same pathway is also involved in excessive HGP in the setting of obesity. These results reveal a calcium-mediated signaling pathway involved in FoxO1 nuclear localization and hepatic glucose homeostasis. PMID:22503562

  5. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  6. Orai and TRPC channel characterization in FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling and mediator secretion in human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajdner, Hannah E; Farrington, Jasmine; Barnard, Claire; Peachell, Peter T; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Marino, Joseph P; Xu, Xiaoping; Affleck, Karen; Begg, Malcolm; Seward, Elizabeth P

    2017-03-01

    Inappropriate activation of mast cells via the FcεRI receptor leads to the release of inflammatory mediators and symptoms of allergic disease. Calcium influx is a critical regulator of mast cell signaling and is required for exocytosis of preformed mediators and for synthesis of eicosanoids, cytokines and chemokines. Studies in rodent and human mast cells have identified Orai calcium channels as key contributors to FcεRI-initiated mediator release. However, until now the role of TRPC calcium channels in FcεRI-mediated human mast cell signaling has not been published. Here, we show evidence for the expression of Orai 1,2, and 3 and TRPC1 and 6 in primary human lung mast cells and the LAD2 human mast cell line but, we only find evidence of functional contribution of Orai and not TRPC channels to FcεRI-mediated calcium entry. Calcium imaging experiments, utilizing an Orai selective antagonist (Synta66) showed the contribution of Orai to FcεRI-mediated signaling in human mast cells. Although, the use of a TRPC3/6 selective antagonist and agonist (GSK-3503A and GSK-2934A, respectively) did not reveal evidence for TRPC6 contribution to FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling in human mast cells. Similarly, inactivation of STIM1-regulated TRPC1 in human mast cells (as tested by transfecting cells with STIM1-KK684-685EE - TRPC1 gating mutant) failed to alter FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling in LAD2 human mast cells. Mediator release assays confirm that FcεRI-mediated calcium influx through Orai is necessary for histamine and TNFα release but is differentially involved in the generation of cytokines and eicosanoids. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  7. Coordinated Ramp Metering and Intersection Signal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Su

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The operations of freeway ramp metering and urban traffic network signal control are independent in most areas. Such situation may cause some conflict between traffic streams of the two subsystems, or, at least, their dynamic interactions have not been taken into account from an overall system viewpoint. Traffic performance can be improved if the controls of these two subnetworks are integrated. This paper proposes a novel signal control strategy for the feeding intersection and a coordination strategy for integrating it with the corresponding freeway onramp metering. UP ALINEA with queue-overwrite is used for the ramp metering. A signal optimization, which takes into account the available ramp space and traffic demand, is developed for intersection signal control. A calibrated micro-simulation is used to compare the proposed control/coordination strategies and current control plans in the field. Simulation result shows that, even though the overall system performance only gets a marginal improvement, intersection delay reduces significantly.

  8. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully...

  9. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  10. Biotic and abiotic stress responses through calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) signaling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Aili; Wang, Xiang; Leseberg, Charles H; Jia, Jizeng; Mao, Long

    2008-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) sense the calcium concentration changes in plant cells and play important roles in signaling pathways for disease resistance and various stress responses as indicated by emerging evidences. Among the 20 wheat CDPK genes studied, 10 were found to respond to drought, salinity and ABA treatments. Consistent with previous observations, one CDPK gene was shown to respond to multiple abiotic stresses in wheat suggesting that CDPKs could be converging points...

  11. Stroma cell-derived factor-1α signaling enhances calcium transients and beating frequency in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ielham Hadad

    Full Text Available Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency.Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax.These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect.

  12. Net analyte signal based statistical quality control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skibsted, E.T.S.; Boelens, H.F.M.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Smilde, A.K.; Broad, N.W.; Rees, D.R.; Witte, D.T.

    2005-01-01

    Net analyte signal statistical quality control (NAS-SQC) is a new methodology to perform multivariate product quality monitoring based on the net analyte signal approach. The main advantage of NAS-SQC is that the systematic variation in the product due to the analyte (or property) of interest is

  13. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects. We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  14. Astrocytic calcium signals induced by neuromodulators via functional metabotropic receptors in the ventral respiratory group of neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtel, Kai; Schnell, Christian; Hülsmann, Swen

    2009-06-01

    A controlled, periodic exchange of air between lungs and atmosphere requires a neuronal rhythm generated by a network of neurons in the ventral respiratory group (VRG) of the brainstem. Glial cells, e.g. astrocytes, have been shown to be supportive in stabilizing this neuronal activity in the central nervous system during development. In addition, a variety of neuromodulators including serotonin (5-HT), Substance P (SP), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulate respiratory neurons directly. If astrocytes in the VRG, like their neuronal neighbors, are also directly stimulated by neuromodulators, they might indirectly affect the respiratory neurons and consequently the respiratory rhythm. In the present study, we provide support for this concept by demonstrating expression of NK1-R, TRH-R, and 5-HT(2)-R in astrocytes of the VRG with immunohistochemistry. Additionally, we showed that the external application of the neuromodulators 5-HT, SP, and TRH activate calcium transients in VRG astrocytes. Consequently, we postulate that in the VRG of the neonatal mouse, neuromodulation by SP, TRH, and serotonin also involves astrocytic calcium signaling. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Digitally Controlled Analog Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    process Fabricated: July - August 1987 Chip Size: 230014m x 34001im (7.82mm 2) Active Area: 235pm x 1940 /um (.45mm 2 ) Number of Pads: 11 Packaging: 28...Self-Tuned Filters,’ Proc. 26th Mid- west Symp. Ckts Systems, Puebla , Mexico, 1983. V in V C Fig. 6. (Compensated) OTA Integrator. DigWitly ControlDW...Proc. WS Mid- filters obtained by cascading the proposed second-order wat Symp. Circuits Sjdanwk INAOE, Puebla , Mex- block is presently under

  16. Convergent CaMK and RacGEF signals control dendritic structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzes, Peter; Cahill, Michael E; Jones, Kelly A; Srivastava, Deepak P

    2008-09-01

    Structural plasticity of excitatory synapses is a vital component of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and behavior, and its malfunction underlies many neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms that control dendritic spine morphogenesis have only recently emerged. We summarize recent work that has revealed an important connection between calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs) and guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) that activate the small GTPase Rac (RacGEFs) in controlling dendritic spine morphogenesis. These two groups of molecules function in neurons as a unique signaling cassette that transduces calcium influx into small GTPase activity and, thence, actin reorganization and spine morphogenesis. Through this pathway, CaMKs and RacGEFs amplify calcium signals and translate them into spatially and temporally regulated structural remodeling of dendritic spines.

  17. Store-Operated Calcium Entries Control Neural Stem Cell Self-Renewal in the Adult Brain Subventricular Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenichini, Florence; Terrié, Elodie; Arnault, Patricia; Harnois, Thomas; Magaud, Christophe; Bois, Patrick; Constantin, Bruno; Coronas, Valérie

    2018-01-23

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the major stem cell niche in the brain of adult mammals. Within this region, neural stem cells (NSC) proliferate, self-renew and give birth to neurons and glial cells. Previous studies underlined enrichment in calcium signaling-related transcripts in adult NSC. Because of their ability to mobilize sustained calcium influxes in response to a wide range of extracellular factors, store-operated channels (SOC) appear to be, among calcium channels, relevant candidates to induce calcium signaling in NSC whose cellular activities are continuously adapted to physiological signals from the microenvironment. By Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting and immunocytochemistry experiments, we demonstrate that SVZ cells express molecular actors known to build up SOC, namely transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) and Orai1, as well as their activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). Calcium imaging reveals that SVZ cells display store-operated calcium entries. Pharmacological blockade of SOC with SKF-96365 or YM-58483 (also called BTP2) decreases proliferation, impairs self-renewal by shifting the type of SVZ stem cell division from symmetric proliferative to asymmetric, thereby reducing the stem cell population. Brain section immunostainings show that TRPC1, Orai1, and STIM1 are expressed in vivo, in SOX2-positive SVZ NSC. Injection of SKF-96365 in brain lateral ventricle diminishes SVZ cell proliferation and reduces the ability of SVZ cells to form neurospheres in vitro. The present study combining in vitro and in vivo approaches uncovers a major role for SOC in the control of SVZ NSC population and opens new fields of investigation for stem cell biology in health and disease. Stem Cells 2018. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  18. Controlling Signal Transduction with Synthetic Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, David M.; Wandless, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Crabtree, Gerald R.

    1993-11-01

    Dimerization and oligomerization are general biological control mechanisms contributing to the activation of cell membrane receptors, transcription factors, vesicle fusion proteins, and other classes of intra- and extracellular proteins. Cell permeable, synthetic ligands were devised that can be used to control the intracellular oligomerization of specific proteins. To demonstrate their utility, these ligands were used to reduce intracellular oligomerization of cell surface receptors that lacked their transmembrane and extracellular regions but contained intracellular signaling domains. Addition of these ligands to cells in culture resulted in signal transmission and specific target gene activation. Monomeric forms of the ligands blocked the pathway. This method of ligandregulated activation and termination of signaling pathways has the potential to be applied wherever precise control of a signal transduction pathway is desired.

  19. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  20. Spatiotemporal patterns of voltage and calcium signaling in heart cells and tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Alain

    2009-03-01

    This talk will describe recent progress made in understanding oscillatory patterns of voltage and calcium signals that precede the onset of electromechanical wave turbulence in the main chambers of the heart. Results will illustrate how both physiologically detailed and abstract models have proven useful to cope with the bewildering molecular complexity of cardiac biology and to bridge phenomena on cellular and tissue scales. A main conclusion is that those oscillatory patterns can be self-organized, resulting from symmetry-breaking linear instabilities, or/and a manifestation of underling tissue heterogeneities. Thus studying the evolution of those patterns provides a valuable indirect probe of complex physiological processes that render the heart susceptible to the sudden onset of lethal heart rhythm disorders.

  1. Control of calcium carbonate precipitation in anaerobic reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, van E.P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of waste waters with a high calcium content may lead to excessive precipitation of calcium carbonate. So far, no proper methods were available to predict or reduce the extent of precipitation in an anaerobic treatment system. Moreover, it also was not clear to what

  2. The Control of Calcium Metabolism in Zebrafish (Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish is an emerging model for the research of body fluid ionic homeostasis. In this review, we focus on current progress on the regulation of Ca2+ uptake in the context of Ca2+ sensing and hormonal regulation in zebrafish. Na+-K+-ATPase-rich cells (NaRCs, the specialized ionocytes in the embryonic skin and adult gills, play a dominant role in Ca2+ uptake in zebrafish. Transepithelial Ca2+ transport in NaRC, through apical epithelial Ca2+ channels (ECaC, basolateral plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX, is analogous to mammalian renal and intestinal Ca2+-absorption cells. Several hormones were demonstrated to differentially regulate Ca2+ uptake through modulating the expression of Ca2+ transporters and/or the proliferation/differentiation of NaRC in zebrafish. In addition, the counterbalance among these hormones is associated with the maintenance of body fluid Ca2+ homeostasis. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is expressed in several hormone-secreting tissues in zebrafish, and activated CaSR differentially controls calciotropic hormones. The major principles of Ca2+ transport and the hormonal control appear to be conserved from zebrafish to other vertebrates including mammals. The new knowledge gained from zebrafish studies provides new insights into the related issues in vertebrates.

  3. The control of calcium signaling in the heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye Samuel

    pipe water supplied by the New River Water Company. As this water contains .... Figure modified from (Eisner, Bode, Venetucci, & Trafford 2012). .... is this negative feedback system which is responsible for beat to .... Circulation Research, 87,.

  4. The control of calcium signaling in the heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye Samuel

    The most important paragraph in this paper is. “I discovered, that the saline solution which I had used had not been prepared with distilled water, but with pipe water supplied by the New River Water Company. As this water contains minute traces of various inorganic substances, I at once tested the action of saline solution ...

  5. Effects of differentiation on purinergic and neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling in human HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammad A; Peters, Amelia A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-09-13

    Calcium signaling is a key regulator of processes important in differentiation. In colon cancer cells differentiation is associated with altered expression of specific isoforms of calcium pumps of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane, suggesting that differentiation of colon cancer cells is associated with a major remodeling of calcium homeostasis. Purinergic and neurotensin receptor activation are known regulators of cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in colon cancer cells. This study aimed to assess changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP and neurotensin with differentiation induced by sodium butyrate or culturing post-confluence. Parameters assessed included peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) level after activation; time to reach peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) and the EC50 of dose response curves. Our results demonstrate that differentiation of HT-29 colon cancer cells is associated with a remodeling of both ATP and neurotensin mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling appeared more sensitive to differentiation than ATP-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürstenbinder, Katharina; Möller, Birgit; Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca 2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca 2+ -CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca 2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  8. Incorporation of Collagen in Calcium Phosphate Cements for Controlling Osseointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsien Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effect of supplementing a non-dispersive dicalcium phosphate-rich calcium phosphate bone cement (DCP-rich CPC with type I collagen on in vitro cellular activities and its performance as a bone graft material. Varying amounts of type I collagen were added during the preparation of the DCP-rich CPC. In vitro cell adhesion, morphology, viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity were evaluated using progenitor bone cells. Bone graft performance was evaluated via a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model and osteointegration of the implant. New bone formations in the restorative sites were assessed by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histological analysis. We found that the incorporation of collagen into the DCP-rich CPC was associated with increased cell adhesion, cell viability, and ALP activity in vitro. The spinal fusion model revealed a significant increase in bone regeneration. Additionally, better osseointegration was observed between the host bone and graft with the DCP-rich CPC supplemented with collagen than with the collagen-free DCP-rich CPC control graft. Furthermore, compared to the control graft, the results of micro-CT showed that a smaller amount of residual material was observed with the collagen-containing DCP-rich CPC graft compared with the control graft, which suggests the collagen supplement enhanced new bone formation. Of the different mixtures evaluated in this study (0.8 g DCP-rich CPC supplemented with 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mL type I collagen, respectively, DCP-rich CPC supplemented with 0.4 mL collagen led to the highest level of osteogenesis. Our results suggest that the DCP-rich CPC supplemented with collagen has potential to be used as an effective bone graft material in spinal surgery.

  9. Fungal genes related to calcium homeostasis and signalling are upregulated in symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Arnould, Christine; Wipf, Daniel; Zhao, Bin; van Tuinen, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular calcium levels generate signalling events and regulate different cellular processes. Whilst the implication of Ca(2+) in plant responses during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) interactions is well documented, nothing is known about the regulation or role of this secondary messenger in the fungal symbiont. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of putatively Ca(2+)-related genes of Glomus intraradices BEG141 encoding five proteins involved in membrane transport and one nuclear protein kinase, was investigated during the AM symbiosis. Expression profiles related to successful colonization of host roots were observed in interactions of G. intraradices with roots of wild-type Medicago truncatula (line J5) compared to the mycorrhiza-defective mutant dmi3/Mtsym13. Symbiotic fungal activity was monitored using stearoyl-CoA desaturase and phosphate transporter genes. Laser microdissection based-mapping of fungal gene expression in mycorrhizal root tissues indicated that the Ca(2+)-related genes were differentially upregulated in arbuscules and/or in intercellular hyphae. The spatio-temporal variations in gene expression suggest that the encoded proteins may have different functions in fungal development or function during symbiosis development. Full-length cDNA obtained for two genes with interesting expression profiles confirmed a close similarity with an endoplasmic reticulum P-type ATPase and a Vcx1-like vacuolar Ca(2+) ion transporter functionally characterized in other fungi and involved in the regulation of cell calcium pools. Possible mechanisms are discussed in which Ca(2+)-related proteins G. intraradices BEG141 may play a role in mobilization and perception of the intracellular messenger by the AM fungus during symbiotic interactions with host roots. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Control of earphone produced binaural signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte; Hoffmann, Pablo F.

    2011-01-01

    While most people keep a high attention to the significance of the binaural recording method, whether it is e.g. individual or non-individual (as e.g. artificial head recording), many pay less attention to the type of earphone used to reproduce the binaural signals, and to the accurate control...

  11. Control of earphone produced binaural signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte; Hoffmann, Pablo F.

    2011-01-01

    While most people keep a high attention to the significance of the binaural recording method, whether it is e.g. individual or non-individual (as e.g. artificial head recording), many pay less attention to the type of earphone used to reproduce the binaural signals, and to the accurate control of...

  12. Light signals for road traffic control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Signals for road traffic control are a major constituent of the modern traffic scene, particularly in built-up areas. A vast amount of research has been executed in the last two decennia, resulting in a fairly generally accepted view on what the requirements for effective traffic lights are. For the

  13. Heterogeneous regional signal control : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-12

    The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive framework with a set of models to improve multi-modal traffic signal control, by incorporating advanced floating sensor data (e.g. GPS data, etc.) and traditional fixed sensor data (e.g. loop det...

  14. Regional specificity of exercise and calcium during skeletal growth in girls : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iuliano-Burns, S; Saxon, L; Naughton, G; Gibbons, K; Bass, SL

    Combining exercise with calcium supplementation may produce additive or multiplicative effects at loaded sites; thus, we conducted a single blind, prospective, randomized controlled study in pre- and early-pubertal girls to test the following hypotheses. (1) At the loaded sites, exercise and calcium

  15. Dexamethasone-induced cardiac deterioration is associated with both calcium handling abnormalities and calcineurin signaling pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Salvi Guimarães, Fabiana; de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Bozi, Luis Henrique Marchesi; Souza, Pâmela R; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Dexamethasone is a potent and widely used anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drug. However, recent evidences suggest that dexamethasone cause pathologic cardiac remodeling, which later impairs cardiac function. The mechanism behind the cardiotoxic effect of dexamethasone is elusive. The present study aimed to verify if dexamethasone-induced cardiotoxicity would be associated with changes in the cardiac net balance of calcium handling protein and calcineurin signaling pathway activation. Wistar rats (~400 g) were treated with dexamethasone (35 µg/g) in drinking water for 15 days. After dexamethasone treatment, we analyzed cardiac function, cardiomyocyte diameter, cardiac fibrosis, and the expression of proteins involved in calcium handling and calcineurin signaling pathway. Dexamethasone-treated rats showed several cardiovascular abnormalities, including elevated blood pressure, diastolic dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Regarding the expression of proteins involved in calcium handling, dexamethasone increased phosphorylation of phospholamban at threonine 17, reduced protein levels of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and had no effect on protein expression of Serca2a. Protein levels of NFAT and GATA-4 were increased in both cytoplasmic and nuclear faction. In addition, dexamethasone increased nuclear protein levels of calcineurin. Altogether our findings suggest that dexamethasone causes pathologic cardiac remodeling and diastolic dysfunction, which is associated with impaired calcium handling and calcineurin signaling pathway activation.

  16. Integration of Kinase and Calcium Signaling at the Level of Chromatin Underlies Inducible Gene Activation in T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignall, Ruth; Cauchy, Pierre; Bevington, Sarah L; Gorman, Bethany; Pisco, Angela O; Bagnall, James; Boddington, Christopher; Rowe, William; England, Hazel; Rich, Kevin; Schmidt, Lorraine; Dyer, Nigel P; Travis, Mark A; Ott, Sascha; Jackson, Dean A; Cockerill, Peter N; Paszek, Pawel

    2017-10-15

    TCR signaling pathways cooperate to activate the inducible transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, and AP-1. In this study, using the calcium ionophore ionomycin and/or PMA on Jurkat T cells, we show that the gene expression program associated with activation of TCR signaling is closely related to specific chromatin landscapes. We find that calcium and kinase signaling cooperate to induce chromatin remodeling at ∼2100 chromatin regions, which demonstrate enriched binding motifs for inducible factors and correlate with target gene expression. We found that these regions typically function as inducible enhancers. Many of these elements contain composite NFAT/AP-1 sites, which typically support cooperative binding, thus further reinforcing the need for cooperation between calcium and kinase signaling in the activation of genes in T cells. In contrast, treatment with PMA or ionomycin alone induces chromatin remodeling at far fewer regions (∼600 and ∼350, respectively), which mostly represent a subset of those induced by costimulation. This suggests that the integration of TCR signaling largely occurs at the level of chromatin, which we propose plays a crucial role in regulating T cell activation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  18. The involvement of calcium and MAP kinase signaling pathways in the production of radiation-induced bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyng, F M

    2006-04-01

    Much evidence now exists regarding radiation-induced bystander effects, but the mechanisms involved in the transduction of the signal are still unclear. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways have been linked to growth factor-mediated regulation of cellular events such as proliferation, senescence, differentiation and apoptosis. Activation of multiple MAPK pathways such as the ERK, JNK and p38 pathways have been shown to occur after exposure of cells to radiation and a variety of other toxic stresses. Previous studies have shown oxidative stress and calcium signaling to be important in radiation-induced bystander effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate MAPK signaling pathways in bystander cells exposed to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and the role of oxidative metabolism and calcium signaling in the induction of bystander responses. Human keratinocytes (HPV-G cell line) were irradiated (0.005-5 Gy) using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The medium was harvested 1 h postirradiation and transferred to recipient HPV-G cells. Phosphorylated forms of p38, JNK and ERK were studied by immunofluorescence 30 min-24 h after exposure to ICCM. Inhibitors of the ERK pathway (PD98059 and U0126), the JNK pathway (SP600125), and the p38 pathway (SB203580) were used to investigate whether bystander-induced cell death could be blocked. Cells were also incubated with ICCM in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, EGTA, verapamil, nifedipine and thapsigargin to investigate whether bystander effects could be inhibited because of the known effects on calcium homeostasis. Activated forms of JNK and ERK proteins were observed after exposure to ICCM. Inhibition of the ERK pathway appeared to increase bystander-induced apoptosis, while inhibition of the JNK pathway appeared to decrease apoptosis. In addition, reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and calcium signaling were found to be important modulators of

  19. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W.H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; consortium, HRGEN; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Fabiola Del, Greco M.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C.M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R.P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 novel QT loci in 298 unrelated LQTS probands identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode for proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies novel candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS,and SCD. PMID:24952745

  20. Interplay between phosphoinositide lipids and calcium signals at the leading edge of chemotaxing ameboid cells☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J.; Ziemba, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The chemotactic migration of eukaryotic ameboid cells up concentration gradients is among the most advanced forms of cellular behavior. Chemotaxis is controlled by a complex network of signaling proteins bound to specific lipids on the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, or the leading edge. The central lipid players in this leading edge signaling pathway include the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), both of which play multiple roles. The products of PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 (IP3), are also implicated as important players. Together, these leading edge phosphoinositides and their degradation products, in concert with a local Ca2+ signal, control the recruitment and activities of many peripheral membrane proteins that are crucial to the leading edge signaling network. The present critical review summarizes the current molecular understanding of chemotactic signaling at the leading edge, including newly discovered roles of phosphoinositide lipids and Ca2+, while highlighting key questions for future research. PMID:24451847

  1. Interplay between phosphoinositide lipids and calcium signals at the leading edge of chemotaxing ameboid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J; Ziemba, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    The chemotactic migration of eukaryotic ameboid cells up concentration gradients is among the most advanced forms of cellular behavior. Chemotaxis is controlled by a complex network of signaling proteins bound to specific lipids on the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, or the leading edge. The central lipid players in this leading edge signaling pathway include the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), both of which play multiple roles. The products of PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 (IP3), are also implicated as important players. Together, these leading edge phosphoinositides and their degradation products, in concert with a local Ca(2+) signal, control the recruitment and activities of many peripheral membrane proteins that are crucial to the leading edge signaling network. The present critical review summarizes the current molecular understanding of chemotactic signaling at the leading edge, including newly discovered roles of phosphoinositide lipids and Ca(2+), while highlighting key questions for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Signaling pathways controlling skeletal muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerman, Marc A; Glass, David J

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle maintenance involve interplay between multiple signaling pathways. Under normal physiological conditions, a network of interconnected signals serves to control and coordinate hypertrophic and atrophic messages, culminating in a delicate balance between muscle protein synthesis and proteolysis. Loss of skeletal muscle mass, termed "atrophy", is a diagnostic feature of cachexia seen in settings of cancer, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney disease, and burns. Cachexia increases the likelihood of death from these already serious diseases. Recent studies have further defined the pathways leading to gain and loss of skeletal muscle as well as the signaling events that induce differentiation and post-injury regeneration, which are also essential for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. In this review, we summarize and discuss the relevant recent literature demonstrating these previously undiscovered mediators governing anabolism and catabolism of skeletal muscle.

  3. Possible Signaling Pathways Mediating Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1-Dependent Spatial Learning and Memory in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoe Y Nakamura

    Full Text Available Intracellular Ca2+ signaling regulates diverse functions of the nervous system. Many of these neuronal functions, including learning and memory, are regulated by neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1. However, the pathways by which NCS-1 regulates these functions remain poorly understood. Consistent with the findings of previous reports, we revealed that NCS-1 deficient (Ncs1-/- mice exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory function in the Morris water maze test, although there was little change in their exercise activity, as determined via treadmill-analysis. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a key regulator of memory function and dopamine was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain, without changes in the levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor or nerve growth factor. Although there were no gross structural abnormalities in the hippocampi of Ncs1-/- mice, electron microscopy analysis revealed that the density of large dense core vesicles in CA1 presynaptic neurons, which release BDNF and dopamine, was decreased. Phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-α (CaMKII-α, which is known to trigger long-term potentiation and increase BDNF levels, was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain. Furthermore, high voltage electric potential stimulation, which increases the levels of BDNF and promotes spatial learning, significantly increased the levels of NCS-1 concomitant with phosphorylated CaMKII-α in the hippocampus; suggesting a close relationship between NCS-1 and CaMKII-α. Our findings indicate that NCS-1 may regulate spatial learning and memory function at least in part through activation of CaMKII-α signaling, which may directly or indirectly increase BDNF production.

  4. A clinically relevant model of osteoinduction: a process requiring calcium phosphate and BMP/Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, J; Roberts, S J; Schrooten, J; Luyten, F P

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we investigated a clinically relevant model of in vivo ectopic bone formation utilizing human periosteum derived cells (HPDCs) seeded in a Collagraft carrier and explored the mechanisms by which this process is driven. Bone formation occurred after eight weeks when a minimum of one million HPDCs was loaded on Collagraft carriers and implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nu/nu mice. De novo bone matrix, mainly secreted by the HPDCs, was found juxta-proximal of the calcium phosphate (CaP) granules suggesting that CaP may have triggered the 'osteoinductive program'. Indeed, removal of the CaP granules by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decalcification prior to cell seeding and implantation resulted in loss of bone formation. In addition, inhibition of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt signalling by overexpression of the secreted antagonists Noggin and Frzb, respectively, also abrogated osteoinduction. Proliferation of the engrafted HPDCs was strongly reduced in the decalcified scaffolds or when seeded with adenovirus-Noggin/Frzb transduced HPDCs indicating that cell division of the engrafted HPDCs is required for the direct bone formation cascade. These data suggest that this model of bone formation is similar to that observed during physiological intramembranous bone development and may be of importance when investigating tissue engineering strategies.

  5. Atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotypic modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs via down-regulation the Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Liu, Baoqin; Kong, Dehui; Li, Si; Li, Chao; Wang, Huaqin; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a central role in the onset and progression of proliferative vascular diseases. In adult tissue, VSMCs exist in a physiological contractile-quiescent phenotype, which is defined by lack of the ability of proliferation and migration, while high expression of contractile marker proteins. After injury to the vessel, VSMC shifts from a contractile phenotype to a pathological synthetic phenotype, associated with increased proliferation, migration and matrix secretion. It has been demonstrated that PDGF-BB is a critical mediator of VSMCs phenotypic switch. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl l coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, exhibits various protective effects against VSMCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of atorvastatin calcium on phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and the related intracellular signal transduction pathways. Treatment of VSMCs with atorvastatin calcium showed dose-dependent inhibition of PDGF-BB-induced proliferation. Atorvastatin calcium co-treatment inhibited the phenotype modulation and cytoskeleton rearrangements and improved the expression of contractile phenotype marker proteins such as α-SM actin, SM22α and calponin in comparison with PDGF-BB alone stimulated VSMCs. Although Akt phosphorylation was strongly elicited by PDGF-BB, Akt activation was attenuated when PDGF-BB was co-administrated with atorvastatin calcium. In conclusion, atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and activation of the Akt signaling pathway, indicating that Akt might play a vital role in the modulation of phenotype.

  6. Renal control of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Judith; Chonchol, Michel; Levi, Moshe

    2015-07-07

    Calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are multivalent cations that are important for many biologic and cellular functions. The kidneys play a central role in the homeostasis of these ions. Gastrointestinal absorption is balanced by renal excretion. When body stores of these ions decline significantly, gastrointestinal absorption, bone resorption, and renal tubular reabsorption increase to normalize their levels. Renal regulation of these ions occurs through glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption and/or secretion and is therefore an important determinant of plasma ion concentration. Under physiologic conditions, the whole body balance of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium is maintained by fine adjustments of urinary excretion to equal the net intake. This review discusses how calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are handled by the kidneys. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Robust control through signal constraints with application to predictive control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.A.J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel approach to robust controller design. It describes how linear constraints can be derived on the output of an arbitrary controller, that guarantee robust bounded-input/bounded-output stability and asymptotic perfect tracking of the reference when the external signals

  8. Role of calcium deficiency in development of nutritional rickets in Indian children: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Seth, Anju; Aneja, Satinder; Sharma, Bhawna; Sonkar, Pitamber; Singh, Satveer; Marwaha, Raman K

    2012-10-01

    Nutritional rickets is usually attributed to vitamin D deficiency. Studies from some tropical countries have postulated low dietary intake of calcium as the cause of nutritional rickets. Both vitamin D and dietary calcium deficiency are highly prevalent in India. Information on their relative contribution in the development of rickets in Indian children is limited. The aim was to study the role of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in causation of nutritional rickets in young Indian children. In a case-control study, 67 children with nutritional rickets and 68 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were compared for demographic factors, nutritional status, sun exposure (UV score), dietary calcium and phytate intake (for subjects not breast-fed at presentation), and biochemical parameters [serum calcium, inorganic phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and PTH]. Mean intake of calcium (204±129 vs. 453±234 mg/d; Prickets, significant negative correlations were seen between dietary calcium intake and radiological score (r=-0.28; P=0.03) and PTH (r=-0.26; P=0.02). No correlation was found between serum 25OHD level and radiological score or biochemical parameters of rickets. Rickets develops when low dietary calcium intake coexists with a low or borderline vitamin D nutrition status.

  9. Mechanical characterization of calcium pectinate hydrogel for controlled drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Jin Thau

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium pectinate beads, a paniculate hydrogel system, is an attractive drug carrier for oral delivery. In this study, a poorly water-soluble model drug indomethacin was incorporated into calcium pectinate beads made of different pectin concentrations, which were produced by an extrusion method. The effect of pectin concentration on bead size, circularity, swelling behavior, and mechanical properties, as well as in vitro drug release profile was investigated. The mechanical properties of calcium pectinate beads were determined by a micromanipulation technique. The drug release profile was measured using a standard British Pharmacopoeia method. It was found that the beads made of higher pectin concentration in general had a less permeable matrix structure and greater mechanical rigidity, although they swelled more after hydration. However, such an effect was not significant when the pectin concentration was increased to above 8%. Micromanipulation measurements showed that there was significant relaxation of the force being imposed on single hydrated beads when they were held, but this phenomenon did not occur on dry beads, which means that the force relaxation was dominated by liquid loss from the beads. The rate of the force relaxation was determined, and has been related to the release rate of the model drug entrapped in the calcium pectinate beads.

  10. Effects of calcium gluconate and ascorbic acid on controlling shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro shoot necrosis is a quite widespread disorder affecting raspberry micropropagation. This study was conducted to investigate effects of calcium gluconate and ascorbic acid on shoot necrosis and dieback of raspberry shoots during micropropagation. Nodal segments of primocane-fruiting raspberry cultivars 'Allgold', ...

  11. Shape control synthesis of low-dimensional calcium sulfate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Calcium sulfate nanorods, nanowires, nanobelts and sheets had been synthesized via a facile solution reaction of CaCl2 and H2SO4 in mixed solvents of ethanol/, -dimethylformamide and deionized water at 35°C. The results indicated that well-crystallized CaSO4 nanomaterials with different morphology were obtained ...

  12. Calcium supplementation increases blood creatinine concentration in a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L Barry

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements are widely used among older adults for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. However, their effect on creatinine levels and kidney function has not been well studied.We investigated the effect of calcium supplementation on blood creatinine concentration in a randomized controlled trial of colorectal adenoma chemoprevention conducted between 2004-2013 at 11 clinical centers in the United States. Healthy participants (N = 1,675 aged 45-75 with a history of colorectal adenoma were assigned to daily supplementation with calcium (1200 mg, as carbonate, vitamin D3 (1000 IU, both, or placebo for three or five years. Changes in blood creatinine and total calcium concentration were measured after one year of treatment and multiple linear regression was used to estimate effects on creatinine concentrations.After one year of treatment, blood creatinine was 0.013±0.006 mg/dL higher on average among participants randomized to calcium compared to placebo after adjustment for other determinants of creatinine (P = 0.03. However, the effect of calcium treatment appeared to be larger among participants who consumed the most alcohol (2-6 drinks/day or whose estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 at baseline. The effect of calcium treatment on creatinine was only partially mediated by a concomitant increase in blood total calcium concentration and was independent of randomized vitamin D treatment. There did not appear to be further increases in creatinine after the first year of calcium treatment.Among healthy adults participating in a randomized clinical trial, daily supplementation with 1200 mg of elemental calcium caused a small increase in blood creatinine. If confirmed, this finding may have implications for clinical and public health recommendations for calcium supplementation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00153816.

  13. Large-scale DNA methylation expression analysis across 12 solid cancers reveals hypermethylation in the calcium-signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Xiao, Fu-Hui; Li, Qi-Gang; Liu, Jia; He, Yong-Han; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2017-02-14

    Tumorigenesis is linked to the role of DNA methylation in gene expression regulation. Yet, cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in which the global pattern of DNA methylation and gene expression, especially across diverse cancers, is not well understood. We investigated DNA methylation status and its association with gene expressions across 12 solid cancer types obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Results showed that global hypermethylation was an important characteristic across all 12 cancer types. Moreover, there were more epigenetically silenced than epigenetically activated genes across the cancers. Further analysis identified epigenetically silenced genes shared in the calcium-signaling pathway across the different cancer types. Reversing the aberrant DNA methylation of genes involved in the calcium-signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for suppressing cancers and developing anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Neuroblast Migration and P2Y1 Receptor Mediated Calcium Signalling Depend on 9-O-Acetyl GD3 Ganglioside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo F Santiago

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicated that a ganglioside 9acGD3 (9-O-acetyl GD3 antibody [the J-Ab (Jones antibody] reduces GCP (granule cell progenitor migration in vitro and in vivo. We here investigated, using cerebellar explants of postnatal day (P 6 mice, the mechanism by which 9acGD3 reduces GCP migration. We found that immunoblockade of the ganglioside with the J-Ab or the lack of GD3 synthase reduced GCP in vitro migration and the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations. Immunocytochemistry and pharmacological assays indicated that GCPs expressed P2Y1Rs (P2Y1 receptors and that deletion or blockade of these receptors decreased the migration rate of GCPs and the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations. The reduction in P2Y1-mediated calcium signals seen in Jones-treated and GD3 synthase-null GCPs were paralleled by P2Y1R internalization. We conclude that 9acGD3 controls GCP migration by influencing P2Y1R cellular distribution and function.

  15. ATP- and gap junction-dependent intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, N R; Geist, S T; Civitelli, R

    1997-01-01

    stores. In one model, IP3 traverses gap junctions and initiates the release of intracellular calcium stores in neighboring cells. Alternatively, calcium waves may be mediated not by gap junctional communication, but rather by autocrine activity of secreted ATP on P2 purinergic receptors. We studied...... mechanically induced calcium waves in two rat osteosarcoma cell lines that differ in the gap junction proteins they express, in their ability to pass microinjected dye from cell to cell, and in their expression of P2Y2 (P2U) purinergic receptors. ROS 17/2.8 cells, which express the gap junction protein...... connexin43 (Cx43), are well dye coupled, and lack P2U receptors, transmitted slow gap junction-dependent calcium waves that did not require release of intracellular calcium stores. UMR 106-01 cells predominantly express the gap junction protein connexin 45 (Cx45), are poorly dye coupled, and express P2U...

