WorldWideScience

Sample records for calcium oscillations evidence

  1. ALG-2 oscillates in subcellular localization, unitemporally with calcium oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2007-01-01

    localization in an oscillatory fashion unitemporally with Ca2+ oscillations, whereas a Ca2+-binding deficient mutant of ALG-2 did not redistribute. Using tagged ALG-2 as bait we identified its novel target protein Sec31A and based on the partial colocalization of endogenous ALG-2 and Sec31A we propose that ALG......A variety of stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium oscillations. Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms decoding these events. We show that ALG-2, a Ca2+-binding protein originally isolated as a protein associated with apoptosis, is directly linked to Ca2+ signalling. We...

  2. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillations Model Including Mitochondrial Calcium Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Min; LIU Zeng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger. Mitochondria contributes significantly to intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.The experiment of Kaftan et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 275(2000) 25465] demonstrated that inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake can reduce the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration oscillations of gonadotropes. By considering the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling we develop a three-variable model of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations based on the models of Atri et al. [Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1727] and Falcke et al. [Biophys. J. 77 (1999) 37]. The model reproduces the fact that mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling increases the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations, which accords with Kaftan's results. Moreover the model predicts that when the mitochondria overload with Ca2+, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations vanish, which may trigger apoptosis.

  3. Role of mitochondria and network connectivity in intercellular calcium oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Dokukina, I V; Grachev, E A; Gunton, J D; Dokukina, Irina V.; Gracheva, Maria E.; Grachev, Eugene A.; Gunton, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are large-scale regulators of cytosolic calcium under normal cellular conditions. In this paper we model the complex behavior of mitochondrial calcium during the action of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on a single cell and find results that are in good agreement with recent experimental studies. We also study the influence of the cellular network connectivity on intercellular signalling via gap junction diffusion. We include in our model the dependence of the junctional conductivity on the cytosolic calcium concentrations in adjacent cells. We consider three different mechanisms of calcium wave propagation through gap junctions: via calcium diffusion, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion, and both calcium and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion. We show that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion is the mechanism of calcium wave propagation and that calcium diffusion is the mechanism of synchronization of cytosolic calcium oscillations in adjacent cells. We also study the role of different to...

  4. Outward potassium current oscillations in macrophage polykaryons: extracellular calcium entry and calcium-induced calcium release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraiva R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Outward current oscillations associated with transient membrane hyperpolarizations were induced in murine macrophage polykaryons by membrane depolarization in the absence of external Na+. Oscillations corresponded to a cyclic activation of Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IKCa probably correlated with variations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Addition of external Na+ (8 mM immediately abolished the outward current oscillations, suggesting that the absence of the cation is necessary not only for their induction but also for their maintenance. Oscillations were completely blocked by nisoldipine. Ruthenium red and ryanodine reduced the number of outward current cycles in each episode, whereas quercetin prolonged the hyperpolarization 2- to 15-fold. Neither low molecular weight heparin nor the absence of a Na+ gradient across the membrane had any influence on oscillations. The evidence suggests that Ca2+ entry through a pathway sensitive to Ca2+ channel blockers is elicited by membrane depolarization in Na+-free medium and is essential to initiate oscillations, which are also dependent on the cyclic release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+-sensitive stores; Ca2+ ATPase acts by reducing intracellular Ca2+, thus allowing slow deactivation of IKCa. Evidence is presented that neither a Na+/Ca2+ antiporter nor Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores participate directly in the mechanism of oscillation

  5. Calcium sensing receptors and calcium oscillations: calcium as a first messenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Gerda E

    2006-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaR) are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) since both the first (extracellular) and second (intracellular) messengers are Ca(2+). CaR serves to translate small fluctuations in extracellular Ca(2+) into intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. In many cells and tissues, CaR also acts as a coincidence detector, sensing both changes in extracellular Ca(2+) plus the presence of various allosteric activators including amino acids, polyamines, and/or peptides. CaR oscillations are uniquely shaped by the activating agonist, that is, Ca(2+) triggers sinusoidal oscillations while Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine trigger transient oscillations of lower frequency. The distinct oscillation patterns generated by Ca(2+)versus Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine are the results of activation of distinct signal transduction pathways. CaR is a member of Family C GPCRs, having a large extracellular agonist binding domain, and functioning as a disulfide-linked dimer. The CaR dimer likely can be driven to distinct active conformations by various Ca(2+) plus modulator combinations, which can drive preferential coupling to divergent signaling pathways. Such plasticity with respect to both agonist and signaling outcomes allows CaR to uniquely contribute to the physiology of organs and tissues where it is expressed. This chapter will examine the structural features of CaR, which contribute to its unique properties, the nature of CaR-induced intracellular Ca(2+) signals and the potential role(s) for CaR in development and differentiation.

  6. The mechanical environment modulates intracellular calcium oscillation activities of myofibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Godbout

    Full Text Available Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair.

  7. Water Channels Are Involved in Stomatal Oscillations Encoded by Parameter-Specific Cytosolic Calcium Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that various stimuli can induce specific cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) oscillations in guard cells and various oscillations in stomatal apertures. Exactly how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation signaling functions in stomatal oscillation is not known. In the present study, the epidermis of broad bean (Vicia faba L.)was used and a rapid ion-exchange treatment with two shifting buffers differing in K+ and Ca2+ concentrations was applied. The treatment for five transients at a 10-min transient period induced clear and regular stomatal oscillation. However, for other transient numbers and periods, the treatments induced some irregular oscillations or even no obvious oscillations in stomatal aperture. The results indicate that stomatal oscillation is encoded by parameter-specific [Ca2+]cyt oscillation: the parameters of [Ca2+]cyt oscillation affected the occurrence rate and the parameters of stomatal oscillation. The water channel inhibitor HgCl2 completely inhibited stomatal oscillation and the inhibitory effect could be partially reversed by β-mercaptoethanol (an agent capable of reversing water channel inhibition by HgCl2). Other inhibitory treatments against ion transport (i.e. the application of LaCl3, EGTA, or tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl))weakly impaired stomatal oscillation when the compounds were added after rapid ion-exchange treatment.If these compounds were added before rapid-ion exchange treatment, the inhibitory effect was much more apparent (except in the case of TEACI). The results of the present study suggest that water channels are involved in stomatal oscillation as a downstream element of [Ca2+]cyt oscillation signaling.

  8. Ouabain, a steroid hormone that signals with slow calcium oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizman, O; Uhlén, P; Lal, M; Brismar, H; Aperia, A

    2001-11-06

    The plant-derived steroid, digoxin, a specific inhibitor of Na,K-ATPase, has been used for centuries in the treatment of heart disease. Recent studies demonstrate the presence of a digoxin analog, ouabain, in mammalian tissue, but its biological role has not been elucidated. Here, we show in renal epithelial cells that ouabain, in doses causing only partial Na,K-ATPase inhibition, acts as a biological inducer of regular, low-frequency intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) oscillations that elicit activation of the transcription factor, NF-kappa B. Partial inhibition of Na,K-ATPase using low extracellular K(+) and depolarization of cells did not have these effects. Incubation of cells in Ca(2+)-free media, inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels, inositol triphosphate receptor antagonism, and redistribution of actin to a thick layer adjacent to the plasma membrane abolished [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations, indicating that they were caused by a concerted action of inositol triphosphate receptors and capacitative calcium entry via plasma membrane channels. Blockade of ouabain-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations prevented activation of NF-kappa B. The results demonstrate a new mechanism for steroid signaling via plasma membrane receptors and underline a novel role for the steroid hormone, ouabain, as a physiological inducer of [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations involved in transcriptional regulation in mammalian cells.

  9. Ouabain, a steroid hormone that signals with slow calcium oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The plant-derived steroid, digoxin, a specific inhibitor of Na,K-ATPase, has been used for centuries in the treatment of heart disease. Recent studies demonstrate the presence of a digoxin analog, ouabain, in mammalian tissue, but its biological role has not been elucidated. Here, we show in renal epithelial cells that ouabain, in doses causing only partial Na,K-ATPase inhibition, acts as a biological inducer of regular, low-frequency intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillations that elicit a...

  10. Model of Calcium Oscillations Due to Negative Feedback in Olfactory Cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidl, Juergen; Borowski, Peter; Sensse, Anke;

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Ca oscillations in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. The underlying mechanism is based on direct negative regulation of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels by calcium/calmodulin and does not require any autocatalysis such as calcium-induced calcium release....... The model is in quantitative agreement with available experimental data, both with respect to oscillations and to fast adaptation. We give predictions for the ranges of parameters in which oscillations should be observable. Relevance of the model to calcium oscillations in other systems is discussed....

  11. Noise induced calcium oscillations in a cell exposed to electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Zhao, Yongli; Chen, Yafei; Yuan, Changqing; Zhan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of noise on the calcium oscillations in a cell exposed to electromagnetic fields are described by a dynamic model. Noise is a very important factor to be considered in the dynamic research on the calcium oscillations in a cell exposed to electromagnetic fields. Some meaningful results have been obtained here based on the discussion. The results show that the pattern of intracellular calcium oscillations exposure to electromagnetic fields can be influenced by noise. Furthermore, the intracellular calcium oscillations exposure to electromagnetic fields can also be induced by noise. And the work has also studied the relationships between the voltage sensitive calcium channel's open probability and electromagnetic field. The result can provide new insights into constructive roles and potential applications of selecting appropriate electromagnetic field frequency during the research of biological effect of electromagnetic field.

  12. Calcium spikes, waves and oscillations in a large, patterned epithelial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Ramya; Bielmeier, Christina; Harz, Hartmann; Bates, Jack; Stadler, Cornelia; Hildebrand, Alexander; Classen, Anne-Kathrin

    2017-02-20

    While calcium signaling in excitable cells, such as muscle or neurons, is extensively characterized, calcium signaling in epithelial tissues is little understood. Specifically, the range of intercellular calcium signaling patterns elicited by tightly coupled epithelial cells and their function in the regulation of epithelial characteristics are little explored. We found that in Drosophila imaginal discs, a widely studied epithelial model organ, complex spatiotemporal calcium dynamics occur. We describe patterns that include intercellular waves traversing large tissue domains in striking oscillatory patterns as well as spikes confined to local domains of neighboring cells. The spatiotemporal characteristics of intercellular waves and oscillations arise as emergent properties of calcium mobilization within a sheet of gap-junction coupled cells and are influenced by cell size and environmental history. While the in vivo function of spikes, waves and oscillations requires further characterization, our genetic experiments suggest that core calcium signaling components guide actomyosin organization. Our study thus suggests a possible role for calcium signaling in epithelia but importantly, introduces a model epithelium enabling the dissection of cellular mechanisms supporting the initiation, transmission and regeneration of long-range intercellular calcium waves and the emergence of oscillations in a highly coupled multicellular sheet.

  13. Calcium spikes, waves and oscillations in a large, patterned epithelial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Ramya; Bielmeier, Christina; Harz, Hartmann; Bates, Jack; Stadler, Cornelia; Hildebrand, Alexander; Classen, Anne-Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    While calcium signaling in excitable cells, such as muscle or neurons, is extensively characterized, calcium signaling in epithelial tissues is little understood. Specifically, the range of intercellular calcium signaling patterns elicited by tightly coupled epithelial cells and their function in the regulation of epithelial characteristics are little explored. We found that in Drosophila imaginal discs, a widely studied epithelial model organ, complex spatiotemporal calcium dynamics occur. We describe patterns that include intercellular waves traversing large tissue domains in striking oscillatory patterns as well as spikes confined to local domains of neighboring cells. The spatiotemporal characteristics of intercellular waves and oscillations arise as emergent properties of calcium mobilization within a sheet of gap-junction coupled cells and are influenced by cell size and environmental history. While the in vivo function of spikes, waves and oscillations requires further characterization, our genetic experiments suggest that core calcium signaling components guide actomyosin organization. Our study thus suggests a possible role for calcium signaling in epithelia but importantly, introduces a model epithelium enabling the dissection of cellular mechanisms supporting the initiation, transmission and regeneration of long-range intercellular calcium waves and the emergence of oscillations in a highly coupled multicellular sheet. PMID:28218282

  14. 9-Phenanthrol and flufenamic acid inhibit calcium oscillations in HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Rees; Graves, Bridget M; Gao, Ming; Li, Chaunfu; Williams, David L; Fregoso, Santiago P; Hoover, Donald B; Li, Ying; Wright, Gary L; Wondergem, Robert

    2013-09-01

    It is well established that intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) controls the inotropic state of the myocardium, and evidence mounts that a "Ca2+ clock" controls the chronotropic state of the heart. Recent findings describe a calcium-activated nonselective cation channel (NSCCa) in various cardiac preparations sharing hallmark characteristics of the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4). TRPM4 is functionally expressed throughout the heart and has been implicated as a NSCCa that mediates membrane depolarization. However, the functional significance of TRPM4 in regards to Ca2+ signaling and its effects on cellular excitability and pacemaker function remains inconclusive. Here, we show by Fura2 Ca-imaging that pharmacological inhibition of TRPM4 in HL-1 mouse cardiac myocytes by 9-phenanthrol (10 μM) and flufenamic acid (10 and 100 μM) decreases Ca2+ oscillations followed by an overall increase in [Ca2+]i. The latter occurs also in HL-1 cells in Ca(2+)-free solution and after depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ with thapsigargin (10 μM). These pharmacologic agents also depolarize HL-1 cell mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, by on-cell voltage clamp we show that 9-phenanthrol reversibly inhibits membrane current; by fluorescence immunohistochemistry we demonstrate that HL-1 cells display punctate surface labeling with TRPM4 antibody; and by immunoblotting using this antibody we show these cells express a 130-150 kDa protein, as expected for TRPM4. We conclude that 9-phenanthrol inhibits TRPM4 ion channels in HL-1 cells, which in turn decreases Ca2+ oscillations followed by a compensatory increase in [Ca2+]i from an intracellular store other than the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We speculate that the most likely source is the mitochondrion.

  15. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger;

    2007-01-01

    waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cGMP leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole cell calcium oscillations. At the same time, membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...... approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes a uniform opening of L-type calcium...

  16. Cellular mechanism for spontaneous calcium oscillations in astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-fei WANG; Chen ZHOU; Ai-hui TANG; Shi-qiang WANG; Zhen CHAI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the Ca2+ source and cellular mechanisms of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in hippocampal astrocytes. Methods: The cultured cells were loaded with Fluo-4 AM, the indicator of intracellular Ca2+, and the dynamic Ca2+ transients were visualized with confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Results: The spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in astrocytes were observed first in co-cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. These oscillations were not affected by tetrodotoxin (TTX) treatment and kept up in purity cultured astrocytes. The spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations were not impacted after blocking the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels or ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) bathing, indicating that intracellular Ca2+ elevation was not the result of extracellular Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, the correlation between the spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and the Ca2+ store in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were investigated with pharmacological experiments. The oscillations were: 1) enhanced when cells were exposed to both low Na+ (70 mmol/L) and high Ca2+ (5 mmol/L) solution, and eliminated completely by 2 μmol/L thapsigargin, a blocker of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase; and 2) still robust after the application with either 50 μmol/L ryanodine or 400 μmol/L tetracaine, two specific antagonists of ryanodine receptors, but depressed in a dose-dependent manner by 2-APB, an InsP3 receptors (InsP3R) blocker. Conclusion: InsP3R-induced ER Ca2+ release is an important cellular mechanism for the initiation of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation in hippocampal astrocytes.

  17. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole-cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger;

    2007-01-01

    waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the SR is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole-cell calcium oscillations. At the same time membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...... approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes uniform opening of L-type calcium...... onset of oscillations in membrane potential within the individual cell may underlie sudden intercellular synchronization and the appearance of vasomotion. Key words: Vasomotion, Chloride channel, cGMP, Mathematical model, Calcium waves....

  18. Evidence For Oscillation Of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, Y; Ichihara, E; Inoue, K; Ishihara, K; Ishino, H; Itow, Y; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kasuga, S; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M A; Habig, A; Kearns, E T; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, David William; Gajewski, W; Halverson, P G; Hsu, J; Kropp, W R; Price, L R; Reines, F; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Flanagan, J W; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Stenger, Victor J; Takemori, D; Ishii, T; Kanzaki, J I; Kobayashi, T; Mine, S; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakai, A; Sakuda, M; Sasaki, O; Echigo, S; Kohama, M; Suzuki, A T; Haines, T J; Blaufuss, E; Kim, B K; Sanford, R; Svoboda, R; Chen, M L; Conner, Z; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Hill, J; Jung, C K; Martens, K; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Viren, B M; Yanagisawa, C; Doki, W; Miyano, K; Okazawa, H; Saji, C; Takahata, M; Nagashima, Y; Takita, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Etoh, M; Fujita, K; Hasegawa, A; Hasegawa, T; Hatakeyama, S; Iwamoto, T; Koga, M; Maruyama, T; Ogawa, H; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Tsushima, F; Koshiba, M; Nemoto, M; Nishijima, K; Futagami, T; Hayato, Y; Kanaya, Y; Kaneyuki, K; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; Doyle, R A; George, J S; Stachyra, A L; Wai, L L; Wilkes, R J; Young, K K

    1998-01-01

    We present an analysis of atmospheric neutrino data from a 33.0 kiloton-year (535-day) exposure of the Super-Kamiokande detector. The data exhibit a zenith angle dependent deficit of muon neutrinos which is inconsistent with expectations based on calculations of the atmospheric neutrino flux. Experimental biases and uncertainties in the prediction of neutrino fluxes and cross sections are unable to explain our observation. The data are consistent, however, with two-flavor nu_mu nu_tau oscillations with sin^2(2theta)>0.82 and 5x10^-4 < delta m^2 < 6x10^-3 eV^2 at 90% confidence level.

  19. Mouse neuroblastoma cell-based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyoung; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mouse neuroblastoma cells have been considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and they have been intensively used as a model system in different areas. For example, the differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor-mediated ion current, and glutamate-induced physiological responses have been actively investigated with these cells. These mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells are of interest because they grow faster than other cells of neural origin and have a number of other advantages. The calcium oscillations and neural spikes of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in epileptic conditions are evaluated. Based on our observations of neural spikes in these cells with our proposed imaging modality, we reported that they can be an important model in epileptic activity studies. We concluded that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as those produced by neurons or astrocytes. This evidence suggests that increased levels of neurotransmitter release due to the enhancement of free calcium from 4-aminopyridine causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce epileptic spikes and calcium oscillations.

  20. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  1. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  2. Alternate oscillations of self-terminating and recombination lasers in univalent calcium and strontium ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Bai-Liang; Chen Gang; Fang Ben-Min; Mao Bang-Ning; Yao Zhi-Xin

    2004-01-01

    The univalent calcium and strontium ions have been confirmed as ideal lasing substances both for self-terminating laser and recombination laser by theoretically analysing their energy level structures and lasing mechanisms. With the optimization of the excitation circuit and the improvement of the laser cavity as well as the laser discharge tube, the alternate laser oscillations of the two laser mechanisms were successfully realized by longitudinal pulsed discharge in mixture vapours of helium and univalent ions of calcium or strontium, respectively. The dependences of laser performance on working parameters, together with the characteristics of the photoelectric pulse waveforms were elementally studied and analysed.

  3. Simulation of time delay effects in the intracellular calcium oscillation of cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Weilong; Mei Dongcheng [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Yang Linjing, E-mail: meidch@ynu.edu.c [College of Chinese Medicine, Yunnan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Kunming 650500 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Intracellular calcium oscillation with time delay and correlated noises was investigated in this paper by means of stochastic simulation. The time evolution and stationary probability distribution (SPD) of Ca{sup 2+} concentration in the cytosol and in an IP{sub 3}-insensitive pool were calculated. The results indicate that: (i) the intracellular calcium oscillation is suppressed with increasing the delay time {tau} but is enhanced with increasing the external noise intensity D; (ii) the structure of the SPD exhibits a transition from a single peak to double peaks and the biggest peak shrinks as the external noise intensity D increases; (iii) the structure of the SPD exhibits a transition from double peaks to a single peak and the biggest peak grows as the delay time {tau} increases.

  4. Effects of non-Gaussian noise on a calcium oscillation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bing; Sun Ya-Qin; Tang Xu-Dong

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the non-Gaussian colored noise on a calcium oscillation system using stochastic simulation methods.It is found that the reciprocal coefficient of variance R has a maximum (Rmax) with increasing noise intensity Q.The non-Gaussian noise parameter q has an important effect on the system.For some values of q (e.g.,q =0.9,q =1.0),R has a maximum with increasing correlation time τ.Non-Gaussian noise induced spikes are more regular than Gaussian noise induced spikes when q is small and Q has large values.The R has a maximum with increasing q.Therefore,non-Gaussian noise could play more effective roles in the calcium oscillation system.

  5. Evidence for Fine Structure in the Chromospheric Umbral Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, R; Collados, M; Bueno, J T

    2005-01-01

    Novel spectro-polarimetric observations of the \\ion{He}{1} multiplet are used to explore the dynamics of the chromospheric oscillation above sunspot umbrae. The results presented here provide strong evidence in support of the two-component model proposed by Socas-Navarro and co-authors. According to this model, the waves propagate only inside channels of sub-arcsecond width (the ``active'' component), whereas the rest of the umbra remains nearly at rest (the ``quiet'' component). Although the observations support the fundamental elements of that model, there is one particular aspect that is not compatible with our data. We find that, contrary to the scenario as originally proposed, the active component remains through the entire oscillation cycle and harbors both the upflowing and the downflowing phase of the oscillation.

  6. Acetylcholine-induced calcium oscillation in isolated outer hair cells in guinea pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ding-hua; XIAO Zi-an; YANG Shu

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study is to explore the relationship between acetylcholine (ACh)-induced calcium release from intracellular Ca2+ stores and function of outer hair cell (OHC) motors, in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of OHC electromotility at resting state. Methods OHCs were isolated from adult guinea pig (200-300 g) cochlea and loaded with Fluo-3/AM. The cells were treated with ACh/dHBSS, ACh/HBSS, dHBSS only or HBSS only. Intracellular [Ca2+]i variations in cells under the four treatments were observed using an Ar-Kr laser scan confocal microscope. Results [Ca2+]i oscillations were recorded in five OHCs treated with ACh/dHBSS but not in other cells. This is the first time that Ach-excited [Ca2+]i oscillations are reported in guinea pig OHCs independent of extracellular calcium. Conclusions ACh-excited [Ca2+]i oscillations in OHCs originates from intracellular calcium release and may play a crucial role in maintaining active mechanical motility of the OHC at resting and modulating OHC electromotility.

  7. Electric pulses: a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations and generate spontaneous-like calcium oscillations in mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menorval, Marie-Amelie; Andre, Franck M.; Silve, Aude; Dalmay, Claire; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Mir, Lluis M.

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells of great interest in regenerative medicine or oncology. They present spontaneous calcium oscillations related to cell cycle progression or differentiation but the correlation between these events is still unclear. Indeed, it is difficult to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations with chemical means. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) can permeabilise plasma and/or organelles membranes depending on the applied pulses and therefore generate cytosolic calcium peaks by recruiting calcium from the external medium or from internal stores. We show that it is possible to mimic haMSCs spontaneous calcium oscillations (same amplitude, duration and shape) using 100 μs PEFs or 10 ns PEFs. We propose a model that explains the experimental situations reported. PEFs can therefore be a flexible tool to manipulate cytosolic calcium concentrations. This tool, that can be switched on and off instantaneously, contrary to chemicals agents, can be very useful to investigate the role of calcium oscillations in cell physiology and/or to manipulate cell fate. PMID:27561994

  8. Synchronized Anti-Phase and In-Phase Oscillations of Intracellular Calcium Ions in Two Coupled Hepatocytes System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Chuan-Sheng; CHEN Han-Shuang; ZHANG Ji-Qian

    2008-01-01

    @@ We study the dynamic behaviour of two intracellular calcium oscillators that are coupled through gap junctions both to Ca2+ and inositol(1,4,5)-trisphosphate(IPa).It is found that synchronized anti-phase and in-phase oscillations of cytoplasmic calcium coexist in parameters space.Especially,synchronized anti-phase oecillations only occur near the onset of a Hopf bifurcation point when the velocity of IP3 synthesis is increased.

  9. Determination of Neutrino mixing parameters after SNO oscillation evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Aliani, P; Picariello, M; Ferrari, R; Torrente-Lujan, E

    2003-01-01

    An updated analysis of all available neutrino oscillation evidence in Solar experiments (SK day and night spectra, global rates from Homestake, SAGE and GALLEX) including the latest SNO CC and NC data is presented. Assuming that the shape of the SNO CC energy spectrum is undistorted and using the information provided by SNO we obtain, for the fraction of electron neutrinos remaining in the solar beam at energies $\\gsim 5$ MeV: $\\phi_{CC}/\\phi_{NC}=0.34^{+0.05}_{-0.04},$ which is nominally $\\sim 30\\sigma$ away from the standard value. The fraction of oscillating neutrinos which into active ones is computed to be: $ (\\Phi_{NC}-\\Phi_{CC})/(\\Phi_{SSM}-\\Phi_{CC})=0.92^{+0.39}_{-0.20} $ nearly $5\\sigma$ deviations from the pure sterile oscillation case. The data is still compatible with an important fraction of sterile component in the solar beam (up to 20% of the total). In the framework of two active neutrino oscillations we determine individual neutrino mixing parameters and their errors in the region of no spec...

  10. Fluorescence detection and imaging of cytosolic calcium oscillations:A comparison of four equipment setups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Fang; Xiaoting Zhao; Wei Zhou; Jia Li; Qin Liu; Xun Shen; Yoh-ichi Satoh; Zong Jie Cui

    2009-01-01

    The increase in cytosolic calcium concentration has been shown to play an important role in vital cellular functions such as muscle contraction,cell secretion,oocyte fertilization,nerve conduction,embryo development and apoptosis in animals,plants and microbes,and in the invasion of mammalian cells by parasites,bacteria,and viruses.Therefore,live cell imaging of increases in cytosolic calcium concentration in cellular compartments has been investigated intensively.Multiple calcium imaging systems are now available commercially,but when it comes to deciding which model to purchase,it is often hard to obtain enough information for an optimal setup.In this paper,a comparison was made among four fluorescent detection/imaging devices for the detection of cytosolic calcium oscillations induced in rat pancreatic acinar ceils by cholecystokinin and in hepatocytes by phenylephrine.Detailed equipment setup,differences in data acquisition and analysis,and side effects of the excitation light on live cells were analyzed.A list of important factors that should be considered in choosing the optimal equipment are recommended,which will be useful for users of such devices in the future.

  11. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Akihiro, E-mail: ayoneda@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan); Division of Molecular Therapeutics, Center for Food & Medical Innovation, Hokkaido University (Japan); Watanabe, Tomomasa [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  12. Model for external influences on cellular signal transduction pathways including cytosolic calcium oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichwald, C.; Kaiser, F. [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Experiments on the effects of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields on cells of the immune system, T-lymphocytes in particular, suggest that the external field interacts with the cell at the level of intracellular signal transduction pathways. These are directly connected with changes in the calcium-signaling processes of the cell. Based on these findings, a theoretical model for receptor-controlled cytosolic calcium oscillations and for external influences on the signal transduction pathway is presented. The authors discuss the possibility that the external field acts on the kinetics of the signal transduction between the activated receptors at the cell membrane and the G-proteins. It is shown that, depending on the specific combination of cell internal biochemical and external physical parameters, entirely different responses of the cell can occur. The authors compare the effects of a coherent (periodic) modulation and of incoherent perturbations (noise). The model and the calculations are based on the theory of self-sustained, nonlinear oscillators. It is argued that these systems form an ideal basis for information-encoding processes in biological systems.

  13. Mitochondrial fusion dynamics is robust in the heart and depends on calcium oscillations and contractile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Verónica; Cupo, Ryan R; Gao, Erhe; Csordás, György; Slovinsky, William S; Paillard, Melanie; Cheng, Lan; Ibetti, Jessica; Chen, S R Wayne; Chuprun, J Kurt; Hoek, Jan B; Koch, Walter J; Hajnóczky, György

    2017-01-31

    Mitochondrial fusion is thought to be important for supporting cardiac contractility, but is hardly detectable in cultured cardiomyocytes and is difficult to directly evaluate in the heart. We overcame this obstacle through in vivo adenoviral transduction with matrix-targeted photoactivatable GFP and confocal microscopy. Imaging in whole rat hearts indicated mitochondrial network formation and fusion activity in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Promptly after isolation, cardiomyocytes showed extensive mitochondrial connectivity and fusion, which decayed in culture (at 24-48 h). Fusion manifested both as rapid content mixing events between adjacent organelles and slower events between both neighboring and distant mitochondria. Loss of fusion in culture likely results from the decline in calcium oscillations/contractile activity and mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), because (i) verapamil suppressed both contraction and mitochondrial fusion, (ii) after spontaneous contraction or short-term field stimulation fusion activity increased in cardiomyocytes, and (iii) ryanodine receptor-2-mediated calcium oscillations increased fusion activity in HEK293 cells and complementing changes occurred in Mfn1. Weakened cardiac contractility in vivo in alcoholic animals is also associated with depressed mitochondrial fusion. Thus, attenuated mitochondrial fusion might contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

  14. Estrogen receptor beta-selective agonists stimulate calcium oscillations in human and mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhang

    Full Text Available Estrogens are used extensively to treat hot flashes in menopausal women. Some of the beneficial effects of estrogens in hormone therapy on the brain might be due to nongenomic effects in neurons such as the rapid stimulation of calcium oscillations. Most studies have examined the nongenomic effects of estrogen receptors (ER in primary neurons or brain slices from the rodent brain. However, these cells can not be maintained continuously in culture because neurons are post-mitotic. Neurons derived from embryonic stem cells could be a potential continuous, cell-based model to study nongenomic actions of estrogens in neurons if they are responsive to estrogens after differentiation. In this study ER-subtype specific estrogens were used to examine the role of ERalpha and ERbeta on calcium oscillations in neurons derived from human (hES and mouse embryonic stem cells. Unlike the undifferentiated hES cells the differentiated cells expressed neuronal markers, ERbeta, but not ERalpha. The non-selective ER agonist 17beta-estradiol (E(2 rapidly increased [Ca2+]i oscillations and synchronizations within a few minutes. No change in calcium oscillations was observed with the selective ERalpha agonist 4,4',4''-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyltrisphenol (PPT. In contrast, the selective ERbeta agonists, 2,3-bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl-propionitrile (DPN, MF101, and 2-(3-fluoro-4-hydroxyphenyl-7-vinyl-1,3 benzoxazol-5-ol (ERB-041; WAY-202041 stimulated calcium oscillations similar to E(2. The ERbeta agonists also increased calcium oscillations and phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK1/2 in neurons derived from mouse ES cells, which was inhibited by nifedipine demonstrating that ERbeta activates L-type voltage gated calcium channels to regulate neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate that ERbeta signaling regulates nongenomic pathways in neurons derived from ES cells, and suggest that these cells might be useful to study the nongenomic mechanisms of estrogenic compounds.

  15. Bacterial-induced calcium oscillations are common to nitrogen-fixing associations of nodulating legumes and nonlegumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granqvist, Emma; Sun, Jongho; Op den Camp, Rik; Pujic, Petar; Hill, Lionel; Normand, Philippe; Morris, Richard J; Downie, J Allan; Geurts, Rene; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2015-08-01

    Plants that form root-nodule symbioses are within a monophyletic 'nitrogen-fixing' clade and associated signalling processes are shared with the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Central to symbiotic signalling are nuclear-associated oscillations in calcium ions (Ca(2+) ), occurring in the root hairs of several legume species in response to the rhizobial Nod factor signal. In this study we expanded the species analysed for activation of Ca(2+) oscillations, including nonleguminous species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. We showed that Ca(2+) oscillations are a common feature of legumes in their association with rhizobia, while Cercis, a non-nodulating legume, does not show Ca(2+) oscillations in response to Nod factors from Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234. Parasponia andersonii, a nonlegume that can associate with rhizobia, showed Nod factor-induced calcium oscillations to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors, but its non-nodulating sister species, Trema tomentosa, did not. Also within the nitrogen-fixing clade are actinorhizal species that associate with Frankia bacteria and we showed that Alnus glutinosa induces Ca(2+) oscillations in root hairs in response to exudates from Frankia alni, but not to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors. We conclude that the ability to mount Ca(2+) oscillations in response to symbiotic bacteria is a common feature of nodulating species within the nitrogen-fixing clade.

  16. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Alysia Diane

    2004-08-10

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while {approx}2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 {+-} 0.065(stat.){+-}{sub 0.068}{sup 0.065}(sys.){+-}0.02(theor.)] x 10{sup 6}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21{+-}0.22(stat.){+-}{sub 0.12}{sup 0.11}(sys.){+-}0.01(theor.)] x 10{sup 6}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05{+-}0.23(stat.){+-}{sub 0.37}{sup 0.31}(sys.){+-}0.06(theor.)] x 10{sup 6}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7{sigma} below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation.

  17. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Alysia Diane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ~2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)±$0.065\\atop{0.068}$(sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)±$0.12\\atop{0.11}$(sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)±$0.31\\atop{0.37}$(sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation.

  18. Panofsky Prize Lecture: Evidence for Oscillation of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsuka, Yoji

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are decay products of pions and kaons (and of their decay products muons) produced by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with air nuclei. Though their flux is not known well, only within 20 %, physics quantities that are independent of the flux uncertainty exist. The ratio of the number of muon neutrinos to the number of electron neutrinos is estimated to be accurate within 5 %. The other quantity is the shape of the zenith-angle distribution. Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande are water Cherenkov detectors with 3,000 ton and 50,000 ton pure water, respectively. Kamiokande was operational in 1983 - 1996, and Super-K in 1996 - 2001 and 2003 - in future. We had already noted in 1988 that the observed μ/e ratio, which represented ν_mu/ν_e, was smaller by about 40 %. Later in 1994 we noted that the zenith angle distribution of muon neutrinos was strongly distorted, namely much fewer muons observed in the upward direction, while downward-going muons were what we expected. Electrons were quite normal. In 1996 Super-Kamiokande was ready. Its fiducial volume is 22.5 kton, much larger than Kamiokande's 1.04 kton. In 1998 based on 25.5 kton years of data we presented convincing results on the small μ/e ratio which was caused by fewer number of muons in the upward direction. The essential feature of the observed anomaly was that the disappearance of muon neutrinos depended strongly on their path length and on their energies. Electrons showed no anomaly within the experimental limit. These results were quantitatively and almost uniquely explained by oscillation of muon neutrinos to tau neutrinos, thus evidence for the finite but tiny mass of neutrinos.

  19. Evidence for an oscillatory signature in atmospheric neutrino oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashie, Y; Hosaka, J; Ishihara, K; Itow, Y; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Namba, T; Nambu, R; Obayashi, Y; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Yamada, S; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Ooyabu, T; Saji, C; Takenaga, Y; Desai, S; Kearns, E; Likhoded, S; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Wang, W; Goldhaber, M; Casper, D; Cravens, J P; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Liu, D W; Mine, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Sterner, C W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Guillian, G; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D; Messier, M D; Hayato, Y; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwashita, T; Kobayashi, T; Maruyama, T; Nakamura, K; Nitta, K; Oyama, Y; Sakuda, M; Totsuka, Y; Suzuki, A T; Hasegawa, M; Hayashi, K; Inagaki, T; Kato, I; Maesaka, H; Morita, T; Nakaya, T; Nishikawa, K; Sasaki, T; Ueda, S; Yamamoto, S; Haines, T J; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Svoboda, R; Blaufuss, E; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Turcan, D; Scholberg, K; Habig, A; Fukuda, Y; Jung, C K; Kato, T; Kobayashi, K; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sarrat, A; Sharkey, E; Yanagisawa, C; Toshito, T; Miyano, K; Tamura, N; Ishii, J; Kuno, Y; Nagashima, Y; Takita, M; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Okazawa, H; Ishizuka, T; Choi, Y; Seo, H K; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Koshiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Nishijima, K; Harada, T; Ishino, H; Nishimura, R; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; Zalipska, J; Berns, H G; Gran, R; Shiraishi, K K; Stachyra, A; Washburn, K; Wilkes, R J

    2004-09-01

    Muon neutrino disappearance probability as a function of neutrino flight length L over neutrino energy E was studied. A dip in the L/E distribution was observed in the data, as predicted from the sinusoidal flavor transition probability of neutrino oscillation. The observed L/E distribution constrained nu(micro)nu(tau) neutrino oscillation parameters; 1.9x10(-3)0.90 at 90% confidence level.

  20. Amyloid β Peptide Enhances RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Activation through NF-κB, ERK, and Calcium Oscillation Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangfu Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are common chronic degenerative disorders which are strongly associated with advanced age. We have previously demonstrated that amyloid beta peptide (Aβ, one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, accumulated abnormally in osteoporotic bone specimens in addition to having an activation effect on osteoclast (Bone 2014,61:164-75. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylates, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways by receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL plays a pivotal role in osteoclast activation. Targeting this signaling to modulate osteoclast function has been a promising strategy for osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ on RANKL-induced osteoclast signaling pathways in vitro. In mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMMs, Aβ exerted no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis but promoted osteoclastic bone resorption. In molecular levels, Aβ enhanced NF-κB activity and IκB-α degradation, activated ERK phosphorylation and stimulated calcium oscillation, thus leading to upregulation of NFAT-c1 expression during osteoclast activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Aβ enhances RANKL-induced osteoclast activation through IκB-α degradation, ERK phosphorylation, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways and that Aβ may be a promising agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related disease such as osteoporosis.

  1. New evidence of transient complex oscillations in a closed, well-stirred Belousov-Zhabotinsky system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA KOLAR-ANIC

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Some new experimental evidence of complex irregular oscillations in the Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction realized in a batch reactor is presented. The results were obtained under relatively low cerium and malonic acid concentrations. One-dimensionalmaps were used for general discussion, and, particularly, for the influence of noise on the evolution of the oscillations.

  2. Evidence for a possible calcium flux dependent cardiomyopathy in hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, J.L.; Wicker, P.; Manley, W.; Brendel, A.J.; Lefort, G.; San Galli, F.; Commenges-Ducos, M.; Latapie, J.L.; Riviere, J.; Ducassou, D.

    1985-05-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the impaired functional cardiac reserve to exercise in hyperthyroidism is related to alterations in the regulation of calcium transport. In 2l hyperthyroid patients, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured using equilibrium gated radionuclide angiocardiography at rest and during supine dynamic exercise. After a recovery period, the patients performed a second exercise study after random administration of Verapamil, a calcium entry blocker (11 pts), or propanolol, a beta adrenergic antagonist (10 pts) for comparison. The results showed i) normal resting LVEF with no significant change during exercise before any medication, ii) resting LVEF significantly decreased after Propanolol, and no significantly changed after Verapamil, iii) during exercise, significant increase of LVEF after Verapamil, and no significant change after Propanolol. These results are consistent with previous studies showing that abnormal change in LVEF during exercise in hyperthyroidism seems independent of beta adrenergic activation, and suggest a reversible functional cardiomyopathy dependent of calcium transporting systems.

  3. Optogenetic Restoration of Disrupted Slow Oscillations Halts Amyloid Deposition and Restores Calcium Homeostasis in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanenka, Ksenia V.; Hou, Steven S.; Shakerdge, Naomi; Logan, Robert; Feng, Danielle; Wegmann, Susanne; Chopra, Vanita; Hawkes, Jonathan M.; Chen, Xiqun; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Slow oscillations are important for consolidation of memory during sleep, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients experience memory disturbances. Thus, we examined slow oscillation activity in an animal model of AD. APP mice exhibit aberrant slow oscillation activity. Aberrant inhibitory activity within the cortical circuit was responsible for slow oscillation dysfunction, since topical application of GABA restored slow oscillations in APP mice. In addition, light activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressed in excitatory cortical neurons restored slow oscillations by synchronizing neuronal activity. Driving slow oscillation activity with ChR2 halted amyloid plaque deposition and prevented calcium overload associated with this pathology. Thus, targeting slow oscillatory activity in AD patients might prevent neurodegenerative phenotypes and slow disease progression. PMID:28114405

  4. Dynamics Analysis and Transition Mechanism of Bursting Calcium Oscillations in Non-Excitable Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; LU Qi-Shao; DUAN Li-Xia

    2007-01-01

    A one-pool model with Ca2+-activated inositol-trisphosphate-concentration degradation is considered.For complex bursting Ca2+ oscillation,point-cycle bursting of subHopf-subHopf type is found to be in the intermediate state from quasi-periodic bursting to Point-point bursting of subHopf-subHopf type.The fast-slow burster analysis is used to study the transition mechanisms among simple periodic oscillation,quasi-periodic bursting,point-point and point-cycle burstings.The dynamics analysis of different oscillations provides better insight into the generation and transition mechanisms of complex intra- and inter-cellular Ca2+signalling.

  5. [Vitamin D and calcium in the mirror of clinical evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajnok, László

    2016-07-01

    The biological mechanisms, ecological and observational studies indicate increased morbidity and mortality in vitamin D deficiency, while the controlled, randomized supplementation trials - carried out mostly in vitamin D deficient patients - have shown no or some marginal benefits, mostly in preventing institutionalized elderly individuals' falls and fractures. Clarity is also disturbed by that the primary end points of intervention studies were generally not extraskeletal. The ideal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels also considerably controversial: there is clearly a J-curve, but the optimal range is uncertain. All of these uncertainties appear also in the vitamin D guidelines which are, however, concordant in that they do not recommend (i) a population-wide screening and (ii) vitamin D supplementation with extraskeletal aim - beyond the prevention of falls. Certain studies suggest that calcium supplementation increases the incidence of cardiovascular events, while others show a neutral effect in this respect. There are several ongoing vitamin D studies directly designed for extraskeletal events. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1242-1247.

  6. Intercellular synchronization of intracellular calcium oscillations : a mechanism for pacemaking and propagation of action potentials in networks of normal rat kidney fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Johannes Martinus Adrianus Maria

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to develop an integrated model that can combines an excitable membrane with an IP3-mediated intracellular calcium oscillator and which can explain the different growth-state dependent states of NRK-cells. Furthermore we investigated the interaction between electrically cou

  7. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip, E-mail: manoneeta@tifr.res.in, E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  8. Physical Manipulation of Calcium Oscillation in Shen-Larter Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongkun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental observations show that calcium signals in response to external stimuli encode information via frequency modulation or alternatively via amplitude modulation. Here, by arguments of bifurcation theory and bifurcation control theorem, the amplitude and frequency manipulation of limit cycle in Shen-Larter cell system are investigated. A nonlinear feedback controller is then applied to the system, in order to assign the peak frequency to a prescribed value, such that bifurcation is minimized or eliminated in the closed-loop system. And numerical simulations are presented in order to illustrate the theoretical analysis.

  9. Precise Velocity Observation of K-Giants: Evidence for Solar-Like Oscillations in Arcturus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, W. J.

