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Sample records for calcium oscillations evidence

  1. Stochastic Kinetics of Intracellular Calcium Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昌胜; 曾仁端

    2003-01-01

    A stochastic model of intracellular calcium oscillations is put forward by taking into account the random opening-closing of Ca2+ channels in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The numerical results of the stochastic model show simple and complex calcium oscillations, which accord with the experiment results.

  2. Fractional Dynamics in Calcium Oscillation Model

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    Yoothana Suansook

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcium oscillations have many important roles to perform many specific functions ranging from fertilization to cell death. The oscillation mechanisms have been observed in many cell types including cardiac cells, oocytes, and hepatocytes. There are many mathematical models proposed to describe the oscillatory changes of cytosolic calcium concentration in cytosol. Many experiments were observed in various kinds of living cells. Most of the experimental data show simple periodic oscillations. In certain type of cell, there exists the complex periodic bursting behavior. In this paper, we have studied further the fractional chaotic behavior in calcium oscillations model based on experimental study of hepatocytes proposed by Kummer et al. Our aim is to explore fractional-order chaotic pattern in this oscillation model. Numerical calculation of bifurcation parameters is carried out using modified trapezoidal rule for fractional integral. Fractional-order phase space and time series at fractional order are present. Numerical results are characterizing the dynamical behavior at different fractional order. Chaotic behavior of the model can be analyzed from the bifurcation pattern.

  3. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillations Model Including Mitochondrial Calcium Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Min; LIU Zeng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger. Mitochondria contributes significantly to intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.The experiment of Kaftan et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 275(2000) 25465] demonstrated that inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake can reduce the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration oscillations of gonadotropes. By considering the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling we develop a three-variable model of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations based on the models of Atri et al. [Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1727] and Falcke et al. [Biophys. J. 77 (1999) 37]. The model reproduces the fact that mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling increases the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations, which accords with Kaftan's results. Moreover the model predicts that when the mitochondria overload with Ca2+, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations vanish, which may trigger apoptosis.

  4. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    localization in an oscillatory fashion unitemporally with Ca2+ oscillations, whereas a Ca2+-binding deficient mutant of ALG-2 did not redistribute. Using tagged ALG-2 as bait we identified its novel target protein Sec31A and based on the partial colocalization of endogenous ALG-2 and Sec31A we propose that ALG......A variety of stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium oscillations. Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms decoding these events. We show that ALG-2, a Ca2+-binding protein originally isolated as a protein associated with apoptosis, is directly linked to Ca2+ signalling. We...

  5. Role of mitochondria and network connectivity in intercellular calcium oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Dokukina, I V; Grachev, E A; Gunton, J D; Dokukina, Irina V.; Gracheva, Maria E.; Grachev, Eugene A.; Gunton, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are large-scale regulators of cytosolic calcium under normal cellular conditions. In this paper we model the complex behavior of mitochondrial calcium during the action of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on a single cell and find results that are in good agreement with recent experimental studies. We also study the influence of the cellular network connectivity on intercellular signalling via gap junction diffusion. We include in our model the dependence of the junctional conductivity on the cytosolic calcium concentrations in adjacent cells. We consider three different mechanisms of calcium wave propagation through gap junctions: via calcium diffusion, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion, and both calcium and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion. We show that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion is the mechanism of calcium wave propagation and that calcium diffusion is the mechanism of synchronization of cytosolic calcium oscillations in adjacent cells. We also study the role of different to...

  6. Optogenetic Control of Calcium Oscillation Waveform Defines NFAT as an Integrator of Calcium Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannanta-Anan, Pimkhuan; Chow, Brian Y

    2016-04-27

    It is known that the calcium-dependent transcription factor NFAT initiates transcription in response to pulsatile loads of calcium signal. However, the relative contributions of calcium oscillation frequency, amplitude, and duty cycle to transcriptional activity remain unclear. Here, we engineer HeLa cells to permit optogenetic control of intracellular calcium concentration using programmable LED arrays. This approach allows us to generate calcium oscillations of constant peak amplitude, in which frequency is varied while holding duty cycle constant, or vice versa. Using this setup and mathematical modeling, we show that NFAT transcriptional activity depends more on duty cycle, defined as the proportion of the integrated calcium concentration over the oscillation period, than on frequency alone. This demonstrates that NFAT acts primarily as a signal integrator of cumulative load rather than a frequency-selective decoder. This approach resolves a fundamental question in calcium encoding and demonstrates the value of optogenetics for isolating individual dynamical components of larger signaling behaviors. PMID:27135540

  7. Outward potassium current oscillations in macrophage polykaryons: extracellular calcium entry and calcium-induced calcium release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraiva R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Outward current oscillations associated with transient membrane hyperpolarizations were induced in murine macrophage polykaryons by membrane depolarization in the absence of external Na+. Oscillations corresponded to a cyclic activation of Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IKCa probably correlated with variations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Addition of external Na+ (8 mM immediately abolished the outward current oscillations, suggesting that the absence of the cation is necessary not only for their induction but also for their maintenance. Oscillations were completely blocked by nisoldipine. Ruthenium red and ryanodine reduced the number of outward current cycles in each episode, whereas quercetin prolonged the hyperpolarization 2- to 15-fold. Neither low molecular weight heparin nor the absence of a Na+ gradient across the membrane had any influence on oscillations. The evidence suggests that Ca2+ entry through a pathway sensitive to Ca2+ channel blockers is elicited by membrane depolarization in Na+-free medium and is essential to initiate oscillations, which are also dependent on the cyclic release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+-sensitive stores; Ca2+ ATPase acts by reducing intracellular Ca2+, thus allowing slow deactivation of IKCa. Evidence is presented that neither a Na+/Ca2+ antiporter nor Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores participate directly in the mechanism of oscillation

  8. Enhanced Synchronization of Intercellular Calcium Oscillations by Noise Contaminated Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-Qian; CHEN Han-Shuang; WANG Mao-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of locally coupled calcium oscillation systems, each cell is subjected to extracel-lular contaminated signal, which contains common sub-threshold signal and independent Gaussian noise. It is found that intermediate noise can enhance synchronized oscillations of calcium ions, where the frequency of noise-induced oscilla-tions is matched with the one of sub-threshold external signal. We show that synchronization is enhanced as a result of the entrainment of external signal Furthermore, the effect of coupling strength is considered. We find above-mentioned phenomenon exists only when coupling strength is very small Our findings may exhibit that noise can enhance the detection of feeble external signal through the mechanism of synchronization of intercellular calcium ions.

  9. The mechanical environment modulates intracellular calcium oscillation activities of myofibroblasts.

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    Charles Godbout

    Full Text Available Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair.

  10. Water Channels Are Involved in Stomatal Oscillations Encoded by Parameter-Specific Cytosolic Calcium Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that various stimuli can induce specific cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) oscillations in guard cells and various oscillations in stomatal apertures. Exactly how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation signaling functions in stomatal oscillation is not known. In the present study, the epidermis of broad bean (Vicia faba L.)was used and a rapid ion-exchange treatment with two shifting buffers differing in K+ and Ca2+ concentrations was applied. The treatment for five transients at a 10-min transient period induced clear and regular stomatal oscillation. However, for other transient numbers and periods, the treatments induced some irregular oscillations or even no obvious oscillations in stomatal aperture. The results indicate that stomatal oscillation is encoded by parameter-specific [Ca2+]cyt oscillation: the parameters of [Ca2+]cyt oscillation affected the occurrence rate and the parameters of stomatal oscillation. The water channel inhibitor HgCl2 completely inhibited stomatal oscillation and the inhibitory effect could be partially reversed by β-mercaptoethanol (an agent capable of reversing water channel inhibition by HgCl2). Other inhibitory treatments against ion transport (i.e. the application of LaCl3, EGTA, or tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl))weakly impaired stomatal oscillation when the compounds were added after rapid ion-exchange treatment.If these compounds were added before rapid-ion exchange treatment, the inhibitory effect was much more apparent (except in the case of TEACI). The results of the present study suggest that water channels are involved in stomatal oscillation as a downstream element of [Ca2+]cyt oscillation signaling.

  11. THE GENERATION,EVOLUTION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF INTRACELLUAR CALCIUM OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-min

    2004-01-01

    The Atri intracellular calcium oscillations model was extended, and two new models were established. Furthermore, a unified model of the protein phosphorylation driven by cytosolic calcium oscillations was constructed. The numerical results obtained verified related experimental conclusions. And the analytical expressions of intracellular calcium spiral and target waves in the Xenopus laevis oocyte were obtained, resulting in velocity and waveform of calcium solitary pulse wave were found.

  12. Model of Calcium Oscillations Due to Negative Feedback in Olfactory Cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidl, Juergen; Borowski, Peter; Sensse, Anke;

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Ca oscillations in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. The underlying mechanism is based on direct negative regulation of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels by calcium/calmodulin and does not require any autocatalysis such as calcium-induced calcium release....... The model is in quantitative agreement with available experimental data, both with respect to oscillations and to fast adaptation. We give predictions for the ranges of parameters in which oscillations should be observable. Relevance of the model to calcium oscillations in other systems is discussed....

  13. Clofazimine inhibits human Kv1.3 potassium channel by perturbing calcium oscillation in T lymphocytes.

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    Yunzhao R Ren

    Full Text Available The Kv1.3 potassium channel plays an essential role in effector memory T cells and has been implicated in several important autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and type 1 diabetes. A number of potent small molecule inhibitors of Kv1.3 channel have been reported, some of which were found to be effective in various animal models of autoimmune diseases. We report herein the identification of clofazimine, a known anti-mycobacterial drug, as a novel inhibitor of human Kv1.3. Clofazimine was initially identified as an inhibitor of intracellular T cell receptor-mediated signaling leading to the transcriptional activation of human interleukin-2 gene in T cells from a screen of the Johns Hopkins Drug Library. A systematic mechanistic deconvolution revealed that clofazimine selectively blocked the Kv1.3 channel activity, perturbing the oscillation frequency of the calcium-release activated calcium channel, which in turn led to the inhibition of the calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway. These effects of clofazimine provide the first line of experimental evidence in support of a causal relationship between Kv1.3 and calcium oscillation in human T cells. Furthermore, clofazimine was found to be effective in blocking human T cell-mediated skin graft rejection in an animal model in vivo. Together, these results suggest that clofazimine is a promising immunomodulatory drug candidate for treating a variety of autoimmune disorders.

  14. The frequency of calcium oscillations in mouse eggs at fertilization is modulated by the number of fused sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, J E; Myles, D G; Primakoff, P

    1999-09-15

    In a variety of calcium signaling systems, the frequency of intracellular calcium oscillations is physiologically important. Probably multiple factors control the frequency of calcium oscillations in the egg after fertilization and many of these remain to be identified. In this study, we present the first rigorous set of data showing that monospermic fertilization is important for setting the physiological calcium oscillation frequency. Recordings in 152 zona-free eggs show that the general pattern of the calcium oscillations is identical in monospermic and polyspermic eggs; however, the oscillation frequency is higher in polyspermic eggs (P effect in which some eggs would have the dual properties of oscillating faster and of being able to fuse with several sperm cells. These data instead suggest that the sperm modulates the frequency of the oscillations in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:10479454

  15. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillation Model and its Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应阳君; 李卫华

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ concentration oscillation is one of the typical nonlinear dynamical phenomena in biophysics.According to the experimental facts that when stimulated by different agonists, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations of hepatocytes show nearly constant amplitude for two different oscillation-form, simple spikes and complex bursts,we build a new 4-variables model based on the two models proposed by Hoefer [Biophys J. 77 (1999) 1244] and Kummer et al. [Biophys. J. 79 (2000) 1188] Our model can simulate both simple-spike and multi-spike-burst oscillations with amplitude of 0.5-0. 7μmol/L in a rather wide range of parameters.

  16. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger;

    2007-01-01

    waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cGMP leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole cell calcium oscillations. At the same time, membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...... approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes a uniform opening of L-type calcium...

  17. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  18. Cellular mechanism for spontaneous calcium oscillations in astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-fei WANG; Chen ZHOU; Ai-hui TANG; Shi-qiang WANG; Zhen CHAI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the Ca2+ source and cellular mechanisms of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in hippocampal astrocytes. Methods: The cultured cells were loaded with Fluo-4 AM, the indicator of intracellular Ca2+, and the dynamic Ca2+ transients were visualized with confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Results: The spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in astrocytes were observed first in co-cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. These oscillations were not affected by tetrodotoxin (TTX) treatment and kept up in purity cultured astrocytes. The spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations were not impacted after blocking the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels or ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) bathing, indicating that intracellular Ca2+ elevation was not the result of extracellular Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, the correlation between the spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and the Ca2+ store in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were investigated with pharmacological experiments. The oscillations were: 1) enhanced when cells were exposed to both low Na+ (70 mmol/L) and high Ca2+ (5 mmol/L) solution, and eliminated completely by 2 μmol/L thapsigargin, a blocker of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase; and 2) still robust after the application with either 50 μmol/L ryanodine or 400 μmol/L tetracaine, two specific antagonists of ryanodine receptors, but depressed in a dose-dependent manner by 2-APB, an InsP3 receptors (InsP3R) blocker. Conclusion: InsP3R-induced ER Ca2+ release is an important cellular mechanism for the initiation of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation in hippocampal astrocytes.

  19. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole-cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger;

    2007-01-01

    waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the SR is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole-cell calcium oscillations. At the same time membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...... approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes uniform opening of L-type calcium...... onset of oscillations in membrane potential within the individual cell may underlie sudden intercellular synchronization and the appearance of vasomotion. Key words: Vasomotion, Chloride channel, cGMP, Mathematical model, Calcium waves....

  20. Mouse neuroblastoma cell-based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyoung; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mouse neuroblastoma cells have been considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and they have been intensively used as a model system in different areas. For example, the differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor-mediated ion current, and glutamate-induced physiological responses have been actively investigated with these cells. These mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells are of interest because they grow faster than other cells of neural origin and have a number of other advantages. The calcium oscillations and neural spikes of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in epileptic conditions are evaluated. Based on our observations of neural spikes in these cells with our proposed imaging modality, we reported that they can be an important model in epileptic activity studies. We concluded that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as those produced by neurons or astrocytes. This evidence suggests that increased levels of neurotransmitter release due to the enhancement of free calcium from 4-aminopyridine causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce epileptic spikes and calcium oscillations.

  1. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  2. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  3. Alternate oscillations of self-terminating and recombination lasers in univalent calcium and strontium ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Bai-Liang; Chen Gang; Fang Ben-Min; Mao Bang-Ning; Yao Zhi-Xin

    2004-01-01

    The univalent calcium and strontium ions have been confirmed as ideal lasing substances both for self-terminating laser and recombination laser by theoretically analysing their energy level structures and lasing mechanisms. With the optimization of the excitation circuit and the improvement of the laser cavity as well as the laser discharge tube, the alternate laser oscillations of the two laser mechanisms were successfully realized by longitudinal pulsed discharge in mixture vapours of helium and univalent ions of calcium or strontium, respectively. The dependences of laser performance on working parameters, together with the characteristics of the photoelectric pulse waveforms were elementally studied and analysed.

  4. Electric pulses: a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations and generate spontaneous-like calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menorval, Marie-Amelie; Andre, Franck M.; Silve, Aude; Dalmay, Claire; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Mir, Lluis M.

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells of great interest in regenerative medicine or oncology. They present spontaneous calcium oscillations related to cell cycle progression or differentiation but the correlation between these events is still unclear. Indeed, it is difficult to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations with chemical means. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) can permeabilise plasma and/or organelles membranes depending on the applied pulses and therefore generate cytosolic calcium peaks by recruiting calcium from the external medium or from internal stores. We show that it is possible to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations (same amplitude, duration and shape) using 100 μs PEFs or 10 ns PEFs. We propose a model that explains the experimental situations reported. PEFs can therefore be a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations. This tool, that can be switched on and off instantaneously, contrary to chemicals agents, can be very useful to investigate the role of calcium oscillations in cell physiology and/or to manipulate cell fate. PMID:27561994

  5. Acetylcholine-induced calcium oscillation in isolated outer hair cells in guinea pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ding-hua; XIAO Zi-an; YANG Shu

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study is to explore the relationship between acetylcholine (ACh)-induced calcium release from intracellular Ca2+ stores and function of outer hair cell (OHC) motors, in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of OHC electromotility at resting state. Methods OHCs were isolated from adult guinea pig (200-300 g) cochlea and loaded with Fluo-3/AM. The cells were treated with ACh/dHBSS, ACh/HBSS, dHBSS only or HBSS only. Intracellular [Ca2+]i variations in cells under the four treatments were observed using an Ar-Kr laser scan confocal microscope. Results [Ca2+]i oscillations were recorded in five OHCs treated with ACh/dHBSS but not in other cells. This is the first time that Ach-excited [Ca2+]i oscillations are reported in guinea pig OHCs independent of extracellular calcium. Conclusions ACh-excited [Ca2+]i oscillations in OHCs originates from intracellular calcium release and may play a crucial role in maintaining active mechanical motility of the OHC at resting and modulating OHC electromotility.

  6. Synchronized Anti-Phase and In-Phase Oscillations of Intracellular Calcium Ions in Two Coupled Hepatocytes System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Chuan-Sheng; CHEN Han-Shuang; ZHANG Ji-Qian

    2008-01-01

    @@ We study the dynamic behaviour of two intracellular calcium oscillators that are coupled through gap junctions both to Ca2+ and inositol(1,4,5)-trisphosphate(IPa).It is found that synchronized anti-phase and in-phase oscillations of cytoplasmic calcium coexist in parameters space.Especially,synchronized anti-phase oecillations only occur near the onset of a Hopf bifurcation point when the velocity of IP3 synthesis is increased.

  7. Evidence for Fine Structure in the Chromospheric Umbral Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, R; Collados, M; Bueno, J T

    2005-01-01

    Novel spectro-polarimetric observations of the \\ion{He}{1} multiplet are used to explore the dynamics of the chromospheric oscillation above sunspot umbrae. The results presented here provide strong evidence in support of the two-component model proposed by Socas-Navarro and co-authors. According to this model, the waves propagate only inside channels of sub-arcsecond width (the ``active'' component), whereas the rest of the umbra remains nearly at rest (the ``quiet'' component). Although the observations support the fundamental elements of that model, there is one particular aspect that is not compatible with our data. We find that, contrary to the scenario as originally proposed, the active component remains through the entire oscillation cycle and harbors both the upflowing and the downflowing phase of the oscillation.

  8. Fluorescence detection and imaging of cytosolic calcium oscillations:A comparison of four equipment setups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Fang; Xiaoting Zhao; Wei Zhou; Jia Li; Qin Liu; Xun Shen; Yoh-ichi Satoh; Zong Jie Cui

    2009-01-01

    The increase in cytosolic calcium concentration has been shown to play an important role in vital cellular functions such as muscle contraction,cell secretion,oocyte fertilization,nerve conduction,embryo development and apoptosis in animals,plants and microbes,and in the invasion of mammalian cells by parasites,bacteria,and viruses.Therefore,live cell imaging of increases in cytosolic calcium concentration in cellular compartments has been investigated intensively.Multiple calcium imaging systems are now available commercially,but when it comes to deciding which model to purchase,it is often hard to obtain enough information for an optimal setup.In this paper,a comparison was made among four fluorescent detection/imaging devices for the detection of cytosolic calcium oscillations induced in rat pancreatic acinar ceils by cholecystokinin and in hepatocytes by phenylephrine.Detailed equipment setup,differences in data acquisition and analysis,and side effects of the excitation light on live cells were analyzed.A list of important factors that should be considered in choosing the optimal equipment are recommended,which will be useful for users of such devices in the future.

  9. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Akihiro, E-mail: ayoneda@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan); Division of Molecular Therapeutics, Center for Food & Medical Innovation, Hokkaido University (Japan); Watanabe, Tomomasa [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  10. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca2+) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca2+ oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca2+ oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca2+ oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca2+ oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca2+ oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca2+ oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca2+ oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca2+ oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts

  11. A comparative study of embedded and anesthetized zebrafish in vivo on myocardiac calcium oscillation and heart muscle contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eMuntean

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish (Danio rerio has been used as a model for studying vertebrate development in the cardiovascular system. In order to monitor heart contraction and cytosolic calcium oscillations, fish were either embedded in methylcellulose or anesthetized with tricaine. Using high-resolution differential interference contrast (DIC and calcium imaging microscopy, we here show that dopamine and verapamil alter calcium signaling and muscle contraction in anesthetized zebrafish, but not in embedded zebrafish. In anesthetized fish, dopamine increases the amplitude of cytosolic calcium oscillation with a subsequent increase in heart contraction, whereas verapamil decreases the frequency of calcium oscillation and heart rate. Interestingly, verapamil also increases myocardial contraction. Our data further indicate that verapamil can increase myocardial calcium sensitivity in anesthetized fish. Taken together, our data reinforce in vivo cardiac responses to dopamine and verapamil. Furthermore, effects of dopamine and verapamil on myocardial calcium and contraction are greater in anesthetized than embedded fish. We suggest that while the zebrafish is an excellent model for a cardiovascular imaging study, the cardio-pharmacological profiles are very different between anesthetized and embedded fish.

  12. Model for external influences on cellular signal transduction pathways including cytosolic calcium oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichwald, C.; Kaiser, F. [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Experiments on the effects of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields on cells of the immune system, T-lymphocytes in particular, suggest that the external field interacts with the cell at the level of intracellular signal transduction pathways. These are directly connected with changes in the calcium-signaling processes of the cell. Based on these findings, a theoretical model for receptor-controlled cytosolic calcium oscillations and for external influences on the signal transduction pathway is presented. The authors discuss the possibility that the external field acts on the kinetics of the signal transduction between the activated receptors at the cell membrane and the G-proteins. It is shown that, depending on the specific combination of cell internal biochemical and external physical parameters, entirely different responses of the cell can occur. The authors compare the effects of a coherent (periodic) modulation and of incoherent perturbations (noise). The model and the calculations are based on the theory of self-sustained, nonlinear oscillators. It is argued that these systems form an ideal basis for information-encoding processes in biological systems.

  13. Effects of an electromagnetic field on intracellular calcium oscillations in a cell with external noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Wei-Long; Yang Lin-Jing; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ion concentration oscillation in a cell subjected to external noise and irradiated by an electromagnetic field is considered. The effects of the intensity E0, the polar angle θ and the frequency ω of the external electric field on steady-state probability distribution and the mean Ca2+ concentration, respectively, are investigated by a numerical calculation method. The results indicate that (ⅰ) variation of ω cannot affect the intracellular calcium oscillation; (ⅱ) the steady-state probability distribution presents a meaningful modification due to the variations of E0 and 9, while variation of θ does not affect the steady-state probability distribution under the condition of a small E0, and E0 cannot affect the steady-state probability distribution either when θ = π/2; (ⅲ) the mean Ca2+ concentration increases as E0 increases when θ < π/2 and, as θ increases, it first increases and then decreases. However, it does not vary with E0 increasing when θ = π/2, but it increases with θ increasing when E0 is small.

  14. Estrogen receptor beta-selective agonists stimulate calcium oscillations in human and mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhang

    Full Text Available Estrogens are used extensively to treat hot flashes in menopausal women. Some of the beneficial effects of estrogens in hormone therapy on the brain might be due to nongenomic effects in neurons such as the rapid stimulation of calcium oscillations. Most studies have examined the nongenomic effects of estrogen receptors (ER in primary neurons or brain slices from the rodent brain. However, these cells can not be maintained continuously in culture because neurons are post-mitotic. Neurons derived from embryonic stem cells could be a potential continuous, cell-based model to study nongenomic actions of estrogens in neurons if they are responsive to estrogens after differentiation. In this study ER-subtype specific estrogens were used to examine the role of ERalpha and ERbeta on calcium oscillations in neurons derived from human (hES and mouse embryonic stem cells. Unlike the undifferentiated hES cells the differentiated cells expressed neuronal markers, ERbeta, but not ERalpha. The non-selective ER agonist 17beta-estradiol (E(2 rapidly increased [Ca2+]i oscillations and synchronizations within a few minutes. No change in calcium oscillations was observed with the selective ERalpha agonist 4,4',4''-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyltrisphenol (PPT. In contrast, the selective ERbeta agonists, 2,3-bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl-propionitrile (DPN, MF101, and 2-(3-fluoro-4-hydroxyphenyl-7-vinyl-1,3 benzoxazol-5-ol (ERB-041; WAY-202041 stimulated calcium oscillations similar to E(2. The ERbeta agonists also increased calcium oscillations and phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK1/2 in neurons derived from mouse ES cells, which was inhibited by nifedipine demonstrating that ERbeta activates L-type voltage gated calcium channels to regulate neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate that ERbeta signaling regulates nongenomic pathways in neurons derived from ES cells, and suggest that these cells might be useful to study the nongenomic mechanisms of estrogenic compounds.

  15. Calcium and Cancer Prevention: Strengths and Limits of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium carbonate has about 40 percent elemental calcium, meaning that 500 mg of calcium carbonate actually contains ... in this trial also contained vitamin D (400 international units [ IU ]). During ... and calcium in relation to prostate cancer risk among more than 142, ...

  16. Novel effect of interplay of internal and external noise on the dynamics of calcium oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: When the external noise is small (D ≤ 0.8), R goes through a maximum at an optimal system size V, indicating the occurring of internal-noise stochastic resonance (INSR), and the curves become higher with the increases of D, which shows that INSR can be enhanced by the external noise in a certain range of external noise intensity ((D ≤ 0.8). If D > 0.8, R monotonically increases and the peak disappears. When D increases further, the R curve becomes lower. Research highlights: → External noise coherence resonance (ENCR) can be suppressed by internal noise. → Internal noise stochastic resonance (INSR) can be enhanced by external noise. → When INSR occurs, the optimal system size can be regulated by the external noise. - Abstract: Using a mesoscopic stochastic model, the effect of interplay of external and internal noise on the dynamics of calcium oscillations was studied. When the system was tuned near a Hopf bifurcation point and driven by external noise or internal noise only, the existence of external noise coherence resonance (ENCR) or internal-noise stochastic resonance (INSR) was found, respectively. When both of the noises were considered, it was found that ENCR could be suppressed by internal noise, while INSR could be enhanced by external noise in a certain range of external noise intensity. It was also interesting to note that the optimal system size can be regulated by the external noise when the INSR occurs. The cell system may adapt to adjust the optimal size according to the external noise, indicating some kind of self-tuning mechanism involved in stochastic calcium dynamics.

  17. Amyloid β Peptide Enhances RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Activation through NF-κB, ERK, and Calcium Oscillation Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangfu Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are common chronic degenerative disorders which are strongly associated with advanced age. We have previously demonstrated that amyloid beta peptide (Aβ, one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, accumulated abnormally in osteoporotic bone specimens in addition to having an activation effect on osteoclast (Bone 2014,61:164-75. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylates, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways by receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL plays a pivotal role in osteoclast activation. Targeting this signaling to modulate osteoclast function has been a promising strategy for osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ on RANKL-induced osteoclast signaling pathways in vitro. In mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMMs, Aβ exerted no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis but promoted osteoclastic bone resorption. In molecular levels, Aβ enhanced NF-κB activity and IκB-α degradation, activated ERK phosphorylation and stimulated calcium oscillation, thus leading to upregulation of NFAT-c1 expression during osteoclast activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Aβ enhances RANKL-induced osteoclast activation through IκB-α degradation, ERK phosphorylation, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways and that Aβ may be a promising agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related disease such as osteoporosis.

  18. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ∼2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)±0.0680.065(sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)±0.120.11(sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)±0.370.31(sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation

  19. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Alysia Diane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ~2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)±$0.065\\atop{0.068}$(sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)±$0.12\\atop{0.11}$(sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)±$0.31\\atop{0.37}$(sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation.

  20. Panofsky Prize Lecture: Evidence for Oscillation of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsuka, Yoji

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are decay products of pions and kaons (and of their decay products muons) produced by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with air nuclei. Though their flux is not known well, only within 20 %, physics quantities that are independent of the flux uncertainty exist. The ratio of the number of muon neutrinos to the number of electron neutrinos is estimated to be accurate within 5 %. The other quantity is the shape of the zenith-angle distribution. Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande are water Cherenkov detectors with 3,000 ton and 50,000 ton pure water, respectively. Kamiokande was operational in 1983 - 1996, and Super-K in 1996 - 2001 and 2003 - in future. We had already noted in 1988 that the observed μ/e ratio, which represented ν_mu/ν_e, was smaller by about 40 %. Later in 1994 we noted that the zenith angle distribution of muon neutrinos was strongly distorted, namely much fewer muons observed in the upward direction, while downward-going muons were what we expected. Electrons were quite normal. In 1996 Super-Kamiokande was ready. Its fiducial volume is 22.5 kton, much larger than Kamiokande's 1.04 kton. In 1998 based on 25.5 kton years of data we presented convincing results on the small μ/e ratio which was caused by fewer number of muons in the upward direction. The essential feature of the observed anomaly was that the disappearance of muon neutrinos depended strongly on their path length and on their energies. Electrons showed no anomaly within the experimental limit. These results were quantitatively and almost uniquely explained by oscillation of muon neutrinos to tau neutrinos, thus evidence for the finite but tiny mass of neutrinos.

  1. Evidence for an oscillatory signature in atmospheric neutrino oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashie, Y; Hosaka, J; Ishihara, K; Itow, Y; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Namba, T; Nambu, R; Obayashi, Y; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Yamada, S; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Ooyabu, T; Saji, C; Takenaga, Y; Desai, S; Kearns, E; Likhoded, S; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Wang, W; Goldhaber, M; Casper, D; Cravens, J P; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Liu, D W; Mine, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Sterner, C W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Guillian, G; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D; Messier, M D; Hayato, Y; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwashita, T; Kobayashi, T; Maruyama, T; Nakamura, K; Nitta, K; Oyama, Y; Sakuda, M; Totsuka, Y; Suzuki, A T; Hasegawa, M; Hayashi, K; Inagaki, T; Kato, I; Maesaka, H; Morita, T; Nakaya, T; Nishikawa, K; Sasaki, T; Ueda, S; Yamamoto, S; Haines, T J; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Svoboda, R; Blaufuss, E; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Turcan, D; Scholberg, K; Habig, A; Fukuda, Y; Jung, C K; Kato, T; Kobayashi, K; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sarrat, A; Sharkey, E; Yanagisawa, C; Toshito, T; Miyano, K; Tamura, N; Ishii, J; Kuno, Y; Nagashima, Y; Takita, M; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Okazawa, H; Ishizuka, T; Choi, Y; Seo, H K; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Koshiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Nishijima, K; Harada, T; Ishino, H; Nishimura, R; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; Zalipska, J; Berns, H G; Gran, R; Shiraishi, K K; Stachyra, A; Washburn, K; Wilkes, R J

    2004-09-01

    Muon neutrino disappearance probability as a function of neutrino flight length L over neutrino energy E was studied. A dip in the L/E distribution was observed in the data, as predicted from the sinusoidal flavor transition probability of neutrino oscillation. The observed L/E distribution constrained nu(micro)nu(tau) neutrino oscillation parameters; 1.9x10(-3)0.90 at 90% confidence level.

  2. New evidence of transient complex oscillations in a closed, well-stirred Belousov-Zhabotinsky system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA KOLAR-ANIC

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Some new experimental evidence of complex irregular oscillations in the Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction realized in a batch reactor is presented. The results were obtained under relatively low cerium and malonic acid concentrations. One-dimensionalmaps were used for general discussion, and, particularly, for the influence of noise on the evolution of the oscillations.

  3. Evidence for neutrino oscillations from muon decay at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Athanassopoulos, C; Burman, R L; Cohen, I; Caldwell, D O; Dieterle, B D; Donahue, J B; Eisner, A M; Fazely, A; Federspiel, F J; Garvey, G T; Gray, M; Gunasingha, R M; Imlay, R; Johnston, K; Kim, H J; Louis, W C; Majkic, R; Margulies, J; McIlhany, K; Metcalf, W; Mills, G B; Reeder, R A; Sandberg, V D; Smith, D; Stancu, I; Strossman, W D; Tayloe, R; VanDalen, G J; Vernon, W; Wadia, N; Waltz, J I; Wang, Y X; White, D H; Works, D; Xiao, Y

    1996-01-01

    A search for nu_bar_mu to nu_bar_e oscillations has been conducted at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility using nu_bar_mu from mu+ decay at rest. The nu_bar_e are detected via the reaction (nu_bar_e,p) -> (e+,n), correlated with the 2.2 MeV gamma from (n,p) -> (d,gamma). The use of tight cuts to identify e+ events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with e+ energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 (+/- 0.6) background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1E-08. A chi^2 fit to the entire e+ sample results in a total excess of 51.8 (+18.7) (-16.9) (+/- 8.0) events with e+ energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to nu_bar_mu -> nu_bar_e oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.0031 (+0.0011) (-0.0010) (+/- 0.0005).

  4. Evidence for Solar-like Oscillations in Arcturus (Alpha Boo)

    CERN Document Server

    Retter, A; Buzasi, D L; Kjeldsen, H; Retter, Alon; Bedding, Timothy R.; Buzasi, Derek; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Observations of the red giant Arcturus (Alpha Boo) obtained with the star tracker on the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) satellite during a baseline of 19 successive days in 2000 July-August are analysed. The power spectrum has a significant excess of power at low-frequencies. The highest peak is at about 4.1 micro-Hz, which is in agreement with the ground-based radial velocity and photometry study of Belmonte et al. (1990a; 1990b). The variability of Arcturus can be explained by sound waves, but it is not clear whether these are coherent p-mode oscillations.

  5. Dynamics Analysis and Transition Mechanism of Bursting Calcium Oscillations in Non-Excitable Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; LU Qi-Shao; DUAN Li-Xia

    2007-01-01

    A one-pool model with Ca2+-activated inositol-trisphosphate-concentration degradation is considered.For complex bursting Ca2+ oscillation,point-cycle bursting of subHopf-subHopf type is found to be in the intermediate state from quasi-periodic bursting to Point-point bursting of subHopf-subHopf type.The fast-slow burster analysis is used to study the transition mechanisms among simple periodic oscillation,quasi-periodic bursting,point-point and point-cycle burstings.The dynamics analysis of different oscillations provides better insight into the generation and transition mechanisms of complex intra- and inter-cellular Ca2+signalling.

  6. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ji [Urological Surgery Research Institute, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chen, Zheng [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zhansong, E-mail: Zhouzhansong@sohu.com [Urological Surgery Research Institute, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ji, Guangju, E-mail: Gj28@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  7. [Vitamin D and calcium in the mirror of clinical evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajnok, László

    2016-07-01

    The biological mechanisms, ecological and observational studies indicate increased morbidity and mortality in vitamin D deficiency, while the controlled, randomized supplementation trials - carried out mostly in vitamin D deficient patients - have shown no or some marginal benefits, mostly in preventing institutionalized elderly individuals' falls and fractures. Clarity is also disturbed by that the primary end points of intervention studies were generally not extraskeletal. The ideal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels also considerably controversial: there is clearly a J-curve, but the optimal range is uncertain. All of these uncertainties appear also in the vitamin D guidelines which are, however, concordant in that they do not recommend (i) a population-wide screening and (ii) vitamin D supplementation with extraskeletal aim - beyond the prevention of falls. Certain studies suggest that calcium supplementation increases the incidence of cardiovascular events, while others show a neutral effect in this respect. There are several ongoing vitamin D studies directly designed for extraskeletal events. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1242-1247. PMID:27476520

  8. Physical Manipulation of Calcium Oscillation in Shen-Larter Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongkun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental observations show that calcium signals in response to external stimuli encode information via frequency modulation or alternatively via amplitude modulation. Here, by arguments of bifurcation theory and bifurcation control theorem, the amplitude and frequency manipulation of limit cycle in Shen-Larter cell system are investigated. A nonlinear feedback controller is then applied to the system, in order to assign the peak frequency to a prescribed value, such that bifurcation is minimized or eliminated in the closed-loop system. And numerical simulations are presented in order to illustrate the theoretical analysis.

  9. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    connect ion conformationally rearranged, thus passing the signal through the chain of intermediaries. The most important function of calcium is its participation in many cell signaling pathways. Channels, pumps, gene expression, synthesis of alkaloids, protective molecules, NO etc. respond to changes in [Ca2+]cyt, while transductors are represented by a number of proteins. The universality of calcium is evident in the study in connection with other signaling systems, such as NO, which is involved in the immune response and is able to control the feedback activity of protein activators channels, producing nitric oxide. Simulation of calcium responses can determine the impact of key level and their regulation, and also depends on the type of stimulus and the effector protein that specifically causes certain changes. Using spatiotemporal modeling, scientists showed that the key components for the formation of Ca2+ bursts are the internal and external surfaces of the nucleus membrane. The research was aimed at understanding of the mechanisms of influence of Ca2+-binding components on Ca2+ oscillations. The simulation suggests the existence of a calcium depot EPR with conjugated lumen of the nucleus which releases its contents to nucleoplasm. With these assumptions, the mathematical model was created and confirmed experimentally. It describes the oscillation of nuclear calcium in root hairs of Medicago truncatula at symbiotic relationship of plants and fungi (rhizobia. Calcium oscillations are present in symbiotic relationships of the cortical layer of plant root cells. Before penetration of bacteria into the cells, slow oscillations of Ca2+ are observed, but with their penetration into the cells the oscillation frequency increases. These processes take place by changing buffer characteristics of the cytoplasm caused by signals from microbes, such as Nod-factor available after penetration of bacteria through the cell wall. Thus, the basic known molecular mechanisms for

  10. EVIDENCE OF MULTIPLE SLOW ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE STELLAR FLARING LOOPS OF PROXIMA CENTAURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Pandey, J. C. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital-263 002 (India); Lalitha, S. [Hamburger Sternwarte, University of Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s{sup –1} in a loop of length 7.5 × 10{sup 9} cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P {sub 1}/P {sub 2} is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ∼23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  11. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip, E-mail: manoneeta@tifr.res.in, E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  12. Cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections on synchronization and coherence resonance in diffusively coupled calcium oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maosheng; Sun, Runzhi

    2014-03-01

    The cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections (RLRCs) on synchronization and coherence resonance in networks of calcium oscillators have been investigated. Two different types of collective behaviors, coherence resonance (CR) and synchronization, have been studied numerically in the context of chemical Langevin equations (CLEs). In the CLEs, the reaction steps are all stochastic, including the exchange of calcium ions between adjacent and non-adjacent cells through the gap junctions. The calcium oscillators’ synchronization was characterized by the standard deviation of the cytosolic calcium concentrations. Meanwhile, the temporal coherence of the calcium spike train was characterized by the reciprocal coefficient of variance (RCV). Synchronization induced by RLRCs was observed, namely, the exchange of calcium ions between non-adjacent cells can promote the synchronization of the cells. Moreover, it was found that the RCV shows a clear peak when both inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are optimal, indicating the existence of CR. Since inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are two essential ingredients of cellular processes, synchronization and CR are also important for cells’ functions. The results reported in this paper are expected to be useful for understanding the dynamics of intercellular calcium signaling processes in vivo.