  16. Multiple Mechanisms Drive Calcium Signal Dynamics around Laser-Induced Epithelial Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Erica K; Stevens, Aaron; Edrington, Westin; Zhao, Yunhua; Jayasinghe, Aroshan K; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hutson, M Shane

    2017-10-03

    Epithelial wound healing is an evolutionarily conserved process that requires coordination across a field of cells. Studies in many organisms have shown that cytosolic calcium levels rise within a field of cells around the wound and spread to neighboring cells, within seconds of wounding. Although calcium is a known potent second messenger and master regulator of wound-healing programs, it is unknown what initiates the rise of cytosolic calcium across the wound field. Here we use laser ablation, a commonly used technique for the precision removal of cells or subcellular components, as a tool to investigate mechanisms of calcium entry upon wounding. Despite its precise ablation capabilities, we find that this technique damages cells outside the primary wound via a laser-induced cavitation bubble, which forms and collapses within microseconds of ablation. This cavitation bubble damages the plasma membranes of cells it contacts, tens of microns away from the wound, allowing direct calcium entry from extracellular fluid into damaged cells. Approximately 45 s after this rapid influx of calcium, we observe a second influx of calcium that spreads to neighboring cells beyond the footprint of cavitation. The occurrence of this second, delayed calcium expansion event is predicted by wound size, indicating that a separate mechanism of calcium entry exists, corresponding to cell loss at the primary wound. Our research demonstrates that the damage profile of laser ablation is more similar to a crush injury than the precision removal of individual cells. The generation of membrane microtears upon ablation is consistent with studies in the field of optoporation, which investigate ablation-induced cellular permeability. We conclude that multiple types of damage, including microtears and cell loss, result in multiple mechanisms of calcium influx around epithelial wounds. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. FM dyes enter via a store-operated calcium channel and modify calcium signaling of cultured astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Hérault, Karine; Oheim, Martin; Ropert, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    The amphiphilic fluorescent styryl pyridinium dyes FM1-43 and FM4-64 are used to probe activity-dependent synaptic vesicle cycling in neurons. Cultured astrocytes can internalize FM1-43 and FM4-64 inside vesicles but their uptake is insensitive to the elevation of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentration and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and pharmacological tools to study the mechanisms of FM4-64 uptake into cultured astrocytes from mouse neocortex. Our data show that: (i) endocytosis is not a major route for FM4-64 uptake into astrocytes; (ii) FM4-64 enters astrocytes through an aqueous pore and strongly affects Ca2+ homeostasis; (iii) partitioning of FM4-64 into the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane results in a facilitation of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) channel gating; (iv) FM4-64 permeates and competes with Ca2+ for entry through a SOCE channel; (v) intracellular FM4-64 mobilizes Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum stores, conveying a positive feedback to activate SOCE and to sustain dye uptake into astrocytes. Our study demonstrates that FM dyes are not markers of cycling vesicles in astrocytes and calls for a careful interpretation of FM fluorescence. PMID:20007370

  18. Signal Propagation between Neuronal Populations Controlled by Micropatterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Jonas; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system consists of an unfathomable number of functional networks enabling highly sophisticated information processing. Guided neuronal growth with a well-defined connectivity and accompanying polarity is essential for the formation of these networks. To investigate how two-dimensional protein patterns influence neuronal outgrowth with respect to connectivity and functional polarity between adjacent populations of neurons, a microstructured model system was established. Exclusive cell growth on patterned substrates was achieved by transferring a mixture of poly-l-lysine and laminin to a cell-repellent glass surface by microcontact printing. Triangular structures with different opening angle, height, and width were chosen as a pattern to achieve network formation with defined behavior at the junction of adjacent structures. These patterns were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons and investigated with respect to their impact on neuronal outgrowth by immunofluorescence analysis, as well as their functional connectivity by calcium imaging. Here, we present a highly reproducible technique to devise neuronal networks in vitro with a predefined connectivity induced by the design of the gateway. Daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity and functional polarity were produced using the presented micropatterning method. Controlling the direction of signal propagation among populations of neurons provides insights to network communication and offers the chance to investigate more about learning processes in networks by external manipulation of cells and signal cascades.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable microcapsules for the controlled delivery of calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gao, Xuejun; Liu, Jiguang; Liang, Fuxin; Qu, Xiaozhong; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to synthesize and characterize biodegradable microcapsules based on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and ethylcellulose (EC) for a controlled delivery of calcium hydroxide. Phase separation technique was adopted to synthesize calcium hydroxide-loaded PLA/EC microcapsules. Four PLA/EC blends (4/1, 1/1, 1/4, pure EC) were used as shell materials and the input ratio of calcium hydroxide to shell polymer was 4:1 for all microcapsules. The morphology and composition were studied using SEM-EDS and TEM. Particle size distribution, glass-transition temperature, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency were characterized. In vitro release of the microcapsules was evaluated using a pH microelectrode and an auto-biochemistry analyzer. SEM images of microcapsules showed uniform spherical structures with smooth surfaces. Core-shell, hetero-structures were confirmed using TEM. The presence of calcium in the microcapsules was verified with EDS. Pure calcium hydroxide was 160 nm in diameter and the particle size of the microcapsules ranged between 500 nm and 4 μm. With an increase of PLA in PLA/EC blend, the size of microcapsules increased accordingly. Encapsulation efficiency of these microcapsules was higher than 57% and drug loading was higher than 80%, which were not significantly different among four microcapsules. Pure calcium hydroxide powder was used as a control and 90% was released within 48 h, while release of calcium hydroxide from microcapsules took between 168 and 456 h, depending on the PLA/EC ratio. Compared with calcium hydroxide powder, the calcium hydroxide-loaded microcapsules showed a sustained and prolonged release, which could be controlled via the regulation of the PLA/EC ratio. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Osteogenic Differentiation of MSC through Calcium Signaling Activation: Transcriptomics and Functional Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Viti

    Full Text Available The culture of progenitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSC onto osteoconductive materials to induce a proper osteogenic differentiation and mineralized matrix regeneration represents a promising and widely diffused experimental approach for tissue-engineering (TE applications in orthopaedics. Among modern biomaterials, calcium phosphates represent the best bone substitutes, due to their chemical features emulating the mineral phase of bone tissue. Although many studies on stem cells differentiation mechanisms have been performed involving calcium-based scaffolds, results often focus on highlighting production of in vitro bone matrix markers and in vivo tissue ingrowth, while information related to the biomolecular mechanisms involved in the early cellular calcium-mediated differentiation is not well elucidated yet. Genetic programs for osteogenesis have been just partially deciphered, and the description of the different molecules and pathways operative in these differentiations is far from complete, as well as the activity of calcium in this process. The present work aims to shed light on the involvement of extracellular calcium in MSC differentiation: a better understanding of the early stage osteogenic differentiation program of MSC seeded on calcium-based biomaterials is required in order to develop optimal strategies to promote osteogenesis through the use of new generation osteoconductive scaffolds. A wide spectrum of analysis has been performed on time-dependent series: gene expression profiles are obtained from samples (MSC seeded on calcium-based scaffolds, together with related microRNAs expression and in vivo functional validation. On this basis, and relying on literature knowledge, hypotheses are made on the biomolecular players activated by the biomaterial calcium-phosphate component. Interestingly, a key role of miR-138 was highlighted, whose inhibition markedly increases osteogenic differentiation in vitro and enhance ectopic bone

  1. Effects of energy controllable steep pulses on intracellular calcium concentration and cell membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X-J; Luo, X-D; Xiong, L; Mi, Y; Hu, L-N

    2014-01-01

    Our previous experiments showed that steep pulses could kill tumor cells, but the mechanism is unclear yet. This study was to probe the effects of different dosages of energy controllable steep pulses on intracellular concentration of dissociative calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) and cell membrane potential. The mammary carcinoma cells MDA-MB-231 were divided into control group and 5 different dosages of Energy Controllable Steep Pulses (ECSP) treatment groups. The calcium ion in each group was labeled by Fluo-3/AM individually and the cell membrane potential was labeled by DiBAC4 (3). The mean fluorescence intensity of fluorescent probe in mammary carcinoma cells was observed in quiet state by laser confocal microscopy after ECSP treatment The changes of calcium concentration and cell membrane potential in cells after ECSP treatment were analyzed. The changes of intracellular [Ca2+]i after ECSP treatment were also observed with and without calcium ion outside of the cells. The calcium ion outside of cells influx with lower dosage of pulse in quiet state. With the dosage increase, the intracellular calcium ion outflow. In real time kinetic detection, the mean fluorescence intensity of intracellular calcium ion was increased with the pulse electric field intensity raised in the lower ECSP. When the voltage was 285V, frequency was 100Hz, the [Ca2+]i decreased. The increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration was decreased without calcium ion than with calcium ion outside of cells, but still raised gradually. The lower dosage of ECSP could induce the fluorescence intensity of DiBAC4 (3) in cells increase, which showed that the lower dosage of ECSP could induce the depolarization of cells. With the dosage raised, the fluorescence intensity of DiBAC4 (3) in cells attenuated. This dosage of ECSP could induce the superpolarization of cell membrane. The lower dosage of ECSP can induce the depolarization of cell membrane and induce the inter flow of calcium ion outside of cell

  2. Development of an electronic vehicular traffic signal controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the design, construction, and test of an electronic signal controller for urban vehicular traffic control. The design is based on a series of fixed-time signal plans for different time zones of the day and can accommodate sixty-four signal plans. Finite state machine concept was used in the design of the signal ...

  3. TRPV1-mediated calcium signal couples with cannabinoid receptors and sodium-calcium exchangers in rat odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumura, Maki; Sobhan, Ubaidus; Muramatsu, Takashi; Sato, Masaki; Ichikawa, Hideki; Sahara, Yoshinori; Tazaki, Masakazu; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    Odontoblasts are involved in the transduction of stimuli applied to exposed dentin. Although expression of thermo/mechano/osmo-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels has been demonstrated, the properties of TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-mediated signaling remain to be clarified. We investigated physiological and pharmacological properties of TRPV1 and its functional coupling with cannabinoid (CB) receptors and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers (NCXs) in odontoblasts. Anandamide (AEA), capsaicin (CAP), resiniferatoxin (RF) or low-pH evoked Ca(2+) influx. This influx was inhibited by capsazepine (CPZ). Delay in time-to-activation of TRPV1 channels was observed between application of AEA or CAP and increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), however, an immediate increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was observed on administration of extracellular Ca(2+), followed by activation of TRPV1 channels. Intracellular application of CAP elicited inward current via opening of TRPV1 channels faster than extracellular application. With extracellular RF application, no time delay was observed in either increase in [Ca(2+)](i) or inward current, indicating that agonist binding sites are located on both extra- and intracellular domains. KB-R7943, an NCX inhibitor, yielded an increase in the decay time constant during TRPV1-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Increase in [Ca(2+)](i) by CB receptor agonist, 2-arachidonylglycerol, was inhibited by CB1 receptor antagonist or CPZ, as well as by adenylyl cyclase inhibitor. These results showed that TRPV1-mediated Ca(2+) entry functionally couples with CB1 receptor activation via cAMP signaling. Increased [Ca(2+)](i) by TRPV1 activation was extruded by NCXs. Taken together, this suggests that cAMP-mediated CB1-TRPV1 crosstalk and TRPV1-NCX coupling play an important role in driving cellular functions following transduction of external stimuli to odontoblasts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Deepak K; Chandran, Predeesh; Timm, Alicia E; Aguirre-Rojas, Lina; Smith, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion.

  5. Calcium-calmodulin kinase I cooperatively regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of CCTα by accessing a nuclear export signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agassandian, Marianna; Chen, Bill B; Pulijala, Roopa; Kaercher, Leah; Glasser, Jennifer R; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2012-07-01

    We identified a new calmodulin kinase I (CaMKI) substrate, cytidyltransferase (CCTα), a crucial enzyme required for maintenance of cell membranes. CCTα becomes activated with translocation from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane, resulting in increased membrane phospholipids. Calcium-activated CCTα nuclear import is mediated by binding of its C-terminus to 14-3-3 ζ, a regulator of nuclear trafficking. Here CaMK1 phosphorylates residues within this C-terminus that signals association of CCTα with 14-3-3 ζ to initiate calcium-induced nuclear entry. CaMKI docks within the CCTα membrane-binding domain (residues 290-299), a sequence that displays similarities to a canonical nuclear export signal (NES) that also binds CRM1/exportin 1. Expression of a CFP-CCTα mutant lacking residues 290-299 in cells results in cytosolically retained enzyme. CRM1/exportin 1 was required for CCTα nuclear export, and its overexpression in cells was partially sufficient to trigger CCTα nuclear export despite calcium stimulation. An isolated CFP-290-299 peptide remained in the nucleus in the presence of leptomycin B but was able to target to the cytoplasm with farnesol. Thus CaMKI vies with CRM1/exportin 1 for access to a NES, and assembly of a CaMKI-14-3-3 ζ-CCTα complex is a key effector mechanism that drives nuclear CCTα translocation.

  6. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Activity-dependent calcium signaling and ERK-MAP kinases in neurons: a link to structural plasticity of the nucleus and gene transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, J Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-05-01

    Activity-dependent gene expression is important for the formation and maturation of neuronal networks, neuronal survival and for plastic modifications within mature networks. At the level of individual neurons, expression of new protein is required for dendritic branching, synapse formation and elimination. Experience-driven synaptic activity induces membrane depolarization, which in turn evokes intracellular calcium transients that are decoded according to their source and strength by intracellular calcium sensing proteins. In order to activate the gene transcription machinery of the cell, calcium signals have to be conveyed from the site of their generation in the cytoplasm to the cell nucleus. This can occur via a variety of mechanisms and with different kinetics depending on the source and amplitude of calcium influx. One mechanism involves the propagation of calcium itself, leading to nuclear calcium transients that subsequently activate transcription. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade represents a second central signaling module that transduces information from the site of calcium signal generation at the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Nuclear signaling of the MAPK cascades catalyzes the phosphorylation of transcription factors but also regulates gene transcription more globally at the level of chromatin remodeling as well as through its recently identified role in the modulation of nuclear shape. Here we discuss the possible mechanisms by which the MAPKs ERK1 and ERK2, activated by synaptically evoked calcium influx, can signal to the nucleus and regulate gene transcription. Moreover, we describe how MAPK-dependent structural plasticity of the nuclear envelope enhances nuclear calcium signaling and suggest possible implications for the regulation of gene transcription in the context of nuclear geometry. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biotic and abiotic stress responses through calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) signaling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aili; Wang, Xiang; Leseberg, Charles H; Jia, Jizeng; Mao, Long

    2008-09-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) sense the calcium concentration changes in plant cells and play important roles in signaling pathways for disease resistance and various stress responses as indicated by emerging evidences. Among the 20 wheat CDPK genes studied, 10 were found to respond to drought, salinity and ABA treatments. Consistent with previous observations, one CDPK gene was shown to respond to multiple abiotic stresses in wheat suggesting that CDPKs could be converging points for multiple signaling pathways. Among the 12 wheat CDPK genes that were responsive to Blumeria graminis tritici (Bgt) infection or the treatment of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), eight also responded to abiotic stresses, suggesting a cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stress signaling pathways. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that some of these genes were closely related to CDPKs from other species, whose functions have been partially studied, suggesting similar functions wheat CDPK genes. Combining the up-to-date knowledge of CDPK functions and our observations, a model was developed to project the possible roles of wheat CDPK genes in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stress responses.

  9. The signaling module cAMP/Epac/Rap1/PLCε/IP3 mobilizes acrosomal calcium during sperm exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, Ornella; Ruete, María C; Bustos, Matías A; Quevedo, María F; Tomes, Claudia N

    2016-04-01

    Exocytosis of the sperm's single secretory granule, or acrosome, is a regulated exocytosis triggered by components of the egg's investments. In addition to external calcium, sperm exocytosis (termed the acrosome reaction) requires cAMP synthesized endogenously and calcium mobilized from the acrosome through IP3-sensitive channels. The relevant cAMP target is Epac. In the first part of this paper, we present a novel tool (the TAT-cAMP sponge) to investigate cAMP-related signaling pathways in response to progesterone as acrosome reaction trigger. The TAT-cAMP sponge consists of the cAMP-binding sites of protein kinase A regulatory subunit RIβ fused to the protein transduction domain TAT of the human immunodeficiency virus-1. The sponge permeated into sperm, sequestered endogenous cAMP, and blocked exocytosis. Progesterone increased the population of sperm with Rap1-GTP, Rab3-GTP, and Rab27-GTP in the acrosomal region; pretreatment with the TAT-cAMP sponge prevented the activation of all three GTPases. In the second part of this manuscript, we show that phospholipase Cε (PLCε) is required for the acrosome reaction downstream of Rap1 and upstream of intra-acrosomal calcium mobilization. Last, we present direct evidence that cAMP, Epac, Rap1, and PLCε are necessary for calcium mobilization from sperm's secretory granule. In summary, we describe here a pathway that connects cAMP to calcium mobilization from the acrosome during sperm exocytosis. Never before had direct evidence for each step of the cascade been put together in the same study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inverse Modelling to Obtain Head Movement Controller Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, S. H.; Hannaford, B.; Stark, L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally obtained dynamics of time-optimal, horizontal head rotations have previously been simulated by a sixth order, nonlinear model driven by rectangular control signals. Electromyography (EMG) recordings have spects which differ in detail from the theoretical rectangular pulsed control signal. Control signals for time-optimal as well as sub-optimal horizontal head rotations were obtained by means of an inverse modelling procedures. With experimentally measured dynamical data serving as the input, this procedure inverts the model to produce the neurological control signals driving muscles and plant. The relationships between these controller signals, and EMG records should contribute to the understanding of the neurological control of movements.

  11. Lion's Mane Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes), Modulates Purinoceptor-Coupled Calcium Signaling and Murine Nociceptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Shan; Chueh, Sheau-Huei; Chen, Chin-Chu; Lee, Li-Ya; Shiu, Li-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus is well known for the neurotrophic effect it confers by promoting nerve growth factor biosynthesis. We discovered a novel bioactivity of H. erinaceus in its ability to suppress adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-induced calcium signaling in neuronal PC12 cells. ATP, known primarily as a neurotransmitter, also acts on purinoceptors (P2 purinergic receptor [P2R]) to generate the cellular calcium signaling and secretion that mediate P2R physiological manifestations, including pain. Chronic pain reduces quality of life. However, constant analgesic administration can cause liver and kidney injury, as well as loss of the analgesic effect because of desensitization. In this study we investigated the analgesic potential of H. erinaceus through measurements of ATP-induced Ca2+ signaling in cell lines and observation of pain behaviors in mice. In P2R-coupled Ca2+ signaling measurements, extracts of H. erinaceus mycelia (HEEs) blocked ATP-induced Ca2+ signaling in both rat PC12 cells and human HOS cells. HEEs completely blocked ATP-induced Ca2+ signaling in human HOS cells, suggesting that this effect of HEEs is exerted through the P2R subtypes present in HOS cells, which include the P2X4, P2X7, P2Y2, and P2Y4 subtypes. In observations of animal behavior during pain, HEEs significantly reduced heat-induced pain, including postponing both the tail-flick response to heat stimulation and the paw-lifting response to a hot plate. This study demonstrates novel characteristics of H. erinaceus in reducing nociceptive behavior and blocking the functional activity of P2R. Further studies are required to verify this linkage and its molecular mechanisms.

  12. Regulation of calcium signalling by docosahexaenoic acid in human T-cells. Implication of CRAC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, A; Khan, N A

    2000-02-01

    We elucidated the role of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the increases in free intracellular calcium concentrations, [Ca(2+)]i, in human (Jurkat) T-cell lines. DHA evoked an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in a dose-dependent manner in these cells. Anti-CD3 antibody, known to stimulate increases in Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via the production of inositol trisphosphate, also evoked increases in [Ca(2+)]i in Jurkat T-cells. We also used thapsigargin which inhibits Ca(2+)-ATPase of the ER and, therefore, increases Ca(2+) in the cytosol. Interestingly, addition of DHA during the thapsigargin-induced peak response exerted an additive effect on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in human T-cells, indicating that the mechanisms of action of these two agents are different. However, the DHA-induced calcium response was not observed when this agent was added during the anti-CD3-induced calcium peak, though its addition resulted in a prolonged and sustained calcium response as a function of time, suggesting that DHA recruits calcium, in part, from the ER pool and the prolonged response may be due to Ca(2+) influx. In the medium containing 0% Ca(2+), the DHA-evoked response on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i was significantly curtailed as compared to that in 100% Ca(2+) medium, supporting the notion that the response of the DHA is also due, in part, to the opening of calcium channels. Furthermore, preincubation of cells with tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels also significantly curtailed the DHA-induced sustained response on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in these cells. These results suggest that DHA induces an increase in [Ca(2+)]i via the ER pool and the opening of CRAC channels in human T-cells.

  13. Honey bee dopamine and octopamine receptors linked to intracellular calcium signaling have a close phylogenetic and pharmacological relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle T Beggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three dopamine receptor genes have been identified that are highly conserved among arthropod species. One of these genes, referred to in honey bees as Amdop2, shows a close phylogenetic relationship to the a-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor family. In this study we examined in parallel the functional and pharmacological properties of AmDOP2 and the honey bee octopamine receptor, AmOA1. For comparison, pharmacological properties of the honey bee dopamine receptors AmDOP1 and AmDOP3, and the tyramine receptor AmTYR1, were also examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using HEK293 cells heterologously expressing honey bee biogenic amine receptors, we found that activation of AmDOP2 receptors, like AmOA1 receptors, initiates a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels. We found no evidence of calcium signaling via AmDOP1, AmDOP3 or AmTYR1 receptors. AmDOP2- and AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular calcium were inhibited by 10 µM edelfosine indicating a requirement for phospholipase C-β activity in this signaling pathway. Edelfosine treatment had no effect on AmDOP2- or AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. The synthetic compounds mianserin and epinastine, like cis-(Z-flupentixol and spiperone, were found to have significant antagonist activity on AmDOP2 receptors. All 4 compounds were effective antagonists also on AmOA1 receptors. Analysis of putative ligand binding sites offers a possible explanation for why epinastine acts as an antagonist at AmDOP2 receptors, but fails to block responses mediated via AmDOP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AmDOP2, like AmOA1, is coupled not only to cAMP, but also to calcium-signalling and moreover, that the two signalling pathways are independent upstream of phospholipase C-β activity. The striking similarity between the pharmacological properties of these 2 receptors suggests an underlying conservation of structural properties related to receptor

  14. Intercellular calcium signaling and nitric oxide feedback during constriction of rabbit renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Torben Rene; Schjerning, J; Vanhoutte, Paul M. G.

    2007-01-01

    calciseptine. After a delay of 10 s, [Ca(2+)](i) increased in endothelial cells immediately adjacent to reactive smooth muscle cells, and this calcium wave spread in a nonregenerative fashion laterally into the endothelial cell layer with a velocity of 1.2 microm/s. Depolarization with 100 mmol/l KCl led...

  15. Fouling control mechanisms of demineralized water backwash: Reduction of charge screening and calcium bridging effects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the ionic environment on the charge of colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (charge screening effect) and the calcium adsorption/bridging on new and fouled membranes (calcium bridging effect) by measuring the zeta potentials of membranes and colloidal NOM. Fouling experiments were conducted with natural water to determine whether the reduction of the charge screening effect and/or calcium bridging effect by backwashing with demineralized water can explain the observed reduction in fouling. Results show that the charge of both membranes and NOM, as measured by the zeta potential, became more negative at a lower pH and a lower concentration of electrolytes, in particular, divalent electrolytes. In addition, calcium also adsorbed onto the membranes, and consequently bridged colloidal NOM and membranes via binding with functional groups. The charge screening effect could be eliminated by flushing NOM and membranes with demineralized water, since a cation-free environment was established. However, only a limited amount of the calcium bridging connection was removed with demineralized water backwashes, so the calcium bridging effect mostly could not be eliminated. As demineralized water backwash was found to be effective in fouling control, it can be concluded that the reduction of the charge screening is the dominant mechanism for this. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Calcium modified edible Canna (Canna edulis L) starch for controlled released matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, A. P.; Ridwan, M.; Darmawan, T. A.; Darusman, F.; Gadri, A.

    2017-07-01

    Canna edulis L starch was modified with calcium chloride in order to form controlled released matrix. Present study aim to analyze modified starch characteristic. Four different formulation of ondansetron granules was used to provide dissolution profile of controlled released, two formula consisted of 15% and 30% modified starch, one formula utilized matrix reference standards and the last granules was negative control. Methocel-hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose was used as controlled released matrix reference standards in the third formula. Calcium starch was synthesized in the presence of sodium hydroxide to form gelatinized mass and calcium chloride as the cross linking agent. Physicochemical and dissolution properties of modified starch for controlled released application were investigated. Modified starch has higher swelling index, water solubility and compressibility index. Three of four different formulation of granules provide dissolution profile of controlled released. The profiles indicate granules which employed calcium Canna edulis L starch as matrix are able to resemble controlled drug released profile of matrix reference, however their bigger detain ability lead to lower bioavailability.

  17. Ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 modulates local ATP-induced calcium signaling in human HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Ho

    Full Text Available Keratinocytes are the major building blocks of the human epidermis. In many physiological and pathophysiological conditions, keratinocytes release adenosine triphosphate (ATP as an autocrine/paracrine mediator that regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. ATP receptors have been identified in various epidermal cell types; therefore, extracellular ATP homeostasis likely determines its long-term, trophic effects on skin health. We investigated the possibility that human keratinocytes express surface-located enzymes that modulate ATP concentration, as well as the corresponding receptor activation, in the pericellular microenvironment. We observed that the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT released ATP and hydrolyzed extracellular ATP. Interestingly, ATP hydrolysis resulted in adenosine diphosphate (ADP accumulation in the extracellular space. Pharmacological inhibition by ARL 67156 or gene silencing of the endogenous ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase isoform 2 resulted in a 25% reduction in both ATP hydrolysis and ADP formation. Using intracellular calcium as a reporter, we found that although NTPDase2 hydrolyzed ATP and generated sustainable ADP levels, only ATP contributed to increased intracellular calcium via P2Y2 receptor activation. Furthermore, knocking down NTPDase2 potentiated the nanomolar ATP-induced intracellular calcium increase, suggesting that NTPDase2 globally attenuates nucleotide concentration in the pericellular microenvironment as well as locally shields receptors in the vicinity from being activated by extracellular ATP. Our findings reveal an important role of human keratinocyte NTPDase2 in modulating nucleotide signaling in the extracellular milieu of human epidermis.

  18. Calcium-sensing receptors signal constitutive macropinocytosis and facilitate the uptake of NOD2 ligands in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Schlam, Daniel; Breuer, Christian; Gütschow, Michael; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-04-06

    Macropinocytosis can be induced in several cell types by stimulation with growth factors. In selected cell types, notably macrophages and dendritic cells, macropinocytosis occurs constitutively, supporting the uptake of antigens for subsequent presentation. Despite their different mode of initiation and contrasting physiological roles, it is tacitly assumed that both types of macropinocytosis are mechanistically identical. We report that constitutive macropinocytosis is stringently calcium dependent, while stimulus-induced macropinocytosis is not. Extracellular calcium is sensed by G-protein-coupled calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) that signal macropinocytosis through Gα-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phospholipase C. These pathways promote the recruitment of exchange factors that stimulate Rac and/or Cdc42, driving actin-dependent formation of ruffles and macropinosomes. In addition, the heterologous expression of CaSR in HEK293 cells confers on them the ability to perform constitutive macropinocytosis. Finally, we show that CaSR-induced constitutive macropinocytosis facilitates the sentinel function of macrophages, promoting the efficient delivery of ligands to cytosolic pattern-recognition receptors.

  19. Targeting Intracellular Calcium Signaling ([Ca2+]i to Overcome Acquired Multidrug Resistance of Cancer Cells: A Mini-Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Büsselberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a main public health problem all over the world. It affects millions of humans no matter their age, gender, education, or social status. Although chemotherapy is the main strategy for the treatment of cancer, a major problem limiting its success is the intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Therefore, cancer drug resistance is a major impediment in medical oncology resulting in a failure of a successful cancer treatment. This mini-overview focuses on the interdependent relationship between intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i signaling and multidrug resistance of cancer cells, acquired upon treatment of tumors with anticancer drugs. We propose that [Ca2+]i signaling modulates gene expression of multidrug resistant (MDR genes which in turn can be modulated by epigenetic factors which in turn leads to modified protein expression in drug resistant tumor cells. A precise knowledge of these mechanisms will help to develop new therapeutic strategies for drug resistant tumors and will improve current chemotherapy.

  20. Bruton's tyrosine kinase mediates the synergistic signalling between TLR9 and the B cell receptor by regulating calcium and calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine F Kenny

    Full Text Available B cells signal through both the B cell receptor (BCR which binds antigens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs including TLR9 which recognises CpG DNA. Activation of TLR9 synergises with BCR signalling when the BCR and TLR9 co-localise within an auto-phagosome-like compartment. Here we report that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK is required for synergistic IL6 production and up-regulation of surface expression of MHC-class-II, CD69 and CD86 in primary murine and human B cells. We show that BTK is essential for co-localisation of the BCR and TLR9 within a potential auto-phagosome-like compartment in the Namalwa human B cell line. Downstream of BTK we find that calcium acting via calmodulin is required for this process. These data provide new insights into the role of BTK, an important target for autoimmune diseases, in B cell activation.

  1. Cytoskeleton rotation relocates mitochondria to the immunological synapse and increases calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Ilaria; Zhao, Renping; Peglow, Martin; Schwarz, Karsten; Hornak, Ivan; Pasche, Mathias; Quintana, Ariel; Hoth, Markus; Qu, Bin; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    Ca2+ microdomains and spatially resolved Ca2+ signals are highly relevant for cell function. In T cells, local Ca2+ signaling at the immunological synapse (IS) is required for downstream effector functions. We present experimental evidence that the relocation of the MTOC towards the IS during polarization drags mitochondria along with the microtubule network. From time-lapse fluorescence microscopy we conclude that mitochondria rotate together with the cytoskeleton towards the IS. We hypothesize that this movement of mitochondria towards the IS together with their functionality of absorption and spatial redistribution of Ca2+ is sufficient to significantly increase the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. To test this hypothesis we developed a whole cell model for Ca2+ homoeostasis involving specific geometries for mitochondria and use the model to calculate the spatial distribution of Ca2+ concentrations within the cell body as a function of the rotation angle and the distance from the IS. We find that an inhomogeneous distribution of PMCA pumps on the cell membrane, in particular an accumulation of PMCA at the IS, increases the global Ca2+ concentration and decreases the local Ca2+ concentration at the IS with decreasing distance of the MTOC from the IS. Unexpectedly, a change of CRAC/Orai activity is not required to explain the observed Ca2+ changes. We conclude that rotation-driven relocation of the MTOC towards the IS together with an accumulation of PMCA pumps at the IS are sufficient to control the observed Ca2+ dynamics in T-cells during polarization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pitx2 impairs calcium handling in a dose-dependent manner by modulating Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Daimi, Houria; Serra, Selma A; Herraiz, Adela; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Aránega, Amelia; Franco, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia in humans, yet the genetic cause of AF remains elusive. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have reported risk variants in four distinct genetic loci, and more recently, a meta-GWAS has further implicated six new loci in AF. However, the functional role of these AF GWAS-related genes in AF and their inter-relationship remain elusive. To get further insights into the molecular mechanisms driven by Pitx2, calcium handling and novel AF GWAS-associated gene expression were analysed in two distinct Pitx2 loss-of-function models with distinct basal electrophysiological defects; a novel Pitx2 conditional mouse line, Sox2CrePitx2, and our previously reported atrial-specific NppaCrePitx2 line. Molecular analyses of the left atrial appendage in NppaCrePitx2(+/-) and NppaCrePitx2(-/-) adult mice demonstrate that AF GWAS-associated genes such as Zfhx3, Kcnn3, and Wnt8a are severely impaired but not Cav1, Synpo2l, nor Prrx1. In addition, multiple calcium-handling genes such as Atp2a2, Casq2, and Plb are severely altered in atrial-specific NppaCrePitx2 mice in a dose-dependent manner. Functional assessment of calcium homeostasis further underscores these findings. In addition, multiple AF-related microRNAs are also impaired. In vitro over-expression of Wnt8, but not Zfhx3, impairs calcium handling and modulates microRNA expression signature identified in Pitx2 loss-of-function models. Our data demonstrate a dose-dependent relation between Pitx2 expression and the expression of AF susceptibility genes, calcium handling, and microRNAs and identify a complex regulatory network orchestrated by Pitx2 with large impact on atrial arrhythmogenesis susceptibility. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Vitamin D treatment in calcium-deficiency rickets: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Fischer, Philip R; Pettifor, John M

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether children with calcium-deficiency rickets have a better response to treatment with vitamin D and calcium than with calcium alone. Randomised controlled trial. Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria. Nigerian children with active rickets treated with calcium carbonate as limestone (approximately 938 mg elemental calcium twice daily) were, in addition, randomised to receive either oral vitamin D2 50,000 IU (Ca+D, n=44) or placebo (Ca, n=28) monthly for 24 weeks. Achievement of a 10-point radiographic severity score ≤1.5 and serum alkaline phosphatase ≤350 U/L. The median (range) age of enrolled children was 46 (15-102) months, and baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. Mean (±SD) 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was 30.2±13.2 nmol/L at baseline, and 29 (43%) had values children (94% of original cohort) who completed 24 weeks of treatment, 29 (67%) in the Ca+D group and 11 (44%) in the Ca group achieved the primary outcome (p=0.06). Baseline 25(OH)D did not alter treatment group effects (p=0.99 for interaction). At the end of 24 weeks, 25(OH)D values were 55.4±17.0 nmol/L and 37.9±20.0 nmol/L in the Ca+D and Ca groups, respectively, (pchildren with calcium-deficiency rickets, there is a trend for vitamin D to improve the response to treatment with calcium carbonate as limestone, independent of baseline 25(OH)D concentrations. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00949832. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  5. c-Met must translocate to the nucleus to initiate calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dawidson A; Rodrigues, Michele A; Leite, M Fatima; Gomez, Marcus V; Varnai, Peter; Balla, Tamas; Bennett, Anton M; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-02-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and related activities. HGF acts through its receptor c-Met, which activates downstream signaling pathways. HGF binds to c-Met at the plasma membrane, where it is generally believed that c-Met signaling is initiated. Here we report that c-Met rapidly translocates to the nucleus upon stimulation with HGF. Ca(2+) signals that are induced by HGF result from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation within the nucleus rather than within the cytoplasm. Translocation of c-Met to the nucleus depends upon the adaptor protein Gab1 and importin beta1, and formation of Ca(2+) signals in turn depends upon this translocation. HGF may exert its particular effects on cells because it bypasses signaling pathways in the cytoplasm to directly activate signaling pathways in the nucleus.

  6. Intracellular calcium promotes radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells through activating Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy is a major therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer but is restricted by radioresistance. Although Akt signaling promotes radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer, it is not well understood how Akt signaling is activated. Since intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) could activate Akt in A549 cells, we investigated the relationship between intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) and Akt signaling in radioresistant A549 cells by establishing radioresistant non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. The radioresistant cell line A549 was generated by dose-gradient irradiation of the parental A549 cells. The cell viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were, respectively, assessed using the cell counting kit-8, EdU labeling, and flow cytometry analysis. The phosphorylation of Akt was evaluated by Western blotting, and the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was assessed by Fluo 4-AM. The radioresistant A549 cells displayed mesenchymal morphology. After additional irradiation, the radioresistant A549 cells showed decreased cell viability and proliferation but increased apoptosis. Moreover, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and the phosphorylation level on the Akt473 site in radioresistant A549 cells were higher than those in original cells, whereas the percentage of apoptosis in radioresistant A549 cells was less. All these results could be reversed by verapamil. In conclusion, our study found that intracellular Ca(2+) could promote radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer cells through phosphorylating of Akt on the 473 site, which contributes to a better understanding on the non-small cell lung cancer radioresistance, and may provide a new target for radioresistance management.