    High accuracy measurements of variations in the radial velocity of the K1 giant star Arcturus have been obtained. The observations span 5 years and have a point-to-point repeatability of 5 m/s and night-to-night stability of better than 20 m/s. Velocity oscillations of Arcturus were discovered during the course of this work in 1986. Subsequent, extensive additional data, indicate that Arcturus is exhibiting global non-radial acoustic oscillations with characteristics similar to those occurring in the Sun. All observations were done using a radial velocity spectrometer, designed to search for extrasolar planets, at a dedicated facility of the University of Arizona on Kitt Peak. A dedicated facility was crucial to this work --- because of the changing nature of the oscillations, many observing runs, over several years, were required to understand the star's behavior. Continuous data sets as long as 30 days were acquired. Preliminary pulsation models were performed in collaboration of Art Cox at Los Alamos National Lab. The velocity power spectra are complicated and variable. There is substantial evidence that the variations are solar-like p-mode oscillations. At least 10 frequencies have been identified, over the range 8.3 to 1.7 days. A spectrum of evenly spaced modes is apparent, yielding a value for Δ nuIo ~1.2mu Hz. The average power spectrum peaks near 3 days. There is a broad envelope of power with a distribution reminiscent of that seen in the Sun. Both the mode spacing and the period of peak power are consistent with scaling from the Sun (Kjeldsen & Bedding 1995, A&A 293, 87). The oscillations appear to undergo abrupt discontinuities and have phase coherence times of a few weeks. We interpret the driving to be due to stochastic excitation by convection. Recent observations of the G5 IV star eta Boo by Brown et al. 1997 (Ap. J. 475, 322) have failed to confirm the detection of p-mode oscillations reported by Kjeldsen et al. 1995 (A.J. 109, 1313). Thus

  10. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta

    2014-01-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from ten neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found from any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional ampli...

  11. Cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections on synchronization and coherence resonance in diffusively coupled calcium oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maosheng; Sun, Runzhi

    2014-03-01

    The cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections (RLRCs) on synchronization and coherence resonance in networks of calcium oscillators have been investigated. Two different types of collective behaviors, coherence resonance (CR) and synchronization, have been studied numerically in the context of chemical Langevin equations (CLEs). In the CLEs, the reaction steps are all stochastic, including the exchange of calcium ions between adjacent and non-adjacent cells through the gap junctions. The calcium oscillators’ synchronization was characterized by the standard deviation of the cytosolic calcium concentrations. Meanwhile, the temporal coherence of the calcium spike train was characterized by the reciprocal coefficient of variance (RCV). Synchronization induced by RLRCs was observed, namely, the exchange of calcium ions between non-adjacent cells can promote the synchronization of the cells. Moreover, it was found that the RCV shows a clear peak when both inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are optimal, indicating the existence of CR. Since inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are two essential ingredients of cellular processes, synchronization and CR are also important for cells’ functions. The results reported in this paper are expected to be useful for understanding the dynamics of intercellular calcium signaling processes in vivo.

  12. Strong New Evidence for Oscillation of the Cosmological Scale Factor Observed in the Large Scale Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringermacher, Harry I.; Mead, Lawrence R.

    2017-01-01

    We have analyzed SDSSIII-BOSS, DR9 galaxy number count data using 2 independent approaches, a relativistic expanding space model based on work by Ostriker and direct Fourier analysis, and found incontrovertible evidence for a scale factor oscillation at 7 Hubble-Hertz (HHz) in both methods, where we define 1 HHz as 1 cycle over 1 Hubble-time. The number count of galaxies on these scales should be relatively smooth. However, a DR9 plot of galaxy number count per 0.01 redshift bin as a function of redshift shows significant bumps to redshift 0.5. We take the SDSSIII data (about ¼ of the sky) to be a fair representation of the entire sky when using number count. Our model fits essentially all bumps at a 99.8% R-squared goodness level if and only if the 7 HHz oscillation ( plus 2nd and 3rd harmonics at 14 HHz and 21 HHz) is included. These are the same frequencies observed by us in AJ 149, 137 (2015) using SNe data. Since the SDSSIII data set only goes to redshift 0.8, only one cycle of oscillation is included compared to 2-3 in our earlier work. Thus a Fourier analysis performed on the SDSS redshift data converted to equal-time binning leaves a broadened spectrum over the range where harmonics would normally reside but nevertheless peaked at 7 HHz. A scalar field model presented in the AJ paper describes the oscillation and enters the Friedmann equations by replacing the LCDM dark matter density parameter with the scalar field density. Thus, LCDM dark matter is the median of the wave which appears to act like a fluid with a changing equation-of-state. The oscillation may be a longitudinal gravitational wave originating with the Big Bang and requiring a massive graviton. 7 HHz is consistent with a graviton mass of 10^ -32 eV.

  13. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    -dependent manner suggests that calcium/CaM regulate ZmSAUR1 at the post-translational level. Our data provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of calcium/CaM-mediated signaling in auxin-mediated signal transduction.

  14. Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in inferior olive neurons are dynamically regulated by P/Q- and T-type calcium channels: a study in mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Daesoo; Urbano, Francisco J; Makarenko, Vladimir; Shin, Hee-Sup; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2010-08-15

    The role of P/Q- and T-type calcium channels in the rhythmic oscillatory behaviour of inferior olive (IO) neurons was investigated in mutant mice. Mice lacking either the CaV2.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1A subunit for P/Q-type calcium channel, or the CaV3.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1G subunit for T-type calcium channel were used. In vitro intracellular recording from IO neurons reveals that the amplitude and frequency of sinusoidal subthreshold oscillations (SSTOs) were reduced in the CaV2.1-/- mice. In the CaV3.1-/- mice, IO neurons also showed altered patterns of SSTOs and the probability of SSTO generation was significantly lower (15%, 5 of 34 neurons) than that of wild-type (78%, 31 of 40 neurons) or CaV2.1-/- mice (73%, 22 of 30 neurons). In addition, the low-threshold calcium spike and the sustained endogenous oscillation following rebound potentials were absent in IO neurons from CaV3.1-/- mice. Moreover, the phase-reset dynamics of oscillatory properties of single neurons and neuronal clusters in IO were remarkably altered in both CaV2.1-/- and CaV3.1-/- mice. These results suggest that both alpha1A P/Q- and alpha1G T-type calcium channels are required for the dynamic control of neuronal oscillations in the IO. These findings were supported by results from a mathematical IO neuronal model that incorporated T and P/Q channel kinetics.

  15. Global analysis of Solar neutrino oscillation evidence including SNO and implications for Borexino

    CERN Document Server

    Aliani, P; Picariello, M; Torrente-Lujan, E

    2002-01-01

    An updated analysis of all available neutrino oscillation evidence in Solar experiments including the latest $SNO$ data is presented. Predictions for total rates and day-night asymmetry in Borexino are calculated. Our analysis features the use of exhaustive computation of the neutrino oscillation probabilities and the use of an improved statistical $\\chi^2$ minimization. In the framework of two neutrino oscillations we conclude that the best fit to the data is obtained in the LMA region with parameters $(\\Delta m^2, \\tan^2\\theta) = (5.2 \\times 10^{-5} \\eV^2, 0.47)$, ($\\chi^2_{min}/n=0.82$, $n=38$ degrees of freedom). Although less favored, solutions in the LOW and VAC regions are still possible with a reasonable statistical significance. The best possible solution in the SMA region gets as maximum a statistical significance as low as $\\sim 3%$. We study the implications of these results for the prospects of Borexino and the possibility of discriminating between the different solutions. The expected normalized...

  16. 豚鼠膀胱Cajal样间质细胞钙震荡特性%Calcium Oscillation Characteristics of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Guinea Pig Bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱国栋; 王勤章

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To ascertain the spontaneous and cyclical calcium oscillation in Cajal-like interstitial cells of Cajal in the bladder of adult guinea-pig.Method:The V-type enzyme collagenase was used to separate primary cells from myoblast of the preparation muscle tissue,primary cells were cultured.Using fluo-4 AM dye the Cells.The change of calcium fluorescence intensity was recorded with laser scanning microscope imaging. The changes of the intracellular calcium concentration was on behalf with the Fluorescence intensity.Result:The Cajal-like interstitial cells maintained its inherent characteristics by primary cultivation.We could see that the cell had a spindle cell body with two slender bipolars.In the Cajal-like interstitial cells of bladder:there were 2 different types of spontaneous calcium,small irregular calcium oscillation and large oscillation slow calcium oscillation.The second type of calcium oscillation was completely different from those of smooth muscle cells.Conclusion:We have confirmed the existence of the spontaneous calcium oscillation in the Cajal-like interstitial cells in the bladder of adult guinea-pig,that like the pacemaker cells of interstitial cells of Cajal in the digestive tract.Implying that part of the Cajal-like interstitial cells may be the pacemaker cells of contraction or activity of bladder.%目的:探讨正常成年豚鼠膀胱Cajal样间质细胞(Cajal-like interstitial cells)是否有自发周期性钙震荡(calcium oscillation),以期为膀胱兴奋性起搏细胞为Cajal样间质细胞这一学说提供实验依据。方法:运用胶原酶V消化法,获得原代豚鼠膀胱Cajal样间质细胞进行培养,采用激光共聚焦显微镜成像技术,Fluo-4AM负载后的Cajal样间质细胞内钙离子荧光强度的变化采用激光共聚焦显微镜成像技术进行记录,荧光强度的改变代表细胞内钙离子浓度的变化。结果:培养后的Cajal样间质细胞保持其固有特征,可

  17. POSITIONS OF CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKER LERCANIDIPINE ACCORDING TO EVIDENCE BASED CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lukina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data of evidence based cardiology including results of international clinical trials on efficacy and safety of the modern calcium channel blocker (CCB, lercanidipine, are presented. Results of these trials show the firm position of lercanidipine in the modern cardiology and confirm that treatment with lercanidipine leads to significant reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP with no effect on heart rate (HR. Peripheral edema (the common side effect of CCBs occurs rarer with lercanidipine treatment than this with any other CCB treatment. Lercanidipine can be recommended to patients with concomitant diseases due to its additional features.

  18. Role of a T-type calcium current in supporting a depolarizing potential, damped oscillations, and phasic firing in vasopressinergic guinea pig supraoptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, K R; Ronnekleiv, O K; Kelly, M J

    1993-05-01

    Guinea pig magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) were studied using the in vitro slice preparation. Intracellular recordings were made with biocytin-filled electrodes, permitting immunocytochemical identification of the recorded cells as arginine vasopressin- (AVP) versus oxytocin- (OT) containing. Only AVP cells displaying a depolarizing potential (DP) fired phasically. The DP was associated with a transient inward current measured in voltage clamp, which exhibited a number of properties of the T-type calcium current: activation threshold of -64 mV, time course of up to 250 ms, blockade by nickel and augmentation by barium chloride. This current has not been reported previously in SON neurons. The T-type current (IT) was always associated with a damped oscillation of the membrane following the offset from hyperpolarizing steps. In all cells tested, an apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization (AHP) was observed, similar to the calcium-dependent potassium current (IK, Ca) described in rat SON and other CNS regions. Therefore, as with other CNS regions displaying damped oscillations, guinea pig SON cells possess both an IT and an IK, Ca. We have previously described an Ih activating at hyperpolarized potentials in these cells, which depolarizes the membrane to a range in which the IT and IK, Ca can interactively support oscillations. In summary, the IT and associated depolarizing potential appears to be a requisite feature for phasic firing in AVP cells of guinea pig SON.

  19. Oscillation of an anuran hybrid zone: morphological evidence spanning 50 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hybrid zone between the primarily forest-dwelling American toad, Anaxyrus americanus, and the prairie-adapted Canadian toad, A. hemiophrys, in southeastern Manitoba is known to have shifted its position during the past 50 years. Hybrid zones are areas of interbreeding between species and their movement across a landscape should reflect their underlying dynamics and environmental change. However, empirical demonstrations of hybrid zone movements over long periods of time are rare. This hybrid zone is dominated by individuals of intermediate morphology and genetic composition. We sought to determine if it had continued to move and if that movement was associated with shifts in habitat, as predicted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We used variation in the toads' most diagnostic morphological feature, the separation between their interorbital cranial crests, to determine the geographic position of the hybrid zone center at four times between 1960 and 2009 using maximum likelihood methods. The hybrid zone center moved west by 38 km over 19 years and then east again by 10 km over the succeeding 29 years. The position of the hybrid zone did not track either the direction or the magnitude of movement of the forest-prairie habitat transition over the same time period. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first reported evidence of oscillation in the position of a hybrid zone. The back and forth movement indicates that neither species maintains a selective advantage over the other in the long term. However, the movement of the hybrid zone was not bounded by the breadth of the habitat transition. Its oscillation suggests that the hybrid zone is better described as being elastically tethered to the habitat transition.

  20. Vital pulp therapy using calcium-enriched mixture: An evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asgary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, casecontrol studies have revealed that the treatment outcomes of root canal therapy (RCT are generally favorable; however, the overall epidemiological success rate of RCT in the general population is relatively low. On the other hand, vitality of dental pulp is a key factor in the long-term prognosis of permanent teeth; in recent years, vital pulp therapy (VPT has received significant consideration as it has been revealed that the inflamed pulp has the potential to heal. In this review article, the current best evidence with regard to VPT using calcium-enriched mixture (CEM cement in human permanent/primary teeth is discussed. A strategy based on a search using keywords for CEM cement as well as VPT was applied.

  1. Evidence for a distinct light-induced calcium-dependent potassium current in Hermissenda crassicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, K T

    2000-01-01

    A model of phototransduction is developed as a first step toward a model for investigating the critical interaction of light and turbulence stimuli within the type B photoreceptor of Hermissenda crassicronis. The model includes equations describing phototransduction, release of calcium from intracellular stores, and other calcium regulatory mechanisms, as well as equations describing ligand-gating of a rhabdomeric sodium current. The model is used to determine the sources of calcium in the soma, whether calcium or IP3 is a plausible ligand of the light-induced sodium current, and whether the light-induced potassium current is equivalent to the calcium-dependent potassium current activated by light-induced calcium release. Simulations show that the early light-induced calcium elevation is due to influx through voltage-dependent channels, whereas the later calcium elevation is due to release from intracellular stores. Simulations suggest that the ligand of the fast, light-induced sodium current is IP3 but that there is a smaller, prolonged component of the light-induced sodium current that is activated by calcium. In the model, the calcium-dependent potassium current, located in the soma, is activated only slightly by light-induced calcium elevation, leading to the prediction that a calcium-dependent potassium current, active at resting potential, is located in the rhabdomere and is responsible for the light-induced potassium current.

  2. Theta-burst stimulation of hippocampal slices induces network-level calcium oscillations and activates analogous gene transcription to spatial learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham K Sheridan

    Full Text Available Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3-12 Hz hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to

  3. Microwave-Induced Oscillations in Magnetocapacitance: Direct Evidence for Nonequilibrium Occupation of Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, S. I.; Kapustin, A. A.; Umansky, V.; von Klitzing, K.; Smet, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    In a two-dimensional electron system, microwave radiation may induce giant resistance oscillations. Their origin has been debated controversially and numerous mechanisms based on very different physical phenomena have been invoked. However, none of them have been unambiguously experimentally identified, since they produce similar effects in transport studies. The capacitance of a two-subband system is sensitive to a redistribution of electrons over energy states, since it entails a shift of the electron charge perpendicular to the plane. In such a system, microwave-induced magnetocapacitance oscillations have been observed. They can only be accounted for by an electron distribution function oscillating with energy due to Landau quantization, one of the quantum mechanisms proposed for the resistance oscillations.

  4. Evidence for quasi-periodic oscillations in the optical polarization of the blazar PKS 2155-304

    CERN Document Server

    Pekeur, N W; Potter, S B; Kraan-Korteweg, R C

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the optical polarization of the blazar PKS 2155-304, during a period of enhanced gamma-ray brightness, is presented. The periodogram of the polarized flux revealed the existence of a prominent peak at $T\\sim 13$ min, detected at >99.7% significance, and $T\\sim 30$ min, which was nominally significant at >99%. This is the first evidence of QPOs in the polarization of an active galactic nucleus, potentially opening up a new avenue of studying this phenomenon.

  5. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    connect ion conformationally rearranged, thus passing the signal through the chain of intermediaries. The most important function of calcium is its participation in many cell signaling pathways. Channels, pumps, gene expression, synthesis of alkaloids, protective molecules, NO etc. respond to changes in [Ca2+]cyt, while transductors are represented by a number of proteins. The universality of calcium is evident in the study in connection with other signaling systems, such as NO, which is involved in the immune response and is able to control the feedback activity of protein activators channels, producing nitric oxide. Simulation of calcium responses can determine the impact of key level and their regulation, and also depends on the type of stimulus and the effector protein that specifically causes certain changes. Using spatiotemporal modeling, scientists showed that the key components for the formation of Ca2+ bursts are the internal and external surfaces of the nucleus membrane. The research was aimed at understanding of the mechanisms of influence of Ca2+-binding components on Ca2+ oscillations. The simulation suggests the existence of a calcium depot EPR with conjugated lumen of the nucleus which releases its contents to nucleoplasm. With these assumptions, the mathematical model was created and confirmed experimentally. It describes the oscillation of nuclear calcium in root hairs of Medicago truncatula at symbiotic relationship of plants and fungi (rhizobia. Calcium oscillations are present in symbiotic relationships of the cortical layer of plant root cells. Before penetration of bacteria into the cells, slow oscillations of Ca2+ are observed, but with their penetration into the cells the oscillation frequency increases. These processes take place by changing buffer characteristics of the cytoplasm caused by signals from microbes, such as Nod-factor available after penetration of bacteria through the cell wall. Thus, the basic known molecular mechanisms for

  6. Calcium-sensitive modulation of Ig capping: evidence supporting a cytoplasmic control of ligand-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, G F; Unanue, E R

    1976-01-01

    Capping of anti-Ig-Ig complexes was studied in murine B lymphocytes. Morphological studies indicated that caps formed rapidly on cells before any changes in shape. The first changes in cell shape were evident as a contraction right under the cap area. The removal of extracellular calcium had no effect on cap formation. Furthermore, the introduction of calcium by the ionophore A-23187 stopped capping. The ionophere by itself in the absence of extracellular calcium had no effect. Caps were found to be disrupted, the complexes scattering over the entire cell surface if the cells were treated by A-23187 after the caps had formed. The disruptive effect of A-23187 as dependent on extracellular calcium and could be stopped by drugs that affected energy metabolism. The cytochalasins also disrupted the formed caps. Drugs that affect energy metabolism by themselves did not disrupt the caps. We interpret the effects of the ionophore as resulting from a systemic hypercontractility of microfilaments. A theory for explaining the formation and disruption of capping is discussed.

  7. Greenland ice core evidence for spatial and temporal variability of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chylek, P.; Folland, C.K.; Frankcombe, L.M.; Dijkstra, H.A.; Lesins, G.; Dubey, M.

    2012-01-01

    [1] The Greenland δ18O ice core record is used as a proxy for Greenland surface air temperatures and to interpret Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) variability. An analysis of annual δ18O data from six Arctic ice cores (five from Greenland and one from Canada's Ellesmere Island) suggests a sig

  8. Neurodynamic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  9. Aphanomyces euteiches cell wall fractions containing novel glucan-chitosaccharides induce defense genes and nuclear calcium oscillations in the plant host Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaury Nars

    Full Text Available N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes.

  10. Empirical evidence for a celestial origin of the climate oscillations and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    We investigate whether or not the decadal and multi-decadal climate oscillations have an astronomical origin. Several global surface temperature records since 1850 and records deduced from the orbits of the planets present very similar power spectra. Eleven frequencies with period between 5 and 100 years closely correspond in the two records. Among them, large climate oscillations with peak-to-trough amplitude of about 0.1 $^oC$ and 0.25 $^oC$, and periods of about 20 and 60 years, respectively, are synchronized to the orbital periods of Jupiter and Saturn. Schwabe and Hale solar cycles are also visible in the temperature records. A 9.1-year cycle is synchronized to the Moon's orbital cycles. A phenomenological model based on these astronomical cycles can be used to well reconstruct the temperature oscillations since 1850 and to make partial forecasts for the 21$^{st}$ century. It is found that at least 60\\% of the global warming observed since 1970 has been induced by the combined effect of the above natural...

  11. Evidence of transverse magnetospheric field line oscillations as observed from Cluster and ground magnetometers

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    A. K. Sinha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic spectrum of ULF waves from magnetic field data obtained by the elliptically orbiting Cluster satellites (with an apogee of 119000km, perigee of 19000km and the orbital period of 57h have been prepared in the frequency range 0 to 120mHz when the satellite was near its perigee. The existence of field line oscillations, with increasing frequency in the inbound sector and decreasing frequency in the outbound sector, is seen in the transverse components, indicating the presence of independently oscillating local magnetic flux tubes in the form of transverse standing Alfvén waves. The results show that toroidal and poloidal modes are excited simultaneously. The analysis of simultaneous ground magnetometer data at the footprint of the satellite suggests that these modes are also excited due to coupling to magnetospheric waveguide modes. The clear signature of a resonant fundamental mode is seen in the ground data whereas Cluster detects a harmonic of this frequency. Lower frequency modes indicative of waveguide oscillations are seen in both the ground data and the compressional field at Cluster.

  12. ENSO and IOD teleconnections for African ecosystems: evidence of destructive interference between climate oscillations

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    C. A. Williams

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall and vegetation across Africa are known to resonate with the coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomena of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD. However, the regional-scale implications of sea surface temperature variability for Africa's carbon sources and sinks have received little focused attention, particularly in the case of IOD. Furthermore, studies exploring the interactive effects of ENSO and IOD when coincident are lacking. This analysis uses remotely sensed vegetation change plus a land surface model driven with observed meteorology to investigate how rainfall, vegetation, and photosynthesis across Africa respond to these climate oscillations. In addition to the relatively well-known ENSO forcing, the IOD induces large departures of photosynthesis across much of Africa associated with anomalies in rainfall and vegetation greenness. More importantly, sizeable independent effects can be suppressed or even reversed by destructive interferences during periods of simultaneous ENSO and IOD activity. For example, effects of positive IOD on southeastern Africa tended to dominate those of El Niño during their coincidence spanning 1997–1998, with sign reversal of El Niño's typically strong suppression of photosynthesis in this region. These findings call into question past analyses examining teleconnections to ENSO or IOD in isolation, and indicate the need to consider their simultaneous states when examining influences on hydroclimatic and ecological conditions across Africa.

  13. ENSO and IOD teleconnections for African ecosystems: evidence of destructive interference between climate oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall and vegetation across Africa are known to resonate with the coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomena of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD. However, the regional-scale implications of sea surface temperature variability for Africa's photosyntheis have received little focused attention, particularly in the case of IOD. Furthermore, studies exploring the interactive effects of ENSO and IOD when coincident are lacking. This analysis uses remotely sensed vegetation change plus a land surface model driven with observed meteorology to investigate how rainfall, vegetation, and photosynthesis across Africa respond to these climate oscillations. In addition to the relatively well-known ENSO forcing, the IOD induces large departures of photosynthesis across much of Africa associated with anomalies in rainfall and vegetation greenness. More importantly, sizeable independent effects can be suppressed or even reversed by destructive interferences during periods of simultaneous ENSO and IOD activity. For example, effects of positive IOD on southeastern Africa tended to dominate those of El Niño during their coincidence spanning 1997–1998, with sign reversal of El Niño's typically strong suppression of photosynthesis in this region. These findings call into question past analyses examining teleconnections to ENSO or IOD in isolation, and indicate the need to consider their simultaneous states when examining influences on hydroclimatic and ecological conditions across Africa.

  14. Experimental evidence of electron neutrino oscillations and validation of MSW-LMA model with Borexino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, M. Buizza

    2011-04-01

    We report the real time measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrino fluxes performed with the Borexino experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The achievement of these measurements was possible thanks to the excellent levels of the radiopurity reached. The measurement of the 7Be in real time is the first direct measurements of the survival probability for solar electron neutrinos in the vacuum region. For 8B we reached a threshold energy of 3MeV which is the lowest achieved so far in real time. For the first time, the same apparatus can measure two different oscillation regions (vacuum-driven and matter-enhanced) predicted by the MSW-LMA model. Borexino also quotes the ratio between the survival probabilities, corresponding to 1.93 ± 0.75, and validates the presence of the transition region between the two oscillation regimes, according to the MSW-LMA solution.In addition, a preliminary result on the Day-Night Asymmetry (ADN) for the 7Be neutrino flux is presented and corresponds to 0.007 ± 0.073. This measurement makes Borexino able to give once more an independent confirmation of the MSW-LMA solution.

  15. Evidence of accretion triggered oscillations in the pre-main-sequence interacting binary AK Sco

    CERN Document Server

    de Castro, Ana I Gomez; Talavera, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Pre-main sequence (PMS) binaries are surrounded by circumbinary disks from which matter falls onto both components. The material dragged from the circumbinary disk flows onto each star through independent streams channelled by the variable gravitational field. The action of the bar-like potential is most prominent in high eccentricity systems made of two equal mass stars. AK Sco is a unique PMS system composed of two F5 stars in an orbit with e=0.47. Henceforth, it is an ideal laboratory to study matter infall in binaries and its role in orbit circularization. In this letter, we report the detection of a 1.3mHz ultra low frequency oscillation in the ultraviolet light curve at periastron passage. This oscillation last 7 ks being most likely fed by the gravitational energy released when the streams tails spiralling onto each star get in contact at periastron passage enhancing the accretion flow; this unveils a new mechanism for angular momentum loss during pre-main sequence evolution and a new type of interacti...

  16. Calcium-channel blockers for the prevention of stroke: from scientific evidences to the clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Taddei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF THE REVIEW The present review aims to analyze the role of calcium-channel blockers, and particularly newer molecules, as first-line therapy for cerebrovascular disease. BACKGROUND Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the general population. Among traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hypertension has a key role in the genesis of both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke and a direct correlation exists between blood pressure values and the risk of stroke. Moreover, blood pressure reduction has been demonstrated to be the most important route to reduce stroke incidence and recurrence. However, the mere reduction of blood pressure values does not normalize the cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive patient. It is therefore necessary to use drug classes that beyond their blood pressure-lowering effect have also an additional effect in terms of organ protection. Among these, calcium-channel blockers have a crucial profile. Firstly, they are effective in inducing left ventricular hypertrophy regression, with a strength at least equal to that of ACE-inhibitors. Secondly, they have an antithrombotic and an endothelium-protecting effect, mediated by their antioxidant activity. Finally, calcium-channel blockers are the most powerful drugs in preventing vascular remodeling. For these reasons this drug class has probably the strongest antiatherosclerotic effect, and it is the first-choice treatment mainly for cerebrovascular disease. Among different available calcium-channel blockers, the newer ones seem to possess pharmacokinetic characteristics allowing a more homogeneous 24 hours coverage as compared to older molecules, and preliminary data seem to suggest a greater beneficial effect also on left ventricular hypertrophy and lower incidence of side effects. CONCLUSIONS Although blood pressure reduction is the main tool to reduce cerebrovascular risk in hypertensive patients, some drug classes, such as calciumchannel blockers, seem to provide

  17. Evidence for Langmuir Oscillations and a Low Density Cavity in the Venus Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    We report the discovery of Langmuir oscillations in a very low plasma density region in the Venus magnetotail. These waves are observed more often at 30 kHz, but also at 5.4 kHz indicating densities as low as 0.3/cu cm in the central tail lobe. The Langmuir probe on board the Pioneer Venus Orbiter cannot resolve such a low plasma density. We use the magnetic field strength and the assumption of total pressure balance to infer the electron temperature as a test of the Langmuir wave interpretation. By investigating the spatial distribution of this wave activity we find that the plasma cavity is ordered in a coordinate system defined by the interplanetary magnetic field and is found at either side of the central tail current sheet.

  18. Qualitative Experimental Evidences for the thermal Wave Mechanisms of temperature Oscillations in Living Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingLiu; XingguoSun; 等

    1996-01-01

    To make it possible for the thermal wave theory on temperature oscillation (TO)effects in living tissues to be founded on the substantial experimental basis,a series of typical decisive experiments in vivo as well as in artificially simulating costructions were carred out.COnclusions obtained including some other scholars animal experimental results all greatly support the thermal wave viewpoint qualitatively,A few experimental facts used not to be easily understood from the classical viewpoint are also well reinterpreted.The revealing on the thermal wave mechanisms of TO in living tissues is a brand new discovery and deep insight into this important thermophysiological phenomenon,It may possibly promote new investigations on the corresponding topics in the field of bioheat transfer science.

  19. Clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of a dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in providing instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses recent scientific and clinical research validating the effectiveness of a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate, known as Pro-Argin technology, including clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of this toothpaste versus a potassium-based desensitizing toothpaste. It also introduces new clinical data which prove that a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate delivers superior instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity compared to a toothpaste containing 8% strontium acetate.

  20. Evidence of Last Interglacial sea-level oscillations and recent tectonism in the Late Pleistocene Falmouth Formation of Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrivanek, A.; Dutton, A.; Stemann, T.

    2015-12-01

    The timing and rates of sea-level change during Marine Isotope Stage 5e (MIS 5e) are poorly constrained. Across the Caribbean, many MIS 5e reefs are exposed above modern sea level, and have been studied extensively to understand sea level and ice sheet dynamics during an interglacial climate. This study investigates potential evidence for sub-orbital sea-level oscillations in the limestone Falmouth Formation from the northern and southwestern coastlines of Jamaica, a tectonically active island on the northern boundary of the Caribbean Plate. Vertical exposures of MIS 5e reefs contain multiple facies transitions that are sometimes associated with sharp unconformities. Outcrops at East Rio Bueno contain a distinct change in coral taxonomy from an assemblage of in situ Montastraea spp., Siderastrea and Diploria sp. encrusted by coralline algae, next to a repeated succession of Porites furcata, Acropora cervicornis, coralline algae and Porites astreoides, to in situ P. furcata. This is overlain by a fining-upwards sequence of coral rubble, a laterally persistent layer of small in situ Siderastrea and a ~1-m thick caprock. Near Oracabessa, a unit dominated by Acropora palmata clearly transitions into in situ Montastraea spp., Siderastrea, Colpophyllia natans, and Diploria sp. overlain by A. cervicornis. An abrupt vertical displacement of the sequence, indicating faulting, was observed at Oracabessa. Along the south coast, transitions in coral assemblages were also noted upsection. Common facies observed include in situ A. palmata and/or rubble, with a trend of reduction in algal encrustation upsection, capped by head corals and a regressive beach unit. The structure and composition of reefs preserved in the Falmouth Formation provide detailed information about sea-level behavior during MIS 5e, that will be used to test the hypothesis that sub-orbital sea-level oscillations occurred during the MIS 5e highstand. Evidence of tectonic activity along portions of the northern

  1. Model independent evidence for dark energy evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A

    2014-01-01

    Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) allow us to determine the expansion history of the Universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAO's in the SDSS DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of $H(z)$ at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model independent manner by means of an improved version of the $Om$ diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of $H(z) = 222 \\pm 7$ km/sec/Mpc at $z = 2.34$, when taken in tandem with measurements of $H(z)$ at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic $Omh^2$ from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely $Omh^2 \\approx 0.122 \\pm 0.01$, which is equivalent to $\\Omega_{0m}h^2$ for the spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM model, is in tension with the value $\\Omega_{0m}h^2 = 0.1426 \\pm 0.0025$ determined for $\\Lambda$CDM from P...

  2. MODEL-INDEPENDENT EVIDENCE FOR DARK ENERGY EVOLUTION FROM BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahni, V. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Shafieloo, A. [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Starobinsky, A. A., E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: arman@apctp.org, E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh {sup 2} from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh {sup 2} ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  3. Learning About Time Within the Spinal Cord II: Evidence that Temporal Regularity is Encoded by a Spinal Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Hsien Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available How a stimulus impacts spinal cord function depends upon temporal relations. When intermittent noxious stimulation (shock is applied and the interval between shock pulses is varied (unpredictable, it induces a lasting alteration that inhibits adaptive learning. If the same stimulus is applied in a temporally regular (predictable manner, the capacity to learn is preserved and a protective/restorative effect is engaged that counters the adverse effect of variable stimulation. Sensitivity to temporal relations implies a capacity to encode time. This study explores how spinal neurons discriminate variable and fixed spaced stimulation. Communication with the brain was blocked by means of a spinal transection and adaptive capacity was tested using an instrumental learning task. In this task, subjects must learn to maintain a hind limb in a flexed position to minimize shock exposure. To evaluate the possibility that a distinct class of afferent fibers provide a sensory cue for regularity, we manipulated the temporal relation between shocks given to two dermatomes (leg and tail. Evidence for timing emerged when the stimuli were applied in a coherent manner across dermatomes, implying that a central (spinal process detects regularity. Next, we show that fixed spaced stimulation has a restorative effect when half the physical stimuli are randomly omitted, as long as the stimuli remain in phase, suggesting that stimulus regularity is encoded by an internal oscillator Research suggests that the oscillator that drives the tempo of stepping depends upon neurons within the rostral lumbar (L1-L2 region. Disrupting communication with the L1-L2 tissue by means of a L3 transection eliminated the restorative effect of fixed spaced stimulation. Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed.

  4. Cortical oscillations in auditory perception and speech: evidence for two temporal windows in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan eLuo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds, including vocal communication sounds, contain critical information at multiple time scales. Two essential temporal modulation rates in speech have been argued to be in the low gamma band (~20-80 ms duration information and the theta band (~150-300 ms, corresponding to segmental and syllabic modulation rates, respectively. On one hypothesis, auditory cortex implements temporal integration using time constants closely related to these values. The neural correlates of a proposed dual temporal window mechanism in human auditory cortex remain poorly understood. We recorded MEG responses from participants listening to non-speech auditory stimuli with different temporal structures, created by concatenating frequency-modulated segments of varied segment durations. We show that these non-speech stimuli with temporal structure matching speech-relevant scales (~25 ms and ~200 ms elicit reliable phase tracking in the corresponding associated oscillatory frequencies (low gamma and theta bands. In contrast, stimuli with non-matching temporal structure do not. Furthermore, the topography of theta band phase tracking shows rightward lateralization while gamma band phase tracking occurs bilaterally. The results support the hypothesis that there exists multi-time resolution processing in cortex on discontinuous scales and provide evidence for an asymmetric organization of temporal analysis (asymmetrical sampling in time, AST. The data argue for a macroscopic-level neural mechanism underlying multi-time resolution processing: the sliding and resetting of intrinsic temporal windows on privileged time scales.

  5. Evidence of 1122 Hz X-ray burst oscillations from the neutron star X-ray transient XTE J1739-285

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaaret, P.; Prieskorn, Z.; in 't Zand, J.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on millisecond variability from the X-ray transient XTE J1739-285. We detected six X-ray type I bursts and found evidence for oscillations at 1122 +/- 0.3 Hz in the brightest X-ray burst. Taking into consideration the power in the oscillations and the number of trials in the search, the...... ranging from 757 to 862 Hz. Using the brightest burst, we derive an upper limit on the source distance of about 10.6 kpc....

  6. Inositol trisphosphate and calcium signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate is a second messenger that controls many cellular processes by generating internal calcium signals. It operates through receptors whose molecular and physiological properties closely resemble the calcium-mobilizing ryanodine receptors of muscle. This family of intracellular calcium channels displays the regenerative process of calcium-induced calcium release responsible for the complex spatiotemporal patterns of calcium waves and oscillations. Such a dynamic signalling pathway controls many cellular processes, including fertilization, cell growth, transformation, secretion, smooth muscle contraction, sensory perception and neuronal signalling.

  7. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  8. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco;

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evidence of critical gate voltage oscillations in 1.7 kV/1 kA Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) power modules under short circuit conditions. A 6 kA/1.1 kV Non-Destructive Test (NDT) set up for repeatable short circuit tests has been built with a 40 nH stray inducta...

  9. Sodium-calcium exchanger and R-type Ca(2+) channels mediate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortus, Stepan; Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Forostyak, Oksana; Zapotocky, Martin; Ueta, Yoichi; Sykova, Eva; Chvatal, Alexandr; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2016-06-01

    Isolated supraoptic neurones generate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in isolated conditions. Here we report in depth analysis of the contribution of plasmalemmal ion channels (Ca(2+), Na(+)), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), intracellular Ca(2+) release channels (InsP3Rs and RyRs), Ca(2+) storage organelles, plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump and intracellular signal transduction cascades into spontaneous Ca(2+) activity. While removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or incubation with non-specific voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) blocker Cd(2+) suppressed the oscillations, neither Ni(2+) nor TTA-P2, the T-type VGCC blockers, had an effect. Inhibitors of VGCC nicardipine, ω-conotoxin GVIA, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, ω-agatoxin IVA (for L-, N-, P and P/Q-type channels, respectively) did not affect [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. In contrast, a specific R-type VGCC blocker SNX-482 attenuated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. Incubation with TTX had no effect, whereas removal of the extracellular Na(+) or application of an inhibitor of the reverse operation mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger KB-R7943 blocked the oscillations. The mitochondrial uncoupler CCCP irreversibly blocked spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i activity. Exposure of neurones to Ca(2+) mobilisers (thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, caffeine and ryanodine); 4-aminopyridine (A-type K(+) current blocker); phospholipase C and adenylyl cyclase pathways blockers U-73122, Rp-cAMP, SQ-22536 and H-89 had no effect. Oscillations were blocked by GABA, but not by glutamate, apamin or dynorphin. In conclusion, spontaneous oscillations in magnocellular neurones are mediated by a concerted action of R-type Ca(2+) channels and the NCX fluctuating between forward and reverse modes.

  10. Evidence for the Role of Calcineurin in Morphogenesis and Calcium Homeostasis during Mycelium-to-Yeast Dimorphism of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Claudia B. L.; Di Benedette, Joao Paulo T.; Morais, Flavia V.; Ovalle, Rafael; Nobrega, Marina P.

    2008-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that causes paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent human deep mycosis in Latin America. The dimorphic transition from mycelium to yeast (M-Y) is triggered by a temperature shift from 25°C to 37°C and is critical for pathogenicity. Intracellular Ca2+ levels increased in hyphae immediately after temperature-induced dimorphism. The chelation of Ca2+ with extracellular (EGTA) or intracellular (BAPTA) calcium chelators inhibited temperature-induced dimorphism, whereas the addition of extracellular Ca2+ accelerated dimorphism. The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA), but not tacrolimus (FK506), effectively decreased cell growth, halted the M-Y transition that is associated with virulence, and caused aberrant growth morphologies for all forms of P. brasiliensis. The difference between CsA and FK506 was ascribed by the higher levels of cyclophilins contrasted to FKBPs, the intracellular drug targets required for calcineurin suppression. Chronic exposure to CsA abolished intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and decreased mRNA transcription of the CCH1 gene for the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel in yeast-form cells. CsA had no detectable effect on multidrug resistance efflux pumps, while the effect of FK506 on rhodamine excretion was not correlated with the transition to yeast form. In this study, we present evidence that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin controls hyphal and yeast morphology, M-Y dimorphism, growth, and Ca2+ homeostasis in P. brasiliensis and that CsA is an effective chemical block for thermodimorphism in this organism. The effects of calcineurin inhibitors on P. brasiliensis reinforce the therapeutic potential of these drugs in a combinatory approach with antifungal drugs to treat endemic paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:18776037

  11. Evidence for Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in the Recurrent Emission from Magnetars and their Implications on the Neutron Star Properties and Equation of State

    CERN Document Server

    El-Mezeini, Ahmed M

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of highly magnetized neutron stars "magnetars", in search for high frequency oscillations in the recurrent emission from the soft gamma repeater SGR 1806-20, and we discuss the physical interpretation of these oscillations and its implications on the neutron star properties and structure. We present evidence for Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the recurrent outburst activity from SGR 1806-20 using RXTE observations. By searching for timing signals at the frequencies of the QPOs discovered in the 2004 December 27 giant flare from the source, we find three QPOs at 84, 103, and 648 Hz in three different bursts. The first two QPOs lie within 8.85% and 11.83%, respectively, from the 92 Hz QPO detected in the giant flare. The third QPO lie within 3.75% from the 625 Hz QPO also detected in the same flare. The detected QPOs are found in bursts with different durations, morphologies, and brightness, and are vindicated by Monte Carlo simulations. We also find evidence for candidate QPOs at ...

  12. Cerebellar network plasticity: from genes to fast oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Servais, L; Dan, B

    2008-04-22

    The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized not only in motor control but in sensory, cognitive and emotional learning and regulation. Purkinje cells, being the sole output from the cerebellar cortex, occupy an integrative position in this network. Plasticity at this level is known to critically involve calcium signaling. In the last few years, electrophysiological study of genetically engineered mice has demonstrated the topical role of several genes encoding calcium-binding proteins (calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin). Specific inactivation of these genes results in the emergence of a fast network oscillation (ca. 160 Hz) throughout the cerebellar cortex in alert animals, associated with ataxia. This oscillation is produced by synchronization of Purkinje cells along the parallel fiber beam. It behaves as an electrophysiological arrest rhythm, being blocked by sensorimotor stimulation. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the oscillation is blocked by GABA(A) and NMDA antagonists as well as gap junction blockers. This cerebellar network oscillation has also been documented in mouse models of human conditions with complex developmental cerebellar dysfunction, such as Angelman syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a relationship between fast oscillation and cerebellar long term depression (LTD). This may have major implications for future therapeutic targeting.

  13. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Krishna; Douglas, Sophie; Parekh, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU) but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  14. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Samanta

    Full Text Available Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  15. Evidence for the role of the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation and the ocean heat uptake in hiatus prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Antonello; Triacca, Umberto; Attanasio, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The recent hiatus in global temperature at the surface has been analysed by several studies, mainly using global climate models. The common accepted picture is that since the late 1990s, the increase in anthropogenic radiative forcings has been counterbalanced by other factors, e.g., a decrease in natural forcings, augmented ocean heat storage and negative phases of ocean-atmosphere-coupled oscillation patterns. Here, simple vector autoregressive models are used for forecasting the temperature hiatus in the period 2001-2014. This gives new insight into the problem of understanding the ocean contribution (in terms of heat uptake and atmosphere-ocean-coupled oscillations) to the appearance of this recent hiatus. In particular, considering data about the ocean heat content until a depth of 700 m and the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation is necessary for correctly forecasting the hiatus, so catching both trend and interannual variability. Our models also show that the ocean heat uptake is substantially driven by the natural component of the total radiative forcing at a decadal time scale, confining the importance of the anthropogenic influences to a longer range warming of the ocean.

  16. Glucose-stimulated calcium dynamics in islets of Langerhans in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    Full Text Available In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future.

  17. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 4: Alpha blockers v calcium blockers to increase spontaneous passage of renal calculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexander; Ferguson, Craig

    2013-02-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish the administration of an alpha-1 receptor antagonist or a calcium channel blocker would facilitate the most rapid and successful expulsion of a stone from a patient with uncomplicated renal colic. 597 articles were found using the reported search, of which five trials were selected as providing the best evidence to answer this question. The authors, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. It is concluded that in a patient with an uncomplicated ureteric calculus tamsulosin is more effective than nifedipine in promoting speedy and successful expulsion of the stone.