  13. Experimental evidence of localized oscillations in the photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mínguez, David G.; Alonso Muñoz, Sergio; Muñuzuri, A. P.; Sagués i Mestre, Francesc

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between Hopf and Turing modes has been the subject of active research in recent years. We present here experimental evidence of the existence of mixed Turing-Hopf modes in a two-dimensional system. Using the photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction (CDIMA) and external constant background illumination as a control parameter, standing spots oscillating in amplitude and with hexagonal ordering were observed. Numerical simulations in the Lengyel-Epstein model ...

  14. Precise Velocity Observation of K-Giants: Evidence for Solar-Like Oscillations in Arcturus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, W. J.

    High accuracy measurements of variations in the radial velocity of the K1 giant star Arcturus have been obtained. The observations span 5 years and have a point-to-point repeatability of 5 m/s and night-to-night stability of better than 20 m/s. Velocity oscillations of Arcturus were discovered during the course of this work in 1986. Subsequent, extensive additional data, indicate that Arcturus is exhibiting global non-radial acoustic oscillations with characteristics similar to those occurring in the Sun. All observations were done using a radial velocity spectrometer, designed to search for extrasolar planets, at a dedicated facility of the University of Arizona on Kitt Peak. A dedicated facility was crucial to this work --- because of the changing nature of the oscillations, many observing runs, over several years, were required to understand the star's behavior. Continuous data sets as long as 30 days were acquired. Preliminary pulsation models were performed in collaboration of Art Cox at Los Alamos National Lab. The velocity power spectra are complicated and variable. There is substantial evidence that the variations are solar-like p-mode oscillations. At least 10 frequencies have been identified, over the range 8.3 to 1.7 days. A spectrum of evenly spaced modes is apparent, yielding a value for Δ nuIo ~1.2mu Hz. The average power spectrum peaks near 3 days. There is a broad envelope of power with a distribution reminiscent of that seen in the Sun. Both the mode spacing and the period of peak power are consistent with scaling from the Sun (Kjeldsen & Bedding 1995, A&A 293, 87). The oscillations appear to undergo abrupt discontinuities and have phase coherence times of a few weeks. We interpret the driving to be due to stochastic excitation by convection. Recent observations of the G5 IV star eta Boo by Brown et al. 1997 (Ap. J. 475, 322) have failed to confirm the detection of p-mode oscillations reported by Kjeldsen et al. 1995 (A.J. 109, 1313). Thus

  15. 豚鼠膀胱Cajal样间质细胞钙震荡特性%Calcium Oscillation Characteristics of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Guinea Pig Bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱国栋; 王勤章

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To ascertain the spontaneous and cyclical calcium oscillation in Cajal-like interstitial cells of Cajal in the bladder of adult guinea-pig.Method:The V-type enzyme collagenase was used to separate primary cells from myoblast of the preparation muscle tissue,primary cells were cultured.Using fluo-4 AM dye the Cells.The change of calcium fluorescence intensity was recorded with laser scanning microscope imaging. The changes of the intracellular calcium concentration was on behalf with the Fluorescence intensity.Result:The Cajal-like interstitial cells maintained its inherent characteristics by primary cultivation.We could see that the cell had a spindle cell body with two slender bipolars.In the Cajal-like interstitial cells of bladder:there were 2 different types of spontaneous calcium,small irregular calcium oscillation and large oscillation slow calcium oscillation.The second type of calcium oscillation was completely different from those of smooth muscle cells.Conclusion:We have confirmed the existence of the spontaneous calcium oscillation in the Cajal-like interstitial cells in the bladder of adult guinea-pig,that like the pacemaker cells of interstitial cells of Cajal in the digestive tract.Implying that part of the Cajal-like interstitial cells may be the pacemaker cells of contraction or activity of bladder.%目的:探讨正常成年豚鼠膀胱Cajal样间质细胞(Cajal-like interstitial cells)是否有自发周期性钙震荡(calcium oscillation),以期为膀胱兴奋性起搏细胞为Cajal样间质细胞这一学说提供实验依据。方法:运用胶原酶V消化法,获得原代豚鼠膀胱Cajal样间质细胞进行培养,采用激光共聚焦显微镜成像技术,Fluo-4AM负载后的Cajal样间质细胞内钙离子荧光强度的变化采用激光共聚焦显微镜成像技术进行记录,荧光强度的改变代表细胞内钙离子浓度的变化。结果:培养后的Cajal样间质细胞保持其固有特征,可

  16. Saturn's Equatorial Oscillation: Evidence of Descending Thermal Structure from Cassini Radio Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinder, P. J.; Flasar, F. M.; Marouf, E. A.; French, R. G.; McGhee, C. A.; Kliore, A. J.; Rappaport, N. J.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Anabtawi, A.

    2011-01-01

    A series of near-equatorial radio occultations of Cassini by Saturn occurred in 2005 and again in 2009-2010. Comparison of the temperature-pressure profiles obtained from the two sets of occultations shows evidence of a descending pattern in the stratosphere that is similar to those associated with equatorial oscillations in Earth's middle atmosphere. This is the first time that this descent has been observed in another planetary atmosphere. If absorption of upwardly propagating waves drives the descent, the implied absorbed flux is 0.05 square meters per square second at least as large if not greater than on Earth.

  17. Evidence for Granulation and Oscillations in Procyon from Photometry with the WIRE satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Bruntt, H; Buzasi, D L; Bedding, T R

    2005-01-01

    We report evidence for the granulation signal in the star Procyon A, based on two photometric time series from the star tracker on the WIRE satellite. The power spectra show evidence of excess power around 1 milliHz, consistent with the detection of p-modes reported from radial velocity measurements. We see a significant increase in the noise level below 3 milliHz, which we interpret as the granulation signal. We have made a large set of numerical simulations to constrain the amplitude and timescale of the granulation signal and the amplitude of the oscillations. We find that the timescale for granulation is T(gran) = 750(200) s, the granulation amplitude is 1.8(0.3) times solar, and the amplitude of the p-modes is 8(3) ppm. We found the distribution of peak heights in the observed power spectra to be consistent with that expected from p-mode oscillations. However, the quality of the data is not sufficient to measure the large separation or detect a comb-like structure, as seen in the p-modes of the Sun. Comp...

  18. Evidence for the impact of stellar activity on the detectability of solar-like oscillations observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Bonanno, A; Broomhall, A -M; Garcia, R A; Hekker, S; Huber, D; Verner, G A; Basu, S; Elsworth, Y; Houdek, G; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; New, R; Stevens, I R; Appourchaux, T; Karoff, C; Metcalfe, T S; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Thompson, M J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Gilliland, R L; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Ballot, J; Benomar, O; Corsaro, E; Campante, T L; Gaulme, P; Hale, S J; Handberg, R; Jarvis, E; Regulo, C; Roxburgh, I W; Salabert, D; Stello, D; Mullally, F; Li, J; Wohler, W

    2011-01-01

    We use photometric observations of solar-type stars, made by the NASA Kepler Mission, to conduct a statistical study of the impact of stellar surface activity on the detectability of solar-like oscillations. We find that the number of stars with detected oscillations fall significantly with increasing levels of activity. The results present strong evidence for the impact of magnetic activity on the properties of near-surface convection in the stars, which appears to inhibit the amplitudes of the stochastically excited, intrinsically damped solar-like oscillations.

  19. High-power continuous-wave tunable 544- and 272-nm beams based on a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier for calcium spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Kim, Yonghee; Park, Hyunmin; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Lim; Lim, Gwon; Han, Jaemin; Ko, Kwang-Hee; Jeong, Do-Young

    2015-08-01

    Continuous-wave single-frequency tunable 544- and 272-nm beams have been demonstrated by the second- and fourth-harmonic conversions of a 1088-nm fundamental beam from a diode-oscillator fiber-amplifier. The single-pass second-harmonic generation with a MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal and the external-cavity frequency-doubling technique with a bulk BBO crystal were employed to achieve an approximately 6-W 544-nm beam and a 1.5-W 272-nm beam, respectively. We characterized the second- and fourth-harmonic generations and discussed their applications to calcium spectroscopy.

  20. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS: DATA OF EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE AND RECOM-MENDATIONS ON PRACTICAL USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The classification of calcium antagonists is presented. There were considered the results of large randomized trials, which were devoted to study of influence of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists on the risk of cardiovascular complications. The place of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in modern recommendations on treatment of arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease is defined. The clinical importance of differences between various presentations of dihy-dropyridine calcium antagonists is stressed.

  1. Theta-burst stimulation of hippocampal slices induces network-level calcium oscillations and activates analogous gene transcription to spatial learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham K Sheridan

    Full Text Available Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3-12 Hz hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to

  2. Skeletal muscle sarcolemma in malignant hyperthermia: evidence for a defect in calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, J R; Ross, J A; Hyslop, R J; Gallant, E M; Louis, C F

    1987-03-12

    Sarcolemmal properties implicated in the skeletal muscle disorder, malignant hyperthermia (MH), were examined using sarcolemma-membrane vesicles isolated from normal and MH-susceptible (MHS) porcine skeletal muscle. MHS and normal sarcolemma did not differ in the distribution of the major proteins, cholesterol or phospholipid content, vesicle size and sidedness, (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity, ouabain binding, or adenylate cyclase activity (total and isoproterenol sensitivity). The regulation of the initial rates of MHS and normal sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport (calcium uptake after 1 min) by Ca2+ (K1/2 = 0.64-0.81 microM), calmodulin, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase were similar. However, when sarcolemmal calcium content was measured at either 2 or 20 min after the initiation of active calcium transport, a significant difference between MHS and normal sarcolemmal calcium uptake became apparent, with MHS sarcolemma accumulating approximately 25% less calcium than normal sarcolemma. Calcium transport by MHS and normal sarcolemma, at 2 or 20 min, had a similar calmodulin dependence (C1/2 = 150 nM), and was stimulated to a similar extent by cAMP-dependent protein kinase or calmodulin. Halothane inhibited MHS and normal sarcolemmal active calcium uptake in a similar fashion (half-maximal inhibition at 10 mM halothane), while dantrolene (30 microM) and nitrendipine (1 microM) had little effect on either MHS or normal sarcolemmal calcium transport. After 20 min of ATP-supported calcium uptake, 2 mM EGTA plus 10 microM sodium orthovanadate were added to initiate sarcolemmal calcium efflux. Following an initial rapid phase of calcium release, an extended slow phase of calcium efflux (k = 0.012 min-1) was similar for both MHS and normal sarcolemma vesicles. We conclude that although a number of sarcolemmal properties, including passive calcium permeability, are normal in MH, a small but significant defect in MHS sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport may

  3. Concave Urinary Crystallines: Direct Evidence of Calcium Oxalate Crystals Dissolution by Citrate In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Feng Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in urinary crystal properties in patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx calculi after oral administration of potassium citrate (K3cit were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD, and zeta potential analyzer. The AFM and SEM results showed that the surface of urinary crystals became concave, the edges and corners of crystals became blunt, the average size of urinary crystallines decreased significantly, and aggregation of urinary crystals was reduced. These changes were attributed to the significant increase in concentration of excreted citrate to  mg/L after K3cit intake from  mg/L before K3cit intake. After the amount of urinary citrate was increased, it complexed with Ca2+ ions on urinary crystals, which dissolved these crystals. Thus, the appearance of concave urinary crystals was a direct evidence of CaOx dissolution by citrate in vivo. The XRD results showed that the quantities and species of urinary crystals decreased after K3cit intake. The mechanism of inhibition of formation of CaOx stones by K3cit was possibly due to the complexation of Ca2+ with citrate, increase in urine pH, concentration of urinary inhibitor glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, and the absolute value of zeta potential after K3cit intake.

  4. Experimental evidence for cadmium uptake via calcium channels in the aquatic insect Chironomus staegeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used the chironomid Chironomus staegeri to investigate the mechanism of cadmium (Cd) uptake in aquatic insects. We exposed C. staegeri larvae to a low nominal Cd concentration (50 nM) for 3 days and measured the effects of calcium (Ca) concentration (0.1-10 mM Ca) as well as the Ca channel blockers lanthanum and verapamil on Cd accumulation. When Ca2+ concentrations were increased above a control (0.1 mM Ca2+) to 1-10 mM, Cd accumulation by larvae was inhibited by from 46 to 88%, respectively. A simple theoretical model of Cd-Ca competition for uptake sites fitted our observations well. Cadmium accumulation was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by both La (73% at 10 μM and 92% at 100 μM) and verapamil (59% at 100 μM and 85% at 300 μM). Our findings represent strong evidence that Cd entry into these insects occurs through Ca channels. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Genetic evidence in the mouse solidifies the calcium hypothesis of myofiber death in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, A R; Molkentin, J D

    2015-09-01

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of degenerative muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and often premature death. Although the primary defect underlying most forms of MD typically results from a loss of sarcolemmal integrity, the secondary molecular mechanisms leading to muscle degeneration and myofiber necrosis is debated. One hypothesis suggests that elevated or dysregulated cytosolic calcium is the common transducing event, resulting in myofiber necrosis in MD. Previous measurements of resting calcium levels in myofibers from dystrophic animal models or humans produced equivocal results. However, recent studies in genetically altered mouse models have largely solidified the calcium hypothesis of MD, such that models with artificially elevated calcium in skeletal muscle manifest fulminant dystrophic-like disease, whereas models with enhanced calcium clearance or inhibited calcium influx are resistant to myofiber death and MD. Here, we will review the field and the recent cadre of data from genetically altered mouse models, which we propose have collectively mostly proven the hypothesis that calcium is the primary effector of myofiber necrosis in MD. This new consensus on calcium should guide future selection of drugs to be evaluated in clinical trials as well as gene therapy-based approaches. PMID:26088163

  6. Synchronization of proximal intratubular pressure oscillations: evidence for interaction between nephrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1987-01-01

    of synchronized, interacting nephrons could be detected. In group A nephrons, i.e., nephrons with a high probability of having their afferent arterioles arising from the same interlobular artery, 29 out of 33 pairs of nephrons were found to show synchronized pressure oscillations. In group B nephrons...... the greater homogeneity in frequency in group A. Furthermore, nephrons having synchronized pressure oscillations were found to interact with each other. Thus, perturbation of the proximal tubular pressure oscillations in one nephron by loop microperfusion affected the amplitude of the pressure oscillations......Previous studies in rat kidneys have demonstrated that oscillations in the proximal intratubular pressure are a prominent feature of the tubulo-glomerular feedback mechanism (TGF) operating during free flow conditions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether a subpopulation...

  7. Evidence for quasi-periodic oscillations in the optical polarization of the blazar PKS 2155-304

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekeur, N. W.; Taylor, A. R.; Potter, S. B.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    2016-10-01

    Evidence for the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the optical polarization of the blazar PKS 2155-304, during a period of enhanced gamma-ray brightness, is presented. The periodogram of the polarized flux revealed the existence of a prominent peak at T ˜ 13 min, detected at >99.7 per cent significance, and T ˜ 30 min, which was nominally significant at >99 per cent. This is the first evidence of QPOs in the polarization of an active galactic nucleus, potentially opening up a new avenue of studying this phenomenon.

  8. Evidence for quasi-periodic oscillations in the optical polarization of the blazar PKS 2155-304

    CERN Document Server

    Pekeur, N W; Potter, S B; Kraan-Korteweg, R C

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the optical polarization of the blazar PKS 2155-304, during a period of enhanced gamma-ray brightness, is presented. The periodogram of the polarized flux revealed the existence of a prominent peak at $T\\sim 13$ min, detected at >99.7% significance, and $T\\sim 30$ min, which was nominally significant at >99%. This is the first evidence of QPOs in the polarization of an active galactic nucleus, potentially opening up a new avenue of studying this phenomenon.

  9. [Cognitive Function and Calcium. Ca2+-dependent regulatory mechanism of circadian clock oscillation and its relevance to neuronal function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Naohiro; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock generates a variety of biological rhythms such as sleep/wake cycles and blood hormone rhythms. The circadian clock also bolsters daily mental activities. In fact, abnormalities of the circadian rhythms are found in several neurological disorders. The circadian clock has two important functions: (i) a cell-autonomous oscillatory function and (ii) a phase-adjusting function that synchronizes the clock oscillation with environmental cycling conditions such as light/dark cycle. Behavioral rhythms are controlled by the central clock in hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The central clock orchestrates peripheral clocks in the other tissues via neuronal connection and/or actions of humoral factors. The molecular mechanism of the cell-autonomous clock is based on transcriptional feedback regulation of clock genes by their encoded products. Ca2+ is essential for not only the light response of the clock but also the cell autonomous oscillation mechanism. This article provides an overview of recent progress in studies of Ca2+-dependent regulatory mechanism of the molecular clockwork. PMID:25634045

  10. Measurement of neutrino oscillation with KamLAND: Evidence of spectral distortion

    OpenAIRE

    Araki, T; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.

    2005-01-01

    We present results of a study of neutrino oscillation based on a 766 ton/year exposure of KamLAND to reactor antineutrinos. We observe 258 v_e candidate events with energies above 3.4 MeV compared to 365.2±23.7 events expected in the absence of neutrino oscillation. Accounting for 17.8±7.3 expected background events, the statistical significance for reactor v_e over bar (e) disappearance is 99.998%. The observed energy spectrum disagrees with the expected spectral shape in the absence of ...

  11. Respiratory Control in Stuttering Speakers: Evidence from Respiratory High-Frequency Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Margaret; Smith, Anne

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether stuttering speakers (N=10) differed from fluent speakers in relations between the neural control systems for speech and life support. It concluded that in some stuttering speakers the relations between respiratory controllers are atypical, but that high participation by the high frequency oscillation-producing circuitry…

  12. Neurodynamic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  13. Evidence of transverse magnetospheric field line oscillations as observed from Cluster and ground magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sinha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic spectrum of ULF waves from magnetic field data obtained by the elliptically orbiting Cluster satellites (with an apogee of 119000km, perigee of 19000km and the orbital period of 57h have been prepared in the frequency range 0 to 120mHz when the satellite was near its perigee. The existence of field line oscillations, with increasing frequency in the inbound sector and decreasing frequency in the outbound sector, is seen in the transverse components, indicating the presence of independently oscillating local magnetic flux tubes in the form of transverse standing Alfvén waves. The results show that toroidal and poloidal modes are excited simultaneously. The analysis of simultaneous ground magnetometer data at the footprint of the satellite suggests that these modes are also excited due to coupling to magnetospheric waveguide modes. The clear signature of a resonant fundamental mode is seen in the ground data whereas Cluster detects a harmonic of this frequency. Lower frequency modes indicative of waveguide oscillations are seen in both the ground data and the compressional field at Cluster.

  14. Empirical evidence for a celestial origin of the climate oscillations and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    We investigate whether or not the decadal and multi-decadal climate oscillations have an astronomical origin. Several global surface temperature records since 1850 and records deduced from the orbits of the planets present very similar power spectra. Eleven frequencies with period between 5 and 100 years closely correspond in the two records. Among them, large climate oscillations with peak-to-trough amplitude of about 0.1 $^oC$ and 0.25 $^oC$, and periods of about 20 and 60 years, respectively, are synchronized to the orbital periods of Jupiter and Saturn. Schwabe and Hale solar cycles are also visible in the temperature records. A 9.1-year cycle is synchronized to the Moon's orbital cycles. A phenomenological model based on these astronomical cycles can be used to well reconstruct the temperature oscillations since 1850 and to make partial forecasts for the 21$^{st}$ century. It is found that at least 60\\% of the global warming observed since 1970 has been induced by the combined effect of the above natural...

  15. Calcium-channel blockers for the prevention of stroke: from scientific evidences to the clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Taddei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF THE REVIEW The present review aims to analyze the role of calcium-channel blockers, and particularly newer molecules, as first-line therapy for cerebrovascular disease. BACKGROUND Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the general population. Among traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hypertension has a key role in the genesis of both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke and a direct correlation exists between blood pressure values and the risk of stroke. Moreover, blood pressure reduction has been demonstrated to be the most important route to reduce stroke incidence and recurrence. However, the mere reduction of blood pressure values does not normalize the cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive patient. It is therefore necessary to use drug classes that beyond their blood pressure-lowering effect have also an additional effect in terms of organ protection. Among these, calcium-channel blockers have a crucial profile. Firstly, they are effective in inducing left ventricular hypertrophy regression, with a strength at least equal to that of ACE-inhibitors. Secondly, they have an antithrombotic and an endothelium-protecting effect, mediated by their antioxidant activity. Finally, calcium-channel blockers are the most powerful drugs in preventing vascular remodeling. For these reasons this drug class has probably the strongest antiatherosclerotic effect, and it is the first-choice treatment mainly for cerebrovascular disease. Among different available calcium-channel blockers, the newer ones seem to possess pharmacokinetic characteristics allowing a more homogeneous 24 hours coverage as compared to older molecules, and preliminary data seem to suggest a greater beneficial effect also on left ventricular hypertrophy and lower incidence of side effects. CONCLUSIONS Although blood pressure reduction is the main tool to reduce cerebrovascular risk in hypertensive patients, some drug classes, such as calciumchannel blockers, seem to provide

  16. Genetic evidence in the mouse solidifies the calcium hypothesis of myofiber death in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Burr, A R; Molkentin, J D

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of degenerative muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and often premature death. Although the primary defect underlying most forms of MD typically results from a loss of sarcolemmal integrity, the secondary molecular mechanisms leading to muscle degeneration and myofiber necrosis is debated. One hypothesis suggests that elevated or dysregulated cytosolic calcium is the common transducing ...

  17. Clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of a dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in providing instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses recent scientific and clinical research validating the effectiveness of a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate, known as Pro-Argin technology, including clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of this toothpaste versus a potassium-based desensitizing toothpaste. It also introduces new clinical data which prove that a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate delivers superior instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity compared to a toothpaste containing 8% strontium acetate.

  18. Experimental evidence of electron neutrino oscillations and validation of MSW-LMA model with Borexino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, M. Buizza

    2011-04-01

    We report the real time measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrino fluxes performed with the Borexino experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The achievement of these measurements was possible thanks to the excellent levels of the radiopurity reached. The measurement of the 7Be in real time is the first direct measurements of the survival probability for solar electron neutrinos in the vacuum region. For 8B we reached a threshold energy of 3MeV which is the lowest achieved so far in real time. For the first time, the same apparatus can measure two different oscillation regions (vacuum-driven and matter-enhanced) predicted by the MSW-LMA model. Borexino also quotes the ratio between the survival probabilities, corresponding to 1.93 ± 0.75, and validates the presence of the transition region between the two oscillation regimes, according to the MSW-LMA solution.In addition, a preliminary result on the Day-Night Asymmetry (ADN) for the 7Be neutrino flux is presented and corresponds to 0.007 ± 0.073. This measurement makes Borexino able to give once more an independent confirmation of the MSW-LMA solution.

  19. Calcium hydroxide: study based on scientific evidences Hidróxido de cálcio: estudo baseado em evidências científicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Estrela

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of calcium hydroxide come from its dissociation into calcium and hydroxyl ions. The action of these ions on tissues and bacteria explains the biological and antimicrobial properties of this substance. Under the conditions of this retrospective of literature, based on scientific evidences, it is possible to state that: 1. Dentin is considered the best pulpal protective, and calcium hydroxide has proved, through numerous studies, its capability of inducing the formation of a mineralized bridge over pulpal tissue. 2. It is necessary, whenever possible, to provide time for calcium hydroxide paste to manifest its potential of action on the microorganisms present in endodontic infections. The maintenance of a high concentration of hydroxyl ions can change bacteria enzymatic activity and promote its inactivation. 3. The site of action of hydroxyl ions of calcium hydroxide includes the enzymes in the cytoplasmic membrane. This medication has a large scope of action, and therefore is effective on a wide range of microorganisms, regardless their metabolic capability. In microbial world, cytoplasmic membranes are similar, irrespective from microorganisms morphological, tinctorial and respiratory characteristics, which means that this medication has a similar effect on aerobic, anaerobic, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. 4. Calcium hydroxide as temporary dressing used between appointments promotes better results on the periapical healing process than the treatment in one appointment.As características do hidróxido de cálcio se desenvolvem a partir da dissociação em íons cálcio e hidroxila. A ação desses íons nos tecidos e bactérias explica as características biológicas e antimicrobianas dessa substância. Por meio desta retrospectiva da literatura, baseada em evidências científicas, é possível afirmar que: 1. A dentina é considerada a melhor proteção pulpar, e o hidróxido de cálcio provou, através de

  20. Qualitative Experimental Evidences for the thermal Wave Mechanisms of temperature Oscillations in Living Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingLiu; XingguoSun; 等

    1996-01-01

    To make it possible for the thermal wave theory on temperature oscillation (TO)effects in living tissues to be founded on the substantial experimental basis,a series of typical decisive experiments in vivo as well as in artificially simulating costructions were carred out.COnclusions obtained including some other scholars animal experimental results all greatly support the thermal wave viewpoint qualitatively,A few experimental facts used not to be easily understood from the classical viewpoint are also well reinterpreted.The revealing on the thermal wave mechanisms of TO in living tissues is a brand new discovery and deep insight into this important thermophysiological phenomenon,It may possibly promote new investigations on the corresponding topics in the field of bioheat transfer science.

  1. Evidence for Granulation and Oscillations in Procyon from Photometry with the WIRE satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Bruntt, H; Kjeldsen, H.; Buzasi, D. L.; Bedding, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    We report evidence for the granulation signal in the star Procyon A, based on two photometric time series from the star tracker on the WIRE satellite. The power spectra show evidence of excess power around 1 milliHz, consistent with the detection of p-modes reported from radial velocity measurements. We see a significant increase in the noise level below 3 milliHz, which we interpret as the granulation signal. We have made a large set of numerical simulations to constrain the amplitude and ti...

  2. Model independent evidence for dark energy evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A

    2014-01-01

    Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) allow us to determine the expansion history of the Universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAO's in the SDSS DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of $H(z)$ at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model independent manner by means of an improved version of the $Om$ diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of $H(z) = 222 \\pm 7$ km/sec/Mpc at $z = 2.34$, when taken in tandem with measurements of $H(z)$ at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic $Omh^2$ from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely $Omh^2 \\approx 0.122 \\pm 0.01$, which is equivalent to $\\Omega_{0m}h^2$ for the spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM model, is in tension with the value $\\Omega_{0m}h^2 = 0.1426 \\pm 0.0025$ determined for $\\Lambda$CDM from P...

  3. Binding of [125I]iodipine to parathyroid cell membranes: Evidence of a dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parathyroid cell is unusual, in that an increase in extracellular calcium concentrations inhibits PTH release. Calcium channels are glycoproteins that span cell membranes and allow entry of extracellular calcium into cells. We have demonstrated that the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791, which opens calcium channels, inhibits PTH release and that the antagonist (-)202-791, which closes calcium channels, stimulates PTH release. To identify the calcium channels responsible for these effects, we used a radioligand that specifically binds to calcium channels. Bovine parathyroid cell membranes were prepared and incubated under reduced lighting with [125I] iodipine (SA, 2000 Ci/mmol), which recognizes 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Bound ligand was separated from free ligand by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters. Nonspecific binding was measured by the inclusion of nifedipine at 10 microM. Specific binding represented approximately 40% of the total binding. The optimal temperature for [125I] iodipine binding was 4 C, and binding reached equilibrium by 30 min. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was approximately 550 pM, and the maximum number of binding sites was 780 fmol/mg protein. Both the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and antagonist (-)202-791 competitively inhibited [125I] iodipine binding, with 50% inhibition concentrations of 20 and 300 nM, respectively. These data indicate the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels on parathyroid cell membranes

  4. Learning about Time within the Spinal Cord II: Evidence that Temporal Regularity Is Encoded by a Spinal Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan H; Huang, Yung-Jen; Grau, James W

    2016-01-01

    How a stimulus impacts spinal cord function depends upon temporal relations. When intermittent noxious stimulation (shock) is applied and the interval between shock pulses is varied (unpredictable), it induces a lasting alteration that inhibits adaptive learning. If the same stimulus is applied in a temporally regular (predictable) manner, the capacity to learn is preserved and a protective/restorative effect is engaged that counters the adverse effect of variable stimulation. Sensitivity to temporal relations implies a capacity to encode time. This study explores how spinal neurons discriminate variable and fixed spaced stimulation. Communication with the brain was blocked by means of a spinal transection and adaptive capacity was tested using an instrumental learning task. In this task, subjects must learn to maintain a hind limb in a flexed position to minimize shock exposure. To evaluate the possibility that a distinct class of afferent fibers provide a sensory cue for regularity, we manipulated the temporal relation between shocks given to two dermatomes (leg and tail). Evidence for timing emerged when the stimuli were applied in a coherent manner across dermatomes, implying that a central (spinal) process detects regularity. Next, we show that fixed spaced stimulation has a restorative effect when half the physical stimuli are randomly omitted, as long as the stimuli remain in phase, suggesting that stimulus regularity is encoded by an internal oscillator Research suggests that the oscillator that drives the tempo of stepping depends upon neurons within the rostral lumbar (L1-L2) region. Disrupting communication with the L1-L2 tissue by means of a L3 transection eliminated the restorative effect of fixed spaced stimulation. Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed.

  5. Learning About Time Within the Spinal Cord II: Evidence that Temporal Regularity is Encoded by a Spinal Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Hsien Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available How a stimulus impacts spinal cord function depends upon temporal relations. When intermittent noxious stimulation (shock is applied and the interval between shock pulses is varied (unpredictable, it induces a lasting alteration that inhibits adaptive learning. If the same stimulus is applied in a temporally regular (predictable manner, the capacity to learn is preserved and a protective/restorative effect is engaged that counters the adverse effect of variable stimulation. Sensitivity to temporal relations implies a capacity to encode time. This study explores how spinal neurons discriminate variable and fixed spaced stimulation. Communication with the brain was blocked by means of a spinal transection and adaptive capacity was tested using an instrumental learning task. In this task, subjects must learn to maintain a hind limb in a flexed position to minimize shock exposure. To evaluate the possibility that a distinct class of afferent fibers provide a sensory cue for regularity, we manipulated the temporal relation between shocks given to two dermatomes (leg and tail. Evidence for timing emerged when the stimuli were applied in a coherent manner across dermatomes, implying that a central (spinal process detects regularity. Next, we show that fixed spaced stimulation has a restorative effect when half the physical stimuli are randomly omitted, as long as the stimuli remain in phase, suggesting that stimulus regularity is encoded by an internal oscillator Research suggests that the oscillator that drives the tempo of stepping depends upon neurons within the rostral lumbar (L1-L2 region. Disrupting communication with the L1-L2 tissue by means of a L3 transection eliminated the restorative effect of fixed spaced stimulation. Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed.

  6. Calcium isotope evidence for pulses of increased continental weathering during the early Toarcian (Early Jurassic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suan, Guillaume; Brazier, Jean-Michel; Balter, Vincent; Simon, Laurent; Mattioli, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    The Toarcian interval is punctuated by a number of episodes of environmental changes and mass extinctions that are considered as some of the most severe of the Mesozoic era. Significantly, the corresponding strata record marked negative carbon isotope excursions that point to pulses of massive injection of isotopically light carbon to the superficial reservoirs. Potential causes of these perturbations include gas hydrate dissociation, wildfires, and massive inputs of thermogenic and volcanogenic carbon related to the onset of volcanic activity of the Karoo-Ferrar province. All these scenarii imply large increases in chemical weathering rate as key drivers of the accompanying biotic and environmental perturbations (e.g., productivity-driven anoxia and coastal eutrophication). Nevertheless, detailed examination of most likely cause(s) of these events has been hampered by the uncertainty surrounding the timing and intensity of coeval changes in continental weathering. In this study, we reconstruct changes in continental weathering during the Toarcian using new calcium isotope ratios δ44/42Ca of brachiopods and bulk rock sediments from the Peniche section in Portugal. The data reveal two marked (>0.4permil) negative Ca-isotope excursions near the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition (Pl-To) and at the base of the levisoni ammonite Zone recording the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE). The comparison of the brachiopod and bulk rock Ca isotope data indicates that these excursions reflect changes in the global Ca-isotope composition of seawater rather than changes in the dominant mineralogy of calcifying organisms. Mass balance calculations suggest that the Ca-isotope excursions recorded across the Pl-To transition and T-OAE interval can be explained by the Ca inputs from rivers corresponding respectively to 90% and 34% of the initial mass of oceanic Ca. Based on these values, the injection of tens of thousands of gigatons of carbon with a C-isotope composition

  7. Cortical oscillations in auditory perception and speech: evidence for two temporal windows in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan eLuo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds, including vocal communication sounds, contain critical information at multiple time scales. Two essential temporal modulation rates in speech have been argued to be in the low gamma band (~20-80 ms duration information and the theta band (~150-300 ms, corresponding to segmental and syllabic modulation rates, respectively. On one hypothesis, auditory cortex implements temporal integration using time constants closely related to these values. The neural correlates of a proposed dual temporal window mechanism in human auditory cortex remain poorly understood. We recorded MEG responses from participants listening to non-speech auditory stimuli with different temporal structures, created by concatenating frequency-modulated segments of varied segment durations. We show that these non-speech stimuli with temporal structure matching speech-relevant scales (~25 ms and ~200 ms elicit reliable phase tracking in the corresponding associated oscillatory frequencies (low gamma and theta bands. In contrast, stimuli with non-matching temporal structure do not. Furthermore, the topography of theta band phase tracking shows rightward lateralization while gamma band phase tracking occurs bilaterally. The results support the hypothesis that there exists multi-time resolution processing in cortex on discontinuous scales and provide evidence for an asymmetric organization of temporal analysis (asymmetrical sampling in time, AST. The data argue for a macroscopic-level neural mechanism underlying multi-time resolution processing: the sliding and resetting of intrinsic temporal windows on privileged time scales.

  8. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  9. Calcium Electroporation: Evidence for Differential Effects in Normal and Malignant Cell Lines, Evaluated in a 3D Spheroid Model

    OpenAIRE

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha; Gehl, Julie; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill efficacy–and normal cell sensitivity. Methods Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different h...

  10. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10-3 M H2O2. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10-3M H2O2 oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H2O2 utilising 45calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H2O2-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo

  11. Evidence for the impact of stellar activity on the detectability of solar-like oscillations observed by Kepler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Chaplin; T.R. Bedding; A. Bonanno; A.M. Broomhall; R.A. Garcia; S. Hekker; D. Huber; G.A. Verner; S. Basu; Y. Elsworth; G. Houdek; S. Mathur; B. Mosser; R. New; I.R. Stevens; T. Appourchaux; C. Karoff; T.S. Metcalfe; J. Molenda-Zakowicz; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; M.J. Thompson; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; R.L. Gilliland; S.D. Kawaler; H. Kjeldsen; J. Ballot; O. Benomar; E. Corsaro; T.L. Campante; P. Gaulme; S.J. Hale; R. Handberg; E. Jarvis; C. Regulo; I.W. Roxburgh; D. Salabert; D. Stello; F. Mullally; J. Li; W. Wohler

    2011-01-01

    We use photometric observations of solar-type stars, made by the NASA Kepler Mission, to conduct a statistical study of the impact of stellar surface activity on the detectability of solar-like oscillations. We find that the number of stars with detected oscillations falls significantly with increas

  12. Calcium Electroporation: Evidence for Differential Effects in Normal and Malignant Cell Lines, Evaluated in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Krog Frandsen

    Full Text Available Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity.Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29, a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780, and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231, as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n.The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001 or electrochemotherapy using bleomycin (p<0.0001. Strikingly, the size of normal fibroblast spheroids was neither affected after calcium electroporation nor electrochemotherapy using bleomycin, indicating that calcium electroporation, like electrochemotherapy, will have limited adverse effects on the surrounding normal tissue when treating with calcium electroporation. The intracellular ATP level, which has previously been shown to be depleted after calcium electroporation, was measured in the spheroids after treatment. The results showed a dramatic decrease in the intracellular ATP level (p<0.01 in all four spheroid types-malignant as well as normal.In conclusion, calcium electroporation seems to be more effective in inducing cell death in cancer cell spheroids than in a normal fibroblast spheroid, even though intracellular ATP level is depleted in all spheroid types after treatment. These results may indicate an important therapeutic window for this therapy; although further studies are needed in vivo and in patients to investigate the effect of calcium electroporation on surrounding normal tissue when

  13. Evidences for a quasi 60-year North Atlantic Oscillation since 1700 and its meaning for global climate change

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzarella, Adriano; 10.1007/s00704-011-0499-4

    2012-01-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) obtained using instrumental and documentary proxy predictors from Eurasia is found to be characterized by a quasi 60-year dominant oscillation since 1650. This pattern emerges clearly once the NAO record is time integrated to stress its comparison with the temperature record. The integrated NAO (INAO) is found to well correlate with the length of the day (since 1650) and the global surface sea temperature record HadSST2 and HadSST3 (since 1850). These findings suggest that INAO can be used as a good proxy for global climate change, and that a 60-year cycle exists in the global climate since at least 1700. Finally, the INAO ~60-year oscillation well correlates with the ~60- year oscillations found in the historical European aurora record since 1700, which suggests that this 60-year dominant climatic cycle has a solar-astronomical origin.