  7. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, John C; Jackson, Joshua G; Robinson, Michael B

    2016-07-06

    , are vital integrators of signaling and metabolism. Each astrocyte consists of many long, thin branches, called processes, which ensheathe vasculature and thousands of synapses. Mitochondria occupy the majority of each process. This occupancy is decreased by ∼50% 24 h after an in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion injury, due to delayed fragmentation and mitophagy. The mechanism appears to be independent of neuropathology, instead involving an extended period of high glutamate uptake into astrocytes. Our data suggest that mitochondria serve as spatial buffers, and possibly even as a source of calcium signals in astrocytic processes. Loss of mitochondria resulted in drastically altered calcium signaling that could disrupt neurovascular coupling and gliotransmission. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/367110-19$15.00/0.

  8. Involvement of calcium signaling and the actin cytoskeleton in the membrane block to polyspermy in mouse eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvey, Beth A; Wortzman, Genevieve B; Williams, Carmen J; Evans, Janice P

    2002-10-01

    This study examines the effects of actin microfilament-disrupting drugs on events of fertilization, with emphasis on gamete membrane interactions. Mouse eggs, freed of their zonae pellucidae, were treated with drugs that perturb the actin cytoskeleton by different mechanisms (cytochalasin B, cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide, latrunculin B) and then inseminated. Cytochalasin B, jasplakinolide, and latrunculin B treatments resulted in a decrease in the percentage of eggs fertilized and the average number of sperm fused per egg. However, cytochalasin D treatment resulted in an increase in the average number of sperm fused per egg and the percentage of polyspermic eggs. This increase in polyspermy occurred despite the observation that cytochalasin D treatment caused a decrease in sperm-egg binding and did not affect spontaneous acrosome reactions or sperm motility. This suggested that cytochalasin D-treated eggs had an impaired ability to establish a block to polyspermy at the level of the plasma membrane. The effect of cytochalasin D on the block to polyspermy was not due to a general disruption of egg activation because sperm-induced calcium oscillations and cortical granule exocytosis were similar in cytochalasin D-treated and control eggs. However, buffering of intracellular calcium levels with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM resulted in an increase in polyspermy. Together, these data suggest that a postfertilization decrease in egg membrane receptivity to sperm requires functions of the egg actin cytoskeleton that are disrupted by cytochalasin D. Furthermore, egg activation-associated increased intracellular calcium levels are necessary but not sufficient to affect postfertilization membrane dynamics that contribute to a membrane block to polyspermy.

  9. Calcium and cAMP signaling induced by gamma-hydroxybutyrate receptor(s) stimulation in NCB-20 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coune, P; Taleb, O; Mensah-Nyagan, A G; Maitre, M; Kemmel, V

    2010-04-28

    The NCB-20 neurohybridoma cells differentiated with dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP represent an interesting model to study several components of the gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) system in brain. In particular, an active Na(+)-dependent uptake and a depolarization-evoked release of GHB is expressed by these cells, together with high affinity specific binding sites for this substance. However, only little is known about cellular mechanisms following GHB receptor(s) stimulation in these neurons. Electrophysiological data indicate that GHB can differently affect Ca(2+) currents. L-type calcium channels were typically inhibited by GHB when NCB-20 cells were depolarized. In contrast, when NCB-20 cells were at resting potential, GHB induced a specific Ca(2+) entry through T-type calcium channels. In this study, we investigated the effect induced on cytosolic free Ca(2+) level and cAMP production by GHB receptor(s) stimulated with micromolar concentrations of GHB or structural analogues of GHB. Ca(2+) movements studied by cellular imaging were dose-dependently increased but disappeared for GHB concentrations >25 microM. In addition, nanomolar doses of GHB inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. This effect was also rapidly desensitized at higher GHB concentrations. Acting as an antagonist, NCS-382 decreased GHB receptor(s) mediated cAMP and calcium signals. The agonist NCS-356 mimicked GHB effects which were not affected by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-55-845. Our results reveal the occurrence of Ca(2+)-dependent adenylate cyclase inhibition in NCB-20 neurons after GHB receptor(s) stimulation by GHB concentrations NCB-20 neurons of GHB receptors belonging to GPCR family that may recruit various G protein subtypes. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. STIM and Orai isoform expression in pregnant human myometrium: a potential role in calcium signaling during pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evonne eChin-Smith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Store-operated calcium (Ca2+ entry (SOCE can be mediated by two novel proteins, STIM/Orai. We have previously demonstrated that members of the TRPC family, putative basal and store operated calcium entry channels, are present in human myometrium and regulated by labor associated stimuli IL-1β and mechanical stretch. Although STIM and Orai isoforms (1-3 have been reported in other smooth muscle cell types, there is little known about the expression or gestational regulation of STIM and Orai expression in human myometrium. Total RNA was isolated from lower segment human myometrial biopsies obtained at caesarean section from women at the time of preterm no labor (PTNL, preterm labor (PTL, term non-labor (TNL and term with labor (TL; primary cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells, and a human myometrial cell line (hTERT-HM. STIM1-2, and Orai1-3 mRNA expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. All five genes were expressed in myometrial tissue and cultured cells. Orai2 was the most abundant Orai isoform in human myometrium. Expression of STIM1-2/Orai1-3 did not alter with the onset of labor. Orai1 mRNA expression in cultured cells was enhanced by IL-1β treatment. This novel report of STIM1-2 and Orai1-3 mRNA expression in pregnant human myometrium and Orai1 regulation by IL-1β indicates a potential role for these proteins in calcium signaling in human myometrium during pregnancy.

  11. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells.

  12. Tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 regulates neovascularization of non-small-cell lung cancer via activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaobin; Zhu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Limin; Li, Xiao; Cheng, Dongjun; Feng, Keqing

    2017-03-01

    Lung cancer, especially the non-small-cell lung cancer, is a highly aggressive vascular cancer with excessively activated signaling pathways. Tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2, also known as trop2, was identified to be correlated with tumor proliferation and invasion of non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the biological role of trop2 in neovascularization of non-small-cell lung cancer remained elusive. In this study, we first verified that trop2 was overexpressed in non-small-cell lung cancer tissues as well as cell lines and that the increased expression of trop2 promoted non-small-cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Then, we expanded the biological role of trop2 by in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assay. The tubular formation analysis revealed that trop2 promoted non-small-cell lung cancer angiogenesis in vitro, and the immunohistochemistry staining of vascular markers (CD31 and CD34) provided evidences that trop2 promoted in vivo neovascularization. The results of polymerase chain reaction array revealed that trop2 promoted the expression level of two well-known angiogenesis factors MMP13 and PECAM1. By screening the trop2-related signaling pathways, we observed that excessive angiogenesis was correlated with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) could suppress the tubular formation ability induced by trop2 expression. These results suggested that trop2 facilitated neovascularization of non-small-cell lung cancer via activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Targeting trop2 might provide novel anti-angiogenesis strategy for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment.

  13. Dividing traffic cluster into parts by signal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    When a cluster of vehicles with various speeds moves through the series of signals, the cluster breaks down by stopping at signals and results in smaller groups of vehicles. We present the nonlinear-map model of the motion of vehicles controlled by the signals. We study the breakup of a cluster of vehicles through the series of signals. The cluster of vehicles is divided into various groups by controlling the cycle time of signals. The vehicles within each group move with the same mean velocity. The breakup of the traffic cluster depends highly on the signal control. The dependence of dividing on both cycle time and vehicular speed is clarified. Also, we investigate the effect of the irregular interval between signals on dividing.

  14. Hippocampal activation, memory performance in young and old, and the risk for sporadic Alzheimer’s disease converge genetically to calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Angela; Fastenrath, Matthias; Coynel, David; Auschra, Bianca; Bickel, Horst; Freytag, Virginie; Gschwind, Leo; Hartmann, Francina; Jessen, Frank; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Maier, Wolfgang; Milnik, Annette; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; de Quervain, Dominique F.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Importance Human episodic memory performance is linked to the function of specific brain regions, including the hippocampus, declines as a result of increasing age, and is markedly disturbed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder affecting primarily the hippocampus. Exploring the molecular underpinnings of human episodic memory is key to the understanding of hippocampus-dependent cognitive physiology and pathophysiology. Objective To determine whether biologically defined groups of genes are enriched in episodic memory performance across ages, in memory encoding-related brain activity and in AD. Design, Setting, and Participants In this multicenter collaborative study, gene set enrichment analysis was done by using primary and meta-analysis data from 57968 participants. The Swiss cohorts consisted of 3043 healthy young adults assessed for episodic memory performance. In a subgroup (1119 participants) of one of these cohorts, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to identify gene set-dependent differences in brain activity related to episodic memory. The German AgeCoDe cohort consisted of 763 non-demented elderly participants assessed for episodic memory performance. The International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP) case-control sample consisted of 54162 participants (17008 patients with sporadic AD, 37154 controls). Main Outcomes and Measures Gene set enrichment analysis in all samples was done by using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Episodic memory performance in the Swiss and AgeCoDe cohorts was quantified by picture and verbal delayed free recall tasks. In the fMRI experiment, activation of the hippocampus during encoding of pictures served as the phenotype of interest. In the IGAP sample, diagnosis of sporadic AD served as the phenotype of interest. Results We detected significant and consistent enrichment for genes constituting the Calcium Signaling Pathway (KEGG entry: hsa

  15. Calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 promotes breast cancer progression by activating EGFR and CAMK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britschgi, Adrian; Bill, Anke; Brinkhaus, Heike; Rothwell, Christopher; Clay, Ieuan; Duss, Stephan; Rebhan, Michael; Raman, Pichai; Guy, Chantale T; Wetzel, Kristie; George, Elizabeth; Popa, M Oana; Lilley, Sarah; Choudhury, Hedaythul; Gosling, Martin; Wang, Louis; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Borawski, Jason; Baffoe, Jonathan; Labow, Mark; Gaither, L Alex; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed

    2013-03-12

    The calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamin 1 (ANO1) is located within the 11q13 amplicon, one of the most frequently amplified chromosomal regions in human cancer, but its functional role in tumorigenesis has remained unclear. The 11q13 region is amplified in ∼15% of breast cancers. Whether ANO1 is amplified in breast tumors, the extent to which gene amplification contributes to ANO1 overexpression, and whether overexpression of ANO1 is important for tumor maintenance have remained unknown. We have found that ANO1 is amplified and highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Amplification of ANO1 correlated with disease grade and poor prognosis. Knockdown of ANO1 in ANO1-amplified breast cancer cell lines and other cancers bearing 11q13 amplification inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and reduced tumor growth in established cancer xenografts. Moreover, ANO1 chloride channel activity was important for cell viability. Mechanistically, ANO1 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of its chloride-channel activity reduced EGF receptor (EGFR) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) signaling, which subsequently attenuated AKT, v-src sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (SRC), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in vitro and in vivo. Our results highlight the involvement of the ANO1 chloride channel in tumor progression and provide insights into oncogenic signaling in human cancers with 11q13 amplification, thereby establishing ANO1 as a promising target for therapy in these highly prevalent tumor types.

  16. The plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 signalling in cardiac fibroblasts mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Abou-Leisa, Riham; Stafford, Nicholas; Maqsood, Arfa; Zi, Min; Prehar, Sukhpal; Baudoin-Stanley, Florence; Wang, Xin; Neyses, Ludwig; Cartwright, Elizabeth J.; Oceandy, Delvac

    2016-01-01

    The heart responds to pathological overload through myocyte hypertrophy. Here we show that this response is regulated by cardiac fibroblasts via a paracrine mechanism involving plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4). Pmca4 deletion in mice, both systemically and specifically in fibroblasts, reduces the hypertrophic response to pressure overload; however, knocking out Pmca4 specifically in cardiomyocytes does not produce this effect. Mechanistically, cardiac fibroblasts lacking PMCA4 produce higher levels of secreted frizzled related protein 2 (sFRP2), which inhibits the hypertrophic response in neighbouring cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, we show that treatment with the PMCA4 inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) inhibits and reverses cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload in mice. Our results reveal that PMCA4 regulates the development of cardiac hypertrophy and provide proof of principle for a therapeutic approach to treat this condition. PMID:27020607

  17. Model-Free Reconstruction of Excitatory Neuronal Connectivity from Calcium Imaging Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Olav; Battaglia, Demian; Soriano, Jordi; Geisel, Theo

    2012-01-01

    A systematic assessment of global neural network connectivity through direct electrophysiological assays has remained technically infeasible, even in simpler systems like dissociated neuronal cultures. We introduce an improved algorithmic approach based on Transfer Entropy to reconstruct structural connectivity from network activity monitored through calcium imaging. We focus in this study on the inference of excitatory synaptic links. Based on information theory, our method requires no prior assumptions on the statistics of neuronal firing and neuronal connections. The performance of our algorithm is benchmarked on surrogate time series of calcium fluorescence generated by the simulated dynamics of a network with known ground-truth topology. We find that the functional network topology revealed by Transfer Entropy depends qualitatively on the time-dependent dynamic state of the network (bursting or non-bursting). Thus by conditioning with respect to the global mean activity, we improve the performance of our method. This allows us to focus the analysis to specific dynamical regimes of the network in which the inferred functional connectivity is shaped by monosynaptic excitatory connections, rather than by collective synchrony. Our method can discriminate between actual causal influences between neurons and spurious non-causal correlations due to light scattering artifacts, which inherently affect the quality of fluorescence imaging. Compared to other reconstruction strategies such as cross-correlation or Granger Causality methods, our method based on improved Transfer Entropy is remarkably more accurate. In particular, it provides a good estimation of the excitatory network clustering coefficient, allowing for discrimination between weakly and strongly clustered topologies. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our method to analyses of real recordings of in vitro disinhibited cortical cultures where we suggest that excitatory connections are characterized

  18. Model-free reconstruction of excitatory neuronal connectivity from calcium imaging signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Stetter

    Full Text Available A systematic assessment of global neural network connectivity through direct electrophysiological assays has remained technically infeasible, even in simpler systems like dissociated neuronal cultures. We introduce an improved algorithmic approach based on Transfer Entropy to reconstruct structural connectivity from network activity monitored through calcium imaging. We focus in this study on the inference of excitatory synaptic links. Based on information theory, our method requires no prior assumptions on the statistics of neuronal firing and neuronal connections. The performance of our algorithm is benchmarked on surrogate time series of calcium fluorescence generated by the simulated dynamics of a network with known ground-truth topology. We find that the functional network topology revealed by Transfer Entropy depends qualitatively on the time-dependent dynamic state of the network (bursting or non-bursting. Thus by conditioning with respect to the global mean activity, we improve the performance of our method. This allows us to focus the analysis to specific dynamical regimes of the network in which the inferred functional connectivity is shaped by monosynaptic excitatory connections, rather than by collective synchrony. Our method can discriminate between actual causal influences between neurons and spurious non-causal correlations due to light scattering artifacts, which inherently affect the quality of fluorescence imaging. Compared to other reconstruction strategies such as cross-correlation or Granger Causality methods, our method based on improved Transfer Entropy is remarkably more accurate. In particular, it provides a good estimation of the excitatory network clustering coefficient, allowing for discrimination between weakly and strongly clustered topologies. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our method to analyses of real recordings of in vitro disinhibited cortical cultures where we suggest that excitatory connections

  19. Predicting plant immunity gene expression by identifying the decoding mechanism of calcium signatures.

    OpenAIRE

    Lenzoni, G.; Liu, J.; Knight, M.R.

    2018-01-01

    Calcium plays a key role in determining the specificity of a vast array of signalling pathways in plants. Cellular calcium elevations with different characteristics (calcium signatures) carry information on the identity of the primary stimulus, ensuring appropriate downstream responses. However, the mechanism for decoding calcium signatures is unknown. To determine this, decoding of the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated plant immunity signalling network controlling gene expression was examined. ...

  20. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  1. Robot Control Using Electromyography (EMG Signals of the Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DaSalla

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to design a human–interface system, using EMG signals elicited by various wrist movements, to control a robot. EMG signals are normalized and based on joint torque. A three-layer neural network is used to estimate posture of the wrist and forearm from EMG signals. After training the neural network and obtaining appropriate weights, the subject was able to control the robot in real time using wrist and forearm movements.

  2. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao-Hsin [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP.

  3. Genomics and evolutionary aspect of calcium signaling event in calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-02-03

    Ca2+ ion is a versatile second messenger that operate in a wide ranges of cellular processes that impact nearly every aspect of life. Ca2+ regulates gene expression and biotic and abiotic stress responses in organisms ranging from unicellular algae to multi-cellular higher plants through the cascades of calcium signaling processes. In this study, we deciphered the genomics and evolutionary aspects of calcium signaling event of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin like- (CML) proteins. We studied the CaM and CML gene family of 41 different species across the plant lineages. Genomic analysis showed that plant encodes more calmodulin like-protein than calmodulins. Further analyses showed, the majority of CMLs were intronless, while CaMs were intron rich. Multiple sequence alignment showed, the EF-hand domain of CaM contains four conserved D-x-D motifs, one in each EF-hand while CMLs contain only one D-x-D-x-D motif in the fourth EF-hand. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that, the CMLs were evolved earlier than CaM and later diversified. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that different CaM and CMLs genes were express differentially in different tissues in a spatio-temporal manner. In this study we provided in detailed genome-wide identifications and characterization of CaM and CML protein family, phylogenetic relationships, and domain structure. Expression study of CaM and CML genes were conducted in Glycine max and Phaseolus vulgaris. Our study provides a strong foundation for future functional research in CaM and CML gene family in plant kingdom.

  4. Ubiquitin in signaling and protein quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Saoudi, Sofie Vincents

    Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational modification that holds a variety of cellular functions. This Ph.D. thesis is comprised of two studies, of which one focused on ubiquitylation related to inflammatory signaling, and the other on the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system ...

  5. Climbing fiber signaling and cerebellar gain control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ohtsuki (Gen); C. Piochon (Claire); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje

  6. Lighting adjustments with digital control signals

    OpenAIRE

    Haverinen, Pekka

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to study lighting design, lighting control and the differences between various lighting control systems. The thesis was commissioned by Meyer Turku Oy and the aim was to study the different technical characteristics of the lighting control systems and the control methods of the systems and to design a possible lighting system with DALI. The thesis was conducted as a study to lighting design, lighting control, lighting measures and analog and digital lightin...

  7. Effect of L- type Calcium Channel Blocker Nimodipine and T-type Calcium Channel Blocker Flunarizine on Motor Control in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Balkrishna Kaikade

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of L-type of Calcium channel blocker nimodipine and T-type of calcium channel blocker funarizine on locomotor activity in mice without pretreatment by any other drug. Materials and method: The study was carried out following permission from the Institutional animal ethics committee. Healthy Swiss albino mice of either sex were selected by the strict inclusion and exclusion criteria and the grouping is done. Group A is control treated with normal saline, Group B and C received two titrated doses of nimodipine while Group D and E received two titrated doses of flunarizine. The animals were then observed for motor control on inclined plane and the Statistical analysis was done by using unpaired‘t’ test. Results: L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine has dose dependent effect on motor control on inclined plane while the T- type calcium channel blocker flunarizine has no effect on motor control. Conclusion: Nimodipine has significant dose dependent depressant action on motor control on inclined plane while flunarizine has no effect on the above mentioned parameter.

  8. Spinorphin inhibits membrane depolarization- and capsaicin-induced intracellular calcium signals in rat primary nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Ahmet; Ozcan, Mete; Kuzgun, Kemal Tuğrul; Kalkan, Omer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Spinorphin is a potential endogenous antinociceptive agent although the mechanism(s) of its analgesic effect remain unknown. We conducted this study to investigate, by considering intracellular calcium concentrations as a key signal for nociceptive transmission, the effects of spinorphin on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients, evoked by high-K(+) (30 mM) depolariasation or capsaicin, and to determine whether there were any differences in the effects of spinorphin among subpopulation of cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. DRG neurons were cultured on glass coverslips following enzymatic digestion and mechanical agitation, and loaded with the calcium sensitive dye fura-2 AM (1 µM). Intracellular calcium responses in individual DRG neurons were quantified using standard fura-2 based ratiometric calcium imaging technique. All data were analyzed by using unpaired t test, p nociceptive subtypes of this primary sensory neurons suggesting that peripheral site is involved in the pain modulating effect of this endogenous agent.

  9. High-throughput analysis of calcium signalling kinetics in astrocytes stimulated with different neurotransmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R James

    Full Text Available Astrocytes express a wide range of receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones that are coupled to increases in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration, enabling them to detect activity in both neuronal and vascular networks. There is increasing evidence that astrocytes are able to discriminate between different Ca(2+-linked stimuli, as the efficiency of some Ca(2+ dependent processes--notably release of gliotransmitters--depends on the stimulus that initiates the Ca(2+ signal. The spatiotemporal complexity of Ca(2+ signals is substantial, and we here tested the hypothesis that variation in the kinetics of Ca(2+ responses could offer a means of selectively engaging downstream targets, if agonists exhibited a "signature shape" in evoked Ca(2+ response. To test this, astrocytes were exposed to three different receptor agonists (ATP, glutamate and histamine and the resultant Ca(2+ signals were analysed for systematic differences in kinetics that depended on the initiating stimulus. We found substantial heterogeneity between cells in the time course of Ca(2+ responses, but the variation did not correlate with the type or concentration of the stimulus. Using a simple metric to quantify the extent of difference between populations, it was found that the variation between agonists was insufficient to allow signal discrimination. We conclude that the time course of global intracellular Ca(2+ signals does not offer the cells a means for distinguishing between different neurotransmitters.

  10. Clusters of calcium release channels harness the Ising phase transition to confine their elementary intracellular signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Anna V; Maltsev, Victor A; Stern, Michael D

    2017-07-18

    Intracellular Ca signals represent a universal mechanism of cell function. Messages carried by Ca are local, rapid, and powerful enough to be delivered over the thermal noise. A higher signal-to-noise ratio is achieved by a cooperative action of Ca release channels such as IP3 receptors or ryanodine receptors arranged in clusters (release units) containing a few to several hundred release channels. The channels synchronize their openings via Ca-induced Ca release, generating high-amplitude local Ca signals known as puffs in neurons and sparks in muscle cells. Despite the positive feedback nature of the activation, Ca signals are strictly confined in time and space by an unexplained termination mechanism. Here we show that the collective transition of release channels from an open to a closed state is identical to the phase transition associated with the reversal of magnetic field in an Ising ferromagnet. Our simple quantitative criterion closely predicts the Ca store depletion level required for spark termination for each cluster size. We further formulate exact requirements that a cluster of release channels should satisfy in any cell type for our mapping to the Ising model and the associated formula to remain valid. Thus, we describe deterministically the behavior of a system on a coarser scale (release unit) that is random on a finer scale (release channels), bridging the gap between scales. Our results provide exact mapping of a nanoscale biological signaling model to an interacting particle system in statistical physics, making the extensive mathematical apparatus available to quantitative biology.

  11. Controlled high meat diets do not affect calcium retention or indices of bone status in healthy postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughead, Zamzam K; Johnson, LuAnn K; Lykken, Glenn I; Hunt, Janet R

    2003-04-01

    Calcium balance is decreased by an increased intake of purified proteins, although the effects of common dietary sources of protein (like meat) on calcium economy remain controversial. We compared the effects of several weeks of controlled high and low meat diets on body calcium retention, using sensitive radiotracer and whole body scintillation counting methodology. Healthy postmenopausal women (n = 15) consumed diets with similar calcium content (approximately 600 mg), but either low or high in meat (12 vs. 20% of energy as protein) for 8 wk each, in a randomized crossover design. After 4 wk of equilibration of each diet, calcium retention was measured by extrinsically labeling the 2-d menu with (47)Ca, followed by whole body scintillation counting for 28 d. Urinary and blood indicators of bone metabolism were also determined for each diet. Calcium retention was not different during the high and low meat dietary periods (d 28, mean +/- pooled SD: 17.1 and 15.6%, +/-0.6%, respectively; P = 0.09). An initially higher renal acid excretion in subjects consuming the high meat compared with the low meat diet decreased significantly with time. The diets did not affect urinary calcium loss or indicators of bone metabolism. In conclusion, under controlled conditions, a high meat compared with a low meat diet for 8 wk did not affect calcium retention or biomarkers of bone metabolism in healthy postmenopausal women. Calcium retention is not reduced when subjects consume a high protein diet from common dietary sources such as meat.

  12. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodribb, Timothy J; McAdam, Scott A M

    2013-01-01

    Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+)-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+)-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+)-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  13. Clusters of calcium release channels harness the Ising phase transition to confine their elementary intracellular signals

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, Anna; Stern, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular Ca signals represent a universal mechanism of cell function. Messages carried by Ca are local, rapid, and powerful enough to be delivered over the thermal noise. A higher signal to noise ratio is achieved by a cooperative action of Ca release channels such as IP3 receptors or ryanodine receptors arranged in clusters or release units containing a few to several hundred release channels. The release channels synchronize their openings via Ca-induced-Ca-release, generating high-amplitude local Ca signals known as puffs in neurons or sparks in muscle cells. Despite the high release amplitude and positive feedback nature of the activation, Ca signals are strictly confined in time and space by an unexplained termination mechanism. Here we show that the collective transition of release channels from an open to a closed state is identical to the phase transition associated with the reversal of magnetic field in an Ising ferromagnet. We demonstrate this mechanism using numerical model simulations of Ca s...

  14. Calcium signaling during the plant-plant interaction of parasitic Cuscuta reflexa with its hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, M.; Kaiser, B.; Krol, van der A.R.; Kaldenhoff, R.

    2010-01-01

    The plant parasite Cuscuta reflexa induces various responses in compatible and incompatible host plants. The visual reactions of both types of host plants including obvious morphological changes require the recognition of Cuscuta ssp. A consequently initiated signaling cascade is triggered which

  15. Calcium signals in the nucleus accumbens: Activation of astrocytes by ATP and succinate

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    Emri Zsuzsa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidence suggests that glial signalling is activated by different brain functions. However, knowledge regarding molecular mechanisms of activation or their relation to neuronal activity is limited. The purpose of the present study is to identify the characteristics of ATP-evoked glial signalling in the brain reward area, the nucleus accumbens (NAc, and thereby to explore the action of citric acid cycle intermediate succinate (SUC. Results We described the burst-like propagation of Ca2+ transients evoked by ATP in acute NAc slices from rat brain. Co-localization of the ATP-evoked Ca2+ signalling with immunoreactivities of the astroglia-specific gap junction forming channel protein connexin43 (Cx43 and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP indicated that the responsive cells were a subpopulation of Cx43 and GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes. The ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients were present under the blockade of neuronal activity, but were inhibited by Ca2+ store depletion and antagonism of the G protein coupled purinergic P2Y1 receptor subtype-specific antagonist MRS2179. Similarly, Ca2+ transients evoked by the P2Y1 receptor subtype-specific agonist 2-(Methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate were also blocked by MRS2179. These characteristics implied that intercellular Ca2+ signalling originated from the release of Ca2+ from internal stores, triggered by the activation of P2Y1 receptors. Inhibition by the gap junction blockers carbenoxolone and flufenamic acid and by an antibody raised against the gating-associated segment of Cx43 suggested that intercellular Ca2+ signalling proceeded through gap junctions. We demonstrated for the first time that extracellular SUC also evoked Ca2+ transients (EC50 = 50-60 μM in about 15% of the ATP-responsive NAc astrocytes. By contrast to glial cells, electrophysiologically identified NAc neurons surrounded by ATP-responsive astrocytes were not activated simultaneously. Conclusions We

  16. Reactive oxygen species and calcium signals in skeletal muscle: A crosstalk involved in both normal signaling and disease.

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    Espinosa, Alejandra; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) have been profusely studied as agents of potential damage to living cells and they have been related to a number of pathological processes. Increasing evidence points to a more positive role of ROS in cell signaling and the detailed mechanism that regulates the precise amount of ROS needed for cell functioning without the deleterious effects of excess ROS still needs to be resolved in detail. In skeletal muscle the main source of ROS during normal functioning appears to be NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2), which is activated by electrical stimuli (or exercise) through a cascade of events that include ATP release through pannexin1 channels. NOX2 is a protein complex that assembles in the T-tubule membrane before activation and ROS production by NOX2 appears to be important for muscle adaptation through gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis as well as for improving glucose transport after insulin action. Excess ROS production (or diminished antioxidant defenses) plays a role in a number of pathological processes in skeletal muscle. Together with increased reactive nitrogen species, an increase in ROS appears to have a deleterious role in a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy as well as muscle wasting in other diseases such as aging sarcopenia and cancer cachexia. In addition, ROS is involved in obesity and muscle insulin resistance, both of which are causally related to type 2 diabetes. A detailed description of the fine-tuning of ROS (including all sources of ROS) in skeletal muscle in health and disease will significantly contribute to our knowledge of both muscle adaptation and muscle related pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

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    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  18. The Relationship of Vitamin D and Calcium level with Preeclampsia Severity: A Case- control Study

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    Sima Hashemipour

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Vitamin D deficiency is associated with physiologic changes that are similar to pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Although association of vitamin D and preeclampsia has been studied previously, their results are not consistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of serum vitamin D and calcium with preeclampsia severity. Materials and Methods: This case- control study was conducted in 75 healthy pregnant women and 74 pregnant women with preeclampsia (46 mild preeclampsia and 28 severe preeclampsia in Qazvin, Iran in 2015. Serum vitamin D, calcium, and albumin were measured; corrected calcium was also calculated. Hypocalcemia and vitamin D deficiency were compared between the groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the independent association of hypocalcemia and hypovitaminosis D with preeclampsia. Results Mean serum vitamin D level was 27.7±15.3, 22.9±15.9, and 27.6±16.6 in normal, mild preeclampsia, and severe preeclampsia groups (P> 0.05; also vitamin D deficiency was not different between the groups. Hypocalcemia in severe preeclampsia group was more frequent than normal group (25.9% vs. 6.6%, P: 0.017. Hypocalcemia was associated with severe preeclampsia after adjustment for age, parity, and calcium supplement consumption (OR: 6.7, 95% CI: 1.45-30.79; P: 0.015. Conclusion There was not any association between vitamin D deficiency and preeclampsia in the present study, however low corrected serum calcium was associated with about six times increased risk of sever preeclampsia. More studies are needed to determine the role of hypocalcemia and vitamin D in preeclampsia.

  19. Spontaneous, pro-arrhythmic calcium signals disrupt electrical pacing in mouse pulmonary vein sleeve cells.

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    Katja Rietdorf

    Full Text Available The pulmonary vein, which returns oxygenated blood to the left atrium, is ensheathed by a population of unique, myocyte-like cells called pulmonary vein sleeve cells (PVCs. These cells autonomously generate action potentials that propagate into the left atrial chamber and cause arrhythmias resulting in atrial fibrillation; the most common, often sustained, form of cardiac arrhythmia. In mice, PVCs extend along the pulmonary vein into the lungs, and are accessible in a lung slice preparation. We exploited this model to study how aberrant Ca(2+ signaling alters the ability of PVC networks to follow electrical pacing. Cellular responses were investigated using real-time 2-photon imaging of lung slices loaded with a Ca(2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator (Ca(2+ measurements and phase contrast microscopy (contraction measurements. PVCs displayed global Ca(2+ signals and coordinated contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS. The effects of EFS relied on both Ca(2+ influx and Ca(2+ release, and could be inhibited by nifedipine, ryanodine or caffeine. Moreover, PVCs had a high propensity to show spontaneous Ca(2+ signals that arose via stochastic activation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs. The ability of electrical pacing to entrain Ca(2+ signals and contractile responses was dramatically influenced by inherent spontaneous Ca(2+ activity. In PVCs with relatively low spontaneous Ca(2+ activity (1.5 Hz, electrical pacing was less effective; PVCs became unpaced, only partially-paced or displayed alternans. Because spontaneous Ca(2+ activity varied between cells, neighboring PVCs often had different responses to electrical pacing. Our data indicate that the ability of PVCs to respond to electrical stimulation depends on their intrinsic Ca(2+ cycling properties. Heterogeneous spontaneous Ca(2+ activity arising from stochastic RyR opening can disengage them from sinus rhythm and lead to autonomous, pro-arrhythmic activity.

  20. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

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    Timothy J Brodribb

    Full Text Available Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  1. Dysregulation of Mitochondrial Calcium Signaling and Superoxide Flashes Cause Mitochondrial Genomic DNA Damage in Huntington Disease*

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    Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Chen, Qian; Wang, Xianhua; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Wang, Yun; Cheng, He-Ping; Guo, Caixia; Sun, Qinmiao; Chen, Quan; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. Indications of oxidative stress are apparent in brain tissues from both HD patients and HD mouse models; however, the origin of this oxidant stress remains a mystery. Here, we used a yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128) to investigate the potential connections between dysregulation of cytosolic Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial oxidative damage in HD cells. We found that YAC128 mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit a strikingly higher level of mitochondrial matrix Ca2+ loading and elevated superoxide generation compared with WT cells, indicating that both mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling and superoxide generation are dysregulated in HD cells. The excessive mitochondrial oxidant stress is critically dependent on mitochondrial Ca2+ loading in HD cells, because blocking mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake abolished elevated superoxide generation. Similar results were obtained using neurons from HD model mice and fibroblast cells from HD patients. More importantly, mitochondrial Ca2+ loading in HD cells caused a 2-fold higher level of mitochondrial genomic DNA (mtDNA) damage due to the excessive oxidant generation. This study provides strong evidence to support a new causal link between dysregulated mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling, elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress, and mtDNA damage in HD. Our results also indicate that reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake could be a therapeutic strategy for HD. PMID:23250749

  2. A novel role of the L-type calcium channel α1D subunit as a gatekeeper for intracellular zinc signaling: zinc wave.

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    Satoru Yamasaki

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that zinc ion (Zn can behave as an intracellular signaling molecule. We previously demonstrated that mast cells stimulated through the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI rapidly release intracellular Zn from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and we named this phenomenon the "Zn wave". However, the molecules responsible for releasing Zn and the roles of the Zn wave were elusive. Here we identified the pore-forming α(1 subunit of the Cav1.3 (α(1D L-type calcium channel (LTCC as the gatekeeper for the Zn wave. LTCC antagonists inhibited the Zn wave, and an agonist was sufficient to induce it. Notably, α(1D was mainly localized to the ER rather than the plasma membrane in mast cells, and the Zn wave was impaired by α(1D knockdown. We further found that the LTCC-mediated Zn wave positively controlled cytokine gene induction by enhancing the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Consistent with this finding, LTCC antagonists inhibited the cytokine-mediated delayed-type allergic reaction in mice without affecting the immediate-type allergic reaction. These findings indicated that the LTCC α(1D subunit located on the ER membrane has a novel function as a gatekeeper for the Zn wave, which is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling and the delayed-type allergic reaction.

  3. Gestational diabetes is characterized by reduced mitochondrial protein expression and altered calcium signaling proteins in skeletal muscle.