  18. The epileptic thalamocortical network is a macroscopic self-sustained oscillator: evidence from frequency-locking experiments in rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, J L Perez; Erra, R Guevara; Rosenblum, M

    2015-02-12

    The rhythmic activity observed in nervous systems, in particular in epilepsies and Parkinson's disease, has often been hypothesized to originate from a macroscopic self-sustained neural oscillator. However, this assumption has not been tested experimentally. Here we support this viewpoint with in vivo experiments in a rodent model of absence seizures, by demonstrating frequency locking to external periodic stimuli and finding the characteristic Arnold tongue. This result has important consequences for developing methods for the control of brain activity, such as seizure cancellation.

  19. Prolonged Diuretic Activity and Calcium-Sparing Effect of Tropaeolum majus: Evidence in the Prevention of Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Neris Barboza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies indicate high effectiveness in the use of the hydroethanolic extract from Tropaeolum majus (HETM as a diuretic, the impact of its prolonged use in the presence of low estrogen levels remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the diuretic effects of prolonged administration of HETM in ovariectomized rats and their interrelationship between calcium excretion and bone turnover. Forty-two female Wistar rats were ovariectomized (OVX and treated orally with different doses of HETM (3, 30, and 300 mg/kg for 4 weeks. On the first day of treatment and at weekly intervals for four weeks the diuretic activity was evaluated. Electrolyte concentrations and creatinine levels were estimated from urine sample of each rat. The serum lipids, urea, creatinine, and osteocalcin were also measured at the end of the experiment. The data revealed that the HETM was able to sustain its diuretic effect after prolonged treatment. Moreover, its use has not affected the urinary calcium or potassium excretion, reduces lipid levels, and maintains osteocalcin levels similarly to untreated rats. These findings support the potential of HETM as a candidate to be used in clinical conditions in which the renal loss of calcium is not desired.

  20. Prolonged Diuretic Activity and Calcium-Sparing Effect of Tropaeolum majus: Evidence in the Prevention of Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Lorena Neris; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Dalsenter, Paulo Roberto; Gasparotto, Francielly Mourão; Gasparotto, Francielli; Jacomassi, Ezilda; Araújo, Valdinei de Oliveira; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies indicate high effectiveness in the use of the hydroethanolic extract from Tropaeolum majus (HETM) as a diuretic, the impact of its prolonged use in the presence of low estrogen levels remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the diuretic effects of prolonged administration of HETM in ovariectomized rats and their interrelationship between calcium excretion and bone turnover. Forty-two female Wistar rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated orally with different doses of HETM (3, 30, and 300 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. On the first day of treatment and at weekly intervals for four weeks the diuretic activity was evaluated. Electrolyte concentrations and creatinine levels were estimated from urine sample of each rat. The serum lipids, urea, creatinine, and osteocalcin were also measured at the end of the experiment. The data revealed that the HETM was able to sustain its diuretic effect after prolonged treatment. Moreover, its use has not affected the urinary calcium or potassium excretion, reduces lipid levels, and maintains osteocalcin levels similarly to untreated rats. These findings support the potential of HETM as a candidate to be used in clinical conditions in which the renal loss of calcium is not desired. PMID:25028592

  1. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  2. Investigating the Long-term Variability of 4U1705-44; Evidence for an Underlying Nonlinear Double-Welled Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, Rebecca; Boyd, Patricia T.; Smale, Alan P.

    2016-04-01

    The bright low-mass X-ray binary 4U1705-44 exhibits long-term semi-periodic variability with a timescale of several hundred days. The All-Sky Monitor (ASM) aboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Japanese X-ray All-Sky Monitor (MAXI) aboard the International Space Station together have continuously observed the source from December 1995 through the present. The combined ASM-MAXI data provides a continuous time series over fifty times the length of the timescale of interest. The phase space embedding of the flux versus its first derivative shows a strong resemblance to a double-welled nonlinear oscillator. When comparing our time series against well-known nonlinear oscillators, we find that 4U1705-44 exhibits behavior akin to the Duffing oscillator. Topological analysis can help us identify ‘fingerprints’ in the phase space of a system unique to its equations of motion. If such ‘fingerprints’ are the same between two systems, then their equations of motion must be closely related. We therefore found a range of parameters for which the Duffing oscillator closely follows the time evolution of 4U1705-44 and from this range chose 6 different numerical Duffing time series. We can extract low-period, unstable periodic orbits from both the 4U1705-44 and numerical Duffing time series and compare their topological information in phase space, such as their relative rotation rates. We argue that the associated period-1 orbit in 4U1705-44 has a period between 130 and 170 days. The driving periods of our 6 numerical time series correspond to 140 to 175 days. Assigning a logical sequence name to each orbit, the relative rotation rates can be compiled into a unique ‘intertwining’ matrix. The numerical Duffing time series and the 4U1705-44 intertwining matrices are identical, which provides strong evidence that they share the same underlying template. The implications of this equivalence suggests that we can look to the Duffing equation to describe the X

  3. Genetic Evidence for Possible Involvement of the Calcium Channel Gene CACNA1A in Autism Pathogenesis in Chinese Han Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent studies suggested that calcium channel genes might be involved in the genetic etiology of ASD. CACNA1A, encoding an alpha-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channel, has been reported to play an important role in neural development. Previous study detected that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in CACNA1A confers risk to ASD in Central European population. However, the genetic relationship between autism and CACNA1A in Chinese Han population remains unclear. To explore the association of CACNA1A with autism, we performed a family-based association study. First, we carried out a family-based association test between twelve tagged SNPs and autism in 239 trios. To further confirm the association, the sample size was expanded to 553 trios by recruiting 314 additional trios. In a total of 553 trios, we identified association of rs7249246 and rs12609735 with autism though this would not survive after Bonferroni correction. Our findings suggest that CACNA1A might play a role in the etiology of autism.

  4. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2005-07-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium oscillations in vivo (10-20/h). The expression of calcium transients is up regulated during pupal development. Although the ability to generate transients is a property intrinsic to Kenyon cells, transients can be modulated by bath application of nicotine and GABA. Calcium transients are blocked, and baseline calcium levels reduced, by removal of external calcium, addition of cobalt, or addition of Plectreurys toxin (PLTX), an insect-specific calcium channel antagonist. Transients do not require calcium release from intracellular stores. Whole cell recordings reveal that the majority of voltage-gated calcium channels in Kenyon cells are PLTX-sensitive. Together these data show that influx of calcium through PLTX-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels mediates spontaneous calcium transients and regulates basal calcium levels in cultured Kenyon cells. The data also suggest that these calcium transients represent cellular events underlying calcium oscillations in the intact mushroom bodies. However, spontaneous calcium transients are not unique to Kenyon cells as they are present in approximately 60% of all cultured central brain neurons. This suggests the calcium transients play a more general role in maturation or function of adult brain neurons.

  5. Hydrological evidence for a North Atlantic oscillation during the Little Ice Age outside its range observed since 1850

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín-Puertas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An annual-resolved precipitation reconstruction for the last 800 yr in Southern Spain has been performed using stable carbon isotope (δ13C of Pinus nigra tree rings. The reconstruction exhibits high- to low-frequency variability and distinguishes a Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1350–1850 characterized by lower averaged rainfall than both in the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the LIA and in the 20th century. The driest conditions are recorded during the Maunder solar Minimum (mid 17th–early 18th centuries, in good agreement with the Spanish documentary archive. Similar linkage between solar activity (maximum/minimum and precipitation (increase/decrease is observed throughout the entire LIA. Additionally, the relationship between the hydrological pattern in the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco during the LIA suggests different spatial distribution of precipitation in the south-eastern sector of the North Atlantic region such as it is known currently. Whereas in the instrumental record the precipitation evolves similarly in both regions and opposite to the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO index, the coldest periods of the LIA shows a contrasting pattern with drier conditions in the South of Spain and wetter in Northern Africa. We suggest an extreme negative NAO conditions, accompanied by a southward excursion of the winter rainfall band beyond that observed in the last century, can explain this contrast. The sustained NAO conditions could have been triggered by solar minima and higher volcanic activity during the LIA.

  6. Presence of a thapsigargin-sensitive calcium pump in Trypanosoma evansi: Immunological, physiological, molecular and structural evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gordones, M C; Serrano, M L; Rojas, H; Martínez, J C; Uzcanga, G; Mendoza, M

    2015-12-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) is characterized for its high sensitivity to low concentrations of thapsigargin (TG), a very specific inhibitor. In contrast, SERCA-like enzymes with different sensitivities to TG have been reported in trypanosomatids. Here, we characterized a SERCA-like enzyme from Trypanosoma evansi and evaluated its interaction with TG. Confocal fluorescence microscopy using BODIPY FL TG and specific anti-SERCA antibodies localized the T. evansi SERCA-like enzyme in the ER and confirmed its direct interaction with TG. Moreover, the use of either 1 μM TG or 25 μM 2',5'-di (tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone prevented the reuptake of Ca(2+) and consequently produced a small increase in the parasite cytosolic calcium concentration in a calcium-free medium, which was released from the ER pool. A 3035 bp-sequence coding for a protein with an estimated molecular mass of 110.2 kDa was cloned from T. evansi. The corresponding gene product contained all the invariant residues and conserved motifs found in other P-type ATPases but lacked the calmodulin binding site. Modeling of the three-dimensional structure of the parasite enzyme revealed that the amino acid changes found in the TG-SERCA binding pocket do not compromise the interaction between the enzyme and the inhibitor. Therefore, we concluded that T. evansi possesses a SERCA-like protein that is inhibited by TG.

  7. The first evidence for multiple pulsation axes: a new rapidly oscillating Ap star in the Kepler field, KIC 10195926

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtz, Donald W.; Cunha, Margarida S.; Saio, H.;

    2011-01-01

    model that these two modes cannot have the same axis of pulsation. This is the first time for any pulsating star that evidence has been found for separate pulsation axes for different modes. The two modes are separated in frequency by 55 μHz, which we model as the large separation. The star is an α2 CVn...... to these values that reproduces the rotational variations of the two obliquely pulsating modes with different pulsation axes. The star shows overabundances of the rare earth elements, but these are not as extreme as most other roAp stars. The spectrum is variable with rotation, indicating surface abundance...

  8. Differences between CO- and calcium triplet-derived velocity dispersions in spiral galaxies: evidence for central star formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Riffel, Rogemar A; Mason, Rachel; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Martins, Lucimara; Riffel, Rogerio; Diaz, Ruben; Colina, Luis; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Flohic, Helene; Martin, Omaira Gonzalez; Lira, Paulina; McDermid, Richard; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Schiavon, Ricardo; Thanjavur, Karun; Dutra, Daniel Ruschel; Winge, Claudia; Perlman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We examine the stellar velocity dispersions (sigma) of a sample of 48 galaxies, 35 of which are spirals, from the Palomar nearby galaxy survey. It is known that for ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and merger remnants thesigma derived from the near-infrared CO band-heads is smaller than that measured from optical lines, while no discrepancy between these measurements is found for early-type galaxies. No such studies are available for spiral galaxies - the subject of this paper. We used cross-dispersed spectroscopic data obtained with the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph (GNIRS), with spectral coverage from 0.85 to 2.5um, to obtain sigma measurements from the 2.29 $\\mu$m CO band-heads (sigma_{CO}), and the 0.85 um calcium triplet (sigma_{CaT}). For the spiral galaxies in the sample, we found that sigma_{CO} is smaller than sigma_{CaT}, with a mean fractional difference of 14.3%. The best fit to the data is given by sigma_{opt} = (46.0+/-18.1) + (0.85+/-0.12)sigma_{CO}. This "sigma discrepancy" may be...

  9. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not help. Always tell your provider and pharmacist if you are taking extra calcium. Calcium supplements ... 2012:chap 251. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF). Clinician's Guide to prevention and treatment of osteoporosis . National ...

  10. Meixner oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atakishiyev, N.M. [Instituto de Matematicas. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Jafarov, E.I.; Nagiyev, S.M. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences. Baku, Azerbaijan (Azerbaijan); Wolf, K.B. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y en Sistemas. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    1998-10-01

    Meixner oscillators have a ground state and an energy spectrum that is equally spaced; they are a two-parameter family of models that satisfy a Hamiltonian equation with a difference operator. Meixner oscillators include as limits and particular cases the Charlier, Kravchuk and Hermite (common quantum-mechanical) harmonic oscillators. By the Sommerfeld-Watson transformation they are also related with a relativistic model of the linear harmonic oscillator, built in terms of the Meixner-Pollaczek polynomials, and their continuous weight function. We construct explicitly the corresponding coherent states with the dynamical symmetry group Sp(2,R). The reproducing kernel for the wavefunctions of these models is also found. (Author)

  11. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  12. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  13. Glucose-stimulated oscillations in free cytosolic ATP concentration imaged in single islet beta-cells: evidence for a Ca2+-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-02-01

    Normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is pulsatile, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this pulsatility are poorly understood. Oscillations in the intracellular free [ATP]/[ADP] ratio represent one possible mechanism because they would be expected to cause fluctuations in ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activity and hence oscillatory Ca(2+) influx. After imaging recombinant firefly luciferase, expressed via an adenoviral vector in single human or mouse islet beta-cells, we report here that cytosolic free ATP concentrations oscillate and that these oscillations are affected by glucose. In human beta-cells, oscillations were observed at both 3 and 15 mmol/l glucose, but the oscillations were of a longer wavelength at the higher glucose concentration (167 vs. 66 s). Mouse beta-cells displayed oscillations in both cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] only at elevated glucose concentrations, both with a period of 120 s. To explore the causal relationship between [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] oscillations, the regulation of each was further investigated in populations of MIN6 beta-cells. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free medium lowered cytosolic [Ca(2+)] but increased [ATP] in MIN6 cells at both 3 and 30 mmol/l glucose. Removal of external Ca(2+) increased [ATP], possibly by decreasing ATP consumption by endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases. These results allow a model to be constructed of the beta-cell metabolic oscillator that drives nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

  14. Oscillations of a chemical garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleone, J.; Toth, A.; Horvath, D.; Rother McMahan, J.; Smith, R.; Butki, D.; Braden, J.; Mathews, E.; Geri, H.; Maselko, J.

    2008-04-01

    When soluble metal salts are placed in a silicate solution, chemical gardens grow. These gardens are treelike structures formed of long, thin, hollow tubes. Here we study one particular case: a calcium nitrate pellet in a solution of sodium trisilicate. We observe that tube growth results from a relaxation oscillation. The average period and the average growth rate are approximately constant for most of the structures growth. The period does fluctuate from cycle to cycle, with the oscillation amplitude proportional to the period. Based on our observations, we develop a model of the relaxation oscillations which calculates the average oscillation period and the average tube radius in terms of fundamental membrane parameters. We also propose a model for the average tube growth rate. Predictions are made for future experiments.

  15. [Ca2+]i oscillations in ASM: relationship with persistent airflow obstruction in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, David; Hollins, Fay; Gomez, Edith; Saunders, Ruth; Challiss, R A John; Brightling, Christopher E

    2014-07-01

    The cause of airway smooth muscle (ASM) hypercontractility in asthma is not fully understood. The relationship of spontaneous intracellular calcium oscillation frequency in ASM to asthma severity was investigated. Oscillations were increased in subjects with impaired lung function abolished by extracellular calcium removal, attenuated by caffeine and unaffected by verapamil or nitrendipine. Whether modulation of increased spontaneous intracellular calcium oscillations in ASM from patients with impaired lung function represents a therapeutic target warrants further investigation.

  16. Oscillate Boiling

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Fenfang; Nguyen, Dang Minh; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We report about an intriguing boiling regime occurring for small heaters embedded on the boundary in subcooled water. The microheater is realized by focusing a continuous wave laser beam to about $10\\,\\mu$m in diameter onto a 165\\,nm-thick layer of gold, which is submerged in water. After an initial vaporous explosion a single bubble oscillates continuously and repeatably at several $100\\,$kHz. The microbubble's oscillations are accompanied with bubble pinch-off leading to a stream of gaseous bubbles into the subcooled water. The self-driven bubble oscillation is explained with a thermally kicked oscillator caused by the non-spherical collapses and by surface pinning. Additionally, Marangoni stresses induce a recirculating streaming flow which transports cold liquid towards the microheater reducing diffusion of heat along the substrate and therefore stabilizing the phenomenon to many million cycles. We speculate that this oscillate boiling regime may allow to overcome the heat transfer thresholds observed dur...

  17. Interaction-induced quantum phase revivals and evidence for the transition to the quantum chaotic regime in 1D atomic Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Kirilov, E; Lauber, K; Weinmann, P; Gröbner, M; Nägerl, H-C

    2014-05-16

    We study atomic Bloch oscillations in an ensemble of one-dimensional tilted superfluids in the Bose-Hubbard regime. For large values of the tilt, we observe interaction-induced coherent decay and matter-wave quantum phase revivals of the Bloch oscillating ensemble. We analyze the revival period dependence on interactions by means of a Feshbach resonance. When reducing the value of the tilt, we observe the disappearance of the quasiperiodic phase revival signature towards an irreversible decay of Bloch oscillations, indicating the transition from regular to quantum chaotic dynamics.

  18. Characterization of T cell mutants with defects in capacitative calcium entry: genetic evidence for the physiological roles of CRAC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, C M; Hoth, M; Crabtree, G R; Lewis, R S

    1995-11-01

    Prolonged Ca2+ influx is an essential signal for the activation of T lymphocytes by antigen. This influx is thought to occur through highly selective Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels that are activated by the depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. We have isolated mutants of the Jurkat human T cell line NZdipA to explore the molecular mechanisms that underlie capacitative Ca2+ entry and to allow a genetic test of the functions of CRAC channels in T cells. Five mutant cell lines (CJ-1 through CJ-5) were selected based on their failure to express a lethal diphtheria toxin A chain gene and a lacZ reporter gene driven by NF-AT, a Ca(2+)- and protein kinase C-dependent transcription factor. The rate of Ca2+ influx evoked by thapsigargin was reduced to varying degrees in the mutant cells whereas the dependence of NF-AT/lacZ gene transcription on [Ca2+]i was unaltered, suggesting that the transcriptional defect in these cells is caused by a reduced level of capacitative Ca2+ entry. We examined several factors that determine the rate of Ca2+ entry, including CRAC channel activity, K(+)-channel activity, and Ca2+ clearance mechanisms. The only parameter found to be dramatically altered in most of the mutant lines was the amplitude of the Ca2+ current (ICRAC), which ranged from 1 to 41% of that seen in parental control cells. In each case, the severity of the ICRAC defect was closely correlated with deficits in Ca2+ influx rate and Ca(2-)-dependent gene transcription. Behavior of the mutant cells provides genetic evidence for several roles of ICRAC in T cells. First, mitogenic doses of ionomycin appear to elevate [Ca2+]i primarily by activating CRAC channels. Second, ICRAC promotes the refilling of empty Ca2+ stores. Finally, CRAC channels are solely responsible for the Ca2+ influx that underlies antigen-mediated T cell activation. These mutant cell lines may provide a useful system for isolating, expressing, and exploring the functions of genes involved in

  19. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits.

  20. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical–Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13–30 Hz) and gamma (30–90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30–90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits. PMID:25987642

  1. Protein intake and calcium absorption – Potential role of the calcium sensor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary protein induces calcium excretion but the source of this calcium is unclear. Evidence from short-term studies indicates that protein promotes bone resorption, but many epidemiologic studies do not corroborate this. Evidence is also mixed on weather protein promotes calcium absorption. Stud...

  2. Noise-Induced Bursting and Coherence Resonance in Minimal Cytosolic Ca2+ Oscillation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Ya; YANG Li-Jian; WU Dan; LIU Quan; ZHAN Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A stochastic calcium oscillation model based on the minimal calcium oscillation model is investigated by numerical computation. When the extracellular stimulation is sub-threshold and random, the oscillations of cytosolic calcium show complex behaviour: a bursting-like phenomenon induced by noise, that is, the phase of glomerate spikes are separated by phase of quiescence (but fluctuations in the baseline values of calcium with small amplitude during the silent phase), in a pattern that occurs at irregular inter,ls. By using the histogram of interspike intervals of calcium concentration spikes, it is found that the noise-induced coherence resonance phenomenon occurs at the cellular level.

  3. Oscillation death in coupled oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZOU; Xin-gang WANG; Qi ZHAO; Meng ZHAN

    2009-01-01

    We study dynamical behaviors in coupled nonlinear oscillators and find that under certain condi- tions, a whole coupled oscillator system can cease oscil- lation and transfer to a globally nonuniform stationary state [I.e., the so-called oscillation death (OD) state], and this phenomenon can be generally observed. This OD state depends on coupling strengths and is clearly differ- ent from previously studied amplitude death (AD) state, which refers to the phenomenon where the whole system is trapped into homogeneously steady state of a fixed point, which already exists but is unstable in the ab- sence of coupling. For larger systems, very rich pattern structures of global death states are observed. These Turing-like patterns may share some essential features with the classical Turing pattern.

  4. Neutrino Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bellini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, a very important breakthrough has been brought about in the elementary particle physics by the discovery of the phenomenon of the neutrino oscillations, which has shown neutrino properties beyond the Standard Model. But a full understanding of the various aspects of the neutrino oscillations is far to be achieved. In this paper the theoretical background of the neutrino oscillation phenomenon is described, referring in particular to the paradigmatic models. Then the various techniques and detectors which studied neutrinos from different sources are discussed, starting from the pioneering ones up to the detectors still in operation and to those in preparation. The physics results are finally presented adopting the same research path which has been crossed by this long saga. The problems not yet fixed in this field are discussed, together with the perspectives of their solutions in the near future.

  5. Evidence of calcium-dependent pathway in the regulation of human beta1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-1 (GlcAT-I) gene expression: a key enzyme in proteoglycan synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Lydia; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Magdalou, Jacques; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2006-08-01

    The importance of heparan- and chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycans in physiological and pathological processes led to the investigation of the regulation of beta1,3-glucuronosyltransferase I (GlcAT-I), responsible for the completion of glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage tetrasaccharide, a key step prior to polymerization of chondroitin- and heparan-sulfate chains. We have cloned and functionally characterized GlcAT-I 5'-flanking regulatory region. Mutation analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated the importance of Sp1 motif located at -65/-56 position in promoter activity. Furthermore, we found that elevation of intracellular calcium concentration by the calcium ionophore ionomycin stimulated GlcAT-I gene expression as well as glycosaminoglycan chain synthesis in HeLa cells. Bisanthracycline, an anti-Sp1 compound, inhibited GlcAT-I basal promoter activity and suppressed ionomycin induction, suggesting the importance of Sp1 in calcium induction of GlcAT-I gene expression. Nuclear protein extracts from ionomycin-induced cells exhibited an increased DNA binding of Sp1 factor to the consensus sequence at position -65/-56. Signaling pathway analysis and MEK inhibition studies revealed the important role of p42/p44 MAPK in the stimulation of GlcAT-I promoter activity by ionomycin. The present study identifies, for the first time, GlcAT-I as a target of calcium-dependent signaling pathway and evidences the critical role of Sp1 transcription factor in the activation of GlcAT-I expression.

  6. Nonlinear oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Nayfeh, Ali Hasan

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Oscillations is a self-contained and thorough treatment of the vigorous research that has occurred in nonlinear mechanics since 1970. The book begins with fundamental concepts and techniques of analysis and progresses through recent developments and provides an overview that abstracts and introduces main nonlinear phenomena. It treats systems having a single degree of freedom, introducing basic concepts and analytical methods, and extends concepts and methods to systems having degrees of freedom. Most of this material cannot be found in any other text. Nonlinear Oscillations uses sim

  7. Antiperiodic oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Joana G.; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2013-06-01

    The investigation of regular and irregular patterns in nonlinear oscillators is an outstanding problem in physics and in all natural sciences. In general, regularity is understood as tantamount to periodicity. However, there is now a flurry of works proving the existence of ``antiperiodicity'', an unfamiliar type of regularity. Here we report the experimental observation and numerical corroboration of antiperiodic oscillations. In contrast to the isolated solutions presently known, we report infinite hierarchies of antiperiodic waveforms that can be tuned continuously and that form wide spiral-shaped stability phases in the control parameter plane. The waveform complexity increases towards the focal point common to all spirals, a key hub interconnecting them all.

  8. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D is needed to help your body use calcium. Milk is fortified with vitamin D for this reason. ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ...

  9. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  10. Prevention of bone mineral changes induced by bed rest: Modification by static compression simulating weight bearing, combined supplementation of oral calcium and phosphate, calcitonin injections, oscillating compression, the oral diophosphonatedisodium etidronate, and lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, V. S.; Hulley, S. B.; Donaldson, C. L.; Vogel, J. M.; Rosen, S. N.; Hantman, D. A.; Lockwood, D. R.; Seid, D.; Hyatt, K. H.; Jacobson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    The phenomenon of calcium loss during bed rest was found to be analogous to the loss of bone material which occurs in the hypogravic environment of space flight. Ways of preventing this occurrence are investigated. A group of healthy adult males underwent 24-30 weeks of continuous bed rest. Some of them were given an exercise program designed to resemble normal ambulatory activity; another subgroup was fed supplemental potassium phosphate. The results from a 12-week period of treatment were compared with those untreated bed rest periods. The potassium phosphate supplements prevented the hypercalciuria of bed rest, but fecal calcium tended to increase. The exercise program did not diminish the negative calcium balance. Neither treatment affected the heavy loss of mineral from the calcaneus. Several additional studies are developed to examine the problem further.

  11. Evidence for a role of intracellular stored parathyroid hormone in producing hysteresis of the PTH-calcium relationship in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Peter; Madsen, J C; Rasmussen, A Q

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the clear recognition that extracellular ionized calcium controls PTH secretion, there have been suggestions of hysteresis in the relationship between extracellular ionized calcium and PTH during recovery from induced hypo- and hypercalcaemia in vivo in humans. In this study, we...... examined the possibility that release of intracellular stored PTH during induced hypocalcaemia may explain hysteresis. VOLUNTEERS: Eleven volunteers, five women and six men, were recruited to participate in the study. DESIGN: A series of three protocols of repeated induction of hypocalcaemia or sequential...... of PTH or a markedly blunted peak. Thus, the PTH response during the initial induction of and the first recovery from hypocalcaemia in our protocol 3 showed significant hysteresis in the relationship between blood ionized calcium and PTH (P

  12. Intermittency and lifetime of the 625 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation in the 2004 hyperflare from the magnetar SGR 1806-20 as evidence for magnetic coupling between the crust and the core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1098 XH (Netherlands); Levin, Yuri, E-mail: d.huppenkothen@uva.nl [Monash Center for Astrophysics and School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-10-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) detected in the 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 are often interpreted as global magneto-elastic oscillations of the neutron star. There is, however, a large discrepancy between theoretical models, which predict that the highest frequency oscillations should die out rapidly, and the observations, which suggested that the highest-frequency signals persisted for ∼100 s in X-ray data from two different spacecraft. This discrepancy is particularly important for the high-frequency QPO at ∼625 Hz. However, previous analyses did not systematically test whether the signal could also be present in much shorter data segments, more consistent with the theoretical predictions. Here, we test for the presence of the high-frequency QPO at 625 Hz in data from both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) systematically both in individual rotational cycles of the neutron star, as well as averaged over multiple successive rotational cycles at the same phase. We find that the QPO in the RXTE data is consistent with being only present in a single cycle, for a short duration of ∼0.5 s, whereas the RHESSI data are as consistent with a short-lived signal that appears and disappears as with a long-lived QPO. Taken together, this data provides evidence for strong magnetic interaction between the crust and the core.

  13. [Oscillating physiotherapy for secretolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, U

    2008-03-01

    Assisted coughing and mechanical cough aids compensate for the weak cough flow in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). In cases with preserved respiratory muscles also breathing techniques and special devices, e. g., flutter or acapella can be used for secretion mobilisation during infections of the airways. These means are summarised as oscillating physiotherapy. Their mechanisms are believed to depend on separation of the mucus from the bronchial wall by vibration, thus facilitating mucus transport from the peripheral to the central airways. In mucoviscidosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease their application is established, but there is a paucity of data regarding the commitment in patients with neuromuscular diseases. The effective adoption of simple oscillation physiotherapeutic interventions demands usually a sufficient force of the respiratory muscles--exceptions are the application of the percussionaire (intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, IPV) or high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). In daily practice there is evidence that patients with weak respiratory muscles are overstrained with the use of these physiotherapeutic means, or get exhausted. A general recommendation for the adoption of simple oscillating physiotherapeutic interventions cannot be made in patients with NMDs. Perhaps in the future devices such as IPV or HFCWO will prove to be more effective in NMD patients.

  14. The ins and outs of mitochondrial calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Toren; Menazza, Sara; Holmström, Kira M; Parks, Randi J; Liu, Julia; Sun, Junhui; Liu, Jie; Pan, Xin; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2015-05-22

    Calcium is thought to play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function. Evidence suggests that an increase in mitochondrial calcium can augment ATP production by altering the activity of calcium-sensitive mitochondrial matrix enzymes. In contrast, the entry of large amounts of mitochondrial calcium in the setting of ischemia-reperfusion injury is thought to be a critical event in triggering cellular necrosis. For many decades, the details of how calcium entered the mitochondria remained a biological mystery. In the past few years, significant progress has been made in identifying the molecular components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex. Here, we review how calcium enters and leaves the mitochondria, the growing insight into the topology, stoichiometry and function of the uniporter complex, and the early lessons learned from some initial mouse models that genetically perturb mitochondrial calcium homeostasis.

  15. Evidence for the involvement of carbonic anhydrase and urease in calcium carbonate formation in the gravity-sensing organ of Aplysia californica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Dean, D. D.; Harrison, J. L.; Campbell, J. W.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms that could modulate the formation of otoconia, calcium carbonate granules in the inner ear of vertebrate species, we examined statoconia formation in the gravity-sensing organ, the statocyst, of the gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica using an in vitro organ culture model. We determined the type of calcium carbonate present in the statoconia and investigated the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and urease in regulating statocyst pH as well as the role of protein synthesis and urease in statoconia production and homeostasis in vitro. The type of mineral present in statoconia was found to be aragonitic calcium carbonate. When the CA inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZ), was added to cultures of statocysts, the pH initially (30 min) increased and then decreased. The urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), decreased statocyst pH. Simultaneous addition of AZ and AHA caused a decrease in pH. Inhibition of urease activity also reduced total statoconia number, but had no effect on statoconia volume. Inhibition of protein synthesis reduced statoconia production and increased statoconia volume. In a previous study, inhibition of CA was shown to decrease statoconia production. Taken together, these data show that urease and CA play a role in regulating statocyst pH and the formation and maintenance of statoconia. CA produces carbonate ion for calcium carbonate formation and urease neutralizes the acid formed due to CA action, by production of ammonia.

  16. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J; Seth, Tanya

    2011-12-05

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed.

  17. Physics of Neutrino Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Spandan

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes neutrinos as massless, chargeless elementary particles that come in three different flavours. However, recent experiments indicate that neutrinos not only have mass, but also have multiple mass eigenstates that are not identical to the flavour states, thereby indicating mixing. As an evidence of mixing, neutrinos have been observed to change from one flavour to another during their propagation, a phenomenon called neutrino oscillation. We have studied the reasons and derived the probabilities of neutrino flavour change, both in vacuum and in matter. We have also studied the parameters affecting this probability. We have discussed the special case of two-neutrino oscillations. Lastly, we have discussed some basic properties of neutrinos that are reflected in the previous derivations and highlighted a few relevant open problems. To begin with, we have also studied the relevant topics in introductory High Energy Physics and Quantum Mechanics to familiarize with th...

  18. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  19. Coupled oscillator model of the dopaminergic neuron of the substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C J; Callaway, J C

    2000-05-01

    Calcium imaging using fura-2 and whole cell recording revealed the effective location of the oscillator mechanism on dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, pars compacta, in slices from rats aged 15-20 days. As previously reported, dopaminergic neurons fired in a slow rhythmic single spiking pattern. The underlying membrane potential oscillation survived blockade of sodium currents with TTX and was enhanced by blockade of voltage-sensitive potassium currents with TEA. Calcium levels increased during the subthreshold depolarizing phase of the membrane potential oscillation and peaked at the onset of the hyperpolarizing phase as expected if the pacemaker potential were due to a low-threshold calcium current and the hyperpolarizing phase to calcium-dependent potassium current. Calcium oscillations were synchronous in the dendrites and soma and were greater in the dendrites than in the soma. Average calcium levels in the dendrites overshot steady-state levels and decayed over the course of seconds after the oscillation was resumed after having been halted by hyperpolarizing currents. Average calcium levels in the soma increased slowly, taking many cycles to achieve steady state. Voltage clamp with calcium imaging revealed the voltage dependence of the somatic calcium current without the artifacts of incomplete spatial voltage control. This showed that the calcium current had little or no inactivation and was half-maximal at -40 to -30 mV. The time constant of calcium removal was measured by the return of calcium to resting levels and depended on diameter. The calcium sensitivity of the calcium-dependent potassium current was estimated by plotting the slow tail current against calcium concentration during the decay of calcium to resting levels at -60 mV. A single compartment model of the dopaminergic neuron consisting of a noninactivating low-threshold calcium current, a calcium-dependent potassium current, and a small leak current reproduced most features of the

  20. Calcium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if a person has symptoms of a parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , or an overactive thyroid. A total calcium level is often measured as part of a routine health screening. It is included in the comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) and the basic metabolic panel (BMP) , ...

  1. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcium carbonate, call your doctor.

  2. High-resolution multi-proxy evidence for millennial- and centennial-scale climate oscillations during the last deglaciation in Jeju Island, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungjae; Lim, Hyoun Soo; Lim, Jaesoo; Park, Yong-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Millennial- and centennial-scale climate and vegetation changes during the last deglaciation from Hanon Maar paleolake on Jeju Island, South Korea were reconstructed by high-resolution multi-proxy data (pollen, Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetization [ARM], Total Organic Carbon [TOC], Total Nitrogen [TN], Carbon/Nitrogen [C/N] ratio, carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions (δ15N and δ13C), major element geochemistry, and sediment grain size). The resolution of our multi-proxy data was sufficiently high to enable the detection of millennial- and even centennial-scale climate change in the study area during the last deglacial transition. We found centennial-scale cold reversals between 14,650 and 12,900 cal yr BP, possibly corresponding to the Bølling-Allerød [BA] oscillations. Hanon pollen data implied that climate amelioration around 11,900 cal yr BP terminated the Younger Dryas [YD] in the study area and that a cold event around 11,300 cal yr BP probably correlated with the Pre-Boreal Oscillation [PBO] cooling event. Our results indicate that rising summer insolation and northward expanding low-latitudinal warm currents exerted a strong influence on climatological teleconnection via westerlies between the North Atlantic and the East Asian region during the last deglaciation, presumably causing a decoupling between temperature and East Asian Summer Monsoon [EASM] precipitation during the last deglaciation.

  3. Transport of calcium in seedlings and cuttings of mung bean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, W.

    1984-01-01

    At germination, a very small proportion of stored calcium is mobilized to the axis in the absence of exogenous supplies of calcium. There is no evidence for transport in phloem since exported calcium does not enter the seedling root. /sup 45/Calcium is not redistributed when applied to cotyledons at germination of leaves of seedlings. A subsequent large addition of unlabelled calcium promotes a small redistribution from leaves. Triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), applied to leaves, leads to a small reduction in calcium accumulation but does not effect redistribution. Auxin is without effect and auxin plus TIBA promotes accumulation. These results are discussed in relation to possible extracellular binding sites for calcium.

  4. Power oscillation damping controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    A power oscillation damping controller is provided for a power generation device such as a wind turbine device. The power oscillation damping controller receives an oscillation indicating signal indicative of a power oscillation in an electricity network and provides an oscillation damping control...

  5. Calcium regulation in endosymbiotic organelles of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussemer, Johanna; Vothknecht, Ute C; Chigri, Fatima

    2009-09-01

    In plant cells calcium-dependent signaling pathways are involved in a large array of biological processes in response to hormones, biotic/abiotic stress signals and a variety of developmental cues. This is generally achieved through binding of calcium to diverse calcium-sensing proteins, which subsequently control downstream events by activating or inhibiting biochemical reactions. Regulation by calcium is considered as a eukaryotic trait and has not been described for prokaryotes. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence indicating that organelles of prokaryotic origin, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria, are integrated into the calcium-signaling network of the cell. An important transducer of calcium in these organelles appears to be calmodulin. In this review we want to give an overview over present data showing that endosymbiotic organelles harbour calcium-dependent biological processes with a focus on calmodulin-regulation.

  6. Modelling the transition from simple to complex Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Manhas; James Sneyd; K R Pardasani

    2014-06-01

    A mathematical model is proposed which systematically investigates complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. This model is based on calcium-induced calcium release via inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) and includes calcium modulation of inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate (IP3) levels through feedback regulation of degradation and production. In our model, the apical and the basal regions are separated by a region containing mitochondria, which is capable of restricting Ca2+ responses to the apical region. We were able to reproduce the observed oscillatory patterns, from baseline spikes to sinusoidal oscillations. The model predicts that calcium-dependent production and degradation of IP3 is a key mechanism for complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. A partial bifurcation analysis is performed which explores the dynamic behaviour of the model in both apical and basal regions.

  7. Oscillators and Eigenvalues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1997-01-01

    In order to obtain insight in the nature of nonlinear oscillators the eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian of the differential equations describing the oscillator are found and displayed as functions of time. A number of oscillators are studied including Dewey's oscillator (piecewise linear...... with negative resistance), Kennedy's Colpitts-oscillator (with and without chaos) and a new 4'th order oscillator with hyper-chaos....

  8. Oscillating Permanent Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Haines, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several ways to partially levitate permanent magnets. Computes field line geometries and oscillation frequencies. Provides several diagrams illustrating the mechanism of the oscillation. (YP)

  9. Solar neutrinos: Oscillations or No-oscillations?

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    The Nobel prize in physics 2015 has been awarded "... for the discovery of neutrino oscillations which show that neutrinos have mass". While SuperKamiokande (SK), indeed, has discovered oscillations, SNO observed effect of the adiabatic (almost non-oscillatory) flavor conversion of neutrinos in the matter of the Sun. Oscillations are irrelevant for solar neutrinos apart from small $\

  10. Amplitudes of solar-like oscillations in red-giant stars: Evidences for non-adiabatic effects using CoRoT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Samadi, R; Dupret, M -A; Ludwig, H -G; Baudin, F; Caffau, E; Goupil, M -J; Barban, C

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of solar-like oscillations has been detected in red-giant stars thanks to CoRoT and Kepler space-crafts. The seismic data gathered by CoRoT on red-giant stars allow us to test mode driving theory in different physical conditions than main-sequence stars. Using a set of 3D hydrodynamical models representative of the upper layers of sub- and red-giant stars, we compute the acoustic modes energy supply rate (Pmax). Assuming adiabatic pulsations and using global stellar models where the surface stratification comes from the 3D hydrodynamical models, mode amplitude is computed in terms of surface velocity. The latter is then converted into intensity fluctuations using either a simplified adiabatic scaling relation or a non-adiabatic one. Given L and M (the luminosity and mass respectively), the energy supply rate Pmax is found to scale as (L/M)^(2.6) for both main-sequence and red-giant stars, extending previous results by Samadi et al. (2007). The theoretical amplitudes in velocity under-estimate...

  11. Enhanced effect of β-tricalcium phosphate phase on neovascularization of porous calcium phosphate ceramics: in vitro and in vivo evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Wang, J; Zhu, X D; Tang, Z R; Yang, X; Tan, Y F; Fan, Y J; Zhang, X D

    2015-01-01

    Neovascularization plays a key role in bone repair and regeneration. In the present study, four types of porous calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics, namely hydroxyapatite (HA), biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP-1 and BCP-2) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), with HA to β-TCP ratios of 100/0, 70/30, 30/70 and 2/98, respectively, were investigated in terms of their angiogenic induction. The in vitro cell culture revealed that the ceramics could promote proliferation and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This result could be achieved by stimulating CCD-18Co human fibroblasts to secrete angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor-β) as a paracrine effect, as well as by up-regulating HUVECs to express these angiogenic factors and their receptors (KDR, FGFR1 and ACVRL1) and the downstream eNOS as an autocrine effect. These effects were more significant in β-TCP and BCP-2, which had a higher content of β-TCP phase. In the in vivo implantation into the thigh muscles of mice, the process of neovascularization of the ceramics was initiated at 2 weeks and the mature vascular networks were formed at 4 weeks as visualized by hematoxylin and eosin staining and scanning electron microscopy. Microvessel density count confirmed that β-TCP and BCP-2 induced more microvessels to form than HA or BCP-1. This phenomenon was further confirmed by the significantly up-regulated expressions of angiogenesis-related genes in the ingrowth of cells into the inner pores of the two ceramics. All the results confirmed the angiogenic induction of porous CaP ceramics, and a higher content of β-TCP phase had an enhanced effect on the neovascularization of the ceramics.

  12. Evidence for the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and velocity reconstruction from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaan, Emmanuel; Ferraro, Simone; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Smith, Kendrick M.; Ho, Shirley; Aiola, Simone; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bond, J. Richard; De Bernardis, Francesco; Calabrese, Erminia; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn; Hill, J. Colin; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Hubmayr, Johannes; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent D.; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Li, Dale; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maurin, Loïc; McMahon, Jeffrey John; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Pappas, Christine G.; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D.; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.; ACTPol Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We use microwave temperature maps from two seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at 146 GHz, together with the "Constant Mass" CMASS galaxy sample from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to measure the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect over the redshift range z =0.4 - 0.7 . We use galaxy positions and the continuity equation to obtain a reconstruction of the line-of-sight velocity field. We stack the microwave temperature at the location of each halo, weighted by the corresponding reconstructed velocity. We vary the size of the aperture photometry filter used, thus probing the free electron profile of these halos from within the virial radius out to three virial radii, on the scales relevant for investigating the missing baryons problem. The resulting best fit kSZ model is preferred over the no-kSZ hypothesis at 3.3 and 2.9 σ for two independent velocity reconstruction methods, using 25,537 galaxies over 660 square degrees. The data suggest that the baryon profile is shallower than the dark matter in the inner regions of the halos probed here, potentially due to energy injection from active galactic nucleus or supernovae. Thus, by constraining the gas profile on a wide range of scales, this technique will be useful for understanding the role of feedback in galaxy groups and clusters. The effect of foregrounds that are uncorrelated with the galaxy velocities is expected to be well below our signal, and residual thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich contamination is controlled by masking the most massive clusters. Finally, we discuss the systematics involved in converting our measurement of the kSZ amplitude into the mean free electron fraction of the halos in our sample.

  13. Five-minute oscillations in the solar magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, A. S.; Wilcox, J. M.; Howard, R.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence for the existence of 5 min oscillations in the photospheric and low chromospheric magnetic fields is presented, their properties discussed, and a possible production mechanism suggested. It is pointed out that, because the solar magnetic field is frozen into the oscillating plasma, there are several ways in which the oscillations in the plasma (which are observed as velocity oscillations) could be transferred to the magnetic field. It is shown schematically how vertical waves could cause oscillations in a horizontal magnetic field, and how horizontal waves could cause oscillations in a vertical magnetic field.

  14. Oscillations of Eccentric Pulsons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Groenbech-Jensen, Niels; Lomdahl, Peter;

    1997-01-01

    Perturbation theory for elliptic pulsons is developed and predicts pulson and eccentricity oscillations. The pulson oscillation period is predicted qualitatively correct.......Perturbation theory for elliptic pulsons is developed and predicts pulson and eccentricity oscillations. The pulson oscillation period is predicted qualitatively correct....

  15. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  16. Quantum correlations in terms of neutrino oscillation probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh Kumar Alok; Subhashish Banerjee; Uma Sankar, S.(Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, 400076, India)

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations provide evidence for the mode entanglement of neutrino mass eigenstates in a given flavour eigenstate. Given this mode entanglement, it is pertinent to consider the relation between the oscillation probabilities and other quantum correlations. In this work, we show that all the well-known quantum correlations, such as the Bell's inequality, are directly related to the neutrino oscillation probabilities. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments, which measure t...

  17. Binding and release of brain calcium by low-level electromagnetic fields: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adey, W. R.; Bawin, S. M.

    Evidence has accumulated that sensitivity of brain tissue to specific weak oscillating electromagnetic fields occurs in the absence of significant tissue heating (less than 0.1°C). This review focuses on the ‘windowed’ character of sensitivities of calcium binding and electrical activity in brain tissue to low-frequency modulation and intensity characteristics of impressed RF fields. ELF fields decrease calcium efflux from isolated chick and cat cerebral tissue by about 15% only in narrow amplitude and frequency ‘windows,’ between 6 and 20 Hz and between 10 and 100 V/m (approximate tissue gradient, 10-7 V/cm). VHF (147 MHz) and UHF (450 MHz) fields increase calcium efflux from isolated chick brain by about 15% when amplitude modulated between 6 and 20 Hz, but only for incident fields in the vicinity of 1.0 mW/cm2. We have now shown that this increased efflux in response to 16-Hz amplitude-modulated 450-MHz, 0.75-mW/cm2 field exposure is insensitive to variations in calcium concentration from 0 to 4.16 mM in the testing solution but is enhanced by addition of hydrogen ions (0.108 mM 0.1 N HCl) and inhibited in the absence of normal bicarbonate ion levels (2.4 mM). In the presence of lanthanum ions (2.0 mM), which block transmembrane movement of calcium, exposure to these EM fields decreases the 45Ca2 + efflux. Low-frequency gradients may be transduced in a specific class of extracellular binding sites, normally occupied by calcium ions and susceptible to competitive hydrogen ion binding. Transductive coupling may involve coherent charge states between anionic sites on membrane surface glycoproteins, with longrange cooperative interactions triggered by weak extracellular electric fields. Proton ‘tunneling’ may occur at boundaries between coherent and noncoherent charge zones.

  18. Regulation Mechanisms of Stomatal Oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Min YANG; Jian-Hua ZHANG; Xiao-Yan ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Stomata function as the gates between the plant and the atmospheric environment. Stomatal movement, including stomatal opening and closing, controls CO2 absorption as the raw material for photosynthesis and water loss through transpiration. How to reduce water loss and maintain enough CO2 absorption has been an interesting research topic for some time. Simple stomatal opening may elevate CO2 absorption,but, in the meantime, promote the water loss, whereas simple closing of stomatal pores may reduce both water loss and CO2 absorption, resulting in impairment of plant photosynthesis. Both processes are not economical to the plant. As a special rhythmic stomatal movement that usually occurs at smaller stomatal apertures, stomatal oscillation can keep CO2 absorption at a sufficient level and reduce water loss at the same time, suggesting a potential improvement in water use efficiency. Stomatal oscillation is usually found after a sudden change in one environmental factor in relatively constant environments. Many environmental stimuli can induce stomatal oscillation. It appears that, at the physiological level, feedback controls are involved in stomatal oscillation. At the cellular level, possibly two different patterns exist: (i) a quicker responsive pattern; and (ii) a slower response. Both involve water potential changes and water channel regulation, but the mechanisms of regulation of the two patterns are different. Some evidence suggests that the regulation of water channels may play a vital and primary role in stomatal oscillation. The present review summarizes studies on stomatal oscillation and concludes with some discussion regarding the mechanisms of regulation of stomatal oscillation.

  19. Role of calcium in gravity perception of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium ions may play a key role in linking graviperception by the root cap to the asymmetric growth which occurs in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Application of calcium-chelating agents to the root cap inhibits gravitropic curvature without affecting growth. Asymmetric application of calcium to one side of the root cap induces curvature toward the calcium source, and gravistimulation induces polar movement of applied (Ca-45)(2+) across the root cap toward the lower side. The action of calcium may be linked to auxin movement in roots since: (1) auxin transport inhibitors interfere both with gravitropic curvature and graviinduced polar calcium movement and (2) asymmetric application of calcium enhances auxin movement across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Indirect evidence indicates that the calcium-modulated regulator protein, calmodulin, may be involved in either the transport or action of calcium in the gravitropic response mechanism of roots.

  20. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  1. Dependency of calcium alternans on ryanodine receptor refractoriness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Alvarez-Lacalle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid pacing rates induce alternations in the cytosolic calcium concentration caused by fluctuations in calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. However, the relationship between calcium alternans and refractoriness of the SR calcium release channel (RyR2 remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate how ryanodine receptor (RyR2 refractoriness modulates calcium handling on a beat-to-beat basis using a numerical rabbit cardiomyocyte model. We used a mathematical rabbit cardiomyocyte model to study the beat-to-beat calcium response as a function of RyR2 activation and inactivation. Bi-dimensional maps were constructed depicting the beat-to-beat response. When alternans was observed, a novel numerical clamping protocol was used to determine whether alternans was caused by oscillations in SR calcium loading or by RyR2 refractoriness. Using this protocol, we identified regions of RyR2 gating parameters where SR calcium loading or RyR2 refractoriness underlie the induction of calcium alternans, and we found that at the onset of alternans both mechanisms contribute. At low inactivation rates of the RyR2, calcium alternans was caused by alternation in SR calcium loading, while at low activation rates it was caused by alternation in the level of available RyR2s. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have mapped cardiomyocyte beat-to-beat responses as a function of RyR2 activation and inactivation, identifying domains where SR calcium load or RyR2 refractoriness underlie the induction of calcium alternans. A corollary of this work is that RyR2 refractoriness due to slow recovery from inactivation can be the cause of calcium alternans even when alternation in SR calcium load is present.

  2. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cart Home › Patients › Treatment › Calcium/Vitamin D Calcium/Vitamin D Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is ... the-counter medications and calcium supplements. What is Vitamin D and What Does it Do? Vitamin D ...

  3. Altered calcium signaling following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thomas Weber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell death and dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI is caused by a primary phase, related to direct mechanical disruption of the brain, and a secondary phase which consists of delayed events initiated at the time of the physical insult. Arguably, the calcium ion contributes greatly to the delayed cell damage and death after TBI. A large, sustained influx of calcium into cells can initiate cell death signaling cascades, through activation of several degradative enzymes, such as proteases and endonucleases. However, a sustained level of intracellular free calcium is not necessarily lethal, but the specific route of calcium entry may couple calcium directly to cell death pathways. Other sources of calcium, such as intracellular calcium stores, can also contribute to cell damage. In addition, calcium-mediated signal transduction pathways in neurons may be perturbed following injury. These latter types of alterations may contribute to abnormal physiology in neurons that do not necessarily die after a traumatic episode. This review provides an overview of experimental evidence that has led to our current understanding of the role of calcium signaling in death and dysfunction following TBI.

  4. Calcium wave of tubuloglomerular feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2006-08-01

    ATP release from macula densa (MD) cells into the interstitium of the juxtaglomerular (JG) apparatus (JGA) is an integral component of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism that controls the glomerular filtration rate. Because the cells of the JGA express a number of calcium-coupled purinergic receptors, these studies tested the hypothesis that TGF activation triggers a calcium wave that spreads from the MD toward distant cells of the JGA and glomerulus. Ratiometric calcium imaging of in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from rabbits was performed with fluo-4/fura red and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Activation of TGF by increasing tubular flow rate at the MD rapidly produced a significant elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in extraglomerular mesangial cells (by 187.6 +/- 45.1 nM) and JG renin granular cells (by 281.4 +/- 66.6 nM). Subsequently, cell-to-cell propagation of the calcium signal at a rate of 12.6 +/- 1.1 microm/s was observed upstream toward proximal segments of the afferent arteriole and adjacent glomeruli, as well as toward intraglomerular elements including the most distant podocytes (5.9 +/- 0.4 microm/s). The same calcium wave was observed in nonperfusing glomeruli, causing vasoconstriction and contractions of the glomerular tuft. Gap junction uncoupling, an ATP scavenger enzyme cocktail, and pharmacological inhibition of P(2) purinergic receptors, but not adenosine A(1) receptor blockade, abolished the changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and propagation of the calcium wave. These studies provided evidence that both gap junctional communication and extracellular ATP are integral components of the TGF calcium wave.

  5. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  6. Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Rajasekaran

    2000-07-01

    The phenomenology of solar, atmospheric, supernova and laboratory neutrino oscillations is described. Analytical formulae for matter effects are reviewed. The results from oscillations are confronted with neutrinoless double beta decay.

  7. Oscillating heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental fluid flow and heat transfer principles occurring in oscillating heat pipes and also provides updated developments and recent innovations in research and applications of heat pipes. Starting with fundamental presentation of heat pipes, the focus is on oscillating motions and its heat transfer enhancement in a two-phase heat transfer system. The book covers thermodynamic analysis, interfacial phenomenon, thin film evaporation,  theoretical models of oscillating motion and heat transfer of single phase and two-phase flows, primary  factors affecting oscillating motions and heat transfer,  neutron imaging study of oscillating motions in an oscillating heat pipes, and nanofluid’s effect on the heat transfer performance in oscillating heat pipes.  The importance of thermally-excited oscillating motion combined with phase change heat transfer to a wide variety of applications is emphasized. This book is an essential resource and learning tool for senior undergraduate, gradua...

  8. Oscillations in critical shearing, application to fractures in glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pralong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many evidences of oscillations accompanying the acceleration of critical systems have been reported. These oscillations are usually related to discrete scale invariance properties of the systems and exhibit a logarithmic periodicity. In this paper we propose another explanation for these oscillations in the case of shearing fracture. Using a continuum damage model, we show that oscillations emerge from the anisotropic properties of the cracks in the shearing fracture zone. These oscillations no longer exhibit a logarithmic but rather a power-law periodicity. The power-periodic oscillation is a more general formulation. Its reduces to a log-periodic oscillation when the exponent of the power-law equals one. We apply this model to fit the measured displacements of unstable ice masses of hanging glaciers for which data are available. Results show that power-periodic oscillations adequately fit the observations.

  9. The colpitts oscillator family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.

    A tutorial study of the Colpitts oscillator family defined as all oscillators based on a nonlinear amplifier and a three- terminal linear resonance circuit with one coil and two capacitors. The original patents are investigated. The eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobian for oscillators based...

  10. Neutrino Masses and Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, J W F

    2005-01-01

    I summarize the status of three--neutrino oscillations that follow from combining the relevant world's data. The discussion includes the small parameters Delta_m-sol/Delta_m-atm and \\sin^2\\theta_{13}, which characterize the strength of CP violation in neutrino oscillations, the impact of oscillation data on the prospects for probing the absolute scale of neutrino mass in \

  11. Alendronate affects calcium dynamics in cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny-Suss, Naomi; Kasneci, Amanda; Rivas, Daniel; Afilalo, Jonathan; Komarova, Svetlana V; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Duque, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Therapy with bisphosphonates, including alendronate (ALN), is considered a safe and effective treatment for osteoporosis. However, recent studies have reported an unexpected increase in serious atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients treated with bisphosphonates. The mechanism that explains this side effect remains unknown. Since AF is associated with an altered sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium load, we studied how ALN affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and protein isoprenylation in vitro. Acute and long-term (48h) treatment of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes with ALN (10(-8)-10(-6)M) was performed. Changes in calcium dynamics were determined by both fluorescence measurement of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration and western blot analysis of calcium-regulating proteins. Finally, effect of ALN on protein farnesylation was also identified. In both atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes, ALN treatment delayed and diminished calcium responses to caffeine. Only in atrial cells, long-term exposure to ALN-induced transitory calcium oscillations and led to the development of oscillatory component in calcium responses to caffeine. Changes in calcium dynamics were accompanied by changes in expression of proteins controlling sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium. In contrast, ALN minimally affected protein isoprenylation in these cells. In summary, treatment of atrial cardiomyocytes with ALN-induced abnormalities in calcium dynamics consistent with induction of a self-stimulatory, pacemaker-like behavior, which may contribute to the development of cardiac side effects associated with these drugs.

  12. Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosti Elisabetta

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During maturation, the last phase of oogenesis, the oocyte undergoes several changes which prepare it to be ovulated and fertilized. Immature oocytes are arrested in the first meiotic process prophase, that is morphologically identified by a germinal vesicle. The removal of the first meiotic block marks the initiation of maturation. Although a large number of molecules are involved in complex sequences of events, there is evidence that a calcium increase plays a pivotal role in meiosis re-initiation. It is well established that, during this process, calcium is released from the intracellular stores, whereas less is known on the role of external calcium entering the cell through the plasma membrane ion channels. This review is focused on the functional role of calcium currents during oocyte maturation in all the species, from invertebrates to mammals. The emerging role of specific L-type calcium channels will be discussed.

  13. Neutrino oscillations: theory and phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmedov, E.K., E-mail: akhmedov@ictp.trieste.it [Department of Theoretical Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    A brief overview of selected topics in the theory and phenomenology of neutrino oscillations is given. These include: oscillations in vacuum and in matter; phenomenology of 3-flavour neutrino oscillations; CP and T violation in neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter; matter effects on {nu}{sub {mu}}{r_reversible}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations; parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations inside the earth; oscillations below and above the MSW resonance; unsettled issues in the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  14. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  15. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  16. Calcium quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel

    2002-05-01

    Elementary subcellular Ca2+ signals arising from the opening of single ion channels may offer the possibility to examine the stochastic behavior and the microscopic chemical reaction rates of these channel proteins in their natural environment. Such an analysis can yield detailed information about the molecular function that cannot be derived from recordings obtained from an ensemble of channels. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence suggesting that Ca2+ sparks, elementary Ca2+ signaling events of cardiac and skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling, may be comprised of a number of smaller Ca2+ signaling events, the Ca2+ quarks.

  17. Vitamin D, calcium homeostasis and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldurthy, Vaishali; Wei, Ran; Oz, Leyla; Dhawan, Puneet; Jeon, Yong Heui; Christakos, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and consequent increase in fracture risk. Evidence is accumulating for an important role of calcium deficiency as the process of aging is associated with disturbed calcium balance. Vitamin D is the principal factor that maintains calcium homeostasis. Increasing evidence indicates that the reason for disturbed calcium balance with age is inadequate vitamin D levels in the elderly. In this article, an overview of our current understanding of vitamin D, its metabolism, and mechanisms involved in vitamin D-mediated maintenance of calcium homeostasis is presented. In addition, mechanisms involved in age-related dysregulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 action, recommended daily doses of vitamin D and calcium, and the use of vitamin D analogs for the treatment of osteoporosis (which remains controversial) are reviewed. Elucidation of the molecular pathways of vitamin D action and modifications that occur with aging will be an active area of future research that has the potential to reveal new therapeutic strategies to maintain calcium balance. PMID:27790378

  18. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  19. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  20. Evidence from biosynthetically incorporated strontium and FTIR difference spectroscopy that the C-terminus of the D1 polypeptide of photosystem II does not ligate calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Melodie A; Walker, Lee M; Hillier, Warwick; Debus, Richard J

    2005-06-21

    Recent FTIR studies have provided evidence that the C-terminal alpha-COO(-) group of the D1 polypeptide at D1-Ala344 is a unidentate ligand of a Mn ion in photosystem II [Chu, H.-A., Hiller, W., and Debus, R. J. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 3152-3166; Kimura, Y., Mizusawa, N., Yamanari, T., Ishii, A., and Ono, T.-A. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 2078-2083]. However, the FTIR data could not exclude Ca ligation. Furthermore, the recent approximately 3.5 A X-ray crystallographic structural model positions the alpha-COO(-) group of D1-Ala344 near a Ca ion [Ferreira, K. N., Iverson, T. M., Maghlaoui, K., Barber, J., and Iwata, S. (2004) Science 303, 1831-1838]. Therefore, to conclusively establish whether the alpha-COO(-) group of D1-Ala344 ligates Mn or Ca, the symmetric carboxylate stretching mode of the alpha-COO(-) group of D1-Ala344 was identified in the S(2)-minus-S(1) FTIR difference spectrum of PSII particles having Sr substituted for Ca. Cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were propagated in media having Sr substituted for Ca and containing either l-[1-(13)C]alanine or unlabeled ((12)C) alanine. The S(2)-minus-S(1) FTIR difference spectra of the purified PSII particles show that substituting Sr for Ca alters several carboxylate stretching modes, including some that may correspond to one or more metal ligands, but importantly does not alter the symmetric carboxylate stretching mode of the alpha-COO(-) group of D1-Ala344. In unlabeled PSII particles, this mode appears at approximately 1356 cm(-)(1) in the S(1) state and at either approximately 1337 or approximately 1320 cm(-)(1) in the S(2) state, irrespective of whether the PSII particles contain Ca or Sr. These data are inconsistent with Ca ligation and show, therefore, that the C-terminal alpha-COO(-) group of the D1 polypeptide ligates a Mn ion. These data also show that substituting Ca with the larger Sr ion perturbs other unidentified carboxylate groups, at least one of which may ligate the Mn(4

  1. A memristor-based third-order oscillator: beyond oscillation

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-10-06

    This paper demonstrates the first third-order autonomous linear time variant circuit realization that enhances parametric oscillation through the usage of memristor in conventional oscillators. Although the output has sustained oscillation, the linear features of the conventional oscillators become time dependent. The poles oscillate in nonlinear behavior due to the oscillation of memristor resistance. The mathematical formulas as well as SPICE simulations are introduced for the memristor-based phase shift oscillator showing a great matching.

  2. Calcium - Function and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Jianfen; He, Yifan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Nout, M.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the primary food source for more than half of the world population. Levels of calcium contents and inhibitor - phytic acid are summarized in this chapter. Phytic acid has a very strong chelating ability and it is the main inhibit factor for calcium in rice products. Calcium contents in br

  3. Oscillations of disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the current state of research on disk oscillation theory, focusing on relativistic disks and tidally deformed disks. Since the launch of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996, many high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HFQPOs) have been observed in X-ray binaries. Subsequently, similar quasi-periodic oscillations have been found in such relativistic objects as microquasars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and galactic nuclei. One of the most promising explanations of their origin is based on oscillations in relativistic disks, and a new field called discoseismology is currently developing. After reviewing observational aspects, the book presents the basic characteristics of disk oscillations, especially focusing on those in relativistic disks. Relativistic disks are essentially different from Newtonian disks in terms of several basic characteristics of their disk oscillations, including the radial distributions of epicyclic frequencies. In order to understand the basic processes...

  4. Self-oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  5. Chimera States in Mechanical Oscillator Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Fourrière, Antoine; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The synchronization of coupled oscillators is a fascinating manifestation of self-organization that nature employs to orchestrate essential processes of life, such as the beating of the heart. While it was long thought that synchrony or disorder were mutually exclusive steady states for a network of identical oscillators, numerous theoretical studies in recent years revealed the intriguing possibility of 'chimera states', in which the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into a synchronous and an asynchronous part. However, a striking lack of empirical evidence raises the question of whether chimeras are indeed characteristic to natural systems. This calls for a palpable realization of chimera states without any fine-tuning, from which physical mechanisms underlying their emergence can be uncovered. Here, we devise a simple experiment with mechanical oscillators coupled in a hierarchical network to show that chimeras emerge naturally from a competition between two antagonistic synchronization patte...

  6. The Origin of Type I Spicule Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Christian, D J; Mathioudakis, M; Keys, P H; Keenan, F P

    2011-01-01

    We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope, to reveal how the generation of transverse waves in Type I spicules is a direct result of longitudinal oscillations occurring in the photosphere. Here we show how pressure oscillations, with periodicities in the range 130 - 440 s, manifest in small-scale photospheric magnetic bright points, and generate kink waves in the Sun's outer atmosphere with transverse velocities approaching the local sound speed. Through comparison of our observations with advanced two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations, we provide evidence for how magnetoacoustic oscillations, generated at the solar surface, funnel upwards along Type I spicule structures, before undergoing longitudinal-to-transverse mode conversion into waves at twice the initial driving frequency. The resulting kink modes are visible in chromospheric plasma, with periodicities of 65 -220 s, and amplitud...

  7. Chimera states in mechanical oscillator networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi; Fourrière, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    The synchronization of coupled oscillators is a fascinating manifestation of self-organization that nature uses to orchestrate essential processes of life, such as the beating of the heart. Although it was long thought that synchrony and disorder were mutually exclusive steady states for a network...... of identical oscillators, numerous theoretical studies in recent years have revealed the intriguing possibility of "chimera states," in which the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into a synchronous part and an asynchronous part. However, a striking lack of empirical evidence raises the question...... of whether chimeras are indeed characteristic of natural systems. This calls for a palpable realization of chimera states without any fine-tuning, from which physical mechanisms underlying their emergence can be uncovered. Here, we devise a simple experiment with mechanical oscillators coupled...

  8. Intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Simone; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    GROMOS, the ground-based millimeter-wave ozone spectrometer, continuously measures the stratospheric ozone profile between the altitudes of 20 and 65 km above Bern (46°57‧N, 7°27‧E) since November 1994. Characteristics of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone are derived from the long-term data set. Spectral analysis gives evidence for a dominant oscillation period of about 20 days in the lower and middle stratosphere during winter time. A strong 20-day wave is also found in collocated geopotential height measurements of the microwave limb sounder onboard the Aura satellite (Aura/MLS) confirming the ground-based observations of GROMOS and underlining the link between ozone and dynamics. Remarkably, the ozone series of GROMOS show an interannual variability of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone. The interannual variability of ozone fluctuations is possibly due to influences of planetary wave forcing and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on the meridional Brewer-Dobson circulation of the middle atmosphere. In detail, time series of the mean amplitude of ozone fluctuations with periods ranging from 10 to 60 days are derived at fixed pressure levels. The mean amplitude series are regarded as a measure of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Bern. After deseasonalizing the mean amplitude series, we find QBO-like amplitude modulations of the intraseasonal oscillations of ozone. The amplitudes of the intraseasonal oscillations are enhanced by a factor of 2 in 1997, 2001, 2003, and 2005. QBO-like variations of intraseasonal oscillations are also present in wind, temperature and other parameters above Bern as indicated by meteorological reanalyses of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Further, intercomparisons of interannual variability of intraseasonal tropospheric and stratospheric oscillations are performed where the NAO index (North-Atlantic oscillation

  9. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  10. Pressure oscillations in a chemical garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleone, J.; Toth, A.; Horvath, D.; Rosefigura, L.; Morgan, W.; Maselko, J.

    2009-05-01

    When soluble metal salts are placed in a silicate solution, chemical gardens grow. These gardens are treelike structures formed of long thin hollow tubes. The growth is driven by the increase in internal pressure from osmosis. One particular case is examined here, calcium chloride in a solution of sodium trisilicate. We directly measure the internal pressure of a silicate garden as it grows via a series of relaxation oscillations. From these observations we deduce the stresses in the membrane and discuss how they influence the growth of tubes. Also we estimate the critical stress and the average Young’s modulus for the silicate garden’s membrane.

  11. The physiological role of mitochondrial calcium revealed by mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany; Liu, Chengyu; Sun, Junhui; Teng, Yanjie; Fergusson, Maria M; Rovira, Ilsa I; Allen, Michele; Springer, Danielle A; Aponte, Angel M; Gucek, Marjan; Balaban, Robert S; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial calcium has been postulated to regulate a wide range of processes from bioenergetics to cell death. Here, we characterize a mouse model that lacks expression of the recently discovered mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have no apparent capacity to rapidly uptake calcium. Whereas basal metabolism seems unaffected, the skeletal muscle of MCU(-/-) mice exhibited alterations in the phosphorylation and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, MCU(-/-) mice exhibited marked impairment in their ability to perform strenuous work. We further show that mitochondria from MCU(-/-) mice lacked evidence for calcium-induced permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The lack of PTP opening does not seem to protect MCU(-/-) cells and tissues from cell death, although MCU(-/-) hearts fail to respond to the PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A. Taken together, these results clarify how acute alterations in mitochondrial matrix calcium can regulate mammalian physiology.

  12. Convection and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Houdek, G

    2010-01-01

    In this short review on stellar convection dynamics I address the following, currently very topical, issues: (1) the surface effects of the Reynolds stresses and nonadiabaticity on solar-like pulsation frequencies, and (2) oscillation mode lifetimes of stochastically excited oscillations in red giants computed with different time-dependent convection formulations.

  13. Oscillations at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, D A

    2015-01-01

    A concise summary of the "Oscillation at low energies" parallel session at the 2014 Neutrino Oscillation Workshop is provided. Plans to use man-made neutrinos and antineutrinos to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, search for sterile neutrinos, and to observe coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering were discussed. Potential measurements of solar neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, and geoneutrinos are also summarized.

  14. On the Dirac oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Cuite, PB (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Unidade Academica de Educacao]. E-mail: rafael@df.ufcg.edu.br; rafaelr@cbpf.br

    2007-07-01

    In the present work we obtain a new representation for the Dirac oscillator based on the Clifford algebra C 7. The symmetry breaking and the energy eigenvalues for our model of the Dirac oscillator are studied in the non-relativistic limit. (author)

  15. Hyperchaotic Oscillator with Gyrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A; Cenys, A; Mykolaitis, G.;

    1997-01-01

    A fourth-order hyperchaotic oscillator is described. It contains a negative impedance converter, two gyratots, two capacitors and a diode. The dynamics of the oscillator is shown to be characterised by two positive Lyapunov exponents. The performance of the circuit is investigated by means...

  16. Bursting Ca2+ Oscillations and Synchronization in Coupled Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Quan-Bao; LU Qi-Shao; Yang Zhuo-Qin; Duan Li-Xia

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model proposed by Grubelnk et al. [Biophys. Chem. 94 (2001) 59] is employed to study the physiological role of mitochondria and the cytosolic proteins in generating complex Ca2+ oscillations. Intracellular bursting calcium oscillations of point-point, point cycle and two-folded limit cycle types are observed and explanations are given based on the fast/slow dynamical analysis, especially for point-cycle and two-folded limit cycle types, which have not been reported before. Furthermore, synchronization of coupled bursters of Ca2+oscillations via gap junctions and the effect of bursting types on synchronization of coupled cells are studied. It is argued that bursting oscillations of point-point type may be superior to achieve synchronization than that of point-cycle type.

  17. On the status of neutrino mixing and oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Evidences in favor of neutrino oscillations, obtained in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments, are discussed. Neutrino oscillations in the solar and atmospheric ranges of the neutrino mass-squared differences are considered in the framework of the minimal scheme with the mixing of three massive neutrinos.

  18. Disentangling neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Andrew G. [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)], E-mail: cohen@bu.edu; Glashow, Sheldon L. [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)], E-mail: slg@bu.edu; Ligeti, Zoltan [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: ligeti@lbl.gov

    2009-07-13

    The theory underlying neutrino oscillations has been described at length in the literature. The neutrino state produced by a weak decay is usually portrayed as a linear superposition of mass eigenstates with, variously, equal energies or equal momenta. We point out that such a description is incorrect, that in fact, the neutrino is entangled with the other particle or particles emerging from the decay. We offer an analysis of oscillation phenomena involving neutrinos (applying equally well to neutral mesons) that takes entanglement into account. Thereby we present a theoretically sound proof of the universal validity of the oscillation formulae ordinarily used. In so doing, we show that the departures from exponential decay reported by the GSI experiment cannot be attributed to neutrino mixing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the 'Moessbauer' neutrino oscillation experiment proposed by Raghavan, while technically challenging, is correctly and unambiguously describable by means of the usual oscillation formalae.

  19. Ultrastructural evidence for transepithelial calcium transport in the anterior sternal epithelium of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea) during the formation and resorption of CaCO3 deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler

    1996-05-20

    Before the molt, terrestrial isopods store large amounts of calcium carbonate between the epithelium and the old cuticle of the first four anterior sternites. In order to test whether the anterior sternal epithelium has specific structural differentiations indicative of transepithelial ion transport, the anterior sternal epithelium and, as a control, the posterior sternal epithelium were studied using electron-microscopical techniques. During the formation of calcium carbonate deposits, the basolateral plasma membrane of the anterior sternal epithelium forms an elaborate interconnected network of interstitial dilations and channels. Numerous osmiophilic granules occur within this basolateral intercellular network during resorption of the calcium carbonate deposits. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of the osmiophilic granules indicates that they contain calcium. During the resorption of the calcium carbonate deposits, the apical plasma membrane of the anterior sternal epithelium has many subcuticular folds. An interstitial network, osmiophilic granules, and apical, subcuticular folds do not occur in the posterior sternal epithelium. Taken together, these structural features are indicative of transepithelial ion transport and are probably necessary for the formation and resorption of the anterior sternal calcium carbonate deposits.

  20. East Asian Monsoon and EL NIÑO-SOUTHERN Oscillation Activities Since the Mid-Holocene Evidences from Massive Corals in the the Central Vietnamese Coast, Western South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. D.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Y.; Yu, K.; Gasparon, M.; U-Series Dating Technique Team

    2011-12-01

    The climate of the Vietnamese coast, western South China Sea (SCS), is driven by the annually reversing East Asian Monsoon (EAM) system which is also related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) through teleconnection. Our understanding of EAM activity and its connection with global climate is not fully established. In this study high resolution Sr/Ca and δ18O records derived from four fossil Porites sp. corals with U-series ages ranging from ~7000 to 1800 years (yrs) were used to characterise the EAM-ENSO activities since the mid-Holocene. The results show that both the summer and winter monsoons were stronger than present ~ 7000 yrs ago, as evidenced by the higher-than-present amplitudes of annual cycles in SST (9.1 °C) and seawater δ18O (1.4%). The strengthened summer monsoon is considered to result from higher Northern Hemispheric insolation during the mid-Holocene, while the enhanced winter monsoon could be attributed to a reduction/shutdown of North Atlantic Meridional Overturning (NAMOC), leading to a prevailing "cold tongue" off the Vietnamese coast, and an amplified east-west SST gradient in the northern SCS. The EAM was weakened ca. 4200 yrs ago, as reflected by the lower amplitude of SST (4.3 °C) and seawater δ18O (0.57%) annual cycles. The downturn of the EAM is correlated in timing with the cold phase or the Bond event of the high-latitude climate, the Neolithic cultural collapse in China, and the strengthened ENSO in the Pacific. After this downturn, the EAM was slightly strengthened ~3600 and 1800 yrs ago as shown by larger amplitudes of SST (~ 5 °C) and seawater δ18O (1.0-1.2%) annual cycles. The enhanced EAM at these times are out of phase with the high-latitude climate, but are consistent with evidence from historical documents in Vietnam and China. The waxing/waning of the EAM appear to match with the waning/waxing of the ENSO intensity throughout the records since the mid-Holocene. The changes in EAM activity were accompanied by

  1. Quantum correlations in terms of neutrino oscillation probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alok, Ashutosh Kumar, E-mail: akalok@iitj.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, Jodhpur 342011 (India); Banerjee, Subhashish, E-mail: subhashish@iitj.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, Jodhpur 342011 (India); Uma Sankar, S., E-mail: uma@phy.iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Neutrino oscillations provide evidence for the mode entanglement of neutrino mass eigenstates in a given flavour eigenstate. Given this mode entanglement, it is pertinent to consider the relation between the oscillation probabilities and other quantum correlations. In this work, we show that all the well-known quantum correlations, such as the Bell's inequality, are directly related to the neutrino oscillation probabilities. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments, which measure the neutrino survival probability to be less than unity, imply Bell's inequality violation.

  2. Quantum correlations in terms of neutrino oscillation probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alok, Ashutosh Kumar; Banerjee, Subhashish; Uma Sankar, S.

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino oscillations provide evidence for the mode entanglement of neutrino mass eigenstates in a given flavour eigenstate. Given this mode entanglement, it is pertinent to consider the relation between the oscillation probabilities and other quantum correlations. In this work, we show that all the well-known quantum correlations, such as the Bell's inequality, are directly related to the neutrino oscillation probabilities. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments, which measure the neutrino survival probability to be less than unity, imply Bell's inequality violation.

  3. Quasi-Fibonacci oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilik, A M; Rebesh, A P

    2010-01-01

    We study the properties of sequences of the energy eigenvalues for some generalizations of q-deformed oscillators including the p,q-oscillator, the 3-, 4- and 5-parameter deformed oscillators given in the literature. It is shown that most of the considered models belong to the class of so-called Fibonacci oscillators for which any three consequtive energy levels satisfy the relation E_{n+1}=\\lambda E_n+\\rho E_{n-1} with real constants \\lambda, \\rho. On the other hand, for certain \\mu-oscillator known from 1993 we prove the fact of its non-Fibonacci nature. Possible generalizations of the three-term Fibonacci relation are discussed among which for the \\mu$-oscillator we choose, as the most adequate, the so-called quasi-Fibonacci (or local Fibonacci) property of the energy levels. The property is encoded in the three-term quasi-Fibonacci (QF) relation with non-constant, n-dependent coefficients \\lambda and \\rho. Various aspects of the QF relation are elaborated for the \\mu-oscillator and some of its extensions.

  4. Quasi-Fibonacci oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilik, A. M.; Kachurik, I. I.; Rebesh, A. P.

    2010-06-01

    We study the properties of the sequences of the energy eigenvalues for some generalizations of q-deformed oscillators including the p, q-oscillator, and the three-, four- and five-parameter deformed oscillators given in the literature. It is shown that most of the considered models belong to the class of so-called Fibonacci oscillators for which any three consecutive energy levels satisfy the relation En + 1 = λEn + ρEn - 1 with real constants λ, ρ. On the other hand, for a certain μ-oscillator known since 1993, we prove its non-Fibonacci nature. Possible generalizations of the three-term Fibonacci relation are discussed, among which for the μ-oscillator we choose, as the most adequate, the so-called quasi-Fibonacci (or local Fibonacci) property of the energy levels. The property is encoded in the three-term quasi-Fibonacci (QF) relation with the non-constant, n-dependent coefficients λ and ρ. Various aspects of the QF relation are elaborated for the μ-oscillator and some of its extensions.

  5. Boxing with neutrino oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D. J.; Weiler, Thomas J.

    1999-06-01

    We develop a characterization of neutrino oscillations based on the coefficients of the oscillating terms. These coefficients are individually observable; although they are quartic in the elements of the unitary mixing matrix, they are independent of the conventions chosen for the angle and phase parametrization of the mixing matrix. We call these reparametrization-invariant observables ``boxes'' because of their geometric relation to the mixing matrix, and because of their association with the Feynman box diagram that describes oscillations in field theory. The real parts of the boxes are the coefficients for the CP- or T-even oscillation modes, while the imaginary parts are the coefficients for the CP- or T-odd oscillation modes. Oscillation probabilities are linear in the boxes, so measurements can straightforwardly determine values for the boxes (which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements). We examine the effects of unitarity on the boxes and discuss the reduction of the number of boxes to a minimum basis set. For the three-generation case, we explicitly construct the basis. Using the box algebra, we show that CP violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. The framework presented here will facilitate general analyses of neutrino oscillations among n>=3 flavors.

  6. Calcium is important forus.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高利平

    2005-01-01

    Calcium is important for our health.We must have it in our diet to stay well.A good place to get it is from dairy products like milk, cheese and ice cream.One pound of cheese has fifty times the calcium we should have every day.Other foods have less.For example,a pound of beans also has calcium.But it has only three times the amount we ought to have daily.

  7. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorette, Aurélien; Romanelli, Marco; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-06-15

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is experimentally and numerically studied in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits isolation of a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found, and phase noise spectra allow us to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator, even in the chaotic regime.

  8. The free energy cost of accurate biochemical oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yuansheng; Ouyang, Qi; Tu, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    Oscillation is an important cellular process that regulates timing of different vital life cycles. However, in the noisy cellular environment, oscillations can be highly inaccurate due to phase fluctuations. It remains poorly understood how biochemical circuits suppress phase fluctuations and what is the incurred thermodynamic cost. Here, we study four different types of biochemical oscillations representing three basic oscillation motifs shared by all known oscillatory systems. We find that the phase diffusion constant follows the same inverse dependence on the free energy dissipation per period for all systems studied. This relationship between the phase diffusion and energy dissipation is shown analytically in a model of noisy oscillation. Microscopically, we find that the oscillation is driven by multiple irreversible cycles that hydrolyze the fuel molecules such as ATP; the number of phase coherent periods is proportional to the free energy consumed per period. Experimental evidence in support of this un...

  9. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Thorette, Aurélien; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is studied experimentally and numerically in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits to isolate a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found and phase noise spectra allows to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator even in the chaotic regime.

  10. Efimov Physics around the neutron rich Calcium-60 isotope

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, G; Hammer, H -W; Platter, L

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the neutron-Calcium-60 S-wave scattering phase shifts using state of the art coupled-cluster theory combined with modern ab initio interactions derived from chiral effective theory. Effects of three-nucleon forces are included schematically as density dependent nucleon-nucleon interactions. This information is combined with halo effective field theory in order to investigate the Calcium-60-neutron-neutron system. We predict correlations between different three-body observables and the two-neutron separation energy of Calcium-62. This provides evidence of Efimov physics along the Calcium isotope chain. Experimental key observables that facilitate a test of our findings are discussed.

  11. Collective Calcium Dynamics in Networks of Communicating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Tommy; Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo; Mugler, Andrew

    Cells can sense and encode information about their environment with remarkable precision. These properties have been studied extensively for single cells, but intercellular communication is known to be important for both single- and multicellular organisms. Here, we examine calcium dynamics of fibroblast cells exposed to external ATP stimuli, and the effects of communication and stimulus strength on cells' response. Experimental results show that increasing communication strength induces a greater fraction of cells to exhibit oscillatory calcium dynamics, but the frequencies of oscillation do not systematically shift with ATP strength. We developed a model of calcium signaling by adding noise, communication, and cell-to-cell variability to the model of Tang and Othmer. This model reproduces cells' increased tendency to oscillate as a function of communication strength, and frequency encoding is nearly removed at the global level. Our model therefore suggests that the propensity of cells to oscillate, rather than frequency encoding, determines the response to external ATP. These results suggest that the system lies near a critical boundary separating non-oscillatory and oscillatory calcium dynamics.

  12. Oscillating Filaments: I - Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid based AMR-code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, e.g. with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process `geometrical fragmentation'. In our realization the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristical scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. ...

  13. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  14. Inhomogeneous Power Distribution in Magnetic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Kiran; Kholikov, S; Hill, F

    2010-01-01

    We apply ring-diagram analysis and spherical harmonic decomposition methods to compute 3-dimensional power spectra of magnetograms obtained by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) during quiet periods of solar activity. This allows us to investigate the power distribution in acoustic waves propagating in localized directions on the solar disk. We find evidence of the presence of five-minute oscillations in magnetic signals that suggests a non-homogeneous distribution of acoustic power. In this paper, we present our results on the asymmetry in oscillatory power and its behaviour as a function of frequency, time and magnetic field strength. These characteristics are compared with simultaneous velocity measurements.

  15. Dirac oscillator interacting with a topological defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, J.; Furtado, C.; Moraes, F. [Unidade Academica de Tecnologia de Alimentos, CCTA, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Pereiros, 58840-000, Pombal, Paraiba (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    In this work we study the interaction problem of a Dirac oscillator with gravitational fields produced by topological defects. The energy levels of the relativistic oscillator in the cosmic string and in the cosmic dislocation space-times are sensible to curvature and torsion associated to these defects and are important evidence of the influence of the topology on this system. In the presence of a localized magnetic field the energy levels acquire a term associated with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues and see that in the nonrelativistic limit some results known in standard quantum mechanics are reached.

  16. Little-Parks oscillations in an insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopnov, G; Cohen, O; Ovadia, M; Lee, K Hong; Wong, C C; Shahar, D

    2012-10-19

    We present the results of a magnetoresistance study of the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition in an amorphous indium-oxide thin film patterned by a nanoscale periodic array of holes. We observed Little-Parks-like oscillations over our entire range of disorder spanning the transition. The period of oscillations was unchanged and corresponded to the superconducting flux quantum in the superconducting as well as in the insulating phases. Our results provide direct evidence for electron pairing in the insulator bordering with superconductivity.

  17. Bayesian global analysis of neutrino oscillation data

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstrom, Johannes; Maltoni, Michele; Schwetz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We perform a Bayesian analysis of current neutrino oscillation data. When estimating the oscillation parameters we find that the results generally agree with those of the $\\chi^2$ method, with some differences involving $s_{23}^2$ and CP-violating effects. We discuss the additional subtleties caused by the circular nature of the CP-violating phase, and how it is possible to obtain correlation coefficients with $s_{23}^2$. When performing model comparison, we find that there is no significant evidence for any mass ordering, any octant of $s_{23}^2$ or a deviation from maximal mixing, nor the presence of CP-violation.

  18. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  19. Synchronization of hyperchaotic oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A.; Cenys, A.; Mykolaitis, G.;

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of chaotic oscillators is believed to have promising applications in secure communications. Hyperchaotic systems with multiple positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs) have an advantage over common chaotic systems with only one positive LE. Three different types of hyperchaotic electronic...

  20. A novel photonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  1. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  2. Neutrino anomalies without oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandip Pakvasa

    2000-01-01

    I review explanations for the three neutrino anomalies (solar, atmospheric and LSND) which go beyond the `conventional' neutrino oscillations induced by mass-mixing. Several of these require non-zero neutrino masses as well.

  3. Oscillations in counting statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilk, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The very large transverse momenta and large multiplicities available in present LHC experiments on pp collisions allow a much closer look at the corresponding distributions. Some time ago we discussed a possible physical meaning of apparent log-periodic oscillations showing up in p_T distributions (suggesting that the exponent of the observed power-like behavior is complex). In this talk we concentrate on another example of oscillations, this time connected with multiplicity distributions P(N). We argue that some combinations of the experimentally measured values of P(N) (satisfying the recurrence relations used in the description of cascade-stochastic processes in quantum optics) exhibit distinct oscillatory behavior, not observed in the usual Negative Binomial Distributions used to fit data. These oscillations provide yet another example of oscillations seen in counting statistics in many different, apparently very disparate branches of physics further demonstrating the universality of this phenomenon.

  4. Oscillating Filaments. I. Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Heigl, Stefan; Burkert, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid-based AMR code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, such as with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation, and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process “geometrical fragmentation.” In our realization, the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristic scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. We show that the overall oscillation pattern can hide the infall signature of cores.

  5. The Liege Oscillation Code

    CERN Document Server

    Scuflaire, R; Théado, S; Bourge, P -O; Miglio, A; Godart, M; Thoul, A; Noels, A

    2007-01-01

    The Liege Oscillation code can be used as a stand-alone program or as a library of subroutines that the user calls from a Fortran main program of his own to compute radial and non-radial adiabatic oscillations of stellar models. We describe the variables and the equations used by the program and the methods used to solve them. A brief account is given of the use and the output of the program.

  6. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  7. Indirect neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, K S; Wilczek, Frank; Pati, Jogesh C; Wilczek, Frank

    1995-01-01

    We show how two different scales for oscillations between e and \\mu neutrinos, characterized by different mixing angles and effective mass scales, can arise in a simple and theoretically attractive framework. One scale characterizes direct oscillations, which can accommodate the MSW approach to the solar neutrino problem, whereas the other can be considered as arising indirectly, through virtual transitions involving the \\tau neutrino with a mass \\sim 1 eV. This indirect transition allows the possibility of observable \\bar \

  8. Oscillators and operational amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2005-01-01

    A generalized approach to the design of oscillators using operational amplifiers as active elements is presented. A piecewise-linear model of the amplifier is used so that it make sense to investigate the eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the differential equations. The characteristic equation...... of the general circuit is derived. The dynamic nonlinear transfer characteristic of the amplifier is investigated. Examples of negative resistance oscillators are discussed....

  9. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  10. Self-oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain linear systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy from the environment into the vibration: no external rate needs to be tuned to the resonant frequency. A paper from 1830 by G. B. Airy gives us the opening to introduce self-oscillation as a sort of "perpetual motion" responsible for the human voice. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the more recent swaying of the London Millenium Footbridge. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments, and the heartbeat. We review the criterion that determines whether an arbitrary line...

  11. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  12. Frequency of self-oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Groszkowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of Self-Oscillations covers the realm of electric oscillations that plays an important role both in the scientific and technical aspects. This book is composed of nine chapters, and begins with the introduction to the alternating currents and oscillation. The succeeding chapters deal with the free oscillations in linear isolated systems. These topics are followed by discussions on self-oscillations in linear systems. Other chapters describe the self-oscillations in non-linear systems, the influence of linear elements on frequency of oscillations, and the electro mechanical oscillato

  13. Calcium handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum during oscillatory contractions of skinned skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentesi, P; Zaremba, R; Stienen, G J

    1998-08-01

    Isometric ATP consumption and force were investigated in mechanically skinned fibres from iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis. Measurements were performed at different [Ca2+], in the presence and absence of caffeine (5 nM). In weakly Ca2+-buffered solutions without caffeine, spontaneous oscillations in force and ATPase activity occurred. The repetition frequency was [Ca2+]-and temperature-dependent. The Ca2+ threshold (+/- SEM) for the oscillations corresponded to a pCa of 6.5 +/- 0.1. The maximum ATP consumption associated with calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) reached during the oscillations was similar to the activity under steady-state conditions at saturating calcium concentrations in the presence of caffeine. Maximum activity was reached when the force relaxation was almost complete. The calculated amount of Ca2+ taken up by the SR during a complete cycle corresponded to 5.4 +/ 0.4 mmol per litre cell volume. In strongly Ca2+-buffered solutions, caffeine enhanced the calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and, at low calcium concentrations, SR Ca uptake. These results suggest that when the SR is heavily loaded by net Ca uptake, there is a massive calcium-induced calcium release. Subsequent net Ca uptake by the SR then gives rise to the periodic nature of the calcium transient.

  14. Disturbed calcium signaling in spinocerebellar ataxias and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Polina; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-04-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent a huge scientific and medical question, but the molecular mechanisms of these diseases are still not clear. There is increasing evidence that neuronal calcium signaling is abnormal in many neurodegenerative disorders. Abnormal neuronal calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum may result in disturbances of cell homeostasis, synaptic dysfunction, and eventual cell death. Neuronal loss is observed in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent experimental evidence supporting the role of neuronal calcium signaling in the pathogenesis of SCAs and AD is discussed in this review.

  15. Proper Calcium Use: Vitamin K2 as a Promoter of Bone and Cardiovascular Health

    OpenAIRE

    Maresz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate calcium intake can lead to decreased bone mineral density, which can increase the risk of bone fractures. Supplemental calcium promotes bone mineral density and strength and can prevent osteoporosis. Recent scientific evidence, however, suggests that elevated consumption of calcium supplements may raise the risk for heart disease and can be connected with accelerated deposit of calcium in blood-vessel walls and soft tissues. In contrast, vitamin K2 is associated with the inhibition...

  16. Photodissociation studies of calcium-coronene and calcium-pyrene cation clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A. C.; Buchanan, J. W.; Flynn, N. D.; Duncan, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Gas-phase cluster cations combining calcium atoms and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) coronene (C24H12) and pyrene (C16H10) are produced in a molecular beam using laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals the formation of clusters of the form Cax(coronene)y+ for up to x = 4 and y = 3 and Cax(pyrene)y+ for up to x = 2 and y = 3. Mass-selected photodissociation studies show that the calcium cation is the most prominent fragment for each system. Photoinduced calcium carbide formation is prominent when two or more calcium atoms are present. Additionally, there is evidence that these clusters can form sandwich structures.

  17. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer proteins are post-synaptic density proteins with known functions in receptor trafficking and calcium homeostasis. While they are key mediators of synaptic plasticity, they are also known to function in axon guidance, albeit by mechanisms that are yet to be elucidated. Homer proteins couple extracellular receptors – such as metabotropic glutamate receptors and the transient receptor potential canonical family of cation channels – to intracellular receptors such as inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors on intracellular calcium stores and, therefore, are well placed to regulate calcium dynamics within the neural growth cone. Here we used growth cones from dorsal root ganglia, a well established model in the field of axon guidance, and a growth cone turning assay to examine Homer1 function in axon guidance. Results Homer1 knockdown reversed growth cone turning from attraction to repulsion in response to the calcium-dependent guidance cues brain derived neurotrophic factor and netrin-1. Conversely, Homer1 knockdown had no effect on repulsion to the calcium-independent guidance cue Semaphorin-3A. This reversal of attractive turning suggested a requirement for Homer1 in a molecular switch. Pharmacological experiments confirmed that the operational state of a calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II/calcineurin phosphatase molecular switch was dependent on Homer1 expression. Calcium imaging of motile growth cones revealed that Homer1 is required for guidance-cue-induced rise of cytosolic calcium and the attenuation of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients. Homer1 knockdown-induced calcium transients and turning were inhibited by antagonists of store-operated channels. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed the close association of Homer1 with the store-operated proteins TRPC1 and STIM1 within dorsal root ganglia growth cones. Conclusion These experiments provide evidence that Homer1 is an essential

  18. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by proteoliposomes and cultured rat sertoli cells: Evidence for involvement of voltage-activated and voltage-independent calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1989-12-01

    We have previously reported incorporation into liposomes of Triton X-100-solubilized FSH receptor-G-protein complexes derived from purified bovine calf testis membranes. In the present study we have used this model system to show that FSH induces flux of 45Ca2+ into such proteoliposomes in a hormone-specific concentration-dependent manner. FSH, inactivated by boiling, had no stimulatory effect on 45Ca2+ flux, nor did isolated alpha- or beta-subunits of FSH. Addition of GTP (or its analogs 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate and guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)) or sodium fluoride (in the presence or absence of GTP or its analogs) failed to induce 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes, suggesting that the uptake of 45Ca2+ was receptor, and not G-protein, related. Voltage-independent (ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride) and voltage-activated (methyoxyverapamil and nifedipine) calcium channel-blocking agents reduced FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes to control levels. FSH also induced uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells. Ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake or estradiol secretion by cultured rat Sertoli cells, nor did methoxyverapamil or nifedipine. All four calcium channel blockers, however, were able to reduce FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake to basal levels and FSH-stimulated conversion of androstenedione to estradiol by up to 50%, indicating an involvement of Ca2+ in FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Our results suggest that the well documented changes in intracellular calcium levels consequent to FSH binding may be due, at least in part, to an influx of calcium through FSH receptor-regulated calcium channels.

  19. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Alexander I. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for vμ → $\\bar{v}$μ transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |Δ$\\bar{m}$atm 2| = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat) ± 0.06(syst)) x 10-3 eV2 and sin2(2$\\bar{θ}$23) = 0.860-0.12+0.11(stat) ± 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  20. A Genome-wide Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Regulatory Calcium Sensors in Pollen Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Zhou; Ying FU; Zhenbiao Yang

    2009-01-01

    Calcium, an ubiquitous second messenger, plays an essential and versatile role in cellular signaling. The diverse function of calcium signals is achieved by an excess of calcium sensors. Plants possess large numbers of calcium sensors, most of which have not been functionally characterized. To identify physiologically relevant calcium sensors in a specific cell type, we conducted a genome-wide functional survey in pollen tubes, for which spatiotemporal calcium signals are well-characterized and required for polarized tip growth. Pollen-specific members of calmodulin (CAM), CaM-like (CML), calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and calcineurin B-like protein (CBL) families were tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP) and their localization patterns and overexpression phenotypes were characterized in tobacco pollen tubes. We found that several fusion proteins showed distinct overexpression phenotypes and subcellular localization patterns. CDPK24.GFP was localized to the vegetative nucleus and the generative cell/sperms. CDPK32-GFP caused severe growth depolarization. CBL2-GFP and CBL3-GFP exhibited dynamic patterns of subcellular localization, including several endomembrane compartments, the apical plasma membrane (PM), and cytoskeleton-like structures in pollen tubes. Their overexpression also inhibited pollen tube elongation and induced growth depolarization. These putative calcium sensors are excellent candidates for the calcium sensors responsible for the regulation of calcium homeostasis and calcium-dependent tip growth and growth oscillation in pollen tubes,

  1. Oscillations in stellar superflares

    CERN Document Server

    Balona, L A; Kosovichev, A; Nakariakov, V M; Pugh, C E; Van Doorsselaere, T

    2015-01-01

    Two different mechanisms may act to induce quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in whole-disk observations of stellar flares. One mechanism may be magneto-hydromagnetic (MHD) forces and other processes acting on flare loops as seen in the Sun. The other mechanism may be forced local acoustic oscillations due to the high-energy particle impulse generated by the flare (known as `sunquakes' in the Sun). We analyze short-cadence Kepler data of 257 flares in 75 stars to search for QPP in the flare decay branch or post-flare oscillations which may be attributed to either of these two mechanisms. About 18 percent of stellar flares show a distinct bump in the flare decay branch of unknown origin. The bump does not seem to be a highly-damped global oscillation because the periods of the bumps derived from wavelet analysis do not correlate with any stellar parameter. We detected damped oscillations covering several cycles (QPP), in seven flares on five stars. The periods of these oscillations also do not correlate with any ...

  2. Oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Tiago; Machado, Armando

    2009-06-01

    Three experiments examined behavior in extinction following periodic reinforcement. During the first phase of Experiment 1, four groups of pigeons were exposed to fixed interval (FI 16s or FI 48s) or variable interval (VI 16s or VI 48s) reinforcement schedules. Next, during the second phase, each session started with reinforcement trials and ended with an extinction segment. Experiment 2 was similar except that the extinction segment was considerably longer. Experiment 3 replaced the FI schedules with a peak procedure, with FI trials interspersed with non-food peak interval (PI) trials that were four times longer. One group of pigeons was exposed to FI 20s PI 80s trials, and another to FI 40s PI 160s trials. Results showed that, during the extinction segment, most pigeons trained with FI schedules, but not with VI schedules, displayed pause-peck oscillations with a period close to, but slightly greater than the FI parameter. These oscillations did not start immediately after the onset of extinction. Comparing the oscillations from Experiments 1 and 2 suggested that the alternation of reconditioning and re-extinction increases the reliability and earlier onset of the oscillations. In Experiment 3 the pigeons exhibited well-defined pause-peck cycles since the onset of extinction. These cycles had periods close to twice the value of the FI and lasted for long intervals of time. We discuss some hypotheses concerning the processes underlying behavioral oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

  3. Oscillate boiling from microheaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, S. Roberto; Nguyen, Dang Minh; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    We report about an intriguing boiling regime occurring for small heaters embedded on the boundary in subcooled water. The microheater is realized by focusing a continuous wave laser beam to about 10 μ m in diameter onto a 165-nm-thick layer of gold, which is submerged in water. After an initial vaporous explosion a single bubble oscillates continuously and repeatedly at several 100 kHz albeit with constant laser power input. The microbubble's oscillations are accompanied with bubble pinch-off, leading to a stream of gaseous bubbles in the subcooled water. The self-driven bubble oscillation is explained with a thermally kicked oscillator caused by surface attachment and by the nonspherical collapses. Additionally, Marangoni stresses induce a recirculating streaming flow which transports cold liquid towards the microheater, reducing diffusion of heat along the substrate and therefore stabilizing the phenomenon to many million cycles. We speculate that this oscillate boiling regime may overcome the heat transfer thresholds observed during the nucleate boiling crisis and offers a new pathway for heat transfer under microgravity conditions.

  4. Finite q-oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Klimyk, Anatoliy U [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Wolf, Kurt Bernardo [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, UNAM, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-05-28

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra su{sub q}(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x{sub s} = 1/2 [2s]{sub q}, s element of {l_brace}-j, -j+1, ..., j{r_brace}, and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schroedinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q {yields} 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j {yields} {infinity} limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  5. Finite q-oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  6. Physical realization of the Glauber quantum oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilini, Silvia; Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Marcucci, Giulia; Delre, Eugenio; Conti, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    More than thirty years ago Glauber suggested that the link between the reversible microscopic and the irreversible macroscopic world can be formulated in physical terms through an inverted harmonic oscillator describing quantum amplifiers. Further theoretical studies have shown that the paradigm for irreversibility is indeed the reversed harmonic oscillator. As outlined by Glauber, providing experimental evidence of these idealized physical systems could open the way to a variety of fundamental studies, for example to simulate irreversible quantum dynamics and explain the arrow of time. However, supporting experimental evidence of reversed quantized oscillators is lacking. We report the direct observation of exploding n = 0 and n = 2 discrete states and Γ0 and Γ2 quantized decay rates of a reversed harmonic oscillator generated by an optical photothermal nonlinearity. Our results give experimental validation to the main prediction of irreversible quantum mechanics, that is, the existence of states with quantized decay rates. Our results also provide a novel perspective to optical shock-waves, potentially useful for applications as lasers, optical amplifiers, white-light and X-ray generation.

  7. Physical realization of the Glauber quantum oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilini, Silvia; Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Marcucci, Giulia; DelRe, Eugenio; Conti, Claudio

    2015-11-02

    More than thirty years ago Glauber suggested that the link between the reversible microscopic and the irreversible macroscopic world can be formulated in physical terms through an inverted harmonic oscillator describing quantum amplifiers. Further theoretical studies have shown that the paradigm for irreversibility is indeed the reversed harmonic oscillator. As outlined by Glauber, providing experimental evidence of these idealized physical systems could open the way to a variety of fundamental studies, for example to simulate irreversible quantum dynamics and explain the arrow of time. However, supporting experimental evidence of reversed quantized oscillators is lacking. We report the direct observation of exploding n = 0 and n = 2 discrete states and Γ0 and Γ2 quantized decay rates of a reversed harmonic oscillator generated by an optical photothermal nonlinearity. Our results give experimental validation to the main prediction of irreversible quantum mechanics, that is, the existence of states with quantized decay rates. Our results also provide a novel perspective to optical shock-waves, potentially useful for applications as lasers, optical amplifiers, white-light and X-ray generation.

  8. Arbitrary Spin Galilean Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, C R

    2014-01-01

    The so-called Dirac oscillator was proposed as a modification of the free Dirac equation which reproduces many of the properties of the simple harmonic oscillator but accompanied by a strong spin-orbit coupling term. It has yet to be extended successfully to the arbitrary spin S case primarily because of the unwieldiness of general spin Lorentz invariant wave equations. It is shown here using the formalism of totally symmetric multispinors that the Dirac oscillator can, however, be made to accommodate spin by incorporating it into the framework of Galilean relativity. This is done explicitly for spin zero and spin one as special cases of the arbitrary spin result. For the general case it is shown that the coefficient of the spin-orbit term has a 1/S behavior by techniques which are virtually identical to those employed in the derivation of the g-factor carried out over four decades ago.

  9. Intrinsic oscillations of neocortex generated by layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L R; Amitai, Y; Connors, B W

    1991-01-25

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  10. Intrinsic Oscillations of Neocortex Generated by Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laurie R.; Amitai, Yael; Connors, Barry W.

    1991-01-01

    Rhythmic activity in the neocortex varies with different behavioral and pathological states and in some cases may encode sensory information. However, the neural mechanisms of these oscillations are largely unknown. Many pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the neocortex showed prolonged, 5- to 12-hertz rhythmic firing patterns at threshold. Rhythmic firing was due to intrinsic membrane properties, sodium conductances were essential for rhythmicity, and calcium-dependent conductances strongly modified rhythmicity. Isolated slices of neocortex generated epochs of 4- to 10-hertz synchronized activity when N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated channels were facilitated. Layer 5 was both necessary and sufficient to produce these synchronized oscillations. Thus, synaptic networks of intrinsically rhythmic neurons in layer 5 may generate or promote certain synchronized oscillations of the neocortex.

  11. Oscillations in neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, Gudrun Kristine

    1999-07-01

    We have studied radial and nonradial oscillations in neutron stars, both in a general relativistic and non-relativistic frame, for several different equilibrium models. Different equations of state were combined, and our results show that it is possible to distinguish between the models based on their oscillation periods. We have particularly focused on the p-, f-, and g-modes. We find oscillation periods of II approx. 0.1 ms for the p-modes, II approx. 0.1 - 0.8 ms for the f-modes and II approx. 10 - 400 ms for the g-modes. For high-order (l (>{sub )} 4) f-modes we were also able to derive a formula that determines II{sub l+1} from II{sub l} and II{sub l-1} to an accuracy of 0.1%. Further, for the radial f-mode we find that the oscillation period goes to infinity as the maximum mass of the star is approached. Both p-, f-, and g-modes are sensitive to changes in the central baryon number density n{sub c}, while the g-modes are also sensitive to variations in the surface temperature. The g-modes are concentrated in the surface layer, while p- and f-modes can be found in all parts of the star. The effects of general relativity were studied, and we find that these are important at high central baryon number densities, especially for the p- and f-modes. General relativistic effects can therefore not be neglected when studying oscillations in neutron stars. We have further developed an improved Cowling approximation in the non-relativistic frame, which eliminates about half of the gap in the oscillation periods that results from use of the ordinary Cowling approximation. We suggest to develop an improved Cowling approximation also in the general relativistic frame. (Author)

  12. Measurement and analysis of calcium signaling in heterogeneous cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gillian R; Jack, Andrew D; Platts, Amy; Simpson, Peter B

    2006-01-01

    High-content imaging platforms capable of studying kinetic responses at a single-cell level have elevated kinetic recording techniques from labor-intensive low-throughput experiments to potential high-throughput screening assays. We have applied this technology to the investigation of heterogeneous cell cultures derived from primary neural tissue. The neuronal cultures mature into a coupled network and display spontaneous oscillations in intracellular calcium, which can be modified by the addition of pharmacological agents. We have developed algorithms to perform Fourier analysis and quantify both the degree of synchronization and the effects of modulators on the oscillations. Functional and phenotypic experiments can be combined using this approach. We have used post-hoc immunolabeling to identify subpopulations of cells in cocultures and to dissect the calcium responses of these cells from the population response. The combination of these techniques represents a powerful tool for drug discovery.

  13. Solar-neutrino oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, L.; Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of oscillations of solar neutrinos is developed as it applies to the electron-recoil spectrum in neutrino-electron scattering. The spectral information obtained by such measurements (as opposed to counting total event rates) is crucial for allowing observation of neutrino oscillations for masses down to 500 neV. In this regard, the effects of different masses and mixing angles, as well as such subtleties as thermal and pressure broadening, finite solar-core size, and variable indices of refraction are investigated.

  14. Friedel oscillations in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, J. A.; Power, S. R.; Ferreira, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry breaking perturbations in an electronically conducting medium are known to produce Friedel oscillations in various physical quantities of an otherwise pristine material. Here we show in a mathematically transparent fashion that Friedel oscillations in graphene have a strong sublattice...... asymmetry. As a result, the presence of impurities and/or defects may impact the distinct graphene sublattices very differently. Furthermore, such an asymmetry can be used to explain the recent observations that nitrogen atoms and dimers are not randomly distributed in graphene but prefer to occupy one...

  15. Nonlinear harmonic oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calogero, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' (Italy); Inozemtsev, V I [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2002-12-06

    The existence is noted of assemblies of an arbitrary number of complex oscillators, or equivalently, of an arbitrary even number of real oscillators, characterized by Newtonian equations of motion ('acceleration equal force') with one-body velocity-dependent linear forces and many-body velocity-independent cubic forces, all the nonsingular solutions of which are isochronous (completely periodic with the same period). As for the singular solutions, as usual they emerge, in the context of the initial-value problem, from a closed domain in phase space having lower dimensionality.

  16. Quasi Periodic Oscillations in Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok C. Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Here we report our recent discoveries of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in blazars time series data in X-ray and optical electromagnetic bands. Any such detection can give important clues of the location and nature of the processes of emission mechanism. In the case of radio-quiet AGN, the detected QPOs are very likely to be associated with the accretion disk. But in the case of blazars, it may be associated with jets in the high and outburst states, and in the low-state, it is probably associated with the accretion disk. In this brief review, I summarize the recent QPO detections in blazars. There is one strong evidence of QPO detection in XMM–Newton time series data of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy RE J1034+396 about which we will also discuss briefly.

  17. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for dinner. Create mini-pizzas by topping whole-wheat English muffins or bagels with pizza sauce, low- ... Minerals Do I Need to Drink Milk? Lactose Intolerance Becoming a Vegetarian Soy Foods and Health Calcium ...

  18. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  19. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  20. Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-27

    PNNL developed a new tool for oscillation analysis and baselining. This tool has been developed under a new DOE Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) Project (GM0072 - “Suite of open-source applications and models for advanced synchrophasor analysis”) and it is based on the open platform for PMU analysis. The Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool (OBAT) performs the oscillation analysis and identifies modes of oscillations (frequency, damping, energy, and shape). The tool also does oscillation event baselining (fining correlation between oscillations characteristics and system operating conditions).

  1. In vivo effect of 3,5,3 prime -triiodothyronine on calcium uptake in several tissues in the rat: Evidence for a physiological role for calcium as the first messenger for the prompt action of thyroid hormone at the level of the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, J. (Hebrew Univ. Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-07-01

    Calcium has been shown in vitro to serve as the first messenger for the rapid effect of thyroid hormone at the level of the plasma membrane. In the present study the physiological relevance of this mechanism is examined in the whole animal. To this end, the effect of T3 on 45calcium uptake and sugar 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake, an effect that requires extracellular calcium, and the influence of calcium blockers thereon were measured in ventricles, atria, diaphragm, fat, and liver in the rat. In the first three tissues, T3 produced comparable changes in 45Ca uptake and 2-DG uptake (T3 increased 2-DG uptake in fat, where 45Ca uptake was undetected, and had no effect in liver); this activity was blocked by the calcium channel blocker cadmium. The effect of T3 on 45Ca uptake, like its effect on the in vivo uptake of 2-DG described previously, was biphasic and time related; at physiological doses of 0.01 and 0.1 micrograms/100 g BW, T3 increased 45Ca uptake, whereas at greater (pharmacological) doses of 1 and 100 micrograms/100 g BW, T3 was without effect or inhibited 45Ca uptake. In ventricles and atria, the stimulatory effect of T3 on 45Ca uptake was very rapid within 2 min, at which time it was at or near maximum (50-90% above control) and then declined gradually and was not seen after 10-20 min. Of the several calcium blockers employed, verapamil (organic) and cadmium (inorganic) were found to be the most effective. Verapamil and cadmium produced a rapid, transient, and dose-related inhibition of 45Ca uptake in the tissues examined (except fat tissue where, under the experimental conditions employed, 45Ca uptake was undetected). Verapamil, given iv (200 micrograms/100 g BW) or ip (1 mg/100 g BW), reduced tissue 45Ca uptake by 50-90% within 2 or 10 min, respectively, and then its inhibitory effect diminished rapidly and was not seen after 20-30 min.

  2. A minimalist model of calcium-voltage coupling in GnRH cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, Martin; Chan, Rossanna; Duan Wen; Sneyd, James [Department of Mathematics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Schneider, David, E-mail: schneide@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica. Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-03-01

    We present a minimalist model to describe the interplay between burst firing and calcium dynamics in Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells. This model attempts to give a qualitative representation of Duan's model [3], and it comprises two FithzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) coupled systems describing the dynamics of the membrane potential and calcium concentration in the GnRH cells. Within the framework of our minimalist model, we find that the calcium subsystem drives burst firing by making the voltage subsystem to undergo a Hopf bifurcation. Specifically, fast relaxation oscillations occur in a specific region of the c-z plane (c being the calcium concentration, and z a calcium-dependent gating variable). Slow calcium oscillations, instead, are carried by the voltage subsystem by successive shifts of the calcium steady state, and have the net effect of an external perturbation. The full comprehension of the phase-plane of the voltage subsystem and the 3-dimensional phase-space of the calcium subsystem ultimately allows us to study the behaviours of the entire model under the change of certain parameters. Those special parameters do not necessarily follow realistic assumptions, but merely intend to mimic some pharmacological tests which have been performed experimentally and also simulated by Duan's model under the corresponding physiological considerations.

  3. Calcium and Calcium-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    should be satisfactory, because the electrolytic process for •(!>: A. H. Everts and G. D. Baglev’, " Physical «nrt m<„.+„4 i «_ of Calcium«, Electrochem...Rev. Metalurgie , 3j2, (1), 129 (1935). 10 ^sm^mssss^ma^^ extension between two known loads, is preferable to the value of 3,700,000 p.B.i. obtained

  4. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  5. Experimental observation of N00N state Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebugle, Maxime; Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Perez-Leija, Armando; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-09-22

    Bloch oscillations of quantum particles manifest themselves as periodic spreading and relocalization of the associated wave functions when traversing lattice potentials subject to external gradient forces. Albeit this phenomenon is deeply rooted into the very foundations of quantum mechanics, all experimental observations so far have only contemplated dynamics of one and two particles initially prepared in separable local states. Evidently, a more general description of genuinely quantum Bloch oscillations will be achieved on excitation of a Bloch oscillator by nonlocal states. Here we report the observation of Bloch oscillations of two-particle N00N states, and discuss the nonlocality on the ground of Bell-like inequalities. The time evolution of two-photon N00N states in Bloch oscillators, whether symmetric, antisymmetric or partially symmetric, reveals transitions from particle antibunching to bunching. Consequently, the initial states can be tailored to produce spatial correlations akin to those of bosons, fermions and anyons, presenting potential applications in photonic quantum simulation.

  6. Lorentz noninvariant oscillations of massless neutrinos are excluded

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, Vernon; Marfatia, Danny; Whisnant, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    The bicycle model of Lorentz noninvariant neutrino oscillations without neutrino masses naturally predicts maximal mixing and a 1/E dependence of the oscillation argument for muon-neutrino to tau-neutrino oscillations of atmospheric and long-baseline neutrinos, but cannot also simultaneously fit the data for solar neutrinos and KamLAND. We search for other possible structures of the effective Hamiltonian for Lorentz noninvariant oscillations of massless neutrinos that naturally have a 1/E dependence at high neutrino energy. Due to the lack of any evidence for direction dependence, we consider only direction-independent oscillations. Although we find a number of models with a 1/E dependence for atmospheric and long-baseline neutrinos, none can also simultaneously fit solar and KamLAND data.

  7. Calcium sulphate in ammonium sulphate solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, E.C.

    1905-01-01

    Calcium sulphate, at 25?? C., is two-thirds as soluble in dilute (o.i mol per liter) and twice as soluble in concentrated (3 mois per liter) ammonium sulphate solution as in water. The specific electric conductivity of concentrated ammonium sulphate solutions is lessened by saturating with calcium sulphate. Assuming that dissociation of ammonium sulphate takes place into 2NH4?? and SO4" and of calcium sulphate into Ca and SO4" only, and that the conductivity is a measure of such dissociation, the solubility of calcium sulphate in dilute ammonium sulphate solutions is greater than required by the mass-law. The conductivity of the dilute mixtures may be accurately calculated by means of Arrhenius' principle of isohydric solutions. In the data obtained in these calculations, the concentration of non-dissociated calcium sulphate decreases with increasing ammonium sulphate. The work as a whole is additional evidence of the fact that we are not yet in possession of all the factors necessary for reconciling the mass-law to the behavior of electrolytes. The measurements above described were made in the chemical laboratory of the University of Michigan.

  8. Attention Modulates TMS-Locked Alpha Oscillations in the Visual Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herring, J.D.; Thut, G.; Jensen, O.; Bergmann, T.O.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical oscillations, such as 8–12 Hz alpha-band activity, are thought to subserve gating of information processing in the human brain. While most of the supporting evidence is correlational, causal evidence comes from attempts to externally drive (“entrain”) these oscillations by transcranial magn

  9. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  10. From excitability to oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Neganova, A. Y.; Jacobsen, J. C. B.;

    2013-01-01

    One consequence of cell-to-cell communication is the appearance of synchronized behavior, where many cells cooperate to generate new dynamical patterns. We present a simple functional model of vasomotion based on the concept of a two-mode oscillator with dual interactions: via relatively slow...

  11. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments ({nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}}) currently being performed at accelerators are reviewed. Future plans for short and long base-line experiments are summarized. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  12. Multiphoton coherent population oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Sharypov, A V

    2014-01-01

    We study the bichromatic driving of a two-level system which displays long-lived coherent population oscillations (CPO). We show that under certain conditions, multiphoton parametric interaction leads to the appearance of CPO resonances at the subharmonic frequencies. In addition, in the region of the CPO resonances, there is strong parametric interaction between the weak sideband components of the electromagnetic field.

  13. A simple violin oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  14. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef;

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...

  15. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.;

    2007-01-01

    to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  16. Calcium Signaling in Interstitial Cells: Focus on Telocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Banciu, Adela; Banciu, Daniel Dumitru; Radu, Mihai; Cretoiu, Dragos; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria

    2017-02-13

    In this review, we describe the current knowledge on calcium signaling pathways in interstitial cells with a special focus on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs), and telocytes. In detail, we present the generation of Ca(2+) oscillations, the inositol triphosphate (IP₃)/Ca(2+) signaling pathway and modulation exerted by cytokines and vasoactive agents on calcium signaling in interstitial cells. We discuss the physiology and alterations of calcium signaling in interstitial cells, and in particular in telocytes. We describe the physiological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the pacemaking activity (e.g., intestinal, urinary, uterine or vascular pacemaking activity) and to the reproductive function. We also present the pathological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the aortic valve calcification or intestinal inflammation. Moreover, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by calcium signaling in telocytes in the uterine, cardiac and urinary physiology, and also in various pathologies, including immune response, uterine and cardiac pathologies.

  17. The APP670/671 mutation alters calcium signaling and response to hyperosmotic stress in rat primary hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Bruton, Joseph D; Winblad, Bengt;

    2008-01-01

    on the effect of the APP670/671 mutation on spontaneous calcium oscillations in embryonic hippocampal neurons derived from the tg6590 transgenic rat. Intracellular free calcium levels were imaged by confocal microscopy using the fluorescent dye fluo-3AM. Hyperosmotic shrinkage, which can occur in a variety......Altered calcium homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and much effort has been put into understanding the association between the autosomal dominant gene mutations causative of this devastating disease and perturbed calcium signaling. We have focused our attention...... of pathophysiological conditions, has been shown to induce multiple cellular responses, including activation of volume-regulatory ion transport, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell death. When exposed to hyperosmotic stress (addition of 50mM sucrose) the frequency of calcium oscillations was suppressed to an equal...

  18. Microwave transistor oscillator frequency tripling

    OpenAIRE

    B. A. Kotserzhynskyi

    2010-01-01

    The frequency tripler state of the art is consided. The oscillator-frequency tripler design is now at the state of scientific research. Microwave companies release the devices of the such structure: oscillator, buffer, amplifier-tripler.

  19. Microwave transistor oscillator frequency tripling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kotserzhynskyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency tripler state of the art is consided. The oscillator-frequency tripler design is now at the state of scientific research. Microwave companies release the devices of the such structure: oscillator, buffer, amplifier-tripler.

  20. Neutrino Velocity and Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Minakata, H

    2012-01-01

    We study distances of propagation and the group velocities of the muon neutrinos in the presence of mixing and oscillations assuming that Lorentz invariance holds. Oscillations lead to distortion of the $\

  1. Calcium signaling and T-type calcium channels in cancer cell cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James T Taylor; Xiang-Bin Zeng; Jonathan E Pottle; Kevin Lee; Alun R Wang; Stephenie G Yi; Jennifer A S Scruggs; Suresh S Sikka; Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is an important signaling mechanism for cell proliferation in both normal and cancerous cells. In normal epithelial cells,free calcium concentration is essential for cells to enter and accomplish the S phase and the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, cancerous cells can pass these phases of the cell cycle with much lower cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations, indicating an alternative mechanism has developed for fulfilling the intracellular calcium requirement for an increased rate of DNA synthesis and mitosis of fast replicating cancerous cells. The detailed mechanism underlying the altered calcium loading pathway remains unclear;however, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests the T-type Ca2+ channel is abnormally expressed in cancerous cells and that blockade of these channels may reduce cell proliferation in addition to inducing apoptosis. Recent studies also show that the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in breast cancer cells is proliferation state dependent, i.e. the channels are expressed at higher levels during the fast-replication period, and once the cells are in a non-proliferation state, expression of this channel isminimal. Therefore, selectively blocking calcium entry into cancerous cells may be a valuable approach for preventing tumor growth. Since T-type Ca2+ channels are not expressed in epithelial cells, selective T-type Ca2+ channel blockers may be useful in the treatment of certain types of cancers.

  2. APPswe mutation increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-oscillations in rat hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Winblad, Bengt;

    2008-01-01

    Altered calcium homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Much effort has been put into understanding the association between protein mutations causative of this devastating neurodegenerative disease and perturbed calcium signaling. Whereas the presenilin mutations...... have received most attention in the context of neuronal calcium signaling, we focused on the effects of APP with the so-called Swedish mutation (APPswe) on spontaneous neuronal activity. We observed that primary hippocampal neurons from an APPswe transgenic rat showed increased frequency and unaltered...... amplitude of spontaneous calcium oscillations as compared to wild-type neurons. We found that the altered calcium signaling of APPswe transgenic neurons was unlikely to be due to modulation of the NMDA or nicotinic neurotransmitter systems, and did not depend on secreted APP derivates. The implications...

  3. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent...

  4. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  5. [The character of calcium distribution in developing anther of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Xie, Chao Tian; Yang, Yan Hong; Xu, Qing; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2005-10-01

    Potassium antimonite was used to locate calcium in the anther of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L) during its development. At the early stage of anther development there were few calcium granules in microspore mother cells and the cells of anther wall. After meiosis of microspore mother cells, calcium granules first appeared in the tapetal cells in which some small secretive vacuoles containing many calcium granules were formed and secreted into locule. Then, the tapetal cells began to degenerate. At the late stage of microspore, tapetal cells completely degenerated and its protoplast masses moved into anther locule with many calcium granules. Few calcium granules were precipitated in the microspores just being released from tetrad, but some on the surface of exine. Then calcium granules appeared in the nucleus and cytoplasm of early microspores, as wall as in the exine. When microspores formed some small vacuoles containing some calcium granules, and then the small vacuoles fused to form a large vacuole, the calcium granules in the nucleus and cytoplasm evidently decreased, microspore developed to the late stage. The result suggested that calcium is related to the formation of large vacuole in microspores. The wall of microspore also is a main location of calcium granules during its developing. At early microspore some calcium granules began to accumulate in exine, which suggested calcium related with exine formation. At late stage of microspore, most of calcium granules were mainly deposited on the surface of exine. After the first mitosis of microspores, the large vacuole of bicellular pollen disappeared and calcium granules in the large vacuole went back to cytoplasm again. When bicellular pollen synthesized starches some calcium granules appeared on the surface of starches, which suggested calcium may regulate starch synthesis. With amount of starches increasing, calcium granules disappeared from pollen cytoplasm and only some of them located on the surface of pollen.

  6. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  7. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  8. Renal vascular effects of calcium channel blockers in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstein, J A; Dworkin, L D

    1990-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that calcium channel blockers have specific effects on renal hemodynamics in patients with hypertension and may also slow the progression of chronic renal failure. When these agents are studied in vitro, their predominant effect is to reverse afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction induced by catecholamines or angiotensin II. Because efferent resistance may remain high, glomerular filtration rate rises while renal blood flow remains low. The effects in vivo are less consistent. In human hypertension, calcium channel blockers lower renal resistance and may raise both renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. In experimental models of chronic renal disease, calcium channel blockers slow the progression of renal damage; however, variable effects on renal hemodynamics have been found. Other factors implicated in the progression of renal damage, including compensatory renal hypertrophy, platelet aggregation, and calcium deposition, may also be favorably influenced by these agents. Recent studies suggest that calcium channel blockers may have similar protective effects in patients with hypertension and chronic renal disease.

  9. Closed-loop transcranial alternating current stimulation of slow oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS is an emerging non-invasive tool for modulating brain oscillations. There is evidence that weak oscillatory electrical stimulation during sleep can entrain cortical slow oscillations to improve the memory consolidation in rodents and humans. Using a novel method and a custom built stimulation device, automatic stimulation of slow oscillations in-phase with the endogenous activity in a real-time closed-loop setup is possible. Preliminary data from neuroplasticity experiments show a high detection performance of the proposed method, electrical measurements demonstrate the outstanding quality of the presented stimulation device.

  10. Neutrino Oscillations with Nil Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Edward R.

    2016-09-01

    An alternative neutrino oscillation process is presented as a counterexample for which the neutrino may have nil mass consistent with the standard model. The process is developed in a quantum trajectories representation of quantum mechanics, which has a Hamilton-Jacobi foundation. This process has no need for mass differences between mass eigenstates. Flavor oscillations and ν ,bar{ν } oscillations are examined.

  11. Circadian profiles in the embryonic chick heart: L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Michael L; Shi, Liheng; Grushin, Kirill; Nigussie, Fikru; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2010-10-01

    Circadian clocks exist in the heart tissue and modulate multiple physiological events, from cardiac metabolism to contractile function and expression of circadian oscillator and metabolic-related genes. Ample evidence has demonstrated that there are endogenous circadian oscillators in adult mammalian cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian embryos cannot be entrained independently to light-dark (LD) cycles in vivo without any maternal influence, but circadian genes are well expressed and able to oscillate in embryonic stages. The authors took advantage of using chick embryos that are independent of maternal influences to investigate whether embryonic hearts could be entrained under LD cycles in ovo. The authors found circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channels responsible for the production of cardiac muscle contraction in embryonic chick hearts. The mRNA levels and protein expression of VGCCα1C and VGCCα1D are under circadian control, and the average L-VGCC current density is significantly larger when cardiomyocytes are recorded during the night than day. The phosphorylation states of several kinases involved in insulin signaling and cardiac metabolism, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), stress-activated protein kinase (p38), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), are also under circadian control. Both Erk and p38 have been implicated in regulating cardiac contractility and in the development of various pathological states, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Even though both Erk and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathways participate in complex cellular processes regarding physiological or pathological states of cardiomyocytes, the circadian oscillators in the heart regulate these pathways independently, and both pathways contribute to the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs.

  12. The mechanism of hetero-synaptic interaction based on spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Futagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent physiological experiments focusing on synaptic plasticity, it is shown that synaptic modifications induced at one synapse are accompanied by hetero-synaptic changes at neighbor sites (Bi, 2002. These evidences imply that the hetero-synaptic interaction plays an important role in reconfiguration of synaptic connections to form and maintain functional neural circuits (Takahashi et al., 2012. Although the mechanism of the interaction is still unclear, some physiological studies suggest that the hetero-synaptic interaction could be caused by propagation of intracellular calcium signals (Nishiyama et al., 2000. Concretely, a spike-triggered calcium increase initiates calcium ion propagation along a dendrite through activation of molecular processes at neighboring sites. Here we hypothesized that the mechanism of the hetero-synaptic interaction was based on the intracellular calcium signaling, which is regulated by interactions between NMDA receptors (NMDARs, voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs and Ryanodine receptors (RyRs on endoplasmic reticulum (ER. To assess realizability of the hypothesized interaction mechanism, we simulated intracellular calcium dynamics at a cellular level, using the computational model that integrated the model of intracellular calcium dynamics (Keizer and Levine, 1996 and the multi-compartment neuron model (Poirazi et al., 2003. Using the proposed computational model, we induced calcium influxes at a local site in postsynaptic dendrite by controlling the spike timings of pre- and postsynaptic neurons. As a result, synchronized calcium influxes through NMDARs and VDCCs caused calcium release from ER. According to the phase plane analysis, RyR-mediated calcium release occurred when the calcium concentration in cytoplasm sufficiently increased under the condition of a high calcium concentration in ER. An NMDAR-mediated calcium influx was slow and persistent, consequently responsible for maintaining a high

  13. Recording Gamma Band Oscillations in Pedunculopontine Nucleus Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Francisco J; Luster, Brennon R; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2016-09-14

    Synaptic efferents from the PPN are known to modulate the neuronal activity of several intralaminar thalamic regions (e.g., the centrolateral/parafascicular; Cl/Pf nucleus). The activation of either the PPN or Cl/Pf nuclei in vivo has been described to induce the arousal of the animal and an increment in gamma band activity in the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). The cellular mechanisms for the generation of gamma band oscillations in Reticular Activating System (RAS) neurons are the same as those found to generate gamma band oscillations in other brains nuclei. During current-clamp recordings of PPN neurons (from parasagittal slices from 9 - 25 day-old rats), the use of depolarizing square steps rapidly activated voltage-dependent potassium channels that prevented PPN neurons from being depolarized beyond -25 mV. Injecting 1 - 2 sec long depolarizing current ramps gradually depolarized PPN membrane potential resting values towards 0 mV. However, injecting depolarizing square pulses generated gamma-band oscillations of membrane potential that showed to be smaller in amplitude compared to the oscillations generated by ramps. All experiments were performed in the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels and fast synaptic receptors blockers. It has been shown that the activation of high-threshold voltage-dependent calcium channels underlie gamma-band oscillatory activity in PPN neurons. Specific methodological and pharmacological interventions are described here, providing the necessary tools to induce and sustain PPN subthreshold gamma band oscillation in vitro.

  14. Voltage-controlled photonic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, A A; Ilchenko, V S; Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2010-05-15

    We report the development and demonstration of an X-band voltage-controlled photonic oscillator based on a whispering gallery mode resonator made of an electro-optic crystalline material. The oscillator has good spectral purity and wide, agile, linear tunability. We have modified the existing theoretical model of the opto-electronic oscillator to describe the performance of our tunable oscillator and have found a good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the measurement results. We show that the device is promising for higher-frequency applications where high-performance tunable oscillators with wide tunability do not exist.

  15. Stable local oscillator module.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  16. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, M.; Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [Universita degli Studi di Salerno Via Ponte don Melillon, Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica, Fisciano SA (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo collegato di Salerno - Baronissi SA (Italy); Dell' Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Illuminati, F. [CNR-INFM Coherentia - Napoli (Italy); Blasone, M. [ISI Foundation for Scientific Interchange, Torino (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multimode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged-lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks. (authors)

  17. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  18. Neutrino Masses and Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Treille, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos.

  19. Oscillations in the bispectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Meerburg, P Daniel

    2010-01-01

    There exist several models of inflation that produce primordial bispectra that contain a large number of oscillations. In this paper we discuss these models, and aim at finding a method of detecting such bispectra in the data. We explain how the recently proposed method of mode expansion of bispectra might be able to reconstruct these spectra from separable basis functions. Extracting these basis functions from the data might then lead to observational constraints on these models.

  20. Polychromatic optical Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2009-07-15

    Bloch oscillations (BOs) of polychromatic beams in circularly curved optical waveguide arrays are smeared out owing to the dependence of the BO spatial period on the wavelength. Here it is shown that restoring of the self-imaging property of the array and approximate BOs over relatively broad spectral ranges can be achieved by the insertion of suitable lumped phase slips uniformly applied across the array.

  1. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  2. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone mass, which is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Many Americans don't get enough calcium in their diets. Children and adolescent girls are at particular risk, but so are adults age 50 and older. How much calcium you ...

  3. Scientific evidence contradicts findings and assumptions of Canadian Safety Panel 6: microwaves act through voltage-gated calcium channel activation to induce biological impacts at non-thermal levels, supporting a paradigm shift for microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic field action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This review considers a paradigm shift on microwave electromagnetic field (EMF) action from only thermal effects to action via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Microwave/lower frequency EMFs were shown in two dozen studies to act via VGCC activation because all effects studied were blocked by calcium channel blockers. This mode of action was further supported by hundreds of studies showing microwave changes in calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i signaling. The biophysical properties of VGCCs/similar channels make them particularly sensitive to low intensity, non-thermal EMF exposures. Non-thermal studies have shown that in most cases pulsed fields are more active than are non-pulsed fields and that exposures within certain intensity windows have much large biological effects than do either lower or higher intensity exposures; these are both consistent with a VGCC role but inconsistent with only a heating/thermal role. Downstream effects of VGCC activation include calcium signaling, elevated nitric oxide (NO), NO signaling, peroxynitrite, free radical formation, and oxidative stress. Downstream effects explain repeatedly reported biological responses to non-thermal exposures: oxidative stress; single and double strand breaks in cellular DNA; cancer; male and female infertility; lowered melatonin/sleep disruption; cardiac changes including tachycardia, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death; diverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression; and therapeutic effects. Non-VGCC non-thermal mechanisms may occur, but none have been shown to have effects in mammals. Biologically relevant safety standards can be developed through studies of cell lines/cell cultures with high levels of different VGCCs, measuring their responses to different EMF exposures. The 2014 Canadian Report by a panel of experts only recognizes thermal effects regarding safety standards for non-ionizing radiation exposures. Its position is therefore contradicted by each

  4. Temperature sensitive oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An oscillator circuit for sensing and indicating temperature by changing oscillator frequency with temperature comprises a programmable operational amplifier which is operated on the roll-off portion of its gain versus frequency curve and has its output directly connected to the inverting input to place the amplifier in a follower configuration. Its output is also connected to the non-inverting input by a capacitor with a crystal or other tuned circuit also being connected to the non-inverting input. A resistor is connected to the program input of the amplifier to produce a given set current at a given temperature, the set current varying with temperature. As the set current changes, the gain-bandwidth of the amplifier changes and, in turn, the reflected capacitance across the crystal changes, thereby providing the desired change in oscillator frequency by pulling the crystal. There is no requirement that a crystal employed with this circuit display either a linear frequency change with temperature or a substantial frequency change with temperature.

  5. Role of Vitamin D Glucosiduronate in Calcium Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagubandi, Sreeramulu; Kumar, Rajiv; Londowski, James M.; Corradino, R. A.; Tietz, Pamela S

    1984-01-01

    Evidence has been presented suggesting the presence of vitamin D3 3β-glucosiduronate and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 glucosiduronate in rat bile. To evaluate the role of vitamin D glucosiduronates in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, we synthesized vitamin D3 3β-glucosiduronate and tested its biological activity in calcium- and vitamin D-deficient rats. After the intravenous administration of vitamin D3 3β-glucosiduronate to rats maintained on a low calcium diet, there was an increase in duode...

  6. Vitamin D and calcium: what do we need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Vincent; Jiang, Xuezhi; Farukhi, Yousaf Z; Rosen, Clifford J; Schnatz, Peter F

    2013-12-01

    This chapter provides a summary of the literature including results from large trials, meta-analyses, and recent major recommendations. Two well-accepted and recent recommendations include those from the Agency for Health Research and Quality on calcium and vitamin D supplementation and from the Institute of Medicine's dietary reference intakes for calcium and vitamin D. This review suggests that there is strong evidence for synergistic roles of calcium and vitamin D in maintaining bone health in postmenopausal women, but the correlation between vitamin D alone and bone health is overall inconclusive.

  7. Calcium channels, neuromuscular synaptic transmission and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Francisco J; Pagani, Mario R; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2008-09-15

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels are essential in neuronal signaling and synaptic transmission, and their functional alterations underlie numerous human disorders whether monogenic (e.g., ataxia, migraine, etc.) or autoimmune. We review recent work on Ca(V)2.1 or P/Q channelopathies, mostly using neuromuscular junction preparations, and focus specially on the functional hierarchy among the calcium channels recruited to mediate neurotransmitter release when Ca(V)2.1 channels are mutated or depleted. In either case, synaptic transmission is greatly compromised; evidently, none of the reported functional replacements with other calcium channels compensates fully.

  8. Calcium binding to cardiac myocytes protected from proteolytic enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, L E; Fawzi, A B

    1985-04-17

    Excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle is dependent on extracellular calcium and calcium bound to the surface of the myocardial cell. In this study, we examined the physical characteristics of calcium binding to adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes disaggregated mechanically in oxygenated tissue culture medium containing a proteinase inhibitor (aprotinin), and separated from cellular debris by Cytodex beads. Cells prepared in this manner excluded Trypan blue and showed no evidence of spontaneous contraction or contracture. Scatchard plots of calcium binding determined by continuous flow equilibrium dialysis revealed a high-affinity, low-capacity pool, Ka = 65 X 10(3) M-1 and Bt = 1.3 nmol X mg-1 and a low-affinity, high-capacity pool, Ka = 141 M-1 and Bt = 138 nmol X mg-1. The low-affinity pool was not detectable after lanthanum, trypsin or collagenase treatment or in cells prepared without aprotinin in the isolation medium. Both neuraminidase and phospholipase C reduced Bt of the low-affinity pool by one half, but only neuraminidase affected the affinity constant of this pool. Ka was increased to 516.7 M-1, similar to the apparent affinity constant for calcium binding estimated from dP/dtmax measured at several extracellular calcium concentrations (470 M-1). The results suggest that calcium bound to sarcolemmal phospholipids represents the superficial calcium involved in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart.

  9. Nonlinear Oscillators in Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester,Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    We discuss dynamical systems that produce an oscillation without an external time dependent source. Numerical results are presented for nonlinear oscillators in the Em1h's atmosphere, foremost the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBOl. These fluid dynamical oscillators, like the solar dynamo, have in common that one of the variables in a governing equation is strongly nonlinear and that the nonlinearity, to first order, has particular form. of 3rd or odd power. It is shown that this form of nonlinearity can produce the fundamental li'equency of the internal oscillation. which has a period that is favored by the dynamical condition of the fluid. The fundamental frequency maintains the oscillation, with no energy input to the system at that particular frequency. Nonlinearities of 2nd or even power could not maintain the oscillation.

  10. Calcium and vitamin D in post menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and Vitamin D are widely used therapies for Osteoporosis. Vitamin D is not a vitamin in true sense since it is produced in response to the action of sunlight on skin. Vitamin D has multiple roles in the body, not all of them well-understood. Vitamin D supplementation must be considered a form of hormone replacement therapy. Therefore it raises all the questions about efficacy, dose, and side effects. The Efficacy of use of Calcium and Vitamin D in all post menopausal women in terms of the prevention of fracture is uncertain. The Annual worldwide sales of these supplements have been several billion dollars. The variation of the results from various studies of Calcium and Vitamin D supplementation in elderly women suggest that benefit of calcium plus vitamin D on bone mineral density or the risk of fracture is small and may vary from group to group and baseline Vitamin D status. Women taking supplemental vitamin D and calcium have a statistically increased incidence of renal stones, according to evidence from the Women′s Health Initiative. Studies have shown association between calcium use and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In a recent review of evidence from 6 randomized trials evaluating the use of vitamin D and calcium to prevent fractures in postmenopausal women who are not living in a nursing home or other institution, the United States Preventive Task Force (USPTF found no evidence of a benefit from supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D3 and 1000 mg or less of calcium. Also in a report from institute of Medicine Committee, there was insufficient evidence, particularly from randomized trials, that vitamin D treatment affected the risk of non skeletal outcomes like risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, infections, autoimmune disease, and other extra skeletal outcomes.

  11. [The dynamics of calcium distribution in stigma and style of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) before and after pollination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Xie, Chao Tian; Yang, Yan Hong; Gu, Li; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2005-08-01

    Potassium antimonite was used to deposit calcium in the stigma and style of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) before and after pollination. The stigma of lettuce is two splits. Abundant calcium granules are displayed in the wall of papillae on the receptive surface of stigma before and after pollination, which may facilitate pollen germination. However, a few calcium granules in the wall of epidermis cell on no-receptive surface. Calcium distribution in style presents a gradient in transmitting tissue and parenchyma cells from the top to the base of the style before pollination. After pollination, calcium in transmitting tissue distinctly increased and its gradient distribution became more evident. Pollen tubes grow in the intercellular gaps of transmitting tissue. When pollen tubes grew into transmitting tissue, calcium granules in parenchyma around transmitting tissue decreased, suggesting a calcium movement was controlled by pollen tubes. The calcium gradient distribution also appeared in the trachea of vascular bundle of style. In general, calcium in style displays a feature of time-special distribution: transmitting tissue doesn't need much more calcium that is only stored in the parenchyma before pollination. However, calcium in parenchyma cells may be transported to transmitting tissue and make the latter contain more calcium to form an evident calcium gradient and meet the requirement of pollen tubes directionally growing after pollination. This is the second sample of calcium gradient existing in style, which was found by using potassium antimonite method.

  12. Calcium Signaling throughout the Toxoplasma gondii Lytic Cycle: A STUDY USING GENETICALLY ENCODED CALCIUM INDICATORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Budu, Alexandre; McKnight, Ciara A; Moore, Christina A; Vella, Stephen A; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Liu, Jing; Garcia, Celia R S; Pace, Douglas A; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that invades host cells, creating a parasitophorous vacuole where it communicates with the host cell cytosol through the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. The lytic cycle of the parasite starts with its exit from the host cell followed by gliding motility, conoid extrusion, attachment, and invasion of another host cell. Here, we report that Ca(2+) oscillations occur in the cytosol of the parasite during egress, gliding, and invasion, which are critical steps of the lytic cycle. Extracellular Ca(2+) enhances each one of these processes. We used tachyzoite clonal lines expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with host cells expressing transiently expressed calcium indicators of different colors, and we measured Ca(2+) changes in both parasites and host simultaneously during egress. We demonstrated a link between cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in the host and in the parasite. Our approach also allowed us to measure two new features of motile parasites, which were enhanced by Ca(2+) influx. This is the first study showing, in real time, Ca(2+) signals preceding egress and their direct link with motility, an essential virulence trait.

  13. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  14. Acquisition of a Nd-Yag Pumped MOPO (Master Oscillator/Power Oscillator) Optical Parametric Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    SEP 1997 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1997 to 00-00-1997 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Acquisition of a Nd-Yag Pumped MOPO (Master Oscillator...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ACQUISITION OF A ND-YAG PUMPED MOPO (MASTER OSCILLATOR / POWER OSCILLATOR) OPTICAL...instrument is configured in a master oscillator/power oscillator configuration, hence the designation MOPO . The MOPO will be used in conjunction

  15. Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    There is compelling evidence for neutrino flavor change as neutrinos propagate. The evidence for this phenomenon has been provided by several experiments observing neutrinos that traverse distances of several hundred kilometers between production and detection. This review outlines the evidence for neutrino flavor change from such experiments and describes recent results in the field.

  16. Calcium, vitamin D and bone

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium, protein and vitamin D are the main nutrients relevant to bone health. This short article discusses the importance of vitamin D and its relation to calcium homeostasis. The various causes, clinical manifestations and treatment are outlined.

  17. A study of neutrino oscillations in MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufer, Tobias Martin [Univ. College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillations experiment located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA. It makes use of the NuMI neutrino beamline and two functionally identical detectors located at distances of ~1km and ~735km from the neutrino production target respectively. The Near Detector measures the composition and energy spectrum of the neutrino beam with high precision while the Far Detector looks for evidence of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents work conducted in two distinct areas of the MINOS experiment: analysis of neutral current and charged current interactions. While charged current events are only sensitive to muon neutrino disappearance, neutral current events can be used to distinguish oscillations into sterile neutrinos from those involving only active neutrino species. A complete, preliminary neutral current study is performed on simulated data. This is followed by a more detailed investigation of neutral current neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector. A procedure identifying neutral current interactions and rejecting backgrounds due to reconstruction failures is developed. Two distinct event classification methods are investigated. The selected neutral current events in the Near Detector are used to extract corrections to the neutral current cross-section in the MINOS Monte Carlo simulation as a function of energy. The resulting correction factors are consistent with unity. The main MINOS charged current neutrino disappearance analysis is described. We present the Monte Carlo tuning procedure, event selection, extrapolation from Near to Far Detector and fit for neutrino oscillations. Systematic errors on this measurement are evaluated and discussed in detail. The data are consistent with neutrino oscillations with the following parameters: 2.74 $+0.44\\atop{-0.26}$ x 10-3 eV2 and sin2(2θ23) > 0.87 at 68% confidence level.

  18. THE ORIGIN OF TYPE I SPICULE OSCILLATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keys, P. H.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Pascoe, D. J. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J., E-mail: d.jess@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope, to reveal how the generation of transverse waves in Type I spicules is a direct result of longitudinal oscillations occurring in the photosphere. Here we show how pressure oscillations, with periodicities in the range of 130-440 s, manifest in small-scale photospheric magnetic bright points, and generate kink waves in the Sun's outer atmosphere with transverse velocities approaching the local sound speed. Through comparison of our observations with advanced two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we provide evidence for how magnetoacoustic oscillations, generated at the solar surface, funnel upward along Type I spicule structures, before undergoing longitudinal-to-transverse mode conversion into waves at twice the initial driving frequency. The resulting kink modes are visible in chromospheric plasma, with periodicities of 65-220 s, and amplitudes often exceeding 400 km. A sausage mode oscillation also arises as a consequence of the photospheric driver, which is visible in both simulated and observational time series. We conclude that the mode conversion and period modification is a direct consequence of the 90 Degree-Sign phase shift encompassing opposite sides of the photospheric driver. The chromospheric energy flux of these waves are estimated to be Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} W m{sup -2}, which indicates that they are sufficiently energetic to accelerate the solar wind and heat the localized corona to its multi-million degree temperatures.

  19. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, D. A.; Rameika, R.; Stanton, N.

    This paper attempts to summarize the neutrino oscillation section of the Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Beam Facilities. There were very lively discussions about the merits of the different oscillation channels, experiments, and facilities, but we believe a substantial consensus emerged. First, the next decade is one of great potential for discovery in neutrino physics, but it is also one of great peril. The possibility that neutrino oscillations explain the solar neutrino and atmospheric neutrino experiments, and the indirect evidence that Hot Dark Matter (HDM) in the form of light neutrinos might make up 30% of the mass of the universe, point to areas where accelerator-based experiments could play a crucial role in piecing together the puzzle. At the same time, the field faces a very uncertain future. The LSND experiment at LAMPF is the only funded neutrino oscillation experiment in the United States and it is threatened by the abrupt shutdown of LAMPF proposed for fiscal 1994. The future of neutrino physics at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS depends on the continuation of High Energy Physics (HEP) funding after the RHIC startup. Most proposed neutrino oscillation searches at Fermilab depend on the completion of the Main Injector project and on the construction of a new neutrino beamline, which is uncertain at this point. The proposed KAON facility at TRIUMF would provide a neutrino beam similar to that at the AGS but with a much increased intensity. The future of KAON is also uncertain. Despite the difficult obstacles present, there is a real possibility that we are on the verge of understanding the masses and mixings of the neutrinos. The physics importance of such a discovery cannot be overstated. The current experimental status and future possibilities are discussed.

  20. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is not very poisonous. Recovery is quite likely. But, long-term overuse is more serious than a single overdose, because it can cause kidney damage. Few people die from an antacid overdose. Keep all medicines in child-proof bottles and out ...

  1. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as kidney function and levels of calcium in your urine. Your provider may do other tests to further assess your condition, such as checking your blood levels of phosphorus (a mineral). Imaging studies also may be helpful, such as bone ...

  2. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  3. Calcium aluminate in alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Arzu

    The properties of ceramic materials are determined not only by the composition and structure of the phases present, but also by the distribution of impurities, intergranular films and second phases. The phase distribution and microstructure both depend on the fabrication techniques, the raw materials used, the phase-equilibrium relations, grain growth and sintering processes. In this dissertation research, various approaches have been employed to understand fundamental phenomena such as grain growth, impurity segregation, second-phase formation and crystallization. The materials system chosen was alumina intentionally doped with calcium. Atomic-scale structural analyses of grain boundaries in alumina were carried on the processed samples. It was found that above certain calcium concentrations, CA6 precipitated as a second phase at all sintering temperatures. The results also showed that abnormal grain growth can occur after precipitation and it is not only related to the calcium level, but it is also temperature dependent. In order to understand the formation mechanism of CA6 precipitates in calcium doped alumina samples, several studies have been carried out using either bulk materials or thin films The crystallization of CA2 and CA6 powders has been studied. Chemical processing techniques were used to synthesize the powders. It was observed that CA2 powders crystallized directly, however CA6 powders crystallized through gamma-Al 2O3 solid solution. The results of energy-loss near-edge spectrometry confirmed that gamma-Al2O3 can dissolve calcium. Calcium aluminate/alumina reaction couples have also been investigated. All reaction couples were heat treated following deposition. It was found that gamma-Al2O3 was formed at the interface as a result of the interfacial reaction between the film and the substrate. gamma-Al 2O3 at the interface was stable at much higher temperatures compared to the bulk gamma-Al2O3 formed prior to the CA6 crystallization. In order to

  4. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...

  5. Fast calcium wave propagation mediated by electrically conducted excitation and boosted by CICR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, J.M.A.M.; Meerwijk, W.P. van; Ypey, D.L.; Theuvenet, A.P.R.; Gielen, C.C.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated synchronization and propagation of calcium oscillations, mediated by gap junctional excitation transmission. For that purpose we used an experimentally based model of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells, electrically coupled in a one-dimensional configuration (linear strand). Fibrobla

  6. Bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-03-01

    A strong interest in use of ceramics for biomedical applications appeared in the late 1960's. Used initially as alternatives to metals in order to increase a biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics, bioactive (or surface reactive) and bioresorbable ones. Furthermore, any type of bioceramics could be porous to provide tissue ingrowth. This review is devoted to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates, which belong to the categories of bioresorbable and bioactive compounds. During the past 30-40 years, there have been a number of major advances in this field. Namely, after the initial work on development of bioceramics that was tolerated in the physiological environment, emphasis was shifted towards the use of bioceramics that interacted with bones by forming a direct chemical bond. By the structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether the bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates was biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether it was resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics, which is able to regenerate bone tissues, has been developed. Current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Potential future applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics will include drug-delivery systems, as well as they will become effective carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  7. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model...... for this complex polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The model reproduces well the qualitatively different time series that result from different experimental conditions, and illuminates the role and importance of individual processes in the cycle. Simple experiments are suggested that can further test...... and define the model and the polymer's reaction cycle....

  8. On particle oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Góźdź, Marek

    2013-01-01

    It has been firmly established, that neutrinos change their flavour during propagation. This feature is attributed to the fact, that each flavour eigenstate is a superposition of three mass eigenstates, which propagate with different frequencies. This picture, although widely accepted, is wrong in the simplest approach and requires quite sophisticated treatment based on the wave-packet description within quantum field theory. In this communication we present a novel, much simpler explanation and show, that oscillations among massive particles can be obtained in a natural way. We use the framework of quantum mechanics with time being a physical observable, not just a parameter.

  9. Kravchuk oscillator revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakishiyeva, Mesuma K.; Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    The study of irreducible representations of Lie algebras and groups has traditionally considered their action on functions of a continuous manifold (e.g. the 'rotation' Lie algebra so(3) on functions on the sphere). Here we argue that functions of a discrete variable -Kravchuk functions- are on equal footing for that study in the case of so(3). They lead to a discrete quantum model of the harmonic oscillator, and offer a corresponding set of special function relations. The technique is applicable to other special function families of a discrete variable, which stem from low-dimensional Lie algebras and are stationary solutions for the corresponding discrete quantum models.

  10. On Oscillating Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, E V

    2006-01-01

    Distance-redshift data can impose strong constraints on dark energy models even when the equation of state is oscillatory. Despite the double integral dependence of the distance on the equation of state, precision measurement of the distance-redshift relation for z=0-2 is more incisive than the linear growth factor, CMB last scattering surface distance, and the age of the universe in distinguishing oscillatory behavior from an average behavior. While oscillating models might help solve the coincidence problem (since acceleration occurs periodically), next generation observations will strongly constrain such possibilities.

  11. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. The authors propose that this role may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis, specifically, that the increases in theta oscillations and changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments.

  12. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40-100Hz in mammals, 20-30Hz in insects, 0.5-1.5Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB), antennal lobe (AL), or procerebrum (PrC). Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the OB and AL. Beta (20Hz) and theta (2-12Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal OB input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration.

  13. C P -violating baryon oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2016-10-01

    We enumerate the conditions necessary for C P violation to be manifest in n -n ¯ oscillations and build a simple model that can give rise to such effects. We discuss a possible connection between neutron oscillations and dark matter, provided the mass of the latter lies between mp-me and mp+me. We apply our results to a possible baryogenesis scenario involving C P violation in the oscillations of the Ξ0.

  14. Linearization of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belendez, A; Alvarez, M L [Departamento de Fisica, IngenierIa de Sistemas y TeorIa de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Fernandez, E; Pascual, I [Departamento de Optica, FarmacologIa y AnatomIa, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: a.belendez@ua.es

    2009-03-11

    A linearization method of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force which allows us to obtain a frequency-amplitude relation which is valid not only for small but also for large amplitudes and, sometimes, for the complete range of oscillation amplitudes. Some conservative nonlinear oscillators are analysed to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of the technique.

  15. How pervasive are circadian oscillations?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Circadian oscillations play a critical role in coordinating the physiology, homeostasis, and behavior of biological systems. Once thought to only be controlled by a master clock, recent high-throughput experiments suggest many genes and metabolites in a cell are potentially capable of circadian oscillations. Each cell can reprogram itself and select a relatively small fraction of this broad repertoire for circadian oscillations, as a result of genetic, environmental, and even diet changes.

  16. Peculiarity of the oscillation stratification in sunspot penumbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Kolobov, D Y; Kobanov, N I

    2016-01-01

    Spatial distributions of the dominant oscillation frequency obtained for four sunspots show a feature shared by all the analysed levels of the solar atmosphere in these sunspots. This feature located in the inner penumbrae indicates that this region has favourable conditions for 2.5-4 mHz oscillation propagation. This agrees with the fact that the spectral composition of the oscillations at three atmospheric heights (FeI 6173{\\AA}, 1700{\\AA}, and He II 304{\\AA}) in this region are similar. There have been previous evidence of particular similarities along height of photospheric magnetic field strength, line-of-sight velocity, and temperature profile in the inner penumbra, where the internal boundary of the Evershed flow is located. The finding of the same dominant oscillation frequency at a range of altitudes from the chromosphere up to the transition region extends the height range, suggesting similarities in physical conditions.

  17. Calcium Nutrition and Extracellular Calcium Sensing: Relevance for the Pathogenesis of Osteoporosis, Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meinrad Peterlik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a systematic search in Pubmed for literature, on links between calcium malnutrition and risk of chronic diseases, we found the highest degree of evidence for osteoporosis, colorectal and breast cancer, as well as for hypertension, as the only major cardiovascular risk factor. Low calcium intake apparently has some impact also on cardiovascular events and disease outcome. Calcium malnutrition can causally be related to low activity of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR. This member of the family of 7-TM G-protein coupled receptors allows extracellular Ca2+ to function as a “first messenger” for various intracellular signaling cascades. Evidence demonstrates that Ca2+/CaSR signaling in functional linkage with vitamin D receptor (VDR-activated pathways (i promotes osteoblast differentiation and formation of mineralized bone; (ii targets downstream effectors of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathway to inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of colorectal cancer cells; (iii evokes Ca2+ influx into breast cancer cells, thereby activating pro-apoptotic intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Ca2+/CaSR signaling opens Ca2+-sensitive K+ conductance channels in vascular endothelial cells, and also participates in IP3-dependent regulation of cytoplasmic Ca2+, the key intermediate of cardiomyocyte functions. Consequently, impairment of Ca2+/CaSR signaling may contribute to inadequate bone formation, tumor progression, hypertension, vascular calcification and, probably, cardiovascular disease.

  18. Experiments on Deflecting & Oscillating Waterjet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new type jet,the oscillating & deflecting jet ,is put forward and its oscillating and deflecting characteristics are investigated.The nozzle of the self-oscillating & deflecting water jet consists of an upstream nozzle,a downstream nozzle,an oscillating chamber and two switches,It is experimentally shown that the deflective angle may reach 9.53 degeree,the generated pressure fluctuation is very regular and the jet can efficiently increase the ability for bradking and cutting by eliminating the water cushion effect associated with a continuous jet.

  19. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show that at resona......We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...

  20. Unstable oscillators based hyperchaotic circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; G. Mykolaitis, A.;

    1999-01-01

    A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations in the circ......A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations...

  1. MULTIPLE OSCILLATION STABILIZING CONTROL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    YUE,M.; SCHLUETER,R.; AZARM,M.; BARI,R.

    2004-07-23

    This paper presents a strategy that may be used to guide stabilizing control design for multiple oscillations, which are difficult to control using conventional control design procedures. A multiple oscillation phenomena is observed in an example power system. A local bifurcation and an interarea bifurcation develop in an example power system due to multiple bifurcation parameter variations. The dynamic behaviors of the bifurcating system are complex due to the overlapping of the two different bifurcation subsystems and are shown to be difficult to control. The double bifurcations are studied in this paper and in order to stabilize them, three kind of {mu}-synthesis robust controls are designed, (a) {mu}-synthesis power system stabilizer (MPSS); (b) {mu}-synthesis SVC control (MSVC); and (c) a mixed MPSS/MSVC control. Based on the bifurcation subsystem analysis, the measurement signals and locations of the controls are selected. The control performances of three kind of controls are evaluated and compared. The conclusions are given according to the analysis and time simulation results.

  2. Scanning for oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cheveigné, Alain; Arzounian, Dorothée

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Oscillations are an important aspect of brain activity, but they often have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to source-to-electrode mixing with competing brain activity and noise. Filtering can improve the SNR of narrowband signals, but it introduces ringing effects that may masquerade as genuine oscillations, leading to uncertainty as to the true oscillatory nature of the phenomena. Likewise, time-frequency analysis kernels have a temporal extent that blurs the time course of narrowband activity, introducing uncertainty as to timing and causal relations between events and/or frequency bands. Approach. Here, we propose a methodology that reveals narrowband activity within multichannel data such as electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, electrocorticography or local field potential. The method exploits the between-channel correlation structure of the data to suppress competing sources by joint diagonalization of the covariance matrices of narrowband filtered and unfiltered data. Main results. Applied to synthetic and real data, the method effectively extracts narrowband components at unfavorable SNR. Significance. Oscillatory components of brain activity, including weak sources that are hard or impossible to observe using standard methods, can be detected and their time course plotted accurately. The method avoids the temporal artifacts of standard filtering and time-frequency analysis methods with which it remains complementary.

  3. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  4. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  5. indications of r-mode oscillations in soho/mdi solar radius measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Sturrock, P A; Gough, D O; Scargle, J D

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of solar radius measurements acquired by the Michelson Doppler Imager on the SOHO spacecraft supports previously reported evidence of solar internal r-mode oscillations in Mt Wilson radius data and in nuclear-decay data acquired at the Lomonosov Moscow State University. The frequencies of these oscillations are compatible with oscillations in a putative inner tachocline that separates a slowly rotating core from the radiative envelope.

  6. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  7. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  8. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  9. Absence of rebound effect with calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, G

    1996-01-01

    This was an open, randomised balance cross-over study in 12 healthy male volunteers. The antacid activity of calcium carbonate plus magnesium carbonate (Rennie and hydrotalcite (Talcid), given in the recommended dose of 2 tablets 4 times daily, were compared using 24 h intragastric measurement of pH. The volunteers received 2 tablets of calcium carbonate plus magnesium carbonate or hydrotalcite according to a randomised order 1 h after each meal and at bedtime. Results showed that both treatments have similar antacid efficacy and a similar duration of action of about one hour. There was no evidence of acid 'rebound' following either treatment during the second and third hours following the administration of antacid.

  10. Filamin and phospholipase C-ε are required for calcium signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismar Kovacevic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue.

  11. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  12. T-type calcium channel: a privileged gate for calcium entry and control of adrenal steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Florian Rossier

    2016-05-01

    -type channels have been described yet to affect cortisol secretion or to be linked to the development of Cushing syndrome, but several evidences suggest that the function of T channels is also crucial in fasciculata cells. Putative molecular mechanisms and cellular structural organization making T channels a privileged entry for the steroidogenic calcium are also discussed.

  13. Physics of bubble oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas [Third Physical Institute, University of Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    Bubbles in liquids, soft and squeezy objects made of gas and vapour, yet so strong as to destroy any material and so mysterious as at times turning into tiny light bulbs, are the topic of the present report. Bubbles respond to pressure forces and reveal their full potential when periodically driven by sound waves. The basic equations for nonlinear bubble oscillation in sound fields are given, together with a survey of typical solutions. A bubble in a liquid can be considered as a representative example from nonlinear dynamical systems theory with its resonances, multiple attractors with their basins, bifurcations to chaos and not yet fully describable behaviour due to infinite complexity. Three stability conditions are treated for stable trapping of bubbles in standing sound fields: positional, spherical and diffusional stability. Chemical reactions may become important in that respect, when reacting gases fill the bubble, but the chemistry of bubbles is just touched upon and is beyond the scope of the present report. Bubble collapse, the runaway shrinking of a bubble, is presented in its current state of knowledge. Pressures and temperatures that are reached at this occasion are discussed, as well as the light emission in the form of short flashes. Aspherical bubble collapse, as for instance enforced by boundaries nearby, mitigates most of the phenomena encountered in spherical collapse, but introduces a new effect: jet formation, the self-piercing of a bubble with a high velocity liquid jet. Examples of this phenomenon are given from light induced bubbles. Two oscillating bubbles attract or repel each other, depending on their oscillations and their distance. Upon approaching, attraction may change to repulsion and vice versa. When being close, they also shoot self-piercing jets at each other. Systems of bubbles are treated as they appear after shock wave passage through a liquid and with their branched filaments that they attain in standing sound fields. The N

  14. A novel Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzen M.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all types of cells in humans. A family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, previously identified as important in the development of plants and protists, was recently shown to play a role in the infectivity of apicomplexans, and in motility and host cell invasion in particular. We report here the isolation of a new calcium-dependent protein kinase gene from the human toxoplasmosis parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The gene consists of 12 exons. The encoded protein, TgCDPK4, consists of the four characteristic domains of members of the CDPK family and is most similar to PfCDPK2 from Plasmodium falciparum. We measured TgCDPK4 activity, induced by calcium influx, using a kinase assay. A calcium chelator (EGTA inhibited this activity. These findings provide evidence of signal transduction involving members of the CDPK family in T. gondii.

  15. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to beta-palmitate and increased calcium absorption pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    triglycerides may increase calcium absorption by decreasing faecal calcium excretion as calcium soaps, albeit a significant effect on calcium absorption was demonstrated in one study only. The Panel concludes that the evidence provided is insufficient to establish a cause and effect relationship between...

  16. Self-Sustaining Dynamical Nuclear Polarization Oscillations in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudner, Mark Spencer; Levitov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Early experiments on spin-blockaded double quantum dots revealed robust, large-amplitude current oscillations in the presence of a static (dc) source-drain bias. Despite experimental evidence implicating dynamical nuclear polarization, the mechanism has remained a mystery. Here we introduce a min......) and nuclear spin diffusion, which governs dynamics of the spatial profile of nuclear polarization. The proposed framework naturally explains the differences in phenomenology between vertical and lateral quantum dot structures as well as the extremely long oscillation periods.......Early experiments on spin-blockaded double quantum dots revealed robust, large-amplitude current oscillations in the presence of a static (dc) source-drain bias. Despite experimental evidence implicating dynamical nuclear polarization, the mechanism has remained a mystery. Here we introduce...

  17. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms.

  18. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Findings Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Conclusion Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance. PMID:28182142

  19. Solar neutrino oscillation phenomenology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srubabati Goswami

    2004-02-01

    This article summarises the status of the solar neutrino oscillation phenomenology at the end of 2002 in the light of the SNO and KamLAND results. We first present the allowed areas obtained from global solar analysis and demonstrate the preference of the solar data towards the large-mixing-angle (LMA) MSW solution. A clear confirmation in favour of the LMA solution comes from the KamLAND reactor neutrino data. the KamLAND spectral data in conjunction with the global solar data further narrows down the allowed LMA region and splits it into two allowed zones - a low $ m^{2}$ region (low-LMA) and high $ m^{2}$ region (high-LMA). We demonstrate through a projected analysis that with an exposure of 3 kton-year (kTy) KamLAND can remove this ambiguity.

  20. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  1. Collective supernova neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Neutrinos emitted by core-collapse supernovae (SNe) represent an important laboratory for both particle physics and astrophysics. While propagating in the dense SN environment, they can feel not only the presence of background matter (via ordinary Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects) but also of the gas of neutrinos and antineutrinos (via neutrino-neutrino interaction effects). The neutrino-neutrino interactions appear to modify the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos in a collective way, completely different from the ordinary matter effects. In these conditions, the flavor evolution equations become highly nonlinear, sometimes resulting in surprising phenomena when the entire neutrino system oscillates coherently as a single collective mode. In this talk, I present the recent results on collective supernova neutrino flavor conversions and I discuss about the sensitivity of these effects to the ordering of the neutrino mass spectrum.

  2. Longitudinal oscillation of launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    During powered flight a vehicle may develop longitudinal self-excited oscillations, so-called oscillations, of its structure. The energy supplying the vibration is tapped from the thrust by the activity of the system itself; that is, oscillation of the structure causes oscillation of the propellant system, especially of the pumps. In this way an oscillating thrust can be created that, by a feedback loop, may sustain the structural oscillation under certain circumstances. Two special features of the system proved to be essential for creation of instability. One is the effect of the inherent time interval that the thrust oscillation is lagging behind the structural oscillation. The other is the decreased of system mass caused by the exhausting of gas. The latter feature may cause an initially stable system to become unstable. To examine the stability of the system, a single mass-spring model, which is the result of a one-term Galerkin approach to the equation of motion, has been considered. The Nyquist stability criterion leads to a stability graph that shows the stability conditions in terms of the system parameter and also demonstrates the significance of time lag, feedback magnitude, and loss of mass. An important conclusion can be drawn from the analysis: large relative displacements of the pump-engine masses favor instability. This is also confirmed by flight measurements.

  3. Solar Neutrino Oscillation - An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, D P

    2005-01-01

    After a brief summary of the neutrino oscillation formalism and the solar neutrino sources and experiments I discuss the matter effect on solar neutrino oscillation. Then I discuss how the resulting alternative solutions are experimentally resolved in favour of the LMA solution, with particular exphasis on the SK, SNO and KL data.

  4. On The Harmonic Oscillator Group

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Raquel M; Vega-Guzman, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the maximum kinematical invariance group of the quantum harmonic oscillator from a view point of the Ermakov-type system. The invariance group of generalized driven harmonic oscillator is shown to be isomorphic to the corresponding Schroedinger group of the free particle.

  5. The Wien Bridge Oscillator Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2006-01-01

    A tutorial in which the Wien bridge family of oscillators is defined and investigated. Oscillators which do not fit into the Barkhausen criterion topology may be designed. A design procedure based on initial complex pole quality factor is reported. The dynamic transfer characteristic...

  6. Lorentz violation and neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewes, Matthew [Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Lorentz violation naturally leads to neutrino oscillations and provides an alternative mechanism that may explain current data. This contribution to the proceedings of The XXII International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics provides a brief review of possible signals of Lorentz violation in neutrino-oscillation experiments.

  7. Neutrino Oscillations with Nil Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Floyd, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    An alternative neutrino oscillation process is presented as a counterexample for which the neutrino may have nil mass consistent with the standard model. The process is developed in a quantum trajectories representation of quantum mechanics, which has a Hamilton-Jacobi foundation. This process has no need for mass differences between mass eigenstates. Flavor oscillations and $\\bar{\

  8. Oscillator With Low Phase Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    Phase errors cancelled for high frequency stability. Radio-frequency oscillator achieves high stability of frequency through parallel, two-amplifier configuration in which effects cause phase noise tend to cancel each other. Circuit includes two amplifiers with resonating elements, each constitutes part of feedback loop of other. Generate same frequency because each circuit provides other with conditions necessary for oscillation.

  9. Hyperchaotic system with unstable oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; Mykolaitis, G.;

    2000-01-01

    A simple electronic system exhibiting hyperchaotic behaviour is described. The system includes two nonlinearly coupled 2nd order unstable oscillators, each composed of an LC resonance loop and an amplifier. The system is investigated by means of numerical integration of appropriate differential e...... equations, PSPICE simulations and hardware experiments. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic mode of the oscillations....

  10. Mechanical Parametric Oscillations and Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Usually parametric oscillations are not the topic of general physics courses. Probably it is because the mathematical theory of this phenomenon is relatively complicated, and until quite recently laboratory experiments for students were difficult to implement. However parametric oscillations are good illustrations of the laws of physics and can be…

  11. Phase noise of whispering gallery photonic hyper-parametric microwave oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Rubiola, Enrico; Matsko, Andrey B; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Maleki, Lute

    2008-03-17

    We report on the experimental study of phase noise properties of a high frequency photonic microwave oscillator based on four wave mixing in calcium fluoride whispering gallery mode resonators. Specifically, the oscillator generates approximately 8.5 GHz signals with -120 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz from the carrier. The floor of the phase noise is limited by the shot noise of the signal received at the photodetector. We argue that the performance of the oscillator can be significantly improved if one uses extremely high finesse resonators, increases the input optical power, supersaturates the oscillator, and suppresses the residual stimulated Raman scattering in the resonator. We also disclose a method of extremely sensitive measurement of the integral dispersion of millimeter scale dielectric resonators.

  12. Coupled oscillators on evolving networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. K.; Bagarti, Trilochan

    2016-12-01

    In this work we study coupled oscillators on evolving networks. We find that the steady state behavior of the system is governed by the relative values of the spread in natural frequencies and the global coupling strength. For coupling strong in comparison to the spread in frequencies, the system of oscillators synchronize and when coupling strength and spread in frequencies are large, a phenomenon similar to amplitude death is observed. The network evolution provides a mechanism to build inter-oscillator connections and once a dynamic equilibrium is achieved, oscillators evolve according to their local interactions. We also find that the steady state properties change by the presence of additional time scales. We demonstrate these results based on numerical calculations studying dynamical evolution of limit-cycle and van der Pol oscillators.

  13. Photoacoustic elastic oscillation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2015-08-10

    Photoacoustic imaging and sensing have been studied extensively to probe the optical absorption of biological tissue in multiple scales ranging from large organs to small molecules. However, its elastic oscillation characterization is rarely studied and has been an untapped area to be explored. In literature, photoacoustic signal induced by pulsed laser is commonly modelled as a bipolar "N-shape" pulse from an optical absorber. In this paper, the photoacoustic damped oscillation is predicted and modelled by an equivalent mass-spring system by treating the optical absorber as an elastic oscillator. The photoacoustic simulation incorporating the proposed oscillation model shows better agreement with the measured signal from an elastic phantom, than conventional photoacoustic simulation model. More interestingly, the photoacoustic damping oscillation effect could potentially be a useful characterization approach to evaluate biological tissue's mechanical properties in terms of relaxation time, peak number and ratio beyond optical absorption only, which is experimentally demonstrated in this paper.

  14. Photoacoustic elastic oscillation and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging and sensing have been studied extensively to probe the optical absorption of biological tissue in multiple scales ranging from large organs to small molecules. However, its elastic oscillation characterization is rarely studied and has been an untapped area to be explored. In literature, photoacoustic signal induced by pulsed laser is commonly modelled as a bipolar "N-shape" pulse from an optical absorber. In this paper, the photoacoustic damped oscillation is predicted and modelled by an equivalent mass-spring system by treating the optical absorber as an elastic oscillator. The photoacoustic simulation incorporating the proposed oscillation model shows better agreement with the measured signal from an elastic phantom, than conventional photoacoustic simulation model. More interestingly, the photoacoustic damping oscillation effect could potentially be a useful characterization approach to evaluate biological tissue's mechanical properties in terms of relaxation time, peak number and ra...

  15. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  16. Serum calcium concentration and prostate cancer risk: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Sepehr; Hosseini, Mostafa; Allameh, Farzad; Babakoohi, Shahab; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Pourmand, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to further evaluate the possible effects of serum calcium level on prostate cancer (PC) risk, with considering the age, body mass index (BMI), and sex steroid hormones. Using data from a prospective multicenter study, serum calcium concentration, as well as thorough demographic and medical characteristics, were determined in 194 cases with newly diagnosed, clinicopathologically confirmed PC and 317 controls, without any malignant disease, admitted to the same network of hospitals. Serum total and ionized calcium levels were categorized into tertiles. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) after adjustment for major potential confounders, including age, BMI, smoking, alcohol, education, occupation, marital status, family history of PC, and sex hormones level. The mean serum calcium level (±SD) in case and control groups was 9.22 (±0.46) mg/dl and 9.48 (±0.51) mg/dl, respectively (P < 0.001). After adjustment for mentioned confounders, a significant trend of decreasing risk was found for serum total calcium concentration (OR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.12-0.59, comparing the highest with the lowest tertile) and ionized calcium (OR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.10-0.58). An increase of 1 mg/dl in serum calcium level was associated with a significant decrease in PC risk (OR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.34-0.76). Our findings reveal the inverse association between serum total and ionized concentrations and PC risk, which supports the hypothesis that calcium may protect against PC. Furthermore, no evidence was found regarding age, BMI, and sex steroid hormones to modify the association between serum calcium and PC risk.

  17. Calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Nicholas M; Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-05-28

    The ability to rapidly respond to changes in temperature is a critical adaptation for insects and other ectotherms living in thermally variable environments. In a process called rapid cold hardening (RCH), insects significantly enhance cold tolerance following brief (i.e., minutes to hours) exposure to nonlethal chilling. Although the ecological relevance of RCH is well-established, the underlying physiological mechanisms that trigger RCH are poorly understood. RCH can be elicited in isolated tissues ex vivo, suggesting cold-sensing and downstream hardening pathways are governed by brain-independent signaling mechanisms. We previously provided preliminary evidence that calcium is involved in RCH, and here we firmly establish that calcium signaling mediates cold sensing in insect tissues. In tracheal cells of the freeze-tolerant goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, chilling to 0 °C evoked a 40% increase in intracellular calcium concentration as determined by live-cell confocal imaging. Downstream of calcium entry, RCH conditions significantly increased the activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) while reducing phosphorylation of the inhibitory Thr306 residue. Pharmacological inhibitors of calcium entry, calmodulin activation, and CaMKII activity all prevented ex vivo RCH in midgut and salivary gland tissues, indicating that calcium signaling is required for RCH to occur. Similar results were obtained for a freeze-intolerant species, adults of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, suggesting that calcium-mediated cold sensing is a general feature of insects. Our results imply that insect tissues use calcium signaling to instantly detect decreases in temperature and trigger downstream cold-hardening mechanisms.

  18. Free oscillation of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abedini

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This work is a study of the Earths free oscillations considering a merge of solid and liquid model. At the turn of 19th century Geophysicists presented the theory of the free oscillations for a self-gravitating, isotropic and compressible sphere. Assuming a steel structure for an Earth size sphere, they predicted a period of oscillation of about 1 hour. About 50 years later, the free oscillations of stars was studied by Cowling and others. They classified the oscillation modes of the stars into acoustic and gravity modes on the basis of their driving forces. These are pressure and buoyancy forces respectively. The earliest measurements for the period of the free oscillations of the Earth was made by Benyove from a study of Kamchathca earthquake. Since then, the Geophysicists have been trying to provide a theoretical basis for these measurements. Recently, the theory concerning oscillations of celestial fluids is extended by Sobouti to include the possible oscillations of the Earthlike bodies. Using the same technique, we study the free oscillations of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and elastic model for the Earth.   We used the actual data of the Earths interior structure in our numerical calculations. Numerical results show that there exist three distinct oscillation modes namely acoustic, gravity and toroidal modes. These modes are driven by pressure, buoyancy and shear forces respectively. The shear force is due to the elastic properties of the solid part of the Earth. Our numerical results are consistent with the seismic data recorded from earthquake measurements.

  19. Polynomially deformed oscillators as k-bonacci oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilik, A M

    2009-01-01

    A family of multi-parameter, polynomially deformed oscillators (PDOs) given by polynomial structure function \\phi(n) is studied from the viewpoint of being (or not) in the class of Fibonacci oscillators. These obey the Fibonacci relation/property (FR/FP) meaning that the n-th level energy E_n is given linearly, with real coefficients, by the two preceding ones E_{n-1}, E_{n-2}. We first prove that the PDOs do not fall in the Fibonacci class. Then, three different paths of generalizing the usual FP are developed for these oscillators: we prove that the PDOs satisfy respective k-term generalized Fibonacci (or "k-bonacci") relations; for these same oscillators we examine two other generalizations of the FR, the inhomogeneous FR and the "quasi-Fibonacci" relation. Extended families of deformed oscillators are studied too: the (q;\\mu)-oscillator with \\phi(n) quadratic in the basic q-number [n]_q is shown to be Tribonacci one, while the (p,q;\\mu)-oscillators with \\phi(n) quadratic (cubic) in the p,q-number [n]_{p,q...

  20. Flagellar oscillation: a commentary on proposed mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, David M

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia have a remarkably uniform internal 'engine' known as the '9+2' axoneme. With few exceptions, the function of cilia and flagella is to beat rhythmically and set up relative motion between themselves and the liquid that surrounds them. The molecular basis of axonemal movement is understood in considerable detail, with the exception of the mechanism that provides its rhythmical or oscillatory quality. Some kind of repetitive 'switching' event is assumed to occur; there are several proposals regarding the nature of the 'switch' and how it might operate. Herein I first summarise all the factors known to influence the rate of the oscillation (the beating frequency). Many of these factors exert their effect through modulating the mean sliding velocity between the nine doublet microtubules of the axoneme, this velocity being the determinant of bend growth rate and bend propagation rate. Then I explain six proposed mechanisms for flagellar oscillation and review the evidence on which they are based. Finally, I attempt to derive an economical synthesis, drawing for preference on experimental research that has been minimally disruptive of the intricate structure of the axoneme. The 'provisional synthesis' is that flagellar oscillation emerges from an effect of passive sliding direction on the dynein arms. Sliding in one direction facilitates force-generating cycles and dynein-to-dynein synchronisation along a doublet; sliding in the other direction is inhibitory. The direction of the initial passive sliding normally oscillates because it is controlled hydrodynamically through the alternating direction of the propulsive thrust. However, in the absence of such regulation, there can be a perpetual, mechanical self-triggering through a reversal of sliding direction due to the recoil of elastic structures that deform as a response to the prior active sliding. This provisional synthesis may be a useful basis for further examination of the problem.

  1. Parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in a Josephson tunnel junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1975-01-01

    Experimental evidence for subharmonic parametric excitation of plasma oscillations in Josephson tunnel junctions is presented. The experiments described are performed by measuring the microwave power necessary to switch a Josephson−tunnel junction biased in the zero−voltage state to a finite−volt......−voltage state. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  2. Motivation, emotion, and their inhibitory control mirrored in brain oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Gennady G

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies suggest brain oscillations as a mechanism for cerebral integration. Such integration can exist across a number of functional domains, with different frequency rhythms associated with each domain. Here, evidence is summarized which shows that delta oscillations depend on activity of motivational systems and participate in salience detection. Theta oscillations are involved in memory and emotional regulation. Alpha oscillations participate in inhibitory processes which contribute to a variety of cognitive operations such as attention and memory. The importance of inhibitory functions associated with alpha oscillations increases during the course of evolution. In ontogenesis, these functions develop later and may be more sensitive to a variety of detrimental environmental influences. In a number of developmental stages and pathological conditions, a deficient alpha and/or increased slow-wave activity are associated with cognitive deficits and a lack of inhibitory control. It is shown that slow-wave and alpha oscillations are reciprocally related to each other. This reciprocal relationship may reflect an inhibitory control over motivational and emotional drives which is implemented by the prefrontal cortex.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide attenuates refilling of intracellular calcium store in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mi Na; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Se Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) oscillation is an initial event in digestive enzyme secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Reactive oxygen species are known to be associated with a variety of oxidative stress-induced cellular disorders including pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on intracellular Ca2+ accumulation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Perfusion of H2O2 at 300 µM resulted in additional elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels and termination of oscillatory Ca2+ signals induced by carbamylcholine (CCh) in the presence of normal extracellular Ca2+. Antioxidants, catalase or DTT, completely prevented H2O2-induced additional Ca2+ increase and termination of Ca2+ oscillation. In Ca2+-free medium, H2O2 still enhanced CCh-induced intracellular Ca2+ levels and thapsigargin (TG) mimicked H2O2-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increase. Furthermore, H2O2-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels was abolished under sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase-inactivated condition by TG pretreatment with CCh. H2O2 at 300 µM failed to affect store-operated Ca2+ entry or Ca2+ extrusion through plasma membrane. Additionally, ruthenium red, a mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter blocker, failed to attenuate H2O2-induced intracellular Ca2+ elevation. These results provide evidence that excessive generation of H2O2 in pathological conditions could accumulate intracellular Ca2+ by attenuating refilling of internal Ca2+ stores rather than by inhibiting Ca2+ extrusion to extracellular fluid or enhancing Ca2+ mobilization from extracellular medium in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

  4. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Jaiswal

    2001-09-01

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a unique opportunity to be used in several biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties.

  5. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  6. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-20

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of neural spike recordings and multi-photon calcium imaging in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhwan; Jung, Unsang; Baek, Juyeong; Kang, Shinwon; Kim, Jeehyun

    2012-11-08

    This paper proposes the design and implementation of a micro-electrode array (MEA) for neuroblastoma cell culturing. It also explains the implementation of a multi-photon microscope (MPM) customized for neuroblastoma cell excitation and imaging under ambient light. Electrical signal and fluorescence images were simultaneously acquired from the neuroblastoma cells on the MEA. MPM calcium images of the cultured neuroblastoma cell on the MEA are presented and also the neural activity was acquired through the MEA recording. A calcium green-1 (CG-1) dextran conjugate of 10,000 D molecular weight was used in this experiment for calcium imaging. This study also evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spike recording of neuroblastoma cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in neuroblastoma cells with our proposed imaging modality, we report that neuroblastoma cells can be an important model for epileptic activity studies.

  8. Calcium measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rightly stressed by prof. Wolfgang Walz in the Preface to the series Neuromethods series, the “careful application of methods is probably the most important step in the process of scientific inquiry”. Thus, I strongly suggest to all those interested in calcium signaling and especially to the new-comers in the hot topic of neuroscience (which has so much space even in science-society debate for its implications in legal issues and in the judge-decision process to take profit from this so well edited book. I am saying this since prof. Verkhratsky and prof. Petersen......

  9. Rhythmic light stimulation modifies brain oscillations via entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eNotbohm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The functional relevance of brain oscillations in the alpha frequency range (8-13Hz has been repeatedly investigated through the use of rhythmic visual stimulation. The underlying mechanism of the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP measured in EEG during rhythmic stimulation, however, is not known. There are two hypotheses on the origin of the SSVEPs: entrainment of brain oscillations and superposition of event-related responses (ERPs. The entrainment but not the superposition hypothesis justifies rhythmic visual stimulation as a means to manipulate brain oscillations, because superposition assumes a linear summation of single responses, independent from ongoing brain oscillations. Here, we stimulated participants with a rhythmic flickering light of different frequencies and intensities.. We measured entrainment by comparing the phase coupling of brain oscillations stimulated by rhythmic visual flicker with the oscillations induced by arrhythmic jittered stimulation, varying the time, stimulation frequency, and intensity conditions. In line with a theoretical concept of entrainment (the so called Arnold tongue, we found the phase coupling to be more pronounced with increasing stimulation intensity as well as at stimulation frequencies closer to each participant’s intrinsic frequency. Only inside the Arnold tongue did the conditions significantly differ from the jittered stimulation. Furthermore, even in a single sequence of an SSVEP, we found non-linear features (intermittency of phase locking that contradict the linear summation of single responses, as assumed by the superposition hypothesis. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence that visual rhythmic stimulation entrains brain oscillations, thus validating the approach of rhythmic stimulation as a manipulation of brain oscillations.

  10. Forced synchronization of quasiperiodic oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevich, N. V.; Kurths, J.; Kuznetsov, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    A model of a generator of quasiperiodic oscillations forced by a periodic pulse sequence is studied. We analyze synchronization when the autonomous generator demonstrates periodic, quasiperiodic, respective weakly chaotic oscillations. For the forced quasiperiodic oscillations a picture of synchronization, consisting of small-scale and large-scale structures was uncovered. It even includes the existence of stable the three-frequency tori. For the regime of weak chaos a partial destruction of this features and of the regime of three-frequency tori are found.

  11. Collective oscillations in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Akhiezer, A I; Polovin, R V; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy: Collective Oscillations in a Plasma, Volume 7 presents specific topics within the general field of radio waves propagation. This book contains five chapters that address the theory of linear oscillations in a plasma, the spectra of the eigen oscillations, and the mechanism of high-frequency heating. The opening chapters deal with the self-consistent fields; development of initial perturbation; dispersion permittivity tensor of a plasma in a magnetic field; effect of thermal motion of particles on low-frequency resonances; excitation of

  12. Oscillating solitons in nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lin Xiao-Gang; Liu Wen-Jun; Lei Ming

    2016-03-01

    Oscillating solitons are obtained in nonlinear optics. Analytical study of the variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which is used to describe the soliton propagation in those systems, is carried out using the Hirota’s bilinear method. The bilinear forms and analytic soliton solutions are derived, and the relevant properties and features of oscillating solitons are illustrated. Oscillating solitons are controlled by the reciprocal of the group velocity and Kerr nonlinearity. Results of this paper will be valuable to the study of dispersion-managed optical communication system and mode-locked fibre lasers.

  13. Gravitational Wave - Gauge Field Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, R R; Maksimova, N A

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational waves propagating through a stationary gauge field transform into gauge field waves and back again. When multiple families of flavor-space locked gauge fields are present, the gravitational and gauge field waves exhibit novel dynamics. At high frequencies, the system behaves like coupled oscillators in which the gravitational wave is the central pacemaker. Due to energy conservation and exchange among the oscillators, the wave amplitudes lie on a multi-dimensional sphere, reminiscent of neutrino flavor oscillations. This phenomenon has implications for cosmological scenarios based on flavor-space locked gauge fields.

  14. Fission waves can oscillate

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  15. Oscillations in Mathematical Biology

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    The papers in this volume are based on talks given at a one day conference held on the campus of Adelphi University in April 1982. The conference was organized with the title "Oscillations in Mathematical Biology;" however the speakers were allowed considerable latitutde in their choice of topics. In the event, the talks all concerned the dynamics of non-linear systems arising in biology so that the conference achieved a good measure of cohesion. Some of the speakers cho~e not to submit a manuscript for these proceedings, feeling that their material was too conjectural to be committed to print. Also the paper of Rinzel and Troy is a distillation of the two separate talks that the authors gave. Otherwise the material reproduces the conference proceedings. The conference was made possible by the generous support of the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Adelphi. The bulk of the organization of the conference was carried out by Dr. Ronald Grisell whose energy was in large measure responsib...

  16. Chromosome oscillations in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campas, Otger

    2008-03-01

    Successful cell division necessitates a tight regulation of chromosome movement via the activity of molecular motors. Many of the key players at the origin of the forces generating the motion have been identified, but their spatial and temporal organization remains elusive. In animal cells, chromosomes periodically switch between phases of movement towards and away from the pole. This characteristic oscillatory behaviour cannot be explained by the current models of chromosome positioning and congression. We perform a self-contained theoretical analysis in which the motion of mono-oriented chromosomes results from the competition between the activity of the kinetochore and chromokinesin motors on the chromosome arms. Our analysis, consistent with the available experimental data, proposes that the interplay between the aster-like morphology of the spindle and the collective kinetics of molecular motors is at the origin of chromosome oscillations, positioning and congression. It provides a natural explanation for the so-called chromosome directional instability and for the mechanism by which chromosomes sense their position in space. In addition, we estimate the in vivo velocity of chromokinesins at vanishing load and propose new experiments to assess the mechanism at the origin of chromosome movement in cell division.

  17. Antiphase oscillations of endothelium and smooth muscle [Ca2+]i in vasomotion of rat mesenteric small arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahman, Awahan; Matchkov, Vladimir; Hughes, Alun

    2007-01-01

    in endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (SMC). Calcium in the endothelial cells and SMC was imaged with confocal microscopy. In the presence of noradrenaline and cyclopiazonic acid, ryanodine-insensitive oscillations in tone were produced. The frequency was about 1min(-1) and amplitude about 70...

  18. Cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations in studying motivation and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Knyazev, Gennady G

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that brain functions are realized by simultaneous oscillations in various frequency bands. In addition to examining oscillations in pre-specified bands, interactions and relations between the different frequency bandwidths is another important aspect that needs to be considered in unraveling the workings of the human brain and its functions. In this review we provide evidence that studying interdependencies between brain oscillations may be a valuable approach to study the electrophysiological processes associated with motivation and emotional states. Studies will be presented showing that amplitude-amplitude coupling between delta-alpha and delta-beta oscillations varies as a function of state anxiety and approach-avoidance-related motivation, and that changes in the association between delta-beta oscillations can be observed following successful psychotherapy. Together these studies suggest that cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations may contribute to expanding our understanding of the neural processes underlying motivation and emotion.

  19. Calcium availability limits breeding success of passerines on poor soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland, J.; Drent, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    1. The role of food in avian reproduction is generally studied from the perspective of the protein and energy demand of birds, This study provides the first experimental evidence that calcium availability may limit reproduction in wild birds as well. 2. Data are presented showing that a large propor

  20. Should we prescribe calcium or vitamin D supplements to treat or prevent osteoporosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, M J; Grey, A; Reid, I R

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the highest level of evidence to inform clinical practice. Meta-analyses of large RCTs of calcium and/or vitamin D supplements completed in the last 15 years provide strong evidence for clinical recommendations. These meta-analyses with data for > 50,000 older adults reported that calcium with or without vitamin D has only weak, inconsistent effects on fracture, and that vitamin D without calcium has no effect on fracture. Only one RCT of co-administered calcium and vitamin D in frail, institutionalized, elderly women with low dietary calcium intake and vitamin D levels showed significant reductions in fracture risk. These RCTs have also reported previously unrecognized adverse events of calcium supplements including kidney stones, myocardial infarction, hypercalcemia, and hospitalization with acute gastrointestinal symptoms. The small risk of these important adverse effects, together with the moderate risk of minor side-effects such as constipation, probably outweighs any benefits of calcium supplements on fracture. These data suggest the role for calcium and vitamin D supplements in osteoporosis management is very limited. Neither calcium nor vitamin D supplements should be recommended for fracture prevention in community-dwelling adults, although vitamin D should be considered for prevention of osteomalacia in at-risk individuals.

  1. Who should receive calcium and vitamin D supplementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Frederik H; Gielen, Evelien; Milisen, Koen; Boonen, Steven

    2012-09-01

    Combined calcium and vitamin D supplementation is recommended in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Until recently, supplementation was perceived as harmless without adverse effects. However, recent meta-analyses have provided evidence suggesting that calcium supplements, whether or not in combination with vitamin D, may be associated with cardiovascular risks. Although this finding constitutes a safety signal that has to be taken seriously, these data have to be interpreted with some caution. Current data do not allow definite conclusions to be drawn, but require further independent confirmation, since in numerous large studies, combined calcium and vitamin D supplementation did not increase cardiovascular events, even in the most frail and elderly populations. Nevertheless, it seems appropriate to correct calcium deficiency preferably by enhancing dietary intake and to target supplementation on individuals at high risk of fracture or in whom calcium and vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent. Other trials have shown an increased risk of falls and fractures with annual oral administration of high dose of vitamin D. Therefore, supplementation with more frequent, lower doses is preferred. Yet, the optimal dosing schedule is unknown and needs further study. In order to correct age-associated secondary hyperparathyroidism and to prevent osteoporotic fractures, a daily dose of 1,000-1,200 mg calcium and 800 IU vitamin D is recommended in elderly or institutionalised people, patients with established osteoporosis and individuals on glucocorticoids.

  2. Calcium interacts with temperature to influence Daphnia movement rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszell, Jordan; Heyland, Andreas; Fryxell, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the ecological responses to climate change is particularly challenging, because organisms might be affected simultaneously by the synergistic effects of multiple environmental stressors. Global warming is often accompanied by declining calcium concentration in many freshwater ecosystems. Although there is growing evidence that these changes in water chemistry and thermal conditions can influence ecosystem dynamics, little information is currently available about how these synergistic environmental stressors could influence the behaviour of aquatic organisms. Here, we tested whether the combined effects of calcium and temperature affect movement parameters (average speed, mean turning frequency and mean-squared displacement) of the planktonic Daphnia magna, using a full factorial design and exposing Daphnia individuals to a range of realistic levels of temperature and calcium concentration. We found that movement increased with both temperature and calcium concentration, but temperature effects became considerably weaker when individuals were exposed to calcium levels close to survival limits documented for several Daphnia species, signalling a strong interaction effect. These results support the notion that changes in water chemistry might have as strong an effect as projected changes in temperature on movement rates of Daphnia, suggesting that even sublethal levels of calcium decline could have a considerable impact on the dynamics of freshwater ecosystems. PMID:28083097

  3. Multiple Kinases Involved in the Nicotinic Modulation of Gamma Oscillations in the Rat Hippocampal CA3 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, JianGang; He, XiaoLong; Guo, Fangli; Cheng, XiangLin; Wang, Yali; Wang, XiaoFang; Feng, ZhiWei; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, ChengBiao

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal synchronization at gamma band frequency (20–80 Hz, γ oscillations) is closely associated with higher brain function, such as learning, memory and attention. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and modulate hippocampal γ oscillations, but the intracellular mechanism underlying such modulation remains elusive. We explored multiple kinases by which nicotine can modulate γ oscillations induced by kainate in rat hippocampal area CA3 in vitro. We found that inhibitors of cyclic AMP dependent kinase (protein kinase A, PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptors, Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK), each individually could prevent the γ oscillation-enhancing effect of 1 μM nicotine, whereas none of them affected baseline γ oscillation strength. Inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase Akt increased baseline γ oscillations and partially blocked its nicotinic enhancement. We propose that the PKA-NMDAR-PI3K-ERK pathway modifies cellular properties required for the nicotinic enhancement of γ oscillations, dependent on a PKC-ERK mediated pathway. These signaling pathways provide clues for restoring γ oscillations in pathological conditions affecting cognition. The suppression of γ oscillations at 100 μM nicotine was only dependent on PKA-NMDAR activation and may be due to very high intracellular calcium levels.

  4. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  5. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  6. Barcoding T cell calcium response diversity with methods for automated and accurate analysis of cell signals (MAAACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Salles

    Full Text Available We introduce a series of experimental procedures enabling sensitive calcium monitoring in T cell populations by confocal video-microscopy. Tracking and post-acquisition analysis was performed using Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS, a fully customized program that associates a high throughput tracking algorithm, an intuitive reconnection routine and a statistical platform to provide, at a glance, the calcium barcode of a population of individual T-cells. Combined with a sensitive calcium probe, this method allowed us to unravel the heterogeneity in shape and intensity of the calcium response in T cell populations and especially in naive T cells, which display intracellular calcium oscillations upon stimulation by antigen presenting cells.

  7. Barcoding T Cell Calcium Response Diversity with Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergé, Arnauld; Bernard, Anne-Marie; Phélipot, Marie-Claire; Bertaux, Nicolas; Fallet, Mathieu; Grenot, Pierre; Marguet, Didier; He, Hai-Tao; Hamon, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a series of experimental procedures enabling sensitive calcium monitoring in T cell populations by confocal video-microscopy. Tracking and post-acquisition analysis was performed using Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS), a fully customized program that associates a high throughput tracking algorithm, an intuitive reconnection routine and a statistical platform to provide, at a glance, the calcium barcode of a population of individual T-cells. Combined with a sensitive calcium probe, this method allowed us to unravel the heterogeneity in shape and intensity of the calcium response in T cell populations and especially in naive T cells, which display intracellular calcium oscillations upon stimulation by antigen presenting cells. PMID:24086124

  8. Gamma Oscillations and Visual Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Kim, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    At the root of visual perception is the mechanism the brain uses to analyze features in a scene and bind related ones together. Experiments show this process is linked to oscillations of brain activity in the 30-100 Hz gamma band. Oscillations at different sites have correlation functions (CFs) that often peak at zero lag, implying simultaneous firing, even when conduction delays are large. CFs are strongest between cells stimulated by related features. Gamma oscillations are studied here by modeling mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex. Resulting predictions for gamma responses to stimuli account for numerous experimental findings, including why oscillations and zero-lag synchrony are associated, observed connections with feature preferences, the shape of the zero-lag peak, and variations of CFs with attention. Gamma waves are found to obey the Schroedinger equation, opening the possibility of cortical analogs of quantum phenomena. Gamma instabilities are tied to observations of gamma activity linked to seizures and hallucinations.

  9. Matrix Theory of Small Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavda, L. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complete matrix formulation of the theory of small oscillations is presented. Simple analytic solutions involving matrix functions are found which clearly exhibit the transients, the damping factors, the Breit-Wigner form for resonances, etc. (BB)

  10. Global Analysis of Neutrino Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, S; Choubey, S; Goswami, Srubabati; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya

    2005-01-01

    We present the constraints on neutrino oscillation parameters $\\Delta m^2_{\\odot}$ and $\\theta_{\\odot}$ governing the solar neutrino oscillations from two generation analysis of solar and KamLAND data. We include the latest 766.3 ton year KamLAND data in our analysis. We also present the allowed values of parameters $\\Delta m^2_{atm}$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{atm}$ from two generation oscillation analysis of SuperKamiokande atmospheric and K2K data. For both cases we discuss the precision achieved in the present set of experiments and also how the precision can be improved in future. We also obtain the bounds on $\\theta_{13}$ from three generation analysis of global oscillation data. We emphasise on the roles played by different data sets in constraining the allowed parameter ranges.

  11. Global Analysis of Neutrino Oscillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, Srubabati [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit [Theory Group, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Choubey, Sandhya [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, I-34014, Trieste (Italy)

    2005-06-15

    We present the constraints on neutrino oscillation parameters {delta}m{sub -}bar {sup 2} and {theta}{sub -}bar governing the solar neutrino oscillations from two generation analysis of solar and KamLAND data. We include the latest 766.3 ton year KamLAND data in our analysis. We also present the allowed values of parameters {delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub atm} from two generation oscillation analysis of SuperKamiokande atmospheric and K2K data. For both cases we discuss the precision achieved in the present set of experiments and also how the precision can be improved in future. We also obtain the bounds on {theta}{sub 13} from three generation analysis of global oscillation data. We emphasise on the roles played by different data sets in constraining the allowed parameter ranges.

  12. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  13. Matter Effects On Neutrino Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael

    An introduction to neutrino oscillations in vacuum is presented, followed by a survey of various techniques for obtaining either exact or approximate expressions for numu → nue oscillations in matter. The method developed by Arafune, Koike, and Sato uses a perturbative analysis to find an approximation for the evolution operator. The method used by Freund yields an approximate oscillation probability by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian, finding the eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and then using those to find modified mixing angles with the matter effect taken into account. The method devised by Mann, Kafka, Schneps, and Altinok produces an exact expression for the oscillation by determining explicitly the evolution operator. These methods are compared to each other using the T2K, MINOS, NOnuA, and LBNE parameters.

  14. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations in Antares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, J.

    2013-04-15

    The data taken with the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2010, a total live time of 863 days, are used to measure the oscillation parameters of atmospheric neutrinos. Muon tracks are reconstructed with energies as low as 20 GeV. Neutrino oscillations will cause a suppression of vertical upgoing muon neutrinos of such energies crossing the Earth. The parameters determining the oscillation of atmospheric neutrinos are extracted by fitting the event rate as a function of the ratio of the estimated neutrino energy and reconstructed flight path through the Earth. Measurement contours of the oscillation parameters in a two-flavour approximation are derived. Assuming maximum mixing, a mass difference of Δm{sub 32}{sup 2}=(3.1±0.9)⋅10{sup −3}eV{sup 2} is obtained, in good agreement with the world average value.

  15. Oscillations of thick accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroszynski, M.

    1986-06-15

    The non-axisymmetric oscillations of polytropic, ideal fluid tori rotating in the external gravitational field of a point mass are investigated both numerically and analytically. Normal modes of oscillations are found; their classification into 'radial', 'p', 'g' and 'f' modes is done in analogy to the stellar case. The non-discrete spectrum of modes which are neutral in the limit of axisymmetric perturbations is also present.

  16. Vitamin D and Intestinal Calcium Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J.; Seth, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium throu...

  17. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    OpenAIRE

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward; Wysolmerski, John

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate ...

  18. Harmonic Oscillators and Elementary Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sobouti, Y

    2016-01-01

    Two dynamical systems with same symmetry should have features in common, and as far as their shared symmetry is concerned, one may represent the other. The three light quark constituents of the hadrons, a) have an approximate flavor SU(3) symmetry, b) have an exact color SU(3) symmetry, and c) as spin 1/2 particles, have a Lorentz SO(3,1) symmetry. So does a 3D harmonic oscillator. a) Its Hamiltonian has the SU(3) symmetry, breakable if the 3 fundamental modes of oscillation are not identical. b) The 3 directions of oscillation have the permutation symmetry. This enables one to create three copies of unbreakable SU(3) symmetry for each mode of the oscillation, and mimic the color of the elementary particles. And c) The Lagrangian of the 3D oscillator has the SO(3,1) symmetry. This can be employed to accommodate the spin of the particles. In this paper we draw up a one-to-one correspondence between the eigen modes of the Poisson bracket operator of the 3D oscillator and the flavor multiplets of the particles, ...

  19. [Calcium distribution in the egg cell, zygote and proembryo of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Wei, Dong Mei; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2006-02-01

    Potassium antimonite precipitation was used to located calcium in the egg cells (before and after anthesis), zygotes and proembryos of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). A few calcium precipitates (ppts) were located in the small vacuoles of cytoplasm of egg cell at 3 d before anthesis, when egg cells just formed. Then the small vacuoles fused to form some bigger vacuoles in egg cell at 2d before anthesis. Calcium ppts increased evidently in the cytoplasm and nucleus of egg cells at this time. At 1d before anthesis, a biggest vacuole located at the micropyle end of the cell and its nucleus was pushed toward the chalazal end of the cell, which made an evident cellular polarity. The number of calcium ppts in the egg cell markedly decreased, suggesting that change of calcium distribution may be related to the development of egg cell. After anthesis and before fertilization, calcium ppts were still few in the egg cells, and most of them were accumulated in the nucleus, especially in the vacuoles of nucleolus. At 4h after anthesis, egg cell was fertilized and the wall at the chalazal end of egg cell was formed completely. Calcium ppts evidently increased again in egg cell, and some big ppts appeared in the karyoplasm of nucleus and abundant small ppts in the large vacuole. At 9h after anthesis, zygote completed its first division. Calcium ppts in the nucleus and cytoplasm of two-celled proembryo began to decrease, and only some ones accumulated in the vacuoles of nucleolus. At 18h after anthesis, zygote divided several times and became a multi-celled proembryo. Calcium ppts in the cells of proembryo ulteriorly diminished but there were many ppts on the surface of proembryo. The result indicates that calcium in egg cell, zygote and the cells of proembryo orderly changes its temporal and spatial position, which suggests that calcium may play a role during the development of egg cell and zygote.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the...

  1. Magnetically Coupled Magnet-Spring Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2010-01-01

    A system of two magnets hung from two vertical springs and oscillating in the hollows of a pair of coils connected in series is a new, interesting and useful example of coupled oscillators. The electromagnetically coupled oscillations of these oscillators are experimentally and theoretically studied. Its coupling is electromagnetic instead of…

  2. On the nonlinear modeling of ring oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.

    2009-06-01

    We develop higher-order nonlinear models of three-stage and five-stage ring oscillators based on a novel inverter model. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are derived and compared to classical linear model analysis. Two important special cases for five-stage ring oscillators are also studied. Numerical simulations are shown. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  3. Zinc modulation of calcium activity at the photoreceptor terminal: a calcium imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassov, Ivan; Shen, Wen; Ripps, Harris; Chappell, Richard L

    2013-07-01

    There is abundant experimental evidence that zinc ions (Zn(2+)) are present in the synaptic vesicles of vertebrate photoreceptors, and that they are co-released with glutamate. Here we show that increasing the concentration of extracellular zinc (2 μM-2 mM) suppresses the entry of calcium into the synaptic terminals of isolated salamander double cones. The resultant dose-dependent curve was fit by an inverse Hill equation having an IC50 of 38 μM, and Hill coefficient of 1.1. Because there is currently no reliable way to measure the concentration of extracellular zinc, it is not known whether the zinc released under normal circumstances is of physiological significance. In an attempt to circumvent this problem we used zinc chelators to reduce the available pool of endogenous zinc. This enabled us to determine how the absence of zinc affected calcium entry. We found that when intra- or extra-cellular zinc was chelated by 250 μM of membrane-permeable TPEN or 500 μM of membrane-impermeable histidine, there was a significant rise in the depolarization-induced intracellular calcium level within photoreceptor terminals. This increase in internal [Ca(2+)] will undoubtedly lead to a concomitant increase in glutamate release. In addition, we found that blocking the L-type calcium channels that are expressed on the synaptic terminals of photoreceptors with 50 μM nicardipine or 100 μM verapamil abolished the effects of zinc chelation. These findings are a good indication that, when released in vivo, the zinc concentration is sufficient to suppress voltage-gated calcium channels, and reduce the rate of glutamate release from photoreceptor terminals.

  4. Evolution of the Calcium Paradigm: The Relation between Vitamin D, Serum Calcium and Calcium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borje E. Christopher Nordin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the index disease for calcium deficiency, just as rickets/osteomalacia is the index disease for vitamin D deficiency, but there is considerable overlap between them. The common explanation for this overlap is that hypovitaminosis D causes malabsorption of calcium which then causes secondary hyperparathyroidism and is effectively the same thing as calcium deficiency. This paradigm is incorrect. Hypovitaminosis D causes secondary hyperparathyroidism at serum calcidiol levels lower than 60 nmol/L long before it causes malabsorption of calcium because serum calcitriol (which controls calcium absorption is maintained until serum calcidiol falls below 20 nmol/L. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, probably due to loss of a “calcaemic” action of vitamin D on bone first described in 1957, destroys bone and explains why vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Vitamin D thus plays a central role in the maintenance of the serum (ionised calcium, which is more important to the organism than the preservation of the skeleton. Bone is sacrificed when absorbed dietary calcium does not match excretion through the skin, kidneys and bowel which is why calcium deficiency causes osteoporosis in experimental animals and, by implication, in humans.

  5. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Lassen, Benny;

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact cal...... oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics.......Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact...... calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch...

  6. Connections between connexins, calcium, and cataracts in the lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Martinez-Wittinghan, Francisco J; Gong, Xiaohua; White, Thomas W; Mathias, Richard T

    2004-10-01

    There is a good deal of evidence that the lens generates an internal micro circulatory system, which brings metabolites, like glucose, and antioxidants, like ascorbate, into the lens along the extracellular spaces between cells. Calcium also ought to be carried into the lens by this system. If so, the only path for Ca2+ to get out of the lens is to move down its electrochemical gradient into fiber cells, and then move by electrodiffusion from cell to cell through gap junctions to surface cells, where Ca-ATPase activity and Na/Ca exchange can transport it back into the aqueous or vitreous humors. The purpose of the present study was to test this calcium circulation hypothesis by studying calcium homeostasis in connexin (Cx46) knockout and (Cx46 for Cx50) knockin mouse lenses, which have different degrees of gap junction coupling. To measure intracellular calcium, FURA2 was injected into fiber cells, and the gradient in calcium concentration from center to surface was mapped in each type of lens. In wild-type lenses the coupling conductance of the mature fibers was approximately 0.5 S/cm2 of cell to cell contact, and the best fit to the calcium concentration data varied from 700 nM in the center to 300 nM at the surface. In the knockin lenses, the coupling conductance was approximately 1.0 S/cm2 and calcium varied from approximately 500 nM at the center to 300 nM at the surface. Thus, when the coupling conductance doubled, the concentration gradient halved, as predicted by the model. In knockout lenses, the coupling conductance was zero, hence the efflux path was knocked out and calcium accumulated to approximately 2 microM in central fibers. Knockout lenses also had a dense central cataract that extended from the center to about half the radius. Others have previously shown that this cataract involves activation of a calcium-dependent protease, Lp82. We can now expand on this finding to provide a hypothesis on each step that leads to cataract formation: knockout of

  7. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzozero, Julien, E-mail: julien.bizzozero@gmail.com; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  8. Entrainment of neural oscillations as a modifiable substrate of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Daniel J; Lakatos, Peter; Butler, Pamela D; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2014-06-01

    Brain operation is profoundly rhythmic. Oscillations of neural excitability shape sensory, motor, and cognitive processes. Intrinsic oscillations also entrain to external rhythms, allowing the brain to optimize the processing of predictable events such as speech. Moreover, selective attention to a particular rhythm in a complex environment entails entrainment of neural oscillations to its temporal structure. Entrainment appears to form one of the core mechanisms of selective attention, which is likely to be relevant to certain psychiatric disorders. Deficient entrainment has been found in schizophrenia and dyslexia and mounting evidence also suggests that it may be abnormal in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Accordingly, we suggest that studying entrainment in selective-attention paradigms is likely to reveal mechanisms underlying deficits across multiple disorders.

  9. Bloch Oscillations of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen States

    CERN Document Server

    Lebugle, Maxime; Heilmann, René; Perez-Leija, Armando; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Bloch Oscillations (BOs) of quantum particles manifest themselves as periodic spreading and re-localization of the associated wave functions when traversing lattice potentials subject to external gradient forces. Albeit BOs are deeply rooted into the very foundations of quantum mechanics, all experimental observations of this phenomenon so far have only contemplated dynamics of one or two particles initially prepared in separable local states, which is well described by classical wave physics. Evidently, a more general description of genuinely quantum BOs will be achieved upon excitation of a Bloch-oscillator lattice system by nonlocal states, that is, containing correlations in contradiction with local realism. Here we report the first experimental observation of BOs of two-particle Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states (EPR), whose associated N-particle wave functions are nonlocal by nature. The time evolution of two-photon EPR states in Bloch-oscillators, whether symmetric, antisymmetric or partially symmetric, r...

  10. Calcium and Vitamin D in Obesity and Related Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Poonam K; Calton, Emily K; Soares, Mario J

    2016-01-01

    There is a pandemic of lifestyle-related diseases. In both developed and lesser developed countries of the world, an inadequacy of calcium intake and low vitamin D status is common. In this chapter, we explore a mechanistic framework that links calcium and vitamin D status to chronic conditions including obesity, systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We also update the available clinical evidence, mainly from randomized controlled trials, to provide a synthesis of evidence in favor or against these hypotheses. There is consistent data to support calcium increasing whole body fat oxidation and increasing fecal fat excretion, while there is good cellular evidence for vitamin D reducing inflammation. Clinical trials support a marginal reduction in circulating lipids and some meta-analysis support an increase in insulin sensitivity following vitamin D. However, these mechanistic pathways and intermediate biomarkers of disease do not consistently transcribe into measurable health outcomes. Cementing the benefits of calcium and vitamin D for extraskeletal health needs a reexamination of the target 25(OH)D level to be achieved and the minimum duration of future trials.

  11. Deoxyschisandrin modulates synchronized Ca2+ oscillations and spontaneous synaptic transmission of cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min FU; Zhao-hui SUN; Min ZONG; Xiang-ping HE; Huan-cong ZUO; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Deoxyschisandrin is one of the most effective composites of Schisandra chinensis, a famous Chinese medicine widely used as an antistress, anti-aging, and neurological performance-improving herb. In this study, we examined its spe- cific mechanisms of action on cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods: Hippoc- ampal neurons, primarily cultured for 9-11 d in vitro, were used for this study. DS were dissolved in DMSO and applied to calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp. Results: The application of 3 mg/L DS decreased the frequency of sponta- neous and synchronous oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ to 72%±2% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents to 60%±3% (mean±SEM). The inhibitory concentraton 50% (IC50) for the effect of DS on calcium oscillations was 3.8 mg/L. DS also depressed the high voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and the voltage-gated Na+ channel currents at the same time point. It had no effect, however, on voltage-gated K+ and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: DS inhibited the spontaneous and synchronous oscillations of intra- cellular Ca2+ through the depression of influx of extracellular calcium and the initiation of action potential. By repressing the spontaneous neurotransmitter release, DS modulated the neuronal network activities.

  12. El Nino Southern Oscillation as Sporadic Oscillations between Metastable States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to establish a new mechanism of ENSO,as a self-organizing and self-excitation system,with two highly coupled processes.The first is the oscillation between the two metastable warm(El Ni(?)o phase) and cold events(La Ni(?)a phase),and the second is the spatiotemporal oscillation of the sea surface temperature(SST) field.The symbiotic interplay between these two processes gives rises the climate variability associated with the ENSO,leads to both the random and deterministic features of the ENSO,and defines a new natural feedback mechanism,which drives the sporadic oscillation of the ENSO.The new mechanism is rigorously derived using a dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors,which has also been successfully applied to a wide range of problems in nonlinear sciences.

  13. El Nino Southern Oscillation as Sporadic Oscillations between Metastable States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Tian; Shouhong WANG

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to establish a new mechanism of ENSO, as a self-organizing and selfexcitation system, with two highly coupled processes. The first is the oscillation between the two mctastable warm (El Nino phase) and cold events (La Nina phase), and the second is the spatiotemporal oscillation of the sea surface temperature (SST) field. The symbiotic interplay between these two processes gives rises the climate variability associated with the ENSO, leads to both the random and deterministic features of the ENSO, and defines a new natural feedback mechanism, which drives the sporadic oscillation of the ENSO. The new mechanism is rigorously derived using a dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors, which has also been successfully applied to a wide range of problems in nonlinear sciences.

  14. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  15. When Isolated at Full Receptivity, in Vitro Fertilized Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L. Egg Cells Reveal [Ca2+]cyt Oscillation of Intracellular Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Pónya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During in vitro fertilization of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L. in egg cells isolated at various developmental stages, changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt were observed. The dynamics of [Ca2+]cyt elevation varied, reflecting the difference in the developmental stage of the eggs used. [Ca2+]cyt oscillation was exclusively observed in fertile, mature egg cells fused with the sperm cell. To determine how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells is generated, egg cells were incubated in thapsigargin, which proved to be a specific inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-ATPase in wheat egg cells. In unfertilized egg cells, the addition of thapsigargin caused an abrupt transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that an influx pathway for Ca2+ is activated by thapsigargin. The [Ca2+]cyt oscillation seemed to require the filling of an intracellular calcium store for the onset of which, calcium influx through the plasma membrane appeared essential. This was demonstrated by omitting extracellular calcium from (or adding GdCl3 to the fusion medium, which prevented [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells fused with the sperm. Combined, these data permit the hypothesis that the first sperm-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt depletes an intracellular Ca2+ store, triggering an increase in plasma membrane Ca2+ permeability, and this enhanced Ca2+ influx results in [Ca2+]cyt oscillation.

  16. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  17. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2016-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In ...

  18. Influence of fluid and volume state on PaO2 oscillations in mechanically ventilated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstein, Marc; Bierschock, Stephan; Boehme, Stefan; Wang, Hemei; Vogt, Andreas; Kwiecien, Robert; David, Matthias; Markstaller, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Varying pulmonary shunt fractions during the respiratory cycle cause oxygen oscillations during mechanical ventilation. In artificially damaged lungs, cyclical recruitment of atelectasis is responsible for varying shunt according to published evidence. We introduce a complimentary hypothesis that cyclically varying shunt in healthy lungs is caused by cyclical redistribution of pulmonary perfusion. Administration of crystalloid or colloid infusions would decrease oxygen oscillations if our hypothesis was right. Therefore, n=14 mechanically ventilated healthy pigs were investigated in 2 groups: crystalloid (fluid) versus no-fluid administration. Additional volume interventions (colloid infusion, blood withdrawal) were carried out in each pig. Intra-aortal PaO2 oscillations were recorded using fluorescence quenching technique. Phase shift of oxygen oscillations during altered inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ventilation ratio and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) served as control methods to exclude that recruitment of atelectasis is responsible for oxygen oscillations. In hypovolemia relevant oxygen oscillations could be recorded. Fluid and volume state changed PaO2 oscillations according to our hypothesis. Fluid administration led to a mean decline of 105.3 mmHg of the PaO2 oscillations amplitude (PPaO2 oscillations.

  19. Does the potential for chaos constrain the embryonic cell-cycle oscillator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scott McIsaac

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Although many of the core components of the embryonic cell-cycle network have been elucidated, the question of how embryos achieve robust, synchronous cellular divisions post-fertilization remains unexplored. What are the different schemes that could be implemented by the embryo to achieve synchronization? By extending a cell-cycle model previously developed for embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis to include the spatial dimensions of the embryo, we establish a novel role for the rapid, fertilization-initiated calcium wave that triggers cell-cycle oscillations. Specifically, in our simulations a fast calcium wave results in synchronized cell cycles, while a slow wave results in full-blown spatio-temporal chaos. We show that such chaos would ultimately lead to an unpredictable patchwork of cell divisions across the embryo. Given this potential for chaos, our results indicate a novel design principle whereby the fast calcium-wave trigger following embryo fertilization synchronizes cell divisions.

  20. Passive sensitization increases histamine-stimulated calcium signaling and NF-кB transcription activity in bronchial epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si JIN; Dan TIAN; Jian-guo CHEN; Li-ping ZHU; Sheng-yuan LIU; Di-xun WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To find out if the two aspects of asthma (chronic airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness) are related to hypersensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells. Methods: Porcine bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) were divided into sensitized (S) and nonsesitized (N) groups. In group S, the cells were preincubated with serum from ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs. In group N, the cells were preincubated with serum from nonsensitized guinea pigs. Single cell calcium imaging and ELISA-based NF-κB activity were used to evaluate the histamine-stimulated intracellular free calcium level and NF-κB activity, respectively. Results: First, 0.1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations in PBEC of group S, but not in group N. Second, 1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations of PBEC in both group S and group N. The [Ca2+]i oscillation frequency of PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N, though the [Ca2+]i oscillation amplitude showed no difference between the two groups. Finally, when 10 umol/L histamine was used to stimulate PBEC, a transient initial increase followed by a sustained elevation (FSE) of [Ca2+]i was observed in PBEC in both groups. The amplitude of the FSE of [Ca2+]i in PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N. The subsequent NF-KB activity was in accordance to the calcium oscillation frequency evoked by histamine, but not to the amplitude. Conclusion: It was suggested that the increased sensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells might contribute to the exorbitant inflammation or increased susceptibility in asthmatic airway epithelial cells.

  1. Effect of calcium and cholecalciferol supplementation on several parameters of calcium status in plasma and urine of captive Asian (Elephas maximus) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sonsbeek, Gerda R; van der Kolk, Johannes H; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M; Everts, Hendrik; Marais, Johan; Schaftenaar, Willem

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the effect of oral calcium and cholecalciferol supplementation on several parameters of calcium status in plasma and urine of captive Asian (Elephas maximus; n=10) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana; n=6) and to detect potential species differences. Calcium and cholecalciferol supplementation were investigated in a feeding trial using a crossover design consisting of five periods of 28 days each in summer. From days 28-56 (period 2), elephants were fed the Ca-supplemented diet and from days 84-112, elephants were fed the cholecalciferol-supplemented diet (period 4). The control diet was fed during the other periods and was based on their regular ration, and the study was repeated similarly during winter. Periods 1, 3, and 5 were regarded as washout periods. This study revealed species-specific differences with reference to calcium and cholecalciferol supplementation. Asian elephants showed a significant increase in mean plasma total calcium concentration following calcium supplementation during summer, suggesting summer-associated subclinical hypocalcemia in Western Europe. During winter, no effect was seen after oral calcium supplementation, but a significant increase was seen both in mean plasma, total, and ionized calcium concentrations after cholecalciferol supplementation in Asian elephants. In contrast, evidence of subclinical hypocalcemia could be demonstrated neither in summer nor in winter in African elephants, although 28 days of cholecalciferol supplementation during winter reversed the decrease in plasma 1,25(OH)2-cholecalciferol and was followed by a significant increase in mean plasma total calcium concentration. Preliminary findings indicate that the advisable permanent daily intake for calcium in Asian elephants and cholecalciferol in both elephant species at least during winter might be higher than current guidelines. It is strongly recommended to monitor blood calcium concentrations and, if

  2. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005.... Calcium alginate is prepared by the neutralization of purified alginic acid with appropriate pH...

  3. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  4. Classical scattering from oscillating targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papachristou, P.K.; Diakonos, F.K.; Constantoudis, V.; Schmelcher, P.; Benet, L

    2002-12-30

    We study planar classical scattering from an oscillating heavy target whose dynamics defines a five-dimensional phase space. Although the system possesses no periodic orbits, and thus topological chaos is not present, the scattering functions display a variety of structures on different time scales. These structures are due to scattering events with a strong energy transfer from the projectile to the moving disk resulting in low-velocity peaks. We encounter initial conditions for which the projectile exhibits infinitely many bounces with the oscillating disk. Our numerical investigations are supported by analytical results on a specific model with a simple time-law. The observed properties possess universal character for scattering off oscillating targets.

  5. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  6. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodar, Esther; Perez-Garrido, Antonio [Departamento Fisica Aplicada, Antiguo Hospital de Marina Campus Muralla del Mar, UPCT, Cartagena 30202 Murcia (Spain); Rojas, Fernando [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia-UNAM, Apartado Postal 356, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)], E-mail: ejodar@upct.es

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case. (fast track communication)

  7. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Ballard, William P. (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, M. Collins (Albuquerque, NM); Marder, Barry M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  8. 43. Calmodulin regulating calcium sensitivity of Na channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vegiraju

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available By extrapolating information from existing research and observing previous assumptions regarding the structure of the Na Channel, this experiment was conducted under the hypothesis that the Na Channel is in part regulated by the calmodulin protein, as a result proving calcium sensitivity of the Na Channel. Furthermore, we assume that there is a one to one stoichiometry between the Na Channel and the Calmodulin. There has been extensive research into the functionality and structure of sodium ion channels (Na channels, as several diseases are associated with the lack of regulation of sodium ions, that is caused by the disfunction of these Na channels. However, one highly controversial matter in the field is the importance of the protein calmodulin (CaM and calcium in Na channel function. Calmodulin is a protein that is well known for its role as a calcium binding messenger protein, and that association is believed to play an indirect role in regulating the Na channel through the Na channel’s supposed calcium sensitivity. While there are proponents for both sides, there has been relatively little research that provides strong evidence for either case. In this experiment, the effect of calmodulin on NaV 1.5 is tested by preparing a set of cardiac cells (of the human specie with the NaV 1.5 C-Termini and CaM protein, which were then to be placed in solutions with varying concentrations of calcium. We took special care to test multiple concentrations of calcium, as previous studies have tested very low concentrations, with Manu Ben-Johny’s team from the John Hopkins laboratory in particular testing up to a meager 50 micromolar, despite producing a well-respected paper (By comparison, the average Na channel can naturally sustain a concentration of almost 1-2 millimolar and on some occasions, reaching even higher concentrations. After using light scattering and observing the signals given off by the calcium interacting with these Nav1.5/Ca

  9. The non-local oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccari, A. [Istituto Tecnico `G. Cardano`, Monterotondo, Rome (Italy)

    1996-08-01

    The most important characteristics of the non-local oscillator, an oscillator subjected to an additional non-local force, are extensively studied by means of a new asymptotic perturbation method that is able to furnish an approximate solution of weakly non-linear differential equations. The resulting motion is doubly periodic, because a second little frequency appears, in addition to the fundamental harmonic frequency. Comparison with the numerical solution obtained by the Runge-Kitta method confirms the validity of the asymptotic perturbation method and its importance for the study of non-linear dynamical systems.

  10. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.; Romanyuk, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60-100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102-103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method.

  11. Cherenkov radiation oscillator without reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Hangyo, M.; Wei, Y.; Yang, Z.; Miyamoto, S.

    2014-05-01

    This Letter presents a Cherenkov radiation oscillator with an electron beam travelling over a finitely thick plate made of negative-index materials. In such a scheme, the external reflectors required in the traditional Cherenkov oscillators are not necessary, since the electromagnetic energy flows backward in the negative-index materials, leading to inherent feedback. We theoretically analyzed the interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic wave, and worked out the growth rate and start current through numerical calculations. With the help of particle-in-cell simulation, the theoretical predictions are well demonstrated.

  12. Primordial Lepton Oscillations and Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    The baryon asymmetry of the Universe should have been produced after the inflation era. We consider the possibility that the asymmetry is generated by the flavor oscillations in the reheating process after inflation, so that the baryon asymmetry is realized already at the beginning of the radiation dominated era. In the seesaw model, we show that the propagators of the left-handed leptons generically have flavor mixings in the thermal background, that can generate flavor-dependent lepton asymmetry through the $CP$ violation in the oscillation phenomena. The flavor dependent rates for the wash-out process can leave the net asymmetry today.

  13. Smart contact oscillations by IPMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, H.; Asaka, K.; Su, J.; Poubel, L.; Shahinpoor, M.

    2016-02-01

    An ion migration-induced self-oscillation phenomenon observed in ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) is reported. These oscillations are generated from a purely static equilibrium configuration of IPMCs in loose contact with a stationary electrode, and in particular the anode of an imposed DC voltage source. Many interesting possibilities emerge, which are described in this paper. Of particular importance is the emergence of the possibility of creating tailor-made electric signals or pulse-width modulation-type signals from a DC source.

  14. Primordial lepton oscillations and baryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2016-11-01

    The baryon asymmetry of the Universe should have been produced after the inflation era. We consider the possibility that the asymmetry is generated by the flavor oscillations in the reheating process after inflation, so that the baryon asymmetry is realized already at the beginning of the radiation dominated era. In the seesaw model, we show that the propagators of the left-handed leptons generically have flavor mixings in the thermal background, that can generate flavor-dependent lepton asymmetry through the CP violation in the oscillation phenomena. The flavor dependent rates for the wash-out process can leave the net asymmetry today.

  15. Anomalous Dissipative Quantum Harmonic Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dian-Yong; BAI Zhan-Wu; DONG Yu-Bing

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the low-temperature statistical properties of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a heat bath, where the low-frequency spectrum vanishes. We obtain the exact result of the zero point energy. Due to the low frequency shortage of environmental oscillators' spectral density, the coordinate and momentum correlation functions decay as r-4and r-6 respectively at zero temperature, where T is the correlation time. The low-temperature behavior of the mean energy does not violate the third law of thermodynamics, but differs largely from the Ohmic spectrum case.

  16. Resonant solar neutrino oscillation versus laboratory neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chong-Sa

    1987-02-01

    The interplay between resonant solar neutrino oscillations and neutrino oscillations in laboratory experiments is investigated in a 3 generation model. Due to the assumed hierarchy of neutrino masses, together with our choice of a convenient parameterization of the 3 generation mixing matrix, we can derive a simple analytic formula which reduces the solar neutrino problem to an effective 2 generation problem. The reduction makes it apparent that the allowed range of mixing and mass parameters crucially depend on whether the survival probability of solar neutrinos S satisfies S greater than or equal to 1/3 or not. The formulae for probabilities of laboratory neutrino oscillations are also greatly simplified. We argue that a combination of the observed solar neutrino depletion and data obtained from reactor experiments seems to rule out some range of neutrino masses. If a sizable nu/sub ..mu../ ..-->.. nu/sub e/ oscillation is observed at accelerators, as suggested at this Workshop, it severely restricts the range of 2 mixing angles.

  17. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  18. Green's Function for the Quartic Oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a quantum mechanical Green's function $G_{qo}(y_b,t_b;$ $y_a,t_a)$ for the quartic oscillator is presented. This result is built upon two previous papers: first [1], detailing the linearization of the quartic oscillator $(qo)$ to the harmonic oscillator $(ho)$, second [2], the integration of the classical action function for the quartic oscillator. Here an equivalent form for the quartic oscillator action function $S_{qo}(y_b,t_b;$ $y_a,t_a)$ in terms of harmonic oscillator var...

  19. Spicules Intensity Oscillations in SOT/HINODE Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E. Tavabi; A. Ajabshirizadeh; A. R. Ahangarzadeh Maralani; S. Zeighami

    2015-06-01

    Aims. We study the coherency of solar spicules intensity oscillations with increasing height above the solar limb in quiet Sun, active Sun and active region using observations from HINODE/SOT. Existence of coherency up to transition region strengthens the theory of the coronal heating and solar wind, through energy transport and photospheric oscillations. Methods. Using time sequences from the HINODE/SOT in Ca II H line, we investigate oscillations found in intensity profiles at different heights above the solar limb. We use the Fourier and wavelet analysis to measure dominant frequency peaks of intensity at the heights, and phase difference between oscillations at two certain heights, to find evidence for the coherency of the oscillations. Results. The results of fast Fourier transform (FFT) for the quiet Sun, active Sun and active region show frequency peaks of order 3.6 mHz, 5.5 mHz and 7.3 mHz at four separate heights. The fluctuations of powers are random for the three datasets, i.e., independent from height and solar activity. The wavelet results for quiet Sun, active Sun and active region indicate dominant frequencies similar to FFT results. Results of coherency represent frequencies at about 3.5 mHz and 5.5 mHz for all three datasets. Histograms of frequencies corresponding to maximum coherency for quiet Sun, active region and active sun display frequencies of about 3.5 mHz, 4.2 mHz, 4.6 mHz, 5.3 mHz and 5.8 mHz. The phase speeds of 50–450 km s−1 are measured for quiet Sun, 50–560 km s−1 for active region and 50–550 km s−1 for active Sun. The majority of the measured phase speeds in locations where there is known to be considerable dynamic activity are more than quiet Sun, and the phase speeds obtained from three datasets increase with height. We also find strong evidence for upwardly propagating waves with high coherency in three datasets. Intensity oscillations may result from the presence of the coherent waves, which could provide significant

  20. [Calcium supplementation and the possible increase in cardiovascular risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Sáez, Abelardo; Formiga, Francesc; Pujol Farriols, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of osteoporosis treatment is to prevent the occurrence of fragility fractures, and thereby reduce morbidity and mortality. Among the various approaches to the treatment of this disease include ensuring proper calcium intake and to obtain adequate levels of vitamin D. Virtually all clinical trials with drugs used to treat osteoporosis systematically include calcium and vitamin D supplements. In light of the recent publication of clinical trials and meta-analyses, a possible increase in cardiovascular risk, particularly in the form of a myocrdial infarction, is hypothesised in patients taking calcium supplements. However, data published to date are inconclusive. Until the development of new scientific evidence, it seems reasonable to recommend, whenever practicable and individualized for each patient, increasing calcium intake with food and reserve supplements for patients with very low calcium intake in the diet. It would also be advisable for the administration of total daily dose to be fractionated throughout the day and with meals, and to obtain appropriate levels of vitamin D (25-hydroxycholecalciferol or calcidiol), along with the basic treatment for osteoporosis that is decided to be prescribed to patients.

  1. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain.

  2. Factors affecting calcium balance in Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Ailing; Du, Weijing; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Xiaoqi; Ma, Guansheng

    2010-01-01

    Chinese dietary reference intakes (DRIs) for calcium were developed mainly from studies conducted amongst Caucasians, yet a recent review showed that reference calcium intakes for Asians are likely to be different from those of Caucasians (Lee and Jiang, 2008). In order to develop calcium DRIs for Chinese adolescents, it is necessary to explore the characteristics and potential influencing factors of calcium metabolic balance in Chinese adolescents. A total of 80 students (15.1+/-0.8 years) were recruited stratified by gender from a 1-year calcium supplementation study. Subjects were randomly designed to four groups and supplemented with calcium carbonate tablets providing elemental calcium at 63, 354, 660, and 966 mg/day, respectively. Subjects consumed food from a 3-day cycle menu prepared by staff for 10 days. Elemental calcium in samples of foods, feces, and urine was determined in duplicates by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The total calcium intake ranged from 352 to 1323 mg/day. The calcium apparent absorption efficiency and retention in boys were significantly higher than that in girls (68.7% vs. 46.4%, 480 mg/day vs. 204 mg/day, PCalcium retention increased with calcium intakes, but did not reach a plateau. Calcium absorption efficiency in boys increased with calcium intake up to 665 mg/day, and decreased after that. In girls, calcium absorption efficiency decreased with calcium intake. Calcium absorption efficiency increased within 1 year after first spermatorrhea in boys, but decreased with pubertal development in girls. Sex, calcium intake, age, and pubertal development were the most important determinants of calcium absorption (R(2)=0.508, Pcalcium intake, age, and pubertal development are important factors for calcium retention and absorption during growth, which should be considered for the development of calcium DRIs for Chinese adolescents.

  3. Emanuel Strehler’s work on calcium pumps and calcium signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuel; E; Strehler

    2011-01-01

    Cells are equipped with mechanisms to control tightly the influx, efflux and resting level of free calcium (Ca 2+ ). Inappropriate Ca 2+ signaling and abnormal Ca 2+ levels are involved in many clinical disorders including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. Ca 2+ also plays a major role in cell growth, differentiation and motility; disturbances in these processes underlie cell transformation and the progression of cancer. Accordingly, research in the Strehler laboratory is focused on a better understanding of the molecular "toolkit" needed to ensure proper Ca 2+ homeostasis in the cell, as well as on the mechanisms of localized Ca 2+ signaling. A longterm focus has been on the plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCAs), which are linked to multiple disorders including hearing loss, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Our work over the past 20 years or more has revealed a surprising complexity of PMCA isoforms with different functional characteristics, regulation, and cellular localization. Emerging evidence shows how specific PMCAs contribute not only to setting basal intracellular Ca 2+ levels, but also to local Ca 2+ signaling and vectorial Ca 2+ transport. A second major research arearevolves around the calcium sensor protein calmodulin and an enigmatic calmodulin-like protein (CALML3) that is linked to epithelial differentiation. One of the cellular targets of CALML3 is the unconventional motor protein myosin-10, which raises new questions about the role of CALML3 and myosin-10 in cell adhesion and migration in normal cell differentiation and cancer.

  4. Quasi-periodic oscillations in superfluid, relativistic magnetars with nuclear pasta phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Pons, José A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the torsional magneto-elastic oscillations of relativistic superfluid magnetars and explore the effects of a phase transition in the crust-core interface (nuclear pasta) which results in a weaker elastic response. Exploring various models with different extension of nuclear pasta phases, we find that the differences in the oscillation spectrum present in purely elastic modes (weak magnetic field) are smeared out with increasing strength of the magnetic field. For magnetar conditions, the main characteristic and features of models without nuclear pasta are preserved. We find, in general, two classes of magneto-elastic oscillations which exhibit a different oscillation pattern. For Bp global magneto-elastic oscillations show a constant phase and become dominant when Bp > 5 × 1014 G. We do not find any evidence of fundamental pure crustal modes in the low-frequency range (below 200 Hz) for Bp ≥ 1014 G.

  5. Deviations from reversible dynamics in a qubit-oscillator system coupled to a very small environment

    CERN Document Server

    Vidiella-Barranco, A

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution it is considered a simple and solvable model consisting of a qubit in interaction with an oscillator exposed to a very small "environment" (a second qubit). An isolated qubit-oscillator system having the oscillator initially in one of its energy eigenstates exhibits Rabi oscillations, an evidence of coherent quantum behaviour. It is shown here in which way the coupling to a small "environment" disrupts such regular behaviour, leading to a quasi-periodic dynamics for the qubit linear entropy. In particular, it is found that the linear entropy is very sensitive to the amount of mixedness of the "environment". For completeness, fluctuations in the oscillator energy are also taken into account.

  6. Mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George S B; Boyman, Liron; Chikando, Aristide C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-25

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix is critically important to cellular function. As a regulator of matrix Ca(2+) levels, this flux influences energy production and can initiate cell death. If large, this flux could potentially alter intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Despite years of study, fundamental disagreements on the extent and speed of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake still exist. Here, we review and quantitatively analyze mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake fluxes from different tissues and interpret the results with respect to the recently proposed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) candidate. This quantitative analysis yields four clear results: (i) under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) influx into the mitochondria via the MCU is small relative to other cytosolic Ca(2+) extrusion pathways; (ii) single MCU conductance is ∼6-7 pS (105 mM [Ca(2+)]), and MCU flux appears to be modulated by [Ca(2+)]i, suggesting Ca(2+) regulation of MCU open probability (P(O)); (iii) in the heart, two features are clear: the number of MCU channels per mitochondrion can be calculated, and MCU probability is low under normal conditions; and (iv) in skeletal muscle and liver cells, uptake per mitochondrion varies in magnitude but total uptake per cell still appears to be modest. Based on our analysis of available quantitative data, we conclude that although Ca(2+) critically regulates mitochondrial function, the mitochondria do not act as a significant dynamic buffer of cytosolic Ca(2+) under physiological conditions. Nevertheless, with prolonged (superphysiological) elevations of [Ca(2+)]i, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can increase 10- to 1,000-fold and begin to shape [Ca(2+)]i dynamics.

  7. [Studies on the calcium distribution in developing synergids of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Tian, Hui Qiao

    2007-08-01

    Potassium antimonite was used to locate calcium in the synergids of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L) during their development. The two synergids on 3d before anthesis formed evident polarity with most cytoplasm located in the micropylar end and nucleus in the middle and a big vacuole in the chalazal end. At this time, calcium precipitates were a few in both cells. Calcium precipitates in the two synergids began to increase on 2d before anthesis. Synergid wall in the micropylar end thickened on 1d before anthesis, in which many calcium precipitates located. Near anthesis, synergids formed filiform apparatus in which abundant calcium precipitates accumulated to prepare for attracting pollen tubes entering. At anthesis, the distribution of calcium precipitates between two synergids was the same. At 1h after pollination, calcium precipitates evidently increased in one synergid that seemed to degenerate, the other one was persistent and the distribution of calcium granules did not change. Two synergids kept intact at 1d after emasculated, and the distribution of calcium precipitates did not display difference, suggesting that the degeneration of one synergid was caused by approaching pollen tubes which might give some signal to induce calcium increase of the synergid. Before fusion of sperm cell with egg cell, the cytoplasm of degenerated synergid embraced the egg and formed a thin layer between the egg and the central cell. Calcium precipitates in the different parts of degenerated synergid were closely connected with the fertilization: calcium precipitates accumulated in the near chalazal end of degenerated synergid at 1h after pollination. At 2.5h after pollination, the calcium precipitates increased at the chalazal end, especially abundant in the thin layer between the egg and the central cell. However, at 4h after pollination, the fertilization had finished at this time, the distribution of calcium precipitates in degenerated synergid changed again: the precipitates

  8. B0s Oscillation Results

    CERN Document Server

    Willocq, S

    2002-01-01

    We review new studies of the time dependence of B0s - B0s-bar mixing by the ALEPH, DELPHI and SLD Collaborations, with an emphasis on the different analysis methods used. Combining all available results yields a preliminary lower limit on the oscillation frequency of dms > 14.4 ps-1 at the 95% C.L.

  9. Observation of anharmonic Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisow, Felix; Wang, Gang; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    We report on the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations of an optical wave packet in a lattice with second-order coupling. To this end, we employ zigzag waveguide arrays, in which the second-order coupling can be precisely tuned.

  10. Testing Localization in Neutrino Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuridov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    The neutrino wave packet localization in short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, such as MiniBooNE, is investigated. It is shown that the transition from localization to delocalization may be observed for large neutrino mass splitting of order 1 eV, e.g., in theories with sterile neutrinos.

  11. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavlov, A.V., E-mail: shavlov@ikz.ru [Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian Branch, P.O. 1230, 625000 Tyumen (Russian Federation); Dzhumandzhi, V.A.; Romanyuk, S.N. [Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian Branch, P.O. 1230, 625000 Tyumen (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-04

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60–100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method. -- Highlights: ► The present investigation registered short-wave sound oscillations of water drops in a dropwise cluster in the range of 60–100 °C. ► We have found autocorrelation functions and Fourier transforms of time series of interdroplet distance; defined oscillation frequencies. ► Calculated electrical charge of drops and specified that the charge is proportional to the drop surface area.

  12. Optoelectronic Oscillators for Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeira, Bruno; Figueiredo, José

    We introduce and report recent developments on a novel five port optoelectronic voltage controlled oscillator consisting of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) optical-waveguide integrated with a laser diode. The RTD-based optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) has both optical and electrical input and output ports, with the fifth port allowing voltage control. The RTD-OEO locks to reference radio-frequency (RF) sources by either optical or electrical injection locking techniques allowing remote synchronization, eliminating the need of impedance matching between traditional RF oscillators. RTD-OEO functions include generation, amplification and distribution of RF carriers, clock recovery, carrier recovery, modulation and demodulation and frequency synthesis. Self-injection locking operation modes, where small portions of the output electrical/optical signals are fed back into the electrical/optical input ports, are also proposed. The self-phase locked loop configuration can give rise to low-noise high-stable oscillations, not limited by the RF source performance and with no need of external optoelectronic conversion.

  13. Solar Magnetic Waves and Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi von Fay-Siebenburgen, R.

    2006-11-01

    Recent solar and space satellite missions (e.g. SOHO, Trace) and high- resolution ground-based observations (e.g. Swedish Solar Telescope, Dutch Open Telescope) have opened new avenues for 21st century plasma physics. With unprecedented details a very rich and abundant structure of the solar atmosphere is unveiled. Revolutionary observations clearly confirmed the existence of MHD waves and oscillations in a wide range of solar atmospheric magnetic structures, commonly described in the form of solar flux tubes. The objectives of this review are to give an up-to-date account of the theory of MHD waves and oscillations in solar and astrophysical magnetic wave-guides. Since magnetic structuring acts as excellent wave guides, plasma waves and oscillations are able to propagate from sub-surface solar regions through the solar atmosphere deep into the interplanetary space. Observations and theoretical modeling of waves can provide excellent diagnostic tools about the state of solar plasma. Key examples of the various types of MHD waves and oscillations will be discussed both from observational and theoretical perspectives and the concept of atmospheric (coronal) and magneto-seismology will be introduced. The lecture will also contain a few short exercises in order to highlight the important points of the applications of solar MHD wave theory.

  14. Dopaminergic regulation of dendritic calcium: fast multisite calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Oikonomou, Katerina D; Short, Shaina M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2013-01-01

    Optimal dopamine tone is required for the normal cortical function; however it is still unclear how cortical-dopamine-release affects information processing in individual cortical neurons. Thousands of glutamatergic inputs impinge onto elaborate dendritic trees of neocortical pyramidal neurons. In the process of ensuing synaptic integration (information processing), a variety of calcium transients are generated in remote dendritic compartments. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms of dopaminergic modulation it is important to know whether and how dopaminergic signals affect dendritic calcium transients. In this chapter, we describe a relatively inexpensive method for monitoring dendritic calcium fluctuations at multiple loci across the pyramidal dendritic tree, at the same moment of time (simultaneously). The experiments have been designed to measure the amplitude, time course and spatial extent of action potential-associated dendritic calcium transients before and after application of dopaminergic drugs. In the examples provided here the dendritic calcium transients were evoked by triggering the somatic action potentials (backpropagation-evoked), and puffs of exogenous dopamine were applied locally onto selected dendritic branches.

  15. Formation of calcium complexes by borogluconate in vitro and during calcium borogluconate infusion in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farningham, D A

    1985-07-01

    The effect of borogluconate on plasma calcium fractions was studied in vitro and in vivo in sheep. In vitro calcium chloride was more effective in raising ionised plasma calcium than calcium borogluconate. Sodium borate or gluconate added to blood caused only small decreases in blood ionised calcium. However, together, a synergistic reduction in ionised calcium was observed. Following calcium borogluconate infusions into sheep, total plasma calcium rose primarily because of an increase in the unionised ultrafiltrable fraction. Other changes observed following the infusion were hypercalciuria, decreased glomerular filtration rate and acidosis. Sodium borogluconate administered subcutaneously lowered total plasma calcium. This probably resulted from enhanced calcium excretion. It is suggested that since the anionic component of calcium solutions alters the availability and retention of calcium, it is likely to affect clinical efficacy significantly.

  16. Vitamin D Receptor and Calcium Sensing Receptor Polymorphisms and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in European Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenab, Mazda; McKay, James; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Hendrik B.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Ferrari, Pietro; Slimani, Nadia; Jansen, Eugene H. J. M.; Pischon, Tobias; Rinaldi, Sabina; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Engel, Pierre; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Dilis, Vardis; Oustoglou, Erifili; Berrino, Franco; Vineis, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Masala, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Vrieling, Alina; van Gils, Carla H.; Peeters, Petra H.; Brustad, Magritt; Lund, Eiliv; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Rodriguez Suarez, Laudina; Molina, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Sala, Nuria; Hallmans, Goran; Palmqvist, Richard; Roddam, Andrew; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Bingham, Sheila; Boffetta, Paolo; Autier, Philippe; Byrnes, Graham; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    2009-01-01

    Increased levels of vitamin D and calcium may play a protective role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. It has been suggested that these effects may be mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the calcium sensing receptor (CASR). However, current epidemiologic evidence from Eur

  17. [Calcium metabolism characteristics in microgravity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, A I; Larina, I M; Morukov, B V

    1999-06-01

    The results of research of calcium exchange parameters at cosmonauts taken part in long space flights (SF) onboard of orbital stations "SALUT" and "MIR" within 1978-1998 were generalized. The analysis of data received during observation of 44 cosmonauts (18 of them have taken part in long SF twice) was done. The observation was carried out before and after SF by duration 30-438 days. The content of a total calcium in blood serum was increased basically by the increase of its ionized fraction after flights of moderate (3-6 months) and large duration (6-14 months) along with the significant increase of PTH and decrease of calcitonin levels. The content of osteocalcin after SF was increased. Three cosmonauts participated in research of calcium kinetics using stable isotopes before, in time and after a 115-day SF. Reduction of intestinal absorption, excretion through a gastrointestinal tract, and increase of calcium excretion with urine were marked in time of SF. In early postflight period a level of intestinal absorption, on the average, was much lower than in SF, and the calcium removal through intestine was increased. Both renal and intestinal excretion of calcium were not normalized in 3.5-4.5 months after end of SF. Increase of resorbtive processes in bone tissues which induced negative bone balance during flight was observed in all test subjects, proceeding from estimations of speed of the basic calcium flows made on the basis of mathematical modeling. The conclusion about decrease in speed of bone tissue remodeling and strengthening of its resorption proves to be true by data of research of biochemical and endocrine markers.

  18. Entrainment of spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic oscillations to behavioral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, Gert; Walther, Mario; Bauernfeind, Günther; Barry, Robert J; Witte, Herbert; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-04-30

    Entrainment in physiological systems can be manifest in cases where phase-coupling (synchronization) between slow intrinsic oscillations and periodic motor responses, or vice versa, takes place. To test whether voluntary movement has something in common with entrainment of slow hemodynamic oscillations to motor responses, we studied blood pressure (BP), heart rate beat-to-beat intervals (RRI) and prefrontal (de)oxyhemoglobin (Hb/HbO2) during 5min of rest, 10min of self-paced, voluntary movements and 10min of stimulus-paced movements at 10s intervals in 9 subjects. Subjects were divided into 2 groups according to the timing of voluntary finger movements. It appeared that these movements occurred at relatively regular intervals of approximately 10s in 5 subjects (group A); while 4 subjects showed random or very short inter-movement intervals (group B). Two remarkable results were obtained: first, the phase coupling (COH(2)) between BP and RRI showed a significant (p=0.0061) interaction between activity (rest vs. movement) and group (A vs. B), with an increased (p=0.0003) coupling in group A. Second, the COH(2) between BP and Hb oscillations showed a significant (p=0.034) interaction between activity and group, with a decreased (p=0.079) coupling in group B. These results suggest that subjects able to initiate self-paced, voluntary movements at relatively regular intervals of ∼10s show an entrainment potential between physiological oscillations and motor responses. This also provides the first evidence that not only physiological oscillations can be entrained to motor responses, but also motor responses (voluntary movements) can be entrained to slow intrinsic oscillations.

  19. Modeling of progesterone-induced intracellular calcium signaling in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long-Fei; Xiang, Cheng; Zhu, Ya-Bing; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2014-06-21

    Calcium ion is a secondary messenger of mammalian spermatozoa. The dynamic change of its concentration plays a vital role in the process of sperm motility, capacitation, acrosome and fertilization. Progesterone released by the cumulus cells, as a potent stimulator of fertilization, can activate the calcium channels on the plasma membrane, which in turn triggers the dynamic change of intracellular calcium concentration. In this paper, a mathematical model of calcium dynamic response in mammalian spermatozoa induced by progesterone is proposed and numerical simulation of the dynamic model is conducted. The results show that the dynamic response of calcium concentration predicted by the model is in accordance with experimental evidence. The proposed dynamic model can be used to explain the phenomena observed in the experiments and predict new phenomena to be revealed by experimental investigations, which will provide the basis to quantitatively investigate the fluid mechanics and biochemistry for the sperm motility induced by progesterone.

  20. Tunable Oscillations in the Purkinje Neuron

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, Ze'ev R; Wang, Yuan; Trauner, Dirk; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of slow oscillations in Purkinje neurons in vitro, and derive a strong association with a forced parametric oscillator model. We demonstrate the precise rhythmicity of the oscillations in Purkinje neurons, as well as a dynamic tunability of this oscillation using a photo-switchable compound. We show that this slow oscillation can be induced in every Purkinje neuron, having periods ranging between 10-25 seconds. Starting from a Hodgkin-Huxley model, we also demonstrate that this oscillation can be externally modulated, and that the neurons will return to their intrinsic firing frequency after the forced oscillation is concluded. These results signify an additional functional role of tunable oscillations within the cerebellum, as well as a dynamic control of a time scale in the brain in the range of seconds.

  1. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here...

  2. Opto-Electronic Oscillator and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental results of a new class of microwave oscillators called opto-electronic oscillators (OEO). We discuss techniques of achieving high stability single mode operation and demonstrate the applications of OEO in photonic communication systems.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of ring oscillator circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Xiaoqing

    2010-06-01

    Using nonlinear systems techniques, we analyze the stability properties and synchronization conditions for ring oscillator circuits, which are essential building blocks in digital systems. By making use of its cyclic structure, we investigate local and global stability properties of an n-stage ring oscillator. We present a sufficient condition for global asymptotic stability of the origin and obtain necessity if the ring oscillator consists of identical inverter elements. We then give a synchronization condition for identical interconnected ring oscillators.

  4. Optical analogue of electronic Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Riccardo; Costantino, Paola; Wiersma, Diederik; Ghulinyan, Mher; Oton, Claudio J; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2003-12-31

    We report on the observation of Bloch oscillations in light transport through periodic dielectric systems. By introducing a linear refractive index gradient along the propagation direction the optical equivalent of a Wannier-Stark ladder was obtained. Bloch oscillations were observed as time-resolved oscillations in transmission, in direct analogy to electronic Bloch oscillations in conducting crystals where the Wannier-Stark ladder is obtained via an external electric field. The observed oscillatory behavior is in excellent agreement with transfer matrix calculations.

  5. Internal dynamics of long Josephson junction oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, Alwyn C.;

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations on a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson junction fluxon oscillator are compared with experimental measurements. Good agreement is found for the voltage current characteristic, oscillator power output, and range of current bias over which oscillation is observed. Our numeric...... results imply a ''bunched-fluxon'' mode of oscillation at larger values of bias current. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  6. Parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Kh Akhmedov

    2000-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations in matter can exhibit a specific resonance enhancement - parametric resonance, which is different from the MSW resonance. Oscillations of atmospheric and solar neutrinos inside the earth can undergo parametric enhancement when neutrino trajectories cross the core of the earth. In this paper we review the parametric resonance of neutrino oscillations in matter. In particular, physical interpretation of the effect and the prospects of its experimental observation in oscillations of solar and atmospheric neutrinos in the earth are discussed.

  7. Calcium supplement: humanity's double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyaratavej, Narong; Buranasinsup, Shutipen

    2011-10-01

    The principle aim of the present study is to investigate the dark side of calcium, pollutions in calcium preparation especially lead (Pb), mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd). The collected samples were the different calcium salts in the market and 18 preparations which were classified into 3 groups: Calcium carbonate salts, Chelated calcium and natural-raw calcium. All samples were analyzed for lead, cadmium and mercury by inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, in house method based on AOAC (2005) 999.10 by ICP-MS. The calcium carbonate and the natural-raw calcium in every sample contained lead at 0.023-0.407 mg/kg of calcium powder. Meanwhile, the natural-raw calcium such as oyster, coral and animal bone showed amount of lead at 0.106-0.384 mg/kg with small amounts of mercury and cadmium. The chelated calcium such as calcium gluconate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate are free of lead.

  8. Bloch-Zener oscillations in binary superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisow, F; Szameit, A; Heinrich, M; Pertsch, T; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A; Longhi, S

    2009-02-20

    Bloch-Zener oscillations, i.e., the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling between minibands of a binary lattice, are experimentally demonstrated for light waves in curved femtosecond laser-written waveguide arrays. Visualization of double-periodicity breathing and oscillation modes is reported, and synchronous tunneling leading to wave reconstruction is demonstrated.

  9. On the excitation of Goodwin's oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2014-11-01

    We consider the necessary condition for excitation of long-periodic Goodwin's oscillations and short-periodic sawtooth oscillations in the Goodwin model with fixed delay in the induced investment. Also, using the method of equivalent linearization we evaluate the amplitude of steady-state oscillation.

  10. Control linearity and jitter of relaxation oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierkink, Sander Laurentius Johannes

    1999-01-01

    The body of this thesis (chapters 3,4 and 5) deals with the analysis and improvement of a specific class of voltage- or current controlled oscillators (VCO’s respectively CCO’s) called relaxation oscillators. Before going into detail on this particular class of oscillators, first the function and ap

  11. The SD oscillator and its attractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Q [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Railway Institute, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Wiercigroch, M; Pavlovskaia, E; Grebogi, C; Michael, J; Thompson, T [Centre for Applied Dynamics Research, School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, King' s College, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: qingjiecao@hotmail.com

    2008-02-15

    We propose a new archetypal oscillator for smooth and discontinuous systems (SD oscillator). This oscillator behaves both smooth and discontinuous system depending on the value of the smoothness parameter. New dynamic behaviour is presented for the transitions from the smooth to discontinuous regime.

  12. On the mechanism of oscillations in neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Barington, Torben; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the oscillatory generation of H(2)O(2) and oscillations in shape and size in neutrophils in suspension. The oscillations are independent of cell density and hence do not represent a collective phenomena. Furthermore, the oscillations are independent of the e...

  13. Observations of high-frequency and high-wavenumber solar oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, D. N.; Scherrer, P. H.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Doppler shift measurements of the Na D1 absorption line reveal solar oscillations in a new regime of frequency and wavenumber. Oscillations of vertical velocities in the temperature minimum and low chromosphere of the sun are observed with frequencies ranging up to 9.5 mHz. The fundamental modes appear with wavenumbers up to 5.33/Mm (equivalent spherical harmonic degree 3710). No evidence for chromospheric modes of 3-minute period is reported.

  14. Bistability in an uncatalyzed bromate oscillator in a continuously fed stirred tank reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Arun K.; Müller, S. C.

    1996-01-01

    Uncatalyzed gallic acid oscillating system has been investigated in a continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In the [Bromate]0-[Bromide]0 concentration space, a region has been located where a bistability is observed between an oscillatory branch and a flow branch. To our knowledge this is the first evidence of bistability in an uncatalyzed bromate oscillator. Some observations have been explained in terms of the skeleton mechanism proposed in the past.

  15. Calcium Signaling in Mammalian Eggs at Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Hideki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Ito, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The innovation and development of live-cell fluorescence imaging methods have revealed the dynamic aspects of intracellular Ca2+ in a wide variety of cells. The fertilized egg, the very first cell to be a new individual, has long been under extensive investigations utilizing Ca2+ imaging since its early days, and spatiotemporal Ca2+ dynamics and underlying mechanisms of Ca2+ mobilization, as well as physiological roles of Ca2+ at fertilization, have become more or less evident in various animal species. In this article, we illustrate characteristic patterns of Ca2+ dynamics in mammalian gametes and molecular basis for Ca2+ release from intracellular stores leading to the elevation in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and describe the identity and properties of sperm-borne egg-activating factor in relation to the induction of Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ oscillations, referring to its potential use in artificial egg activation as infertility treatment. In addition, a possible Ca2+ influx-driven mechanism for slow and long-lasting Ca2+ oscillations characteristic of mammalian eggs is proposed, based on the recent experimental findings and mathematical modeling. Cumulative knowledge about the roles of Ca2+ in the egg activation leading to early embryogenesis is summarized, to emphasize the diversity of functions that Ca2+ can perform in a single type of cell.

  16. The effect of phase stabilization of microwave oscillations in nanosecond Gunn oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konev, V. Yu.; Klimov, A. I.; Koval'chuk, O. B.; Gubanov, V. P.; Kozhevnikov, V. Yu.; Kozyrev, A. V.; Torkhov, N. A.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of the semiconductor structure of an oscillator diode on the phase stabilization of microwave oscillations in a nanosecond Gunn oscillator by using a modulating voltage pulse edge is investigated. Numerical simulation is employed to determine phase deviations depending on the scatter of pulseedge duration and pulse amplitude. The standard deviation of phase-delay time of microwave oscillations in the oscillator with regard to a constant level at the modulating pulse edge and the standard deviation of phase difference of microwave oscillations in two electrodynamically insulated oscillators connected in parallel to one and the same modulator have been measured.

  17. Time domain oscillating poles: Stability redefined in Memristor based Wien-oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Talukdar, Abdul Hafiz Ibne

    2012-07-28

    Traditionally, the necessary and sufficient condition for any system to be oscillating is that its poles are located on the imaginary (jω) axis. In this paper, for the first time, we have shown that systems can oscillate with time-domain oscillating poles. The idea is verified using a Memristor based Wien oscillator. Sustained oscillations are observed without having the poles of the system fixed on the imaginary axis and the oscillating behavior of the system poles is reported. The oscillating resistance and triangular shape of FFT are also demonstrated with mathematical reasoning and simulation results to support the unusual and surprising characteristics. © 2009 IEEE.

  18. Calcium and Cancer Prevention: Strengths and Limits of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... is an essential dietary mineral commonly found in milk, yogurt, cheese, and dark green vegetables. It also ...

  19. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhouse, Christopher James [Oriel College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0

  20. Restoration of oscillation in network of oscillators in presence of direct and indirect interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Soumen; Bera, Bidesh K.; Bhowmick, Sourav K.; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-10-01

    The suppression of oscillations in coupled systems may lead to several unwanted situations, which requires a suitable treatment to overcome the suppression. In this paper, we show that the environmental coupling in the presence of direct interaction, which can suppress oscillation even in a network of identical oscillators, can be modified by introducing a feedback factor in the coupling scheme in order to restore the oscillation. We inspect how the introduction of the feedback factor helps to resurrect oscillation from various kinds of death states. We numerically verify the resurrection of oscillations for two paradigmatic limit cycle systems, namely Landau-Stuart and Van der Pol oscillators and also in generic chaotic Lorenz oscillator. We also study the effect of parameter mismatch in the process of restoring oscillation for coupled oscillators.