  14. No evidence for role of extracellular choline-acetyltransferase in generation of gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollnagel, J O; ul Haq, R; Behrens, C J; Maslarova, A; Mody, I; Heinemann, U

    2015-01-22

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is well known to induce persistent γ-oscillations in the hippocampus when applied together with physostigmine, an inhibitor of the ACh degrading enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Here we report that physostigmine alone can also dose-dependently induce γ-oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We hypothesized that this effect was due to the presence of choline in the extracellular space and that this choline is taken up into cholinergic fibers where it is converted to ACh by the enzyme choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT). Release of ACh from cholinergic fibers in turn may then induce γ-oscillations. We therefore tested the effects of the choline uptake inhibitor hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) on persistent γ-oscillations either induced by physostigmine alone or by co-application of ACh and physostigmine. We found that HC-3 itself did not induce γ-oscillations and also did not prevent physostigmine-induced γ-oscillation while washout of physostigmine and ACh-induced γ-oscillations was accelerated. It was recently reported that ChAT might also be present in the extracellular space (Vijayaraghavan et al., 2013). Here we show that the effect of physostigmine was prevented by the ChAT inhibitor (2-benzoylethyl)-trimethylammonium iodide (BETA) which could indicate extracellular synthesis of ACh. However, when we tested for effects of extracellularly applied acetyl-CoA, a substrate of ChAT for synthesis of ACh, physostigmine-induced γ-oscillations were attenuated. Together, these findings do not support the idea that ACh can be synthesized by an extracellularly located ChAT. PMID:25453770

  15. Calcium absorption and calcium binding protein synthesis in the chick: evidence for a 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like factor in solanum malacoxylon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, R.H.; Bar, A.; Corradino, R.A.; Taylor, A.N.; Peterlik, M.

    1974-01-01

    Some properties of the vitamin D dependent CaBP have been briefly summarized. In addition to providing possible insight into the molecular basis of vitamin D action, the measurement of intestinal CaBP in animals subjected to different conditions and treatments has proven useful in assessing the effective vitamin D status of that animal. Using measurements of both the degree of intestinal /sup 47/Ca absorption in situ and duodenal CaBP levels, some aspects of the vitamin D-like factor in the South American plant Solanum malacoxylon were investigated. A vitamin D assay based on CaBP as end point indicated that the plant contains about 1.3 x 10/sup 5/ IU vitamin D/sub 3/ equivalents per kg. The Solanum factor, together with an adequate calcium intake, are necessary conditions for the product of gross toxic symptoms in the chick. Using experimental conditions that inhibit the conversion of 25-(OH)D/sub 3/ to 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ by the kidney enzyme system (i.e., a high stable strontium diet), it was shown that the Solanum factor can cause a reversal of this inhibition. This suggested that the Solanum factor mimics the action of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/, and this was confirmed by Walling and Kimberg (personal communication) since, in their hands, the administration of S. malacoxylon extract to nephrectomized rats was able to stimulate intestinal calcium transport in vitro. Similar results were brought forth at this meeting by Dr. Mautalen of Argentina. The Solanum factor was effective in an intestinal organ culture system, indicating that the factor acts directly on the gut and, if modification of the factor is needed for biological activity, the necessary enzymes are present in the intestinal tissue.

  16. Evidence for Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in the Recurrent Emission from Magnetars and their Implications on the Neutron Star Properties and Equation of State

    CERN Document Server

    El-Mezeini, Ahmed M

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of highly magnetized neutron stars "magnetars", in search for high frequency oscillations in the recurrent emission from the soft gamma repeater SGR 1806-20, and we discuss the physical interpretation of these oscillations and its implications on the neutron star properties and structure. We present evidence for Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the recurrent outburst activity from SGR 1806-20 using RXTE observations. By searching for timing signals at the frequencies of the QPOs discovered in the 2004 December 27 giant flare from the source, we find three QPOs at 84, 103, and 648 Hz in three different bursts. The first two QPOs lie within 8.85% and 11.83%, respectively, from the 92 Hz QPO detected in the giant flare. The third QPO lie within 3.75% from the 625 Hz QPO also detected in the same flare. The detected QPOs are found in bursts with different durations, morphologies, and brightness, and are vindicated by Monte Carlo simulations. We also find evidence for candidate QPOs at ...

  17. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Krishna; Douglas, Sophie; Parekh, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU) but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  18. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Samanta

    Full Text Available Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  19. Glucose-stimulated calcium dynamics in islets of Langerhans in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    Full Text Available In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future.

  20. Estradiol coupling to human monocyte nitric oxide release is dependent on intracellular calcium transients: evidence for an estrogen surface receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, G B; Prevot, V; Beauvillain, J C; Fimiani, C; Welters, I; Cadet, P; Breton, C; Pestel, J; Salzet, M; Bilfinger, T V

    1999-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that estrogen acutely stimulates constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) activity in human peripheral monocytes by acting on an estrogen surface receptor. NO release was measured in real time with an amperometric probe. 17beta-estradiol exposure to monocytes stimulated NO release within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas 17alpha-estradiol had no effect. 17beta-estradiol conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) also stimulated NO release, suggesting mediation by a membrane surface receptor. Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor, antagonized the action of both 17beta-estradiol and E2-BSA, whereas ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the nuclear estrogen receptor, had no effect. We further showed, using a dual emission microfluorometry in a calcium-free medium, that the 17beta-estradiol-stimulated release of monocyte NO was dependent on the initial stimulation of intracellular calcium transients in a tamoxifen-sensitive process. Leeching out the intracellular calcium stores abolished the effect of 17beta-estradiol on NO release. RT-PCR analysis of RNA obtained from the cells revealed a strong estrogen receptor-alpha amplification signal and a weak beta signal. Taken together, a physiological dose of estrogen acutely stimulates NO release from human monocytes via the activation of an estrogen surface receptor that is coupled to increases in intracellular calcium. PMID:10490972

  1. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 4: Alpha blockers v calcium blockers to increase spontaneous passage of renal calculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexander; Ferguson, Craig

    2013-02-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish the administration of an alpha-1 receptor antagonist or a calcium channel blocker would facilitate the most rapid and successful expulsion of a stone from a patient with uncomplicated renal colic. 597 articles were found using the reported search, of which five trials were selected as providing the best evidence to answer this question. The authors, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. It is concluded that in a patient with an uncomplicated ureteric calculus tamsulosin is more effective than nifedipine in promoting speedy and successful expulsion of the stone.

  2. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  3. Pathophysiology of incomplete renal tubular acidosis in recurrent renal stone formers: evidence of disturbed calcium, bone and citrate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Bollerslev, Jens; Hansen, A B;

    1993-01-01

    Urinary acidification, bone metabolism and urinary excretion of calcium and citrate were evaluated in 10 recurrent stone formers with incomplete renal tubular acidosis (iRTA), 10 recurrent stone formers with normal urinary acidification (NUA) and 10 normal controls (NC). Patients with iRTA had......-carbonic acidosis during fasting may be a pathophysilogical factor of both nephrolithiasis and disturbed bone metabolism in stone formers with iRTA....... significantly increased in iRTA compared with NUA and NC (P <0.01), indicating increased bone turnover in stone formers with iRTA. Stone formers with iRTA thus presented with disturbed calcium, bone and citrate metabolism--the same metabolic abnormalities which characterize classic type 1 RTA. Mild non...

  4. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003603.htm Calcium - urine To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order ...

  5. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  6. Ryanodine modification of cardiac muscle responses to potassium-free solutions. Evidence for inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    To test whether ryanodine blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle, we examined its effects on the aftercontractions and transient depolarizations or transient inward currents developed by guinea pig papillary muscles and voltage-clamped calf cardiac Purkinje fibers in potassium-free solutions. Ryanodine (0.1-1.0 microM) abolished or prevented aftercontractions and transient depolarizations by the papillary muscles without affecting any of the other sequ...

  7. Evidence for the role of the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation and the ocean heat uptake in hiatus prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Antonello; Triacca, Umberto; Attanasio, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The recent hiatus in global temperature at the surface has been analysed by several studies, mainly using global climate models. The common accepted picture is that since the late 1990s, the increase in anthropogenic radiative forcings has been counterbalanced by other factors, e.g., a decrease in natural forcings, augmented ocean heat storage and negative phases of ocean-atmosphere-coupled oscillation patterns. Here, simple vector autoregressive models are used for forecasting the temperature hiatus in the period 2001-2014. This gives new insight into the problem of understanding the ocean contribution (in terms of heat uptake and atmosphere-ocean-coupled oscillations) to the appearance of this recent hiatus. In particular, considering data about the ocean heat content until a depth of 700 m and the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation is necessary for correctly forecasting the hiatus, so catching both trend and interannual variability. Our models also show that the ocean heat uptake is substantially driven by the natural component of the total radiative forcing at a decadal time scale, confining the importance of the anthropogenic influences to a longer range warming of the ocean.

  8. Prolonged Diuretic Activity and Calcium-Sparing Effect of Tropaeolum majus: Evidence in the Prevention of Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Neris Barboza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies indicate high effectiveness in the use of the hydroethanolic extract from Tropaeolum majus (HETM as a diuretic, the impact of its prolonged use in the presence of low estrogen levels remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the diuretic effects of prolonged administration of HETM in ovariectomized rats and their interrelationship between calcium excretion and bone turnover. Forty-two female Wistar rats were ovariectomized (OVX and treated orally with different doses of HETM (3, 30, and 300 mg/kg for 4 weeks. On the first day of treatment and at weekly intervals for four weeks the diuretic activity was evaluated. Electrolyte concentrations and creatinine levels were estimated from urine sample of each rat. The serum lipids, urea, creatinine, and osteocalcin were also measured at the end of the experiment. The data revealed that the HETM was able to sustain its diuretic effect after prolonged treatment. Moreover, its use has not affected the urinary calcium or potassium excretion, reduces lipid levels, and maintains osteocalcin levels similarly to untreated rats. These findings support the potential of HETM as a candidate to be used in clinical conditions in which the renal loss of calcium is not desired.

  9. Neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecture notes on neutrino oscillations are given, including some background about neutrino mixing and masses, descriptions of flavour oscillations and experimental attempts to detect them, matter effects and neutrino-antineutrino oscillations. (U.K.)

  10. The epileptic thalamocortical network is a macroscopic self-sustained oscillator: evidence from frequency-locking experiments in rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, J L Perez; Erra, R Guevara; Rosenblum, M

    2015-02-12

    The rhythmic activity observed in nervous systems, in particular in epilepsies and Parkinson's disease, has often been hypothesized to originate from a macroscopic self-sustained neural oscillator. However, this assumption has not been tested experimentally. Here we support this viewpoint with in vivo experiments in a rodent model of absence seizures, by demonstrating frequency locking to external periodic stimuli and finding the characteristic Arnold tongue. This result has important consequences for developing methods for the control of brain activity, such as seizure cancellation.

  11. Fractional amplitude of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation from 4U 1728-34: evidence of decline at higher energies

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arunava; 10.1088/0004-637X/756/1/55

    2012-01-01

    A kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillation (kHz QPO) is an observationally robust high-frequency timing feature detected from neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). This feature can be very useful to probe the superdense core matter of neutron stars, and the strong gravity regime. However, although many models exist in the literature, the physical origin of kHz QPO is not known, and hence this feature cannot be used as a tool yet. The energy dependence of kHz QPO fractional rms amplitude is an important piece of the jigsaw puzzle to understand the physical origin of this timing feature. It is known that the fractional rms amplitude increases with energy at lower energies. At higher energies, the amplitude is usually believed to saturate, although this is not established. We combine tens of lower kHz QPOs from a neutron star LMXB 4U 1728-34 in order to improve the signal-to-noise-ratio. Consequently, we, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, find a significant and systematic decrease of the fract...

  12. Differences between CO- and calcium triplet-derived velocity dispersions in spiral galaxies: evidence for central star formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Riffel, Rogemar A; Mason, Rachel; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Martins, Lucimara; Riffel, Rogerio; Diaz, Ruben; Colina, Luis; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Flohic, Helene; Martin, Omaira Gonzalez; Lira, Paulina; McDermid, Richard; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Schiavon, Ricardo; Thanjavur, Karun; Dutra, Daniel Ruschel; Winge, Claudia; Perlman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We examine the stellar velocity dispersions (sigma) of a sample of 48 galaxies, 35 of which are spirals, from the Palomar nearby galaxy survey. It is known that for ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and merger remnants thesigma derived from the near-infrared CO band-heads is smaller than that measured from optical lines, while no discrepancy between these measurements is found for early-type galaxies. No such studies are available for spiral galaxies - the subject of this paper. We used cross-dispersed spectroscopic data obtained with the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS), with spectral coverage from 0.85 to 2.5um, to obtain sigma measurements from the 2.29 $\\mu$m CO band-heads (sigma_{CO}), and the 0.85 um calcium triplet (sigma_{CaT}). For the spiral galaxies in the sample, we found that sigma_{CO} is smaller than sigma_{CaT}, with a mean fractional difference of 14.3%. The best fit to the data is given by sigma_{opt} = (46.0+/-18.1) + (0.85+/-0.12)sigma_{CO}. This "sigma discrepancy" may be...

  13. Hydrological evidence for a North Atlantic oscillation during the Little Ice Age outside its range observed since 1850

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín-Puertas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An annual-resolved precipitation reconstruction for the last 800 yr in Southern Spain has been performed using stable carbon isotope (δ13C of Pinus nigra tree rings. The reconstruction exhibits high- to low-frequency variability and distinguishes a Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1350–1850 characterized by lower averaged rainfall than both in the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the LIA and in the 20th century. The driest conditions are recorded during the Maunder solar Minimum (mid 17th–early 18th centuries, in good agreement with the Spanish documentary archive. Similar linkage between solar activity (maximum/minimum and precipitation (increase/decrease is observed throughout the entire LIA. Additionally, the relationship between the hydrological pattern in the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco during the LIA suggests different spatial distribution of precipitation in the south-eastern sector of the North Atlantic region such as it is known currently. Whereas in the instrumental record the precipitation evolves similarly in both regions and opposite to the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO index, the coldest periods of the LIA shows a contrasting pattern with drier conditions in the South of Spain and wetter in Northern Africa. We suggest an extreme negative NAO conditions, accompanied by a southward excursion of the winter rainfall band beyond that observed in the last century, can explain this contrast. The sustained NAO conditions could have been triggered by solar minima and higher volcanic activity during the LIA.

  14. A Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Interactswith and Activates A Calcium Channel toRequlate Pollen Tube Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Calcium, as a ubiquitous second messenger, plays essential roles in tip-growing cells, such as animal neu-rons, plant pollen tubes, and root hairs. However, little is known concerning the regulatory mechanisms that code anddecode Ca2+ signals in plants. The evidence presented here indicates that a calcium-dependent protein kinase, CPK32,controls polar growth of pollen tubes. Overexpression of CPK32 disrupted the polar growth along with excessive Ca2+accumulation in the tip. A search of downstream effector molecules for CPK32 led to identification of a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, CNGC18, as an interacting partner for CPK32. Co-expression of CPK32 and CNGC18 resulted in activationof CNGC18 in Xenopus oocytes where expression of CNGC18 alone did not exhibit significant calcium channel activity.Overexpression of CNGC18 produced a growth arrest phenotype coupled with accumulation of calcium in the tip, simi-lar to that induced by CPK32 overexpression. Co-expression of CPK32 and CNGC18 had a synergistic effect leading tomore severe depolarization of pollen tube growth. These results provide a potential feed-forward mechanism in whichcalcium-activated CPK32 activates CNGC18, further promoting calcium entry during the elevation phase of Ca2+ oscilla-tions in the polar growth of pollen tubes.

  15. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  16. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  17. Protein intake and calcium absorption – Potential role of the calcium sensor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary protein induces calcium excretion but the source of this calcium is unclear. Evidence from short-term studies indicates that protein promotes bone resorption, but many epidemiologic studies do not corroborate this. Evidence is also mixed on weather protein promotes calcium absorption. Stud...

  18. Evident?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plant, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind......Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind...

  19. Galactic oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    Long-lived oscillations that act like normal modes are described. The total kinetic energy is found to vary with time by amounts far in excess of the fluctuations expected from the virial theorem, and the variation shows periodic patterns that suggest oscillations. Experimental results indicate that oscillation amplitudes depend on the nature of the model. It is noted that it is difficult to answer questions about likely amplitudes in real galaxies with any confidence at the present time.

  20. Oscillations in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Jaroslav; Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J T

    2007-04-01

    Oscillations are surprisingly common in the immune system, both in its healthy state and in disease. The most famous example is that of periodic fevers caused by the malaria parasite. A number of hereditary disorders, which also cause periodic fevers, have also been known for a long time. Various reports of oscillations in cytokine concentrations following antigen challenge have been published over at least the past three decades. Oscillations can also occur at the intracellular level. Calcium oscillations following T-cell activation are familiar to all immunologists, and metabolic and reactive oxygen species oscillations in neutrophils have been well documented. More recently, oscillations in nuclear factor kappaB activity following stimulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha have received considerable publicity. However, despite all of these examples, oscillations in the immune system still tend to be considered mainly as pathological aberrations, and their causes and significance remained largely unknown. This is partly because of a lack of awareness within the immunological community of the appropriate theoretical frameworks for describing and analyzing such behavior. We provide an introduction to these frameworks and give a survey of the currently known oscillations that occur within the immune system. PMID:17367345

  1. Meixner oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atakishiyev, N.M. [Instituto de Matematicas. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Jafarov, E.I.; Nagiyev, S.M. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences. Baku, Azerbaijan (Azerbaijan); Wolf, K.B. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y en Sistemas. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    1998-10-01

    Meixner oscillators have a ground state and an energy spectrum that is equally spaced; they are a two-parameter family of models that satisfy a Hamiltonian equation with a difference operator. Meixner oscillators include as limits and particular cases the Charlier, Kravchuk and Hermite (common quantum-mechanical) harmonic oscillators. By the Sommerfeld-Watson transformation they are also related with a relativistic model of the linear harmonic oscillator, built in terms of the Meixner-Pollaczek polynomials, and their continuous weight function. We construct explicitly the corresponding coherent states with the dynamical symmetry group Sp(2,R). The reproducing kernel for the wavefunctions of these models is also found. (Author)

  2. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (bh) Sources:. Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuck, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2006-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard state, steep power-law (soft) state and in transition between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (> 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e. 60-90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT ≳ 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Γ ~ 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (kT ≲ 5 keV); the index for this state, Γ ~ 2.8 is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in converging flow into

  3. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%-90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT>~50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Γ~1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT<~5 keV; the index for this state, Γ~2.8, is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in a

  4. Glucose-stimulated oscillations in free cytosolic ATP concentration imaged in single islet beta-cells: evidence for a Ca2+-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-02-01

    Normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is pulsatile, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this pulsatility are poorly understood. Oscillations in the intracellular free [ATP]/[ADP] ratio represent one possible mechanism because they would be expected to cause fluctuations in ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activity and hence oscillatory Ca(2+) influx. After imaging recombinant firefly luciferase, expressed via an adenoviral vector in single human or mouse islet beta-cells, we report here that cytosolic free ATP concentrations oscillate and that these oscillations are affected by glucose. In human beta-cells, oscillations were observed at both 3 and 15 mmol/l glucose, but the oscillations were of a longer wavelength at the higher glucose concentration (167 vs. 66 s). Mouse beta-cells displayed oscillations in both cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] only at elevated glucose concentrations, both with a period of 120 s. To explore the causal relationship between [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] oscillations, the regulation of each was further investigated in populations of MIN6 beta-cells. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free medium lowered cytosolic [Ca(2+)] but increased [ATP] in MIN6 cells at both 3 and 30 mmol/l glucose. Removal of external Ca(2+) increased [ATP], possibly by decreasing ATP consumption by endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases. These results allow a model to be constructed of the beta-cell metabolic oscillator that drives nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

  5. Oscillate Boiling

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Fenfang; Nguyen, Dang Minh; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We report about an intriguing boiling regime occurring for small heaters embedded on the boundary in subcooled water. The microheater is realized by focusing a continuous wave laser beam to about $10\\,\\mu$m in diameter onto a 165\\,nm-thick layer of gold, which is submerged in water. After an initial vaporous explosion a single bubble oscillates continuously and repeatably at several $100\\,$kHz. The microbubble's oscillations are accompanied with bubble pinch-off leading to a stream of gaseous bubbles into the subcooled water. The self-driven bubble oscillation is explained with a thermally kicked oscillator caused by the non-spherical collapses and by surface pinning. Additionally, Marangoni stresses induce a recirculating streaming flow which transports cold liquid towards the microheater reducing diffusion of heat along the substrate and therefore stabilizing the phenomenon to many million cycles. We speculate that this oscillate boiling regime may allow to overcome the heat transfer thresholds observed dur...

  6. Noise-Induced Bursting and Coherence Resonance in Minimal Cytosolic Ca2+ Oscillation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Ya; YANG Li-Jian; WU Dan; LIU Quan; ZHAN Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A stochastic calcium oscillation model based on the minimal calcium oscillation model is investigated by numerical computation. When the extracellular stimulation is sub-threshold and random, the oscillations of cytosolic calcium show complex behaviour: a bursting-like phenomenon induced by noise, that is, the phase of glomerate spikes are separated by phase of quiescence (but fluctuations in the baseline values of calcium with small amplitude during the silent phase), in a pattern that occurs at irregular inter,ls. By using the histogram of interspike intervals of calcium concentration spikes, it is found that the noise-induced coherence resonance phenomenon occurs at the cellular level.

  7. Interaction-induced quantum phase revivals and evidence for the transition to the quantum chaotic regime in 1D atomic Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Kirilov, E; Lauber, K; Weinmann, P; Gröbner, M; Nägerl, H-C

    2014-05-16

    We study atomic Bloch oscillations in an ensemble of one-dimensional tilted superfluids in the Bose-Hubbard regime. For large values of the tilt, we observe interaction-induced coherent decay and matter-wave quantum phase revivals of the Bloch oscillating ensemble. We analyze the revival period dependence on interactions by means of a Feshbach resonance. When reducing the value of the tilt, we observe the disappearance of the quasiperiodic phase revival signature towards an irreversible decay of Bloch oscillations, indicating the transition from regular to quantum chaotic dynamics.

  8. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco;

    2015-01-01

    inductance. A large amount of measurements have been acquired on commercial IGBT modules evidencing gate voltage oscillations under short circuit conditions. To tackle this problem, similar tests have been performed on a modified version of the same modules with two parallel sections and one single section....... Mutual oscillations between two parallel sections have been evidenced, whereas single section configuration does not exhibit such instability. According to the experimental observations, it can be concluded that these oscillations are initiated by the paralleling of IGBT chips and sustained by a positive...

  9. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits.

  10. Calcium homeostasis and low-frequency magnetic and electric field exposure: A systematic review and meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Portelli, Lucas A; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Terwel, Sofie R; Kuster, Niels; de Vries, Rob B M; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency magnetic field (LF MF) exposure is recurrently suggested to have the ability to induce health effects in society. Therefore, in vitro model systems are used to investigate biological effects of exposure. LF MF induced changes of the cellular calcium homeostasis are frequently hypothesised to be the possible target, but this hypothesis is both substantiated and rejected by numerous studies in literature. Despite the large amount of data, no systematic analysis of in vitro studies has been conducted to address the strength of evidence for an association between LF MF exposure and calcium homeostasis. Our systematic review, with inclusion of 42 studies, showed evidence for an association of LF MF with internal calcium concentrations and calcium oscillation patterns. The oscillation frequency increased, while the amplitude and the percentage of oscillating cells remained constant. The intracellular calcium concentration increased (SMD 0.351, 95% CI 0.126, 0.576). Subgroup analysis revealed heterogeneous effects associated with the exposure frequency, magnetic flux density and duration. Moreover, we found support for the presence of MF-sensitive cell types. Nevertheless, some of the included studies may introduce a great risk of bias as a result of uncontrolled or not reported exposure conditions, temperature ranges and ambient fields. In addition, mathematical calculations of the parasitic induced electric fields (IEFs) disclosed their association with increased intracellular calcium. Our results demonstrate that LF MF might influence the calcium homeostasis in cells in vitro, but the risk of bias and high heterogeneity (I(2)>75%) weakens the analyses. Therefore any potential clinical implications await further investigation. PMID:26872872

  11. Solar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amongst all stars observed to pulsate, the Sun has by far the largest number and variety of modes of oscillation. This presents a unique opportunity to apply and test stellar oscillation theory. To match the observational accuracy, very precise calculations of oscillation frequencies are needed. Asymptotic methods have proved useful in the analysis and interpretation of the frequencies. The results provide tight constraints on solar models; they may also enable a direct determination of properties of the solar interior. There are difficulties in reconciling the amplitudes obtained in Doppler velocity with those observed in the apparent position of the solar limb. The excitation of the oscillations is so far not well understood, although it is probable that the interaction between pulsation and convection plays an important role. (orig.)

  12. Power oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  13. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  14. Calcium Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latvia - Lebanon - Libya - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Macedonia, Republic of - Malaysia - Malta - Mexico - Moldova - Morocco - Netherlands - New Zealand - Nigeria - ... and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What is Osteoporosis? The Board Introduction to Bone ...

  15. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  16. Hippocampal theta oscillations are travelling waves

    OpenAIRE

    Lubenov, Evgueniy V.; Siapas, Athanassios G.

    2009-01-01

    Theta oscillations clock hippocampal activity during awake behaviour and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. These oscillations are prominent in the local field potential, and they also reflect the subthreshold membrane potential and strongly modulate the spiking of hippocampal neurons. The prevailing view is that theta oscillations are synchronized throughout the hippocampus, despite the lack of conclusive experimental evidence. In contrast, here we show that in freely behaving rats, theta oscil...

  17. Oscillation death in coupled oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZOU; Xin-gang WANG; Qi ZHAO; Meng ZHAN

    2009-01-01

    We study dynamical behaviors in coupled nonlinear oscillators and find that under certain condi- tions, a whole coupled oscillator system can cease oscil- lation and transfer to a globally nonuniform stationary state [I.e., the so-called oscillation death (OD) state], and this phenomenon can be generally observed. This OD state depends on coupling strengths and is clearly differ- ent from previously studied amplitude death (AD) state, which refers to the phenomenon where the whole system is trapped into homogeneously steady state of a fixed point, which already exists but is unstable in the ab- sence of coupling. For larger systems, very rich pattern structures of global death states are observed. These Turing-like patterns may share some essential features with the classical Turing pattern.

  18. Evidence for a role of intracellular stored parathyroid hormone in producing hysteresis of the PTH-calcium relationship in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Peter; Madsen, J C; Rasmussen, A Q;

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the clear recognition that extracellular ionized calcium controls PTH secretion, there have been suggestions of hysteresis in the relationship between extracellular ionized calcium and PTH during recovery from induced hypo- and hypercalcaemia in vivo in humans. In this study, we...... examined the possibility that release of intracellular stored PTH during induced hypocalcaemia may explain hysteresis. VOLUNTEERS: Eleven volunteers, five women and six men, were recruited to participate in the study. DESIGN: A series of three protocols of repeated induction of hypocalcaemia or sequential...... of PTH or a markedly blunted peak. Thus, the PTH response during the initial induction of and the first recovery from hypocalcaemia in our protocol 3 showed significant hysteresis in the relationship between blood ionized calcium and PTH (P

  19. Membrane associated complexes in calcium dynamics modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondria not only govern energy production, but are also involved in crucial cellular signalling processes. They are one of the most important organelles determining the Ca2+ regulatory pathway in the cell. Several mathematical models explaining these mechanisms were constructed, but only few of them describe interplay between calcium concentrations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasm and mitochondria. Experiments measuring calcium concentrations in mitochondria and ER suggested the existence of cytosolic microdomains with locally elevated calcium concentration in the nearest vicinity of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These intermediate physical connections between ER and mitochondria are called MAM (mitochondria-associated ER membrane) complexes. We propose a model with a direct calcium flow from ER to mitochondria, which may be justified by the existence of MAMs, and perform detailed numerical analysis of the effect of this flow on the type and shape of calcium oscillations. The model is partially based on the Marhl et al model. We have numerically found that the stable oscillations exist for a considerable set of parameter values. However, for some parameter sets the oscillations disappear and the trajectories of the model tend to a steady state with very high calcium level in mitochondria. This can be interpreted as an early step in an apoptotic pathway. (paper)

  20. Programmable Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Lee, Clement G.; Nguyen, Huy

    2011-01-01

    A programmable oscillator is a frequency synthesizer with an output phase that tracks an arbitrary function. An offset, phase-locked loop circuit is used in combination with an error control feedback loop to precisely control the output phase of the oscillator. To down-convert the received signal, several stages of mixing may be employed with the compensation for the time-base distortion of the carrier occurring at any one of those stages. In the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), the compensation occurs in the mixing from an intermediate frequency (IF), whose value is dependent on the station and band, to a common IF used in the final stage of down-conversion to baseband. The programmable oscillator (PO) is used in the final stage of down-conversion to generate the IF, along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier, thus removing it from the final down-converted signal.

  1. Neutrino Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bellini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, a very important breakthrough has been brought about in the elementary particle physics by the discovery of the phenomenon of the neutrino oscillations, which has shown neutrino properties beyond the Standard Model. But a full understanding of the various aspects of the neutrino oscillations is far to be achieved. In this paper the theoretical background of the neutrino oscillation phenomenon is described, referring in particular to the paradigmatic models. Then the various techniques and detectors which studied neutrinos from different sources are discussed, starting from the pioneering ones up to the detectors still in operation and to those in preparation. The physics results are finally presented adopting the same research path which has been crossed by this long saga. The problems not yet fixed in this field are discussed, together with the perspectives of their solutions in the near future.

  2. Chromosperic oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on the quiet-Sun chromosphere. Its internetwork areas are dynamically dominated by the so-called chromospheric three-minute oscillation. They are interpretationally dominated by the so-called Ca II K 2V and H 2V grains. The main points of this review are that the one phenome

  3. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  4. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  5. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  6. Intermittency and lifetime of the 625 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation in the 2004 hyperflare from the magnetar SGR 1806-20 as evidence for magnetic coupling between the crust and the core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1098 XH (Netherlands); Levin, Yuri, E-mail: d.huppenkothen@uva.nl [Monash Center for Astrophysics and School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-10-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) detected in the 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 are often interpreted as global magneto-elastic oscillations of the neutron star. There is, however, a large discrepancy between theoretical models, which predict that the highest frequency oscillations should die out rapidly, and the observations, which suggested that the highest-frequency signals persisted for ∼100 s in X-ray data from two different spacecraft. This discrepancy is particularly important for the high-frequency QPO at ∼625 Hz. However, previous analyses did not systematically test whether the signal could also be present in much shorter data segments, more consistent with the theoretical predictions. Here, we test for the presence of the high-frequency QPO at 625 Hz in data from both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) systematically both in individual rotational cycles of the neutron star, as well as averaged over multiple successive rotational cycles at the same phase. We find that the QPO in the RXTE data is consistent with being only present in a single cycle, for a short duration of ∼0.5 s, whereas the RHESSI data are as consistent with a short-lived signal that appears and disappears as with a long-lived QPO. Taken together, this data provides evidence for strong magnetic interaction between the crust and the core.

  7. [Oscillating physiotherapy for secretolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, U

    2008-03-01

    Assisted coughing and mechanical cough aids compensate for the weak cough flow in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). In cases with preserved respiratory muscles also breathing techniques and special devices, e. g., flutter or acapella can be used for secretion mobilisation during infections of the airways. These means are summarised as oscillating physiotherapy. Their mechanisms are believed to depend on separation of the mucus from the bronchial wall by vibration, thus facilitating mucus transport from the peripheral to the central airways. In mucoviscidosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease their application is established, but there is a paucity of data regarding the commitment in patients with neuromuscular diseases. The effective adoption of simple oscillation physiotherapeutic interventions demands usually a sufficient force of the respiratory muscles--exceptions are the application of the percussionaire (intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, IPV) or high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). In daily practice there is evidence that patients with weak respiratory muscles are overstrained with the use of these physiotherapeutic means, or get exhausted. A general recommendation for the adoption of simple oscillating physiotherapeutic interventions cannot be made in patients with NMDs. Perhaps in the future devices such as IPV or HFCWO will prove to be more effective in NMD patients.

  8. Evidence for the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation on the total ozone column at northern low latitudes and midlatitudes during winter and summer seasons.

    OpenAIRE

    Ossó, Albert; Sola Salvatierra, Yolanda; Bech, Joan; Lorente, Jeroni

    2011-01-01

    The strong influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the total ozone column (TOC) in the Northern Hemisphere has been reported in a number of previous studies. In this study we show that this influence is not restricted to the winter season but is also significant in summer. Especially interesting effects of the summer NAO (SNAO) on the TOC are observed over the eastern Mediterranean region, where a strongly positive SNAO index is related to the creation of a geopotential he...

  9. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  10. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  11. Physics of Neutrino Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Spandan

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes neutrinos as massless, chargeless elementary particles that come in three different flavours. However, recent experiments indicate that neutrinos not only have mass, but also have multiple mass eigenstates that are not identical to the flavour states, thereby indicating mixing. As an evidence of mixing, neutrinos have been observed to change from one flavour to another during their propagation, a phenomenon called neutrino oscillation. We have studied the reasons and derived the probabilities of neutrino flavour change, both in vacuum and in matter. We have also studied the parameters affecting this probability. We have discussed the special case of two-neutrino oscillations. Lastly, we have discussed some basic properties of neutrinos that are reflected in the previous derivations and highlighted a few relevant open problems. To begin with, we have also studied the relevant topics in introductory High Energy Physics and Quantum Mechanics to familiarize with th...

  12. Cosmological constraints on neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar, atmospheric and terrestrial neutrino experiments have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations. These neutrino anomalies were successfully explained in terms of neutrino oscillations, the dominant channels being flavour neutrino oscillations. The role of sterile neutrinos and the active-sterile subdominant channels are being explored presently. Therefore, we discuss all cosmological effects of active-sterile neutrino oscillations on the early Universe evolution, and particularly the effects on the nucleosynthesis epoch. Numerical analysis of the cosmological production of He-4, Yp in the presence of νe ↔ νs, effective after νe decoupling from the equilibrium, was provided for the full neutrino oscillations parameter range. These neutrino oscillations lead always to an overproduction of He-4. We have obtained isohelium contours corresponding to different levels of He-4 overproduction, δYp/Yp, for initial population of the sterile state in the range 0 ≤ δNs ≤ 0.5. Cosmological constraints on oscillation parameters, obtained on the base of the calculated isohelium contours and Yp observational data, are discussed. We present the constraints corresponding toδNs = 0.0 and 0.5, and helium overproduction δYp/Yp = 3%. These cosmological constraints, being more stringent than the ones provided from the neutrino experimental data, provide valuable information for the impact of sterile neutrino in the neutrino anomalies and for the neutrino physics in general. (author)

  13. Human Gamma Oscillations during Slow Wave Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Valderrama; Benoît Crépon; Vicente Botella-Soler; Jacques Martinerie; Dominique Hasboun; Catalina Alvarado-Rojas; Michel Baulac; Claude Adam; Vincent Navarro; Michel Le Van Quyen

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS). At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz) and high (60-120 Hz) frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated r...

  14. In vitro and in vivo evidence for an inflammatory role of the calcium channel TRPV4 in lung epithelium: Potential involvement in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Clémence O; Dalloneau, Emilie; Pérez-Berezo, Maria-Teresa; Plata, Cristina; Wu, Yongzheng; Guillon, Antoine; Morello, Eric; Aimar, Rose-France; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Esnard, Frédéric; Coraux, Christelle; Börnchen, Christian; Kiefmann, Rainer; Vandier, Christophe; Touqui, Lhousseine; Valverde, Miguel A; Cenac, Nicolas; Si-Tahar, Mustapha

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease associated with chronic severe lung inflammation, leading to premature death. To develop innovative anti-inflammatory treatments, we need to characterize new cellular and molecular components contributing to the mechanisms of lung inflammation. Here, we focused on the potential role of "transient receptor potential vanilloid-4" (TRPV4), a nonselective calcium channel. We used both in vitro and in vivo approaches to demonstrate that TRPV4 expressed in airway epithelial cells triggers the secretion of major proinflammatory mediators such as chemokines and biologically active lipids, as well as a neutrophil recruitment in lung tissues. We characterized the contribution of cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAPKs, and NF-κB in TRPV4-dependent signaling. We also showed that 5,6-, 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, i.e., four natural lipid-based TRPV4 agonists, are present in expectorations of CF patients. Also, TRPV4-induced calcium mobilization and inflammatory responses were enhanced in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-deficient cellular and animal models, suggesting that TRPV4 is a promising target for the development of new anti-inflammatory treatments for diseases such as CF. PMID:27496898

  15. Power oscillation damping controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    A power oscillation damping controller is provided for a power generation device such as a wind turbine device. The power oscillation damping controller receives an oscillation indicating signal indicative of a power oscillation in an electricity network and provides an oscillation damping control...

  16. Modelling the transition from simple to complex Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Manhas; James Sneyd; K R Pardasani

    2014-06-01

    A mathematical model is proposed which systematically investigates complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. This model is based on calcium-induced calcium release via inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) and includes calcium modulation of inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate (IP3) levels through feedback regulation of degradation and production. In our model, the apical and the basal regions are separated by a region containing mitochondria, which is capable of restricting Ca2+ responses to the apical region. We were able to reproduce the observed oscillatory patterns, from baseline spikes to sinusoidal oscillations. The model predicts that calcium-dependent production and degradation of IP3 is a key mechanism for complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. A partial bifurcation analysis is performed which explores the dynamic behaviour of the model in both apical and basal regions.

  17. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  18. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  19. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  20. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  1. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  2. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  3. Enhanced effect of β-tricalcium phosphate phase on neovascularization of porous calcium phosphate ceramics: in vitro and in vivo evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Wang, J; Zhu, X D; Tang, Z R; Yang, X; Tan, Y F; Fan, Y J; Zhang, X D

    2015-01-01

    Neovascularization plays a key role in bone repair and regeneration. In the present study, four types of porous calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics, namely hydroxyapatite (HA), biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP-1 and BCP-2) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), with HA to β-TCP ratios of 100/0, 70/30, 30/70 and 2/98, respectively, were investigated in terms of their angiogenic induction. The in vitro cell culture revealed that the ceramics could promote proliferation and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This result could be achieved by stimulating CCD-18Co human fibroblasts to secrete angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor-β) as a paracrine effect, as well as by up-regulating HUVECs to express these angiogenic factors and their receptors (KDR, FGFR1 and ACVRL1) and the downstream eNOS as an autocrine effect. These effects were more significant in β-TCP and BCP-2, which had a higher content of β-TCP phase. In the in vivo implantation into the thigh muscles of mice, the process of neovascularization of the ceramics was initiated at 2 weeks and the mature vascular networks were formed at 4 weeks as visualized by hematoxylin and eosin staining and scanning electron microscopy. Microvessel density count confirmed that β-TCP and BCP-2 induced more microvessels to form than HA or BCP-1. This phenomenon was further confirmed by the significantly up-regulated expressions of angiogenesis-related genes in the ingrowth of cells into the inner pores of the two ceramics. All the results confirmed the angiogenic induction of porous CaP ceramics, and a higher content of β-TCP phase had an enhanced effect on the neovascularization of the ceramics. PMID:25246313

  4. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-[3H]PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-[3H]PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 μM for the agonist (±)-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, (±)-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since (-)-PN200-110 (1-200 μM) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS) on binding parameters. GTPγS did increase the ability of (±)-[3H]PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites

  5. Oscillators and Eigenvalues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1997-01-01

    In order to obtain insight in the nature of nonlinear oscillators the eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian of the differential equations describing the oscillator are found and displayed as functions of time. A number of oscillators are studied including Dewey's oscillator (piecewise linear...... with negative resistance), Kennedy's Colpitts-oscillator (with and without chaos) and a new 4'th order oscillator with hyper-chaos....

  6. Role of calcium in gravity perception of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium ions may play a key role in linking graviperception by the root cap to the asymmetric growth which occurs in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Application of calcium-chelating agents to the root cap inhibits gravitropic curvature without affecting growth. Asymmetric application of calcium to one side of the root cap induces curvature toward the calcium source, and gravistimulation induces polar movement of applied (Ca-45)(2+) across the root cap toward the lower side. The action of calcium may be linked to auxin movement in roots since: (1) auxin transport inhibitors interfere both with gravitropic curvature and graviinduced polar calcium movement and (2) asymmetric application of calcium enhances auxin movement across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Indirect evidence indicates that the calcium-modulated regulator protein, calmodulin, may be involved in either the transport or action of calcium in the gravitropic response mechanism of roots.

  7. Role of calcium in gravity perception of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael L.

    Calcium ions may play a key role in linking graviperception by the root cap to the asymmetric growth which occurs in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Application of calcium-chelating agents to the root cap inhibits gravitropic curvature without affecting growth. Asymmetric application of calcium to one side of the root cap induces curvature toward the calcium source, and gravistimulation induces polar movement of applied 45Ca2+ across the root cap toward the lower side. The action of calcium may be linked to auxin movement in roots since 1) auxin transport inhibitors interfere both with gravitropic curvature and gravi-induced polar calcium movement and 2) asymmetric application of calcium enhances auxin movement across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Indirect evidence indicates that the calcium-modulated regulator protein, calmodulin, may be involved in either the transport or action of calcium in the gravitropic response mechanism of roots.

  8. Solar neutrinos: Oscillations or No-oscillations?

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    The Nobel prize in physics 2015 has been awarded "... for the discovery of neutrino oscillations which show that neutrinos have mass". While SuperKamiokande (SK), indeed, has discovered oscillations, SNO observed effect of the adiabatic (almost non-oscillatory) flavor conversion of neutrinos in the matter of the Sun. Oscillations are irrelevant for solar neutrinos apart from small $\

  9. Evidence of multidecadal climate variability and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation from a Gulf of Mexico sea-surface temperature-proxy record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, R.Z.; DeLong, K.L.; Richey, J.N.; Quinn, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of a Mg/Ca-based sea-surface temperature (SST)-anomaly record from the northern Gulf of Mexico, a calculated index of variability in observed North Atlantic SST known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), and a tree-ring reconstruction of the AMO contain similar patterns of variation over the last 110 years. Thus, the multidecadal variability observed in the instrumental record is present in the tree-ring and Mg/Ca proxy data. Frequency analysis of the Gulf of Mexico SST record and the tree-ring AMO reconstruction from 1550 to 1990 found similar multidecadal-scale periodicities (???30-60 years). This multidecadal periodicity is about half the observed (60-80 years) variability identified in the AMO for the 20th century. The historical records of hurricane landfalls reveal increased landfalls in the Gulf Coast region during time intervals when the AMO index is positive (warmer SST), and decreased landfalls when the AMO index is negative (cooler SST). Thus, we conclude that alternating intervals of high and low hurricane landfall occurrences may continue on multidecadal timescales along the northern Gulf Coast. However, given the short length of the instrumental record, the actual frequency and stability of the AMO are uncertain, and additional AMO proxy records are needed to establish the character of multidecadal-scale SST variability in the North Atlantic. ?? 2009 US Government.

  10. Amplitudes of solar-like oscillations in red-giant stars: Evidences for non-adiabatic effects using CoRoT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Samadi, R; Dupret, M -A; Ludwig, H -G; Baudin, F; Caffau, E; Goupil, M -J; Barban, C

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of solar-like oscillations has been detected in red-giant stars thanks to CoRoT and Kepler space-crafts. The seismic data gathered by CoRoT on red-giant stars allow us to test mode driving theory in different physical conditions than main-sequence stars. Using a set of 3D hydrodynamical models representative of the upper layers of sub- and red-giant stars, we compute the acoustic modes energy supply rate (Pmax). Assuming adiabatic pulsations and using global stellar models where the surface stratification comes from the 3D hydrodynamical models, mode amplitude is computed in terms of surface velocity. The latter is then converted into intensity fluctuations using either a simplified adiabatic scaling relation or a non-adiabatic one. Given L and M (the luminosity and mass respectively), the energy supply rate Pmax is found to scale as (L/M)^(2.6) for both main-sequence and red-giant stars, extending previous results by Samadi et al. (2007). The theoretical amplitudes in velocity under-estimate...

  11. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  12. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Patients › Treatment › Calcium/Vitamin D Calcium/Vitamin D Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is essential ... counter medications and calcium supplements. What is Vitamin D and What Does it Do? Vitamin D plays ...

  13. Evidence for the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and velocity reconstruction from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaan, Emmanuel; Ferraro, Simone; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Smith, Kendrick M.; Ho, Shirley; Aiola, Simone; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bond, J. Richard; De Bernardis, Francesco; Calabrese, Erminia; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn; Hill, J. Colin; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Hubmayr, Johannes; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent D.; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Li, Dale; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maurin, Loïc; McMahon, Jeffrey John; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Pappas, Christine G.; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D.; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.; ACTPol Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We use microwave temperature maps from two seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at 146 GHz, together with the "Constant Mass" CMASS galaxy sample from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to measure the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect over the redshift range z =0.4 - 0.7 . We use galaxy positions and the continuity equation to obtain a reconstruction of the line-of-sight velocity field. We stack the microwave temperature at the location of each halo, weighted by the corresponding reconstructed velocity. We vary the size of the aperture photometry filter used, thus probing the free electron profile of these halos from within the virial radius out to three virial radii, on the scales relevant for investigating the missing baryons problem. The resulting best fit kSZ model is preferred over the no-kSZ hypothesis at 3.3 and 2.9 σ for two independent velocity reconstruction methods, using 25,537 galaxies over 660 square degrees. The data suggest that the baryon profile is shallower than the dark matter in the inner regions of the halos probed here, potentially due to energy injection from active galactic nucleus or supernovae. Thus, by constraining the gas profile on a wide range of scales, this technique will be useful for understanding the role of feedback in galaxy groups and clusters. The effect of foregrounds that are uncorrelated with the galaxy velocities is expected to be well below our signal, and residual thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich contamination is controlled by masking the most massive clusters. Finally, we discuss the systematics involved in converting our measurement of the kSZ amplitude into the mean free electron fraction of the halos in our sample.

  14. Altered calcium signaling following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thomas Weber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell death and dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI is caused by a primary phase, related to direct mechanical disruption of the brain, and a secondary phase which consists of delayed events initiated at the time of the physical insult. Arguably, the calcium ion contributes greatly to the delayed cell damage and death after TBI. A large, sustained influx of calcium into cells can initiate cell death signaling cascades, through activation of several degradative enzymes, such as proteases and endonucleases. However, a sustained level of intracellular free calcium is not necessarily lethal, but the specific route of calcium entry may couple calcium directly to cell death pathways. Other sources of calcium, such as intracellular calcium stores, can also contribute to cell damage. In addition, calcium-mediated signal transduction pathways in neurons may be perturbed following injury. These latter types of alterations may contribute to abnormal physiology in neurons that do not necessarily die after a traumatic episode. This review provides an overview of experimental evidence that has led to our current understanding of the role of calcium signaling in death and dysfunction following TBI.

  15. Oscillations of Eccentric Pulsons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Groenbech-Jensen, Niels; Lomdahl, Peter;

    1997-01-01

    Perturbation theory for elliptic pulsons is developed and predicts pulson and eccentricity oscillations. The pulson oscillation period is predicted qualitatively correct.......Perturbation theory for elliptic pulsons is developed and predicts pulson and eccentricity oscillations. The pulson oscillation period is predicted qualitatively correct....

  16. Regulation Mechanisms of Stomatal Oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Min YANG; Jian-Hua ZHANG; Xiao-Yan ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Stomata function as the gates between the plant and the atmospheric environment. Stomatal movement, including stomatal opening and closing, controls CO2 absorption as the raw material for photosynthesis and water loss through transpiration. How to reduce water loss and maintain enough CO2 absorption has been an interesting research topic for some time. Simple stomatal opening may elevate CO2 absorption,but, in the meantime, promote the water loss, whereas simple closing of stomatal pores may reduce both water loss and CO2 absorption, resulting in impairment of plant photosynthesis. Both processes are not economical to the plant. As a special rhythmic stomatal movement that usually occurs at smaller stomatal apertures, stomatal oscillation can keep CO2 absorption at a sufficient level and reduce water loss at the same time, suggesting a potential improvement in water use efficiency. Stomatal oscillation is usually found after a sudden change in one environmental factor in relatively constant environments. Many environmental stimuli can induce stomatal oscillation. It appears that, at the physiological level, feedback controls are involved in stomatal oscillation. At the cellular level, possibly two different patterns exist: (i) a quicker responsive pattern; and (ii) a slower response. Both involve water potential changes and water channel regulation, but the mechanisms of regulation of the two patterns are different. Some evidence suggests that the regulation of water channels may play a vital and primary role in stomatal oscillation. The present review summarizes studies on stomatal oscillation and concludes with some discussion regarding the mechanisms of regulation of stomatal oscillation.

  17. Model of the Ca2+ oscillator for shuttle streaming in Physarum polycephalum.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D. A.; Saldana, R

    1992-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for the cytoplasmic Ca++ oscillator which is thought to power shuttle streaming in strands of the slime-mold Physarum polycephalum. The mechanism uses a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle of myosin light chain kinase. This kinase is bistable if the kinase phosphorylation chain, through adenylate cyclase and cAMP, is activated by calcium. Relaxation oscillations can then occur if calcium is exchanged between the cytoplasm and internal vacuoles known to exist in phys...

  18. Calcium quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel

    2002-05-01

    Elementary subcellular Ca2+ signals arising from the opening of single ion channels may offer the possibility to examine the stochastic behavior and the microscopic chemical reaction rates of these channel proteins in their natural environment. Such an analysis can yield detailed information about the molecular function that cannot be derived from recordings obtained from an ensemble of channels. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence suggesting that Ca2+ sparks, elementary Ca2+ signaling events of cardiac and skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling, may be comprised of a number of smaller Ca2+ signaling events, the Ca2+ quarks.

  19. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  20. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  1. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  2. Oscillations in critical shearing, application to fractures in glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pralong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many evidences of oscillations accompanying the acceleration of critical systems have been reported. These oscillations are usually related to discrete scale invariance properties of the systems and exhibit a logarithmic periodicity. In this paper we propose another explanation for these oscillations in the case of shearing fracture. Using a continuum damage model, we show that oscillations emerge from the anisotropic properties of the cracks in the shearing fracture zone. These oscillations no longer exhibit a logarithmic but rather a power-law periodicity. The power-periodic oscillation is a more general formulation. Its reduces to a log-periodic oscillation when the exponent of the power-law equals one. We apply this model to fit the measured displacements of unstable ice masses of hanging glaciers for which data are available. Results show that power-periodic oscillations adequately fit the observations.

  3. Oscillating heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental fluid flow and heat transfer principles occurring in oscillating heat pipes and also provides updated developments and recent innovations in research and applications of heat pipes. Starting with fundamental presentation of heat pipes, the focus is on oscillating motions and its heat transfer enhancement in a two-phase heat transfer system. The book covers thermodynamic analysis, interfacial phenomenon, thin film evaporation,  theoretical models of oscillating motion and heat transfer of single phase and two-phase flows, primary  factors affecting oscillating motions and heat transfer,  neutron imaging study of oscillating motions in an oscillating heat pipes, and nanofluid’s effect on the heat transfer performance in oscillating heat pipes.  The importance of thermally-excited oscillating motion combined with phase change heat transfer to a wide variety of applications is emphasized. This book is an essential resource and learning tool for senior undergraduate, gradua...

  4. Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Rajasekaran

    2000-07-01

    The phenomenology of solar, atmospheric, supernova and laboratory neutrino oscillations is described. Analytical formulae for matter effects are reviewed. The results from oscillations are confronted with neutrinoless double beta decay.

  5. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  6. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  7. MEMS based reference oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Hedestig, Joel

    2005-01-01

    The interest in tiny wireless applications raises the demand for an integrated reference oscillator with the same performance as the macroscopic quartz crystal reference oscillators. The main challenge of the thesis is to prove that it is possible to build a MEMS based oscillator that approaches the accuracy level of existing quartz crystal oscillators. The MEMS resonator samples which Philips provides are measured and an equivalent electrical model is designed for them. This model is used in...

  8. The colpitts oscillator family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.

    A tutorial study of the Colpitts oscillator family defined as all oscillators based on a nonlinear amplifier and a three- terminal linear resonance circuit with one coil and two capacitors. The original patents are investigated. The eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian for oscillators based...

  9. Neutrino oscillations: theory and phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmedov, E.K., E-mail: akhmedov@ictp.trieste.it [Department of Theoretical Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    A brief overview of selected topics in the theory and phenomenology of neutrino oscillations is given. These include: oscillations in vacuum and in matter; phenomenology of 3-flavour neutrino oscillations; CP and T violation in neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter; matter effects on {nu}{sub {mu}}{r_reversible}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations; parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations inside the earth; oscillations below and above the MSW resonance; unsettled issues in the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  10. Neutrino oscillations under gravity: mass independent oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2003-01-01

    I discuss the possibility of neutrino oscillation in presence of gravity. In this respect I consider the propagation of neutrinos in the early phase of universe and around black holes. It is seen that whether the rest masses of a neutrino and corresponding anti-neutrino are considered to be same or not due to space-time curvature effect non-zero oscillation probability between the neutrino and anti-neutrino states comes out. Therefore I can conclude that under gravity neutrino oscillation tak...

  11. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  12. The Oscillator Principle of Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Oscillators are found on all levels in Nature. The general oscillator concept is defined and investigated. Oscillators may synchronize into fractal patterns. Apparently oscillators are the basic principle in Nature. The concepts of zero and infinite are discussed. Electronic manmade oscillators...... are introduced by means of an example of an autonomous third-order chaotic oscillator....

  13. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  14. The physiological role of mitochondrial calcium revealed by mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany; Liu, Chengyu; Sun, Junhui; Teng, Yanjie; Fergusson, Maria M; Rovira, Ilsa I; Allen, Michele; Springer, Danielle A; Aponte, Angel M; Gucek, Marjan; Balaban, Robert S; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial calcium has been postulated to regulate a wide range of processes from bioenergetics to cell death. Here, we characterize a mouse model that lacks expression of the recently discovered mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have no apparent capacity to rapidly uptake calcium. Whereas basal metabolism seems unaffected, the skeletal muscle of MCU(-/-) mice exhibited alterations in the phosphorylation and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, MCU(-/-) mice exhibited marked impairment in their ability to perform strenuous work. We further show that mitochondria from MCU(-/-) mice lacked evidence for calcium-induced permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The lack of PTP opening does not seem to protect MCU(-/-) cells and tissues from cell death, although MCU(-/-) hearts fail to respond to the PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A. Taken together, these results clarify how acute alterations in mitochondrial matrix calcium can regulate mammalian physiology.

  15. Functional Modeling of the Shift in Cellular Calcium Dynamics at the Onset of Synchronization in Smooth Muscle Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D E; Brings Jacobsen, J C; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper we address the nature of synchronization properties found in populations of mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells. We present a minimal model of the onset of synchronization in the individual smooth muscle cell that is manifested as a transition from calcium waves to whole......-cell calcium oscillations. We discuss how different types of ion currents may influence both amplitude and frequency in the regime of whole-cell oscillations. The model may also explain the occurrence of mixed-mode oscillations and chaotic oscillations frequently observed in the experimental system....

  16. Smoking, calcium, calcium antagonists, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicita-Mauro, V

    1990-01-01

    Aging is characterized, besides other changes, by a progressive increase in calcium content in the arterial wall, which is enhanced by diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arterial hypertension, and tabagism. As to tabagism, experiments in animals have shown that nicotine can increase calcium content of the arterial wall, and clinical studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking induces peripheral vasoconstriction, with consequent increase in blood pressure levels. In order to study the role of calcium ions in the pathogenesis of the vasoconstrictive lesions caused by "acute" smoking, the author has studied the peripheral vascular effects of the calcium-channel antagonist nifedipine, a dihydropyridine derivative, and calcitonin, a hypocalcemizing hormone which possess vasoactive actions on 12 elderly regular smokers (mean age 65.8 years). The results demonstrated that both nifedipine (10 mg sublingually 20 min before smoking) and salmon calcitonin (100 MRC U/daily intramuscularly for three days) are able to prevent peripheral vasoconstriction evaluated by Doppler velocimetry, as well as the increase of blood pressure induced by smoking. On the basis of our results, the author proposes that cigarette smoking-induced vasoconstriction is a calcium-mediated process, which can be hindered by drugs with calcium antagonist action. PMID:2226675

  17. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  18. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-10-06

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  19. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium

  20. Measurements of intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been measured in cultured cells by using Fura-2 load cells and a computer-controlled Perkin Elmer LS-5B spectrofluorometer. Increased [Ca2+]i in cells exposed to extracellular bilirubin was observed both with and without extracellular calcium. However, the increase was considerable larger with extracellular calcium. The enhancement of [Ca2+]i became smaller with decreasing bilirubin/BSA (bovine serum albumine) ratio. 5 refs., 5 figs

  1. Oscillations of disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the current state of research on disk oscillation theory, focusing on relativistic disks and tidally deformed disks. Since the launch of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996, many high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HFQPOs) have been observed in X-ray binaries. Subsequently, similar quasi-periodic oscillations have been found in such relativistic objects as microquasars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and galactic nuclei. One of the most promising explanations of their origin is based on oscillations in relativistic disks, and a new field called discoseismology is currently developing. After reviewing observational aspects, the book presents the basic characteristics of disk oscillations, especially focusing on those in relativistic disks. Relativistic disks are essentially different from Newtonian disks in terms of several basic characteristics of their disk oscillations, including the radial distributions of epicyclic frequencies. In order to understand the basic processes...

  2. Damping mechanisms for oscillations in solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, I

    2010-01-01

    Small amplitude oscillations are a commonly observed feature in prominences/filaments. These oscillations appear to be of local nature, are associated to the fine structure of prominence plasmas, and simultaneous flows and counterflows are also present. The existing observational evidence reveals that small amplitude oscillations, after excited, are damped in short spatial and temporal scales by some as yet not well determined physical mechanism(s). Commonly, these oscillations have been interpreted in terms of linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, and this paper reviews the theoretical damping mechanisms that have been recently put forward in order to explain the observed attenuation scales. These mechanisms include thermal effects, through non-adiabatic processes, mass flows, resonant damping in non-uniform media, and partial ionization effects. The relevance of each mechanism is assessed by comparing the spatial and time scales produced by each of them with those obtained from observations. Also, the app...

  3. The Origin of Type I Spicule Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Christian, D J; Mathioudakis, M; Keys, P H; Keenan, F P

    2011-01-01

    We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope, to reveal how the generation of transverse waves in Type I spicules is a direct result of longitudinal oscillations occurring in the photosphere. Here we show how pressure oscillations, with periodicities in the range 130 - 440 s, manifest in small-scale photospheric magnetic bright points, and generate kink waves in the Sun's outer atmosphere with transverse velocities approaching the local sound speed. Through comparison of our observations with advanced two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations, we provide evidence for how magnetoacoustic oscillations, generated at the solar surface, funnel upwards along Type I spicule structures, before undergoing longitudinal-to-transverse mode conversion into waves at twice the initial driving frequency. The resulting kink modes are visible in chromospheric plasma, with periodicities of 65 -220 s, and amplitud...

  4. Chimera States in Mechanical Oscillator Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Fourrière, Antoine; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The synchronization of coupled oscillators is a fascinating manifestation of self-organization that nature employs to orchestrate essential processes of life, such as the beating of the heart. While it was long thought that synchrony or disorder were mutually exclusive steady states for a network of identical oscillators, numerous theoretical studies in recent years revealed the intriguing possibility of 'chimera states', in which the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into a synchronous and an asynchronous part. However, a striking lack of empirical evidence raises the question of whether chimeras are indeed characteristic to natural systems. This calls for a palpable realization of chimera states without any fine-tuning, from which physical mechanisms underlying their emergence can be uncovered. Here, we devise a simple experiment with mechanical oscillators coupled in a hierarchical network to show that chimeras emerge naturally from a competition between two antagonistic synchronization patte...

  5. Slime mould electronic oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We construct electronic oscillator from acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum. The slime mould oscillator is made of two electrodes connected by a protoplasmic tube of the living slime mould. A protoplasmic tube has an average resistance of 3~MOhm. The tube's resistance is changing over time due to peristaltic contractile activity of the tube. The resistance of the protoplasmic tube oscillates with average period of 73~sec and average amplitude of 0.6~MOhm. We present experimental labor...

  6. Mesoscopic Capacitance Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Buttiker, Markus; Nigg, Simon

    2006-01-01

    We examine oscillations as a function of Fermi energy in the capacitance of a mesoscopic cavity connected via a single quantum channel to a metallic contact and capacitively coupled to a back gate. The oscillations depend on the distribution of single levels in the cavity, the interaction strength and the transmission probability through the quantum channel. We use a Hartree-Fock approach to exclude self-interaction. The sample specific capacitance oscillations are in marked contrast to the c...

  7. Self-oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  8. On the origin of rhythmic calcium transients in the ICC-MP of the mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowie, Bobbi-Jo; Wang, Xuan-Yu; White, Elizabeth J; Huizinga, Jan D

    2011-11-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) are pacemaker cells of the small intestine, producing the characteristic omnipresent electrical slow waves, which orchestrate peristaltic motor activity and are associated with rhythmic intracellular calcium oscillations. Our objective was to elucidate the origins of the calcium transients. We hypothesized that calcium oscillations in the ICC-MP are primarily regulated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release system. With the use of calcium imaging, study of the effect of T-type calcium channel blocker mibefradil revealed that T-type channels did not play a major role in generating the calcium transients. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) inhibitor, and U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, both drastically decreased the frequency of calcium oscillations, suggesting a major role of IP(3) and IP(3)-induced calcium release from the SR. Immunohistochemistry proved the expression of IP(3)R type I (IP(3)R-I), but not type II (IP(3)R-II) and type III (IP(3)R-III) in ICC-MP, indicating the involvement of the IP(3)R-I subtype in calcium release from the SR. Cyclopiazonic acid, a SR/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump inhibitor, strongly reduced or abolished calcium oscillations. The Na-Ca exchanger (NCX) in reverse mode is likely involved in refilling the SR because the NCX inhibitor KB-R7943 markedly reduced the frequency of calcium oscillations. Immunohistochemistry revealed 100% colocalization of NCX and c-Kit in ICC-MP. Testing a mitochondrial NCX inhibitor, we were unable to show an essential role for mitochondria in regulating calcium oscillations in the ICC-MP. In summary, ongoing IP(3) synthesis and IP(3)-induced calcium release from the SR, via the IP(3)R-I, are the major drivers of the calcium transients associated with ICC pacemaker activity. This suggests that a biochemical clock intrinsic to ICC determines the pacemaker

  9. Effects of Aconitine on [Ca2+] Oscillation in Cultured Myocytes of Neonatal Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yah LIU; Shiwei ZHANG; Man LIANG; Qian LIU; Liang LIU

    2008-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the effects of aconitine on [Ca2+] oscillation patterns in cultured myocytes of neonatal rats, fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4 NW and laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) were used to detect the real-time changes of [Ca2+] oscillation patterns in the cultured myocytes before and after aconitine (1.0 μmol/L) incubation or antiarrhythmic peptide (AAP) and aconitine co-incubation. The results showed under control conditions, [Ca2+] oscillations were irregular but relatively stable, occasionally accompanied by small calcium sparks. After incubation of the cultures with aconitine, high frequency [Ca2+] oscillations emerged in both nuclear and cytoplasmic regions, whereas typical calcium sparks disappeared and the average [Ca2+] in the cytoplasm of the cardiomyocyte did not change significantly. In AAP-treated cultures, intraecllular [Ca2+] oscillation also changed, with periodic frequency, increased amplitudes and prolonged duration of calcium sparks. These patterns were not altered significantly by subsequent aconitine incubation. The basal value of [Ca2+] in nuclear region was higher than that in the cytoplasmic region, in the presence or absence of drugs, the [Ca2+] oscillated synchronously in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic regions of the same cardiomyocyte. It was concluded that although oscillating strenuously at high frequency, the average [Ca2+] in the cytoplasm of cardiomyocyte did not change significantly after aconitine incubation, compared to the controls. The observations indicate that aconitine induces the changes in [Ca2+] oscillation frequency other than the Ca2+ overload.

  10. Intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Simone; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    GROMOS, the ground-based millimeter-wave ozone spectrometer, continuously measures the stratospheric ozone profile between the altitudes of 20 and 65 km above Bern (46°57‧N, 7°27‧E) since November 1994. Characteristics of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone are derived from the long-term data set. Spectral analysis gives evidence for a dominant oscillation period of about 20 days in the lower and middle stratosphere during winter time. A strong 20-day wave is also found in collocated geopotential height measurements of the microwave limb sounder onboard the Aura satellite (Aura/MLS) confirming the ground-based observations of GROMOS and underlining the link between ozone and dynamics. Remarkably, the ozone series of GROMOS show an interannual variability of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone. The interannual variability of ozone fluctuations is possibly due to influences of planetary wave forcing and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on the meridional Brewer-Dobson circulation of the middle atmosphere. In detail, time series of the mean amplitude of ozone fluctuations with periods ranging from 10 to 60 days are derived at fixed pressure levels. The mean amplitude series are regarded as a measure of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Bern. After deseasonalizing the mean amplitude series, we find QBO-like amplitude modulations of the intraseasonal oscillations of ozone. The amplitudes of the intraseasonal oscillations are enhanced by a factor of 2 in 1997, 2001, 2003, and 2005. QBO-like variations of intraseasonal oscillations are also present in wind, temperature and other parameters above Bern as indicated by meteorological reanalyses of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Further, intercomparisons of interannual variability of intraseasonal tropospheric and stratospheric oscillations are performed where the NAO index (North-Atlantic oscillation

  11. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  12. Bursting Ca2+ Oscillations and Synchronization in Coupled Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Quan-Bao; LU Qi-Shao; Yang Zhuo-Qin; Duan Li-Xia

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model proposed by Grubelnk et al. [Biophys. Chem. 94 (2001) 59] is employed to study the physiological role of mitochondria and the cytosolic proteins in generating complex Ca2+ oscillations. Intracellular bursting calcium oscillations of point-point, point cycle and two-folded limit cycle types are observed and explanations are given based on the fast/slow dynamical analysis, especially for point-cycle and two-folded limit cycle types, which have not been reported before. Furthermore, synchronization of coupled bursters of Ca2+oscillations via gap junctions and the effect of bursting types on synchronization of coupled cells are studied. It is argued that bursting oscillations of point-point type may be superior to achieve synchronization than that of point-cycle type.

  13. A 65--70 year oscillation in observed surface temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are three possible sources for the 65--70-year ''global'' oscillation: (1) random forcing of the ocean by the atmosphere, such as by white noise; (2) external oscillatory forcing of the climate system, such as by a variation in the solar irradiance; and (3) an internal oscillation of the atmosphere-ocean system. It is unlikely that putative variations in solar irradiance are the source of the oscillation because solar forcing should generate a global response, but the oscillation is not global. It is also unlikely that white-noise forcing is the source of the oscillation because such forcing should generate an oceanwide response, but the oscillation is not panoceanic. Consequently, the most probable cause of the oscillation is an internal oscillation of the atmosphere-ocean system. This conclusion is supported by a growing body of observational evidence and coupled atmosphere/ocean general circulation model simulation results. Comparison of the regional and global-mean temperature changes caused by the oscillation with those induced by GHG + ASA forcing shows that the rapid rise in global-mean temperature between about 1908 and 1946, and the subsequent reversal of this warming until about 1965 were the result of the oscillation. In the North Atlantic and North American regions, the domination of the GHG + ASA-induced warming by the oscillation has obscured and confounded detection of this warming

  14. Collective Calcium Dynamics in Networks of Communicating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Tommy; Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo; Mugler, Andrew

    Cells can sense and encode information about their environment with remarkable precision. These properties have been studied extensively for single cells, but intercellular communication is known to be important for both single- and multicellular organisms. Here, we examine calcium dynamics of fibroblast cells exposed to external ATP stimuli, and the effects of communication and stimulus strength on cells' response. Experimental results show that increasing communication strength induces a greater fraction of cells to exhibit oscillatory calcium dynamics, but the frequencies of oscillation do not systematically shift with ATP strength. We developed a model of calcium signaling by adding noise, communication, and cell-to-cell variability to the model of Tang and Othmer. This model reproduces cells' increased tendency to oscillate as a function of communication strength, and frequency encoding is nearly removed at the global level. Our model therefore suggests that the propensity of cells to oscillate, rather than frequency encoding, determines the response to external ATP. These results suggest that the system lies near a critical boundary separating non-oscillatory and oscillatory calcium dynamics.

  15. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  16. Convection and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Houdek, G

    2010-01-01

    In this short review on stellar convection dynamics I address the following, currently very topical, issues: (1) the surface effects of the Reynolds stresses and nonadiabaticity on solar-like pulsation frequencies, and (2) oscillation mode lifetimes of stochastically excited oscillations in red giants computed with different time-dependent convection formulations.

  17. Synchronization of hyperchaotic oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A.; Cenys, A.; Mykolaitis, G.;

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of chaotic oscillators is believed to have promising applications in secure communications. Hyperchaotic systems with multiple positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs) have an advantage over common chaotic systems with only one positive LE. Three different types of hyperchaotic electronic...... oscillators are investigated demonstrating synchronization by means of only one properly selected variable....

  18. Hyperchaotic Oscillator with Gyrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A; Cenys, A; Mykolaitis, G.;

    1997-01-01

    A fourth-order hyperchaotic oscillator is described. It contains a negative impedance converter, two gyratots, two capacitors and a diode. The dynamics of the oscillator is shown to be characterised by two positive Lyapunov exponents. The performance of the circuit is investigated by means...

  19. A Conspiracy of Oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss nonlinear mechanical systems containing several oscillators whose frequecies are all much higher than frequencies associated with the remaining degrees of freedom. In this situation a near constant of the motion, an adiabatic invariant, exists which is the sum of all the oscillator act...

  20. Disentangling neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Andrew G. [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)], E-mail: cohen@bu.edu; Glashow, Sheldon L. [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)], E-mail: slg@bu.edu; Ligeti, Zoltan [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: ligeti@lbl.gov

    2009-07-13

    The theory underlying neutrino oscillations has been described at length in the literature. The neutrino state produced by a weak decay is usually portrayed as a linear superposition of mass eigenstates with, variously, equal energies or equal momenta. We point out that such a description is incorrect, that in fact, the neutrino is entangled with the other particle or particles emerging from the decay. We offer an analysis of oscillation phenomena involving neutrinos (applying equally well to neutral mesons) that takes entanglement into account. Thereby we present a theoretically sound proof of the universal validity of the oscillation formulae ordinarily used. In so doing, we show that the departures from exponential decay reported by the GSI experiment cannot be attributed to neutrino mixing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the 'Moessbauer' neutrino oscillation experiment proposed by Raghavan, while technically challenging, is correctly and unambiguously describable by means of the usual oscillation formalae.

  1. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free calciu

  2. Quantum correlations in terms of neutrino oscillation probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alok, Ashutosh Kumar; Banerjee, Subhashish; Uma Sankar, S.

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino oscillations provide evidence for the mode entanglement of neutrino mass eigenstates in a given flavour eigenstate. Given this mode entanglement, it is pertinent to consider the relation between the oscillation probabilities and other quantum correlations. In this work, we show that all the well-known quantum correlations, such as the Bell's inequality, are directly related to the neutrino oscillation probabilities. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments, which measure the neutrino survival probability to be less than unity, imply Bell's inequality violation.

  3. Disturbed calcium signaling in spinocerebellar ataxias and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Polina; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-04-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent a huge scientific and medical question, but the molecular mechanisms of these diseases are still not clear. There is increasing evidence that neuronal calcium signaling is abnormal in many neurodegenerative disorders. Abnormal neuronal calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum may result in disturbances of cell homeostasis, synaptic dysfunction, and eventual cell death. Neuronal loss is observed in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent experimental evidence supporting the role of neuronal calcium signaling in the pathogenesis of SCAs and AD is discussed in this review.

  4. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  5. Photodissociation studies of calcium-coronene and calcium-pyrene cation clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A. C.; Buchanan, J. W.; Flynn, N. D.; Duncan, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Gas-phase cluster cations combining calcium atoms and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) coronene (C24H12) and pyrene (C16H10) are produced in a molecular beam using laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals the formation of clusters of the form Cax(coronene)y+ for up to x = 4 and y = 3 and Cax(pyrene)y+ for up to x = 2 and y = 3. Mass-selected photodissociation studies show that the calcium cation is the most prominent fragment for each system. Photoinduced calcium carbide formation is prominent when two or more calcium atoms are present. Additionally, there is evidence that these clusters can form sandwich structures.

  6. Impact of calcium on salivary α-amylase activity, starch paste apparent viscosity and thickness perception

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Thickness perception of starch-thickened products during eating has been linked to starch viscosity and salivary amylase activity. Calcium is an essential cofactor for α-amylase and there is anecdotal evidence that adding extra calcium affects amylase activity in processes like mashing of beer. The aims of this paper were to (1) investigate the role of salivary calcium on α-amylase activity and (2) to measure the effect of calcium concentration on apparent viscosity and thic...

  7. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer proteins are post-synaptic density proteins with known functions in receptor trafficking and calcium homeostasis. While they are key mediators of synaptic plasticity, they are also known to function in axon guidance, albeit by mechanisms that are yet to be elucidated. Homer proteins couple extracellular receptors – such as metabotropic glutamate receptors and the transient receptor potential canonical family of cation channels – to intracellular receptors such as inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors on intracellular calcium stores and, therefore, are well placed to regulate calcium dynamics within the neural growth cone. Here we used growth cones from dorsal root ganglia, a well established model in the field of axon guidance, and a growth cone turning assay to examine Homer1 function in axon guidance. Results Homer1 knockdown reversed growth cone turning from attraction to repulsion in response to the calcium-dependent guidance cues brain derived neurotrophic factor and netrin-1. Conversely, Homer1 knockdown had no effect on repulsion to the calcium-independent guidance cue Semaphorin-3A. This reversal of attractive turning suggested a requirement for Homer1 in a molecular switch. Pharmacological experiments confirmed that the operational state of a calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II/calcineurin phosphatase molecular switch was dependent on Homer1 expression. Calcium imaging of motile growth cones revealed that Homer1 is required for guidance-cue-induced rise of cytosolic calcium and the attenuation of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients. Homer1 knockdown-induced calcium transients and turning were inhibited by antagonists of store-operated channels. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed the close association of Homer1 with the store-operated proteins TRPC1 and STIM1 within dorsal root ganglia growth cones. Conclusion These experiments provide evidence that Homer1 is an essential

  8. Quasi-Fibonacci oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilik, A M; Kachurik, I I; Rebesh, A P, E-mail: omgavr@bitp.kiev.u [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine)

    2010-06-18

    We study the properties of the sequences of the energy eigenvalues for some generalizations of q-deformed oscillators including the p, q-oscillator, and the three-, four- and five-parameter deformed oscillators given in the literature. It is shown that most of the considered models belong to the class of so-called Fibonacci oscillators for which any three consecutive energy levels satisfy the relation E{sub n+1} = {lambda}E{sub n} + {rho}E{sub n-1} with real constants {lambda}, {rho}. On the other hand, for a certain {mu}-oscillator known since 1993, we prove its non-Fibonacci nature. Possible generalizations of the three-term Fibonacci relation are discussed, among which for the {mu}-oscillator we choose, as the most adequate, the so-called quasi-Fibonacci (or local Fibonacci) property of the energy levels. The property is encoded in the three-term quasi-Fibonacci (QF) relation with the non-constant, n-dependent coefficients {lambda} and {rho}. Various aspects of the QF relation are elaborated for the {mu}-oscillator and some of its extensions.

  9. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorette, Aurélien; Romanelli, Marco; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-06-15

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is experimentally and numerically studied in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits isolation of a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found, and phase noise spectra allow us to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator, even in the chaotic regime.

  10. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Thorette, Aurélien; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is studied experimentally and numerically in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits to isolate a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found and phase noise spectra allows to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator even in the chaotic regime.

  11. The free energy cost of accurate biochemical oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yuansheng; Ouyang, Qi; Tu, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    Oscillation is an important cellular process that regulates timing of different vital life cycles. However, in the noisy cellular environment, oscillations can be highly inaccurate due to phase fluctuations. It remains poorly understood how biochemical circuits suppress phase fluctuations and what is the incurred thermodynamic cost. Here, we study four different types of biochemical oscillations representing three basic oscillation motifs shared by all known oscillatory systems. We find that the phase diffusion constant follows the same inverse dependence on the free energy dissipation per period for all systems studied. This relationship between the phase diffusion and energy dissipation is shown analytically in a model of noisy oscillation. Microscopically, we find that the oscillation is driven by multiple irreversible cycles that hydrolyze the fuel molecules such as ATP; the number of phase coherent periods is proportional to the free energy consumed per period. Experimental evidence in support of this un...

  12. Stimulus induced high frequency oscillations are present in neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick M Hales

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathological high frequency oscillations (250-600Hz are present in the brains of epileptic animals and humans. The etiology of these oscillations and how they contribute to the diseased state remains unclear. This work identifies the presence of microstimulation-evoked high frequency oscillations (250-400Hz in dissociated neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs. Oscillations are more apparent with higher stimulus voltages. As with in vivo studies, activity is isolated to a single electrode, however the MEA provides improved spatial resolution with no spread of the oscillation to adjacent electrodes 200µm away. Oscillations develop across 4 weeks in vitro. Oscillations still occur in the presence of tetrodotoxin and synaptic blockers, and they cause no apparent disruption in the ability of oscillation-presenting electrodes to elicit directly evoked action potentials (dAPs or promote the spread of synaptic activity throughout the culture. Chelating calcium with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA causes a temporal prolongation of the oscillation. Finally, carbenoxolone significantly reduces or eliminates the high frequency oscillations. Gap junctions may play a significant role in maintaining the oscillation given the inhibitory effect of carbenoxolone, the propagating effect of reduced calcium conditions and the isolated nature of the activity as demonstrated in previous studies. This is the first demonstration of stimulus evoked high frequency oscillations in dissociated cultures. Unlike current models that rely on complex in vivo recording conditions, this work presents a simple controllable model in neuronal cultures on MEAs to further investigate how the oscillations occur at the molecular level and how they may contribute to the pathophysiology of disease.

  13. A Genome-wide Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Regulatory Calcium Sensors in Pollen Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Zhou; Ying FU; Zhenbiao Yang

    2009-01-01

    Calcium, an ubiquitous second messenger, plays an essential and versatile role in cellular signaling. The diverse function of calcium signals is achieved by an excess of calcium sensors. Plants possess large numbers of calcium sensors, most of which have not been functionally characterized. To identify physiologically relevant calcium sensors in a specific cell type, we conducted a genome-wide functional survey in pollen tubes, for which spatiotemporal calcium signals are well-characterized and required for polarized tip growth. Pollen-specific members of calmodulin (CAM), CaM-like (CML), calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and calcineurin B-like protein (CBL) families were tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP) and their localization patterns and overexpression phenotypes were characterized in tobacco pollen tubes. We found that several fusion proteins showed distinct overexpression phenotypes and subcellular localization patterns. CDPK24.GFP was localized to the vegetative nucleus and the generative cell/sperms. CDPK32-GFP caused severe growth depolarization. CBL2-GFP and CBL3-GFP exhibited dynamic patterns of subcellular localization, including several endomembrane compartments, the apical plasma membrane (PM), and cytoskeleton-like structures in pollen tubes. Their overexpression also inhibited pollen tube elongation and induced growth depolarization. These putative calcium sensors are excellent candidates for the calcium sensors responsible for the regulation of calcium homeostasis and calcium-dependent tip growth and growth oscillation in pollen tubes,

  14. Ca2+ controls slow NAD(P)H oscillations in glucose-stimulated mouse pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luciani, Dan Seriano; Misler, S.; Polonsky, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of pancreatic islets of Langerhans to physiological concentrations of glucose leads to secretion of insulin in an oscillatory pattern. The oscillations in insulin secretion are associated with oscillations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+](c)). Evidence suggests that the oscillations...

  15. Inhomogeneous Power Distribution in Magnetic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Kiran; Kholikov, S; Hill, F

    2010-01-01

    We apply ring-diagram analysis and spherical harmonic decomposition methods to compute 3-dimensional power spectra of magnetograms obtained by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) during quiet periods of solar activity. This allows us to investigate the power distribution in acoustic waves propagating in localized directions on the solar disk. We find evidence of the presence of five-minute oscillations in magnetic signals that suggests a non-homogeneous distribution of acoustic power. In this paper, we present our results on the asymmetry in oscillatory power and its behaviour as a function of frequency, time and magnetic field strength. These characteristics are compared with simultaneous velocity measurements.

  16. Dirac oscillator interacting with a topological defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, J.; Furtado, C.; Moraes, F. [Unidade Academica de Tecnologia de Alimentos, CCTA, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Pereiros, 58840-000, Pombal, Paraiba (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    In this work we study the interaction problem of a Dirac oscillator with gravitational fields produced by topological defects. The energy levels of the relativistic oscillator in the cosmic string and in the cosmic dislocation space-times are sensible to curvature and torsion associated to these defects and are important evidence of the influence of the topology on this system. In the presence of a localized magnetic field the energy levels acquire a term associated with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues and see that in the nonrelativistic limit some results known in standard quantum mechanics are reached.

  17. Bayesian global analysis of neutrino oscillation data

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstrom, Johannes; Maltoni, Michele; Schwetz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We perform a Bayesian analysis of current neutrino oscillation data. When estimating the oscillation parameters we find that the results generally agree with those of the $\\chi^2$ method, with some differences involving $s_{23}^2$ and CP-violating effects. We discuss the additional subtleties caused by the circular nature of the CP-violating phase, and how it is possible to obtain correlation coefficients with $s_{23}^2$. When performing model comparison, we find that there is no significant evidence for any mass ordering, any octant of $s_{23}^2$ or a deviation from maximal mixing, nor the presence of CP-violation.

  18. Oscillating Filaments: I - Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid based AMR-code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, e.g. with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process `geometrical fragmentation'. In our realization the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristical scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. ...

  19. Oscillations in counting statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilk, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The very large transverse momenta and large multiplicities available in present LHC experiments on pp collisions allow a much closer look at the corresponding distributions. Some time ago we discussed a possible physical meaning of apparent log-periodic oscillations showing up in p_T distributions (suggesting that the exponent of the observed power-like behavior is complex). In this talk we concentrate on another example of oscillations, this time connected with multiplicity distributions P(N). We argue that some combinations of the experimentally measured values of P(N) (satisfying the recurrence relations used in the description of cascade-stochastic processes in quantum optics) exhibit distinct oscillatory behavior, not observed in the usual Negative Binomial Distributions used to fit data. These oscillations provide yet another example of oscillations seen in counting statistics in many different, apparently very disparate branches of physics further demonstrating the universality of this phenomenon.

  20. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  1. Neutrino anomalies without oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandip Pakvasa

    2000-01-01

    I review explanations for the three neutrino anomalies (solar, atmospheric and LSND) which go beyond the `conventional' neutrino oscillations induced by mass-mixing. Several of these require non-zero neutrino masses as well.

  2. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  3. Oscillators and operational amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2005-01-01

    A generalized approach to the design of oscillators using operational amplifiers as active elements is presented. A piecewise-linear model of the amplifier is used so that it make sense to investigate the eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the differential equations. The characteristic equation...... of the general circuit is derived. The dynamic nonlinear transfer characteristic of the amplifier is investigated. Examples of negative resistance oscillators are discussed....

  4. From excitability to oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Neganova, A. Y.; Jacobsen, J. C. B.;

    2013-01-01

    One consequence of cell-to-cell communication is the appearance of synchronized behavior, where many cells cooperate to generate new dynamical patterns. We present a simple functional model of vasomotion based on the concept of a two-mode oscillator with dual interactions: via relatively slow......-dependent chloride channels in the plasma membrane may synchronize into whole-cell oscillations which subsequently may spread across a large population of cells. We show how heterogeneity of the system can induce new patterns....

  5. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multi-mode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We disc...

  6. Should we prescribe calcium supplements for osteoporosis prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ian R

    2014-02-01

    Advocacy for the use of calcium supplements arose at a time when there were no other effective interventions for the prevention of osteoporosis. Their promotion was based on the belief that increasing calcium intake would increase bone formation. Our current understandings of the biology of bone suggest that this does not occur, though calcium does act as a weak antiresorptive. Thus, it slows postmenopausal bone loss but, despite this, recent meta-analyses suggest no significant prevention of fractures. In sum, there is little substantive evidence of benefit to bone health from the use of calcium supplements. Against this needs to be balanced the likelihood that calcium supplement use increases cardiovascular events, kidney stones, gastrointestinal symptoms, and admissions to hospital with acute gastrointestinal problems. Thus, the balance of risk and benefit seems to be consistently negative. As a result, current recommendations are to obtain calcium from the diet in preference to supplements. Dietary calcium intake has not been associated with the adverse effects associated with supplements, probably because calcium is provided in smaller boluses, which are absorbed more slowly since they come together with quantities of protein and fat, resulting in a slower gastric transit time. These findings suggest that calcium supplements have little role to play in the modern therapeutics of osteoporosis, which is based around the targeting of safe and effective anti-resorptive drugs to individuals demonstrated to be at increased risk of future fractures. PMID:24707464

  7. Self-oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain linear systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy from the environment into the vibration: no external rate needs to be tuned to the resonant frequency. A paper from 1830 by G. B. Airy gives us the opening to introduce self-oscillation as a sort of "perpetual motion" responsible for the human voice. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the more recent swaying of the London Millenium Footbridge. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments, and the heartbeat. We review the criterion that determines whether an arbitrary line...

  8. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  9. Measurement and analysis of calcium signaling in heterogeneous cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gillian R; Jack, Andrew D; Platts, Amy; Simpson, Peter B

    2006-01-01

    High-content imaging platforms capable of studying kinetic responses at a single-cell level have elevated kinetic recording techniques from labor-intensive low-throughput experiments to potential high-throughput screening assays. We have applied this technology to the investigation of heterogeneous cell cultures derived from primary neural tissue. The neuronal cultures mature into a coupled network and display spontaneous oscillations in intracellular calcium, which can be modified by the addition of pharmacological agents. We have developed algorithms to perform Fourier analysis and quantify both the degree of synchronization and the effects of modulators on the oscillations. Functional and phenotypic experiments can be combined using this approach. We have used post-hoc immunolabeling to identify subpopulations of cells in cocultures and to dissect the calcium responses of these cells from the population response. The combination of these techniques represents a powerful tool for drug discovery.

  10. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  11. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone...... and inhibition of calcium transport processes within the renal tubule. The mechanisms whereby acid alters the integrity and stability of bone have been examined extensively in the published literature. Here, after briefly reviewing this literature, we consider the effects of acid on calcium transport...

  12. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  13. A minimalist model of calcium-voltage coupling in GnRH cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, Martin; Chan, Rossanna; Duan Wen; Sneyd, James [Department of Mathematics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Schneider, David, E-mail: schneide@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica. Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-03-01

    We present a minimalist model to describe the interplay between burst firing and calcium dynamics in Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells. This model attempts to give a qualitative representation of Duan's model [3], and it comprises two FithzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) coupled systems describing the dynamics of the membrane potential and calcium concentration in the GnRH cells. Within the framework of our minimalist model, we find that the calcium subsystem drives burst firing by making the voltage subsystem to undergo a Hopf bifurcation. Specifically, fast relaxation oscillations occur in a specific region of the c-z plane (c being the calcium concentration, and z a calcium-dependent gating variable). Slow calcium oscillations, instead, are carried by the voltage subsystem by successive shifts of the calcium steady state, and have the net effect of an external perturbation. The full comprehension of the phase-plane of the voltage subsystem and the 3-dimensional phase-space of the calcium subsystem ultimately allows us to study the behaviours of the entire model under the change of certain parameters. Those special parameters do not necessarily follow realistic assumptions, but merely intend to mimic some pharmacological tests which have been performed experimentally and also simulated by Duan's model under the corresponding physiological considerations.

  14. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  15. Frequency of self-oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Groszkowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of Self-Oscillations covers the realm of electric oscillations that plays an important role both in the scientific and technical aspects. This book is composed of nine chapters, and begins with the introduction to the alternating currents and oscillation. The succeeding chapters deal with the free oscillations in linear isolated systems. These topics are followed by discussions on self-oscillations in linear systems. Other chapters describe the self-oscillations in non-linear systems, the influence of linear elements on frequency of oscillations, and the electro mechanical oscillato

  16. Hypothesis-driven methods to augment human cognition by optimizing cortical oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Horschig, Jörn M.; Zumer, Johanna M.; Ali eBahramisharif

    2014-01-01

    Cortical oscillations have been shown to represent fundamental functions of a working brain, e.g., communication, stimulus binding, error monitoring, and inhibition, and are directly linked to behavior. Recent studies intervening with these oscillations have demonstrated effective modulation of both the oscillations and behavior. In this review, we collect evidence in favor of how hypothesis-driven methods can be used to augment cognition by optimizing cortical oscillations. We elaborate thei...

  17. Coalescence in coupled Duffing oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    The forced Duffing oscillator has a pair of symmetrical attractors in a proper parameter regime. When a lot of Duffing oscillators are coupled linearly, the system tends to form clusters in which the neighboring oscillators fall onto the same attractor. When the coupling strength is strong, all of the oscillators fall onto one attractor. In this work, we investigate coalescence in the coupled forced Duffing oscillators. Some phenomena are found and explanations are presented.

  18. Calcium signaling and T-type calcium channels in cancer cell cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James T Taylor; Xiang-Bin Zeng; Jonathan E Pottle; Kevin Lee; Alun R Wang; Stephenie G Yi; Jennifer A S Scruggs; Suresh S Sikka; Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is an important signaling mechanism for cell proliferation in both normal and cancerous cells. In normal epithelial cells,free calcium concentration is essential for cells to enter and accomplish the S phase and the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, cancerous cells can pass these phases of the cell cycle with much lower cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations, indicating an alternative mechanism has developed for fulfilling the intracellular calcium requirement for an increased rate of DNA synthesis and mitosis of fast replicating cancerous cells. The detailed mechanism underlying the altered calcium loading pathway remains unclear;however, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests the T-type Ca2+ channel is abnormally expressed in cancerous cells and that blockade of these channels may reduce cell proliferation in addition to inducing apoptosis. Recent studies also show that the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in breast cancer cells is proliferation state dependent, i.e. the channels are expressed at higher levels during the fast-replication period, and once the cells are in a non-proliferation state, expression of this channel isminimal. Therefore, selectively blocking calcium entry into cancerous cells may be a valuable approach for preventing tumor growth. Since T-type Ca2+ channels are not expressed in epithelial cells, selective T-type Ca2+ channel blockers may be useful in the treatment of certain types of cancers.

  19. Multi-periodic oscillations of alpha Hya

    CERN Document Server

    Setiawan, J; Roth, M

    2005-01-01

    We report the detection of multi-periodic oscillations of the cool evolved star alpha Hya (HD 81797, K3II-III). Two-hundred and forty-three high-resolution spectra (R=48,000) of this star have been obtained in March and April 2005 with FEROS at the 2.2 m-MPG/ESO telescope in La Silla Observatory, Chile. We observed oscillations in the stellar radial velocity and the asymmetry of the spectral line profile. We detected oscillation frequencies of the stellar radial velocity in two frequency regions, nu= 2-30 muHz and nu= 50-120 muHz. The corresponding periods are P= 0.6-5.6 days and P= 2.3-5.5 hours, respectively. In addition to these oscillations we also observed a trend in the radial velocity which shows evidence for a long-term variability. Furthermore, our measurements show a correlation between the variation in the radial velocity and the asymmetry of the spectral line profile, as measured in the bisector velocity spans. The line bisectors also show oscillations in the same frequency regions as those of the...

  20. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Alexander I.; /Caltech

    2011-05-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |{Delta}{bar m}{sub atm}{sup 2}| = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst)) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}) = 0.860{sub -0.12}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  1. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Alexander I. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for vμ → $\\bar{v}$μ transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |Δ$\\bar{m}$atm 2| = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat) ± 0.06(syst)) x 10-3 eV2 and sin2(2$\\bar{θ}$23) = 0.860-0.12+0.11(stat) ± 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  2. Finite q-oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Klimyk, Anatoliy U [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Wolf, Kurt Bernardo [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-05-28

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra su{sub q}(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x{sub s} = 1/2 [2s]{sub q}, s element of {l_brace}-j, -j+1, ..., j{r_brace}, and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schroedinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q {yields} 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j {yields} {infinity} limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  3. Finite q-oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  4. Oscillations in stellar superflares

    CERN Document Server

    Balona, L A; Kosovichev, A; Nakariakov, V M; Pugh, C E; Van Doorsselaere, T

    2015-01-01

    Two different mechanisms may act to induce quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in whole-disk observations of stellar flares. One mechanism may be magneto-hydromagnetic (MHD) forces and other processes acting on flare loops as seen in the Sun. The other mechanism may be forced local acoustic oscillations due to the high-energy particle impulse generated by the flare (known as `sunquakes' in the Sun). We analyze short-cadence Kepler data of 257 flares in 75 stars to search for QPP in the flare decay branch or post-flare oscillations which may be attributed to either of these two mechanisms. About 18 percent of stellar flares show a distinct bump in the flare decay branch of unknown origin. The bump does not seem to be a highly-damped global oscillation because the periods of the bumps derived from wavelet analysis do not correlate with any stellar parameter. We detected damped oscillations covering several cycles (QPP), in seven flares on five stars. The periods of these oscillations also do not correlate with any ...

  5. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  6. Forced spaser oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisyansky, Alexander A.; Andrianov, Eugeney S.; Dorofeenko, Alexander V.; Pukhov, Alexander A.; Vinogradov, Alexey P.

    2012-10-01

    We study oscillations of a spaser driven by an external optical wave. When the frequency of the external field is shifted from the frequency of an autonomous spaser, the spaser exhibits stochastic oscillations at low field intensity. The plasmon oscillations lock to the frequency of the external field only when the field amplitude exceeds a threshold value. We find a region of external field amplitude and the frequency detuning (the Arnold tongue) for which the spaser becomes synchronized with the external wave. We obtain the conditions upon the amplitude and frequency of the external field (the curve of compensation) at which the spaser's dipole moment oscillates with a phase shift of π relatively to the external wave. For these values of the amplitude and frequency, the loss in the metal nanoparticles within the spaser is exactly compensated for by the gain. It is expected that if these conditions are not satisfied, then due to loss or gain of energy, the amplitude of the wave travelling along the system of spasers either tends to the curve of compensation or leave the Arnold tongue. We also consider cooperative phenomena showing that in a chain of interacting spasers, depending on the values of the coupling constants, either all spasers oscillate in phase or a nonlinear autowave travels in the system. In the latter scenario, the traveling wave is harmonic, unlike excitations in other nonlinear systems. Due to the nonlinear nature of the system, any initial distribution of spaser states evolves into one of these steady states.

  7. 荒漠条件下甘草气孔振荡的水被动证据%Evidence of Hydropassive Movement in Stomatal Oscillations of Glycyrrhiza inflata under Desert Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王根轩; 廖建雄; 吴冬秀

    2001-01-01

    Stomatal conductance was found to change from steady_state to a state of oscillations during daytime when vapour pressure deficit (VPD) increased to a value of 1 kPa in Glycyrrhiza inflata Batalin grown under the conditions of arid desert in north_west China. The injected metabolic inhibitors (NaN3 or carbonyl cyanide_m_chlorophenyl_hydrazone (CCCP)) slightly reduced the stomatal conductance but did not significantly decrease the intensity of stomatal oscillations (amplitude/average). The oscillation intensity was found to be significantly correlated with VPD and root resistance, but not with the respiration rate. There might exist a minimum threshold of VPD (0.8 kPa) and root resistance (1/4 relative value) that induced stomatal oscillations. These results suggested that stomatal oscillations induced by atmospheric drought stress and root resistance were mainly a type of hydropassive movement.%生长在中国西北干旱荒漠的甘草(Glycyrrhiza inflata Batalin), 当白天大气水蒸汽压差(VPD)高于1 kPa 时,其气孔导度随时间的变化趋势为从稳态转为振荡态。通过茎木质部注射代谢抑制剂(NaN3或羰基氰化物-间-氯苯腙(CCCP))使气孔导度有些微降低,但是并不能显著改变气孔振荡强度(振幅/平均值)。气孔振荡强度与VPD和根阻力显著相关,但与呼吸速率无明显相关。在荒漠条件下,当VPD大于0.8 kPa和至少存在1/4全根阻力的条件下才可能出现气孔振荡。结果说明荒漠干旱条件诱发的甘草气孔振荡可能主要是一种水被动过程。

  8. Intrinsic oscillations of neocortex generated by layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L R; Amitai, Y; Connors, B W

    1991-01-25

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  9. Physical realization of the Glauber quantum oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilini, Silvia; Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Marcucci, Giulia; DelRe, Eugenio; Conti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    More than thirty years ago Glauber suggested that the link between the reversible microscopic and the irreversible macroscopic world can be formulated in physical terms through an inverted harmonic oscillator describing quantum amplifiers. Further theoretical studies have shown that the paradigm for irreversibility is indeed the reversed harmonic oscillator. As outlined by Glauber, providing experimental evidence of these idealized physical systems could open the way to a variety of fundamental studies, for example to simulate irreversible quantum dynamics and explain the arrow of time. However, supporting experimental evidence of reversed quantized oscillators is lacking. We report the direct observation of exploding n = 0 and n = 2 discrete states and Γ0 and Γ2 quantized decay rates of a reversed harmonic oscillator generated by an optical photothermal nonlinearity. Our results give experimental validation to the main prediction of irreversible quantum mechanics, that is, the existence of states with quantized decay rates. Our results also provide a novel perspective to optical shock-waves, potentially useful for applications as lasers, optical amplifiers, white-light and X-ray generation.

  10. The mechanism of hetero-synaptic interaction based on spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Futagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent physiological experiments focusing on synaptic plasticity, it is shown that synaptic modifications induced at one synapse are accompanied by hetero-synaptic changes at neighbor sites (Bi, 2002. These evidences imply that the hetero-synaptic interaction plays an important role in reconfiguration of synaptic connections to form and maintain functional neural circuits (Takahashi et al., 2012. Although the mechanism of the interaction is still unclear, some physiological studies suggest that the hetero-synaptic interaction could be caused by propagation of intracellular calcium signals (Nishiyama et al., 2000. Concretely, a spike-triggered calcium increase initiates calcium ion propagation along a dendrite through activation of molecular processes at neighboring sites. Here we hypothesized that the mechanism of the hetero-synaptic interaction was based on the intracellular calcium signaling, which is regulated by interactions between NMDA receptors (NMDARs, voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs and Ryanodine receptors (RyRs on endoplasmic reticulum (ER. To assess realizability of the hypothesized interaction mechanism, we simulated intracellular calcium dynamics at a cellular level, using the computational model that integrated the model of intracellular calcium dynamics (Keizer and Levine, 1996 and the multi-compartment neuron model (Poirazi et al., 2003. Using the proposed computational model, we induced calcium influxes at a local site in postsynaptic dendrite by controlling the spike timings of pre- and postsynaptic neurons. As a result, synchronized calcium influxes through NMDARs and VDCCs caused calcium release from ER. According to the phase plane analysis, RyR-mediated calcium release occurred when the calcium concentration in cytoplasm sufficiently increased under the condition of a high calcium concentration in ER. An NMDAR-mediated calcium influx was slow and persistent, consequently responsible for maintaining a high

  11. A common lag scenario in quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, K.; Sabarathinam, S.; Thamilmaran, K.; Kurths, Jürgen; Dana, Syamal K.

    2016-08-01

    A large parameter mismatch can induce amplitude death in two instantaneously coupled oscillators. Alternatively, a time delay in the coupling can induce amplitude death in two identical oscillators. We unify the mechanism of quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators, either by a large parameter mismatch or a delay coupling, by a common lag scenario that is, surprisingly, different from the conventional lag synchronization. We present numerical as well as experimental evidence of this unknown kind of lag scenario when the lag increases with coupling and at a critically large value at a critical coupling strength, amplitude death emerges in two largely mismatched oscillators. This is analogous to amplitude death in identical systems with increasingly large coupling delay. In support, we use examples of the Chua oscillator and the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol system. Furthermore, we confirm this lag scenario during the onset of amplitude death in identical Stuart-Landau system under various instantaneous coupling forms, repulsive, conjugate, and a type of nonlinear coupling.

  12. Arbitrary Spin Galilean Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, C R

    2014-01-01

    The so-called Dirac oscillator was proposed as a modification of the free Dirac equation which reproduces many of the properties of the simple harmonic oscillator but accompanied by a strong spin-orbit coupling term. It has yet to be extended successfully to the arbitrary spin S case primarily because of the unwieldiness of general spin Lorentz invariant wave equations. It is shown here using the formalism of totally symmetric multispinors that the Dirac oscillator can, however, be made to accommodate spin by incorporating it into the framework of Galilean relativity. This is done explicitly for spin zero and spin one as special cases of the arbitrary spin result. For the general case it is shown that the coefficient of the spin-orbit term has a 1/S behavior by techniques which are virtually identical to those employed in the derivation of the g-factor carried out over four decades ago.

  13. Oscillations in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, Gudrun Kristine

    1999-07-01

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l (>{sub )} 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines II{sub l+1} from II{sub l} and II{sub l-1} to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density n{sub c}, while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  14. Oscillations in neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l → 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines IIl+1 from IIl and IIl-1 to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density nc, while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  15. Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok C. Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Here we report our recent discoveries of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in blazars time series data in X-ray and optical electromagnetic bands. Any such detection can give important clues of the location and nature of the processes of emission mechanism. In the case of radio-quiet AGN, the detected QPOs are very likely to be associated with the accretion disk. But in the case of blazars, it may be associated with jets in the high and outburst states, and in the low-state, it is probably associated with the accretion disk. In this brief review, I summarize the recent QPO detections in blazars. There is one strong evidence of QPO detection in XMM–Newton time series data of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy RE J1034+396 about which we will also discuss briefly.

  16. Experimental situation of beauty oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental situation of the evidences for beauty oscillations is reviewed. After a brief description of the formalism the results from the CERN proton-antiproton collider are described and compared with the results from electron-positron colliders. Whereas the experiments on the continuum measure a mixture of χs and χd the experiments on the Υ (4s) are only sensitive to χd. A forecast for 1992 is given and a method is described which allows to measure χs. A precision measurement of χs would allow to further constrain the CKM matrix and would eventually lead to a determination of the phase in the matrix

  17. Friedel oscillations in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, J. A.; Power, S. R.; Ferreira, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry breaking perturbations in an electronically conducting medium are known to produce Friedel oscillations in various physical quantities of an otherwise pristine material. Here we show in a mathematically transparent fashion that Friedel oscillations in graphene have a strong sublattice...... asymmetry. As a result, the presence of impurities and/or defects may impact the distinct graphene sublattices very differently. Furthermore, such an asymmetry can be used to explain the recent observations that nitrogen atoms and dimers are not randomly distributed in graphene but prefer to occupy one...

  18. Circadian profiles in the embryonic chick heart: L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Michael L; Shi, Liheng; Grushin, Kirill; Nigussie, Fikru; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2010-10-01

    Circadian clocks exist in the heart tissue and modulate multiple physiological events, from cardiac metabolism to contractile function and expression of circadian oscillator and metabolic-related genes. Ample evidence has demonstrated that there are endogenous circadian oscillators in adult mammalian cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian embryos cannot be entrained independently to light-dark (LD) cycles in vivo without any maternal influence, but circadian genes are well expressed and able to oscillate in embryonic stages. The authors took advantage of using chick embryos that are independent of maternal influences to investigate whether embryonic hearts could be entrained under LD cycles in ovo. The authors found circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channels responsible for the production of cardiac muscle contraction in embryonic chick hearts. The mRNA levels and protein expression of VGCCα1C and VGCCα1D are under circadian control, and the average L-VGCC current density is significantly larger when cardiomyocytes are recorded during the night than day. The phosphorylation states of several kinases involved in insulin signaling and cardiac metabolism, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), stress-activated protein kinase (p38), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), are also under circadian control. Both Erk and p38 have been implicated in regulating cardiac contractility and in the development of various pathological states, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Even though both Erk and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathways participate in complex cellular processes regarding physiological or pathological states of cardiomyocytes, the circadian oscillators in the heart regulate these pathways independently, and both pathways contribute to the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs.

  19. Calcium binding to cardiac myocytes protected from proteolytic enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, L E; Fawzi, A B

    1985-04-17

    Excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle is dependent on extracellular calcium and calcium bound to the surface of the myocardial cell. In this study, we examined the physical characteristics of calcium binding to adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes disaggregated mechanically in oxygenated tissue culture medium containing a proteinase inhibitor (aprotinin), and separated from cellular debris by Cytodex beads. Cells prepared in this manner excluded Trypan blue and showed no evidence of spontaneous contraction or contracture. Scatchard plots of calcium binding determined by continuous flow equilibrium dialysis revealed a high-affinity, low-capacity pool, Ka = 65 X 10(3) M-1 and Bt = 1.3 nmol X mg-1 and a low-affinity, high-capacity pool, Ka = 141 M-1 and Bt = 138 nmol X mg-1. The low-affinity pool was not detectable after lanthanum, trypsin or collagenase treatment or in cells prepared without aprotinin in the isolation medium. Both neuraminidase and phospholipase C reduced Bt of the low-affinity pool by one half, but only neuraminidase affected the affinity constant of this pool. Ka was increased to 516.7 M-1, similar to the apparent affinity constant for calcium binding estimated from dP/dtmax measured at several extracellular calcium concentrations (470 M-1). The results suggest that calcium bound to sarcolemmal phospholipids represents the superficial calcium involved in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart.

  20. Calcium and vitamin D in post menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and Vitamin D are widely used therapies for Osteoporosis. Vitamin D is not a vitamin in true sense since it is produced in response to the action of sunlight on skin. Vitamin D has multiple roles in the body, not all of them well-understood. Vitamin D supplementation must be considered a form of hormone replacement therapy. Therefore it raises all the questions about efficacy, dose, and side effects. The Efficacy of use of Calcium and Vitamin D in all post menopausal women in terms of the prevention of fracture is uncertain. The Annual worldwide sales of these supplements have been several billion dollars. The variation of the results from various studies of Calcium and Vitamin D supplementation in elderly women suggest that benefit of calcium plus vitamin D on bone mineral density or the risk of fracture is small and may vary from group to group and baseline Vitamin D status. Women taking supplemental vitamin D and calcium have a statistically increased incidence of renal stones, according to evidence from the Women′s Health Initiative. Studies have shown association between calcium use and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In a recent review of evidence from 6 randomized trials evaluating the use of vitamin D and calcium to prevent fractures in postmenopausal women who are not living in a nursing home or other institution, the United States Preventive Task Force (USPTF found no evidence of a benefit from supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D3 and 1000 mg or less of calcium. Also in a report from institute of Medicine Committee, there was insufficient evidence, particularly from randomized trials, that vitamin D treatment affected the risk of non skeletal outcomes like risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, infections, autoimmune disease, and other extra skeletal outcomes.

  1. Attention Modulates TMS-Locked Alpha Oscillations in the Visual Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herring, J.D.; Thut, G.; Jensen, O.; Bergmann, T.O.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical oscillations, such as 8–12 Hz alpha-band activity, are thought to subserve gating of information processing in the human brain. While most of the supporting evidence is correlational, causal evidence comes from attempts to externally drive (“entrain”) these oscillations by transcranial magn

  2. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  3. Experimental observation of N00N state Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebugle, Maxime; Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Perez-Leija, Armando; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-09-22

    Bloch oscillations of quantum particles manifest themselves as periodic spreading and relocalization of the associated wave functions when traversing lattice potentials subject to external gradient forces. Albeit this phenomenon is deeply rooted into the very foundations of quantum mechanics, all experimental observations so far have only contemplated dynamics of one and two particles initially prepared in separable local states. Evidently, a more general description of genuinely quantum Bloch oscillations will be achieved on excitation of a Bloch oscillator by nonlocal states. Here we report the observation of Bloch oscillations of two-particle N00N states, and discuss the nonlocality on the ground of Bell-like inequalities. The time evolution of two-photon N00N states in Bloch oscillators, whether symmetric, antisymmetric or partially symmetric, reveals transitions from particle antibunching to bunching. Consequently, the initial states can be tailored to produce spatial correlations akin to those of bosons, fermions and anyons, presenting potential applications in photonic quantum simulation.

  4. APPswe mutation increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-oscillations in rat hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Winblad, Bengt;

    2008-01-01

    Altered calcium homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Much effort has been put into understanding the association between protein mutations causative of this devastating neurodegenerative disease and perturbed calcium signaling. Whereas the presenilin mutations...... have received most attention in the context of neuronal calcium signaling, we focused on the effects of APP with the so-called Swedish mutation (APPswe) on spontaneous neuronal activity. We observed that primary hippocampal neurons from an APPswe transgenic rat showed increased frequency and unaltered...... amplitude of spontaneous calcium oscillations as compared to wild-type neurons. We found that the altered calcium signaling of APPswe transgenic neurons was unlikely to be due to modulation of the NMDA or nicotinic neurotransmitter systems, and did not depend on secreted APP derivates. The implications...

  5. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  6. Evidence of Zonal-Flow-Driven Limit-Cycle Oscillations during L-H Transition and at H-mode Pedestal of a New Small-ELM Regime in EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.; Wang, H.; Guo, H.;

    using two toroidally separated reciprocating probes inside the separatrix demonstrate a periodic turbulence suppression accompanied by an oscillation in Er as the shearing rate transiently exceeds the turbulence decorrelation rate. Wavelet bicoherence analysis shows a strong three-wave coupling between...... to the L-H transition threshold. The growth, saturation and disappearance of the zonal flows are correlated with those of the high-frequency turbulence, with the energy gain of the zonal flows being of the same order as the energy loss of the high-frequency turbulence, thus strongly suggesting a causal...

  7. Semiclassical transition probabilities for interacting oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Khlebnikov, S. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    Semiclassical transition probabilities characterize transfer of energy between "hard" and "soft" modes in various physical systems. We establish the boundary problem for singular euclidean solutions used to calculate such probabilities. Solutions are found numerically for a system of two interacting quartic oscillators. In the double-well case, we find numerical evidence that certain regular {\\em minkowskian} trajectories have approximate stopping points or, equivalently, are approximately pe...

  8. A sensor for calcium uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified.

  9. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  10. Calcium Signaling throughout the Toxoplasma gondii Lytic Cycle: A STUDY USING GENETICALLY ENCODED CALCIUM INDICATORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Budu, Alexandre; McKnight, Ciara A; Moore, Christina A; Vella, Stephen A; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Liu, Jing; Garcia, Celia R S; Pace, Douglas A; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that invades host cells, creating a parasitophorous vacuole where it communicates with the host cell cytosol through the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. The lytic cycle of the parasite starts with its exit from the host cell followed by gliding motility, conoid extrusion, attachment, and invasion of another host cell. Here, we report that Ca(2+) oscillations occur in the cytosol of the parasite during egress, gliding, and invasion, which are critical steps of the lytic cycle. Extracellular Ca(2+) enhances each one of these processes. We used tachyzoite clonal lines expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with host cells expressing transiently expressed calcium indicators of different colors, and we measured Ca(2+) changes in both parasites and host simultaneously during egress. We demonstrated a link between cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in the host and in the parasite. Our approach also allowed us to measure two new features of motile parasites, which were enhanced by Ca(2+) influx. This is the first study showing, in real time, Ca(2+) signals preceding egress and their direct link with motility, an essential virulence trait.

  11. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.;

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...

  12. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments ({nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}}) currently being performed at accelerators are reviewed. Future plans for short and long base-line experiments are summarized. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  13. Solar neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The special properties of solar neutrinos that render this flux so uniquely important in searches for neutrino masses and flavor mixing are reviewed. The effects of matter, including density fluctuations and turbulence, on solar neutrino oscillations are explained through analogies with more familiar atomic physics phenomena

  14. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef;

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able to...

  15. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about...

  16. Calcium aluminate in alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Arzu

    The properties of ceramic materials are determined not only by the composition and structure of the phases present, but also by the distribution of impurities, intergranular films and second phases. The phase distribution and microstructure both depend on the fabrication techniques, the raw materials used, the phase-equilibrium relations, grain growth and sintering processes. In this dissertation research, various approaches have been employed to understand fundamental phenomena such as grain growth, impurity segregation, second-phase formation and crystallization. The materials system chosen was alumina intentionally doped with calcium. Atomic-scale structural analyses of grain boundaries in alumina were carried on the processed samples. It was found that above certain calcium concentrations, CA6 precipitated as a second phase at all sintering temperatures. The results also showed that abnormal grain growth can occur after precipitation and it is not only related to the calcium level, but it is also temperature dependent. In order to understand the formation mechanism of CA6 precipitates in calcium doped alumina samples, several studies have been carried out using either bulk materials or thin films The crystallization of CA2 and CA6 powders has been studied. Chemical processing techniques were used to synthesize the powders. It was observed that CA2 powders crystallized directly, however CA6 powders crystallized through gamma-Al 2O3 solid solution. The results of energy-loss near-edge spectrometry confirmed that gamma-Al2O3 can dissolve calcium. Calcium aluminate/alumina reaction couples have also been investigated. All reaction couples were heat treated following deposition. It was found that gamma-Al2O3 was formed at the interface as a result of the interfacial reaction between the film and the substrate. gamma-Al 2O3 at the interface was stable at much higher temperatures compared to the bulk gamma-Al2O3 formed prior to the CA6 crystallization. In order to

  17. Orthogonal polynomials and deformed oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzov, V. V.; Damaskinsky, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    In the example of the Fibonacci oscillator, we discuss the construction of oscillator-like systems associated with orthogonal polynomials. We also consider the question of the dimensions of the corresponding Lie algebras.

  18. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  19. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  20. Bimodal oscillations in nephron autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A N; Mosekilde, E;

    2002-01-01

    The individual functional unit of the kidney (the nephron) displays oscillations in its pressure and flow regulation at two different time scales: fast oscillations associated with a myogenic dynamics of the afferent arteriole, and slower oscillations arising from a delay in the tubuloglomerular ...

  1. Neutrino Oscillations with Nil Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Edward R.

    2016-09-01

    An alternative neutrino oscillation process is presented as a counterexample for which the neutrino may have nil mass consistent with the standard model. The process is developed in a quantum trajectories representation of quantum mechanics, which has a Hamilton-Jacobi foundation. This process has no need for mass differences between mass eigenstates. Flavor oscillations and ν ,bar{ν } oscillations are examined.

  2. Imaging Calcium in Drosophila at Egg Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Christopher J; York-Andersen, Anna H; Weil, Timothy T

    2016-01-01

    Egg activation is a universal process that includes a series of events to allow the fertilized egg to complete meiosis and initiate embryonic development. One aspect of egg activation, conserved across all organisms examined, is a change in the intracellular concentration of calcium (Ca(2+)) often termed a 'Ca(2+) wave'. While the speed and number of oscillations of the Ca(2+) wave varies between species, the change in intracellular Ca(2+) is key in bringing about essential events for embryonic development. These changes include resumption of the cell cycle, mRNA regulation, cortical granule exocytosis, and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. In the mature Drosophila egg, activation occurs in the female oviduct prior to fertilization, initiating a series of Ca(2+)-dependent events. Here we present a protocol for imaging the Ca(2+) wave in Drosophila. This approach provides a manipulable model system to interrogate the mechanism of the Ca(2+) wave and the downstream changes associated with it. PMID:27584955

  3. Improved chaotic Colpitts oscillator for ultrahigh frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A.; Bumeliene, S.; Lindberg, Erik

    2004-01-01

    A novel version of the Colpitts oscillator is presented generating chaotic oscillations at gigahertz frequencies.......A novel version of the Colpitts oscillator is presented generating chaotic oscillations at gigahertz frequencies....

  4. The electrical soliton oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, David Shawn

    Solitons are a special class of pulse-shaped waves that propagate in nonlinear dispersive media while maintaining their spatial confinement. They are found throughout nature where the proper balance between nonlinearity and dispersion is achieved. Examples of the soliton phenomena include shallow water waves, vibrations in a nonlinear spring-mass lattice, acoustic waves in plasma, and optical pulses in fiber optic cable. In electronics, the nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) serves as a nonlinear dispersive medium that propagates voltage solitons. Electrical solitons on the NLTL have been actively investigated over the last 40 years, particularly in the microwave domain, for sharp pulse generation applications and for high-speed RF and microwave sampling applications. In these past studies the NLTL has been predominantly used as a 2-port system where a high-frequency input is required to generate a sharp soliton output through a transient process. One meaningful extension of the past 2-port NLTL works would be to construct a 1-port self-sustained electrical soliton oscillator by properly combining the NLTL with an amplifier (positive active feedback). Such an oscillator would self-start by growing from ambient noise to produce a train of periodic soliton pulses in steady-state, and hence would make a self-contained soliton generator not requiring an external high-frequency input. While such a circuit may offer a new direction in the field of electrical pulse generation, there has not been a robust electrical soliton oscillator reported to date to the best of our knowledge. In this thesis we introduce the first robust electrical soliton oscillator, which is able to self-generate a stable, periodic train of electrical solitons. This new oscillator is made possible by combining the NLTL with a unique nonlinear amplifier that is able to "tame" the unruly dynamics of the NLTL. The principle contribution of this thesis is the identification of the key instability

  5. EEG oscillations: From correlation to causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Strüber, Daniel; Helfrich, Randolph F; Engel, Andreas K

    2016-05-01

    Already in his first report on the discovery of the human EEG in 1929, Berger showed great interest in further elucidating the functional roles of the alpha and beta waves for normal mental activities. Meanwhile, most cognitive processes have been linked to at least one of the traditional frequency bands in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma range. Although the existing wealth of high-quality correlative EEG data led many researchers to the conviction that brain oscillations subserve various sensory and cognitive processes, a causal role can only be demonstrated by directly modulating such oscillatory signals. In this review, we highlight several methods to selectively modulate neuronal oscillations, including EEG-neurofeedback, rhythmic sensory stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). In particular, we discuss tACS as the most recent technique to directly modulate oscillatory brain activity. Such studies demonstrating the effectiveness of tACS comprise reports on purely behavioral or purely electrophysiological effects, on combination of behavioral effects with offline EEG measurements or on simultaneous (online) tACS-EEG recordings. Whereas most tACS studies are designed to modulate ongoing rhythmic brain activity at a specific frequency, recent evidence suggests that tACS may also modulate cross-frequency interactions. Taken together, the modulation of neuronal oscillations allows to demonstrate causal links between brain oscillations and cognitive processes and to obtain important insights into human brain function. PMID:25659527

  6. Chimera states in mechanical oscillator networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi; Fourrière, Antoine; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-06-25

    The synchronization of coupled oscillators is a fascinating manifestation of self-organization that nature uses to orchestrate essential processes of life, such as the beating of the heart. Although it was long thought that synchrony and disorder were mutually exclusive steady states for a network of identical oscillators, numerous theoretical studies in recent years have revealed the intriguing possibility of "chimera states," in which the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into a synchronous part and an asynchronous part. However, a striking lack of empirical evidence raises the question of whether chimeras are indeed characteristic of natural systems. This calls for a palpable realization of chimera states without any fine-tuning, from which physical mechanisms underlying their emergence can be uncovered. Here, we devise a simple experiment with mechanical oscillators coupled in a hierarchical network to show that chimeras emerge naturally from a competition between two antagonistic synchronization patterns. We identify a wide spectrum of complex states, encompassing and extending the set of previously described chimeras. Our mathematical model shows that the self-organization observed in our experiments is controlled by elementary dynamical equations from mechanics that are ubiquitous in many natural and technological systems. The symmetry-breaking mechanism revealed by our experiments may thus be prevalent in systems exhibiting collective behavior, such as power grids, optomechanical crystals, or cells communicating via quorum sensing in microbial populations.

  7. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  8. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S, as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC, T-type calcium channels (TTCC, sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX, transient receptor potential (TRP channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  10. Stable local oscillator module.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  11. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multimode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged-lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks. (authors)

  12. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, M.; Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [Universita degli Studi di Salerno Via Ponte don Melillon, Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica, Fisciano SA (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo collegato di Salerno - Baronissi SA (Italy); Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [CNR-INFM Coherentia - Napoli (Italy); Blasone, M. [ISI Foundation for Scientific Interchange, Torino (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multimode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged-lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks. (authors)

  13. Nonlinear (Anharmonic Casimir Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Razmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We want to study the dynamics of a simple linear harmonic micro spring which is under the influence of the quantum Casimir force/pressure and thus behaves as a (an nonlinear (anharmonic Casimir oscillator. Generally, the equation of motion of this nonlinear micromechanical Casimir oscillator has no exact solvable (analytical solution and the turning point(s of the system has (have no fixed position(s; however, for particular values of the stiffness of the micro spring and at appropriately well-chosen distance scales and conditions, there is (are approximately sinusoidal solution(s for the problem (the variable turning points are collected in a very small interval of positions. This, as a simple and elementary plan, may be useful in controlling the Casimir stiction problem in micromechanical devices.

  14. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  15. CP Violating Baryon Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze neutron-antineutron oscillation in detail, developing a Hamiltonian describing the system in the presence of electromagnetic fields. While magnetic fields can couple states of different spin, we show that, because of Fermi statistics, this coupling of different spin states does not involve baryon-number--changing transitions and, therefore, a two-state analysis ignoring spin is sufficient even in the presence of electromagnetic fields. We also enumerate the conditions necessary for...

  16. Reconstructing baryon oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Yookyung; White, Martin; Padmanabhan, Nikhil

    2009-01-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method for constraining the expansion history is adversely affected by non-linear structure formation, which washes out the correlation function peak created at decoupling. To increase the constraining power of low z BAO experiments, it has been proposed that one use the observed distribution of galaxies to "reconstruct'' the acoustic peak. Recently Padmanabhan, White and Cohn provided an analytic formalism for understanding how reconstruction works withi...

  17. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakariakov Valery M.; Verwichte Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves), theoretical modelling of interactio...

  18. Neutrino Oscillations for Dummies

    OpenAIRE

    Waltham, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The reality of neutrino oscillations has not really sunk in yet. The phenomenon presents us with purely quantum mechanical effects over macroscopic time and distance scales (milliseconds and 1000s of km). In order to help with the pedagogical difficulties this poses, I attempt here to present the physics in words and pictures rather than math. No disrespect is implied by the title; I am merely borrowing a term used by a popular series of self-help books.

  19. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    CERN Document Server

    Sawai, S; Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-01-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introduced to study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The model successfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which has been experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higher intrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocity attains its maximum value in the interface region between total locking and partial locking and also suggest possible roles played by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  20. Polychromatic optical Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2009-07-15

    Bloch oscillations (BOs) of polychromatic beams in circularly curved optical waveguide arrays are smeared out owing to the dependence of the BO spatial period on the wavelength. Here it is shown that restoring of the self-imaging property of the array and approximate BOs over relatively broad spectral ranges can be achieved by the insertion of suitable lumped phase slips uniformly applied across the array.

  1. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  2. Temperature sensitive oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An oscillator circuit for sensing and indicating temperature by changing oscillator frequency with temperature comprises a programmable operational amplifier which is operated on the roll-off portion of its gain versus frequency curve and has its output directly connected to the inverting input to place the amplifier in a follower configuration. Its output is also connected to the non-inverting input by a capacitor with a crystal or other tuned circuit also being connected to the non-inverting input. A resistor is connected to the program input of the amplifier to produce a given set current at a given temperature, the set current varying with temperature. As the set current changes, the gain-bandwidth of the amplifier changes and, in turn, the reflected capacitance across the crystal changes, thereby providing the desired change in oscillator frequency by pulling the crystal. There is no requirement that a crystal employed with this circuit display either a linear frequency change with temperature or a substantial frequency change with temperature.

  3. Coupled Classical and Quantum Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    McDermott, R M; Dermott, Rachael M. Mc; Redmount, Ian H.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the most enduring questions in physics--including the quantum measurement problem and the quantization of gravity--involve the interaction of a quantum system with a classical environment. Two linearly coupled harmonic oscillators provide a simple, exactly soluble model for exploring such interaction. Even the ground state of a pair of identical oscillators exhibits effects on the quantum nature of one oscillator, e.g., a diminution of position uncertainty, and an increase in momentum uncertainty and uncertainty product, from their unperturbed values. Interaction between quantum and classical oscillators is simulated by constructing a quantum state with one oscillator initially in its ground state, the other in a coherent or Glauber state. The subsequent wave function for this state is calculated exactly, both for identical and distinct oscillators. The reduced probability distribution for the quantum oscillator, and its position and momentum expectation values and uncertainties, are obtained from thi...

  4. Nonlinear Oscillators in Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester,Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    We discuss dynamical systems that produce an oscillation without an external time dependent source. Numerical results are presented for nonlinear oscillators in the Em1h's atmosphere, foremost the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBOl. These fluid dynamical oscillators, like the solar dynamo, have in common that one of the variables in a governing equation is strongly nonlinear and that the nonlinearity, to first order, has particular form. of 3rd or odd power. It is shown that this form of nonlinearity can produce the fundamental li'equency of the internal oscillation. which has a period that is favored by the dynamical condition of the fluid. The fundamental frequency maintains the oscillation, with no energy input to the system at that particular frequency. Nonlinearities of 2nd or even power could not maintain the oscillation.

  5. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  6. Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    There is compelling evidence for neutrino flavor change as neutrinos propagate. The evidence for this phenomenon has been provided by several experiments observing neutrinos that traverse distances of several hundred kilometers between production and detection. This review outlines the evidence for neutrino flavor change from such experiments and describes recent results in the field.

  7. T-Type Calcium Channel: A Privileged Gate for Calcium Entry and Control of Adrenal Steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, Michel F

    2016-01-01

    have been described yet to affect cortisol secretion or to be linked to the development of Cushing syndrome, but several evidences suggest that the function of T channels is also crucial in fasciculata cells. Putative molecular mechanisms and cellular structural organization making T channels a privileged entry for the "steroidogenic calcium" are also discussed. PMID:27242667

  8. T-type calcium channel: a privileged gate for calcium entry and control of adrenal steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Florian Rossier

    2016-05-01

    -type channels have been described yet to affect cortisol secretion or to be linked to the development of Cushing syndrome, but several evidences suggest that the function of T channels is also crucial in fasciculata cells. Putative molecular mechanisms and cellular structural organization making T channels a privileged entry for the steroidogenic calcium are also discussed.

  9. Filamin and phospholipase C-ε are required for calcium signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismar Kovacevic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue.

  10. A study of neutrino oscillations in MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufer, Tobias Martin [Univ. College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillations experiment located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA. It makes use of the NuMI neutrino beamline and two functionally identical detectors located at distances of ~1km and ~735km from the neutrino production target respectively. The Near Detector measures the composition and energy spectrum of the neutrino beam with high precision while the Far Detector looks for evidence of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents work conducted in two distinct areas of the MINOS experiment: analysis of neutral current and charged current interactions. While charged current events are only sensitive to muon neutrino disappearance, neutral current events can be used to distinguish oscillations into sterile neutrinos from those involving only active neutrino species. A complete, preliminary neutral current study is performed on simulated data. This is followed by a more detailed investigation of neutral current neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector. A procedure identifying neutral current interactions and rejecting backgrounds due to reconstruction failures is developed. Two distinct event classification methods are investigated. The selected neutral current events in the Near Detector are used to extract corrections to the neutral current cross-section in the MINOS Monte Carlo simulation as a function of energy. The resulting correction factors are consistent with unity. The main MINOS charged current neutrino disappearance analysis is described. We present the Monte Carlo tuning procedure, event selection, extrapolation from Near to Far Detector and fit for neutrino oscillations. Systematic errors on this measurement are evaluated and discussed in detail. The data are consistent with neutrino oscillations with the following parameters: 2.74 $+0.44\\atop{-0.26}$ x 10-3 eV2 and sin2(2θ23) > 0.87 at 68% confidence level.

  11. THE ORIGIN OF TYPE I SPICULE OSCILLATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keys, P. H.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Pascoe, D. J. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J., E-mail: d.jess@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope, to reveal how the generation of transverse waves in Type I spicules is a direct result of longitudinal oscillations occurring in the photosphere. Here we show how pressure oscillations, with periodicities in the range of 130-440 s, manifest in small-scale photospheric magnetic bright points, and generate kink waves in the Sun's outer atmosphere with transverse velocities approaching the local sound speed. Through comparison of our observations with advanced two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we provide evidence for how magnetoacoustic oscillations, generated at the solar surface, funnel upward along Type I spicule structures, before undergoing longitudinal-to-transverse mode conversion into waves at twice the initial driving frequency. The resulting kink modes are visible in chromospheric plasma, with periodicities of 65-220 s, and amplitudes often exceeding 400 km. A sausage mode oscillation also arises as a consequence of the photospheric driver, which is visible in both simulated and observational time series. We conclude that the mode conversion and period modification is a direct consequence of the 90 Degree-Sign phase shift encompassing opposite sides of the photospheric driver. The chromospheric energy flux of these waves are estimated to be Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} W m{sup -2}, which indicates that they are sufficiently energetic to accelerate the solar wind and heat the localized corona to its multi-million degree temperatures.

  12. Calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Nicholas M; Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-05-28

    The ability to rapidly respond to changes in temperature is a critical adaptation for insects and other ectotherms living in thermally variable environments. In a process called rapid cold hardening (RCH), insects significantly enhance cold tolerance following brief (i.e., minutes to hours) exposure to nonlethal chilling. Although the ecological relevance of RCH is well-established, the underlying physiological mechanisms that trigger RCH are poorly understood. RCH can be elicited in isolated tissues ex vivo, suggesting cold-sensing and downstream hardening pathways are governed by brain-independent signaling mechanisms. We previously provided preliminary evidence that calcium is involved in RCH, and here we firmly establish that calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues. In tracheal cells of the freeze-tolerant goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, chilling to 0 °C evoked a 40% increase in intracellular calcium concentration as determined by live-cell confocal imaging. Downstream of calcium entry, RCH conditions significantly increased the activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) while reducing phosphorylation of the inhibitory Thr306 residue. Pharmacological inhibitors of calcium entry, calmodulin activation, and CaMKII activity all prevented ex vivo RCH in midgut and salivary gland tissues, indicating that calcium signaling is required for RCH to occur. Similar results were obtained for a freeze-intolerant species, adults of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, suggesting that calcium-mediated cold sensing is a general feature of insects. Our results imply that insect tissues use calcium signaling to instantly detect decreases in temperature and trigger downstream cold-hardening mechanisms.

  13. Theory of oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich; Vitt, Aleksandr Adolfovich

    1966-01-01

    Theory of Oscillators presents the applications and exposition of the qualitative theory of differential equations. This book discusses the idea of a discontinuous transition in a dynamic process. Organized into 11 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the simplest type of oscillatory system in which the motion is described by a linear differential equation. This text then examines the character of the motion of the representative point along the hyperbola. Other chapters consider examples of two basic types of non-linear non-conservative systems, namely, dissipative systems and self-

  14. Kravchuk oscillator revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakishiyeva, Mesuma K.; Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    The study of irreducible representations of Lie algebras and groups has traditionally considered their action on functions of a continuous manifold (e.g. the 'rotation' Lie algebra so(3) on functions on the sphere). Here we argue that functions of a discrete variable -Kravchuk functions- are on equal footing for that study in the case of so(3). They lead to a discrete quantum model of the harmonic oscillator, and offer a corresponding set of special function relations. The technique is applicable to other special function families of a discrete variable, which stem from low-dimensional Lie algebras and are stationary solutions for the corresponding discrete quantum models.

  15. Oscillations in nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Jack K

    2015-01-01

    By focusing on ordinary differential equations that contain a small parameter, this concise graduate-level introduction to the theory of nonlinear oscillations provides a unified approach to obtaining periodic solutions to nonautonomous and autonomous differential equations. It also indicates key relationships with other related procedures and probes the consequences of the methods of averaging and integral manifolds.Part I of the text features introductory material, including discussions of matrices, linear systems of differential equations, and stability of solutions of nonlinear systems. Pa

  16. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  17. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model...... for this complex polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The model reproduces well the qualitatively different time series that result from different experimental conditions, and illuminates the role and importance of individual processes in the cycle. Simple experiments are suggested that can further test...... and define the model and the polymer's reaction cycle....

  18. Transport Equations for Oscillating Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunfan

    2013-01-01

    We derive a suite of generalized Boltzmann equations, based on the density-matrix formalism, that incorporates the physics of neutrino oscillations for two- and three-flavor oscillations, matter refraction, and self-refraction. The resulting equations are straightforward extensions of the classical transport equations that nevertheless contain the full physics of quantum oscillation phenomena. In this way, our broadened formalism provides a bridge between the familiar neutrino transport algorithms employed by supernova modelers and the more quantum-heavy approaches frequently employed to illuminate the various neutrino oscillation effects. We also provide the corresponding angular-moment versions of this generalized equation set. Our goal is to make it easier for astrophysicists to address oscillation phenomena in a language with which they are familiar. The equations we derive are simple and practical, and are intended to facilitate progress concerning oscillation phenomena in the context of core-collapse su...

  19. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. The authors propose that this role may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis, specifically, that the increases in theta oscillations and changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments.

  20. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40-100Hz in mammals, 20-30Hz in insects, 0.5-1.5Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB), antennal lobe (AL), or procerebrum (PrC). Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the OB and AL. Beta (20Hz) and theta (2-12Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal OB input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration.

  1. Observations on intestinal secretions of calcium by strontium-85 in normal Indian subjects and patients of nutritiond osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty cases of nutritional osteomalacia were studied and compared with 25 adult subjects of comparable age, sex and socio-economic status without any suspicion of metabolic bone disease. The diagnosis of nutritional osteomalacia was established by clinical, biochemical, radiological and histopathological studies. 15 of the 50 patients were restudied after treatment with vitamin D. Total digestive juice calcium (TDJCa), true absorption of calcium and endogenous faecal calcium (EFCa) were measured in all by the intravenous administration of strontium85 and balance studies for the stable calcium were carried out simultaneously. In nutritional osteomalacia there was no evidence of more active secretions of calcium into the intestines and endogenous loss of calcium was not high. It was interesting to note that absorption of calcium from the gut was normal even with relative vitamin D deficiency. It was also observed that vitamin D increased the bidirectional (absorption and secretion) permeability of calcium into the gut. (author)

  2. Peculiarity of the oscillation stratification in sunspot penumbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Kolobov, D Y; Kobanov, N I

    2016-01-01

    Spatial distributions of the dominant oscillation frequency obtained for four sunspots show a feature shared by all the analysed levels of the solar atmosphere in these sunspots. This feature located in the inner penumbrae indicates that this region has favourable conditions for 2.5-4 mHz oscillation propagation. This agrees with the fact that the spectral composition of the oscillations at three atmospheric heights (FeI 6173{\\AA}, 1700{\\AA}, and He II 304{\\AA}) in this region are similar. There have been previous evidence of particular similarities along height of photospheric magnetic field strength, line-of-sight velocity, and temperature profile in the inner penumbra, where the internal boundary of the Evershed flow is located. The finding of the same dominant oscillation frequency at a range of altitudes from the chromosphere up to the transition region extends the height range, suggesting similarities in physical conditions.

  3. Peculiarity of the Oscillation Stratification in Sunspot Penumbrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobov, D. Y.; Chelpanov, A. A.; Kobanov, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    Spatial distributions of the dominant oscillation frequency obtained for four sunspots show a feature shared by all the analysed levels of the solar atmosphere in these sunspots. This feature located in the inner penumbrae indicates that this region has favourable conditions for 2.5 - 4 mHz oscillation propagation. This agrees with the fact that the spectral composition of the oscillations at three atmospheric heights (Fe uc(i) 6173 Å, 1700 Å, and He uc(ii) 304 Å) in this region are similar. There has been previous evidence of particular similarities along the height of the photospheric magnetic field strength, line-of-sight velocity, and temperature profile in the inner penumbra, where the internal boundary of the Evershed flow is located. The finding of the same dominant oscillation frequency at a range of altitudes from the chromosphere up to the transition region extends the height range, suggesting similarities in physical conditions.

  4. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Jaiswal

    2001-09-01

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a unique opportunity to be used in several biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties.

  5. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  6. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  7. Calcium measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rightly stressed by prof. Wolfgang Walz in the Preface to the series Neuromethods series, the “careful application of methods is probably the most important step in the process of scientific inquiry”. Thus, I strongly suggest to all those interested in calcium signaling and especially to the new-comers in the hot topic of neuroscience (which has so much space even in science-society debate for its implications in legal issues and in the judge-decision process to take profit from this so well edited book. I am saying this since prof. Verkhratsky and prof. Petersen......

  8. C P -violating baryon oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2016-10-01

    We enumerate the conditions necessary for C P violation to be manifest in n -n ¯ oscillations and build a simple model that can give rise to such effects. We discuss a possible connection between neutron oscillations and dark matter, provided the mass of the latter lies between mp-me and mp+me. We apply our results to a possible baryogenesis scenario involving C P violation in the oscillations of the Ξ0.

  9. Chimera States for Coupled Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Daniel M.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2004-01-01

    Arrays of identical oscillators can display a remarkable spatiotemporal pattern in which phase-locked oscillators coexist with drifting ones. Discovered two years ago, such "chimera states" are believed to be impossible for locally or globally coupled systems; they are peculiar to the intermediate case of nonlocal coupling. Here we present an exact solution for this state, for a ring of phase oscillators coupled by a cosine kernel. We show that the stable chimera state bifurcates from a spati...

  10. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  11. Linearization of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belendez, A; Alvarez, M L [Departamento de Fisica, IngenierIa de Sistemas y TeorIa de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Fernandez, E; Pascual, I [Departamento de Optica, FarmacologIa y AnatomIa, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: a.belendez@ua.es

    2009-03-11

    A linearization method of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force which allows us to obtain a frequency-amplitude relation which is valid not only for small but also for large amplitudes and, sometimes, for the complete range of oscillation amplitudes. Some conservative nonlinear oscillators are analysed to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of the technique.

  12. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide to form a substance consisting of not less than 60 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240 Food... Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used...

  13. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  14. Cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations in studying motivation and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Schutter, Dennis J. L. G.; Knyazev, Gennady G.

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that brain functions are realized by simultaneous oscillations in various frequency bands. In addition to examining oscillations in pre-specified bands, interactions and relations between the different frequency bandwidths is another important aspect that needs to be considered in unraveling the workings of the human brain and its functions. In this review we provide evidence that studying interdependencies between brain oscillations may be a valuable approach to study the ...

  15. Experiments on Deflecting & Oscillating Waterjet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new type jet,the oscillating & deflecting jet ,is put forward and its oscillating and deflecting characteristics are investigated.The nozzle of the self-oscillating & deflecting water jet consists of an upstream nozzle,a downstream nozzle,an oscillating chamber and two switches,It is experimentally shown that the deflective angle may reach 9.53 degeree,the generated pressure fluctuation is very regular and the jet can efficiently increase the ability for bradking and cutting by eliminating the water cushion effect associated with a continuous jet.

  16. The Duffing oscillator with damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to the differential equation describing the Duffing oscillator with damping is presented. The damping term of the differential equation and the initial conditions satisfy an algebraic equation, and thus the solution is specific for this type of damping. The nonlinear term....... It is established that the period of oscillation is shorter compared to that of a linearized model but increasing with time and asymptotically approaching the period of oscillation of the linear damped model. An explicit expression for the period of oscillation has been derived, and it is found to be very accurate....

  17. Unstable oscillators based hyperchaotic circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; G. Mykolaitis, A.;

    1999-01-01

    A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations in the circ...... in the circuit. The performance of the circuit is investigated by means of numerical integration of appropriate differential equations, PSPICE simulations, and hardware experiment.......A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations...

  18. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  19. A Matterwave Transistor Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Caliga, Seth C; Zozulya, Alex A; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A triple-well atomtronic transistor combined with forced RF evaporation is used to realize a driven matterwave oscillator circuit. The transistor is implemented using a metalized compound glass and silicon substrate. On-chip and external currents produce a cigar-shaped magnetic trap, which is divided into transistor source, gate, and drain regions by a pair of blue-detuned optical barriers projected onto the magnetic trap through a chip window. A resonant laser beam illuminating the drain portion of the atomtronic transistor couples atoms emitted by the gate to the vacuum. The circuit operates by loading the source with cold atoms and utilizing forced evaporation as a power supply that produces a positive chemical potential in the source, which subsequently drives oscillation. High-resolution in-trap absorption imagery reveals gate atoms that have tunneled from the source and establishes that the circuit emits a nominally mono-energetic matterwave with a frequency of 23.5(1.0) kHz by tunneling from the gate, ...

  20. Policy oscillation is overshooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A majority of approximate dynamic programming approaches to the reinforcement learning problem can be categorized into greedy value function methods and value-based policy gradient methods. The former approach, although fast, is well known to be susceptible to the policy oscillation phenomenon. We take a fresh view to this phenomenon by casting, within the context of non-optimistic policy iteration, a considerable subset of the former approach as a limiting special case of the latter. We explain the phenomenon in terms of this view and illustrate the underlying mechanism with artificial examples. We also use it to derive the constrained natural actor-critic algorithm that can interpolate between the aforementioned approaches. In addition, it has been suggested in the literature that the oscillation phenomenon might be subtly connected to the grossly suboptimal performance in the Tetris benchmark problem of all attempted approximate dynamic programming methods. Based on empirical findings, we offer a hypothesis that might explain the inferior performance levels and the associated policy degradation phenomenon, and which would partially support the suggested connection. Finally, we report scores in the Tetris problem that improve on existing dynamic programming based results by an order of magnitude. PMID:24491826

  1. Scanning for oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cheveigné, Alain; Arzounian, Dorothée

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Oscillations are an important aspect of brain activity, but they often have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to source-to-electrode mixing with competing brain activity and noise. Filtering can improve the SNR of narrowband signals, but it introduces ringing effects that may masquerade as genuine oscillations, leading to uncertainty as to the true oscillatory nature of the phenomena. Likewise, time-frequency analysis kernels have a temporal extent that blurs the time course of narrowband activity, introducing uncertainty as to timing and causal relations between events and/or frequency bands. Approach. Here, we propose a methodology that reveals narrowband activity within multichannel data such as electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, electrocorticography or local field potential. The method exploits the between-channel correlation structure of the data to suppress competing sources by joint diagonalization of the covariance matrices of narrowband filtered and unfiltered data. Main results. Applied to synthetic and real data, the method effectively extracts narrowband components at unfavorable SNR. Significance. Oscillatory components of brain activity, including weak sources that are hard or impossible to observe using standard methods, can be detected and their time course plotted accurately. The method avoids the temporal artifacts of standard filtering and time-frequency analysis methods with which it remains complementary.

  2. Extinction of oscillating populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Naftali R; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation. PMID:27078294

  3. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  4. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca(2+) signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  5. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  6. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  7. Extracellular calcium-sensing-receptor (CaR)-mediated opening of an outward K(+) channel in murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells: evidence for expression of a functional CaR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, C. P.; Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Sanders, J. L.; Vassilev, P. M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The existence in osteoblasts of the G-protein-coupled extracellular calcium (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) that was originally cloned from parathyroid and kidney remains controversial. In our recent studies, we utilized multiple detection methods to demonstrate the expression of CaR transcripts and protein in several osteoblastic cell lines, including murine MC3T3-E1 cells. Although we and others have shown that high Ca(o)(2+) and other polycationic CaR agonists modulate the function of MC3T3-E1 cells, none of these actions has been unequivocally shown to be mediated by the CaR. Previous investigations using neurons and lens epithelial cells have shown that activation of the CaR stimulates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Because osteoblastic cells express a similar type of channel, we have examined the effects of specific "calcimimetic" CaR activators on the activity of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel in MC3T3-E1 cells as a way of showing that the CaR is not only expressed in those cells but is functionally active. Patch-clamp analysis in the cell-attached mode showed that raising Ca(o)(2+) from 0.75 to 2.75 mmol/L elicited about a fourfold increase in the open state probability (P(o)) of an outward K(+) channel with a conductance of approximately 92 pS. The selective calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467 (0.5 micromol/L), evoked a similar activation of the channel, while its less active stereoisomer, NPSS-467 (0.5 micromol/L), did not. Thus, the CaR is not only expressed in MC3T3-E1 cells, but is also functionally coupled to the activity of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel. This receptor, therefore, could transduce local or systemic changes in Ca(o)(2+) into changes in the activity of this ion channel and related physiological processes in these and perhaps other osteoblastic cells.

  8. Redox control of calcium channels: from mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hool, Livia C; Corry, Ben

    2007-04-01

    Calcium plays an integral role in cellular function. It is a well-recognized second messenger necessary for signaling cellular responses, but in excessive amounts can be deleterious to function, causing cell death. The main route by which calcium enters the cytoplasm is either from the extracellular compartment or internal addistores via calcium channels. There is good evidence that calcium channels can respond to pharmacological compounds that reduce or oxidize thiol groups on the channel protein. In addition, reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide that can mediate oxidative pathology also mediate changes in channel function via alterations of thiol groups. This review looks at the structure and function of calcium channels, the evidence that changes in cellular redox state mediate changes in channel function, and the role of redox modification of channels in disease processes. Understanding how redox modification of the channel protein alters channel structure and function is providing leads for the design of therapeutic interventions that target oxidative stress responses.

  9. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    OpenAIRE

    Choksi Krishna; Shenoy Ashoka M; A. R. Shabharaya; Lala Minaxi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg) and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg) were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg) to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate cou...

  10. P-T事件后特提斯洋从停滞到动荡的岩石学证据%The petrological evidences of sluggish to oscillating Tethys ocean after the P-T Event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 时志强; 罗凤姿; 安红艳

    2011-01-01

    In the upper Yangzte region, laminated limestone, thin-bedded pelmicrite, argillaceous limestone are widely covered by storm-generated brecciform limestone, anachronistic flat-pebble conglomerate calcirudyte, hummocky cross-bedding grain limestone or siltstone. This shows in the first member of Lower Triassic Feixianguan Formation in the Guangyuan and Chongqing areas. This phenomenon is widespread in the strata of the Early Triassic in southern Alps, Kashmir, and Iran. The isochronism of this event needs further investigation. The petrologic change from laminated sediments to grain limestone and calcirudyte indicates that the palaeo-oceanographical environment of the coastal shelf area in Tethys has changed significantly. The petrology features suggest that the limestone is rich in mud and lack of which can reflect the exposed shallow water sedimentary structures and that the laminated limestone and thin bedded limstone are the products of low energy and formed at deep water, indicating the quiet and stagnant marine environments. The HCS and chrysanthemum structure in the brecciform limestone and flat-pebble conglomerate calcirudyte mark the oscillating environment and show that they formed by the weakly solidified carbonate which were broken, torn up and re-worked by the oscillating water resulting from the storm. The weak biodisruption in the thin bedded and laminate limestone indicates that the depressed marine ecosystem after the P-T Event set a limit to the drilling of benthos. The storm activities resulted in the development of the calcirudyte that may be associated with diversified factors including global warming and higher temperature sea water caused by the increase of CO2, the paleogeography of the Tethys and the prevailing megamonsoon in Early Triassic.%上扬子地区下三叠统飞仙关组下部薄层状、纹层状微晶灰岩、泥质灰岩之上普遍发育与风暴作用有关的角砾状灰岩、"错时相"扁平砾屑灰岩、丘状交错层

  11. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk;

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  12. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  13. Solar neutrino oscillation phenomenology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srubabati Goswami

    2004-02-01

    This article summarises the status of the solar neutrino oscillation phenomenology at the end of 2002 in the light of the SNO and KamLAND results. We first present the allowed areas obtained from global solar analysis and demonstrate the preference of the solar data towards the large-mixing-angle (LMA) MSW solution. A clear confirmation in favour of the LMA solution comes from the KamLAND reactor neutrino data. the KamLAND spectral data in conjunction with the global solar data further narrows down the allowed LMA region and splits it into two allowed zones - a low $ m^{2}$ region (low-LMA) and high $ m^{2}$ region (high-LMA). We demonstrate through a projected analysis that with an exposure of 3 kton-year (kTy) KamLAND can remove this ambiguity.

  14. Collective supernova neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Neutrinos emitted by core-collapse supernovae (SNe) represent an important laboratory for both particle physics and astrophysics. While propagating in the dense SN environment, they can feel not only the presence of background matter (via ordinary Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects) but also of the gas of neutrinos and antineutrinos (via neutrino-neutrino interaction effects). The neutrino-neutrino interactions appear to modify the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos in a collective way, completely different from the ordinary matter effects. In these conditions, the flavor evolution equations become highly nonlinear, sometimes resulting in surprising phenomena when the entire neutrino system oscillates coherently as a single collective mode. In this talk, I present the recent results on collective supernova neutrino flavor conversions and I discuss about the sensitivity of these effects to the ordering of the neutrino mass spectrum.

  15. Hyperchaotic system with unstable oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; Mykolaitis, G.;

    2000-01-01

    A simple electronic system exhibiting hyperchaotic behaviour is described. The system includes two nonlinearly coupled 2nd order unstable oscillators, each composed of an LC resonance loop and an amplifier. The system is investigated by means of numerical integration of appropriate differential...... equations, PSPICE simulations and hardware experiments. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic mode of the oscillations....

  16. The Wien Bridge Oscillator Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2006-01-01

    A tutorial in which the Wien bridge family of oscillators is defined and investigated. Oscillators which do not fit into the Barkhausen criterion topology may be designed. A design procedure based on initial complex pole quality factor is reported. The dynamic transfer characteristic...

  17. The El Nino Stochastic Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Burgers, G

    1997-01-01

    Anomalies during an El Nino are dominated by a single, irregularly oscillating, mode. Equatorial dynamics has been linked to delayed-oscillator models of this mode. Usually, the El Nino mode is regarded as an unstable mode of the coupled atmosphere system and the irregularity is attributed to noise and possibly chaos. Here a variation on the delayed oscillator is explored. In this stochastic-oscillator view, El Nino is a stable mode excited by noise. It is shown that the autocorrelation function of the observed NINO3.4 index is that of a stochastic oscillator, within the measurement uncertainty. Decadal variations as would occur in a stochastic oscillator are shown to be comparable to those observed, only the increase in the long-term mean around 1980 is rather large. The observed dependence of the seasonal cycle on the variance and the correlation is so large that it can not be attributed to the natural variability of a stationary stochastic oscillator. So the El Niño stochastic-oscillator parameters must d...

  18. Lorentz violation and neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewes, Matthew [Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Lorentz violation naturally leads to neutrino oscillations and provides an alternative mechanism that may explain current data. This contribution to the proceedings of The XXII International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics provides a brief review of possible signals of Lorentz violation in neutrino-oscillation experiments.

  19. Neutrino Oscillations with Nil Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Floyd, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    An alternative neutrino oscillation process is presented as a counterexample for which the neutrino may have nil mass consistent with the standard model. The process is developed in a quantum trajectories representation of quantum mechanics, which has a Hamilton-Jacobi foundation. This process has no need for mass differences between mass eigenstates. Flavor oscillations and $\\bar{\

  20. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  1. Mechanical Parametric Oscillations and Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Usually parametric oscillations are not the topic of general physics courses. Probably it is because the mathematical theory of this phenomenon is relatively complicated, and until quite recently laboratory experiments for students were difficult to implement. However parametric oscillations are good illustrations of the laws of physics and can be…

  2. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  3. Photoacoustic elastic oscillation and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging and sensing have been studied extensively to probe the optical absorption of biological tissue in multiple scales ranging from large organs to small molecules. However, its elastic oscillation characterization is rarely studied and has been an untapped area to be explored. In literature, photoacoustic signal induced by pulsed laser is commonly modelled as a bipolar "N-shape" pulse from an optical absorber. In this paper, the photoacoustic damped oscillation is predicted and modelled by an equivalent mass-spring system by treating the optical absorber as an elastic oscillator. The photoacoustic simulation incorporating the proposed oscillation model shows better agreement with the measured signal from an elastic phantom, than conventional photoacoustic simulation model. More interestingly, the photoacoustic damping oscillation effect could potentially be a useful characterization approach to evaluate biological tissue's mechanical properties in terms of relaxation time, peak number and ra...

  4. Parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in a Josephson tunnel junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig;

    1975-01-01

    Experimental evidence for subharmonic parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in Josephson tunnel junctions is presented. The experiments described are performed by measuring the microwave power necessary to switch a Josephson−tunnel junction biased in the zero−voltage state to a finite...

  5. Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes.

  6. Flagellar oscillation: a commentary on proposed mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, David M

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia have a remarkably uniform internal 'engine' known as the '9+2' axoneme. With few exceptions, the function of cilia and flagella is to beat rhythmically and set up relative motion between themselves and the liquid that surrounds them. The molecular basis of axonemal movement is understood in considerable detail, with the exception of the mechanism that provides its rhythmical or oscillatory quality. Some kind of repetitive 'switching' event is assumed to occur; there are several proposals regarding the nature of the 'switch' and how it might operate. Herein I first summarise all the factors known to influence the rate of the oscillation (the beating frequency). Many of these factors exert their effect through modulating the mean sliding velocity between the nine doublet microtubules of the axoneme, this velocity being the determinant of bend growth rate and bend propagation rate. Then I explain six proposed mechanisms for flagellar oscillation and review the evidence on which they are based. Finally, I attempt to derive an economical synthesis, drawing for preference on experimental research that has been minimally disruptive of the intricate structure of the axoneme. The 'provisional synthesis' is that flagellar oscillation emerges from an effect of passive sliding direction on the dynein arms. Sliding in one direction facilitates force-generating cycles and dynein-to-dynein synchronisation along a doublet; sliding in the other direction is inhibitory. The direction of the initial passive sliding normally oscillates because it is controlled hydrodynamically through the alternating direction of the propulsive thrust. However, in the absence of such regulation, there can be a perpetual, mechanical self-triggering through a reversal of sliding direction due to the recoil of elastic structures that deform as a response to the prior active sliding. This provisional synthesis may be a useful basis for further examination of the problem.

  7. Free oscillation of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abedini

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This work is a study of the Earths free oscillations considering a merge of solid and liquid model. At the turn of 19th century Geophysicists presented the theory of the free oscillations for a self-gravitating, isotropic and compressible sphere. Assuming a steel structure for an Earth size sphere, they predicted a period of oscillation of about 1 hour. About 50 years later, the free oscillations of stars was studied by Cowling and others. They classified the oscillation modes of the stars into acoustic and gravity modes on the basis of their driving forces. These are pressure and buoyancy forces respectively. The earliest measurements for the period of the free oscillations of the Earth was made by Benyove from a study of Kamchathca earthquake. Since then, the Geophysicists have been trying to provide a theoretical basis for these measurements. Recently, the theory concerning oscillations of celestial fluids is extended by Sobouti to include the possible oscillations of the Earthlike bodies. Using the same technique, we study the free oscillations of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and elastic model for the Earth.   We used the actual data of the Earths interior structure in our numerical calculations. Numerical results show that there exist three distinct oscillation modes namely acoustic, gravity and toroidal modes. These modes are driven by pressure, buoyancy and shear forces respectively. The shear force is due to the elastic properties of the solid part of the Earth. Our numerical results are consistent with the seismic data recorded from earthquake measurements.

  8. Evolution of the Calcium Paradigm: The Relation between Vitamin D, Serum Calcium and Calcium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borje E. Christopher Nordin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the index disease for calcium deficiency, just as rickets/osteomalacia is the index disease for vitamin D deficiency, but there is considerable overlap between them. The common explanation for this overlap is that hypovitaminosis D causes malabsorption of calcium which then causes secondary hyperparathyroidism and is effectively the same thing as calcium deficiency. This paradigm is incorrect. Hypovitaminosis D causes secondary hyperparathyroidism at serum calcidiol levels lower than 60 nmol/L long before it causes malabsorption of calcium because serum calcitriol (which controls calcium absorption is maintained until serum calcidiol falls below 20 nmol/L. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, probably due to loss of a “calcaemic” action of vitamin D on bone first described in 1957, destroys bone and explains why vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Vitamin D thus plays a central role in the maintenance of the serum (ionised calcium, which is more important to the organism than the preservation of the skeleton. Bone is sacrificed when absorbed dietary calcium does not match excretion through the skin, kidneys and bowel which is why calcium deficiency causes osteoporosis in experimental animals and, by implication, in humans.

  9. Sensitivity to calcium intake in calcium stone forming patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1996-01-01

    The absorptive or renal origin of hypercalciuria can be discriminated using an acute oral calcium load test (ACLT). Of 86 patients with calcium oxalate kidney stones, 28 (23%) were found to be hypercalciuric (HCa) and 58 (67%) normocalciuric (NCa) on their customary free diet, containing 542 +/- 29 mg/day (mean +/- SE) of calcium. Since the apparently normal 24-hour calcium excretion of many calcium stone formers (CSF) may be due to a combination of high calcium absorption with moderately low calcium intake, all patients were investigated by ACLT. Of 28 HCa patients, 13 (46%) were classified as absorptive (AH) and 15 (54%) as renal hypercalciuria (RH). Of the 58 NCa patients, 38 (65%) presented features of intestinal hyperabsorption and were therefore designated as AH-like, and 20 (35%) as RH-like. To further elucidate the role of dietary calcium in these CSF, a chronic calcium load test (CCLT), consisting of 1 g/day of oral Ca for 7 days, was designed. A positive response to the CCLT was considered to occur when urinary calcium (uCa) was > or = 4 mg/ kg/24 h on the 7th day. Among NCa patients, 29% of AH-like subjects responded to the CCLT and 71% did not; 50% of RH-like subjects also responded and 50% did not. In HCa patients, 85% of AH and 67% of RH subjects maintained uCa > or = 4 mg/kg/24 h after the CCLT and 15% of AH and 23% of RH subjects did not. However, a significant additional increase in mean uCa was not observed among HCa patients. All patients were submitted to a second evaluation of fasting calciuria (Ca/Cr). A modification of this parameter was noticed in 89% of RH-like and 78% of RH patients. In conclusion, these data suggest the presence of subpopulations of patients sensitive or not to calcium intake, regardless of whether the acute response to a calcium overload test suggested AH or RH. The CCLT disclosed dietary hypercalciuria in 21/58 (36%) of previously NCa patients. In these NCa patients, the ACLT may be replaced by the CCLT. The distinction

  10. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzozero, Julien, E-mail: julien.bizzozero@gmail.com; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  11. Connections between connexins, calcium, and cataracts in the lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Martinez-Wittinghan, Francisco J; Gong, Xiaohua; White, Thomas W; Mathias, Richard T

    2004-10-01

    There is a good deal of evidence that the lens generates an internal micro circulatory system, which brings metabolites, like glucose, and antioxidants, like ascorbate, into the lens along the extracellular spaces between cells. Calcium also ought to be carried into the lens by this system. If so, the only path for Ca2+ to get out of the lens is to move down its electrochemical gradient into fiber cells, and then move by electrodiffusion from cell to cell through gap junctions to surface cells, where Ca-ATPase activity and Na/Ca exchange can transport it back into the aqueous or vitreous humors. The purpose of the present study was to test this calcium circulation hypothesis by studying calcium homeostasis in connexin (Cx46) knockout and (Cx46 for Cx50) knockin mouse lenses, which have different degrees of gap junction coupling. To measure intracellular calcium, FURA2 was injected into fiber cells, and the gradient in calcium concentration from center to surface was mapped in each type of lens. In wild-type lenses the coupling conductance of the mature fibers was approximately 0.5 S/cm2 of cell to cell contact, and the best fit to the calcium concentration data varied from 700 nM in the center to 300 nM at the surface. In the knockin lenses, the coupling conductance was approximately 1.0 S/cm2 and calcium varied from approximately 500 nM at the center to 300 nM at the surface. Thus, when the coupling conductance doubled, the concentration gradient halved, as predicted by the model. In knockout lenses, the coupling conductance was zero, hence the efflux path was knocked out and calcium accumulated to approximately 2 microM in central fibers. Knockout lenses also had a dense central cataract that extended from the center to about half the radius. Others have previously shown that this cataract involves activation of a calcium-dependent protease, Lp82. We can now expand on this finding to provide a hypothesis on each step that leads to cataract formation: knockout of

  12. A calcium-induced calcium release mechanism mediated by calsequestrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Seon; Keener, James P

    2008-08-21

    Calcium (Ca(2+))-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) is widely accepted as the principal mechanism linking electrical excitation and mechanical contraction in cardiac cells. The CICR mechanism has been understood mainly based on binding of cytosolic Ca(2+) with ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inducing Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). However, recent experiments suggest that SR lumenal Ca(2+) may also participate in regulating RyR gating through calsequestrin (CSQ), the SR lumenal Ca(2+) buffer. We investigate how SR Ca(2+) release via RyR is regulated by Ca(2+) and calsequestrin (CSQ). First, a mathematical model of RyR kinetics is derived based on experimental evidence. We assume that the RyR has three binding sites, two cytosolic sites for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation, and one SR lumenal site for CSQ binding. The open probability (P(o)) of the RyR is found by simulation under controlled cytosolic and SR lumenal Ca(2+). Both peak and steady-state P(o) effectively increase as SR lumenal Ca(2+) increases. Second, we incorporate the RyR model into a CICR model that has both a diadic space and the junctional SR (jSR). At low jSR Ca(2+) loads, CSQs are more likely to bind with the RyR and act to inhibit jSR Ca(2+) release, while at high SR loads CSQs are more likely to detach from the RyR, thereby increasing jSR Ca(2+) release. Furthermore, this CICR model produces a nonlinear relationship between fractional jSR Ca(2+) release and jSR load. These findings agree with experimental observations in lipid bilayers and cardiac myocytes. PMID:18538346

  13. HF Doppler oscillations in the low-latitude ionosphere coherent with equatorial long-period geomagnetic field oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoba, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shibata, T.; Yumoto, K.

    2004-12-01

    provide strong evidence that the observed low-latitude HFD oscillations arose from fluctuations in the vertical plasma drift due to direct penetration of a polar dawn-dusk electric field.

  14. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-20

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics.

  15. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Lassen, Benny;

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact...... calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch...... oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics....

  16. Calcium and Vitamin D in Obesity and Related Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Poonam K; Calton, Emily K; Soares, Mario J

    2016-01-01

    There is a pandemic of lifestyle-related diseases. In both developed and lesser developed countries of the world, an inadequacy of calcium intake and low vitamin D status is common. In this chapter, we explore a mechanistic framework that links calcium and vitamin D status to chronic conditions including obesity, systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We also update the available clinical evidence, mainly from randomized controlled trials, to provide a synthesis of evidence in favor or against these hypotheses. There is consistent data to support calcium increasing whole body fat oxidation and increasing fecal fat excretion, while there is good cellular evidence for vitamin D reducing inflammation. Clinical trials support a marginal reduction in circulating lipids and some meta-analysis support an increase in insulin sensitivity following vitamin D. However, these mechanistic pathways and intermediate biomarkers of disease do not consistently transcribe into measurable health outcomes. Cementing the benefits of calcium and vitamin D for extraskeletal health needs a reexamination of the target 25(OH)D level to be achieved and the minimum duration of future trials. PMID:26944102

  17. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness. PMID:7488645

  18. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  19. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de La Mora, M. B.; Del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power.

  20. Advanced light source master oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Master Oscillator of the Advanced Light Source operates at a frequency of 499.654 MHz which is the 328th harmonic of the storage ring. The oscillator is capable of providing up to a maximum of ± 500 KHz frequency deviation for various experimental purposes. Provisions for external signal injection as well as using an external signal source have been designed into the unit. A power distribution system has also been included to provide signals for various parts of the ALS machine and user requirements. The Master Oscillator is made up with modules housed in a Euro chassis. 4 refs., 7 figs

  1. Oscillating solitons in nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lin Xiao-Gang; Liu Wen-Jun; Lei Ming

    2016-03-01

    Oscillating solitons are obtained in nonlinear optics. Analytical study of the variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which is used to describe the soliton propagation in those systems, is carried out using the Hirota’s bilinear method. The bilinear forms and analytic soliton solutions are derived, and the relevant properties and features of oscillating solitons are illustrated. Oscillating solitons are controlled by the reciprocal of the group velocity and Kerr nonlinearity. Results of this paper will be valuable to the study of dispersion-managed optical communication system and mode-locked fibre lasers.

  2. Gravitational Wave - Gauge Field Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, R R; Maksimova, N A

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational waves propagating through a stationary gauge field transform into gauge field waves and back again. When multiple families of flavor-space locked gauge fields are present, the gravitational and gauge field waves exhibit novel dynamics. At high frequencies, the system behaves like coupled oscillators in which the gravitational wave is the central pacemaker. Due to energy conservation and exchange among the oscillators, the wave amplitudes lie on a multi-dimensional sphere, reminiscent of neutrino flavor oscillations. This phenomenon has implications for cosmological scenarios based on flavor-space locked gauge fields.

  3. Modeling Oscillations of Magnetizable Microdrops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Shagrova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Developed a system of computer simulation of oscillations of magnetizable microdrops in a wide range of changing their parameters: surface tension, viscosity, magnetic permeability, density, and radius. Computational experiments of oscillations of magnetizable drops in an alternating magnetic field and the influence of various forces of nature (inertial, viscous, surface and magnetic on the nature of the oscillations were carried out. Adequacy of the model, used as the basis for the developed system of computer simulation was shown on the basis of computational and experimental data.

  4. Bimodal oscillations in nephron autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.; Mosekilde, Erik;

    2002-01-01

    The individual functional unit of the kidney (the nephron) displays oscillations in its pressure and flow regulation at two different time scales: fast oscillations associated with a myogenic dynamics of the afferent arteriole, and slower oscillations arising from a delay in the tubuloglomerular...... feedback. We investigate the intra- and internephron entrainment of the two time scales. In addition to full synchronization, both wavelet analyses of experimental data and numerical simulations reveal a partial entrainment in which neighboring nephrons attain a state of chaotic synchronization...

  5. Collective oscillations in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Akhiezer, A I; Polovin, R V; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy: Collective Oscillations in a Plasma, Volume 7 presents specific topics within the general field of radio waves propagation. This book contains five chapters that address the theory of linear oscillations in a plasma, the spectra of the eigen oscillations, and the mechanism of high-frequency heating. The opening chapters deal with the self-consistent fields; development of initial perturbation; dispersion permittivity tensor of a plasma in a magnetic field; effect of thermal motion of particles on low-frequency resonances; excitation of

  6. Cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations in studying motivation and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Knyazev, Gennady G

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that brain functions are realized by simultaneous oscillations in various frequency bands. In addition to examining oscillations in pre-specified bands, interactions and relations between the different frequency bandwidths is another important aspect that needs to be considered in unraveling the workings of the human brain and its functions. In this review we provide evidence that studying interdependencies between brain oscillations may be a valuable approach to study the electrophysiological processes associated with motivation and emotional states. Studies will be presented showing that amplitude-amplitude coupling between delta-alpha and delta-beta oscillations varies as a function of state anxiety and approach-avoidance-related motivation, and that changes in the association between delta-beta oscillations can be observed following successful psychotherapy. Together these studies suggest that cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations may contribute to expanding our understanding of the neural processes underlying motivation and emotion. PMID:22448078

  7. Current Self-Oscillations in Negative Effective Mass Terahertz Oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹俊诚

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically study current self-oscillations and spatiotemporal current patterns in quantum-well negativeeffective mass (NEM) p+ pp+ diodes by considering scattering contributions from impurity, acoustic phonons andoptic phonons. It is indicated that both the applied bias and the doping concentration strongly influence thepatterns and self-oscillating frequencies. The NEM p+pp+ diode presented here may be used as an electricallytunable terahertz source.

  8. Fission waves can oscillate

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  9. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  10. Oscillations in Mathematical Biology

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    The papers in this volume are based on talks given at a one day conference held on the campus of Adelphi University in April 1982. The conference was organized with the title "Oscillations in Mathematical Biology;" however the speakers were allowed considerable latitutde in their choice of topics. In the event, the talks all concerned the dynamics of non-linear systems arising in biology so that the conference achieved a good measure of cohesion. Some of the speakers cho~e not to submit a manuscript for these proceedings, feeling that their material was too conjectural to be committed to print. Also the paper of Rinzel and Troy is a distillation of the two separate talks that the authors gave. Otherwise the material reproduces the conference proceedings. The conference was made possible by the generous support of the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Adelphi. The bulk of the organization of the conference was carried out by Dr. Ronald Grisell whose energy was in large measure responsib...

  11. Resonant near-surface inertial oscillations in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Matt K.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; MacMahan, Jamie H.; Howden, Stephan D.

    2016-04-01

    The inertial frequency is nearly diurnal at 30°N latitude which transects the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (NeGoM). At this latitude, near-surface inertial oscillations can amplify due to resonance with diurnal wind forcing. Diurnal oscillations have also been attributed to diurnal tidal forcing in this region. Because tidal forcing, wind forcing, and inertial oscillations are nearly diurnal, a unique series of comparative analyses are required to determine their relative influence on surface circulation. By comparing surface currents obtained by HF radar to predictions of the inertial response to wind forcing and barotropic tidal currents, it is found that diurnal oscillations in the NeGoM were predominantly due to wind-forced inertial oscillations in June 2010. The analyses provide a unique spatiotemporal perspective of inertial oscillations in the NeGoM where there is evidence of propagation, frequency and phase shifts, and amplitude variability. Because inertial oscillations mix the ocean differently than the tides, these results provide insight into how inertial oscillations potentially mixed oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in June 2010. Near-diurnal oscillations during the winter were found to be predominantly due to tidal forcing when wind-driven inertial oscillations were diminished due to a presumably deeper mixed layer.

  12. Suppression of parasitic space-charge oscillations in a gyrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louksha, O. I.; Piosczyk, B.; Sominski, G. G.; Thumm, M.; Samsonov, D. B.

    2006-10-01

    We study the influence of nonuniform electric and magnetic fields in the helical-beam compression region on the low-frequency parasitic space-charge oscillations for a moderate-power (˜ 100 kW) 4-mm gyrotron. Suppression of the oscillations is achieved by optimization of both the cathode-unit geometry in the magnetron-injector gun and the magnetic-field distribution in the region near the cavity input. The obtained data are evidence of possible effective operation of the gyrotron at elevated pitch-factor values α > 1.5 even for emitters with no highest emission uniformity (δje ≈ 30%).

  13. Loss of Cell-Substrate Adhesion Leads to Periodic Shape Oscillations in Fibroblasts

    CERN Document Server

    Pullarkat, P A

    2006-01-01

    We report the phenomenon of periodic shape oscillations occurring in 3T3 fibroblasts merely as a consequence of a loss of cell-substrate adhesion. The oscillatory behavior can last many hours at a constant frequency, and can be switched off and on using chemical agents. This robustness allows for the extraction of quantitative data using single cells. We demonstrate that the frequency of oscillations increases with increasing actomyosin contractility. Both the Myosin Light Chain Kinase as well as the Rho Kinase pathways are shown to operate during this process. Further, we reveal significant similarities between the oscillatory dynamics and the commonly observed phenomenon of blebbing. We show that both these processes ceases when extracellular calcium is depleted or when stretch activated calcium channels are blocked. This, along with the fact that these dynamical processes require actomyosin contactility points towards strong similarities in the respective mechanisms. Finally, we speculate on a possible mec...

  14. Variability of calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in calcium absorption was estimated in three groups of normal subjects in whom Ca absorption was measured by standard isotopic-tracer methods at interstudy intervals ranging from 1 to 4 mo. Fifty absorption tests were performed in 22 subjects. Each was done in the morning after an overnight fast with an identical standard breakfast containing a Ca load of approximately 250 mg. Individual fractional absorption values were normalized to permit pooling of the data. The coefficient of variation (CVs) for absorption for the three groups ranged from 10.57 to 12.79% with the size of the CV increasing with interstudy duration. One other published study presenting replicate absorption values was analyzed in a similar fashion and was found to have a CV of absorption of 9.78%. From these data we estimate that when the standard double-isotope method is used to measure Ca absorption there is approximately 10% variability around any given absorption value within an individual human subject and that roughly two-thirds of this represents real biological variability in absorption

  15. Radiation damping of betatron oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission of synchrotron radiation damps the incoherent betatron oscillations of a pinched beam, causing its radius to shrink. However, the rate of shrinkage is small compared with the rate of expansion caused by scattering for typical propagation parameters

  16. An Oscillating Magnet Watt Balance

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmedov, H

    2015-01-01

    We establish the principles for a new generation of simplified and accurate watt balances in which an oscillating magnet generates Faraday's voltage in a stationary coil. A force measuring system and a mechanism providing vertical movements of the magnet are completely independent in an oscillating magnet watt balance. This remarkable feature allows to establish the link between the Planck constant and a macroscopic mass by a one single experiment. Weak dependence on variations of environmental and experimental conditions, weak sensitivity to ground vibrations and temperature changes, simple force measuring procedure, small sizes and other useful features offered by the novel approach considerably reduce the complexity of the experimental setup. We formulate the oscillating magnet watt balance principle and establish the measurement procedure for the Planck constant. We discuss the nature of oscillating magnet watt balance uncertainties and give a brief description of the National Metrology Institute (UME) wa...

  17. Matter Effects On Neutrino Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael

    An introduction to neutrino oscillations in vacuum is presented, followed by a survey of various techniques for obtaining either exact or approximate expressions for numu → nue oscillations in matter. The method developed by Arafune, Koike, and Sato uses a perturbative analysis to find an approximation for the evolution operator. The method used by Freund yields an approximate oscillation probability by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian, finding the eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and then using those to find modified mixing angles with the matter effect taken into account. The method devised by Mann, Kafka, Schneps, and Altinok produces an exact expression for the oscillation by determining explicitly the evolution operator. These methods are compared to each other using the T2K, MINOS, NOnuA, and LBNE parameters.

  18. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  19. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations in Antares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, J.

    2013-04-15

    The data taken with the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2010, a total live time of 863 days, are used to measure the oscillation parameters of atmospheric neutrinos. Muon tracks are reconstructed with energies as low as 20 GeV. Neutrino oscillations will cause a suppression of vertical upgoing muon neutrinos of such energies crossing the Earth. The parameters determining the oscillation of atmospheric neutrinos are extracted by fitting the event rate as a function of the ratio of the estimated neutrino energy and reconstructed flight path through the Earth. Measurement contours of the oscillation parameters in a two-flavour approximation are derived. Assuming maximum mixing, a mass difference of Δm{sub 32}{sup 2}=(3.1±0.9)⋅10{sup −3}eV{sup 2} is obtained, in good agreement with the world average value.

  20. Gamma Oscillations and Visual Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Kim, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    At the root of visual perception is the mechanism the brain uses to analyze features in a scene and bind related ones together. Experiments show this process is linked to oscillations of brain activity in the 30-100 Hz gamma band. Oscillations at different sites have correlation functions (CFs) that often peak at zero lag, implying simultaneous firing, even when conduction delays are large. CFs are strongest between cells stimulated by related features. Gamma oscillations are studied here by modeling mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex. Resulting predictions for gamma responses to stimuli account for numerous experimental findings, including why oscillations and zero-lag synchrony are associated, observed connections with feature preferences, the shape of the zero-lag peak, and variations of CFs with attention. Gamma waves are found to obey the Schroedinger equation, opening the possibility of cortical analogs of quantum phenomena. Gamma instabilities are tied to observations of gamma activity linked to seizures and hallucinations.

  1. Analysis of Rattleback Chaotic Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hanias; Stavrinides, Stavros G.; Santo Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Rattleback is a canoe-shaped object, already known from ancient times, exhibiting a nontrivial rotational behaviour. Although its shape looks symmetric, its kinematic behaviour seems to be asymmetric. When spun in one direction it normally rotates, but when it is spun in the other direction it stops rotating and oscillates until it finally starts rotating in the other direction. It has already been reported that those oscillations demonstrate chaotic characteristics. In this paper, rattleback...

  2. Hyperchaos in coupled Colpitts oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenys, Antanas; Tamasevicius, Arunas; Baziliauskas, Antanas;

    2003-01-01

    chaotic signals, v(t) = (v(1) + v(2))/2. The corresponding differential equations have been derived. The results of both, numerical simulations and hardware experiments are presented. The coupling coefficient k proportional to 1/R-k should be small to avoid mutual synchronisation of the individual...... oscillators. The spectrum of the Lyapunov exponents (LE) have been calculated versus the coefficient k. For weakly coupled oscillators there are two positive LE indicating hyperchaotic behaviour of the overall system....

  3. The Great Season Climatic Oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Boucenna, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    The variations of water density and thermal conductivity of the oceans cold region waters according to their salinity lead to suggest an hypothesis of an oscillating climate between two extreme positions: a maximum of hot temperatures and a minimum of cold ones. It will be shown that the distance separating the surface hot streams from the depth cold ones oscillate between two limit values linked to the optimal melting and regeneration glaciers. The melting and regeneration glaciers cycle lea...

  4. Transition in complex calcium bursting induced by IP3 degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex intracellular Ca2+ oscillations are systematically investigated in a mathematical model based on the mechanism of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR), taking account of the Ca2+-stimulated degradation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) by a 3-kinase. Periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic bursting oscillations exist in a wide range of parameter values and occur alternatively as the parameters change slightly. The transition among them can be observed by the evidence in their interspike interval and the Lyapunov exponent. These results reveal the role of agonist-stimulated of IP3 degradation as a possible source for complex patterns in Ca2+ signaling.

  5. Harmonic Oscillators and Elementary Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sobouti, Y

    2016-01-01

    Two dynamical systems with same symmetry should have features in common, and as far as their shared symmetry is concerned, one may represent the other. The three light quark constituents of the hadrons, a) have an approximate flavor SU(3) symmetry, b) have an exact color SU(3) symmetry, and c) as spin 1/2 particles, have a Lorentz SO(3,1) symmetry. So does a 3D harmonic oscillator. a) Its Hamiltonian has the SU(3) symmetry, breakable if the 3 fundamental modes of oscillation are not identical. b) The 3 directions of oscillation have the permutation symmetry. This enables one to create three copies of unbreakable SU(3) symmetry for each mode of the oscillation, and mimic the color of the elementary particles. And c) The Lagrangian of the 3D oscillator has the SO(3,1) symmetry. This can be employed to accommodate the spin of the particles. In this paper we draw up a one-to-one correspondence between the eigen modes of the Poisson bracket operator of the 3D oscillator and the flavor multiplets of the particles, ...

  6. Vitamin D does not increase calcium absorption in young women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J Christopher; Jindal, Prachi S; Smith, Lynette M

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly said that vitamin D should be used to increase calcium absorption. We tested this statement in a dose-response study of vitamin D on calcium absorption. A total of 198 white and African American women, aged 25 to 45 years, with vitamin D insufficiency, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) ng/mL, were randomized in a double-blind study to vitamin D3 400, 800, 1600, 2400 IU, or placebo. A calcium supplement was given to increase mean calcium intake at baseline from 706 mg/d to 1031 mg/d. Calcium absorption was measured at baseline and after 12 months using a single isotope method with radiocalcium45 and 100 mg of calcium. Mean baseline serum 25OHD was 13.4 ng/mL (33.5 nmol/L) and increased to 40 ng/mL (100 nmol/L) on the highest dose of 2400 IU. Using a multivariate regression analysis with significant predictors, baseline absorption, calcium intake, and weight, there was no increase in 12-month calcium absorption compared with baseline on any dose of vitamin D in either whites or African Americans. There was no significant relationship between 12-month calcium absorption and final serum 25OHD. In an analysis of calcium absorption and serum 25OHD at baseline, serum 25OHD levels were divided into groups: 0 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 15, or 16 to 20 ng/mL. There was no evidence of a threshold decrease in calcium absorption or serum 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2 D) amongst the lowest groups. Vitamin D doses up to 2400 IU daily did not increase calcium absorption. No threshold level of serum 25OHD for calcium absorption was found at baseline or in the longitudinal study, suggesting that active transport of calcium is saturated at very low serum 25OHD levels ng/mL. There is no need to recommend vitamin D for increasing calcium absorption in normal subjects. Very efficient calcium absorption at very low levels of serum 25OHD explains why people do not develop osteomalacia provided that dietary intakes of calcium and phosphorus are adequate. PMID

  7. On the nonlinear modeling of ring oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.

    2009-06-01

    We develop higher-order nonlinear models of three-stage and five-stage ring oscillators based on a novel inverter model. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are derived and compared to classical linear model analysis. Two important special cases for five-stage ring oscillators are also studied. Numerical simulations are shown. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  8. Emanuel Strehler’s work on calcium pumps and calcium signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuel; E; Strehler

    2011-01-01

    Cells are equipped with mechanisms to control tightly the influx, efflux and resting level of free calcium (Ca 2+ ). Inappropriate Ca 2+ signaling and abnormal Ca 2+ levels are involved in many clinical disorders including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. Ca 2+ also plays a major role in cell growth, differentiation and motility; disturbances in these processes underlie cell transformation and the progression of cancer. Accordingly, research in the Strehler laboratory is focused on a better understanding of the molecular "toolkit" needed to ensure proper Ca 2+ homeostasis in the cell, as well as on the mechanisms of localized Ca 2+ signaling. A longterm focus has been on the plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCAs), which are linked to multiple disorders including hearing loss, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Our work over the past 20 years or more has revealed a surprising complexity of PMCA isoforms with different functional characteristics, regulation, and cellular localization. Emerging evidence shows how specific PMCAs contribute not only to setting basal intracellular Ca 2+ levels, but also to local Ca 2+ signaling and vectorial Ca 2+ transport. A second major research arearevolves around the calcium sensor protein calmodulin and an enigmatic calmodulin-like protein (CALML3) that is linked to epithelial differentiation. One of the cellular targets of CALML3 is the unconventional motor protein myosin-10, which raises new questions about the role of CALML3 and myosin-10 in cell adhesion and migration in normal cell differentiation and cancer.

  9. Nonlinear oscillations of coalescing magnetic flux ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkov, Dmitrii Y; Nakariakov, Valery M; Rowlands, George

    2016-05-01

    An analytical model of highly nonlinear oscillations occurring during a coalescence of two magnetic flux ropes, based upon two-fluid hydrodynamics, is developed. The model accounts for the effect of electric charge separation, and describes perpendicular oscillations of the current sheet formed by the coalescence. The oscillation period is determined by the current sheet thickness, the plasma parameter β, and the oscillation amplitude. The oscillation periods are typically greater or about the ion plasma oscillation period. In the nonlinear regime, the oscillations of the ion and electron concentrations have a shape of a narrow symmetric spikes. PMID:27300993

  10. Bloch Oscillations of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen States

    CERN Document Server

    Lebugle, Maxime; Heilmann, René; Perez-Leija, Armando; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Bloch Oscillations (BOs) of quantum particles manifest themselves as periodic spreading and re-localization of the associated wave functions when traversing lattice potentials subject to external gradient forces. Albeit BOs are deeply rooted into the very foundations of quantum mechanics, all experimental observations of this phenomenon so far have only contemplated dynamics of one or two particles initially prepared in separable local states, which is well described by classical wave physics. Evidently, a more general description of genuinely quantum BOs will be achieved upon excitation of a Bloch-oscillator lattice system by nonlocal states, that is, containing correlations in contradiction with local realism. Here we report the first experimental observation of BOs of two-particle Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states (EPR), whose associated N-particle wave functions are nonlocal by nature. The time evolution of two-photon EPR states in Bloch-oscillators, whether symmetric, antisymmetric or partially symmetric, r...

  11. Entrainment of neural oscillations as a modifiable substrate of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Daniel J; Lakatos, Peter; Butler, Pamela D; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2014-06-01

    Brain operation is profoundly rhythmic. Oscillations of neural excitability shape sensory, motor, and cognitive processes. Intrinsic oscillations also entrain to external rhythms, allowing the brain to optimize the processing of predictable events such as speech. Moreover, selective attention to a particular rhythm in a complex environment entails entrainment of neural oscillations to its temporal structure. Entrainment appears to form one of the core mechanisms of selective attention, which is likely to be relevant to certain psychiatric disorders. Deficient entrainment has been found in schizophrenia and dyslexia and mounting evidence also suggests that it may be abnormal in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Accordingly, we suggest that studying entrainment in selective-attention paradigms is likely to reveal mechanisms underlying deficits across multiple disorders.

  12. Mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George S B; Boyman, Liron; Chikando, Aristide C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-25

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix is critically important to cellular function. As a regulator of matrix Ca(2+) levels, this flux influences energy production and can initiate cell death. If large, this flux could potentially alter intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Despite years of study, fundamental disagreements on the extent and speed of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake still exist. Here, we review and quantitatively analyze mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake fluxes from different tissues and interpret the results with respect to the recently proposed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) candidate. This quantitative analysis yields four clear results: (i) under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) influx into the mitochondria via the MCU is small relative to other cytosolic Ca(2+) extrusion pathways; (ii) single MCU conductance is ∼6-7 pS (105 mM [Ca(2+)]), and MCU flux appears to be modulated by [Ca(2+)]i, suggesting Ca(2+) regulation of MCU open probability (P(O)); (iii) in the heart, two features are clear: the number of MCU channels per mitochondrion can be calculated, and MCU probability is low under normal conditions; and (iv) in skeletal muscle and liver cells, uptake per mitochondrion varies in magnitude but total uptake per cell still appears to be modest. Based on our analysis of available quantitative data, we conclude that although Ca(2+) critically regulates mitochondrial function, the mitochondria do not act as a significant dynamic buffer of cytosolic Ca(2+) under physiological conditions. Nevertheless, with prolonged (superphysiological) elevations of [Ca(2+)]i, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can increase 10- to 1,000-fold and begin to shape [Ca(2+)]i dynamics.

  13. Deoxyschisandrin modulates synchronized Ca2+ oscillations and spontaneous synaptic transmission of cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min FU; Zhao-hui SUN; Min ZONG; Xiang-ping HE; Huan-cong ZUO; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Deoxyschisandrin is one of the most effective composites of Schisandra chinensis, a famous Chinese medicine widely used as an antistress, anti-aging, and neurological performance-improving herb. In this study, we examined its spe- cific mechanisms of action on cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods: Hippoc- ampal neurons, primarily cultured for 9-11 d in vitro, were used for this study. DS were dissolved in DMSO and applied to calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp. Results: The application of 3 mg/L DS decreased the frequency of sponta- neous and synchronous oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ to 72%±2% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents to 60%±3% (mean±SEM). The inhibitory concentraton 50% (IC50) for the effect of DS on calcium oscillations was 3.8 mg/L. DS also depressed the high voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and the voltage-gated Na+ channel currents at the same time point. It had no effect, however, on voltage-gated K+ and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: DS inhibited the spontaneous and synchronous oscillations of intra- cellular Ca2+ through the depression of influx of extracellular calcium and the initiation of action potential. By repressing the spontaneous neurotransmitter release, DS modulated the neuronal network activities.

  14. When Isolated at Full Receptivity, in Vitro Fertilized Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L. Egg Cells Reveal [Ca2+]cyt Oscillation of Intracellular Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Pónya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During in vitro fertilization of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L. in egg cells isolated at various developmental stages, changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt were observed. The dynamics of [Ca2+]cyt elevation varied, reflecting the difference in the developmental stage of the eggs used. [Ca2+]cyt oscillation was exclusively observed in fertile, mature egg cells fused with the sperm cell. To determine how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells is generated, egg cells were incubated in thapsigargin, which proved to be a specific inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-ATPase in wheat egg cells. In unfertilized egg cells, the addition of thapsigargin caused an abrupt transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that an influx pathway for Ca2+ is activated by thapsigargin. The [Ca2+]cyt oscillation seemed to require the filling of an intracellular calcium store for the onset of which, calcium influx through the plasma membrane appeared essential. This was demonstrated by omitting extracellular calcium from (or adding GdCl3 to the fusion medium, which prevented [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells fused with the sperm. Combined, these data permit the hypothesis that the first sperm-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt depletes an intracellular Ca2+ store, triggering an increase in plasma membrane Ca2+ permeability, and this enhanced Ca2+ influx results in [Ca2+]cyt oscillation.

  15. A General $q$-Oscillator Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Kwek, L. C.; Oh, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    It is well-known that the Macfarlane-Biedenharn $q$-oscillator and its generalization has no Hopf structure, whereas the Hong Yan $q$-oscillator can be endowed with a Hopf structure. In this letter, we demonstrate that it is possible to construct a general $q$-oscillator algebra which includes the Macfarlane-Biedenharn oscillator algebra and the Hong Yan oscillator algebra as special cases.

  16. The source of solar oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, R.

    1999-05-01

    In this study the role of line asymmetry and phase difference between velocity and intensity helioseismic spectra for understanding the excitation of solar oscillations is discussed. The solar intensity and velocity oscillations are usually observed from variations in an absorption line. These variations consist of two parts: solar oscillation modes and granulation noise. Because the oscillation modes are excited by granulation, we argue that the granulation signal (noise) is partially correlated with the oscillations. The data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have clearly revealed a reversal of asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra. We have shown that the cause of reversal in asymmetry between velocity and intensity power spectra is due to the presence of the correlated noise in the intensity data. This noise is also responsible for the high-frequency shift in the two spectra at and above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Our theory also explains the deviation of the observed phase difference between velocity and intensity from that predicted by simple adiabatic theory of solar oscillations. The observed phase, jumps in the vicinity of an eigenfrequency, but theory does not explain such jumps. We studied different types of excitation sources at various depths and found that monopole and quadrupole acoustic sources when placed in the superadiabatic layer (at a depth of 75 km below the photosphere) match the observations. For these source types, the sign of the correlation is negative corresponding to photospheric darkening. Finally, an asymmetric fitting formula is used to determine the eigenfrequencies of solar oscillations by fitting both the velocity and intensity power spectra.

  17. Triggering of Aftershocks by Free Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufe, C. G.; Varnes, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    Periodicities observed in aftershock sequences may result from earthquake triggering by free oscillations of the Earth produced by the main shock. Using an algorithm we developed to compute spectra of inter-event times, we examine inter-event intervals of teleseismically recorded aftershock sequences from large (M>7.5) main shocks that occurred during 1980-2001. Observed periodicities may result from triggering at intervals that are multiples of normal mode periods. We have focussed our analysis of inter-event times on identification of triggering by free oscillations at periods in the range 6-60 minutes. In this paper we describe our most commonly observed aftershock inter-event times and the free oscillation modes most likely to be the triggers. Because of their separation, the longer period modes are easiest to identify in the aftershock data (0S2 at 53.9 minutes, 0S3 at 35.6 minutes, 0S4 at 25.8 minutes, and 0T2 at 43.9 minutes). Evidence of triggering by 0S2 and 0T2 was also found in the aftershocks of the 1989 Loma Prieta, CA (M 7) earthquake (Kamal and Mansinha, 1996). Because of the plethora of higher modes, shorter inter-event periods are more difficult to identify with a particular mode. Preliminary analysis of the 2001 Bhuj, India (M 7.7) earthquake sequence tentatively identifies a contribution to triggering of the first four large aftershocks by multiples of 0S12 (8.37 minutes).

  18. Modeling of progesterone-induced intracellular calcium signaling in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long-Fei; Xiang, Cheng; Zhu, Ya-Bing; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2014-06-21

    Calcium ion is a secondary messenger of mammalian spermatozoa. The dynamic change of its concentration plays a vital role in the process of sperm motility, capacitation, acrosome and fertilization. Progesterone released by the cumulus cells, as a potent stimulator of fertilization, can activate the calcium channels on the plasma membrane, which in turn triggers the dynamic change of intracellular calcium concentration. In this paper, a mathematical model of calcium dynamic response in mammalian spermatozoa induced by progesterone is proposed and numerical simulation of the dynamic model is conducted. The results show that the dynamic response of calcium concentration predicted by the model is in accordance with experimental evidence. The proposed dynamic model can be used to explain the phenomena observed in the experiments and predict new phenomena to be revealed by experimental investigations, which will provide the basis to quantitatively investigate the fluid mechanics and biochemistry for the sperm motility induced by progesterone.

  19. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  20. El Nino Southern Oscillation as Sporadic Oscillations between Metastable States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to establish a new mechanism of ENSO,as a self-organizing and self-excitation system,with two highly coupled processes.The first is the oscillation between the two metastable warm(El Ni(?)o phase) and cold events(La Ni(?)a phase),and the second is the spatiotemporal oscillation of the sea surface temperature(SST) field.The symbiotic interplay between these two processes gives rises the climate variability associated with the ENSO,leads to both the random and deterministic features of the ENSO,and defines a new natural feedback mechanism,which drives the sporadic oscillation of the ENSO.The new mechanism is rigorously derived using a dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors,which has also been successfully applied to a wide range of problems in nonlinear sciences.

  1. El Nino Southern Oscillation as Sporadic Oscillations between Metastable States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Tian; Shouhong WANG

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to establish a new mechanism of ENSO, as a self-organizing and selfexcitation system, with two highly coupled processes. The first is the oscillation between the two mctastable warm (El Nino phase) and cold events (La Nina phase), and the second is the spatiotemporal oscillation of the sea surface temperature (SST) field. The symbiotic interplay between these two processes gives rises the climate variability associated with the ENSO, leads to both the random and deterministic features of the ENSO, and defines a new natural feedback mechanism, which drives the sporadic oscillation of the ENSO. The new mechanism is rigorously derived using a dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors, which has also been successfully applied to a wide range of problems in nonlinear sciences.

  2. Aging and calcium as an environmental factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T

    1985-12-01

    Calcium deficiency is a constant menace to land-abiding animals, including mammals. Humans enjoying exceptional longevity on earth are especially susceptible to calcium deficiency in old age. Low calcium and vitamin D intake, short solar exposure, decreased intestinal absorption, and falling renal function with insufficient 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D biosynthesis all contribute to calcium deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and possibly calcium shift from the bone to soft tissue, and from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment, blunting the sharp concentration gap between these compartments. The consequences of calcium deficiency might thus include not only osteoporosis, but also arteriosclerosis and hypertension due to the increase of calcium in the vascular wall, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and senile dementia due to calcium deposition in the central nervous system, and a decrease in cellular function, because of blunting of the difference in extracellular-intracellular calcium, leading to diabetes mellitus, immune deficiency and others (Fig. 6). PMID:2943880

  3. Optimizing calcium selective fluorimetric nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Anna; Kłucińska, Katarzyna; Gniadek, Marianna; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2015-11-01

    Recently it was shown that optical nanosensors based on alternating polymers e.g. poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) were characterized by a linear dependence of emission intensity on logarithm of concentration over a few of orders of magnitude range. In this work we focus on the material used to prepare calcium selective nanosensors. It is shown that alternating polymer nanosensors offer competitive performance in the absence of calcium ionophore, due to interaction of the nanospheres building blocks with analyte ions. The emission increase corresponds to increase of calcium ions contents in the sample within the range from 10(-4) to 10(-1) M. Further improvement in sensitivity (from 10(-6) to 10(-1) M) and selectivity can be achieved by incorporating calcium ionophore in the nanospheres. The optimal results were obtained for core-shell nanospheres, where the core was prepared from poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) and the outer layer from poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene). Thus obtained chemosensors were showing linear dependence of emission on logarithm of calcium ions concentration within the range from 10(-7) to 10(-1) M. PMID:26452839

  4. A model for oscillations and pattern formation in protoplasmic droplets of Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radszuweit, M.; Engel, H.; Bär, M.

    2010-12-01

    A mechano-chemical model for the spatiotemporal dynamics of free calcium and the thickness in protoplasmic droplets of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum is derived starting from a physiologically detailed description of intracellular calcium oscillations proposed by Smith and Saldana (Biopys. J. 61, 368 (1992)). First, we have modified the Smith-Saldana model for the temporal calcium dynamics in order to reproduce the experimentally observed phase relation between calcium and mechanical tension oscillations. Then, we formulate a model for spatiotemporal dynamics by adding spatial coupling in the form of calcium diffusion and advection due to calcium-dependent mechanical contraction. In another step, the resulting reaction-diffusion model with mechanical coupling is simplified to a reaction-diffusion model with global coupling that approximates the mechanical part. We perform a bifurcation analysis of the local dynamics and observe a Hopf bifurcation upon increase of a biochemical activity parameter. The corresponding reaction-diffusion model with global coupling shows regular and chaotic spatiotemporal behaviour for parameters with oscillatory dynamics. In addition, we show that the global coupling leads to a long-wavelength instability even for parameters where the local dynamics possesses a stable spatially homogeneous steady state. This instability causes standing waves with a wavelength of twice the system size in one dimension. Simulations of the model in two dimensions are found to exhibit defect-mediated turbulence as well as various types of spiral wave patterns in qualitative agreement with earlier experimental observation by Takagi and Ueda (Physica D, 237, 420 (2008)).

  5. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2016-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In ...

  6. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  7. It's All in the Rhythm: The Role of Cannabinoids in Neural Oscillations and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skosnik, Patrick D; Cortes-Briones, Jose A; Hajós, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated over the past several decades suggesting that both exocannabinoids and endocannabinoids play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The current article presents evidence suggesting that one of the mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce psychosis is through the alteration in synchronized neural oscillations. Neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma (30-80 Hz) and theta (4-7 Hz) ranges, are disrupted in schizophrenia and are involved in various areas of perceptual and cognitive function. Regarding cannabinoids, preclinical evidence from slice and local field potential recordings has shown that central cannabinoid receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) agonists decrease the power of neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma and theta bands. Further, the administration of cannabinoids during critical stages of neural development has been shown to disrupt the brain's ability to generate synchronized neural oscillations in adulthood. In humans, studies examining the effects of chronic cannabis use (utilizing electroencephalography) have shown abnormalities in neural oscillations in a pattern similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Finally, recent studies in humans have also shown disruptions in neural oscillations after the acute administration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis. Taken together, these data suggest that both acute and chronic cannabinoids can disrupt the ability of the brain to generate synchronized oscillations at functionally relevant frequencies. Hence, this may represent one of the primary mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce disruptions in attention, working memory, sensory-motor integration, and many other psychosis-related behavioral effects. PMID:26850792

  8. GROWING TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF A MULTISTRANDED LOOP OBSERVED BY SDO/AIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first evidence of transverse oscillations of a multistranded loop with growing amplitudes and internal coupling observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. The loop oscillation event occurred on 2011 March 8, triggered by a coronal mass ejection (CME). The multiwavelength analysis reveals the presence of multithermal strands in the oscillating loop, whose dynamic behaviors are temperature-dependent, showing differences in their oscillation amplitudes, phases, and emission evolution. The physical parameters of growing oscillations of two strands in 171 Å are measured and the three-dimensional loop geometry is determined using STEREO-A/EUVI data. These strands have very similar frequencies, and between two 193 Å strands a quarter-period phase delay sets up. These features suggest the coupling between kink oscillations of neighboring strands and the interpretation by the collective kink mode as predicted by some models. However, the temperature dependence of the multistranded loop oscillations was not studied previously and needs further investigation. The transverse loop oscillations are associated with intensity and loop width variations. We suggest that the amplitude-growing kink oscillations may be a result of continuous non-periodic driving by magnetic deformation of the CME, which deposits energy into the loop system at a rate faster than its loss.

  9. Slow oscillations in two pairs of dopaminergic neurons gate long-term memory formation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Trannoy, Séverine; Isabel, Guillaume; Aso, Yoshinori; Siwanowicz, Igor; Belliart-Guérin, Ghislain; Vernier, Philippe; Birman, Serge; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Preat, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    A fundamental duty of any efficient memory system is to prevent long-lasting storage of poorly relevant information. However, little is known about dedicated mechanisms that appropriately trigger production of long-term memory (LTM). We examined the role of Drosophila dopaminergic neurons in the control of LTM formation and found that they act as a switch between two exclusive consolidation pathways leading to LTM or anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM). Blockade, after aversive olfactory conditioning, of three pairs of dopaminergic neurons projecting on mushroom bodies, the olfactory memory center, enhanced ARM, whereas their overactivation conversely impaired ARM. Notably, blockade of these neurons during the intertrial intervals of a spaced training precluded LTM formation. Two pairs of these dopaminergic neurons displayed sustained calcium oscillations in naive flies. Oscillations were weakened by ARM-inducing massed training and were enhanced during LTM formation. Our results indicate that oscillations of two pairs of dopaminergic neurons control ARM levels and gate LTM. PMID:22366756

  10. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  11. Magnetically coupled magnet-spring oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, G; Ladera, C L; Martin, P [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Apdo. 89000, Caracas 1086 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: clladera@usb.ve, E-mail: pmartin@usb.ve

    2010-05-15

    A system of two magnets hung from two vertical springs and oscillating in the hollows of a pair of coils connected in series is a new, interesting and useful example of coupled oscillators. The electromagnetically coupled oscillations of these oscillators are experimentally and theoretically studied. Its coupling is electromagnetic instead of mechanical, and easily adjustable by the experimenter. The coupling of this new coupled oscillator system is determined by the currents that the magnets induce in two coils connected in series, one to each magnet. It is an interesting case of mechanical oscillators with field-driven coupling, instead of mechanical coupling. Moreover, it is both a coupled and a damped oscillating system that lends itself to a detailed study and presentation of many properties and phenomena of such a system of oscillators. A set of experiments that validates the theoretical model of the oscillators is presented and discussed.

  12. Susceptibility to calcium dysregulation during brain aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+ is a highly versatile intracellular signaling molecule that is essential for regulating a variety of cellular and physiological processes ranging from fertilization to programmed cell death. Research has provided ample evidence that brain aging is associated with altered Ca2+ homeostasis. Much of the work has focused on the hippocampus, a brain region critically involved in learning and memory, which is particularly susceptible to dysfunction during senescence. The current review takes a broader perspective, assessing age-related changes in Ca2+ sources, Ca2+ sequestration, and Ca2+ binding proteins throughout the nervous system. The nature of altered Ca2+ homeostasis is cell specific and may represent a deficit or a compensatory mechanism, producing complex patterns of impaired cellular function. Incorporating the knowledge of the complexity of age-related alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis will positively shape the development of highly effective therapeutics to treat brain disorders.

  13. SY 16-4 VITAMIN D WITH OR WITHOUT CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN RELATION TO HYPERTENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ballegooijen, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis are major age-related causes of morbidity and premature death that occur among older adults. Emerging evidence suggests that calcium from bone is deposited in the arteries. This leads to calcification in valves and vessels, which is associated with a 3-4 fold higher risk of coronary heart disease. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is frequently advised in older adults for the prevention of osteoporosis and to reduce the risk of fractures and falls. However, recent RCT's showed that individuals taking calcium and vitamin D were at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. The widespread use of vitamin D and calcium supplements, and the fortification of vitamin D in food products, underscores the need for further investigation. This lecture will give a brief overview of the current body of evidence and what to do recommend in daily practice. PMID:27643267

  14. The periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of operating an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device is proposed, and its performance is evaluated. The scheme involved an oscillating thermal cloud of ions immersed in a bath of electrons that form a harmonic oscillator potential. The scheme is called the periodically oscillating plasma sphere, and it appears to solve many of the problems that may limit other IEC systems to low gain. A set of self-similar solutions to the ion fluid equations is presented, and plasma performance is evaluated. Results indicate that performance enhancement of gridded IEC systems such as the Los Alamos intense neutron source device is possible as well as high-performance operation for low-loss systems such as the Penning trap experiment. Finally, a conceptual idea for a massively modular Penning trap reactor is also presented

  15. Classical scattering from oscillating targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papachristou, P.K.; Diakonos, F.K.; Constantoudis, V.; Schmelcher, P.; Benet, L

    2002-12-30

    We study planar classical scattering from an oscillating heavy target whose dynamics defines a five-dimensional phase space. Although the system possesses no periodic orbits, and thus topological chaos is not present, the scattering functions display a variety of structures on different time scales. These structures are due to scattering events with a strong energy transfer from the projectile to the moving disk resulting in low-velocity peaks. We encounter initial conditions for which the projectile exhibits infinitely many bounces with the oscillating disk. Our numerical investigations are supported by analytical results on a specific model with a simple time-law. The observed properties possess universal character for scattering off oscillating targets.

  16. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  17. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  18. Fano interference in classical oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the splitting of normal-mode frequencies of a coupled oscillator. Using this analogy, we simulate and experimentally demonstrate Fano interference and the associated phenomena in three-level atoms in a coupled electrical resonator circuit. This work aims to highlight analogies between classical and quantum systems for students at the postgraduate and graduate levels. Also, the reported technique can be easily realized in undergraduate laboratories. (paper)

  19. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Ballard, William P. (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, M. Collins (Albuquerque, NM); Marder, Barry M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  20. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  1. Effect of calcium ionophore on unfertilized oocytes after ICSI cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Eftekhar; Farnaz Mohammadian; Fariba Yousefnejad; Parisa Khani; Abbas Aflatoonian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fertilization failure is one of the most problems in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Objective: The aim of this study was the evaluation of oocytes activation by addition of calcium ionophore in unfertilized oocytes in ICSI cycles. Materials and Methods: This study was done on 15 ICSI cycles (stimulated with standard long protocol). Mature retrieved oocytes with normal morphology that had no evidence of fertilization 24 hours after ICSI were included in the study. The oocy...

  2. Effect of calcium ionophore on unfertilized oocytes after ICSI cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fertilization failure is one of the most problems in assisted reproduction technology (ART. Objective: The aim of this study was the evaluation of oocytes activation by addition of calcium ionophore in unfertilized oocytes in ICSI cycles. Materials and Methods: This study was done on 15 ICSI cycles (stimulated with standard long protocol. Mature retrieved oocytes with normal morphology that had no evidence of fertilization 24 hours after ICSI were included in the study. The oocytes with fertilization and unfertilized oocytes with degeneration were excluded from the study. The unfertilized oocytes were washed with GIVF medium and were transferred to GIVF medium that contained 5 μmol of calcium ionophore and were incubated for 10 minutes. Then again oocytes were washed with GIVF medium and consequently were transferred to GIVF medium and were incubated at 37°C in 6% CO2. After 18 hours, the oocytes were examined and activated oocytes were defined with observation of at least one pronucleus or cleaved oocytes. Results: After ovarian stimulation and oocytes retrieval, 175 mature oocytes were obtained and injection of sperm was done for all of them. 114 of 175 oocytes (66% showed evidence of fertilization after 24 hours. A total of 61 oocytes (34% showed no evidence of fertilization and 10 oocytes were degenerated and were excluded from the study. Only 51 unfertilized oocytes with normal morphology were selected and were exposed to calcium ionophore. 37 (72.5% of treated oocytes were fertilized (2PN and 32 (62.7% of them showed evidence of cleavage. 6 (11.8% embryos had good quality. Conclusion: According to our results, oocytes activation with calcium ionophore had an acceptable fertilization rate, however high quality embryos remained low. We propose future studies to evaluate embryo quality.

  3. Calcium Signaling in Mammalian Eggs at Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Hideki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Ito, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The innovation and development of live-cell fluorescence imaging methods have revealed the dynamic aspects of intracellular Ca2+ in a wide variety of cells. The fertilized egg, the very first cell to be a new individual, has long been under extensive investigations utilizing Ca2+ imaging since its early days, and spatiotemporal Ca2+ dynamics and underlying mechanisms of Ca2+ mobilization, as well as physiological roles of Ca2+ at fertilization, have become more or less evident in various animal species. In this article, we illustrate characteristic patterns of Ca2+ dynamics in mammalian gametes and molecular basis for Ca2+ release from intracellular stores leading to the elevation in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and describe the identity and properties of sperm-borne egg-activating factor in relation to the induction of Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ oscillations, referring to its potential use in artificial egg activation as infertility treatment. In addition, a possible Ca2+ influx-driven mechanism for slow and long-lasting Ca2+ oscillations characteristic of mammalian eggs is proposed, based on the recent experimental findings and mathematical modeling. Cumulative knowledge about the roles of Ca2+ in the egg activation leading to early embryogenesis is summarized, to emphasize the diversity of functions that Ca2+ can perform in a single type of cell.

  4. Evidence for Solar-like Oscillations in Arcturus (Alpha Boo)

    OpenAIRE

    Retter, Alon; Bedding, Timothy R.; Buzasi, Derek; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Observations of the red giant Arcturus (Alpha Boo) obtained with the star tracker on the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) satellite during a baseline of 19 successive days in 2000 July-August are analysed. The power spectrum has a significant excess of power at low-frequencies. The highest peak is at about 4.1 micro-Hz, which is in agreement with the ground-based radial velocity and photometry study of Belmonte et al. (1990a; 1990b). The variability of Arcturus can be explained by sound wa...

  5. LYAPUNOV SPECTRA FOR KAPITZA OSCILLATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyer Iqbal

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we purpose a simple but realistic model of one dimensional nonlinear Kapitza oscillator driven by sin- or cos- rapidly external oscillating periodical force. The model has a parameter 2gl=a22 of dimension one, depending on the amplitude a and frequency of modulation . Changing its value we construct phase portraits of the system in the neighbourhood of fixed points and demonstrate the changing in Lyapunov spectrum. Our purpose is to observe the behavior of system at fixed points due to the different structures of the Lyapunov spectra

  6. LYAPUNOV SPECTRA FOR KAPITZA OSCILLATOR

    OpenAIRE

    Nayyer Iqbal; Shahid Ahmad; Muhammad Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Here we purpose a simple but realistic model of one dimensional nonlinear Kapitza oscillator driven by sin- or cos- rapidly external oscillating periodical force. The model has a parameter 2gl=a22 of dimension one, depending on the amplitude a and frequency of modulation . Changing its value we construct phase portraits of the system in the neighbourhood of fixed points and demonstrate the changing in Lyapunov spectrum. Our purpose is to observe the behavior of system at fixed points due to t...

  7. Stochastic excitation of stellar oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Samadi, R

    2001-01-01

    Excitation of solar oscillations is attribued to turbulent motions in the solar convective zone. It is also currently believed that oscillations of low massive stars (M <2 Mo) - which possess an upper convective zone - are stochastically excited by turbulent convection in their outer layers. A recent theoretical work (Samadi & Goupil, 2001 ; Samadi et al, 2001) supplements and reinforces this theory. This allows the use of any available model of turbulence and emphasizes some recent unsolved problems which are brought up by these new theoretical developments.

  8. Oscillator strengths for Be I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates, Sule, E-mail: suleates@selcuk.edu.tr; Oezarslan, Selma; Celik, Gueltekin; Taser, Mehmet

    2012-07-15

    The electric dipole oscillator strengths for lines between some singlet and triplet levels have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model theory and the quantum defect orbital theory for Be I. In the calculations both multiplet and fine structure transitions are studied. We employed both the numerical Coulomb approximation method and numerical non-relativistic Hartree-Fock wavefunctions for expectation values of radii. The necessary energy values have been taken from experimental energy data in the literature. The calculated oscillator strengths have been compared with available theoretical results. A good agreement with the results in the literature has been obtained.

  9. Oscillations in molecular motor assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Vilfan, A; Vilfan, Andrej; Frey, Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous oscillations in biological systems may have a biochemical origin or result from an interplay between force-generating and visco-elastic elements. In molecular motor assemblies the force-generating elements are molecular engines and the visco-elastic elements are stiff cytoskeletal polymers. The physical mechanism leading to oscillations depends on the particular architecture of the assembly. Existing models can be grouped into two distinct categories: systems with a {\\em delayed force activation} and {\\em anomalous force-velocity relations}. We discuss these systems within phase plane analysis known from the theory of dynamic systems and by adopting methods from control theory, the Nyquist criterion.

  10. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.; Romanyuk, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60-100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102-103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method.

  11. Primordial Lepton Oscillations and Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    The baryon asymmetry of the Universe should have been produced after the inflation era. We consider the possibility that the asymmetry is generated by the flavor oscillations in the reheating process after inflation, so that the baryon asymmetry is realized already at the beginning of the radiation dominated era. In the seesaw model, we show that the propagators of the left-handed leptons generically have flavor mixings in the thermal background, that can generate flavor-dependent lepton asymmetry through the $CP$ violation in the oscillation phenomena. The flavor dependent rates for the wash-out process can leave the net asymmetry today.

  12. The ER mitochondria calcium cycle and ER stress response as therapeutic targets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedrana eTadic

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Although the etiology remains unclear, disturbances in calcium homoeostasis and protein folding are essential features of neurodegeneration in this disorder. Here, we review recent research findings on the interaction between endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria, and its effect on calcium signaling and oxidative stress. We further provide insights into studies, providing evidence that structures of the ER mitochondria calcium cycle (ERMCC serve as a promising targets for therapeutic approaches for treatment of ALS.

  13. Spicules Intensity Oscillations in SOT/HINODE Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E. Tavabi; A. Ajabshirizadeh; A. R. Ahangarzadeh Maralani; S. Zeighami

    2015-06-01

    Aims. We study the coherency of solar spicules intensity oscillations with increasing height above the solar limb in quiet Sun, active Sun and active region using observations from HINODE/SOT. Existence of coherency up to transition region strengthens the theory of the coronal heating and solar wind, through energy transport and photospheric oscillations. Methods. Using time sequences from the HINODE/SOT in Ca II H line, we investigate oscillations found in intensity profiles at different heights above the solar limb. We use the Fourier and wavelet analysis to measure dominant frequency peaks of intensity at the heights, and phase difference between oscillations at two certain heights, to find evidence for the coherency of the oscillations. Results. The results of fast Fourier transform (FFT) for the quiet Sun, active Sun and active region show frequency peaks of order 3.6 mHz, 5.5 mHz and 7.3 mHz at four separate heights. The fluctuations of powers are random for the three datasets, i.e., independent from height and solar activity. The wavelet results for quiet Sun, active Sun and active region indicate dominant frequencies similar to FFT results. Results of coherency represent frequencies at about 3.5 mHz and 5.5 mHz for all three datasets. Histograms of frequencies corresponding to maximum coherency for quiet Sun, active region and active sun display frequencies of about 3.5 mHz, 4.2 mHz, 4.6 mHz, 5.3 mHz and 5.8 mHz. The phase speeds of 50–450 km s−1 are measured for quiet Sun, 50–560 km s−1 for active region and 50–550 km s−1 for active Sun. The majority of the measured phase speeds in locations where there is known to be considerable dynamic activity are more than quiet Sun, and the phase speeds obtained from three datasets increase with height. We also find strong evidence for upwardly propagating waves with high coherency in three datasets. Intensity oscillations may result from the presence of the coherent waves, which could provide significant

  14. Calcium and Vitamin D in the Regulation of Energy Balance: Where Do We Stand?

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Mario J; Kaveri Pathak; Emily K Calton

    2014-01-01

    There is a pandemic of obesity and associated chronic diseases. Dietary calcium and vitamin D have many extra-skeletal roles in human health. In this review we have summarized the current understanding of their influence on human energy balance by examining the epidemiological, clinical, animal, cellular and molecular evidence. We opine that while calcium and vitamin D are functional nutrients in the battle against obesity, there is a need for prospective human trials to tilt the balance of e...

  15. The effect of calcium gluconate and other calcium supplements as a dietary calcium source on magnesium absorption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, O; Takahashi, R; Yasui, H; Watanuki, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of commercially available calcium supplements (calcium carbonate, calcium gluconate, oyster shell preparation and bovine bone preparation) and gluconic acid on the absorption of calcium and magnesium were evaluated for 30 days in male Wistar rats. There were no differences in the apparent absorption ratio of calcium among rats fed each calcium supplement; however, the rats fed the calcium gluconate diet had a higher apparent absorption ratio of magnesium than the rats fed the other calcium supplements. Dietary gluconic acid also more markedly stimulated magnesium absorption than the calcium carbonate diet, and the bone (femur and tibia) magnesium contents of rats fed the gluconic acid diet were significantly higher than those of the rats fed the calcium carbonate diet. Furthermore, the weight of cecal tissue and the concentrations of acetic acid and butyric acid in cecal digesta of rats fed the calcium gluconate diet or the gluconic acid diet were significantly increased. We speculate that the stimulation of magnesium absorption in rats fed the calcium gluconate diet is a result of the gluconic acid component and the effect of gluconic acid on magnesium absorption probably results from cecal hypertrophy, magnesium solubility in the large intestine and the effects of volatile fatty acids on magnesium absorption.

  16. Decalcification of calcium polycarbophil in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Saito, T; Takahara, E; Nagata, O; Tamai, I; Tsuji, A

    1997-03-01

    The in vivo decalcification of calcium polycarbophil was examined. The decalcification ratio of [45Ca]calcium polycarbophil in the stomach after oral dosing to rats was more than 70% at each designated time and quite closely followed in the in vitro decalcification curve, indicating that the greater part of the calcium ion is released from calcium polycarbophil under normal gastric acidic conditions. The residual radioactivity in rat gastrointestine was nearly equal to that after oral administration of either [45Ca]calcium chloride + polycarbophil. The serum level of radioactivity was nearly equal to that after oral dosing of [45Ca]calcium lactate. These results indicate that the greater part of orally administered calcium polycarbophil released calcium ions to produce polycarbophil in vivo.

  17. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  18. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can break easily, even without an obvious injury. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Eat foods that provide the right amounts of calcium, vitamin D, and protein. This kind of diet will give ...

  19. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dairy Dilemma Dairy Dilemma Are You Getting Enough Calcium? You may be avoiding dairy products because of ... But dairy products are a major source of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients that are important ...

  20. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2000-12-01

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the store-operated calcium entry or capacitative calcium entry. Capacitative calcium current plays a key role in replenishing calcium stores and activating various physiological processes. Despite considerable efforts, very little is known about the molecular nature of the capacitative channel and the signalling pathway that activates it. This review summarizes our current knowledge about store operated calcium entry and suggests possible hypotheses for its mode of activation.

  1. Tuning pathological brain oscillations with neurofeedback: A systems neuroscience framework

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas eRos; Baars, Bernard J.; Lanius, Ruth A.; Patrik eVuilleumier

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback is emerging as a promising technique that enables self-regulation of ongoing brain oscillations. However, despite a rise in empirical evidence attesting to its clinical benefits, a solid theoretical basis is still lacking on the manner in which neurofeedback is able to achieve these outcomes. The present work attempts to bring together various concepts from neurobiology, engineering, and dynamical systems so as to propose a contemporary theoretical framework for the mechanistic ...

  2. Modulation of EEG-Alpha oscillations during visual spatial attention

    OpenAIRE

    Rihs, Tonia

    2008-01-01

    Voluntarily directing visual attention to a cued position in space leads to improved processing of forthcoming visual stimuli at this position, due to anticipatory tuning of visual cortex activity. Recent evidence points to a determining role of modulations of posterior alpha-band activity (8-14Hz) during attention orienting.This thesis investigates the modulation of EEG alpha-oscillations during anticipatory preparation for a visual target. The results show that the topography of alpha band ...

  3. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tan; Yulin Deng; Hong Qing

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofi-brillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers in-volved in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone,...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may...

  6. Linearization of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belendez, A.; Alvarez, M. L.; Fernandez, E.; Pascual, I.

    2009-01-01

    A linearization method of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force which allows us to obtain a frequency-amplitude relation which is valid not only for small but also for large amplitudes and, sometimes, for…

  7. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  8. Teleportation using coupled oscillator states

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, P. T.; Milburn, G. J.; Munro, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    We analyse the fidelity of teleportation protocols, as a function of resource entanglement, for three kinds of two mode oscillator states: states with fixed total photon number, number states entangled at a beam splitter, and the two-mode squeezed vacuum state. We define corresponding teleportation protocols for each case including phase noise to model degraded entanglement of each resource.

  9. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60–100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102–103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method. -- Highlights: ► The present investigation registered short-wave sound oscillations of water drops in a dropwise cluster in the range of 60–100 °C. ► We have found autocorrelation functions and Fourier transforms of time series of interdroplet distance; defined oscillation frequencies. ► Calculated electrical charge of drops and specified that the charge is proportional to the drop surface area.

  10. Oscillating Flavors in Massless Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Lester C

    2016-01-01

    By considering Dirac's equation using quaternions ($\\mathbb{H}$) with their greater degree of freedom in imaginaries, it is shown that a model can be created with oscillations among flavors even if the particles, are massless. Furthermore the solutions are spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ and have helicities depending on whether their energy is positive or negative.

  11. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavlov, A.V., E-mail: shavlov@ikz.ru [Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian Branch, P.O. 1230, 625000 Tyumen (Russian Federation); Dzhumandzhi, V.A.; Romanyuk, S.N. [Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian Branch, P.O. 1230, 625000 Tyumen (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-04

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60–100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method. -- Highlights: ► The present investigation registered short-wave sound oscillations of water drops in a dropwise cluster in the range of 60–100 °C. ► We have found autocorrelation functions and Fourier transforms of time series of interdroplet distance; defined oscillation frequencies. ► Calculated electrical charge of drops and specified that the charge is proportional to the drop surface area.

  12. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  13. Lepton textures and neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Systematic analyses of the textures arising in lepton mass matrices have been carried out using unitary transformations and condition of naturalness for the Dirac and Majorana neutrino possibilities. It is observed that the recent three neutrino oscillation data together with the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay provide vital clues in predicting the general structures of these lepton mass matrices.

  14. Observation of anharmonic Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisow, Felix; Wang, Gang; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    We report on the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations of an optical wave packet in a lattice with second-order coupling. To this end, we employ zigzag waveguide arrays, in which the second-order coupling can be precisely tuned.

  15. B0s Oscillation Results

    CERN Document Server

    Willocq, S

    2002-01-01

    We review new studies of the time dependence of B0s - B0s-bar mixing by the ALEPH, DELPHI and SLD Collaborations, with an emphasis on the different analysis methods used. Combining all available results yields a preliminary lower limit on the oscillation frequency of dms > 14.4 ps-1 at the 95% C.L.

  16. Optoelectronic Oscillators for Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeira, Bruno; Figueiredo, José

    We introduce and report recent developments on a novel five port optoelectronic voltage controlled oscillator consisting of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) optical-waveguide integrated with a laser diode. The RTD-based optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) has both optical and electrical input and output ports, with the fifth port allowing voltage control. The RTD-OEO locks to reference radio-frequency (RF) sources by either optical or electrical injection locking techniques allowing remote synchronization, eliminating the need of impedance matching between traditional RF oscillators. RTD-OEO functions include generation, amplification and distribution of RF carriers, clock recovery, carrier recovery, modulation and demodulation and frequency synthesis. Self-injection locking operation modes, where small portions of the output electrical/optical signals are fed back into the electrical/optical input ports, are also proposed. The self-phase locked loop configuration can give rise to low-noise high-stable oscillations, not limited by the RF source performance and with no need of external optoelectronic conversion.

  17. Neutrino Oscillation Experiment at JHF

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first stage of a next-generation long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment is proposed to explore the physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment will use the high intensity proton beam from the JHF 50 GeV proton synchrotron (JHF PS), and Super-Kamiokande as a far detector. The baseline length will be 295 km. The beam power of JHF PS is capable of delivering 3.3 x 10$^{14}$ 50 GeV protons every 3.5 seconds (0.75 MW). The experiment assumes 130 days of operation at full intensity for five years. The high intensity neutrino beam is produced in an off-axis configuration. The peak neutrino energy is tuned to the oscillation maximum of $\\sim$ 0.8 GeV to maximize the sensitivity to neutrino oscillations. The merits of this experiment can be summarized as follows: \\begin{itemize} \\item The off-axis beam can produce the highest possible intensity with a narrow energy spread. The oscillation maximum will be $\\sim$ 0.8 GeV for the distance of 295 km and $\\Delta m^{2} \\sim$ 3 x 10$^{-3}$eV$^{2}$. The corre...

  18. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure...

  19. Mice deficient in GEM GTPase show abnormal glucose homeostasis due to defects in beta-cell calcium handling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny E Gunton

    Full Text Available AIMS AND HYPOTHESIS: Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from beta-cells is a tightly regulated process that requires calcium flux to trigger exocytosis of insulin-containing vesicles. Regulation of calcium handling in beta-cells remains incompletely understood. Gem, a member of the RGK (Rad/Gem/Kir family regulates calcium channel handling in other cell types, and Gem over-expression inhibits insulin release in insulin-secreting Min6 cells. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Gem in insulin secretion. We hypothesised that Gem may regulate insulin secretion and thus affect glucose tolerance in vivo. METHODS: Gem-deficient mice were generated and their metabolic phenotype characterised by in vivo testing of glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and insulin secretion. Calcium flux was measured in isolated islets. RESULTS: Gem-deficient mice were glucose intolerant and had impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Furthermore, the islets of Gem-deficient mice exhibited decreased free calcium responses to glucose and the calcium oscillations seen upon glucose stimulation were smaller in amplitude and had a reduced frequency. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that Gem plays an important role in normal beta-cell function by regulation of calcium signalling.

  20. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....