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    Kristen E Boyle

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM affects up to 18% of pregnant women with immediate and long-term metabolic consequences for both mother and infant. Abnormal glucose uptake and lipid oxidation are hallmark features of GDM prompting us to use an exploratory proteomics approach to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying differences in skeletal muscle metabolism between obese pregnant women with GDM (OGDM and obese pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (ONGT. Functional validation was performed in a second cohort of obese OGDM and ONGT pregnant women. Quantitative proteomic analysis in rectus abdominus skeletal muscle tissue collected at delivery revealed reduced protein content of mitochondrial complex I (C-I subunits (NDUFS3, NDUFV2 and altered content of proteins involved in calcium homeostasis/signaling (calcineurin A, α1-syntrophin, annexin A4 in OGDM (n = 6 vs. ONGT (n = 6. Follow-up analyses showed reduced enzymatic activity of mitochondrial complexes C-I, C-III, and C-IV (-60-75% in the OGDM (n = 8 compared with ONGT (n = 10 subjects, though no differences were observed for mitochondrial complex protein content. Upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation were not different between groups. However, AMPK phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by 75% in the OGDM women. These data suggest that GDM is associated with reduced skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation and disordered calcium homeostasis. These relationships deserve further attention as they may represent novel risk factors for development of GDM and may have implications on the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on both treatment strategies for GDM and for prevention of type 2 diabetes postpartum.

  4. ZmCPK1, a calcium-independent kinase member of the Zea mays CDPK gene family, functions as a negative regulator in cold stress signalling.

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    Weckwerth, Philipp; Ehlert, Britta; Romeis, Tina

    2015-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have been shown to play important roles in plant environmental stress signal transduction. We report on the identification of ZmCPK1 as a member of the maize (Zea mays) CDPK gene family involved in the regulation of the maize cold stress response. Based upon in silico analysis of the Z. mays cv. B73 genome, we identified that the maize CDPK gene family consists of 39 members. Two CDPK members were selected whose gene expression was either increased (Zmcpk1) or decreased (Zmcpk25) in response to cold exposure. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that ZmCPK1 displays calcium-independent protein kinase activity. The C-terminal calcium-binding domain of ZmCPK1 was sufficient to mediate calcium independency of a previously calcium-dependent enzyme in chimeric ZmCPK25-CPK1 proteins. Furthermore, co-transfection of maize mesophyll protoplasts with active full-length ZmCPK1 suppressed the expression of a cold-induced marker gene, Zmerf3 (ZmCOI6.21). In accordance, heterologous overexpression of ZmCPK1 in Arabidopsis thaliana yielded plants with altered acclimation-induced frost tolerance. Our results identify ZmCPK1 as a negative regulator of cold stress signalling in maize. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Synaptic activity induces dramatic changes in the geometry of the cell nucleus: interplay between nuclear structure, histone H3 phosphorylation, and nuclear calcium signaling.

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    Wittmann, Malte; Queisser, Gillian; Eder, Anja; Wiegert, J Simon; Bengtson, C Peter; Hellwig, Andrea; Wittum, Gabriel; Bading, Hilmar

    2009-11-25

    Synaptic activity initiates many adaptive responses in neurons. Here we report a novel form of structural plasticity in dissociated hippocampal cultures and slice preparations. Using a recently developed algorithm for three-dimensional image reconstruction and quantitative measurements of cell organelles, we found that many nuclei from hippocampal neurons are highly infolded and form unequally sized nuclear compartments. Nuclear infoldings are dynamic structures, which can radically transform the geometry of the nucleus in response to neuronal activity. Action potential bursting causing synaptic NMDA receptor activation dramatically increases the number of infolded nuclei via a process that requires the ERK-MAP kinase pathway and new protein synthesis. In contrast, death-signaling pathways triggered by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors cause a rapid loss of nuclear infoldings. Compared with near-spherical nuclei, infolded nuclei have a larger surface and increased nuclear pore complex immunoreactivity. Nuclear calcium signals evoked by cytosolic calcium transients are larger in small nuclear compartments than in the large compartments of the same nucleus; moreover, small compartments are more efficient in temporally resolving calcium signals induced by trains of action potentials in the theta frequency range (5 Hz). Synaptic activity-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine 10 was more robust in neurons with infolded nuclei compared with neurons with near-spherical nuclei, suggesting a functional link between nuclear geometry and transcriptional regulation. The translation of synaptic activity-induced signaling events into changes in nuclear geometry facilitates the relay of calcium signals to the nucleus, may lead to the formation of nuclear signaling microdomains, and could enhance signal-regulated transcription.

  6. Calcium Signaling Regulates Ventricular Hypertrophy During Development Independent of Contraction or Blood Flow

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    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Ramachandran, Kapil V.; Bao, Michelle M.; Kirby, Margaret L.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Hutson, Mary R.

    2014-01-01

    In utero interventions aimed at restoring left ventricular hemodynamic forces in fetuses with prenatally diagnosed hypoplastic left heart syndrome failed to stimulate ventricular myocardial growth during gestation, suggesting chamber growth during development may not rely upon fluid forces. We therefore hypothesized that ventricular hypertrophy during development may depend upon fundamental Ca2+-dependent growth pathways that function independent of hemodynamic forces. To test this hypothesis, zebrafish embryos were treated with inhibitors or activators of Ca2+ signaling in the presence or absence of contraction during the period of chamber development. Abolishment of contractile function alone in the setting of preserved Ca2+ signaling did not impair ventricular hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx abolished contraction and led to reduced ventricular hypertrophy, whereas increasing L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx led to enhanced ventricular hypertrophy in either the presence or absence of contraction. Similarly, inhibition of the downstream Ca2+-sensitive phosphatase calcineurin, a known regulator of adult cardiac hypertrophy, led to reduced ventricular hypertrophy in the presence or absence of contraction, whereas hypertrophy was rescued in the absence of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx and contraction by expression of a constitutively active calcineurin. These data suggest ventricular cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during chamber formation is dependent upon Ca2+ signaling pathways that are unaffected by heart function or hemodynamic forces. Disruption of Ca2+-dependent hypertrophy during heart development may therefore represent one mechanism for impaired chamber formation that is not related to impaired blood flow. PMID:25536179

  7. Reciprocal Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Calcium Signaling in Astrocyte Processes

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    Jackson, Joshua G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that inhibition of neuronal activity, glutamate uptake, or reversed-Na+/Ca2+-exchange with TTX, TFB-TBOA, or YM-244769, respectively, increases mitochondrial mobility in astrocytic processes. In the present study, we examined the interrelationships between mitochondrial mobility and Ca2+ signaling in astrocyte processes in organotypic cultures of rat hippocampus. All of the treatments that increase mitochondrial mobility decreased basal Ca2+. As recently reported, we observed spontaneous Ca2+ spikes with half-lives of ∼1 s that spread ∼6 μm and are almost abolished by a TRPA1 channel antagonist. Virtually all of these Ca2+ spikes overlap mitochondria (98%), and 62% of mitochondria are overlapped by these spikes. Although tetrodotoxin, TFB-TBOA, or YM-244769 increased Ca2+ signaling, the specific effects on peak, decay time, and/or frequency were different. To more specifically manipulate mitochondrial mobility, we explored the effects of Miro motor adaptor proteins. We show that Miro1 and Miro2 are both expressed in astrocytes and that exogenous expression of Ca2+-insensitive Miro mutants (KK) nearly doubles the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Expression of Miro1KK had a modest effect on the frequency of these Ca2+ spikes but nearly doubled the decay half-life. The mitochondrial proton ionophore, FCCP, caused a large, prolonged increase in cytosolic Ca2+ followed by an increase in the decay time and the spread of the spontaneous Ca2+ spikes. Photo-ablation of mitochondria in individual astrocyte processes has similar effects on Ca2+. Together, these studies show that Ca2+ regulates mitochondrial mobility, and mitochondria in turn regulate Ca2+ signals in astrocyte processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In neurons, the movement and positioning of mitochondria at sites of elevated activity are important for matching local energy and Ca2+ buffering capacity. Previously, we demonstrated that mitochondria are immobilized in astrocytes in response

  8. Case-control study of breast milk calcium in mothers of children with and without nutritional rickets.

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    Thacher, Tom D; Pettifor, John M; Fischer, Philip R; Okolo, Selina N; Prentice, Ann

    2006-07-01

    Despite similarly low calcium intakes and normal vitamin D status, only some Nigerian children develop nutritional rickets. We hypothesized that mothers with children who had developed rickets might have lower breast-milk calcium concentration than mothers with normal children and compared the breast-milk calcium concentration of mothers who had had children with rickets with those who had not (controls). We collected breast milk from 35 Nigerian mothers who had previously had children with nutritional rickets. For each case mother, we collected breast milk from three matched control mothers at the same stage of lactation (+/-4 weeks) who had had no children with rickets. Data were collected about parity, stage of lactation, and the infant's intake. The mother's bone density was measured. The mean breast milk calcium concentration of mothers of children with rickets (4.30+/-1.24 mmol/L) was less than that of control mothers (4.65+/-1.03 mmol/L; P=0.034 in multivariate regression controlling for duration of lactation and resumption of menses). Forearm bone mineral content was significantly related to breast milk calcium concentration (r=0.20) after adjusting for height, weight, and bone area (P=0.028). Reduced breast-milk calcium concentration may contribute to a reduced calcium intake in infancy and predispose children to nutritional rickets.

  9. Stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 by metabolic acidosis requires osteoblastic intracellular calcium signaling and prostaglandin synthesis.

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    Krieger, Nancy S; Bushinsky, David A

    2017-10-01

    Serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) increases progressively in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased mortality. FGF23 is synthesized in osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the factors regulating its production are not clear. Patients with CKD have decreased renal acid excretion leading to metabolic acidosis (MET). During MET, acid is buffered by bone with release of mineral calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P). MET increases intracellular Ca signaling and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-induced prostaglandin production in the osteoblast, leading to decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption. We found that MET directly stimulates FGF23 in mouse bone organ cultures and primary osteoblasts. We hypothesized that MET increases FGF23 through similar pathways that lead to bone resorption. Neonatal mouse calvariae were incubated in neutral (NTL, pH = 7.44, Pco2 = 38 mmHg, [HCO3-] = 27 mM) or acid (MET, pH = 7.18, Pco2 = 37 mmHg, [HCO3-] = 13 mM) medium without or with 2-APB (50 μM), an inhibitor of intracellular Ca signaling or NS-398 (1 μM), an inhibitor of COX2. Each agent significantly inhibited MET stimulation of medium FGF23 protein and calvarial FGF23 RNA as well as bone resorption at 48 h. To exclude the potential contribution of MET-induced bone P release, we utilized primary calvarial osteoblasts. In these cells each agent inhibited MET stimulation of FGF23 RNA expression at 6 h. Thus stimulation of FGF23 by MET in mouse osteoblasts utilizes the same initial signaling pathways as MET-induced bone resorption. Therapeutic interventions directed toward correction of MET, especially in CKD, have the potential to not only prevent bone resorption but also lower FGF23 and perhaps decrease mortality. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Calcium in plant cells

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    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  11. Hypotonic stress-induced calcium signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves TRP-like transporters on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

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    Rigamonti, M; Groppi, S; Belotti, F; Ambrosini, R; Filippi, G; Martegani, E; Tisi, R

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond to hypotonic stress (HTS) by a cytosolic calcium rise, either generated by an influx of calcium from extracellular medium, when calcium is available, or by a release from intracellular stores in scarcity of extracellular calcium. Calcium release from intracellular compartments is peculiarly inhibited by external calcium in a calcineurin-independent and Cch1-, but not Mid1-, driven manner. HTS-induced calcium release is also negatively regulated by the ER protein Cls2 and involves a poorly characterized protein, FLC2/YAL053W gene product, previously proposed to be required for FAD transport in the ER, albeit, due to its molecular features, it was also previously classified as an ion transporter. A computational analysis revealed that this gene and its three homologs in S. cerevisiae, together with previously identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe pkd2 and Neurospora crassa calcium-related spray protein, belong to a fungal branch of TRP-like ion transporters related to human mucolipin and polycystin 2 calcium transporters. Moreover, disruption of FLC2 gene confers severe sensitivity to Calcofluor white and hyper-activation of the cell wall integrity MAPK cascade, suggesting a role in cell wall maintenance as previously suggested for the fission yeast homolog. Perturbation in cytosolic resting calcium concentration and hyper-activation of calcineurin in exponentially growing cells suggest a role for this transporter in calcium homeostasis in yeast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anabolic Androgenic Steroids and Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A Mini Review on Mechanisms and Physiological Implications

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    Vicencio, J.M.; Estrada, M.; Galvis, D.; Bravo, R.; Contreras, A.E.; Rotter, D.; Szabadkai, G.; Hill, J.A.; Rothermel, B.A.; Jaimovich, E.; Lavandero, S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nongenomic effects of testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) operate concertedly with genomic effects. Classically, these responses have been viewed as separate and independent processes, primarily because nongenomic responses are faster and appear to be mediated by membrane androgen receptors, whereas long-term genomic effects are mediated through cytosolic androgen receptors regulating transcriptional activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca2+ in response to AAS. These Ca2+ mediated responses have been seen in a diversity of cell types, including osteoblasts, platelets, skeletal muscle cells, cardiac myocytes and neurons. The versatility of Ca2+ as a second messenger provides these responses with a vast number of pathophysiological implications. In cardiac cells, testosterone elicits voltage-dependent Ca2+ oscillations and IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, leading to activation of MAPK and mTOR signaling that promotes cardiac hypertrophy. In neurons, depending upon concentration, testosterone can provoke either physiological Ca2+ oscillations, essential for synaptic plasticity, or sustained, pathological Ca2+ transients that lead to neuronal apoptosis. We propose therefore, that Ca2+ acts as an important point of crosstalk between nongenomic and genomic AAS signaling, representing a central regulator that bridges these previously thought to be divergent responses. PMID:21443511

  13. Signaling Network of Environmental Sensing and Adaptation in Plants:. Key Roles of Calcium Ion

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    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Considering the important issues concerning food, environment, and energy that humans are facing in the 21st century, humans mostly depend on plants. Unlike animals which move from an inappropriate environment, plants do not move, but rapidly sense diverse environmental changes or invasion by other organisms such as pathogens and insects in the place they root, and adapt themselves by changing their own bodies, through which they developed adaptability. Whole genetic information corresponding to the blueprints of many biological systems has recently been analyzed, and comparative genomic studies facilitated tracing strategies of each organism in their evolutional processes. Comparison of factors involved in intracellular signal transduction between animals and plants indicated diversification of different gene sets. Reversible binding of Ca2+ to sensor proteins play key roles as a molecular switch both in animals and plants. Molecular mechanisms for signaling network of environmental sensing and adaptation in plants will be discussed with special reference to Ca2+ as a key element in information processing.

  14. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of calcium signaling in mice.

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    Kelly L Rogers

    Full Text Available Rapid and transient elevations of Ca(2+ within cellular microdomains play a critical role in the regulation of many signal transduction pathways. Described here is a genetic approach for non-invasive detection of localized Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+] rises in live animals using bioluminescence imaging (BLI. Transgenic mice conditionally expressing the Ca(2+-sensitive bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin targeted to the mitochondrial matrix were studied in several experimental paradigms. Rapid [Ca(2+] rises inside the mitochondrial matrix could be readily detected during single-twitch muscle contractions. Whole body patterns of [Ca(2+] were monitored in freely moving mice and during epileptic seizures. Furthermore, variations in mitochondrial [Ca(2+] correlated to behavioral components of the sleep/wake cycle were observed during prolonged whole body recordings of newborn mice. This non-invasive imaging technique opens new avenues for the analysis of Ca(2+ signaling whenever whole body information in freely moving animals is desired, in particular during behavioral and developmental studies.

  15. Calcium and cytoskeleton signaling during cell volume regulation in isolated nematocytes of Aiptasia mutabilis (Cnidaria: Anthozoa).

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    Marino, A; La Spada, G

    2007-05-01

    Cell volume regulation has not been completely clarified in Coelenterates. The present investigation focuses on cell volume regulation under anisosmotic conditions, both hyposmotic and hypertonic, and on the underlying signals in nematocytes isolated from the Coelenterate Aiptasia mutabilis living in sea water. Nematocytes, once isolated from acontia, that were submitted to either hyposmotic (35%) and hypertonic shock (45%) show RVD and RVI capabilities, respectively. In order to ascertain the role of Ca2+ in triggering such regulatory mechanisms and the possible involvement of cytoskeleton components, tests were performed by employing either Ca2+ free conditions, Gd3+ as Ca2+ channel blockers, TFP as calmodulin inhibitor, colchicine as microtubule inhibitor and cytochalasin B as microfilament polymerization inhibitor. Results show that isolated nematocytes of A. mutabilis can regulate their volume upon both hyposmotic and hypertonic challenge. Ca2+ both from external medium and from internal stores is needed to perform RVD mechanisms, whereas, intracellular Ca2+ seems to be mainly involved in RVI. Moreover cytoskeletal components may play an important role since a significant RVD and RVI inhibition was observed in treated cells. On the basis of our observations further studies are warranted to further verify the role of signals, including phosphatases and phosphorylases, in cell volume regulation of primitive eukaryotic cells.

  16. L-selectin stimulation of canine neutrophil initiates calcium signal secondary to tyrosine kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett-Torabi, E; Fantone, J C

    1997-03-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Neutrophil adhesion to the vascular endothelium is one of the important early mechanisms that lead to reperfusion injury. The leukocyte adhesion molecule, L-selectin, plays a major role in the initial interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells. Intervention aimed at blocking selectins or their associated ligands can exert cardioprotective effects. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of L-selectin in the initiation of transmembrane signaling and regulation of canine neutrophil responses. Cross-linking of canine neutrophil L-selectin using anti-L-selectin antibody induced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels and superoxide anion generation that were dependent on the extent of L-selectin cross-linking. The responses were significantly inhibited by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein. The results demonstrate that ligation of canine neutrophil L-selectin is coupled to intracellular signal transduction pathways and the generation of second messengers, which may independently play important regulatory roles in modulating neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions.

  17. 49 CFR 236.205 - Signal control circuits; requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION... installed that each signal governing train movements into a block will display its most restrictive aspect... restrictive state; or when signal control circuit is deenergized. [33 FR 19684, Dec. 25, 1968, as amended at...

  18. Measuring Workload Weak Resilience Signals at a Rail Control Post

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, A.W.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    OCCUPATIONAL APPLICATIONS This article describes an observational study at a rail control post to measure workload weak resilience signals. A weak resilience signal indicates a possible degradation of a system's resilience, which is defined as the ability of a complex socio-technical system to cope

  19. Cognitive Control Signals in Posterior Cingulate Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eHayden

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficiently shifting between tasks is a central function of cognitive control. The role of the default network—a constellation of areas with high baseline activity that declines during task performance—in cognitive control remains poorly understood. We hypothesized that task switching demands cognitive control to shift the balance of processing towards the external world, and therefore predicted that switching between the two tasks would require suppression of activity of neurons within the CGp. To test this idea, we recorded the activity of single neurons in posterior cingulate cortex (CGp, a central node in the default network, in monkeys performing two interleaved tasks. As predicted, we found that basal levels of neuronal activity were reduced following a switch from one task to another and gradually returned to pre-switch baseline on subsequent trials. We failed to observe these effects in lateral intraparietal cortex (LIP, part of the dorsal fronto-parietal cortical attention network directly connected to CGp. These findings indicate that suppression of neuronal activity in CGp facilitates cognitive control, and suggest that activity in the default network reflects processes that directly compete with control processes elsewhere in the brain..

  20. Genetic Analysis of Association Between Calcium Signaling and Hippocampal Activation, Memory Performance in the Young and Old, and Risk for Sporadic Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Angela; Fastenrath, Matthias; Coynel, David; Auschra, Bianca; Bickel, Horst; Freytag, Virginie; Gschwind, Leo; Hartmann, Francina; Jessen, Frank; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Maier, Wolfgang; Milnik, Annette; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Genomics of Alzheimer's Project sample, diagnosis of sporadic AD served as the phenotype of interest. In the discovery sample, we detected significant enrichment for genes constituting the calcium signaling pathway, especially those related to the elevation of cytosolic calcium (P = 2 × 10-4). This enrichment was replicated in 2 additional samples of healthy young individuals (P = .02 and .04, respectively) and a sample of healthy elderly participants (P = .004). Hippocampal activation (P = 4 × 10-4) and the risk for sporadic AD (P = .01) were also significantly enriched for genes related to the elevation of cytosolic calcium. By detecting consistent significant enrichment in independent cohorts of young and elderly participants, this study identified that calcium signaling plays a central role in hippocampus-dependent human memory processes in cognitive health and disease, contributing to the understanding and potential treatment of hippocampus-dependent cognitive pathology.

  1. Digital signal processing in power electronics control circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sozański, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses problems concerning the design and realization of digital control algorithms for power electronics circuits using digital signal processing (DSP) methods. It includes Matlab examples for illustration of considered problems.

  2. Canonical Wnt signaling in differentiated osteoblasts controls osteoclast differentiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glass, D.A.; Bialek, P.; Ahn, J.D.; Starbuck, M.; Patel, M.S.; Clevers, J.C.; Taketo, M.M.; Long, F.; McMahon, A.P.; Lang, R.A.; Karsenty, G.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivation of beta-catenin in mesenchymal progenitors prevents osteoblast differentiation; inactivation of Lrp5, a gene encoding a likely Wnt coreceptor, results in low bone mass (osteopenia) by decreasing bone formation. These observations indicate that Wnt signaling controls osteoblast

  3. Hormone-Mediated Intercellular Calcium Signalling in an Insect Salivary Gland Pathways and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Bernhard; Walz, Bernd

    The salivary glands of the blowfly Calliphora vicina are a favourable preparation for investigations into spatio-temporal Ca 2+ dynamics in an intact miniorgan by using Ca 2+-sensitive indicator dyes and digital imaging techniques, including confocal microscopy, in combination with pharmacological approaches. The review summarizes the available data on the spatio-temporal patterns of the hormone-induced and IP 3-mediated Ca 2+ dynamics at both the intracellular and the intercellular level (intra- and intercellular Ca 2+ waves). The underlying signaling mechanisms are addressed, as well as the pathways of intercellular communication responsible for the complex spatio-temporal Ca 2+ dynamics. In addition, we review evidence for the exchange of Ca 2+ between IP 3 sensitive intracellular Ca 2+ stores and mitochondria including a modulatory effect of mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake on the frequency of IP 3-induced Ca 2+ spiking.

  4. Disruption of action potential and calcium signaling properties in malformed myofibers from dystrophin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Pratt, Stephen J P; Garcia-Pelagio, Karla P; Schneider, Martin F; Lovering, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe muscular dystrophy, is caused by the absence of dystrophin. Muscle weakness and fragility (i.e., increased susceptibility to damage) are presumably due to structural instability of the myofiber cytoskeleton, but recent studies suggest that the increased presence of malformed/branched myofibers in dystrophic muscle may also play a role. We have previously studied myofiber morphology in healthy wild-type (WT) and dystrophic (MDX) skeletal muscle. Here, we examined myofiber excitability using high-speed confocal microscopy and the voltage-sensitive indicator di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS) to assess the action potential (AP) properties. We also examined AP-induced Ca2+ transients using high-speed confocal microscopy with rhod-2, and assessed sarcolemma fragility using elastimetry. AP recordings showed an increased width and time to peak in malformed MDX myofibers compared to normal myofibers from both WT and MDX, but no significant change in AP amplitude. Malformed MDX myofibers also exhibited reduced AP-induced Ca2+ transients, with a further Ca2+ transient reduction in the branches of malformed MDX myofibers. Mechanical studies indicated an increased sarcolemma deformability and instability in malformed MDX myofibers. The data suggest that malformed myofibers are functionally different from myofibers with normal morphology. The differences seen in AP properties and Ca2+ signals suggest changes in excitability and remodeling of the global Ca2+ signal, both of which could underlie reported weakness in dystrophic muscle. The biomechanical changes in the sarcolemma support the notion that malformed myofibers are more susceptible to damage. The high prevalence of malformed myofibers in dystrophic muscle may contribute to the progressive strength loss and fragility seen in dystrophic muscles. PMID:25907787

  5. Controlled substitution of soy protein for meat protein: effects on calcium retention, bone, and cardiovascular health indices in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughead, Zamzam K; Hunt, Janet R; Johnson, Luann K; Badger, Thomas M; Lykken, Glenn I

    2005-01-01

    In a controlled feeding study, the effects of substituting 25 g soy protein for meat on calcium retention and bone biomarkers were determined. Postmenopausal women (n = 13) ate two diets that were similar, except that, in one diet, 25 g high-isoflavone soy protein (SOY) was substituted for an equivalent amount of meat protein (control diet), for 7 wk each in a randomized crossover design. After 3 wk of equilibration, calcium retention was measured by labeling the 2-d menu with (47)Ca, followed by whole-body counting for 28 d. Urinary calcium and renal acid excretion were measured at wk 3, 5, and 7. Biomarkers of bone and cardiovascular health were measured at the beginning and end of each diet. Calcium was similarly retained during the control and SOY diets (d 28, percent dose, mean +/- pooled sd: 14.1 and 14.0 +/- 1.6, respectively). Despite a 15-20% lower renal acid excretion during the SOY diet, urinary calcium loss was unaffected by diet. Diet also did not affect any of the indicators of bone or cardiovascular health. Substitution of 25 g high isoflavone soy protein for meat, in the presence of typical calcium intakes, did not improve or impair calcium retention or indicators of bone and cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women.

  6. False discovery rate control for identifying simultaneous signals

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Sihai Dave

    2015-01-01

    It is frequently of interest to jointly analyze multiple sequences of multiple tests in order to identify simultaneous signals, defined as features tested in multiple independent studies whose test statistics are non-null in each. For example, researchers often wish to discover genetic variants that are significantly associated with multiple traits. This paper proposes a false discovery rate control procedure for identifying simultaneous signals in two studies. Error control is difficult due ...

  7. Calcium signalling from the type I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor is required at early phase of liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Andrade, Viviane A; Guimarães, Erika S; Florentino, Rodrigo M; Sousa, Pedro A; Marques, Pedro E; Melo, Flávia M; Ortega, Miguel J; Menezes, Gustavo B; Leite, M Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Liver regeneration is a multistage process that unfolds gradually, with different mediators acting at different stages of regeneration. Calcium (Ca(2+) ) signalling is essential for liver regeneration. In hepatocytes, Ca(2+) signalling results from the activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3 R) of which two of the three known isoforms are expressed (InsP3 R-I and InsP3 R-II). Here, we investigated the role of the InsP3 R-I-dependent Ca(2+) signals in hepatic proliferation during liver regeneration. Partial hepatectomy (HX) in combination with knockdown of InsP3 R-I (AdsiRNA-I) was used to evaluate the role of InsP3 R-I on liver regeneration and hepatocyte proliferation, as assessed by liver to body mass ratio, PCNA expression, immunoblots and measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. AdsiRNA-I efficiently infected the liver as demonstrated by the expression of β-galactosidase throughout the liver lobules. Moreover, this construct selectively and efficiently reduced the expression of InsP3 R-I, as evaluated by immunoblots. Expression of AdsiRNA-I in liver decreased peak Ca(2+) amplitude induced by vasopressin in isolated hepatocytes 2 days after HX. Reduced InsP3 R-I expression prior to HX also delayed liver regeneration, as measured by liver to body weight ratio, and reduced hepatocyte proliferation, as evaluated by PCNA staining, at the same time point. At later stages of regeneration, control hepatocytes showed a decreased expression of InsP3 R, as well as reduced InsP3 R-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, events that did not affect liver growth. Together, these results show that InsP3 R-I-dependent Ca(2+) signalling is an early triggering pathway required for liver regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids and calcium signaling in taste bud cells are altered in nutritionally obesity-prone Psammomys obesus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souleymane Abdoul-Azize

    Full Text Available Since the increasing prevalence of obesity is one of the major health problems of the modern era, understanding the mechanisms of oro-gustatory detection of dietary fat is critical for the prevention and treatment of obesity. We have conducted the present study on Psammomys obesus, the rodent desert gerbil which is a unique polygenic natural animal model of obesity. Our results show that obese animals exhibit a strong preference for lipid solutions in a two-bottle test. Interestingly, the expression of CD36, a lipido-receptor, in taste buds cells (TBC, isolated from circumvallate papillae, was decreased at mRNA level, but remained unaltered at protein level, in obese animals. We further studied the effects of linoleic acid (LA, a long-chain fatty acid, on the increases in free intracellular calcium (Ca(2+ concentrations, [Ca(2+]i, in the TBC of P. obesus. LA induced increases in [Ca(2+]i, largely via CD36, from intracellular pool, followed by the opening of store-operated Ca(2+ (SOC channels in the TBC of these animals. The action of this fatty acid on the increases in [Ca(2+]i was higher in obese animals than that in controls. However, the release of Ca(2+ from intracellular stores, studied also by employing thapsigargin, was lower in TBC of obese animals than control rodents. In this study, we show, for the first time, that increased lipid intake and altered Ca(2+ signaling in TBC are associated with obesity in Psammomys obesus.

  9. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Douglas T. (Inventor); Schmitt, Donald E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The rotor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor may be regulated by applying a separate control signal to each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  10. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, D. T.

    1985-04-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The motor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor be regulated by applying a separate control signal and each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  11. Signal Integration at Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: THE ROLES OF CALCIUM, CALMODULIN, AND SER-500 PHOSPHORYLATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Clint D J; Giles, David H; Stancu, Gabriel; Chitjian, Catrina A; Ferguson, Scarlett B; Wellmann, Rebecca M; Kaoud, Tamer S; Ghose, Ranajeet; Dalby, Kevin N

    2017-02-03

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF-2K), the only calmodulin (CaM)-dependent member of the unique α-kinase family, impedes protein synthesis by phosphorylating eEF-2. We recently identified Thr-348 and Ser-500 as two key autophosphorylation sites within eEF-2K that regulate its activity. eEF-2K is regulated by Ca2+ ions and multiple upstream signaling pathways, but how it integrates these signals into a coherent output, i.e. phosphorylation of eEF-2, is unclear. This study focuses on understanding how the post-translational phosphorylation of Ser-500 integrates with Ca2+ and CaM to regulate eEF-2K. CaM is shown to be absolutely necessary for efficient activity of eEF-2K, and Ca2+ is shown to enhance the affinity of CaM toward eEF-2K. Ser-500 is found to undergo autophosphorylation in cells treated with ionomycin and is likely also targeted by PKA. In vitro, autophosphorylation of Ser-500 is found to require Ca2+ and CaM and is inhibited by mutations that compromise binding of phosphorylated Thr-348 to an allosteric binding pocket on the kinase domain. A phosphomimetic Ser-500 to aspartic acid mutation (eEF-2K S500D) enhances the rate of activation (Thr-348 autophosphorylation) by 6-fold and lowers the EC50 for Ca2+/CaM binding to activated eEF-2K (Thr-348 phosphorylated) by 20-fold. This is predicted to result in an elevation of the cellular fraction of active eEF-2K. In support of this mechanism, eEF-2K knock-out MCF10A cells reconstituted with eEF-2K S500D display relatively high levels of phospho-eEF-2 under basal conditions. This study reports how phosphorylation of a regulatory site (Ser-500) integrates with Ca2+ and CaM to influence eEF-2K activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. NSAIDs, Mitochondria and Calcium Signaling: Special Focus on Aspirin/Salicylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Suzuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid is a well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID that has long been used as an anti-pyretic and analgesic drug. Recently, much attention has been paid to the chemopreventive and apoptosis-inducing effects of NSAIDs in cancer cells. These effects have been thought to be primarily attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis. However, recent studies have demonstrated unequivocally that certain NSAIDs, including aspirin and its metabolite salicylic acid, exert their anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects independently of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. It is becoming increasingly evident that two potential common targets of NSAIDs are mitochondria and the Ca2+ signaling pathway. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding the roles of mitochondria and Ca2+ in the apoptosis-inducing effects as well as some side effects of aspirin, salicylates and other NSAIDs, and introducing the emerging role of L-type Ca2+ channels, a new Ca2+ entry pathway in non-excitable cells that is up-regulated in human cancer cells.

  13. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nonthermal exposures of cells of the immune system to extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes that might be relevant to in vivo immune activity. A similar responsiveness to nonionizing electromagnetic energy in this frequency range has also been documented for tissues of the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal system. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which such fields can induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca[sup 2+]-regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells and then closely examines new results that suggest a role for Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] signaling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 69 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Purinergic receptors and calcium signalling in human pancreatic duct cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette R; Krabbe, Simon; Novak, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    pancreatic duct cell lines PANC-1 and CFPAC-1. Expression of P2 receptors was examined using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Both cell lines, and also Capan-1 cells, express RNA transcripts for the following receptors: P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11-14 and P2X1, P2X2, P2X4, P2X5, P2X6 and P2X7. Using Fura-2......ATP, commonly used to stimulate P2X7 receptors, elicited non-oscillatory and transient Ca(2+) responses. Ivermectin, a potentiator of P2X4 receptors, increased Ca(2+) signals evoked by ATP. The single cell Ca(2+) measurements indicated functional expression of P2Y2 and other P2Y receptors, and notably...... expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors. Expression of P2Y2, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. This fingerprint of P2 receptors in human pancreatic duct models forms the basis for studying effect of nucleotides on ion and fluid secretion, as well as on Ca(2+) and tissue homeostasis...

  15. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J.

    1991-07-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating the exposures of cells of the immune system to relatively weak extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes which might be relevant to in-vivo immune activity. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which weak fields induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca{sup 2+} regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field-coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells, and then closely examines new results which suggest a role for Ca{sup 2+} in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca{sup 2+} signalling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 64 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. mGluR-mediated calcium signalling in the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyer, Christina; Herr, David; Kohmann, Denise; Budde, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian; Coulon, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) plays a major role in modulating the transfer of information from the thalamus to the cortex. GABAergic inhibition via the TRN is differentially regulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and the effect of mGluRs on the membrane potential, on ion channels, and on the plasticity of electrical coupling of TRN neurons has been studied previously. Although mGluRs are generally known to trigger Ca(2+) transients, mGluR-mediated Ca(2+)-transients in TRN neurons have not yet been investigated. In this study, we show that mGluRs can trigger Ca(2+)-transients in TRN neurons, that these transients depend on intracellular Ca(2+)-stores, and are mediated by IP3 receptors. Ca(2+) transients caused by the group I mGluR agonist DHPG elicit a current that is sensitive to flufenamic acid and has a reversal potential around -40mV. Our results add mGluR-mediated Ca(2+)-signalling in the TRN to the state-dependent modulators of the thalamocortical system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Intracellular signals involved in glucose control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Velasco, E; Kumate, J

    2001-01-01

    Many proteins are involved in glucose control. The first step for glucose uptake is insulin receptor-binding. Stimulation of the insulin receptor results in rapid autophosphorylation and conformational changes in the beta chain and the subsequent phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate. This results in the docking of several SH2 domain proteins, including PI 3-kinase and other adapters. The final event is glucose transporter (GLUT) translocation to the cell surface. GLUT is in the cytosol but after insulin stimulation, several proteins are activated either in the GLUT vesicles or in the inner membrane. The role of the cytoskeleton is not well known, but it apparently participates in membrane fusion and vesicle mobilization. After glucose uptake, several hexokines metabolize the glucose to generate energy, convert the glucose in glycogen and store it. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high glucose levels and insulin resistance. The insulin receptor is diminished on the cell surface membrane, tyrosine phosphorylation is decreased, serine and threonine phosphorylation is augmented. Apparently, the main problem with GLUT protein is in its translocation to the cell surface. At present, we know the role of many proteins involved in glucose control. However, we do not understand the significance of insulin resistance at the molecular level with type 2 diabetes.

  18. The design of traffic signal coordinated control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xueting; Sun, Hongsheng; Wang, Xifu

    2017-05-01

    Traffic as the tertiary industry is an important pillar industry to support the normal development of the economy. But now China's road traffic development and economic development has shown a great imbalance and fault phenomenon, which greatly inhibited the normal development of China's economy. Now in many large and medium-sized cities in China are implementing green belt construction. The so-called green band is when the road conditions to meet the conditions for the establishment of the green band, the sections of the intersection of several planning to a traffic coordination control system, so that when the driver at a specific speed can be achieved without stopping the continuous Through the intersection. Green belt can effectively reduce the delay and queuing length of vehicle driving, the normal function of urban roads and reduce the economic losses caused by traffic congestion is a great help. In this paper, the theoretical basis of the design of the coordinated control system is described. Secondly, the green time offset is calculated by the analytic method and the green band is established. And then the VISSIM software is used to simulate the traffic system before and after the improvement. Finally, the results of the two simulations are compared.

  19. Stimulation of Odontogenesis and Angiogenesis via Bioactive Nanocomposite Calcium Phosphate Cements Through Integrin and VEGF Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Im; Lee, Eui-Suk; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Lee, So-Youn; Eun-Cheol Kim; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-05-01

    Formulating self-setting calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) with secondary phases particularly in the nanoscale order holds great promise to improve biological properties. Here, we focus on the effect that bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGN) incorporated in CPC compositions can have on the proliferation, odontogenic differentiation, and angiogenic stimulation of stem cells derived from human dental pulp (HDPSCs). These odontogenic and angiogenic events are of special importance in the dentin-pulp regeneration processes. In comparison to pure CPCs, nanocomposite cements exhibit a significantly improved proliferation of HDPSCs, and the improvement is more significant as the BGN content increases. The nanocomposite cements substantially enhance the adhesion of cells, and significantly up-regulate odontogenic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expressions of odontogenic genes (sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein I, ALP, osteopontin and osteocalcin). Furthermore, the use of nanocomposite cements result in stimulation of angiogenic gene expression (VEGF, FGF-2, VEGFRs, PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin) and protein production (VEGF, VEGFR-1). The angiogenic stimulation by the HDPSCs significantly affects the endothelial cell behaviors, that is, the endothelial cell migration and the tubular network formation are substantially improved when treated with HDPSC-conditioned medium, particularly with the help of nanocomposite cements. The integrin and VEGF signaling pathways are reasoned for the stimulation of the odontogenesis and angiogenesis of cells, where the nanocomposite cements up-regulate the integrin subsets α1, α2, α3, and β1, and activate the integrin downstream signal pathways, such as p-FAK, p-Akt, p-paxillin, JNK, EK, and NF-κB, as well as other nuclear transcriptional factors, including CREB, STAT-3, and ELK-1. The current results indicate that the new formulation of the nanocomposite self-setting cements might provide some

  20. Stimulus-dependent regulation of nuclear Ca2+ signaling in cardiomyocytes: a role of neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Shu; Wakabayashi, Shigeo; Nakamura, Tomoe Y

    2015-01-01

    In cardiomyocytes, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) transients are elicited by electrical and receptor stimulations, leading to muscle contraction and gene expression, respectively. Although such elevations of Ca2+levels ([Ca2+]) also occur in the nucleus, the precise mechanism of nuclear [Ca2+] regulation during different kinds of stimuli, and its relationship with cytoplasmic [Ca2+] regulation are not fully understood. To address these issues, we used a new region-specific fluorescent protein-based Ca2+ indicator, GECO, together with the conventional probe Fluo-4 AM. We confirmed that nuclear Ca2+ transients were elicited by both electrical and receptor stimulations in neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes. Kinetic analysis revealed that electrical stimulation-elicited nuclear Ca2+ transients are slower than cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients, and chelating cytoplasmic Ca2+ abolished nuclear Ca2+ transients, suggesting that nuclear Ca2+ are mainly derived from the cytoplasm during electrical stimulation. On the other hand, receptor stimulation such as with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) preferentially increased nuclear [Ca2+] compared to cytoplasmic [Ca2+]. Experiments using inhibitors revealed that electrical and receptor stimulation-elicited Ca2+ transients were mainly mediated by ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), respectively, suggesting different mechanisms for the two signals. Furthermore, IGF-1-elicited nuclear Ca2+ transient amplitude was significantly lower in myocytes lacking neuronal Ca2+ sensor-1 (NCS-1), a Ca2+ binding protein implicated in IP3R-mediated pathway in the heart. Moreover, IGF-1 strengthened the interaction between NCS-1 and IP3R. These results suggest a novel mechanism for receptor stimulation-induced nuclear [Ca2+] regulation mediated by IP3R and NCS-1 that may further fine-tune cardiac Ca2+ signal regulation.

  1. Calcium-sensing receptor activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in LS14 preadipocytes mediated by ERK1/2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Espessailles, Amanda; Mora, Yuly A; Fuentes, Cecilia; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2018-01-18

    The study of the mechanisms that trigger inflammation in adipose tissue is key to understanding and preventing the cardiometabolic consequences of obesity. We have proposed a model where activation of the G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) leads to inflammation and dysfunction in adipose cells. Upon activation, CaSR can mediate the expression and secretion of proinflammatory factors in human preadipocytes, adipocytes and adipose tissue explants. One possible pathway involved in CaSR-induced inflammation is the activation of the NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, that promotes maturation and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β. The present work aimed to study whether CaSR mediates the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the human adipose cell model LS14. We assessed NLRP3 inflammasome priming and assembly after cinacalcet-induced CaSR activation and evaluated if this activation is mediated by downstream ERK1/2 signaling in LS14 preadipocytes. Exposure to 2µM cinacalcet elevated mRNA expression of NLRP3, CASP-1 and IL-1β, as well as an increase in pro-IL-1β protein. In addition, CaSR activation triggered NLRP3 inflammasome assembly, as evidenced by a 25% increase in caspase-1 activity and 63% IL-1β secretion. CaSR silencing (siRNA) abolished the effect. Upstream ERK pathway inhibition decreased cinacalcet-dependent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose CaSR-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation in preadipocytes through ERK signaling as a novel mechanism for the development of adipose dysfunction, that may favor the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of obesity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report linking the inflammatory effect of CaSR to NLRP3 inflammasome induction in adipose cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Activation and proliferation signals in mouse B cells. VII. Calcium ionophores are non-mitogenic polyclonal B-cell activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, G G; Bijsterbosch, M K; Holman, M

    1985-01-01

    Calcium ionophores cause polyclonal proliferation of lymphocytes from man, rabbit and pig, but are not mitogenic for mouse T or B lymphocytes. We show here that two Ca2+ ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin) nonetheless activate a substantial proportion of mouse B lymphocytes at concentrations which effectively inhibit DNA synthesis induced by conventional mitogens, such as anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Activation of B cells was detected by (i) increased expression of Ia antigen after 24 hr culture with ionophores, and (ii) the accelerated onset of DNA synthesis in B cells primed with ionophores for 24 hr, washed and then rechallenged with anti-Ig. Unlike anti-Ig, the ionophores did not induce either the breakdown of inositol phospholipids, or RNA synthesis in B cells. Finally, activation of B cells by ionophores is highly susceptible to inhibition by cyclosporine. These results therefore suggest that elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induced by these ionophores is sufficient to cause B cells to leave Go, but not to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Clearly, additional signals are required for B cells to progress further into cycle and eventually become committed to DNA synthesis. PMID:2414214

  3. VSNL1 Co-expression networks in aging include calcium signaling, synaptic plasticity, and Alzheimer’s disease pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C W Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visinin-like 1 (VSNL1 gene encodes Visinin-like protein 1, a peripheral biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD. Little is known, however, about normal VSNL1 expression in brain and the biologic networks in which it participates. Frontal cortex gray matter from 209 subjects without neurodegenerative or psychiatric illness, ranging in age from 16–91, were processed on Affymetrix GeneChip 1.1 ST and Human SNP Array 6.0. VSNL1 expression was unaffected by age and sex, and not significantly associated with SNPs in cis or trans. VSNL1 was significantly co-expressed with genes in pathways for Calcium Signaling, AD, Long Term Potentiation, Long Term Depression, and Trafficking of AMPA Receptors. The association with AD was driven, in part, by correlation with amyloid precursor protein (APP expression. These findings provide an unbiased link between VSNL1 and molecular mechanisms of AD, including pathways implicated in synaptic pathology in AD. Whether APP may drive increased VSNL1 expression, VSNL1 drives increased APP expression, or both are downstream of common pathogenic regulators will need to be evaluated in model systems.

  4. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05–0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2–0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases. PMID:26009544

  5. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  6. Synaptic activity and nuclear calcium signaling protect hippocampal neurons from death signal-associated nuclear translocation of FoxO3a induced by extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Oliver; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-06-18

    Synaptic activity and the generation of nuclear calcium signals promote neuronal survival through a transcription-dependent process that is not fully understood. Here we show that one mechanism of activity-induced acquired neuroprotection involves the Forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a, which is known to induce genomic death responses upon translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus. Depletion of endogenous FoxO3a using RNA interference renders hippocampal neurons more resistant to excitotoxic cell death. Using a FoxO3a-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein to monitor in real time the localization of FoxO3a in hippocampal neurons, we found that several cell death inducing stimuli, including the stimulation of extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, growth factor withdrawal, and oxygen-glucose deprivation, caused a swift translocation of FoxO3a-GFP from the cytosol to the cell nucleus. This translocation was inhibited in hippocampal neurons that had undergone prolonged periods of synaptic activity before exposure to cell death-inducing conditions. The activity-dependent protection from death signal-induced FoxO3a-GFP nuclear translocation required synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation and was dependent on nuclear calcium signaling and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV. The modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO3a may represent one mechanism through which nuclear calcium-induced genomic responses affect cell death processes.

  7. Synaptic Activity and Nuclear Calcium Signaling Protect Hippocampal Neurons from Death Signal-associated Nuclear Translocation of FoxO3a Induced by Extrasynaptic N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Oliver; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic activity and the generation of nuclear calcium signals promote neuronal survival through a transcription-dependent process that is not fully understood. Here we show that one mechanism of activity-induced acquired neuroprotection involves the Forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a, which is known to induce genomic death responses upon translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus. Depletion of endogenous FoxO3a using RNA interference renders hippocampal neurons more resistant to excitotoxic cell death. Using a FoxO3a-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein to monitor in real time the localization of FoxO3a in hippocampal neurons, we found that several cell death inducing stimuli, including the stimulation of extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, growth factor withdrawal, and oxygen-glucose deprivation, caused a swift translocation of FoxO3a-GFP from the cytosol to the cell nucleus. This translocation was inhibited in hippocampal neurons that had undergone prolonged periods of synaptic activity before exposure to cell death-inducing conditions. The activity-dependent protection from death signal-induced FoxO3a-GFP nuclear translocation required synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation and was dependent on nuclear calcium signaling and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV. The modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO3a may represent one mechanism through which nuclear calcium-induced genomic responses affect cell death processes. PMID:20404335

  8. Power system small signal stability analysis and control

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Debasish; Sengupta, Aparajita

    2014-01-01

    Power System Small Signal Stability Analysis and Control presents a detailed analysis of the problem of severe outages due to the sustained growth of small signal oscillations in modern interconnected power systems. The ever-expanding nature of power systems and the rapid upgrade to smart grid technologies call for the implementation of robust and optimal controls. Power systems that are forced to operate close to their stability limit have resulted in the use of control devices by utility companies to improve the performance of the transmission system against commonly occurring power system

  9. Electrical control of calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells using microsecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Hanna; Andre, Franck M; Mir, Lluis M

    2017-04-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cells are promising tools for regenerative medicine due to their ability to differentiate into many cellular types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes amongst many other cell types. These cells present spontaneous calcium oscillations implicating calcium channels and pumps of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. These oscillations regulate many basic functions in the cell such as proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, the possibility to mimic or regulate these oscillations might be useful to regulate mesenchymal stem cells biological functions. One or several electric pulses of 100 μs were used to induce Ca 2+ spikes caused by the penetration of Ca 2+ from the extracellular medium, through the transiently electropermeabilized plasma membrane, in human adipose mesenchymal stem cells from several donors. Attached cells were preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and exposed to the electric pulse(s) under the fluorescence microscope. Viability was also checked. According to the pulse(s) electric field amplitude, it is possible to generate a supplementary calcium spike with properties close to those of calcium spontaneous oscillations, or, on the contrary, to inhibit the spontaneous calcium oscillations for a very long time compared to the pulse duration. Through that inhibition of the oscillations, Ca 2+ oscillations of desired amplitude and frequency could then be imposed on the cells using subsequent electric pulses. None of the pulses used here, even those with the highest amplitude, caused a loss of cell viability. An easy way to control Ca 2+ oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells, through their cancellation or the addition of supplementary Ca 2+ spikes, is reported here. Indeed, the direct link between the microsecond electric pulse(s) delivery and the occurrence/cancellation of cytosolic Ca 2+ spikes allowed us to mimic and regulate the Ca 2+ oscillations in these cells. Since microsecond electric pulse delivery

  10. Compartmentalization of GPCR signalling controls unique cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellisdon, Andrew M; Halls, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    With >800 members, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell-surface signalling proteins, and their activation mediates diverse physiological processes. GPCRs are ubiquitously distributed across all cell types, involved in many diseases and are major drug targets. However, GPCR drug discovery is still characterized by very high attrition rates. New avenues for GPCR drug discovery may be provided by a recent shift away from the traditional view of signal transduction as a simple chain of events initiated from the plasma membrane. It is now apparent that GPCR signalling is restricted to highly organized compartments within the cell, and that GPCRs activate distinct signalling pathways once internalized. A high-resolution understanding of how compartmentalized signalling is controlled will probably provide unique opportunities to selectively and therapeutically target GPCRs. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  12. Controlled EIT and signal storage in metamaterial with tripod structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Raczyńska, S.; Ziemkiewicz, D.

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper we have discussed in detail electromagnetically induced transparency and signal storing in the case of one signal pulse propagating in a classical electric medium resembles this of four-level atoms in the tripod configuration. Our theoretical results confirm recently observed dependence of transparency windows position on coupling parameters. In the process of storing, the pulse energy is confined inside the metamaterial as electric charge oscillations, and after required time it is possible to switch the control fields on again and to release the trapped signal. By manipulating the driving fields, one can thus control the parameters of the released signal and even to divide it on demand into arbitrary parts.

  13. Bioinformatic identification of FGF, p38-MAKP, and calcium signalling pathways associated with carcinoma in situ in the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbsleb, Malene; Christensen, Ole F; Thykjaer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    (FGF, p38 MAPK, and calcium signalling) or the expression of the twelve TFs together could be used to predict presence or absence of concomitant CIS. A cluster analysis based on expression of the twelve TFs separated the samples in two main clusters: one branch contained 11 of the 15 patients without...... approach to predict presence or absence of CIS in patients suffering from non muscle invasive bladder cancer. From Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we considered four canonical signalling pathways (p38 MAPK, FGF, Calcium, and cAMP pathways) with most coherent expression of transcription factors (TFs) across...... samples in a set of twenty-eight non muscle invasive bladder carcinomas. These pathways contained twelve TFs in total. We used the expression of the TFs to predict presence or absence of CIS in a Leave-One-Out Cross Validation classification. Results We showed that TF expression levels in three pathways...

  14. Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate-dependent nuclear calcium signals regulate angiogenesis and cell motility in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Guimarães

    Full Text Available Increases in nuclear calcium concentration generate specific biological outcomes that differ from those resulting from increased cytoplasmic calcium. Nuclear calcium effects on tumor cell proliferation are widely appreciated; nevertheless, its involvement in other steps of tumor progression is not well understood. Therefore, we evaluated whether nuclear calcium is essential in other additional stages of tumor progression, including key steps associated with the formation of the primary tumor or with the metastatic cascade. We found that nuclear calcium buffering impaired 4T1 triple negative breast cancer growth not just by decreasing tumor cell proliferation, but also by enhancing tumor necrosis. Moreover, nuclear calcium regulates tumor angiogenesis through a mechanism that involves the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10-IP10. In addition, nuclear calcium buffering regulates breast tumor cell motility, culminating in less cell invasion, likely due to enhanced vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Together, our results show that nuclear calcium is essential for triple breast cancer angiogenesis and cell migration and can be considered as a promising strategic target for triple negative breast cancer therapy.

  15. Bcl-2 regulation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor and calcium signaling in normal and malignant lymphocytes: potential new target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Edward F; Lavik, Andrew R; Distelhorst, Clark W

    2014-10-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 is a versatile regulator of cell survival. Its interactions with its own pro-apoptotic family members are widely recognized for their role in promoting the survival of cancer cells. These interactions are thus being targeted for cancer treatment. Less widely recognized is the interaction of Bcl-2 with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R), an InsP3-gated Ca(2+) channel located on the endoplasmic reticulum. The nature of this interaction, the mechanism by which it controls Ca(2+) release from the ER, its role in T-cell development and survival, and the possibility of targeting it as a novel cancer treatment strategy are summarized in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium signaling in health and disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling oscillatory control in NF-¿B, p53 and Wnt signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel, Benedicte; Hunziker, Alexander; Pedersen, Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Oscillations are commonly observed in cellular behavior and span a wide range of timescales, from seconds in calcium signaling to 24 hours in circadian rhythms. In between lie oscillations with time periods of 1-5 hours seen in NF-¿B, p53 and Wnt signaling, which play key roles in the immune system...

  17. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajin Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Inhibitors of arachidonate-regulated calcium channel signaling suppress triggered activity induced by the late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, Paul; Umeda, Patrick K; Sharifov, Oleg F; White, C Roger; Huang, Jian; Mahtani, Harry; Urthaler, Ferdinand

    2014-02-05

    Disturbances in myocyte calcium homeostasis are hypothesized to be one cause for cardiac arrhythmia. The full development of this hypothesis requires (i) the identification of all sources of arrhythmogenic calcium and (ii) an understanding of the mechanism(s) through which calcium initiates arrhythmia. To these ends we superfused rat left atria with the late sodium current activator type II Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATXII). This toxin prolonged atrial action potentials, induced early afterdepolarization, and provoked triggered activity. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 (N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphon-amide) suppressed ATXII triggered activity but its inactive congener KN-92 (2-[N-(4-methoxy benzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine) did not. Neither drug affected normal atrial contractility. Calcium entry via L-type channels or calcium leakage from sarcoplasmic reticulum stores are not critical for this type of ectopy as neither verapamil ((RS)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-{[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-(methyl)amino}-2-prop-2-ylpentanenitrile) nor ryanodine affected ATXII triggered activity. By contrast, inhibitors of the voltage independent arachidonate-regulated calcium (ARC) channel and the store-operated calcium channel specifically suppressed ATXII triggered activity without normalizing action potentials or affecting atrial contractility. Inhibitors of cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 also suppressed triggered activity suggesting that this lipase, which generates free arachidonate, plays a key role in ATXII ectopy. Thus, increased left atrial late sodium current appears to activate atrial Orai-linked ARC and store operated calcium channels, and these voltage-independent channels may be unexpected sources for the arrhythmogenic calcium that underlies triggered activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Can calcium ionophore "use" in patients with diminished ovarian reserve increase fertilization and pregnancy rates? A randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar Aytac, Pinar; Kilicdag, Esra Bulgan; Haydardedeoglu, Bulent; Simsek, Erhan; Cok, Tayfun; Parlakgumus, Huriye Ayse

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether calcium ionophore solution can improve the fertilization rate in patients with diminished ovarian reserve whose partners have normal sperm parameters. Between January 2014 and August 2014, patients with diminished ovarian reserve were randomized to make artificial oocyte activation with calcium ionophore solution. University hospital. A total of 296 patients who had diminished ovarian reserve and partners with normal sperm parameters were included in the study. Metaphase 2 oocytes were treated with calcium ionophore solution (GM508 Cult-Active) for 15 minutes just after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Fertilization rate, implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, ongoing pregnancy rate. Fertilization, implantation, pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates for the calcium ionophore and control groups were 60.7% and 55.4%, 12.8% and 10.7%, 21% and 12.8%, and 10.9% and 6.1%, respectively. This is the first prospective, randomized, controlled study to analyze the effect of calcium ionophore solution on fertilization rate in patients with diminished ovarian reserve. We did not observe any differences in fertilization, clinical pregnancy, or ongoing pregnancy rates between the groups. We propose that fertilization ratios could not be increased by artificial oocyte activation via application of calcium ionophore solution in patients with diminished ovarian reserve. NCT02045914. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fast, optically controlled Kerr phase shifter for digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R B; Deng, L; Hagley, E W; Payne, M G; Bienfang, J C; Levine, Z H

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate an optically controlled Kerr phase shifter using a room-temperature 85Rb vapor operating in a Raman gain scheme. Phase shifts from zero to π relative to an unshifted reference wave are observed, and gated operations are demonstrated. We further demonstrate the versatile digital manipulation of encoded signal light with an encoded phase-control light field using an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Generalizations of this scheme should be capable of full manipulation of a digitized signal field at high speed, opening the door to future applications.

  1. Antagonizing amyloid-β/calcium-sensing receptor signaling in human astrocytes and neurons: a key to halt Alzheimer′s disease progression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Dal Prà

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes′ roles in late-onset Alzheimer′s disease (LOAD promotion are important, since they survive soluble or fibrillar amyloid-β peptides (Aβs neurotoxic effects, undergo alterations of intracellular and intercellular Ca 2+ signaling and gliotransmitters release via the Aβ/α7-nAChR (α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor signaling, and overproduce/oversecrete newly synthesized Aβ42 oligomers, NO, and VEGF-A via the Aβ/CaSR (calcium-sensing receptor signaling. Recently, it was suggested that the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibitor nitromemantine would block the synapse-destroying effects of Aβ/α7-nAChR signaling. Yet, this and the progressive extracellular accrual and spreading of Aβ42 oligomers would be stopped well upstream by NPS 2143, an allosteric CaSR antagonist (calcilytic.

  2. Polyaspartic Acid Concentration Controls the Rate of Calcium Phosphate Nanorod Formation in High Concentration Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Daniel V. [Biosystems and; Wang, Dongbo [Biosystems and; Lin-Gibson, Sheng [Biosystems and

    2017-08-31

    Polyelectrolytes are known to greatly affect calcium phosphate (CaP) mineralization. The reaction kinetics as well as the CaP phase, morphology and aggregation state depend on the relative concentrations of the polyelectrolyte and the inorganic ions in a complex, nonlinear manner. This study examines the structural evolution and kinetics of polyaspartic acid (pAsp) directed CaP mineralization at high concentrations of polyelectrolytes, calcium, and total phosphate (19–30 mg/mL pAsp, 50–100 mM Ca2+, Ca/P = 2). Using a novel combination of characterization techniques including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), spectrophotometry, X-ray total scattering pair distribution function analysis, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), it was determined that the CaP mineralization occurred over four transition steps. The steps include the formation of aggregates of pAsp stabilized CaP spherical nanoparticles (sNP), crystallization of sNP, oriented attachment of the sNP into nanorods, and further crystallization of the nanorods. The intermediate aggregate sizes and the reaction kinetics were found to be highly polymer concentration dependent while the sizes of the particles were not concentration dependent. This study demonstrates the complex role of pAsp in controlling the mechanism as well as the kinetics of CaP mineralization.

  3. Calcium-energized motor protein forisome controls damage in phloem: potential applications as biomimetic "smart" material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-06-01

    Forisomes are ATP independent, mechanically active proteins from the Fabaceae family (also called Leguminosae). These proteins are located in sieve tubes of phloem and function to prevent loss of nutrient-rich photoassimilates, upon mechanical injury/wounding. Forisomes are SEO (sieve element occlusion) gene family proteins that have recently been shown to be involved in wound sealing mechanism. Recent findings suggest that forisomes could act as an ideal model to study self assembly mechanism for the development of nanotechnological devices like microinstruments, the microfluidic system frequently used in space exploration missions. Technology enabling improvement in micro instruments has been identified as a key technology by NASA in future space exploration missions. Forisomes are designated as biomimetic smart materials which are calcium-energized motor proteins. Since forisomes are biomolecules from plant systems it can be doctored through genetic engineering. In contrast, "smart" materials which are not derived from plants are difficult to modify in their properties. Current levels of understanding about forisomes conformational shifts with respect to calcium ions and pH changes requires supplement of future advances with relation to its 3D structure to understand self assembly processes. In plant systems it forms blood clots in the form of occlusions to prevent nutrient fluid leakage and thus proves to be a unique damage control system of phloem tissue.

  4. Robust Bio-Signal Based Control of an Intelligent Wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyi Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive human-machine interaction (HMI method that is based on surface electromyography (sEMG signals is proposed for the hands-free control of an intelligent wheelchair. sEMG signals generated by the facial movements are obtained by a convenient dry electrodes sensing device. After the signals features are extracted from the autoregressive model, control data samples are updated and trained by an incremental online learning algorithm in real-time. Experimental results show that the proposed method can significantly improve the classification accuracy and training speed. Moreover, this method can effectively reduce the influence of muscle fatigue during a long time operation of sEMG-based HMI.

  5. High extracellular magnesium inhibits mineralized matrix deposition and modulates intracellular calcium signaling in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Chunxi; Li, Jiao; Zhu, Yuchang; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2014-08-08

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into several cell types and provide an attractive source of autologous cells for regenerative medicine. However, their cellular biology is not fully understood. Similar to Ca(2+), extracellular Mg(2+) plays an important role in the functions of the skeletal system. Here, we examined the effects of extracellular Mg(2+) on the deposition of calcium phosphate matrix and Ca(2+) signaling with or without ATP stimulation in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). We found that high extracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)]e) inhibited extracellular matrix mineralization in hBMSCs in vitro. hBMSCs also produced a dose-dependent decrease in the frequency of calcium oscillations during [Mg(2+)]e elevation with a slight suppression on oscillation amplitude. In addition, spontaneous ATP release was inhibited under high [Mg(2+)]e levels and exogenous ATP addition stimulated oscillation reappear. Taken together, our results indicate that high [Mg(2+)]e modulates calcium oscillations via suppression of spontaneous ATP release and inactivates purinergic receptors, resulting in decreased extracellular mineralized matrix deposition in hBMSCs. Therefore, the high magnesium environment created by the rapid corrosion of Mg alloys may result in the dysfunction of calcium-dependent physiology processes and be disadvantageous to hBMSCs physiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The roles of calcium signaling and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Pax6+/- mouse model of epithelial wound-healing delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCaig Colin D

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital aniridia caused by heterozygousity at the PAX6 locus is associated with ocular surface disease including keratopathy. It is not clear whether the keratopathy is a direct result of reduced PAX6 gene dosage in the cornea itself, or due to recurrent corneal trauma secondary to defects such as dry eye caused by loss of PAX6 in other tissues. We investigated the hypothesis that reducing Pax6 gene dosage leads to corneal wound-healing defects. and assayed the immediate molecular responses to wounding in wild-type and mutant corneal epithelial cells. Results Pax6+/- mouse corneal epithelia exhibited a 2-hour delay in their response to wounding, but subsequently the cells migrated normally to repair the wound. Both Pax6+/+ and Pax6+/- epithelia activated immediate wound-induced waves of intracellular calcium signaling. However, the intensity and speed of propagation of the calcium wave, mediated by release from intracellular stores, was reduced in Pax6+/- cells. Initiation and propagation of the calcium wave could be largely decoupled, and both phases of the calcium wave responses were required for wound healing. Wounded cells phosphorylated the extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2. ERK1/2 activation was shown to be required for rapid initiation of wound healing, but had only a minor effect on the rate of cell migration in a healing epithelial sheet. Addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF to wounded Pax6+/- cells restored the calcium wave, increased ERK1/2 activation and restored the immediate healing response to wild-type levels. Conclusion The study links Pax6 deficiency to a previously overlooked wound-healing delay. It demonstrates that defective calcium signaling in Pax6+/- cells underlies this delay, and shows that it can be pharmacologically corrected. ERK1/2 phosphorylation is required for the rapid initiation of wound healing. A model is presented whereby minor abrasions, which are

  7. Photoreception and signal transduction in corals: proteomic and behavioral evidence for cytoplasmic calcium as a mediator of light responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, J Daniel; Brady, Aisling K; Spaho, Skender A; Vize, Peter D

    2012-12-01

    Little is known about how corals sense and respond to light. In this report the proteome of coral is explored using 2D protein electrophoresis in two species, Montastraea cavernosa and Acropora millepora. Multiple protein species have major shifts in abundance in both species when sampled in daylight compared to corals sampled late in the night. These changes were observed both in larvae lacking zooxanthellae and in adult tissue containing zooxanthellae, including both Pacific and Caribbean corals. When larvae kept in the dark were treated with either thapsigargin or ionomycin, compounds that raise the level of cytoplasmic calcium, the night pattern of proteins shifted to the day pattern. This implies that photoreceptors responding to light elevate calcium levels and that calcium acts as the second messenger relaying light responses in corals. Corals spawn at night, and spawning can be delayed by exposure to light or pushed forward by early artificial sunsets. In a series of behavioral experiments, treatment of corals with ionomycin or thapsigargin was found to delay broadcast spawning in M. franksi, demonstrating that pharmacologically altering cytoplasmic calcium levels generates the same response as light exposure. Together these results show that the photo-responsive cells of corals detect and respond to light by altering cytoplasmic calcium levels, similarly to the transduction pathways in complex invertebrate eyes. The primacy of cytoplasmic calcium levels in light responsivity has broad implications for coral reproduction, including predicting how different species spawn at different times after sunset and how reproductive isolation is achieved during coral speciation.

  8. Digital signal processing in power electronics control circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sozanski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Many digital control circuits in current literature are described using analog transmittance. This may not always be acceptable, especially if the sampling frequency and power transistor switching frequencies are close to the band of interest. Therefore, a digital circuit is considered as a digital controller rather than an analog circuit. This helps to avoid errors and instability in high frequency components. Digital Signal Processing in Power Electronics Control Circuits covers problems concerning the design and realization of digital control algorithms for power electronics circuits using

  9. Relationships between digital signal processing and control and estimation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Research areas associated with digital signal processing and control and estimation theory are identified. Particular attention is given to image processing, system identification problems (parameter identification, linear prediction, least squares, Kalman filtering), stability analyses (the use of the Liapunov theory, frequency domain criteria, passivity), and multiparameter systems, distributed processes, and random fields.

  10. Delays at signalized intersections with exhaustive traffic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, M.A.A.; Adan, I.J.B.F.; Winands, E.M.M.; Down, D.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study a traffic intersection with vehicle-actuated traffic signal control. Traffic lights stay green until all lanes within a group are emptied. Assuming general renewal arrival processes, we derive exact limiting distributions of the delays under heavy traffic (HT) conditions.

  11. Dietary calcium intake and Renin Angiotensin System polymorphisms alter the blood pressure response to aerobic exercise: a randomized control design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsongalis Gregory J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary calcium intake and the renin angiotensin system (RAS regulate blood pressure (BP by modulating calcium homeostasis. Despite similar BP regulatory effects, the influence of dietary calcium intake alone and combined with RAS polymorphisms on the BP response following acute aerobic exercise (i.e., postexercise hypotension has not been studied. Thus, we examined the effect of dietary calcium intake and selected RAS polymorphisms on postexercise hypotension. Methods Subjects were men (n = 50, 43.8 ± 1.3 yr with high BP (145.3 ± 1.5/85.9 ± 1.1 mm Hg. They completed three experiments: non-exercise control and two cycle bouts at 40% and 60% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max. Subjects provided 3 d food records on five protocol-specific occasions. Dietary calcium intake was averaged and categorized as low (1R A/C were analyzed with molecular methods. Genotypes were reduced from three to two: ACE II/ID and ACE DD; or AT1R AA and AT1R CC/AC. Repeated measure ANCOVA tested if BP differed among experiments, dietary calcium intake level and RAS polymorphisms. Results Systolic BP (SBP decreased 6 mm Hg after 40% and 60% VO2max compared to non-exercise control for 10 h with LowCa (p 2max versus non-exercise control for 10 h among ACE II/ID (6 mm Hg and AT1R AA (8 mm Hg; and by 8 mm Hg after 40% VO2max among ACE DD and AT1R CC/CA (p 2max compared to non-exercise control for 10 h (p 2max (p ≥ 0.05. Conclusion SBP decreased after exercise compared to non-exercise control among men with low but not high dietary calcium intake. Dietary calcium intake interacted with the ACE I/D and AT1R A/C polymorphisms to further modulate postexercise hypotension. Interactions among dietary calcium intake, exercise intensity and RAS polymorphisms account for some of the variability in the BP response to exercise.

  12. Rap2B promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human breast cancer through calcium-related ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Jiehui; Huang, Hui; Qu, Debao; Tang, Juangjuan; Cao, Wenjia; Lu, Zheng; Cheng, Qian; Yang, Jing; Bai, Jin; Zhang, Yanping; Zheng, Junnian

    2015-07-23

    Rap2B, a member of GTP-binding proteins, is widely upregulated in many types of tumors and promotes migration and invasion of human suprarenal epithelioma. However, the function of Rap2B in breast cancer is unknown. Expression of Rap2B was examined in breast cancer cell lines and human normal breast cell line using Western blot analysis. Using the CCK-8 cell proliferation assay, cell cycle analysis, and transwell migration assay, we also elucidated the role of Rap2B in breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Results showed that the expression of Rap2B is higher in tumor cells than in normal cells. Flow cytometry and Western blot analysis revealed that Rap2B elevates the intracellular calcium level and further promotes extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation. By contrast, calcium chelator BAPTM/AM and MEK inhibitor (U0126) can reverse Rap2B-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, Rap2B knockdown inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities via calcium related-ERK1/2 signaling. In addition, overexpression of Rap2B promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities, which could be neutralized by BAPTM/AM and U0126. Taken together, these findings shed light on Rap2B as a therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  13. Effect of a high dose of simvastatin on muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtier, F., E-mail: f-galtier@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); CPID, Faculté de Pharmacie, 15 Av. Charles Flahault, BP 14491, 34093 Montpellier Cedex 5, Montpellier (France); Mura, T., E-mail: t-mura@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Raynaud de Mauverger, E., E-mail: eric.raynaud-de-mauverger@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Université Montpellier 1, 5 bd Henri IV CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier Cedex 2 (France); Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, U1046, 371 Avenue du Doyen G. Giraud, CHU Arnaud de Villeneuve, Bâtiment INSERM Crastes de Paulet, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Chevassus, H., E-mail: h-chevassus@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Farret, A., E-mail: a-farret@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Gagnol, J.-P., E-mail: jp-gagnol@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Costa, F., E-mail: francoisecosta@sfr.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Dupuy, A., E-mail: am-dupuy@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-09-15

    Statin use may be limited by muscle side effects. Although incompletely understood to date, their pathophysiology may involve oxidative stress and impairments of mitochondrial function and of muscle Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. In order to simultaneously assess these mechanisms, 24 male healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either simvastatin for 80 mg daily or placebo for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples and a stress test were performed at baseline and at follow-up, and mitochondrial respiration and Ca{sup 2+} spark properties were evaluated on a muscle biopsy 4 days before the second stress test. Simvastatin-treated subjects were separated according to their median creatine kinase (CK) increase. Simvastatin treatment induced a significant elevation of aspartate amino transferase (3.38 ± 5.68 vs − 1.15 ± 4.32 UI/L, P < 0.001) and CK (− 24.3 ± 99.1 ± 189.3vs 48.3 UI/L, P = 0.01) and a trend to an elevation of isoprostanes (193 ± 408 vs12 ± 53 pmol/mmol creatinine, P = 0.09) with no global change in mitochondrial respiration, lactate/pyruvate ratio or Ca{sup 2+} sparks. However, among statin-treated subjects, those with the highest CK increase displayed a significantly lower Vmax rotenone succinate and an increase in Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude vs both subjects with the lowest CK increase and placebo-treated subjects. Moreover, Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude was positively correlated with treatment-induced CK increase in the whole group (r = 0.71, P = 0.0045). In conclusion, this study further supports that statin induced muscular toxicity may be related to alterations in mitochondrial respiration and muscle calcium homeostasis independently of underlying disease or concomitant medication. -- Highlights: ► Statin use may be limited by side effects, particularly myopathy. ► Statins might impair mitochondrial function and muscle Ca2+ signaling in muscle. ► This was tested among healthy volunteers receiving simvastatin 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. ► CK

  14. Development of remote control software for multiformat test signal generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multi format test signal generator mentioned in this paper is the video signal generator named TG8000 produced by Tektronix Company. I will introduce the function about remote control for signal generator, how to connect the computer to the instrument, and how to remote control. My topic uses my computer to connect the instrument through the 10/100/1000 BASE-T port on the rear panel of TG8000. Then I write program to transmit SCPI (Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments to control TG8000. The application is running on the Windows operating system, the programming language is C#, development environment is Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, using the TCP/IP protocol based on Socket. And the method of remote control refers to the application called TGSetup which is developed by Tektronix Company. This paper includes a brief summary of the basic principle, and introduce for details about the process of remote control software development, and how to use my software. In the end, I will talk about the advantages of my software compared with another one.

  15. [Effects of energy controllable steep pulses on intracellular calcium concentration and cell membrane potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Li-Na; Zhu, Yun-Shan; Hong, Chuan; Li, Cong; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2009-09-01

    Our previous experiments showed that steep pulses could kill tumor cells, but the mechanism is unclear. This study was to probe the effects of different dosages of energy controllable steep pulses (ECSP) on intracellular concentration of dissociative calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) and cell membrane potential. The breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells were divided into control group and five ECSP (different dosages) groups. Ca2+ was labeled by Fluo-3/AM and cell membrane potential was labeled by DiBAC4(3). The mean fluorescence intensity in MDA-MB-231 cells was observed by laser confocal microscopy after ECSP treatment. The changes of calcium concentration and cell membrane potential after ECSP treatment were analyzed. The changes of intracellular [Ca2+]i after ECSP treatment were also observed either with or without Ca2+ outside of the cells. Ca2+ outflow was observed when the cells were treated with lower dosage of pulse in quiet state; the outflow was enhanced with the dosage increase. In real-time kinetic detection, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was increased with the increase of pulse electric field intensity when cells were treated with lower dosages of ECSP. When the voltage was 285 V, frequency was 100 Hz, [Ca2+]i decreased obviously. The intracellular Ca2+ concentration was obviously lower in the cells without outside Ca2+ than in cells with outside Ca2+, but it still increased gradually. Low dosage of ECSP induced the increase of cell membrane potential, indicating the depolarization of cell membrane. With increase of the dosage, cell membrane potential was attenuated, indicating the superpolarization of cell membrane. Lower dosage of ECSP can induce the depolarization of cell membrane and the inflow of outside Ca2+; higher dosage of ECSP can directly destroy the cell membrane and induce the superpolarization of cell membrane, then induce the outflow of intracellular Ca2+ which causes the necrosis of tumor cells.

  16. Calcium-mediated repression of β-catenin and its transcriptional signaling mediates neural crest cell death in an avian model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentke, George R; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M

    2011-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates G-protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol's calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol's repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically relevant ethanol concentrations (22-78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion, and survival. Using forced expression studies, we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative T cell transcription factor [TCF]) recapitulates ethanol's effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol's presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol's calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol's repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol's teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. The Calcium-Mediated Repression of β-Catenin and Its Transcriptional Signaling Mediates Neural Crest Cell Death in an Avian Model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentke, George R.; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates a G protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol’s calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol’s repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically-relevant ethanol concentrations (22–78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion and survival. Using forced expression studies we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative TCF) recapitulates ethanol’s effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol’s presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol’s calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol’s repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol’s teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. PMID:21630427

  18. Nacre-like calcium carbonate controlled by ionic liquid/graphene oxide composite template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chengli; Xie, Anjian; Shen, Yuhua; Zhu, Jinmiao; Li, Hongying

    2015-06-01

    Nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures have been mediated by an ionic liquid (IL)-graphene oxide (GO) composite template. The resultant crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD). The results showed that either 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4) or graphene oxide can act as a soft template for calcium carbonate formation with unusual morphologies. Based on the time-dependent morphology changes of calcium carbonate particles, it is concluded that nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures can be formed gradually utilizing [BMIM]BF4/GO composite template. During the process of calcium carbonate formation, [BMIM]BF4 acted not only as solvents but also as morphology templates for the fabrication of calcium carbonate materials with nacre-like morphology. Based on the observations, the possible mechanisms were also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Attitude Control of a Satellite by using Digital Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adirelle C. Santana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article has discussed the development of a three-axis attitude digital controller for an artificial satellite using a digital signal processor. The main motivation of this study is the attitude control system of the satellite Multi-Mission Platform, developed by the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research for application in different sort of missions. The controller design was based on the theory of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator, synthesized from the linearized model of the motion of the satellite, i.e., the kinematics and dynamics of attitude. The attitude actuators considered in this study are pairs of cold gas jets powered by a pulse width/pulse frequency modulator. In the first stage of the project development, a system controller for continuous time was studied with the aim of testing the adequacy of the adopted control. The next steps had included an analysis of discretization techniques, the setting time of sampling rate, and the testing of the digital version of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator controller in the MATLAB/SIMULINK. To fulfill the study, the controller was implemented in a digital signal processor, specifically the Blackfin BF537 from Analog Devices, along with the pulse width/pulse frequency modulator. The validation tests used a scheme of co-simulation, where the model of the satellite was simulated in MATLAB/SIMULINK, while the controller and modulator were processed in the digital signal processor with a tool called Processor-In-the-Loop, which acted as a data communication link between both environments.function and required time to achieve a given mission accuracy are determined, and results are provided as illustration.

  20. Stochastic Model of Traffic Jam and Traffic Signal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Cui, Cheng-You; Lee, Tae-Hong; Lee, Hee-Hyol

    Traffic signal control is an effective method to solve the traffic jam. and forecasting traffic density has been known as an important part of the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The several methods of the traffic signal control are known such as random walk method, Neuron Network method, Bayesian Network method, and so on. In this paper, we propose a new method of a traffic signal control using a predicted distribution of traffic jam based on a Dynamic Bayesian Network model. First, a forecasting model to predict a probabilistic distribution of the traffic jam during each period of traffic lights is built. As the forecasting model, the Dynamic Bayesian Network is used to predict the probabilistic distribution of a density of the traffic jam. According to measurement of two crossing points for each cycle, the inflow and outflow of each direction and the number of standing vehicles at former cycle are obtained. The number of standing vehicle at k-th cycle will be calculated synchronously. Next, the probabilistic distribution of the density of standing vehicle in each cycle will be predicted using the Dynamic Bayesian Network constructed for the traffic jam. And then a control rule to adjust the split and the cycle to increase the probability between a lower limit and ceiling of the standing vehicles is deduced. As the results of the simulation using the actual traffic data of Kitakyushu city, the effectiveness of the method is shown.

  1. ROS and calcium signaling mediated pathways involved in stress responses of the marine microalgae Dunaliella salina to enhanced UV-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bin; Wang, You

    2017-08-01

    UV-B ray has been addressed to trigger common metabolic responses on marine microalgae, however, the upstream events responsible for these changes in marine microalgae are poorly understood. In the present study, a species of marine green microalgae Dunaliella salina was exposed to a series of enhanced UV-B radiation ranging from 0.25 to 1.00 KJ·m -2 per day. The role of ROS and calcium signaling in the D. salina responses to UV-B was discussed. Results showed that enhanced UV-B radiation markedly decreased the cell density in a dose-dependent manner, but the contents of protein and glycerol that were essential for cell growth increased. It suggested that it was cell division instead of cell growth that UV-B exerted negative effects on. The subcellular damages on nuclei and plasmalemma further evidenced the hypothesis. The nutrient absorption was affected with UV-B exposure, and the inhibition on PO 4 3- uptake was more serious compared to NO 3 - uptake. UV-B radiation promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) contents, decreased the redox status and altered the antioxidant enzyme activities. The addition of the ROS scavenger and the glutathione biosynthesis precursor N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) alleviated the stress degree, implying ROS-mediated pathway was involved in the stress response to UV-B radiation. Transient increase in Ca 2+ -ATPase was triggered simultaneously with UV-B exposure. Meanwhile, the addition of an intracellular free calcium chelator aggravated the damage of cell division, but exogenous calcium and ion channel blocker applications did not, inferring that endogenously initiated calcium signaling played roles in response to UV-B. Cross-talk analysis showed a relatively clear relationship between ROS inhibition and Ca 2+ -ATPase suppression, and a relation between Ca 2+ inhibition and GPx activity change was also observed. It was thus presumed that ROS-coupled calcium signaling via the

  2. Calcium-dependent and calcium-independent signals in the conglutinin-binding assay (KgBa) for immune complexes. Influence of anti-collagen-antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Haas, Henning de; Teisner, B

    1992-01-01

    G eluted on gel chromatography at the position of monomeric IgG suggesting binding via the antigen binding sites. Binding of this IgG was inhibited by both collagen type II and purified conglutinin. These observations suggest that the assay detects cross-reacting autoantibodies against collagen epitopes......G with serum at 37 degrees C abolished the binding to conglutinin, a finding consistent with the complete degradation of deposited C3b to C3c and C3d. The solubilized IgG that bound to solid phase conglutinin was found by gel chromatography to be of high molecular weight (greater than 600 kDa). Binding of Ig......G to solid phase bovine conglutinin was also observed to a variable degree in normal and pathological sera. However, in this situation the IgG binding was largely calcium-independent, was not inhibited by GlcNAc and did not decrease after prolonged incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C. The reactive Ig...

  3. FireSignal application Node for subsystem control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, A.S., E-mail: andre.duarte@ipfn.ist.utl.p [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, B.; Pereira, T.; Carvalho, B.B.; Fernandes, H.; Neto, A. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Janky, F.; Cahyna, P.; Pisacka, J.; Hron, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-15

    Modern fusion experiments require the presence of several subsystems, responsible for the different parameters involved in the operation of the machine. With the migration from the pre-programmed to the real-time control paradigm, their integration in Control, Data Acquisition, and Communication (CODAC) systems became an important issue, as this implies not only the connection to a main central coordination system, but also communications with related diagnostics and actuators. A subsystem for the control and operation of the vacuum, gas injection and baking was developed and installed in the COMPASS tokamak. These tasks are performed by dsPIC microcontrollers that receive commands from a hub computer and send information regarding the status of the operation. Communications are done in the serial protocol RS-232 through fibre optics. Java software, with an intuitive graphical user interface, for controlling and monitoring of the subsystem was developed and installed in a hub computer. In order to allow operators to perform these tasks remotely besides locally, this was integrated in the FireSignal system. Taking advantage of FireSignal features, it was possible to provide the users with, not only the same functionalities of the local application but also a similar user interface. An independent FireSignal Java Node bridges the central server and the control application. This design makes possible to easily reuse the Node for other subsystems or integrate the vacuum slow control in the other CODAC systems. The complete system, with local and remote control, has been installed successfully on COMPASS and has been in operation since April this year.

  4. FireSignal Application Node for Subsystem Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, A.; Santos, B.; Pereira, T.; Carvalho, B.; Fernandes, H. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Cahyna, P.; Pisacka, J.; Hron, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-01

    Modern fusion experiments require the presence of several sub-systems, responsible for the different parameters involved in the operation of the machine. With the migration from the pre-programmed to the real-time control paradigm, their integration in Control, Data Acquisition, and Communication (CODAC) systems became an important issue, as this implies not only the connection to a main central coordination system, but also communications with related diagnostics and actuators. A sub-system for the control and operation of the vacuum, gas injection and baking was developed and installed in the COMPASS tokamak. These tasks are performed by 'dsPIC' micro-controllers that receive commands from a computer and send information regarding the status of the operation. Communications are done in the serial protocol RS-232 through fibre optics at speeds up to 1 Mbaud. A Java software, with an intuitive graphical user interface, for controlling and monitoring the sub-system was developed and installed in a hub computer. In order to allow operators to perform these tasks remotely besides locally, this was integrated in the FireSignal system. Taking advantage of FireSignal features, it was possible to provide the users with, not only the same functionalities of the local application but also a similar user interface. An independent FireSignal Java node bridges the central server and the control application. This design makes possible to easily reuse the node for other subsystems or integrate the vacuum slow control in the other CODAC systems. This document is composed of an abstract and a poster. (authors)

  5. DFB laser array driver circuit controlled by adjustable signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weikang; Du, Yinchao; Guo, Yu; Li, Wei; Wang, Hao

    2018-01-01

    In order to achieve the intelligent controlling of DFB laser array, this paper presents the design of an intelligence and high precision numerical controlling electric circuit. The system takes MCU and FPGA as the main control chip, with compact, high-efficiency, no impact, switching protection characteristics. The output of the DFB laser array can be determined by an external adjustable signal. The system transforms the analog control model into a digital control model, which improves the performance of the driver. The system can monitor the temperature and current of DFB laser array in real time. The output precision of the current can reach ± 0.1mA, which ensures the stable and reliable operation of the DFB laser array. Such a driver can benefit the flexible usage of the DFB laser array.

  6. Effects of various calcium antagonists in isolated perfused hearts from diabetic and age-matched control rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnis, J. B.; Mathy, M. J.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of several calcium antagonistic drugs on left ventricular contraction (isovolumetric) and coronary flow in isolated perfused hearts from streptozotocin diabetic rats compared to age-matched controls, thereby hoping to throw further light on the

  7. Solution combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate particles for controlled release of bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Junfeng, E-mail: daidai02304@163.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Zhao, Junjie; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Xiali; Zhou, Feifei; Zhang, Hong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Lu, Hongbin [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Chen, JianHua; Wang, XuHong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Yu, Wencong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China)

    2015-05-01

    Four different phase compositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) particles were prepared via a solution combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld analysis results revealed that the variations in the nominal Ca/P (molar) ratios were found to provide a favorable control in the different proportions of CaP materials. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behavior. The release profile indicated that the BSA release rates depended on the phase compositions of the CaP particles, and showed an order of TCP-BSA > BCP-1-BSA > BCP-2-BSA > HA-BSA. The results suggested that the BSA protein release rate can be controlled by varying the phase compositions of CaP carriers. Moreover, the release process involved two stages: firstly surface diffusion via ion exchange and secondly intraparticle diffusion. - Highlights: • Solution combustion method was an efficient way to produced CaP powders. • Ca/P (molar) ratios provided a favorable control in the different proportions of phase composition. • BSA release rate varied depending on the phase composition of the CaP particles. • Two kinetic models were chosen to simulate the release kinetics of the drugs from CaP carriers.

  8. Control of IsAHP in mouse hippocampus CA1 pyramidal neurons by RyR3-mediated calcium-induced calcium release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Vrede, van de; Fossier, P.; Baux, G.; Joëls, M.; Chameau, P.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    In several neuronal preparations, the ryanodine-sensitive calcium store was reported to participate in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization currents (IsAHP) involved in spike frequency adaptation. We show that calcium release from the ryanodine-sensitive calcium store is a major determinant

  9. Calcium-sensing receptors signal constitutive macropinocytosis and facilitate the uptake of NOD2 ligands in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Canton, Johnathan; Schlam, Daniel; Breuer, Christian; G?tschow, Michael; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis can be induced in several cell types by stimulation with growth factors. In selected cell types, notably macrophages and dendritic cells, macropinocytosis occurs constitutively, supporting the uptake of antigens for subsequent presentation. Despite their different mode of initiation and contrasting physiological roles, it is tacitly assumed that both types of macropinocytosis are mechanistically identical. We report that constitutive macropinocytosis is stringently calcium de...

  10. In situ probing calcium carbonate formation by combining fast controlled precipitation method and small-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yanjia; Horner, Olivier; Vallée, Philippe; Meneau, Florian; Alos-Ramos, Olga; Hui, Franck; Turmine, Mireille; Perrot, Hubert; Lédion, Jean

    2014-04-01

    The initial stage of calcium carbonate nucleation and growth, found usually in "natural" precipitation conditions, is still not well understood. The calcium carbonate formation for moderate supersaturation level could be achieved by an original method called the fast controlled precipitation (FCP) method. FCP was coupled with SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) measurements to get insight into the nucleation and growth mechanisms of calcium carbonate particles in Ca(HCO3)2 aqueous solutions. Two size distributions of particles were observed. The particle size evolutions of these two distributions were obtained by analyzing the SAXS data. A nice agreement was obtained between the total volume fractions of CaCO3 obtained by SAXS analysis and by pH-resistivity curve modeling (from FCP tests).

  11. Fiber optic signal collection system for primary flight control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Sandy L.

    1994-10-01

    The FOPMN is a fiber-optic signal collection system for primary flight control applications. An avionics bay protected electro-optic interface unit transmits light down fiber optic cable to an optical sensor housed in the harsh environment of a hydraulic actuator. The interface unit also receives the sensor's reflected pattern and calculates independent positions from the multiplexed signals. This paper discusses the FOPMN method for fiber-optically sensing and multiplexing two channels of position of a TEF actuator's main ram cylinder. Currently installed in NASA Dryden's SRA F/A-18, the FOPMN has accumulated approximately 15 hours of flight time. A performance comparison is made between the FOPMN positions and the flight control computer's feedback mechanism (the actuator LVDTs). Included is a discussion of some of the lessons learned as a result of testing the FOPMN in the lab and in flight. The FOPMN is well on its way to proving itself as a robust fiber optic system with the ability to multiplex numerous optical sensors for primary flight control. The success of the FOPMN leads to the second phase of the project--optical loop closure. Our goal for this phase is to have four FOPMN sensor channels on the main ram and/or the main control valve of the actuator to serve as the quad redundant feedback mechanism for flight control.

  12. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... Urine calcium level can help your provider: Decide on the best treatment for the most common type of kidney ...

  13. A mixed flow reactor method to synthesize amorphous calcium carbonate under controlled chemical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christina R; Rimstidt, J Donald; Dove, Patricia M

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a new procedure to synthesize amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) from well-characterized solutions that maintain a constant supersaturation. The method uses a mixed flow reactor to prepare ACC in significant quantities with consistent compositions. The experimental design utilizes a high-precision solution pump that enables the reactant solution to continuously flow through the reactor under constant mixing and allows the precipitation of ACC to reach steady state. As a proof of concept, we produced ACC with controlled Mg contents by regulating the Mg/Ca ratio of the input solution and the carbonate concentration and pH. Our findings show that the Mg/Ca ratio of the reactant solution is the primary control for the Mg content in ACC, as shown in previous studies, but ACC composition is further regulated by the carbonate concentration and pH of the reactant solution. The method offers promise for quantitative studies of ACC composition and properties and for investigating the role of this phase as a reactive precursor to biogenic minerals. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diffusion characteristics and controlled release of bacterial fertilizers from modified calcium alginate capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Wu, Jane-Yii; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2008-04-01

    An indigenous Cellulosimicrobium cellulans GS6 isolate able to solubilize insoluble phosphate complexes in soil is a potential bacterial fertilizer. Enclosure of the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB) in biodegradable capsules may protect the PSB cells inoculated into soil and, in the meantime, enable the control of cell release that confers long-term fertilizing effects. In this study, calcium alginate (CA) was used as the core matrix to encapsulate cells of C. cellulans GS6. The cell-liberating properties of the CA-based capsules were modified by blending with a variety of supplemental materials (SM), including chitin, cellulose, olive oil, and gelatin. The experimental results showed that the maximum cell-release percentage (MCR%) of the capsules decreased in the order of CA-cellulose>CA-olive oil>CA-chitin>CA-gelatin>CA. Furthermore, a mass transport model was developed to accurately describe the kinetics of cell release results for each capsule. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) of each capsule was also determined from the model simulation. We found that the estimated D(e) values are positively correlated to the release rate with rare exceptions. Lastly, as our results underscored the crucial roles that the type of capsules plays in the rate and amount of cell release, controlled release of the bacterial fertilizer (C. cellulans GS6 cells) may be achieved via the design of capsule materials.

  15. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano-Muñoz, Manuel; Schnee, Michael E; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Signal acquisition and analysis for cortical control of neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Stephen I Helms; Taylor, Dawn M

    2004-12-01

    Work in cortically controlled neuroprosthetic systems has concentrated on decoding natural behaviors from neural activity, with the idea that if the behavior could be fully decoded it could be duplicated using an artificial system. Initial estimates from this approach suggested that a high-fidelity signal comprised of many hundreds of neurons would be required to control a neuroprosthetic system successfully. However, recent studies are showing hints that these systems can be controlled effectively using only a few tens of neurons. Attempting to decode the pre-existing relationship between neural activity and natural behavior is not nearly as important as choosing a decoding scheme that can be more readily deployed and trained to generate the desired actions of the artificial system. These artificial systems need not resemble or behave similarly to any natural biological system. Effective matching of discrete and continuous neural command signals to appropriately configured device functions will enable effective control of both natural and abstract artificial systems using compatible thought processes.

  17. Does dietary calcium interact with dietary fiber against colorectal cancer? A case-control study in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galas, Aleksander; Augustyniak, Malgorzata; Sochacka-Tatara, Elzbieta

    2013-10-04

    An unfavorable trend of increasing rates of colorectal cancer has been observed across modern societies. In general, dietary factors are understood to be responsible for up to 70% of the disease's incidence, though there are still many inconsistencies regarding the impact of specific dietary items. Among the dietary minerals, calcium intake may play a crucial role in the prevention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of intake of higher levels of dietary calcium on the risk of developing of colorectal cancer, and to evaluate dose dependent effect and to investigate possible effect modification. A hospital based case-control study of 1556 patients (703 histologically confirmed colon and rectal incident cases and 853 hospital-based controls) was performed between 2000-2012 in Krakow, Poland. The 148-item semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire to assess dietary habits and level of nutrients intake was used. Data regarding possible covariates was also collected. After adjustment for age, gender, education, consumption of fruits, raw and cooked vegetables, fish, and alcohol, as well as for intake of fiber, vitamin C, dietary iron, lifetime recreational physical activity, BMI, smoking status, and taking mineral supplements, an increase in the consumption of calcium was associated with the decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98 for every 100 mg Ca/day increase). Subjects consumed >1000 mg/day showed 46% decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.83). The effect of dietary calcium was modified by dietary fiber (p for interaction =0.015). Finally, consistent decrease of colon cancer risk was observed across increasing levels of dietary calcium and fiber intake. These relationships were not proved for rectal cancer. The study confirmed the effect of high doses of dietary calcium against the risk of colon cancer development. This relationship was observed across different levels of dietary fiber, and the

  18. Does dietary calcium interact with dietary fiber against colorectal cancer? A case–control study in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background An unfavorable trend of increasing rates of colorectal cancer has been observed across modern societies. In general, dietary factors are understood to be responsible for up to 70% of the disease’s incidence, though there are still many inconsistencies regarding the impact of specific dietary items. Among the dietary minerals, calcium intake may play a crucial role in the prevention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of intake of higher levels of dietary calcium on the risk of developing of colorectal cancer, and to evaluate dose dependent effect and to investigate possible effect modification. Methods A hospital based case–control study of 1556 patients (703 histologically confirmed colon and rectal incident cases and 853 hospital-based controls) was performed between 2000–2012 in Krakow, Poland. The 148-item semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire to assess dietary habits and level of nutrients intake was used. Data regarding possible covariates was also collected. Results After adjustment for age, gender, education, consumption of fruits, raw and cooked vegetables, fish, and alcohol, as well as for intake of fiber, vitamin C, dietary iron, lifetime recreational physical activity, BMI, smoking status, and taking mineral supplements, an increase in the consumption of calcium was associated with the decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98 for every 100 mg Ca/day increase). Subjects consumed >1000 mg/day showed 46% decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.83). The effect of dietary calcium was modified by dietary fiber (p for interaction =0.015). Finally, consistent decrease of colon cancer risk was observed across increasing levels of dietary calcium and fiber intake. These relationships were not proved for rectal cancer. Conclusions The study confirmed the effect of high doses of dietary calcium against the risk of colon cancer development. This relationship was observed across

  19. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caarls, Lotte; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  20. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte eCaarls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  1. Controlled adsorption and release onto calcium phosphates materials and drug delivery applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroug A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive properties of synthetic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral were examined with respect to cisplatin and risedronate, two biological active drugs; the uptake and release experiments were carried out under various conditions in order to understand the basic mechanism of interaction. The effect of temperature and solution composition were highlighted and discussed. The adsorption results obtained for the therapeutic agents demonstrated that, depending on the conditions investigated (nature of the sorbent, concentration range, ionic composition, temperature…, the shape of the isotherms is of Freundlich or Langmuir type. The adsorption is described as an ion-exchange process in dilute solutions, while the interaction appears to be reactive for concentrated solutions (dissolution of mineral ions from the apatite substrate and formation of soluble calcium complex and/or precipitation of calcium salts involving sorbate molecules. The information gained on the surface reactivity of calcium phosphate were exploited to associate an antibiotic to calcium phosphate cements for drug delivery applications. The specimens were obtained by combination of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate powders upon mixing with water. The physicochemical properties of the paste were altered by the drug loading method (in the liquid or solid phase. Thus, a dose-dependent effect was noticed for the paste setting time, hardening and the release process.

  2. Queen pheromones in Temnothorax ants: control or honest signal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroiss Johannes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The division of reproductive labor among group members in insect societies is regulated by "queen pheromones". However, it remains controversial whether these are manipulative, i.e., actively suppress worker reproduction, or honestly signal the fertility status of the queen to which workers react in their own interest by refraining from laying eggs. Manipulative queen control is thought to lead to an evolutionary arms race between queens and workers, resulting in complex queen bouquets that diverge strongly among different populations and species. In contrast, honest signals would evolve more slowly and might therefore differ less strongly within and among species. Results We aimed at determining the tempo of the evolution of queen signals in two ways. First, we investigated whether queens of Temnothorax ants are capable of controlling egg laying by workers of their own, closely, and distantly related species. Second, we compared the species- and caste-specific patterns of cuticular hydrocarbons, which are assumed to convey information on reproductive status. In mixed-species colonies, queens were not able to fully suppress egg-laying and male production by workers of unrelated species, while workers did not reproduce under the influence of a queen from their own species. Furthermore, the chemical profiles differed more strongly among queens of different species than among the respective workers. Conclusions Our results suggest that cuticular hydrocarbons associated with fecundity are not fully conserved in evolution and evolve slightly faster than worker-specific components in the blend of cuticular hydrocarbons. While this higher rate of evolution might reflect an arms race between queens and workers, the observation that workers still respond to the presence of a queen from another species support the honest signal hypothesis. Future studies need to examine alternative explanations for a higher rate of evolution of queen

  3. Different calcium sources control somatic versus dendritic SK channel activation during action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott L; Stuart, Greg J

    2013-12-11

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability. While SK channels at the soma have long been known to contribute to the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP), recent evidence indicates they also regulate NMDA receptor activation in dendritic spines. Here we investigate the activation of SK channels in spines and dendrites of rat cortical pyramidal neurons during action potentials (APs), and compare this to SK channel activation at the soma. Using confocal calcium imaging, we demonstrate that the inhibition of SK channels with apamin results in a location-dependent increase in calcium influx into dendrites and spines during backpropagating APs (average increase, ~40%). This effect was occluded by block of R-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs), but not by inhibition of N- or P/Q-type VDCCs, or block of calcium release from intracellular stores. During these experiments, we noticed that the calcium indicator (Oregon Green BAPTA-1) blocked the mAHP. Subsequent experiments using low concentrations of EGTA (1 mm) produced the same result, suggesting that somatic SK channels are not tightly colocalized with their calcium source. Consistent with this idea, all known subtypes of VDCCs except R-type were calcium sources for the apamin-sensitive mAHP at the soma. We conclude that SK channels in spines and dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons regulate calcium influx during backpropagating APs in a distance-dependent manner, and are tightly coupled to R-type VDCCs. In contrast, SK channels activated by APs at the soma of these neurons are weakly coupled to a variety of VDCCs.

  4. PR3 and elastase alter PAR1 signaling and trigger vWF release via a calcium-independent mechanism from glomerular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Samantha P; Bevins, Anne; Kuravi, Sahithi Jyothsna; Satchell, Simon C; Al-Ani, Bahjat; Young, Stephen P; Harper, Lorraine; Williams, Julie M; Rainger, George Ed; Savage, Caroline O S

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil proteases, proteinase-3 (PR3) and elastase play key roles in glomerular endothelial cell (GEC) injury during glomerulonephritis. Endothelial protease-activated receptors (PARs) are potential serine protease targets in glomerulonephritis. We investigated whether PAR1/2 are required for alterations in GEC phenotype that are mediated by PR3 or elastase during active glomerulonephritis. Endothelial PARs were assessed by flow cytometry. Thrombin, trypsin and agonist peptides for PAR1 and PAR2, TFLLR-NH(2) and SLIGKV-NH(2,) respectively, were used to assess alterations in PAR activation induced by PR3 or elastase. Endothelial von Willebrand Factor (vWF)release and calcium signaling were used as PAR activation markers. Both PR3 and elastase induced endothelial vWF release, with elastase inducing the highest response. PAR1 peptide induced GEC vWF release to the same extent as PR3. However, knockdown of PARs by small interfering RNA showed that neither PAR1 nor PAR2 activation caused PR3 or elastase-mediated vWF release. Both proteases interacted with and disarmed surface GEC PAR1, but there was no detectable interaction with cellular PAR2. Neither protease induced a calcium response in GEC. Therefore, PAR signaling and serine protease-induced alterations in endothelial function modulate glomerular inflammation via parallel but independent pathways.

  5. PR3 and elastase alter PAR1 signaling and trigger vWF release via a calcium-independent mechanism from glomerular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha P Tull

    Full Text Available Neutrophil proteases, proteinase-3 (PR3 and elastase play key roles in glomerular endothelial cell (GEC injury during glomerulonephritis. Endothelial protease-activated receptors (PARs are potential serine protease targets in glomerulonephritis. We investigated whether PAR1/2 are required for alterations in GEC phenotype that are mediated by PR3 or elastase during active glomerulonephritis. Endothelial PARs were assessed by flow cytometry. Thrombin, trypsin and agonist peptides for PAR1 and PAR2, TFLLR-NH(2 and SLIGKV-NH(2, respectively, were used to assess alterations in PAR activation induced by PR3 or elastase. Endothelial von Willebrand Factor (vWFrelease and calcium signaling were used as PAR activation markers. Both PR3 and elastase induced endothelial vWF release, with elastase inducing the highest response. PAR1 peptide induced GEC vWF release to the same extent as PR3. However, knockdown of PARs by small interfering RNA showed that neither PAR1 nor PAR2 activation caused PR3 or elastase-mediated vWF release. Both proteases interacted with and disarmed surface GEC PAR1, but there was no detectable interaction with cellular PAR2. Neither protease induced a calcium response in GEC. Therefore, PAR signaling and serine protease-induced alterations in endothelial function modulate glomerular inflammation via parallel but independent pathways.

  6. Sorcin Links Calcium Signaling to Vesicle Trafficking, Regulates Polo-Like Kinase 1 and Is Necessary for Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalioti, Vasiliki S.; Ilari, Andrea; O'Connell, David J.; Poser, Elena; Sandoval, Ignacio V.; Colotti, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Sorcin, a protein overexpressed in many multi-drug resistant cancers, dynamically localizes to distinct subcellular sites in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts during cell-cycle progression. During interphase sorcin is in the nucleus, in the plasma membrane, in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae, and in ER-derived vesicles localized along the microtubules. These vesicles are positive to RyR, SERCA, calreticulin and Rab10. At the beginning of mitosis, sorcin-containing vesicles associate with the mitotic spindle, and during telophase are concentrated in the cleavage furrow and, subsequently, in the midbody. Sorcin regulates dimensions and calcium load of the ER vesicles by inhibiting RYR and activating SERCA. Analysis of sorcin interactome reveals calcium-dependent interactions with many proteins, including Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora A and Aurora B kinases. Sorcin interacts physically with PLK1, is phosphorylated by PLK1 and induces PLK1 autophosphorylation, thereby regulating kinase activity. Knockdown of sorcin results in major defects in mitosis and cytokinesis, increase in the number of rounded polynucleated cells, blockage of cell progression in G2/M, apoptosis and cell death. Sorcin regulates calcium homeostasis and is necessary for the activation of mitosis and cytokinesis. PMID:24427308

  7. Viability of Controlling Prosthetic Hand Utilizing Electroencephalograph (EEG) Dataset Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskon, Azizi; A/L Thanakodi, Suresh; Raihan Mazlan, Mohd; Mohd Haziq Azhar, Satria; Nooraya Mohd Tawil, Siti

    2016-11-01

    This project presents the development of an artificial hand controlled by Electroencephalograph (EEG) signal datasets for the prosthetic application. The EEG signal datasets were used as to improvise the way to control the prosthetic hand compared to the Electromyograph (EMG). The EMG has disadvantages to a person, who has not used the muscle for a long time and also to person with degenerative issues due to age factor. Thus, the EEG datasets found to be an alternative for EMG. The datasets used in this work were taken from Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Project. The datasets were already classified for open, close and combined movement operations. It served the purpose as an input to control the prosthetic hand by using an Interface system between Microsoft Visual Studio and Arduino. The obtained results reveal the prosthetic hand to be more efficient and faster in response to the EEG datasets with an additional LiPo (Lithium Polymer) battery attached to the prosthetic. Some limitations were also identified in terms of the hand movements, weight of the prosthetic, and the suggestions to improve were concluded in this paper. Overall, the objective of this paper were achieved when the prosthetic hand found to be feasible in operation utilizing the EEG datasets.

  8. Control of postharvest decay on cherry tomatoes by marine yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum and calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Ren, X; Song, X; Yu, T; Lu, H; Wang, P; Wang, J; Zheng, X D

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the potential of calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) application to improve the efficacy of the marine antagonist Rhodosporidium paludigenum in controlling postharvest diseases of cherry tomatoes was assessed. CaCl(2) alone was found not to have any direct influence on the population growth of R. paludigenum in NYDB cultures or in cherry tomato wounds. However, the combined treatments with 1 x 10(8) cells ml(-1)R. paludigenum and CaCl(2) at the concentration from 0.5 to 2% showed high activities to reduce black rot caused by Alternaria alternata in cherry tomato wounds, significantly higher than those of R. paludigenum or CaCl(2) alone. Meanwhile, 0.5% CaCl(2) in combination with 1 x 10(8) cells ml(-1)R. paludigenum greatly inhibited the natural decay of cherry tomatoes in 21 days' storage at 25 degrees C. The combination of R. paludigenum and CaCl(2) enhances the inhibition of black rot and natural decay of postharvest cherry tomatoes. The results from this study provide a new way to improve the efficiency of R. paludigenum in maintaining the quality of postharvest fruits and vegetables. The marine yeast R. paludigenum combined with CaCl(2) has greatly potential use as an alternative to chemical fungicides in inhibiting postharvest decay on cherry tomatoes.

  9. Survival of pathogenic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and control with calcium oxide in frozen meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Eun Young; Ko, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated both the level of microbial contamination and the presence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in frozen meat products, followed by the evaluation of its survival over 180 days under frozen temperature. We also examined the effect of calcium oxide on the populations of EHEC, E. coli O157:H7 and EPEC under both 10 °C and -18 °C storage conditions. Afterward, the morphological changes occurring in EHEC cells in response to freezer storage temperature and calcium oxide (CaO) treatments were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Among the frozen meat products tested, the highest contamination levels of total aerobic counts, coliforms and E. coli were observed in pork cutlets. Examination showed that 20% of the frozen meat products contained virulence genes, including verotoxin (VT) 1 and 2. Over 180 days of frozen storage and after 3 freeze-thaw cycles, the population of EHEC did not change regardless of the type of products or initial inoculated concentration, indicating the strong survival ability of EHEC. Subsequent testing revealed that the growth of three pathogenic E. coli strains was completely inhibited in meat patties prepared with 1% CaO, stored at 10 °C. However, the addition of 2% CaO was necessary to control the survival of EHEC, E. coli O157:H7 and EPEC in meat patties stored at -18 °C. CaO reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 more effectively than the other EHEC and EPEC strains at both 10 °C and -18 °C. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that exposed EHEC cells were resistant to the freezer storage temperature, although some cells incurred injury and death after several freeze-thaw cycles. Most of the cells exposed to CaO were found to have died or lost their cellular integrity and membranes, indicating that CaO has the potential to be used as a powerful antimicrobial agent for manufacturing frozen meat products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New technology in digital signal controllers, study & applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Fonseca Beltrán

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the new technologies of digital signal controllers (DSC, is a general reference of the different companies making this type of device, in order that the reader has a general idea of the various products available market, highlighting thedifferences it with its predecessors, so as to identify in a clear and precise differences. This work was conceived in order to provide the user, a transition in the management of PIC ® microcontrollers general purpose, to the management of advanced microcontrollerssuch as the dsPIC., Same to be found from the use of general purpose, even those who have special features designed to more specialized applications.

  11. Plasma Membrane Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Calcium Channels Control Land Plant Thermal Sensing and Acquired Thermotolerance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrija Finka; America Farinia Henriquez Cuendet; Frans J.M. Maathuis; Younousse Saidi; Pierre Goloubinoff

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we found that the cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel (CNGC) CNGCb gene from Physcomitrella patens and its Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog CNGC2, encode a component of cyclic nucleotide gated Ca²...

  12. Calcium and vitamin D and risk of colorectal cancer: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuoyu; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Roebothan, Barbara; Cotterchio, Michelle; Green, Roger; Buehler, Sharon; Zhao, Jinhui; Squires, Josh; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Yun; Dicks, Elizabeth; Campbell, Peter T; Mclaughlin, John R; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2011-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have been suggestive but inconclusive in demonstrating inverse associations of calcium, vitamin D, dairy product intakes with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a large population-based comparison of such associations in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON). A case control study design was used. Colorectal cancer cases were new CRC patients aged 20-74 years. Controls were a sex and age-group matched random sample of the population in each province. 1760 cases and 2481 controls from NL and ON were analyzed. Information on dietary intake and lifestyle was collected using self-administered food frequency and personal history questionnaires. Controls reported higher mean daily intakes of total calcium and total vitamin D than cases in both provinces. In ON, significant reduced CRC risk was associated with intakes of total calcium (OR of highest vs. lowest quintiles was 0.57, 95% CI 0.42-0.77, p(trend) = 0.03), total vitamin D (OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-1.00), dietary calcium (OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.60-0.97), dietary vitamin D (OR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.99), total dairy products and milk (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.60-1.00), calcium-containing supplements use (OR = 0.76). In NL, the inverse associations of calcium, vitamin D with CRC risk were most pronounced among calcium- or vitamin D-containing supplement users (OR = 0.67, 0.68, respectively). Results of this study add to the evidence that total calcium, dietary calcium, total vitamin D, dietary vitamin D, calcium- or vitamin D-containing supplement use may reduce the risk of CRC. The inverse associations of CRC risk with intakes of total dairy products and milk may be largely due to calcium and vitamin D.

  13. Calcium's Role in Mechanotransduction during Muscle Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Benavides Damm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction is a process where cells sense their surroundings and convert the physical forces in their environment into an appropriate response. Calcium plays a crucial role in the translation of such forces to biochemical signals that control various biological processes fundamental in muscle development. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cells may for example result from stretch, electric and magnetic stimulation, shear stress, and altered gravity exposure. The response, mainly involving changes in intracellular calcium concentration then leads to a cascade of events by the activation of downstream signaling pathways. The key calcium-dependent pathways described here include the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. The subsequent effects in cellular homeostasis consist of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell cycle progression, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, all necessary for healthy muscle development, repair, and regeneration. A deregulation from the normal process due to disuse, trauma, or disease can result in a clinical condition such as muscle atrophy, which entails a significant loss of muscle mass. In order to develop therapies against such diseased states, we need to better understand the relevance of calcium signaling and the downstream responses to mechanical forces in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review is to discuss in detail how diverse mechanical stimuli cause changes in calcium homeostasis by affecting membrane channels and the intracellular stores, which in turn regulate multiple pathways that impart these effects and control the fate of muscle tissue.

  14. Carbon quantum dot tailored calcium alginate hydrogel for pH responsive controlled delivery of vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Niladri; Sahoo, Gyanaranjan; Das, Rashmita; Prusty, Gyanaranjan; Swain, Sarat K

    2017-11-15

    Herein, we demonstrate the preparation of highly luminescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) from Aloe vera leaf gel; in just 2h at 250°C through carbonization pathway. The prepared CQDs are structurally characterized with high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), hydrodynamic diameter, surface polarity, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The functional carbon nanoparticles are observed as non-cytotoxic materials. The biocompatibility, less cytotoxicity and high aqueous dispersibility of as-synthesized CQDs are motivated to design carbon quantum dot (CQD) tailored calcium alginate (CA) hydrogel films with an aim to controlled delivery of glycopeptides antibiotic vancomycin in the gastrointestinal tract (GI). With CQD, the drug loading capacity of CA/CQD film is increased to 89% from 38% (CA film), whereas; with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) the vancomycin uptake capacity is increased more, 96%. The release of vancomycin through CA/CQD film is more pronounced at pH1.5, close to the pH of the stomach and it is found that in pH1.5 with β-CD, the release rate of vancomycin is lowered, 56% in 120h. The high drug uptake capacity (96%) and lower release rate (56% in 120h) of CA/CQD hydrogel film in pH1.5 with β-CD can be used for its applicability as drug delivery vehicle for controlled release of vancomycin into the stomach region and therefore it can offer a potential option for oral administration of vancomycin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of EMG signals for controlling exoskeleton robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Christian; Wege, Andreas; Kondak, Konstantin; Hommel, Günter

    2006-12-01

    Exoskeleton robots are mechanical constructions attached to human body parts, containing actuators for influencing human motion. One important application area for exoskeletons is human motion support, for example, for disabled people, including rehabilitation training, and for force enhancement in healthy subjects. This paper surveys two exoskeleton systems developed in our laboratory. The first system is a lower-extremity exoskeleton with one actuated degree of freedom in the knee joint. This system was designed for motion support in disabled people. The second system is an exoskeleton for a human hand with 16 actuated joints, four for each finger. This hand exoskeleton will be used in rehabilitation training after hand surgeries. The application of EMG signals for motion control is presented. An overview of the design and control methods, and first experimental results for the leg exoskeleton are reported.

  16. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  17. Comparison of salivary calcium level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Kambalyal, Preeti; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Hungund, Shital

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare salivary calcium (Ca) level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: 56 subjects were included in the study and were grouped as follows: 12 subjects who were periodontally healthy (Group I), 12 subjects having chronic periodontitis who were non-smokers (Group II), 12 non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis (Group III), 12 smokers with chronic periodontit...

  18. Partially Defective Store Operated Calcium Entry and Hem(ITAM Signaling in Platelets of Serotonin Transporter Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Wolf

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamin, 5-HT is an indolamine platelet agonist, biochemically derived from tryptophan. 5-HT is secreted from the enterochromaffin cells into the gastrointestinal tract and blood. Blood 5-HT has been proposed to regulate hemostasis by acting as a vasoconstrictor and by triggering platelet signaling through 5-HT receptor 2A (5HTR2A. Although platelets do not synthetize 5-HT, they take 5-HT up from the blood and store it in their dense granules which are secreted upon platelet activation.To identify the molecular composite of the 5-HT uptake system in platelets and elucidate the role of platelet released 5-HT in thrombosis and ischemic stroke.5-HT transporter knockout mice (5Htt-/- were analyzed in different in vitro and in vivo assays and in a model of ischemic stroke.In 5Htt-/- platelets, 5-HT uptake from the blood was completely abolished and agonist-induced Ca2+ influx through store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE, integrin activation, degranulation and aggregation responses to glycoprotein VI (GPVI and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2 were reduced. These observed in vitro defects in 5Htt-/- platelets could be normalized by the addition of exogenous 5-HT. Moreover, reduced 5-HT levels in the plasma, an increased bleeding time and the formation of unstable thrombi were observed ex vivo under flow and in vivo in the abdominal aorta and carotid artery of 5Htt-/- mice. Surprisingly, in the transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO model of ischemic stroke 5Htt-/- mice showed nearly normal infarct volume and the neurological outcome was comparable to control mice.Although secreted platelet 5-HT does not appear to play a crucial role in the development of reperfusion injury after stroke, it is essential to amplify the second phase of platelet activation through SOCE and plays an important role in thrombus stabilization.

  19. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  20. Extra and intracellular calcium signaling pathway(s) differentially regulate histamine-induced myometrial contractions during early and mid-pregnancy stages in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Nakade, Udayraj P; Choudhury, Soumen; Yadav, Rajkumar Singh; Garg, Satish Kumar

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the differential role of calcium signaling pathway(s) in histamine-induced uterotonic action during early and mid-pregnancy stages in buffaloes. Compared to mid pregnancy, tonic contraction, amplitude and mean-integral tension were significantly increased by histamine to produce myometrial contraction during early pregnancy with small effects on phasic contraction and frequency. Although uterotonic action of histamine during both stages of pregnancy is sensitive to nifedipine (a L-type Ca2+ channels blocker) and NNC55-0396 (T-type Ca2+ channels blocker), the role of extracellular calcium seems to be more significant during mid-pregnancy as in this stage histamine produced only 9.38±0.96% contraction in Ca2+ free-RLS compared to 21.60±1.45% in uteri of early pregnancy stage. Intracellular calcium plays major role in histamine-induced myometrial contraction during early pregnancy as compared to mid pregnancy, as in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) Ca2+-free RLS, histamine produced significantly higher contraction in myometrial strips of early-pregancy in comparison to mid-pregnancy (10.59±1.58% and 3.13±0.46%, respectively). In the presence of U-73122, the DRC of histamine was significantly shifted towards right with decrease in maximal effect (Emax) only in early pregnancy suggesting the predominant role of phospholipase-C (PL-C) in this stage of pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound Enhances the Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocyte Through Activation of TrkB-Akt and Calcium-CaMK Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lai, Yi-Long; Chen, Bo-Lin; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2017-06-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation has been shown to increase the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in astrocytes of an in vitro model and rat brains of an in vivo model; however, their molecular mechanisms are still not well clarified. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of BDNF enhancement by LIPUS in rat cerebral cortex astrocytes. After LIPUS stimulation in astrocytes, the protein and mRNA expressions were measured by western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. The concentration of intracellular calcium was determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that LIPUS enhanced the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and Akt but had no effect on Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, LIPUS increased the intracellular concentration of calcium and enhanced the protein levels of calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK) II and CaMKIV. LIPUS also activated the phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 but did not promote the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Taken together, our results suggest that LIPUS stimulation upregulates BDNF production in astrocytes through the activation of NF-κB via the TrkB/PI3K/Akt and calcium/CaMK signaling pathways. BDNF has emerged as a major molecular player in the regulation of neural circuit development and function. Therefore, LIPUS stimulation may play a crucial and beneficial role in neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Microstructural control of modular peptide release from microporous biphasic calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Samantha J; Lee, Jae Sung; Murphy, William L; Tadier, Solène; Grémillard, Laurent; Lightcap, Ian V; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J

    2017-03-01

    Drug release from tissue scaffolds is commonly controlled by using coatings and carriers, as well as by varying the binding affinity of molecules being released. This paper considers modulating synthetic peptide incorporation and release through the use of interconnected microporosity in biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and identifies the microstructural characteristics important to the release using experiments and a model of relative diffusivity. First, the release of three modular peptides designed to include an osteocalcin-inspired binding sequence based on bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) was compared and one was selected for further study. Next, the incorporation and release of the peptide from four types of substrates were compared: non-microporous (NMP) substrates had no microporosity; microporous (MP) substrates were either 50% microporous with 5μm pores (50/5), 60% microporous with 5μm pores (60/5), or 50% microporous with 50μm pores (50/50). Results showed that MP substrates incorporated significantly more peptide than NMP ones, but that the three different microporous substrates all incorporated the same total amount of peptide. NMP had a markedly lower release rate compared to each of three of the MP samples, though the initial burst release was the highest. The initial release and the release rate for the 60/5 samples were different from the 50/50, though they were not statistically different from the 50/5. The model indicated that the pore interconnection to pore size ratio, affecting the constriction between pores, had the greatest influence on the calculated relative diffusivity. While the model was consistent with the trends observed experimentally, the quantitative experimental results suggested that to attain an appreciable difference in release characteristics, both pore size and pore fraction should be changed for this system. These results contribute to rational scaffold design by showing that microstructure, specifically microporosity

  3. Calcium-dependent protein kinase 21 phosphorylates 14-3-3 proteins in response to ABA signaling and salt stress in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixing; Zhou, Xiaojin; Chang, Shu; Chu, Zhilin; Wang, Hanmeng; Han, Shengcheng; Wang, Yingdian

    2017-12-02

    The calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are a class of plant-specific kinase that directly bind Ca2+ and mediate the calcium-signaling pathways to play important physiological roles in growth and development. The rice genome contains 31 CDPK genes, one of which, OsCPK21, is known to modulate the abscisic acid (ABA) and salt stress responses in this crop; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation are largely unknown. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening, glutathione S-transferase pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the interaction between OsCPK21 and one of its putative targets, Os14-3-3 (OsGF14e). We used an in vitro kinase assay and site-directed mutagenesis to verify that OsCPK21 phosphorylates OsGF14e at Tyr-138. We used real-time PCR to reveal that several ABA and salt inducible genes were more highly expressed in the OsCPK21-OE and OsGF14e WT-OE plants than in the mutant OsGF14e Y138A-OE and wild-type plants. These results suggest that OsCPK21 phosphorylates OsGF14e to facilitate the response to ABA and salt stress. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Research on proportional control system of prosthetic hand based on FMG signals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinhua; Yu, Hongliu; Li, Panpan; Zhao, Shengnan

    2013-02-01

    The control of prosthetic hand is always a focus in prosthesis research. For solving current problems of controlling signals of skin surface electrical signals, we applied force myography (FMG) signals in prosthetic control of this system. The control system based on FMG signals were designed, containing signal acquisition and pre-processing, prosthetic control, motor driving and so on. Two-freedom artificial hand with proportional control was proposed through acquiring two-channel FMG signals from the amputee stump. The proportional control of prosthetic hand was achieved according to the average of FMG amplitude. The results showed that the control system had a great potential to control artificial hand and to realize speed adjustment effectively. Besides, the Virtual instrument software LabVIEW is adopted to establish the FMG signal collection and calibration of experiment system.

  5. Decentralized Hierarchical Controller Design for Selective Damping of Inter Area Oscillations Using PMU Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Ashfaque Ahmed Hashmani; Mukhtiar Ahmed Mahar; Tariq Jameel Saifullah Khanzada

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the decentralized hierarchical PSS (Power System Stabilizer) controller design to achieve a better damping of specific inter-area oscillations. The two-level decentralized hierarchical structure consists of two PSS controllers. The first level controller is a local PSS controller for each generator to damp local mode in the area where controller is located. This controller uses only local signals as input signals. The local signal comes from the generator ...

  6. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P endocrine system were similar to the effects of chairing on the ground, but were more pronounced. Reduced intestinal calcium absorption, losses in body weight, increases in cortisol, and higher postflight blood urea nitrogen were the changes in flight monkeys that distinguished them from the flight simulation study animals.

  7. Aspirin, Calcitriol, and Calcium Do Not Prevent Adenoma Recurrence in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    , and calcium carbonate could prevent colorectal adenoma recurrence. METHODS: We included 1107 patients with 1 or more sporadic adenoma(s) removed from the colon or rectum at centers in Europe, Russia, or the United States, from 2004 through 2010. Inclusion criteria were 1 adenoma greater than 1 cm in diameter......, more than 1 adenoma of any size, or an adenoma of any size and first-degree relatives with colorectal cancer. Subjects were assigned randomly to groups given 0.5 μg calcitriol, 75 mg acetylsalicylic acid, and 1250 mg calcium carbonate (n = 209), or placebo (n = 218), each day for 3 years. The primary...... current smokers OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 0.70-4.09; P value interaction calcium carbonate did not prevent recurrence of colorectal adenomas over a 3-year period...

  8. Signalling and the control of skeletal muscle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Anthony [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom); Patel, Ketan, E-mail: ketan.patel@reading.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly adaptive to environmental stimuli and can alter its mass accordingly. This tissue is almost unique in that it can increase its size through two distinct mechanisms. It can grow through a cellular process mediated by cell fusion, or it can increase its size simply by increasing its protein content. Understanding how these processes are regulated is crucial for the development of potential therapies against debilitating skeletal muscle wasting diseases. Two key signalling molecules, Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF) and GDF-8/myostatin, have emerged in recent years to be potent regulators of skeletal muscle size. In this review we bring together recent data highlighting the important and novel aspects of both molecules and their signalling pathways, culminating in a discussion of the cellular and tissue phenotypic outcomes of their stimulation or antagonism. We emphasise the complex regulatory mechanisms and discuss the temporal and spatial differences that control their action, understanding of which is crucial to further their use as potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Microglia Control Neuronal Network Excitability via BDNF Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ferrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia-neuron interactions play a crucial role in several neurological disorders characterized by altered neural network excitability, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. While a series of potential messengers have been postulated as substrates of the communication between microglia and neurons, including cytokines, purines, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide, the specific links between messengers, microglia, neuronal networks, and diseases have remained elusive. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF released by microglia emerges as an exception in this riddle. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role played by microglial BDNF in controlling neuronal excitability by causing disinhibition. The efforts made by different laboratories during the last decade have collectively provided a robust mechanistic paradigm which elucidates the mechanisms involved in the synthesis and release of BDNF from microglia, the downstream TrkB-mediated signals in neurons, and the biophysical mechanism by which disinhibition occurs, via the downregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2, dysrupting Cl−homeostasis, and hence the strength of GABAA- and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition. The resulting altered network activity appears to explain several features of the associated pathologies. Targeting the molecular players involved in this canonical signaling pathway may lead to novel therapeutic approach for ameliorating a wide array of neural dysfunctions.

  10. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  11. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  12. Effects of Wenxin Keli on Cardiac Hypertrophy and Arrhythmia via Regulation of the Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyu; Chen, Yu; Li, Yanda; Ren, Xiaomeng

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL) on the Calcium/Calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMK II) signal transduction pathway with transverse aortic constriction (TAC) rats. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained 3 and 9 weeks after the surgery. Meanwhile, the action potentials (APDs) were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and western blotting was used to assess components of the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. At both 3 and 9 weeks after treatment, the fractional shortening (FS%) increased in the WXKL group compared with the TAC group. The APD90 of the TAC group was longer than that of the Sham group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment. Western blotting results showed that the protein expressions of CaMK II, phospholamban (PLB), and ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) were not statistically significant among the different groups at both treatment time points. However, WXKL treatment decreased the protein level and phosphorylation of CaMK II (Thr-286) and increased the protein level and phosphorylation of PLB (Thr-17) and the phosphorylation of RYR2 (Ser-2814). WXKL also decreased the accumulation of type III collagen fibers. In conclusion, WXKL may improve cardiac function and inhibit the arrhythmia by regulating the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. PMID:28573136

  13. Effects of Wenxin Keli on Cardiac Hypertrophy and Arrhythmia via Regulation of the Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL on the Calcium/Calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMK II signal transduction pathway with transverse aortic constriction (TAC rats. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained 3 and 9 weeks after the surgery. Meanwhile, the action potentials (APDs were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and western blotting was used to assess components of the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. At both 3 and 9 weeks after treatment, the fractional shortening (FS% increased in the WXKL group compared with the TAC group. The APD90 of the TAC group was longer than that of the Sham group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment. Western blotting results showed that the protein expressions of CaMK II, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2 were not statistically significant among the different groups at both treatment time points. However, WXKL treatment decreased the protein level and phosphorylation of CaMK II (Thr-286 and increased the protein level and phosphorylation of PLB (Thr-17 and the phosphorylation of RYR2 (Ser-2814. WXKL also decreased the accumulation of type III collagen fibers. In conclusion, WXKL may improve cardiac function and inhibit the arrhythmia by regulating the CaMK II signal transduction pathway.

  14. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P animals.

  15. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P parathyroid hormone did not reach significance. Calcitonin showed modest decreases postflight (P animals.

  16. A rendezvous with the queen of ion channels: Three decades of ion channel research by David T Yue and his Calcium Signals Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Ivy E; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Issa, John B; Ben-Johny, Manu; Adams, Paul J; Kang, Po Wei; Lee, Shin Rong; Sang, Lingjie; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer; Zhang, Manning; Bazazzi, Hojjat; Yue, Nancy C; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2016-01-01

    David T. Yue was a renowned biophysicist who dedicated his life to the study of Ca(2+) signaling in cells. In the wake of his passing, we are left not only with a feeling of great loss, but with a tremendous and impactful body of work contributed by a remarkable man. David's research spanned the spectrum from atomic structure to organ systems, with a quantitative rigor aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying biological function. Along the way he developed new tools and approaches, enabling not only his own research but that of his contemporaries and those who will come after him. While we cannot hope to replicate the eloquence and style we are accustomed to in David's writing, we nonetheless undertake a review of David's chosen field of study with a focus on many of his contributions to the calcium channel field.

  17. FireSignal application Node for subsystem control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duarte, A.S.; Santos, B.; Pereira, T.; Carvalho, B.B.; Fernandes, H.; Neto, A.; Janky, Filip; Cahyna, Pavel; Písačka, Jan; Hron, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 85, 3-4 (2010), s. 496-499 ISSN 0920-3796. [IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition and Remote Participation for Fusion Research/7th./. Aix – en – Provence, 15.06.2009-19.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Subsystems * CODAC * FireSignal * Java * Remote operation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.143, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V3C-4YYGPR8-4&_user=6542793&_coverDate=07%2F31%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000070123&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=6542793&md5=899631b6e2f4d05b21b04bde3cfb8e65&searchtype=a

  18. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-01-25

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress-responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input-dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal-processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal-processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with "programmable" signal-processing functions.

  19. Calcium signals regulated by NAADP and two-pore channels--their role in development, differentiation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrington, John; Lear, Pamela; Hachem, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    Ca(2+) signals regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Intracellular Ca(2+) stores can be mobilized in response to extracellular stimuli via a range of signal transduction mechanisms, often involving recruitment of diffusible second messenger molecules. The Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers InsP 3 and cADPR release Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum via InsP 3 and ryanodine receptors, respectively, while a third messenger, NAADP, releases Ca(2+) from acidic endosomes and lysosomes. Bidirectional communication between the ER and acidic organelles has functional relevance for endolysosomal function as well as for the generation of Ca(2+) signals. The two-pore channels (TPCs) are currently strong candidates for being key components of NAADP-regulated Ca(2+) channels. Ca(2+) signals have been shown to play important roles in embryonic development and cell differentiation; however, much remains to be established about the exact signalling mechanisms involved. Investigation of the role of NAADP and TPCs in development and differentiation is still at an early stage, but recent studies have suggested that they play important roles at key developmental stages in vivo and are important mediators of differentiation of neurons, skeletal muscle cells and osteoclasts in vitro. NAADP signals and TPCs have also been implicated in autophagy, an important process in differentiation. Moreover, potential links between TPC2 and cancer have been recently identified. Further studies will be required to identify the precise mechanisms of action of TPCs and their link with NAADP signalling, and to relate these to their roles in differentiation and other key developmental processes in the cell and organism.

  20. Intrinsically disordered and pliable Starmaker-like protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes) controls the formation of calcium carbonate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed.

  1. Controls of Polysaccharide Chemistry on the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Heterogeneous Calcium Carbonate Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffre, A. J.; Han, N.; Dove, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Polysaccharide fibrils control the orientation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) biominerals. Good examples are found in the multilayered extracellular mucilaginous sheath of green algae and cyanobacteria and in specialized vesicles inside coccolithophorids. More complex organisms such as arthropods and mollusks form biomineralized exoskeletons and shells that consist of insoluble polysaccharides and soluble acid-rich proteins. In these structures, CaCO3 mineral orientation occurs along fibers of the polysaccharide chitin. This raises the question of whether polysaccharide chemistry has specific roles in directing biomineralization. The last three decades of research show that acidic proteins influence CaCO3 polymorph selection, crystallographic orientation, and nucleation and growth rates but little is known about the function of polysaccharides. In fact, polysaccharides are long considered an inert component of organic frameworks. In this experimental investigation, we test the hypothesis that polysaccharides have chemistry-specific influences on calcification by measuring the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto three types of polysaccharide films under controlled solution compositions. Characterized polysaccharides of simple repeating monomer sequences were chosen as model compounds to represent the major carbohydrates seen in microbial and calcifying environments: 1) alginic acid with carboxyl groups, 2) hyaluronic acid with alternating carboxyl and acetylamine groups, and 3) chitosan with amine and acetylamine groups. Biosubstrates were prepared by electrodeposition of these compounds as thin gel-like films onto gold-coated silicon wafers. Using a flow-through cell, heterogeneous nucleation rates of calcite were measured for a suite of supersaturation conditions. These rate data were compared to similar measurements for carboxyl- and hydroxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Calcite nucleation rates onto the three polysaccharides vary by a factor of 400x

  2. Controlling surface microstructure of calcium phosphate ceramic from random to custom-design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Liao; Luo, Xiaoman; Barbieri, D.; Bao, Chongyun; Yuan, Huipin

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have long been studied as bone graft substitutes due to their similarity with the mineral constitute of bone and teeth, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. Chemical composition, macrostructure and surface microstructure are believed to be important for the bone

  3. Viral infection controlled by a calcium-dependent lipid-binding module in ALIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Christin; Lenoir, Marc; Velluz, Marie-Claire; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael; Gruenberg, Jean

    2013-05-28

    ALIX plays a role in nucleocapsid release during viral infection, as does lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that LBPA is recognized within an exposed site in ALIX Bro1 domain predicted by MODA, an algorithm for discovering membrane-docking areas in proteins. LBPA interactions revealed a strict requirement for a structural calcium tightly bound near the lipid interaction site. Unlike other calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins, the all-helical triangle-shaped fold of the Bro1 domain confers selectivity for LBPA via a pair of hydrophobic residues in a flexible loop, which undergoes a conformational change upon membrane association. Both LBPA and calcium binding are necessary for endosome association and virus infection, as are ALIX ESCRT binding and dimerization capacity. We conclude that LBPA recruits ALIX onto late endosomes via the calcium-bound Bro1 domain, triggering a conformational change in ALIX to mediate the delivery of viral nucleocapsids to the cytosol during infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. on the electronic signal direction indicator for the control of road traffic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-02-14

    Feb 14, 2006 ... An electronic signal direction indicator (ESDI) for the control of road traffic has been designed, constructed and ... voltage (signal) level or a low voltage level. That is, it will either be set or reset, and the state of the output can be changed with proper input signals. ..... Belts, J. (1970): Signal Processing and.

  5. Amorphous calcium carbonate controls avian eggshell mineralization: A new paradigm for understanding rapid eggshell calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Marie, Pauline; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T; Gautron, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Avian eggshell mineralization is the fastest biogenic calcification process known in nature. How this is achieved while producing a highly crystalline material composed of large calcite columnar single crystals remains largely unknown. Here we report that eggshell mineral originates from the accumulation of flat disk-shaped amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles on specific organic sites on the eggshell membrane, which are rich in proteins and sulfated proteoglycans. These structures known as mammillary cores promote the nucleation and stabilization of a amorphous calcium carbonate with calcitic short range order which predetermine the calcite composition of the mature eggshell. The amorphous nature of the precursor phase was confirmed by the diffuse scattering of X-rays and electrons. The nascent calcitic short-range order of this transient mineral phase was revealed by infrared spectroscopy and HRTEM. The ACC mineral deposited around the mammillary core sites progressively transforms directly into calcite crystals without the occurrence of any intermediate phase. Ionic speciation data suggest that the uterine fluid is equilibrated with amorphous calcium carbonate, throughout the duration of eggshell mineralization process, supporting that this mineral phase is constantly forming at the shell mineralization front. On the other hand, the transient amorphous calcium carbonate mineral deposits, as well as the calcite crystals into which they are converted, form by the ordered aggregation of nanoparticles that support the rapid mineralization of the eggshell. The results of this study alter our current understanding of avian eggshell calcification and provide new insights into the genesis and formation of calcium carbonate biominerals in vertebrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcium-calmodulin signalling is involved in light-induced acidification by epidermal leaf cells of pea, Pisum sativum L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    1997-01-01

    Pathways of signal transduction of red and blue light-dependent acidification by leaf epidermal cells were studied using epidermal strips of the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum. In these preparations the contribution of guard cells to the acidification is minimal. The hydroxypyridine nifedipine, a

  7. MCUR1-mediated mitochondrial calcium signaling facilitates cell survival of hepatocellular carcinoma via ROS-dependent P53 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jinliang; Ren, Tingting; Wang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hui; Yuan, Peng; Zhu, Jianjun; Wu, Yousheng; Huang, Qichao; Guo, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Ji, Lele; Li, Jibin; Zhang, Hongxin; Yang, Hushan

    2017-09-22

    Levels of the Mitochondrial Calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) increases during development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis is remodeled and its functional roles remains limited in cancers, especially in HCC. MCUR1 was frequently upregulated in HCC cells to enhance the Ca2+ uptake into mitochondria in a MCU-dependent manner, which significantly facilitated cell survival by promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting mitochondria-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and thus contributed to poor prognosis of HCC patients. In vivo assay confirmed these results, indicating that forced expression of MCUR1 significantly increased the fraction of Ki67-positive cells and reduced the positive TUNEL staining in xenograft tumors, while decreased MCUR1 expression was associated with impaired growth capacity of HCC cells in nude mice. The survival advantage conferred by MCUR1-mediated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was majorly caused by elevated mitochondrial ROS production and subsequent AKT/MDM2- mediated P53 degradation, which regulated the expression of apoptosis-related molecules BAX and BCL-2 and cell cycle-related molecules P21, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E. Treatment with mitochondrial Ca2+-buffering protein parvalbumin significantly suppressed the growth of HCC cells. Conclusions & Innovation: Our study provides evidence supporting a possible tumor-promoting role for MCUR1-mediated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and uncovers a mechanism that links remodeling of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis to cancer cell survival, which suggests a potential novel therapeutic target for HCC.

  8. Calcium intakes in individuals on diets for the management of cows' milk allergy: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, M; Gibney, M J

    1993-09-01

    Three hundred and twenty-three individuals with self-reported food allergy were recruited by media advertisements. Questionnaire information was collected on all respondents. Chocolate (57%), milk (47%), wheat (36%) and food additives (35%) were the most frequently implicated foods. The most frequently reported symptoms were itching (43%), skin rash (43%) and tiredness (43%). Food avoidance was the most common form of food allergy diagnosis (33%) with only 8% of respondents reporting food challenge in food allergy diagnosis. Self-diagnosis was reported by 34% of respondents with 29% and 24% reporting diagnosis by a general practitioner or a homeopath, respectively. Twenty-four per cent of respondents 'always' avoided and a further 57% 'nearly always' avoided the implicated food(s). A group of 38 adults with self-reported 'milk allergy' was selected for further study. Dietary assessments, using the dietary history method, were carried out on this subgroup and on age-, sex- and occupation-matched controls. The results of the dietary assessments revealed that the 'milk allergy' group had significantly higher intakes of fibre, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron and folic acid (P allergy' group took calcium-containing supplements. Even after calcium supplementation, the mean calcium intake of those who completely avoided milk was unacceptably low (441 mg/d).

  9. Comparison of salivary calcium level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambalyal, Preeti; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Hungund, Shital

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare salivary calcium (Ca) level in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and healthy controls. 56 subjects were included in the study and were grouped as follows: 12 subjects who were periodontally healthy (Group I), 12 subjects having chronic periodontitis who were non-smokers (Group II), 12 non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis (Group III), 12 smokers with chronic periodontitis (Group IV), and 8 smokers with aggressive periodontitis (Group V). Clinical measurements and non-stimulated whole saliva samples were obtained and analyzed for Ca levels by ion-selective electrolyte analyzer. When salivary Ca values were compared between the groups, they showed statistically significant values (P periodontitis and smokers with aggressive periodontitis, respectively, than in other groups. Between groups II and III also, the mean salivary Ca level was statistically significant (P periodontitis than in non-smokers having aggressive periodontitis. The present study showed that smokers having chronic periodontitis as well as smokers having aggressive periodontitis have higher salivary calcium levels. Also, patients with aggressive periodontitis were found to have lesser salivary calcium level than chronic periodontitis patients by ion-selective electrolyte analyzer.

  10. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Maltsev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s. Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs quickly decays to resting Ca levels (<100 nM at high Pup, but remained elevated during slower decay at low Pup. Release propagation is facilitated at higher Pup by a larger LCR amplitude, whereas at low Pup by higher background Ca. While at low Pup LCRs show smaller amplitudes, their larger durations and sizes combined with longer transient decay stabilize integrals of diastolic Ca and NCX current signals. Thus, the local interplay of SR Ca pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  11. Protein kinase A signaling and calcium ions are major players in PAF mediated toxicity against Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Ulrike; Benčina, Mojca; Fizil, Ádám; Batta, Gyula; Chhillar, Anil K; Marx, Florentine

    2015-05-08

    The Penicillium chrysogenum antifungal protein PAF is toxic against potentially pathogenic Ascomycetes. We used the highly sensitive aequorin-expressing model Aspergillus niger to identify a defined change in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) dynamics in response to PAF. This Ca(2+) signature depended on an intact positively charged lysine-rich PAF motif. By combining Ca(2+) measurements in A. niger mutants with deregulated cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, we proved the interconnection of Ca(2+) perturbation and cAMP/PKA signaling in the mechanistic function of PAF. A deep understanding of the mode of action of PAF is an invaluable prerequisite for its future application as new antifungal drug. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcium Supplement Derived from Gallus gallus domesticus Promotes BMP-2/RUNX2/SMAD5 and Suppresses TRAP/RANK Expression through MAPK Signaling Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seok Yoo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effects of a calcium (Ca supplement derived from Gallus gallus domesticus (GD on breaking force, microarchitecture, osteogenic differentiation and osteoclast differentiation factor expression in vivo in Ca-deficient ovariectomized (OVX rats. One percent of Ca supplement significantly improved Ca content and bone strength of the tibia. In micro-computed tomography analysis, 1% Ca supplement attenuated OVX- and low Ca-associated changes in bone mineral density, trabecular thickness, spacing and number. Moreover, 1% Ca-supplemented diet increased the expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2, Wnt3a, small mothers against decapentaplegic 1/5/8, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteocalcin and collagenase-1, while it decreased the expression of osteoclast differentiation genes, such as thrombospondin-related anonymous protein, cathepsin K and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B. Furthermore, 1% Ca-supplemented diet increased the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. The increased expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling were associated with significant increases in trabecular bone volume, which plays an important role in the overall skeletal strength. Our results demonstrated that 1% Ca supplement inhibited osteoclastogenesis, stimulated osteoblastogenesis and restored bone loss in OVX rats.

  13. Binding of alphaherpesvirus glycoprotein H to surface α4β1-integrins activates calcium-signaling pathways and induces phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Walid; Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular signaling connected to integrin activation is known to induce cytoplasmic Ca(2+) release, which in turn mediates a number of downstream signals. The cellular entry pathways of two closely related alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), are differentially regulated with respect to the requirement of interaction of glycoprotein H (gH) with α4β1-integrins. We show here that binding of EHV-1, but not EHV-4, to target cells resulted in a rapid and significant increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 gH (gH4) in lieu of authentic gH1 failed to induce Ca(2+) release, while EHV-4 with gH1 triggered significant Ca(2+) release. Blocking the interaction between gH1 and α4β1-integrins, inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) activation, or blocking binding of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to its receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) abrogated Ca(2+) release. Interestingly, phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the plasma membrane in response to cytosolic calcium increase after EHV-1 binding through a scramblase-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of both Ca(2+) release from the ER and scramblase activation blocked PS scrambling and redirected virus entry to the endocytic pathway, indicating that PS may play a role in facilitating virus entry directly at the plasma membrane. Herpesviruses are a large family of enveloped viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, causing a variety of diseases. These viruses have developed a number of strategies for successful entry into different cell types. We and others have shown that alphaherpesviruses, including EHV-1 and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), can route their entry pathway and do so by manipulation of cell signaling cascades to ensure viral genome delivery to nuclei. We show here that the interaction between EHV-1 gH and cellular α4β1-integrins is necessary to induce emptying of ER calcium stores, which induces phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane

  14. Comparison of Physicochemical Properties of Nano- and Microsized Crystals in the Urine of Calcium Oxalate Stone Patients and Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the properties of different sizes of urinary crystallites between calcium oxalate (CaOx calculi patients and healthy controls. Methods. We studied the average particle size, size distribution, intensity-autocorrelation curve, zeta potential (ζ, conductivity, mobility, aggregation state, and stability of different sizes of urinary crystallites by nanoparticle size analysis and transmission electron microscopy after filtration through a microporous membrane with an aperture size from 0.22 μm to 0.45, 1.2, 3, and 10 μm. Results. The urinary crystallites of the CaOx calculi patients were uneven and much easy to aggregate than those of controls. The number of large-sized crystallites of the patients was significantly more than that of the controls. The main components of the nanosized urinary crystallites in patients were CaOx monohydrate (COM, uric acid, and β-calcium phosphate, and these components were basically similar to those of the microsized urinary crystallites. The urinary crystallites of the calculi patients were easier to aggregate than that of the controls, and the small-sized urinary crystallites were much easier to agglomerate. Conclusions. The urinary system of CaOx calculi patients is unstable and highly susceptible to urinary crystallite aggregation. The rapid aggregation of urinary crystallites may be the key factor affecting urolithiasis formation.

  15. ER-mitochondria contacts: Actin dynamics at the ER control mitochondrial fission via calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Janos; Koehler, Carla M

    2018-01-02

    The formin-like protein INF2 is an important player in the polymerization of actin filaments. In this issue, Chakrabarti et al. (2018. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201709111) demonstrate that INF2 mediates actin polymerization at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in increased ER-mitochondria contacts, calcium uptake by mitochondria, and mitochondrial division. © 2018 Steffen and Koehler.

  16. Linear signal noise summer accurately determines and controls S/N ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Linear signal noise summer precisely controls the relative power levels of signal and noise, and mixes them linearly in accurately known ratios. The S/N ratio accuracy and stability are greatly improved by this technique and are attained simultaneously.

  17. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyungjun [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi-Ryoung, E-mail: msong@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Bioimaging Research Center and Cell Dynamics Research Center, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-07

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  18. Intestinal glucose-induced calcium-calmodulin kinase signaling in the gut-brain axis in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, K M; Sharp, J W; Raybould, H E

    2011-07-01

    Lumenal glucose initiates changes in gastrointestinal (GI) function, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine secretion, and intestinal fluid secretion. Glucose stimulates the release of GI hormones and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and activates intrinsic and extrinsic neuronal pathways to initiate changes in GI function. The precise mechanisms involved in luminal glucose-sensing are not clear; studying gut endocrine cells is difficult due to their sparse and irregular localization within the epithelium. Here we show a technique to determine activation of gut epithelial cells and the gut-brain pathway in vivo in rats using immunohistochemical detection of the activated, phosphorylated, form of calcium-calmodulin kinase II (pCaMKII). Perfusion of the gut with glucose (60 mg) increased pCaMKII immunoreactivity in 5-HT-expressing enterochromaffin (EC) cells, cytokeratin-18 immunopositive brush cells, but not in enterocytes or cholecystokinin-expressing cells. Lumenal glucose increased pCaMKII in neurons in the myenteric plexus and nodose ganglion, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the arcuate nucleus. pCaMKII expression in neurons, but not in EC cells, was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the 5-HT(3) R antagonist ondansetron. Deoxynojirimycin, a selective agonist for the putative glucose sensor, sodium-glucose cotransporter-3 (SGLT-3), mimicked the effects of glucose with increased pCaMKII in ECs and neurons; galactose had no effect. The data suggest that native EC cells in situ respond to glucose, possibly via SGLT-3, to activate intrinsic and extrinsic neurons and thereby regulate GI function. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Ryanodine-, IP3- and NAADP-dependent calcium stores control acetylcholine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameau, P; Van de Vrede, Y; Fossier, P; Baux, G

    2001-11-01

    Injections of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) into the presynaptic neurone of an identified cholinergic synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica increased the amplitude of the inhibitory postsynaptic current evoked by a presynaptic action potential. This suggests that Ca2+ release from various Ca2+ stores can modulate acetylcholine (ACh) release. Specific blockade of the calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) mechanism with ryanodine, or of IP3-induced calcium release with heparin, abolished the effects of IP3, but not the effects of NAADP, suggesting the presence of an intracellular Ca2+ pool independent of those containing ryanodine receptors (RyR) or IP3 receptors. To reinforce electrophysiological observations, intracellular [Ca2+]i changes were measured using the fluorescent dye rhod-2. Injections of cyclic ADP-ribose (an activator of RyR), IP3 or NAADP into the presynaptic neurone induced transient increases in the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration. RyR- and IP3-induced increases were prevented by application of respective selective antagonists but not NAADP-induced increases. Our results show that RyR-dependent, IP3-dependent, and NAADP-dependent Ca2+ stores are present in the same presynaptic terminal but are differently involved in the regulation of the presynaptic Ca2+ concentration that triggers transmitter release.

  20. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander V; Maltsev, Victor A; Stern, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs) from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX) during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations) that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup) that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s). Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs) quickly decays to resting Ca levels (pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  1. Differential phosphorylation signals control endocytosis of GPR15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yukari; Shikano, Sojin

    2017-08-15

    GPR15 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that serves for an HIV coreceptor and was also recently found as a novel homing receptor for T-cells implicated in colitis. We show that GPR15 undergoes a constitutive endocytosis in the absence of ligand. The endocytosis was clathrin dependent and partially dependent on β-arrestin in HEK293 cells, and nearly half of the internalized GPR15 receptors were recycled to the plasma membrane. An Ala mutation of the distal C-terminal Arg-354 or Ser-357, which forms a consensus phosphorylation site for basophilic kinases, markedly reduced the endocytosis, whereas phosphomimetic mutation of Ser-357 to Asp did not. Ser-357 was phosphorylated in vitro by multiple kinases, including PKA and PKC, and pharmacological activation of these kinases enhanced both phosphorylation of Ser-357 and endocytosis of GPR15. These results suggested that Ser-357 phosphorylation critically controls the ligand-independent endocytosis of GPR15. The functional role of Ser-357 in endocytosis was distinct from that of a conserved Ser/Thr cluster in the more proximal C-terminus, which was responsible for the β-arrestin- and GPCR kinase-dependent endocytosis of GPR15. Thus phosphorylation signals may differentially control cell surface density of GPR15 through endocytosis. © 2017 Okamoto and Shikano. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Understanding CRY2 interactions for optical control of intracellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Liting; Hope, Jen; Ong, Qunxiang; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Kim, Namdoo; McCarthy, Comfrey; Acero, Victor; Lin, Michael Z; Cui, Bianxiao

    2017-09-15

    Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) can simultaneously undergo light-dependent CRY2-CRY2 homo-oligomerization and CRY2-CIB1 hetero-dimerization, both of which have been widely used to optically control intracellular processes. Applications using CRY2-CIB1 interaction desire minimal CRY2 homo-oligomerization to avoid unintended complications, while those utilizing CRY2-CRY2 interaction prefer robust homo-oligomerization. However, selecting the type of CRY2 interaction has not been possible as the molecular mechanisms underlying CRY2 interactions are unknown. Here we report CRY2-CIB1 and CRY2-CRY2 interactions are governed by well-separated protein interfaces at the two termini of CRY2. N-terminal charges are critical for CRY2-CIB1 interaction. Moreover, two C-terminal charges impact CRY2 homo-oligomerization, with positive charges facilitating oligomerization and negative charges inhibiting it. By engineering C-terminal charges, we develop CRY2high and CRY2low with elevated or suppressed oligomerization respectively, which we use to tune the levels of Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced CRY2 interactions and enhance the controllability of CRY2-based optogenetic systems.Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) can form light-regulated CRY2-CRY2 homo-oligomers or CRY2-CIB1 hetero-dimers, but modulating these interactions is difficult owing to the lack of interaction mechanism. Here the authors identify the interactions facilitating homo-oligomers and introduce mutations to create low and high oligomerization versions.

  3. Identifying Driver Nodes in the Human Signaling Network Using Structural Controllability Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueming; Pan, Linqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling governs the basic cellular activities and coordinates the actions in cell. Abnormal regulations in cell signaling processing are responsible for many human diseases, such as diabetes and cancers. With the accumulation of massive data related to human cell signaling, it is feasible to obtain a human signaling network. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis to biological networks. In this work, we apply structural controllability to a human signaling network and detect driver nodes, providing a systematic analysis of the role of different proteins in controlling the human signaling network. We find that the proteins in the upstream of the signaling information flow and the low in-degree proteins play a crucial role in controlling the human signaling network. Interestingly, inputting different control signals on the regulators of the cancer-associated genes could cost less than controlling the cancer-associated genes directly in order to control the whole human signaling network in the sense that less drive nodes are needed. This research provides a fresh perspective for controlling the human cell signaling system.

  4. Rho is Required for the Initiation of Calcium Signaling and Phagocytosis by Fcγ Receptors in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackam, David J.; Rotstein, Ori D.; Schreiber, Alan; Zhang, Wei-jian; Grinstein, Sergio

    1997-01-01

    Phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and neutrophils is an essential component of host defense against infection. The mechanism whereby the interaction of opsonized particles with Fcγ receptors triggers the engulfment of opsonized particles remains incompletely understood, although activation of tyrosine kinases has been recognized as an early step. Recent studies in other systems have demonstrated that tyrosine kinases can in turn signal the activation of small GTPases of the ras superfamily. We therefore investigated the possible role of Rho in Fc receptor–mediated phagocytosis. To this end we microinjected J774 macrophages with C3 exotoxin from Clostridium botulinum, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates Rho. C3 exotoxin induced the retraction of filopodia, the disappearance of focal complexes, and a global decrease in the F-actin content of J774 cells. In addition, these cells exhibited increased spreading and the formation of vacuolar structures. Importantly, inactivation of Rho resulted in the complete abrogation of phagocytosis. Inhibition of Fcγ receptor–mediated phagocytosis by C3 exotoxin was confirmed in COS cells, which become phagocytic upon transfection of the FcγRIIA receptor. Rho was found to be essential for the accumulation of phosphotyrosine and of F-actin around phagocytic cups and for Fcγ receptor–mediated Ca2+ signaling. The clustering of receptors in response to opsonin, an essential step in Fcγ-induced signaling, was the earliest event shown to be inhibited by C3 exotoxin. The effect of the toxin was specific, since clustering and internalization of transferrin receptors were unaffected by microinjection of C3. These data identify a role for small GTPases in Fcγ receptor–mediated phagocytosis by leukocytes. PMID:9294149

  5. Polyamine regulates tolerance to water stress in leaves of white clover associated with antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes via involvement in calcium messenger system and hydrogen peroxide signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous polyamine (PA may play a critical role in tolerance to water stress in plants acting as a signaling molecule activator. Water stress caused increases in endogenous PA content in leaves, including putrescine (Put, spermidine (Spd, and spermine (Spm. Exogenous application of Spd could induce the instantaneous H2O2 burst and accumulation of cytosolic free Ca2+, and activate NADPH oxidase and CDPK gene expression in cells. To a great extent, PA biosynthetic inhibitor reduced the water stress-induced H2O2 accumulation, free cytosolic Ca2+ release, antioxidant enzyme activities and genes expression leading to aggravate water stress-induced oxidative damage, while these suppressing effects were alleviated by the addition of exogenous Spd, indicating PA was involved in water stress-induced H2O2 and cytosolic free Ca2+ production as well as stress tolerance. Dehydrin genes (Y2SK, Y2K, and SK2 were showed to be highly responsive to exogenous Spd. PA-induced antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes expression could be blocked by the scavenger of H2O2 and the inhibitors of H2O2 generation or Ca2+ channels blockers, a calmodulin antagonist, as well as the inhibitor of CDPK. These findings suggested that PA regulated tolerance to water stress in white clover associated with antioxidant defenses and dehydrins via involvement in the calcium messenger system and H2O2 signaling pathways. PA-induced H2O2 production required Ca2+ release, while PA-induced Ca2+ release was also essential for H2O2 production, suggesting an interaction between PA-induced H2O2 and Ca2+ signaling.

  6. Utilization of excitation signal harmonics for control of nonlinear systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Kasper; Rasmussen, Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2012-01-01

    signal together with Fourier analysis to generate a feedback signal and simulations have shown that different system gains and time constants does not change the global equilibrium/operating point. An evaporator in a refrigeration system was used as example in the simulations, however, it is anticipated...

  7. Bacterial Biofilm Control by Perturbation of Bacterial Signaling Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2017-01-01

    infections. A potential method for biofilm dismantling is chemical interception of regulatory processes that are specifically involved in the biofilm mode of life. In particular, bacterial cell to cell signaling called “Quorum Sensing” together with intracellular signaling by bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic...

  8. Vitamin D, PTH, and calcium and tumor aggressiveness in prostate cancer: a prospective nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändstedt, Johan; Almquist, Martin; Ulmert, David; Manjer, Jonas; Malm, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that low levels of vitamin D (25OHD) constitute a risk factor for more aggressive prostate cancer. We examined the relationship between pre-diagnostic serum levels of vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and calcium and risk of prostate cancer according to tumor aggressiveness. We performed a nested case-control study within the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study on 943 incident prostate cancer cases. Tumor aggressiveness was defined by Gleason score, TNM stage, and serum levels of total prostate-specific antigen. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for different quartiles of serum levels of 25OHD, PTH, and calcium, and for interactions between them. We found no significant association when comparing aggressive to non-aggressive disease regarding vitamin D, PTH, or calcium. There was a trend toward an increased risk in low-grade tumors, i.e., Gleason score ≤6, and a significant association regarding Gleason score 7 tumors with OR 1.70 (1.09-2.65) in the highest quartile of vitamin D. Stratifying the analysis yielded several significant findings demonstrating a nonspecific interaction between the metabolites. In men with PTH above median, the risk of aggressive prostate cancer was double in the highest vitamin D quartile, OR 2.01 (1.24-3.25), and for non-aggressive cancer 1.82 (1.25-2.66). There was an inverse effect on risk of prostate cancer in men with PTH above median and vitamin D ≤50 nmol/L, OR 0.25 (0.09-0.71) and calcium ≤2.37 mmol/L, OR 0.53 (0.34-0.82) for aggressive cancer. This study showed no significant association when comparing aggressive to non-aggressive disease. There was a possible relationship between vitamin D and low-risk tumors. There were both positive and negative interactions between PTH, calcium, and vitamin D and risk of prostate cancer. These results were similar for low-risk and aggressive cases.

  9. Medial nucleus tractus solitarius oxytocin receptor signaling and food intake control: the role of gastrointestinal satiation signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhi Yi; Alhadeff, Amber L; Grill, Harvey J

    2015-05-01

    Central oxytocin (OT) administration reduces food intake and its effects are mediated, in part, by hindbrain oxytocin receptor (OT-R) signaling. The neural substrate and mechanisms mediating the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain OT-R signaling are undefined. We examined the hypothesis that hindbrain OT-R-mediated feeding inhibition results from an interaction between medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS) OT-R signaling and the processing of gastrointestinal (GI) satiation signals by neurons of the mNTS. Here, we demonstrated that mNTS or fourth ventricle (4V) microinjections of OT in rats reduced chow intake in a dose-dependent manner. To examine whether the intake suppressive effects of mNTS OT-R signaling is mediated by GI signal processing, rats were injected with OT to the 4V (1 μg) or mNTS (0.3 μg), followed by self-ingestion of a nutrient preload, where either treatment was designed to be without effect on chow intake. Results showed that the combination of mNTS OT-R signaling and GI signaling processing by preload ingestion reduced chow intake significantly and to a greater extent than either stimulus alone. Using enzyme immunoassay, endogenous OT content in mNTS-enriched dorsal vagal complex (DVC) in response to ingestion of nutrient preload was measured. Results revealed that preload ingestion significantly elevated endogenous DVC OT content. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that mNTS neurons are a site of action for hindbrain OT-R signaling in food intake control and that the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain mNTS OT-R signaling are mediated by interactions with GI satiation signal processing by mNTS neurons. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Driving behavior and control in traffic system with two kinds of signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Hino, Yuki

    2014-06-01

    We study the vehicular traffic controlled by two kinds of signals which are positioned with a periodic configuration. We propose a microscopic model to explore the driving behavior in the traffic system with two kinds of signals. The control method of traffic flow by the combination of two kinds of signals is proposed. The dynamic model is described by the nonlinear map model and the CA model. The driving behavior is clarified for the traffic system controlled by two kinds of signals. The fundamental diagrams are derived for various combinations of two kinds of signals. The traffic flow through two kinds of signals is compared with that of a single kind of signals. The traffic flow displays the complex behavior different from the conventional traffic with a single kind of signals.

  11. Activation of astroglial calcium signaling by endogenous metabolites succinate and gamma-hydroxybutyrate in the nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tünde eMolnár

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that different energy metabolites play a role not only in neuronal but also in glial signalling. Recently, astroglial Ca2+ transients evoked by the major citric acid cycle metabolite succinate (SUC and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB that enters the citric acid cycle via SUC have been described in the brain reward area, the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Cells responding to SUC by Ca2+ transient constitute a subset of ATP-responsive astrocytes that are activated in a neuron-independent way. In this study we show that GHB-evoked Ca2+ transients were also found to constitute a subset of ATP-responsive astrocytes in the NAc. Repetitive Ca2+ dynamics evoked by GHB suggested that Ca2+ was released from internal stores. Similarly to SUC, the GHB-response was also characterized by an effective concentration of 50 µM. We observed that the number of ATP-responsive cells decreased with increasing concentration of either SUC or GHB. Moreover, the concentration dependence of the number of ATP-responsive cells were highly identical as a function of both [SUC] and [GHB], suggesting a mutual receptor for SUC and GHB, therefore implying the existence of a distinct GHB-recognizing astroglial SUC receptor in the brain. The SUC-evoked Ca2+ signal remained in mice lacking GABAB receptor type 1 subunit in the presence and absence of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist (2R-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, indicating action mechanisms independent of the GABAB or NMDA receptor subtypes. By molecular docking calculations we found that residues R99, H103, R252 and R281 of the binding crevice of the kidney SUC-responsive membrane receptor SUCNR1 (GPCR91 also predict interaction with GHB, further implying similar GHB and SUC action mechanisms. We conclude that the astroglial action of SUC and GHB may represent a link between brain energy states and Ca2+ signalling in astrocytic networks.

  12. Randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the lymphagogue effect and clinical efficacy of calcium dobesilate in chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flota-Cervera, Fernando; Flota-Ruiz, Cintia; Treviño, Carlos; Berber, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of calcium dobesilate on lymph flow and lymphovenous edema in patients with chronic venous disease. It was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. Patients received 1 capsule of 500 mg calcium dobesilate every 8 hours (1.5 g/day) or placebo by 49 days. By the end of the treatment period, only the patients treated with calcium dobesilate had normalization of lymphogammagraphy (capture index and speed of lymph flow; 80 and 78%, respectively). Only patients treated with calcium dobesilate had statistically significant reduction in the perimeter of leg, calf, and ankle. Twenty-two out of 25 (88%) calcium dobesilate-treated patients presented clinical improvement versus 5 out of 24 (20.8%) in the placebo group. One patient on calcium dobesilate developed rash and one patient on placebo complained of vomiting. In the present study, calcium dobesilate normalized lymph physiology and improved symptoms in patients with chronic venous disease.

  13. Effect of calcium dobesilate on occurrence of diabetic macular oedema (CALDIRET study): randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritoglou, Christos; Gerss, Joachim; Sauerland, Cristina; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael W

    2009-04-18

    Medical treatment for diabetic retinopathy could have an important role in prevention of complications such as visual loss. We aimed to assess the effect of calcium dobesilate on occurrence of diabetic macular oedema. We undertook a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study in 40 centres in 11 countries. We enrolled outpatients with adult-onset type 2 diabetes and mild-to-moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and randomly allocated them via sealed envelopes either calcium dobesilate (1500 mg per day) or placebo. The primary endpoint was development of clinically significant macular oedema (CSME) within a follow-up period of 5 years. Patients who dropped out of the study early were censored. Analysis was by intention to treat. We enrolled 635 patients. 324 were randomly allocated calcium dobesilate and 311 were assigned placebo. In the calcium dobesilate group, 86 patients developed CSME compared with 69 in the placebo group. Accounting for censored cases, estimated cumulative 5-year CSME probability was 35% and 28%, respectively (hazard ratio 1.32, 95% CI 0.96-1.81; p=0.0844). Adverse events did not differ between treatment groups (78 [24%] on calcium dobesilate and 90 [29%] with placebo). No relevant drug-related complications were noted. Nine patients (3%) died in the calcium dobesilate group and eight (3%) deaths were recorded on placebo. Calcium dobesilate did not reduce the risk of development of CSME.

  14. Induction of nitric oxide synthase mRNA by shear stress requires intracellular calcium and G-protein signals and is modulated by PI 3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, A M; Jiang, L; Lee, I; Sessa, W C; Izumo, S; Alper, S L

    1999-01-08

    We have investigated the signaling pathways by which shear stress induces accumulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Steady laminar fluid shear stress (20 dyn/cm2) induced a time-dependent increase in eNOS mRNA levels that did not require de novo protein synthesis and was in part transcriptional. Shear responsiveness was conferred on a luciferase reporter by a portion of the eNOS gene promoter encoding the 5'-flanking region between nt -1600 and -779. Shear-mediated induction of eNOS mRNA was abolished by chelation of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) with BAPTA-AM, and inhibited by blockade of calcium entry with SKF96535. In contrast, eNOS mRNA upregulation by shear was potentiated by thapsigargin-mediated depletion of Ca2+i stores. Pertussis toxin (PTX) inhibited both the shear-induced elevation in [Ca2+]i and the subsequent increase in eNOS mRNA, implicating a PTX-sensitive G-protein in both responses. Shear-induced upregulation of eNOS mRNA was unaffected by the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 and by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A, suggesting that neither calmodulin nor tyrosine kinases are required. However, eNOS mRNA upregulation was potentiated by the PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, suggesting that PI 3-kinase inhibits the shear response. Although microtubule integrity is required for the shear-induced regulation of endothelin-1 mRNA and the morphological and cytoskeletal responses to flow, neither microtubule dissolution with nocodazole nor microtubule stabilization with taxol altered shear-induced [Ca2+]i elevation or upregulation of eNOS mRNA. In conclusion, shear stress of BAEC increases eNOS transcriptional rate and upregulates eNOS mRNA levels by a process that requires calmodulin-independent [Ca2+]i signaling and a PTX-sensitive G-protein, is inhibited by PI 3-kinase, and is independent of microtubule integrity and tyrosine kinase activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract inhibits glutamate-induced cell death through inhibition of calcium signals and nitric oxide formation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myung-Jun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proanthocyanidin is a polyphenolic bioflavonoid with known antioxidant activity. Some flavonoids have a modulatory effect on [Ca2+]i. Although proanthocyanidin extract from blueberries reportedly affects Ca2+ buffering capacity, there are no reports on the effects of proanthocyanidin on glutamate-induced [Ca2+]i or cell death. In the present study, the effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity was investigated through calcium signals and nitric oxide (NO in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Results Pretreatment with GSPE (0.3-10 μg/ml for 5 min inhibited the [Ca2+]i increase normally induced by treatment with glutamate (100 μM for 1 min, in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with GSPE (6 μg/ml for 5 min significantly decreased the [Ca2+]i increase normally induced by two ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists, N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA. GSPE further decreased AMPA-induced response in the presence of 1 μM nimodipine. However, GSPE did not affect the 50 mM K+-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. GSPE significantly decreased the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (RS-3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, but it did not affect caffeine-induced response. GSPE (0.3-6 μg/ml significantly inhibited synaptically induced [Ca2+]i spikes by 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o. In addition, pretreatment with GSPE (6 μg/ml for 5 min inhibited 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o- and glutamate-induced formation of NO. Treatment with GSPE (6 μg/ml significantly inhibited 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o- and oxygen glucose deprivation-induced neuronal cell death. Conclusions All these data suggest that GSPE inhibits 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o- and oxygen glucose deprivation-induced neurotoxicity through inhibition of calcium signals and NO formation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  16. Selenium potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin against oxidative stress and calcium ion signaling-induced intracellular toxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: involvement of the TRPV1 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallı Çetin, Esin; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Çiğ, Bilal; Övey, İshak Suat; Aslan Koşar, Pınar

    2017-02-01

    In breast cancers, calcium signaling is a main cause of proliferation and apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Although previous studies have implicated the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel, the synergistic inhibition effects of selenium (Se) and cisplatin in cancer and the suppression of ongoing apoptosis have not yet been investigated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This study investigates the anticancer properties of Se through TRPV1 channel activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line cultures when given alone or in combination with cisplatin. The MCF-7 cells were divided into four groups: the control group, the Se-treated group (200 nM), the cisplatin-treated group (40 μM) and the Se + cisplatin-treated group. The intracellular free calcium ion concentration and current densities increased with TRPV1 channel activator capsaicin (0.01 mM), but they decreased with the TRPV1 blocker capsazepine (0.1 mM), Se, cisplatin, and Se + cisplatin incubations. However, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis, and the caspase 3, and caspase 9 values increased in the Se-treated group and the cisplatin-treated group, although Western blot (procaspase 3 and 9) results and the cell viability levels decreased with the Se and Se + cisplatin treatments. Apoptosis and caspase-3 were further increased with the Se + cisplatin treatment. Intracellular reactive oxygen species production increased with the cisplatin treatment, but not with the Se treatment. This study's results report, for the first time, that at a cellular level, Se and cisplatin interact on the same intracellular toxic cascade, and the combination of these two drugs can result in a remarkable anticancer effect through modulation of the TRPV1.

  17. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding "bystander" cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca(2+)-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy.

  18. Calcium Dependent FAK/CREB/TNNC1 Signaling Mediates the Effect of Stromal MFAP5 on Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cecilia S.; Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Yip, Kay-Pong; Pradeep, Sunila; Balasubramanian, Lavanya; Liu, Jinsong; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.; Birrer, Michael J.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in the United States, and advanced serous ovarian adenocarcinoma is responsible for most ovarian cancer deaths. However, the stroma-derived molecular determinants that modulate patient survival have yet to be characterized. Here we identify a stromal gene signature for advanced high-grade serous ovarian cancer using microdissected stromal ovarian tumor samples and find that stromal microfibrillar-associated protein 5 (MFAP5) is a prognostic marker for poor survival. Further functional studies reveal that FAK/CREB/TNNC1 signaling pathways mediate the effect of MFAP5 on ovarian cancer cell motility and invasion potential. Targeting stromal MFAP5 using MFAP5 specific siRNA encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles significantly decreases ovarian tumor growth and metastasis in vivo, suggesting that it may be a new modality of ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:25277212

  19. Bone repair in calcium-deficient rats: comparison of xylitol+calcium carbonate with calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on the repletion of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, M M

    1994-06-01

    The potential value of xylitol in calcium therapy was evaluated by comparing the effect of dietary xylitol (50 g/kg diet) + calcium carbonate with the effects of calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on bone repair of young male rats after the rats consumed for 3 wk a calcium-deficient diet (0.2 g Ca/kg diet). After this calcium-depletion period, the rats were fed for 2 wk one of four diets, each containing 5 g Ca/kg diet as one of the four dietary calcium sources. The diet of the control animals was supplemented with CaCO3 (5 g Ca/kg diet) throughout the study. The Ca-deficient rats showed low bone mass, low serum calcium and high serum 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, parathyroid hormone (1-34 fraction) and osteocalcin concentrations. They also excreted magnesium, phosphate and hydroxyproline in the urine in high concentrations, and had high bone alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities. Most of these changes were reversed by the administered of the calcium salts. The highest recoveries of femoral dry weight, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were observed in the groups receiving xylitol+CaCO3 and calcium lactate. Calcium lactate and calcium citrate caused low serum phosphate concentration compared with rats receiving CaCO3 and with the age-matched Ca-replete controls. Xylitol-treated rats excreted more calcium and magnesium in urine than did the other rats, probably due to increased absorption of these minerals from the gut. These results suggest that dietary xylitol improves the bioavailability of calcium salts.

  20. Intersection signal control multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhanhong; Cai, Ming

    2014-01-01

    A signal control intersection increases not only vehicle delay, but also vehicle emissions and fuel consumption in that area. Because more and more fuel and air pollution problems arise recently, an intersection signal control optimization method which aims at reducing vehicle emissions, fuel consumption and vehicle delay is required heavily. This paper proposed a signal control multi-object optimization method to reduce vehicle emissions, fuel consumption and vehicle delay simultaneously at ...

  1. CD47 signaling pathways controlling cellular differentiation and responses to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pantoja, David R; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed integral membrane protein that serves as the counter-receptor for the inhibitory phagocyte receptor signal-regulatory protein-α (SIRPα) and as a signaling receptor for the secreted matricellular protein thrombospondin-1. Recent studies employing mice and somatic cells lacking CD47 have revealed important pathophysiological functions of CD47 in cardiovascular homeostasis, immune regulation, resistance of cells and tissues to stress and chronic diseases of aging including cancer. With the emergence of experimental therapeutics targeting CD47, a more thorough understanding of CD47 signal transduction is essential. CD47 lacks a substantial cytoplasmic signaling domain, but several cytoplasmic binding partners have been identified, and lateral interactions of CD47 with other membrane receptors play important roles in mediating signaling resulting from the binding of thrombospondin-1. This review addresses recent advances in identifying the lateral binding partners, signal transduction pathways and downstream transcription networks regulated through CD47 in specific cell lineages. Major pathways regulated by CD47 signaling include calcium homeostasis, cyclic nucleotide signaling, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis and signaling and stem cell transcription factors. These pathways and other undefined proximal mediators of CD47 signaling regulate cell death and protective autophagy responses, mitochondrial biogenesis, cell adhesion and motility and stem cell self-renewal. Although thrombospondin-1 is the best characterized agonist of CD47, the potential roles of other members of the thrombospondin family, SIRPα and SIRPγ binding and homotypic CD47 interactions as agonists or antagonists of signaling through CD47 should also be considered.

  2. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caarls, Lotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371746213; Pieterse, Corné M J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113; van Wees, Saskia C M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185445373

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA...

  3. Fragile X mental retardation protein controls synaptic vesicle exocytosis by modulating N-type calcium channel density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Cassidy, John S.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2014-04-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable form of mental retardation, is characterized by synaptic dysfunction. Synaptic transmission depends critically on presynaptic calcium entry via voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Here we show that the functional expression of neuronal N-type CaV channels (CaV2.2) is regulated by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). We find that FMRP knockdown in dorsal root ganglion neurons increases CaV channel density in somata and in presynaptic terminals. We then show that FMRP controls CaV2.2 surface expression by targeting the channels to the proteasome for degradation. The interaction between FMRP and CaV2.2 occurs between the carboxy-terminal domain of FMRP and domains of CaV2.2 known to interact with the neurotransmitter release machinery. Finally, we show that FMRP controls synaptic exocytosis via CaV2.2 channels. Our data indicate that FMRP is a potent regulator of presynaptic activity, and its loss is likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunction in FXS.

  4. Randomized, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of a calcium phosphate containing paste on dentin hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Deepak; Gowda, Vishwas; Finger, Werner J; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of non-carious cervical lesions (DH) is a frequently encountered disease. This randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover study evaluated the effectiveness of a calcium phosphate containing desensitizer paste (TAP) on DH in comparison to water as placebo (PLA). In this clinical trial 35 patients were randomly assigned to the test and the negative control group. Using a 10cm long VAS (visual analog scale) patients should respond with DH score >6 on one tooth in each of two quadrants for allocation. Pain stimuli were a 2-seconds air blast (AB) and probe scratching (PS) of the exposed dentin. VAS scores were determined pre-operatively (PRE), immediately after treatment (POST), at 1 week, 1, 3 and finally after 6 months. Both TAP and PLA applications decreased DH significantly at POST and throughout the 6-months recalls (ppaste reduced DH successfully during this 6-months trial. The calcium phosphate crystallites included in the paste and the presumed hydroxyapatite precipitates upon exposure to saliva were hypothetically able to occlude open dentinal tubules, at least to some extent. TAP is considered a biocompatible desensitizer paste. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Control of IsAHP in mouse hippocampus CA1 pyramidal neurons by RyR3-mediated calcium-induced calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vrede, Y; Fossier, P; Baux, G; Joels, M; Chameau, P

    2007-11-01

    In several neuronal preparations, the ryanodine-sensitive calcium store was reported to participate in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization currents (IsAHP) involved in spike frequency adaptation. We show that calcium release from the ryanodine-sensitive calcium store is a major determinant of the triggering of IsAHP in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings in hippocampus slices show that the intracellular calcium stores depletion using an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (5 microM cyclopiazonic acid), as well as the specific blockade of ryanodine receptors (100 microM ryanodine) both reduced the IsAHP by about 70%. Immunohistology, using an anti-RyR3 specific antibody, indicates that RyR3 expression is particularly enriched in the CA1 apical dendrites (considered as the most important site for sAHP generation). We show that our anti-RyR3 antibody acts as a functional RyR3 antagonist and induced a reduction in IsAHP by about 70%. The additional ryanodine application (100 micro M) did not further affect IsAHP, thus excluding RyR2 in IsAHP activation. Our results argue in favor of a specialized function of RyR3 in CA1 pyramidal cells in triggering IsAHP due to their localization in the apical dendrite.

  6. Aluminum disruption of calcium homeostasis and signal transduction resembles change that occurs in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J R

    2012-01-01

    Most humans living in industrialized societies are routinely exposed to bioavailable aluminum salts in the form of additives-in commercially-prepared foods, alum-clarified drinking water, certain pharmaceuticals, sunscreens, and other topical applications. Minute amounts of this aluminum are absorbed into the circulation. Trace aluminum levels cross the blood-brain barrier and progressively accumulate in large pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus, cortex, and other brain regions vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease. More aluminum enters the brain than leaves, resulting in a net increase in intraneuronal aluminum with advancing age. Aluminum is responsible for two main types of toxic damage in cells. As a pro-oxidant, aluminum causes oxidative damage both on its own and in synergy with iron. Aluminum also competes with, and substitutes for, essential metals-primarily Mg2+, iron and Ca2+ ions-in or on proteins and their co-factors. The author hypothesizes that intraneuronal aluminum interferes with Ca2+ metabolism in the aged brain and describes a way to test this hypothesis. This paper reviews: 1) major changes that occur in brain Ca2+ homeostasis and Ca2+ signaling, subtly with aging and more overtly in Alzheimer's disease; and 2) evidence from the scientific literature that aluminum causes these same changes in neurons.

  7. Estimation and comparison of salivary calcium levels in healthy controls and patients with generalized gingivitis and chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhura Vijay Rane

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Salivary calcium levels can be used as a biomarker to assess the periodontal disease progression. Early diagnosis of periodontal disease by estimation of calcium levels in saliva can help in prevention of gingivitis or periodontitis by various therapeutic measures.

  8. Role of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic-mediated secretion of signaling molecules by macrophages in migration and osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Dan; Guo, Bo; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Xuening; Zhu, Xiangdong; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2017-03-15

    The inflammatory reaction initiates fracture healing and could play a role in the osteoinductive effect of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics, which has been widely confirmed; however, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, various signaling molecules from macrophages under the stimulation of osteoinductive biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic and its degradation products were examined and evaluated for their influence on the migration and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The results of cellular experiments confirmed that the gene expression of most inflammatory factors (IL-1, IL-6 and MCP-1) and growth factors (VEGF, PDGF and EGF) by macrophages were up-regulated to varying degrees by BCP ceramic and its degradation products. Cell migration tests demonstrated that the conditioned media (CMs), which contained abundant signaling molecules secreted by macrophages cultured on BCP ceramic and its degradation products, promoted the migration of MSCs. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that CMs promoted the gene expression of osteogenic markers (ALP, COL-I, OSX, BSP and OPN) in MSCs. ALP activity and mineralization staining further confirmed that CMs promoted the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs