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Sample records for calcium metabolic disorders

  1. Dental Problems in Calcium Metabolism Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rabbani M.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium metabolism disorders can be acute or chronic and chronic disorders can cause different disease states such as dental problems. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study done in Children's Medical Center affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 2005-2009, all (93 patients with hypoparathyroidism, nutritional rickets, hypophosphatemic rickets and renal osteodysthrophy from the endocrinology and nephrology departments of the Center were referred to a dentist there for orodental examination. Subsequently, the frequency of dental problems including taurodontism, enamel hypoplasia, dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were recorded and analyzed. Results: Nutritional rickets was the most common disorder in this study and delay in dentition was the most frequent dental problem in the patients (61.9%. Most cases of taurdontism and enamel hypoplasia were seen in patients with hypoparathyroidism (33% and 50%, respectively. Dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were more common in patients with renal osteodysthrophia (50%, 90% and 20%, respectively. In addition, dental caries and delay in dentition were the most prevalent disorders in this study (69.8% and 49.5%, respectively. Conclusion: According to the above findings, it seems that effective screening, regular periodic examinations, proper diagnosis and timely treatment of dental diseases are the main principles of prevention of orodental problems. Moreover, dentists as well as pediatricians should be aware of the features of the aforesaid disorders which lead to dental problems so that early intervention could prevent subsequent serious and more invasive dental problems.

  2. Metabolic Disorders

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    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver ...

  3. Diuretics and disorders of calcium homeostasis.

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    Grieff, Marvin; Bushinsky, David A

    2011-11-01

    Diuretics commonly are administered in disorders of sodium balance. Loop diuretics inhibit the Na-K-2Cl transporter and also increase calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of hypercalcemia. Thiazide diuretics block the thiazide-sensitive NaCl transporter in the distal convoluted tubule, and can decrease calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of nephrolithiasis. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease bicarbonate absorption and the resultant metabolic acidosis can increase calcium excretion. Their use can promote nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. This review will address the use of diuretics on disorders of calcium homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcium metabolism & hypercalcemia in adults.

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    Lumachi, F; Motta, R; Cecchin, D; Ave, S; Camozzi, V; Basso, S M M; Luisetto, G

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is essential for many metabolic process, including nerve function, muscle contraction, and blood clotting. The metabolic pathways that contribute to maintain serum calcium levels are bone remodeling processes, intestinal absorption and secretion, and renal handling, but hypercalcemia occurs when at least 2 of these 3 metabolic pathways are altered. Calcium metabolism mainly depends on the activity of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Its secretion is strictly controlled by the ionized serum calcium levels through a negative feed-back, which is achieved by the activation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) mainly expressed on the surface of the parathyroid cells. The PTH receptor in bone and kidney is now referred as PTHR1. The balance of PTH, calcitonin, and vitamin D has long been considered the main regulator of calcium metabolism, but the function of other actors, such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, and TPRV5 should be considered. Primary hyperparathyroidism and malignancy are the most common causes of hypercalcemia, accounting for more than 90% of cases. Uncontrolled hypercalcemia may cause renal impairment, both temporary (alteration of renal tubular function) and progressive (relapsing nephrolithiasis), leading to a progressive loss of renal function, as well as severe bone diseases, and heart damages. Advances in the understanding of all actors of calcium homeostasis will be crucial, having several practical consequences in the treatment and prevention of hypercalcemia. This would allow to move from a support therapy, sometimes ineffective, to a specific and addressed therapy, especially in patients with chronic hypercalcemic conditions unsuitable for surgery.

  5. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

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    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P metabolism (P metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  6. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

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    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  7. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

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    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  8. Effect of Calcium Borogluconate Injection pre and Immediately Postpartum on Production Performance, Incidence of Metabolic Disorders and Situation of the Uterus After Calving in Cows Fed Anionic Diets

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    H. Amanlou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of calcium borogluconate injection 48 and 24 hours prepartum and immediately after parturition on dry matter intake at day of calving, milk yield, incidence of metabolic disorders and uterine conditions during the first 21 days postpartum in cows fed anionic diets. Thirty six lactating dairy cows were balanced by parity (1, 2, 3+ and allocated to 4 subcutaneous injection treatments of 15.2 gr calcium as borogluconate at different times pre and postpartum than expected calving date . Group 1 consisted of 9 cows receiving no treatment before or after parturition. Group 2 consisted of 9 cows receiving calcium borogluconate 48 h prepartum.Group 3 consisted of 9 cows receiving calcium borogluconate 24 h prepartum. Group 4 consisted of 9 cows receiving 15.2 gr of ca as borogluconate immediately postpartum. Dry matter intake was in treatments 1, 2, 3 and 4 was 10.87, 12.32, 12.63 and 15.03 kg in the first 24 h after calving, respectively And indicated significantly difference among treatments. milk yield in 2, 3 and 4 treatments was significantly greater than group 1 in the first 21 days of lactation (38.7, 38.9, 40.3 vs 36.07 kg/d. Treatment had a significant effect on the subclinical hypocalcemia incidence so incidence risk of subclinical hypocalcemia in 1 treatment was 10 times more likely than 4 treatment. Data regression analysis indicated that 4 treatment had a significant effect on the ketosis incidence. So that the cows no calcium injection 2.43 times more likely to experience ketosis than 4 treatment. But experimental treatments were not significantly effect on the incidence of milk fever, displacement abomasum, retained placenta, metritis and endometritis. In general, calcium injection, especially immediately after parturation increased the dry matter intake in day of calving and reduced metabolic disorders such as hypocalcaemia and ketosis.

  9. [Regulatory mechanism of calcium metabolism.

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    Ozono, Keiichi

    It is often difficult for terrestrial animals to take enough calcium. To maintain serum or extracellular calcium levels is very important for muscle and nerve function. Two major regulators to increase the serum calcium levels are parathyroid hormone(PTH)and vitamin D. PTH binds to the G protein coupling receptor, PTH1R, and increases intracellular cAMP levels. Impirement in the PTH signalling causes many diseases such as pseudohypoparathyroidism and acrodysostosis with hormone resistance. Vitamin D is activated to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D]by two steps of hydroxylation which occurs in the Liver and Kidney. Then, 1,25(OH)2D binds to vitamin D receptor(VDR), which works as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. Hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia are caused by various disorders including abnormal regulation of PTH and vitamin D production and their signal transduction.

  10. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

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    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Lipid metabolism disorders, such as Gaucher disease and Tay-Sachs disease, involve lipids. Lipids are fats or fat-like substances. They ...

  11. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) screening for exon copy number variation in the calcium sensing receptor gene: no large rearrangements identified in patients with calcium metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Wallace, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background. Mutation screening of the CASR by DNA sequencing is commonly used in the diagnosis of disorders of calcium metabolism, such as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH). Exon copy number variation is not detected by currently used molecular genetic screening methods, and might....... Patients and methods. The study included 257 patient samples referred to our laboratory for molecular genetic analysis of the CASR gene. A total of 245 were patients suspected to have FHH, while the remaining 12 samples represent patients with a phenotype of idiopathic hypocalcaemia/hypoparathyroidism. All...

  12. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P parathyroid hormone levels (P animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  13. Diagnosis of alterations of serum calcium metabolism.

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    Lumachi, Franco; Cappelletti, Piero; Tozzoli, Renato; Basso, Stafano M M; Luisetto, Giovanni; Camozzi, Valentina

    2012-07-01

    Calcium is essential to homeostasis and functioning of multiple organ systems. Its circulating concentration is maintained within a very tight physiologic range: 2.25 and 2.50 mmol/L. Under physiological conditions, the ionized calcium concentration is regulated by the parathyroid hormone (PTH), and 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D through interactions on target organs such as kidney, bone and intestine. In mild, moderate, and severe hypercalcemia, laboratory findings are essential in assessing and monitoring disease course and therapy. The main tools are specific standard biochemical tests able to assess calcium balance and renal function, and some specific biochemical tests, such as PTH, 25(OH) vitamin D, and genetic sequencing, used to clarify the cause of hypercalcemia and, subsequently, to determine appropriate therapy. Once hypercalcemia is confirmed by ionized calcium measurement, the intact PTH assay plays a crucial role to differentiate PTH-mediated from non-PTH-mediated hypercalcemia. Mild hypercalcemia is also present in up to 10-20% of patients treated with lithium for bipolar disorders, in 7-8% of those treated with thiazide diuretics, and in patients with prolonged immobilization, while very high (>3.5 mmol/L) serum calcium levels, together with low PTH, and a rapid increase of hypercalcemia, usually suggest a malignancy-associated hypercalcemic syndrome. The measurement of PTH-related protein, a tumor product that mimics certain action of PTH, is useful only in selected cases. The role of biochemical markers of bone turnover for predicting metastatic bone disease, and monitoring bone metabolic changes, and their usefulness as a predictive mean of the likelihood of bone loss or fractures risk is still unclear.

  14. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

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    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  15. A Cross-Sectional Study to Determine the Prevalence of Calcium Metabolic Disorder in Malignant Childhood Cancers in Patients Admitted to the Pediatric Ward of Vali-Asr Hospital

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    Saudatu A. Sambo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium metabolic disorders, such as hypercalcemia is a potentially life-threatening disorder especially when coupled with an already compromised condition. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic calcium disorders in childhood cancers of patients admitted to the pediatric ward of Vali-Asr Hospital from the year 2001-2008. The study was carried out by reviewing hospital records of these patients from the hospital archives. Range of age was between 1 and 18 years. Inclusion criteria for the study population were the presence of total serum calcium evaluated at least once; and for the hypercalcemia subgroup, at least two occasions of elevated calcium levels. The prevalence of hypercalcemia and other metabolic abnormalities of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine; the prevalence of parameters such as age, gender, type and duration of cancer were determined within these groups. Median of elevated calcium levels was also determined to classify hypercalcemia into moderate and severe hypercalcemia. Median was 11.7 mg/dl, therefore, severe hypercalcemia was ≥11.7mg/dl and moderate hypercalcemia, a range between the upper limit of normal, 10.8 and 10.2 mg/dl for the child and adolescent respectively, and 11.7 mg/dl. Relationship between hypercalcemia and the other metabolic disorders and parameters were analyzed by the SPSS V.17 program. The population of study consisted of 148 cases. Hypercalcemia was found in 8 (5.4% patients. Half of the cases were associated with severe hypercalcemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Out of 148 cases, there were 92 (62% boys and 56 (38% girls. Mean and median ages were 10.9 and 11 years respectively. Mean duration of cancer was 12.8 and median 6 months. There were 57 (38.5% cases of leukemia and 91 (61.5% cases of solid tumors. The most common cancers were ALL, 44 cases (29.7% followed by brain tumors, 19 cases (12.8%; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 16 cases (10.8%; 13

  16. Metabolic disorders in menopause

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    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  17. Calcium and Magnesium Metabolism in Pre-Eclampsia.

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    Udenze, I C; Arikawe, A P; Azinge, E C; Okusanya, B O; Ebuehi, O A

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a multisystem disorder associated with high maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. The cause of the disorder is largely unknown and its pathogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Calcium and magnesium are divalent ions which may have roles to play in the manifestations of the disease. An understanding of their metabolism in preeclampsia may aid our management of pregnant women who develop the disease. To determine the plasma and urinary concentrations of calcium, magnesium and parathyroid hormone in women with mild, severe preeclampsia and in normal pregnancy. This is was a case control study of fifty women with mild preeclampsia, fifty women with severe preeclampsia and fifty women with normal pregnancy as controls, drawn from The Antenatal Clinic at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. The women were consecutively recruited after signing an informed consent form. Ethical approval was obtained from the medical ethics committee of the hospital. The three groups of women were similar in their socio demographic characteristics. Plasma calcium was low in mild and severe preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy controls (p=0.021). Urine calcium/creatinine ratio was lower in mild and severe preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy controls (p= 0.030). Fractional excretion of calcium and levels of parathyroid hormone were similar across all three subgroups of women. Plasma magnesium was higher in mild and severe preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy controls (p=0.011) and showed a positive correlation with plasma creatinine (r=0.48, p=0.045). Parathyroid hormone levels were similar across the study groups. Preeclampsia is associated with significant changes in calcium and magnesium metabolism. This study noted significant hypocalcaemia in mild and severe preeclampsia with significantly low urine calcium/creatinine levels. Calcium supplementation may have a place in patient's management. Hypermagnesemia was observed in

  18. [Management of bone and mineral metabolism disorders before the dialysis stage remains still perfectible. Data from the French Phosphorus and Calcium Survey Photo-Graphe].

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    Jean, Guillaume; Daugas, Éric; Roth, Hubert; Drueke, Tilman; Bouchet, Jean-Louis; Hannedouche, Thierry; London, Gérard; Fouque, Denis

    2017-11-01

    Only limited data is available on the management of the chronic kidney disease-associated bone and mineral metabolism disorder (CKD-MBD) in the pre-dialysis stages of CKD in France. A better knowledge of current management habits could lead to an improvement in the implementation of international recommendations (KDIGO). The 3rd version of the French Phosphorus and Calcium Survey Photo-Graphe (Sanofi) included a cohort of CKD stages 4 and 5 patients, whose aim was to examine the prevalence of CKD-MBD and the quality of its management in patients under the care of 62 nephrologists from over 20 geographical regions in France. The study started in October 2011, i.e. one year after patient enrollment. We examined in particular the percentage of patients presenting with laboratory parameter abnormalities indicative of CKD-MBD who were not receiving adequate treatment. A total of 456 patients with CKD stage 4 and 154 with CKD stage 5 were studied. Their mean age was 72.9±14.2 years, and male/female ratio was 58/42. KDIGO targets of serum PTH for CKD stages 4 and 5 were not achieved in respectively 80 and 84% of the patients, for serum calcium in 8 and 22% and for serum phosphate in 12 and 46%. As a potential explanation, insufficient therapy was estimated to account for respectively 45 and 60% of insufficiently controlled secondary hyperparathyroidism, and for 36% of persistent hyperphosphatemia in stage 5. It should be noted that 55.5 and 57.5% of patients were receiving native vitamin D. In this national observatory, the management of CKD-MBD stages 4 and 5 appears suboptimal, especially as regards the control of secondary hyperparathyroidism, which remained untreated in nearly 50% of the patients. Hyperphosphatemia was also common and inadequately controlled in CKD stage 5. To improve the management of CKD-MBD, nephrologists need to be more aware of the importance of aiming for recommended laboratory targets and how this can be achieved. Copyright

  19. Altered calcium metabolism: the probable major biochemical lesion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These data are suggestive of altered calcium metabolism impairing cell membrane stabilization, the vasorelaxing effect of calcium and cell signaling. Altered calcium metabolism may be the major biochemical lesion underlying many pathological and clinical states of lead toxicity. Journal of Biomedical Investigation Vol.

  20. [Sleep and metabolic disorders].

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    Micić, Dragan D; Šumarac-Dumanović, Mirjana; Šušić, Veselinka; Pejković, Danica; Polovina, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    In the 20th century, the prevalence of obesity has been increasing worldwide at an alarming rate and it is followed by an increase in the diseases for which obesity is major risk factor, like metabolic syndrome, diabetes type 2 and hypertension. These facts has been resulting in explosion of investigation devoted to explanation of pathogenetic mechanisms of this serious social and medical problems with the main idea to find adequate way of prevention as well as of treatment. Together with the observed epidemy of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, it was found parallel tendency for sleep curtailment, that was confirmed in numerous epidemiological studies, that coincide with its beginning and progress with this two epidemies. This facts lead to investigations with the idea to try to explaine possible mechanisms of the association between sleep curtailment, obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and polycistic ovary syndrome. Having in mind that insulin resistance is one of the fundamental pathogenetic mechanism in these disorders, numerous studies were done with the aim to explain association between sleep curtailment and insulin resistance in obesity, Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and polycistic ovary syndrome. It was demonstrated that sleep curtailment may affect energy homeostasis of human organism with the effects on body weight increase through three different ways: appetite increase, prolongation of time for food intake and through decrease of energy expenditure. There are several postulated mechanism for the effect of sleep curtailment on development of insulin resistance as well as for predisposition for Type 2 diabetes. Among possible mechanism are included: increase of sympathetic neuronal acitvity, decreased cerebral utilisation of glucose, increase in evening cortisol values, growth hormone increase and disorder of neuroendocrine control of appetite which increases the risk for getting the body weight. Metabolic systems are of particular interest in

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria calcium signaling in hepatic metabolic diseases.

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    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in glucose homeostasis, and both metabolic inflexibility and insulin resistance predispose to the development of hepatic metabolic diseases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which play a key role in the control of hepatic metabolism, also interact at contact points defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), in order to exchange metabolites and calcium (Ca 2+ ) and regulate cellular homeostasis and signaling. Here, we overview the role of the liver in the control of glucose homeostasis, mainly focusing on the independent involvement of mitochondria, ER and Ca 2+ signaling in both healthy and pathological contexts. Then we focus on recent data highlighting MAM as important hubs for hormone and nutrient signaling in the liver, thus adapting mitochondria physiology and cellular metabolism to energy availability. Lastly, we discuss how chronic ER-mitochondria miscommunication could participate to hepatic metabolic diseases, pointing MAM interface as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

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    ... amino acid metabolism disorders Treatment of amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please fill ... It's been added to your dashboard . Amino acid metabolism disorders are rare health conditions that affect a ...

  3. Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

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    Kyu Yeon Hur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the energy extraction and in the control of local or systemic immunity. Gut microbiota and its disturbance also appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases including metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, etc. In the metabolic point of view, gut microbiota can modulate lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content and the production of short-chain fatty acids that affect food intake, inflammatory tone, or insulin signaling. Several strategies have been developed to change gut microbiota such as prebiotics, probiotics, certain antidiabetic drugs or fecal microbiota transplantation, which have diverse effects on body metabolism and on the development of metabolic disorders.

  4. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2006-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a non...

  5. [ZINK IS ACTIVATOR OF ENTERAL CALCIUM METABOLISM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, E P; Ksenofontov, D A; Revyakin, A O; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on goats and rabbits showed that zinc supplement to the diet leads to calcium concentration rise in muscle, bone and blood of animals. However, this rise was not adequate to increase in.zinc consumption. The bulk of alimentary zinc stayed in soluble fraction, dense endogen fraction and infusoria fraction of digesta and stimulated calcium release from food particles, it's accumulation in digesta fractions and calcium utilization on the whole. Authors estimate animal digesta as homeostatic, spatial organized, endogenic formation in which zinc and calcium are functionally dependent through enteral mucosa.

  6. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

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    ... Affairs issues and advocacy priorities National Network of Perinatal Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is ... protein can cause serious health problems and, sometimes, death. People with these kinds of disorders may need ...

  7. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion: Insights from Genetic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine; Dimke, Henrik; Eladari, Dominique

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibition of calcium transport processes within the renal tubule. The mechanisms whereby acid alters the integrity and stability of bone have been examined extensively in the published literature. Here, after briefly reviewing this literature, we consider the effects of acid on calcium transport in the renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Yajin Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. DNA methylation in metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Zierath, Juleen R

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that controls gene expression in physiologic and pathologic states. Metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity are associated with profound alterations in gene expression that are caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recent reports...... have provided evidence that environmental factors at all ages could modify DNA methylation in somatic tissues, which suggests that DNA methylation is a more dynamic process than previously appreciated. Because of the importance of lifestyle factors in metabolic disorders, DNA methylation provides...... a mechanism by which environmental factors, including diet and exercise, can modify genetic predisposition to disease. This article considers the current evidence that defines a role for DNA methylation in metabolic disorders....

  10. Associations between calcium-phosphate metabolism and coronary artery calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Mette H; Gerke, Oke; Mickley, Hans

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: High serum calcium-phosphate levels are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with chronic kidney disease. Recent studies have demonstrated this relationship also in subjects with normal kidney function. Our aim was to examine whether......, were analysed for total calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). CAC was measured by a non-contrast cardiac CT scan and categorised into four groups: 0, 1-99, 100-399, ≥400 Agatston units. The association of calcium-phosphate metabolism with CAC was evaluated...

  11. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate PTHrP secretion and milk calcium transport with calcium availability. To test this idea genetically, we bred BLG-Cre mice with CaSR-floxed mice to ablate the CaSR specifically from mammary epithelial cells only at the onset of lactation (CaSR-cKO mice). Loss of the CaSR in the lactating mammary gland did not disrupt alveolar differentiation or milk production. However, it did increase the secretion of PTHrP into milk and decreased the transport of calcium from the circulation into milk. CaSR-cKO mice did not show accelerated bone resorption, but they did have a decrease in bone formation. Loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in hypercalcemia, decreased PTH secretion, and increased renal calcium excretion in lactating mothers. Finally, loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in decreased calcium accrual by suckling neonates, likely due to the combination of increased milk PTHrP and decreased milk calcium. These results demonstrate that the mammary gland CaSR coordinates maternal bone and calcium metabolism, calcium transport into milk, and neonatal calcium accrual during lactation. PMID:23782944

  12. Metabolic disorders mimicking Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P F; Huang, S F; Hwu, W L; Hou, J W; Ni, Y H; Chang, M H

    2000-04-01

    Several metabolic disorders such as encephalopathy and hepatic dysfunction have been described as Reye's-like syndrome because they present with similar clinical manifestations that mimic Reye's syndrome. We performed a retrospective study to explore the underlying metabolic etiologies of Reye's-like syndrome in patients treated at National Taiwan University Hospital. From January 1991 to June 1998, 19 children with a syndrome fitting the Reye's-like syndrome description were identified for study. Urine organic acid analysis, plasma amino acid analysis, liver pathology, and skin fibroblast enzyme assays were studied during the acute stage of illness. The etiologies of patients' syndromes included urea cycle disorders (n = 7), glycogen storage disease type Ia (4), primary carnitine deficiency (2), hereditary fructose intolerance (1), methylmalonic acidemia (2), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acidemia (1). Fatty acid oxidation defects were suspected in the remaining two cases. A significant number of patients who present with Reye's-like syndrome have an underlying inherited metabolic disorder. In patients with Reye's-like syndrome, an accurate diagnosis is essential to ensure normal growth and development and to prevent recurrence of the condition.

  13. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  14. Could molecular assessment of calcium metabolism be a useful tool to early screen patients at risk for pre-eclampsia complicated pregnancy? Proposal and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Di Gangi, Stefania; Saccardi, Carlo; Cosmi, Erich; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Plebani, Mario

    2015-06-01

    One of the most frequent causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity is represented by hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Women at high risk must be subjected to a more intensive antenatal surveillance and prophylactic treatments. Many genetic risk factors, clinical features and biomarkers have been proposed but none of these seems able to prevent pre-eclampsia onset. English literature review of manuscripts focused on calcium intake and hypertensive disorders during pregnancy was performed. We performed a critical analysis of evidences about maternal calcium metabolism pattern in pregnancy analyzing all possible bias affecting studies. Calcium supplementation seems to give beneficial effects on women with low calcium intake. Some evidence reported that calcium supplementation may drastically reduce the percentage of pre-eclampsia onset consequently improving the neonatal outcome. Starting from this evidence, it is intuitive that investigations on maternal calcium metabolism pattern in first trimester of pregnancy could represent a low cost, large scale tool to screen pregnant women and to identify those at increased risk of pre-eclampsia onset. We propose a biochemical screening of maternal calcium metabolism pattern in first trimester of pregnancy to discriminate patients who potentially may benefit from calcium supplementation. In a second step we propose to randomly allocate the sub-cohort of patients with calcium metabolism disorders in a treatment group (calcium supplementation) or in a control group (placebo) to define if calcium supplementation may represent a dietary mean to reduce pre-eclampsia onset and to improve pregnancy outcome.

  15. Epilepsy in inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Juan M; Campistol, Jaume; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    The study of neurometabolic diseases is still in a prolonged preliminary stage. The catalogue of these diseases continues to grow; some known clinical syndromes have been subdivided into a number of variants once the genes that cause them have been identified, and at the same time new metabolic disorders have been discovered that aggravate or contribute to forms of epilepsy not previously classified as cerebral metabolic disorders. This review presents the basic principles underlying the recognition and treatment of epilepsy caused by neurometabolic diseases. These disorders are divided (purely for the sake of convenience) into epilepsy presenting in newborn infants, children, and adolescents and adults, recognizing that there is a significant degree of overlap between these chronological stages. Current analytical methods and therapeutic approaches are summarized both from a general point of view and within the context of each clinical syndrome, acknowledging that each patient presents specific peculiarities and that, in general, antiepileptic drugs provide few benefits compared with more specific types of therapy (eg, special diets or vitamins) when indicated. We also include therapeutic recommendations and a general approach to fulminant epilepsies of neurometabolic origin, emphasizing the importance of identifying all of the proband's relatives who may be potential carriers of a genetic disorder during the diagnostic and genetic counselling process. Particular emphasis is placed on disorders for which there is curative treatment and on the importance of follow-up by expert professionals. It is expected that in a few years' time it will be possible to know the metabolomic profile of these diseases (possibly by non-invasive methods), thus facilitating accurate diagnosis and making it possible to establish the response to treatment and to identify all individuals who are carriers or remain minimally symptomatic in terms of their risk of manifesting or transmitting

  16. [FETAL PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadinova, M R; Metodieva, R; Boyadzhieva, N

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of fetal programming has developed notably over the years and recent data suggest that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy can have early-onset and long-lasting consequences on the health of the offspring. Specific negative influences of high dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are associated with development of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and diabetes in the offspring. The mechanisms underlying the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on the fetus may involve structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes. The aim of this review is to illustrate how adverse intrauterine environment may influence molecular modifications in the fetus and cause epigenetic alterations in particular. It has been demonstrated that prenatal epigenetic modifications may be linked to the pathogenesis and progression of the adult chronic disorders. Studies on epigenetic alterations will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term effects of in utero exposure and may open new perspectives for disease prevention and treatment.

  17. Compromised calcium and phosphorus metabolism in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Stanislavovna Biragova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Disturbance of bone and mineral metabolism (BMM is one of manifestations of chronic kidney disease (CKD, but its significance goes beyond bone disorders per se. Current discourse is as broad as to include vascular calcification, anemia and arterial hypertension, - conditions increasing mortality in patients with CKD. In this regard the active search for and development of novel approach to correction of BMM is under way. Apart from capacity to normalize calcium and phosphorus metabolism, parathyroid hormone secretion and to reduce morphologic alterations of bone tissue, modern therapeutic agents feature cardio- and renoprotective capabilities, which make them a treatment of choice for compromised BMM in CKD.

  18. Acute effects of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and potassium citrate on markers of calcium and bone metabolism in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Heini J; Ketola, Maarit E; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel J E

    2009-11-01

    Both K and Ca supplementation may have beneficial effects on bone through separate mechanisms. K in the form of citrate or bicarbonate affects bone by neutralising the acid load caused by a high protein intake or a low intake of alkalising foods, i.e. fruits and vegetables. Ca is known to decrease serum parathyroid hormone (S-PTH) concentration and bone resorption. We compared the effects of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and potassium citrate on markers of Ca and bone metabolism in young women. Twelve healthy women aged 22-30 years were randomised into four controlled 24 h study sessions, each subject serving as her own control. At the beginning of each session, subjects received a single dose of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate, potassium citrate or a placebo in randomised order. The diet during each session was identical, containing 300 mg Ca. Both the calcium carbonate and calcium citrate supplement contained 1000 mg Ca; the potassium citrate supplement contained 2250 mg K. Markers of Ca and bone metabolism were followed. Potassium citrate decreased the bone resorption marker (N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen) and increased Ca retention relative to the control session. Both Ca supplements decreased S-PTH concentration. Ca supplements also decreased bone resorption relative to the control session, but this was significant only for calcium carbonate. No differences in bone formation marker (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase) were seen among the study sessions. The results suggest that potassium citrate has a positive effect on the resorption marker despite low Ca intake. Both Ca supplements were absorbed well and decreased S-PTH efficiently.

  19. Plasma phospholipid arachidonic acid content and calcium metabolism in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, B; Budakovic, A; Nassuato, M A; Vezzoli, G; Manzato, E; Luisetto, G; Zaninotto, M

    2000-09-01

    responsible for the mosaic of metabolic and clinical alterations that are distinctive features of renal stone formers, and suggest that a common pathogenetic mechanism might account for the several forms of hypercalciuria detected in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis.

  20. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  1. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-x03B3; (IFN-x03B3;). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells - an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO∙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO∙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO∙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO∙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO∙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may

  2. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostner, Johanna M.; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells – an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO˙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO˙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO˙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO˙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO˙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may play a

  3. Effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation (L-7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Tatsuo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, attention has been focused on the disorders of bone and calcium metabolism during space flight. The skeletal system has evolved on the Earth under 1-g. Space flights under low gravity appear to cause substantial changes in bone and calcium homeostasis of the animals adapted to 1-g. A space experiment for the First Materials Processing Test (FMPT) was proposed to examine the effects of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation using chick embryos loaded in a space shuttle. This space experiment was proposed based on the following two experimental findings. First, it has been reported that bone density decreases significantly during prolonged space flight. The data obtained from the US Skylab and the U.S.S.R. Salyut-6 cosmonauts have also documented that the degree of bone loss is related to the duration of space flight. Second, the US-Soviet joints space experiment demonstrated that the decrease in bone density under low gravity appears to be due to the decrease in bone formation rather than the increase in bone resorption. The purpose of our space experiment is, therefore, to investigate further the mechanisms of bone growth under low gravity using fertilized chick embryos.

  4. Clinical studies of bone metabolism using a simple model of calcium tracer kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncari, G.

    1981-08-01

    Bone metabolism studies were performed in 44 subjects with and without bone disease using a calcium tracer kinetics model, the central feature of which is an expanding exchangeable calcium pool. In normal subjects the accretion rate and the exchangeable calcium pool ranged from 1.49 to 8.45 (mean 3.9 +- 2.05) mg.d/sup -1/kg/sup -1/ and from 60 to 131 (mean 81.25 +- 18.11) mg.kg/sup -1/, respectively. The patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, Pierre Marie's disease and one out of two cases of hypoparathyroidism had values which fell within the normal range. Both the accretion rate and the exchangeable calcium pool were significantly elevated in patients with Paget's disease and with hyperparathyroidism. Uremic patients with generalizated bone lesions had accretion rates or both parameters elevated. As far as patients with successful renal transplant are concerned, the results suggest that this method is a very poor means for detecting bone disorders with only focal lesions. In contrast, the method can be very useful when persistent renal osteodystrophy or secondary hyperparathyroidism are suspected.

  5. The cornea and disorders of lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, B J; Eckel, R H; Ellis, P P

    1991-01-01

    Disorders of lipid metabolism, either hyperlipidemia or hypolipidemia, are associated with the formation of corneal opacities. Corneal arcus, the most commonly encountered peripheral corneal opacity, is frequently associated with abnormal serum lipid levels, but may occur without any predisposing factors. Reports also have linked corneal arcus with alcoholism, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic heart disease. Unilateral arcus is a rare entity that is associated with carotid artery disease or ocular hypotony. Diffuse corneal opacities associated with hypolipidemic disorders such as LCAT deficiency, fish eye disease and Tangier disease, may be the initial manifestation of these disorders and puts the ophthalmologist in a position to make an early diagnosis. Corneal arcus, along with a central corneal opacity, is seen in Schnyder's crystalline stromal distrophy. The association of the disorder with a dyslipidemia remains controversial. A review of lipid metabolism, corneal arcus and several disorders of lipid metabolism that affect the cornea are presented.

  6. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summer Camp Tips for Kids With Asthma, Allergies Antioxidants: The Good Health Helpers As Stroke 'Liquefies' Brain ... Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s Health Issues Skin Disorders Special Subjects Women's Health Issues Symptoms ALL ...

  7. Inherited disorders of HDL metabolism and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovingh, G Kees; de Groot, E.P.; van der Steeg, Wim; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Hutten, Barbara A; Kuivenhoven, J.A.; Kastelein, John J P

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Genetic disorders of HDL metabolism are rare and, as a result, the assessment of atherosclerosis risk in individuals suffering from these disorders has been difficult. Ultrasound imaging of carotid arteries has provided a tool to assess the risk in hereditary hypo and

  8. Calcium and phosphorus metabolism and lithogenic factors in patients with osteoporotic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Hortal Rull, M Á; Cano-García, M C; Arrabal Martín, M; Cano Gea, R; Reyes García, R; Arrabal-Polo, M A

    2015-06-01

    To demonstrate the attendance of mineral metabolism disorders and lithogenic factors in patients' urine with osteoporotic fracture without previously known stones 67 patients with osteoporotic fractures surgically treated in trauma service are included. The area of the fracture site, fracture mechanism and the presence of osteoporosis were the factors taken into account to diagnose osteoporotic fracture. Mineral metabolism, calciuria, oxaluria, uricosuria and citraturia in 24hours urine were analyzed. The presence of abnormal calcium and phosphorus metabolism was proved comparing hypercalciuria patients with normocalciuria ones. 12 men and 55 women with mean age 68.8±14.5 years old were included. Mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was 27.4±4.1kg/m2. 42% of patients showed hypercalciuria, 34% hyperoxaluria, 34% hypocitraturia and 7% hyperuricosuria. Statistically significant differences were observed only in fasting calcium/creatinine ratio (0.17 vs. 0.08; P<.0001) when comparing patients with hypercalciuria with those with normocalciuria. Patients with osteoporotic fractures show different lithogenic factors in urine, mainly hypercalciuria, always in fasting conditions. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Rumen-protected rice bran to induce the adaptation of calcium metabolism in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martín-Tereso López, J.

    2010-01-01

    Dairy cows suffer from hypocalcaemia in the days around calving, which may result in a condition generally known as milk fever. Calcium metabolism sharply shifts at the start of lactation, because Ca needs suddenly become much greater than at the end of gestation. Calcium metabolism is able to adapt

  10. Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis During Exercise as a Mediator of Bone Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0364 TITLE: Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis during Exercise as a Mediator of Bone Metabolism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0364 Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis during Exercise as a Mediator of Bone Metabolism 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (Appendix A). 15. SUBJECT TERMS calcium homeostasis , exercise, bone resorption, parathyroid hormone

  11. Study on the Effect of Calcium and Potassium Spray on Date Bunch Fading Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Shekofteh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Date bunch fading disorder has been one of the most important problems, which caused economic damage to date plantation area of Iran. It has been first reported on Mozafti cultivar in Kahnuj area, Kerman province. It has often been observed on soft and mid ripening cultivars such as Mozafti, Mordaseng and Kalote. Furthermore, it usually appears on Mozafti cultivar when fruits change from Khalal to Rutab stage. The most important symptoms of this disorder are sudden wilting of fruits and necrotic strips on the upper surface of the main bunch stalk. Incidence and development of these symptoms increase by high temperature, low relative humidity, and hot and dry wind. Several research studies have been carried out on this disorder so far, but the only research about the effect of nutrition on disorder was performed by Rosta (2003. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of calcium and potassium spray on date bunch fading and some traits of date fruit in Rigan region, Kerman province. Materials and Methods: The experiment was conducted based on randomized complete block designs with three replicates in Rigan located in east south of Kerman province, Iran, in 2012. Treatments were: T1: control, T2: spray of calcium nitrate at the concentration of 5 ppm, T3: spray of potassium sulfate at the concentration of 5 ppm, and T4: combined spray of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate at the concentration of 5 ppm. Treatments were applied at Kimri, Hobabok and Khalal stages. Sampling was performed from 3 date palms (3 bunches from each date palm were selected randomly at the second date harvest. Totally, the traits of 200 fruits were measured in each date palm. The traits measured in the present study were: fruit length, fruit diameter, fruit weight, stone weight, stone diameter, and bunch fading percentage. Results and Discussions: According to the data of variance analysis, treatments had a significant effect on wet fruit

  12. STATUS OF BONE METABOLISM AND LINEAR GROWTH OF INFANTS DEPENDENT ON MOTHER'S CALCIUM PROVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Shcheplyagina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analytical findings of the mineral metabolism, bone metabolism and linear growth along with the bone strength of the infants dependent on the mother's calcium and vitamin D provision during pregnancy. The researchers have prospectively examined 160 mother–newborn infant pairs and 87 children for 6–8 months. They confirmed that infant's calcium and vitamin D provision depends on calcium and vitamin d contained in mother's body. Prophylaxis and correction of the calcium and vitamin D deficit in the mother's body will ensure necessary rates of the linear growth, mineral metabolism, and bone remodeling both during antenatal period and within the first 6–8 months, following the birth, increase the bone strength and reduce the frequency of rachitic and rachiticblike changes in the infant skeleton.Key words: newborn infants, infants, calcium provision, bone metabolism, linear growth, bone strength.

  13. Targeting metabolic disorders by natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Larijani, Bagher; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent metabolic disorders are diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome, which are developed when normal metabolic processes are disturbed. The most common pathophysiologies of the above disorders are oxidative stress, Nrf2 pathways, epigenetic, and change in miRNA expression. There is a challenge in the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders due to severe adverse effects of some synthetic drugs, their high cost, lack of safety and poverty in some conditions, and insufficient accessibility for the general population in the world. With increasing interest in shifting from synthetic drugs to phytotherapy as an alternative treatment, there is still a gap in scientific evidences of plant-derived therapeutic benefits. One reason may be slow rate of translation of animal studies' findings into human clinical trials. Since metabolic disorders are multifactorial, it seems that poly-herbal medications, or drug-herbal combination are needed for their treatment. However, further researches to determine the most effective plant-derived metabolites, and their cellular mechanism in order to set priorities for well-designed animal and clinical trials, and also more studies with strong scientific evidences such as systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled studies are needed.

  14. Investigation of metabolic disorders resembling Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A; Hall, S M

    1992-01-01

    Ten per cent of patients initially reported with Reye's syndrome in the British Isles (1981-91) were subsequently found to have an underlying inherited metabolic disorder (IMD). There was also evidence to suggest that other cases may not have been recognised. The range of metabolic disorders that mimic Reye's syndrome is wide and specialist, often complex, investigations are required to make a specific diagnosis. Those patients presenting with Reye's syndrome-like illness but also with one or more clinical features suggestive of an IMD require particular attention and detailed investigation. Recommendations for specimen collection and investigation are presented. PMID:1444539

  15. MicroRNAs in Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottiers, Veerle; Näär, Anders M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as key regulators of metabolism. For example, miR-33a and b play a crucial role in controlling cholesterol and lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes, the SREBP transcription factors. Metabolic miRNAs such as miR-103 and miR-107 regulate insulin and glucose homeostasis, while others, such as miR-34a, may be key regulators of hepatic lipid homeostasis. The discovery of circulating miRNAs has highlighted their potential as both endocrine signalling molecules and disease markers. Dysregulation of miRNAs may contribute to metabolic abnormalities, suggesting that miRNAs may potentially serve as therapeutic targets to ameliorate cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:22436747

  16. Migraine: A disorder of metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokavec, Anna

    2016-12-01

    The treatment and prevention of migraine within the last decade has become largely pharmacological. While there is little doubt that the advent of drugs (e.g. triptans) has helped many migraine sufferers to lead a normal life, there is still little knowledge with respect to the factors responsible for precipitating a migraine attack. Evidence from biochemical and behavioural studies from a number of disciplines is integrated to put forward the proposal that migraine is part of a cascade of events, which together act to protect the organism when confronted by a metabolic challenge. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Is osteoarthritis a metabolic disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluzek, S; Newton, J L; Arden, N K

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis (OA), even in non-weight bearing joints. High levels of adipose tissue-associated inflammation may explain this association. Published evidence looking at the associations between components of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and knee, hip or hand OA and the higher mortality described with knee OA. Development of MetS and OA shares a relationship with adipose tissue-associated inflammation. This review supports this inflammatory pathway being part of the shared mechanism behind obesity as a risk factor for OA and the recently described OA-associated increased mortality. In an era of an obesity epidemic, this review identifies a need for well-designed cohort studies assessing early metabolic changes in populations at high risk of OA and MetS, and to identify risk factors for increased mortality in patients with OA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effects of metabolic acidosis and alkalosis on sodium and calcium transport in the dog kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R A; Wong, N L; Dirks, J H

    1979-05-01

    Clearance and micropuncture studies have been performed in dogs to examine the effects of acute and chronic metabolic acidosis and acute alkalosis on tubular sodium and calcium transport. Acute metabolic acidosis, induced by the infusion of hydrochloric acid, decreased proximal fluid reabsorption and increased the fractional delivery of sodium and calcium to the distal tubule, but not to the final urine. In comparison with normal dogs, dogs with chronic metabolic acidosis (induced by feeding ammonium chloride) showed an increase in proximal fluid reabsorption and a dissociation of calcium from sodium reabsorption more distally, leading to an increased delivery of calcium relative to sodium at the distal tubule and in the final urine. The infusion of sodium bicarbonate to correct chronic metabolic acidosis, both in intact and thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) dogs, reduced proximal fluid reabsorption and caused a selective enhancement of calcium reabsorption relative to sodium in the more distal nephron, resulting in a reversal of the dissociation observed in acidosis, both at the distal tubule and in the final urine. By contrastin fusion of sodium chloride in parathyroid-intact acidotic dogs did not reduce proximal fluid reabsorption or enhance tubular calcium reabsorption. In nonacidotic dogs, both intact and TPTX, infusion of sodium bicarconate to induce acute alkalosis resulted in selhese data demonstrate the presence of a component of tubular calcium reabsorption situated beyond the proximal tubule, which is inhibited by chronic (but not acute) metabolic acidosis and enhanced by metabolic alkalosis (or bicarbonate infusion) independently of parathyroid hormone.

  19. Impaired body calcium metabolism with low bone density and compensatory colonic calcium absorption in cecectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongwattanapisan, P.; Suntornsaratoon, P.; Wongdee, K.; Dorkkam, N.; Krishnamra, N.; Charoenphandhu, N.

    2012-01-01

    An earlier study reported that cecal calcium absorption contributes less than 10% of total calcium absorbed by the intestine, although the cecum has the highest calcium transport rate compared with other intestinal segments. Thus, the physiological significance of the cecum pertaining to body

  20. Functional Effects of Prebiotic Fructans in Colon Cancer and Calcium Metabolism in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivera-Huerta, Marisol; Lizárraga-Grimes, Vania Lorena; Castro-Torres, Ibrahim Guillermo; Tinoco-Méndez, Mabel; Macías-Rosales, Lucía; Sánchez-Bartéz, Francisco; Tapia-Pérez, Graciela Guadalupe; Romero-Romero, Laura; Gracia-Mora, María Isabel

    2017-01-01

      Inulin-type fructans are polymers of fructose molecules and are known for their capacity to enhance absorption of calcium and magnesium, to modulate gut microbiota and energy metabolism, and to improve glycemia...

  1. Calcium-ATPases: Gene disorders and dysregulation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Donna; Rao, Rajini

    2016-06-01

    Ca(2+)-ATPases belonging to the superfamily of P-type pumps play an important role in maintaining low, nanomolar cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels at rest and priming organellar stores, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and secretory vesicles with high levels of Ca(2+) for a wide range of signaling functions. In this review, we introduce the distinct subtypes of Ca(2+)-ATPases and their isoforms and splice variants and provide an overview of their specific cellular roles as they relate to genetic disorders and cancer, with a particular emphasis on recent findings on the secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPases (SPCA). Mutations in human ATP2A2, ATP2C1 genes, encoding housekeeping isoforms of the endoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) and secretory pathway (SPCA1) pumps, respectively, confer autosomal dominant disorders of the skin, whereas mutations in other isoforms underlie various muscular, neurological, or developmental disorders. Emerging evidence points to an important function of dysregulated Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in cancers of the colon, lung, and breast where they may serve as markers of differentiation or novel targets for therapeutic intervention. We review the mechanisms underlying the link between calcium homeostasis and cancer and discuss the potential clinical relevance of these observations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  3. New peptides players in metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Mierzwicka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Among new peptides responsible for the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders and carbohydrate metabolism, adipokines are of great importance. Adipokines are substances of hormonal character, secreted by adipose tissue. Apart from the well-known adipokines, adropin and preptin are relatively newly discovered, hence their function is not fully understood. They are peptides not secreted by adipose tissue but their role in the metabolic regulations seems to be significant. Preptin is a 34-amino acid peptide, a derivative of proinsulin growth factor II (pro-IGF-II, secreted by pancreatic β cells, considered to be a physiological enhancer of insulin secretion. Additionally, preptin has a stimulating effect on osteoblasts, inducing their proliferation, differentiation and survival. Adropin is a 76-amino acid peptide, encoded by the energy homeostasis associated gene (Enho, mainly in liver and brain, and its expression is dependent on a diet. Adropin is believed to play an important role in metabolic homeostasis, fatty acids metabolism control, insulin resistance prevention, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. The results of studies conducted so far show that the diseases resulting from metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or cardiovascular disease are accompanied by significant changes in the concentration of these peptides. It is also important to note that preptin has an anabolic effect on bone tissue, which might be preventive in osteoporosis.

  4. Dolomite supplementation improves bone metabolism through modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Nagasawa, Sakae; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Michio

    2005-01-01

    Dolomite, a mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate (CaMg (CO3)2), is used as a food supplement that supplies calcium and magnesium. However, the effect of magnesium supplementation on bone metabolism in patients with osteoporosis is a matter of controversy. We examined the effects of daily supplementation with dolomite on calcium metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Dolomite was administered daily to OVX rats for 9 weeks. The same amount of magnesium chloride as that supplied by the dolomite was given to OVX rats as a positive control. Histological examination revealed that ovariectomy decreased trabecular bone and increased adipose tissues in the femoral metaphysis. Dolomite or magnesium supplementation failed to improve these bone histological features. Calcium content in the femora was decreased in OVX rats. Neither calcium nor magnesium content in the femora in OVX rats was significantly increased by dolomite or magnesium administration. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion was significantly increased in OVX rats, and was not affected by the magnesium supplementation. Serum concentrations of magnesium were increased, and those of calcium were decreased, in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. However, there was a tendency toward decreased parathyroid hormone secretion and increased calcitonin secretion in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and osteocalcin levels were significantly increased in the supplemented OVX rats. These results suggest that increased magnesium intake improves calcium metabolism in favor of increasing bone formation, through the modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion.

  5. Support for calcium channel gene defects in autism spectrum disorders

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    Lu Ake Tzu-Hui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternation of synaptic homeostasis is a biological process whose disruption might predispose children to autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Calcium channel genes (CCG contribute to modulating neuronal function and evidence implicating CCG in ASD has been accumulating. We conducted a targeted association analysis of CCG using existing genome-wide association study (GWAS data and imputation methods in a combined sample of parent/affected child trios from two ASD family collections to explore this hypothesis. Methods A total of 2,176 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP (703 genotyped and 1,473 imputed covering the genes that encode the α1 subunit proteins of 10 calcium channels were tested for association with ASD in a combined sample of 2,781 parent/affected child trios from 543 multiplex Caucasian ASD families from the Autism Genetics Resource Exchange (AGRE and 1,651 multiplex and simplex Caucasian ASD families from the Autism Genome Project (AGP. SNP imputation using IMPUTE2 and a combined reference panel from the HapMap3 and the 1,000 Genomes Project increased coverage density of the CCG. Family-based association was tested using the FBAT software which controls for population stratification and accounts for the non-independence of siblings within multiplex families. The level of significance for association was set at 2.3E-05, providing a Bonferroni correction for this targeted 10-gene panel. Results Four SNPs in three CCGs were associated with ASD. One, rs10848653, is located in CACNA1C, a gene in which rare de novo mutations are responsible for Timothy syndrome, a Mendelian disorder that features ASD. Two others, rs198538 and rs198545, located in CACN1G, and a fourth, rs5750860, located in CACNA1I, are in CCGs that encode T-type calcium channels, genes with previous ASD associations. Conclusions These associations support a role for common CCG SNPs in ASD.

  6. Confocal microscope is able to detect calcium metabolic in neuronal infection by toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensusiati, A. D.; Priya, T. K. S.; Dachlan, Y. P.

    2017-05-01

    Calcium metabolism plays a very important role in neurons infected by Toxoplasma. Detection of change of calcium metabolism of neuron infected by Toxoplasma and Toxoplasma requires the calculation both quantitative and qualitative method. Confocal microscope has the ability to capture the wave of the fluorescent emission of the fluorescent dyes used in the measurement of cell calcium. The purpose of this study was to prove the difference in calcium changes between infected and uninfected neurons using confocal microscopy. Neuronal culture of human-skin-derived neural stem cell were divided into 6 groups, consisting 3 uninfected groups and 3 infected groups. Among the 3 groups were 2 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours. The neuron Toxoplasma gondii ratio was 1:5. Observation of intracellular calcium of neuron and tachyzoite, evidence of necrosis, apoptosis and the expression of Hsp 70 of neuron were examined by confocal microscope. The normality of the data was analysed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test, differentiation test was checked by t2 Test, and ANOVAs, for correlation test was done by Pearson Correlation Test. The calcium intensity of cytosolic neuron and T. gondii was significantly different from control groups (p<0.05). There was also significant correlation between calcium intensity with the evidence of necrosis and Hsp70 expression at 2 hours after infection. Apoptosis and necrosis were simultaneously shown with calcium contribution in this study. Confocal microscopy can be used to measure calcium changes in infected and uninfected neurons both in quantitatively and qualitatively.

  7. [Inherited metabolic disorders in pediatric emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Gutiérrez, M A; López López, R; Morais López, A; Bueno Barriocanal, M; Martínez Ojinaga Nodal, E; Alcolea Sánchez, A M; García García, S

    2015-06-01

    Advances in the early diagnosis and treatment have led to improved survival, and a better quality of life for patients with inherited metabolic disorders (IMD). They can go to the Pediatric Emergency Services (PES) for reasons unrelated to their disease. The purpose of this study was to review the characteristics of visitors to the PES of these patients in a tertiary hospital. A retrospective observational study was conducted on all visits from patients with IMD to the PES of Hospital Infantil La Paz over the years 2011 and 2012. IMD type, complaint, duration of symptoms, need for hospitalization, and presence of metabolic decompensation was recorded. A total of 107 visits were analyzed, with the most frequent reason being for consultation of respiratory processes (30.8%). When the consultation was for vomiting, patients with protein-related disorders were those who delayed less in going to PES. One third of visitors were admitted, half of them due to metabolic decompensation of the underlying pathology. Patients with IMD came to PES for many different reasons, which in some cases were the cause or consequence of an acute metabolic decompensation that led to hospitalization. Being diseases with low prevalence, it would be useful to have diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in order to provide optimal care. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Probiotics as Complementary Treatment for Metabolic Disorders

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    Mélanie Le Barz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, growing evidence has established the gut microbiota as one of the most important determinants of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Indeed, obesogenic diet can drastically alter bacterial populations (i.e., dysbiosis leading to activation of pro-inflammatory mechanisms and metabolic endotoxemia, therefore promoting insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disorders. To counteract these deleterious effects, probiotic strains have been developed with the aim of reshaping the microbiome to improve gut health. In this review, we focus on benefits of widely used probiotics describing their potential mechanisms of action, especially their ability to decrease metabolic endotoxemia by restoring the disrupted intestinal mucosal barrier. We also discuss the perspective of using new bacterial strains such as butyrate-producing bacteria and the mucolytic Akkermansia muciniphila, as well as the use of prebiotics to enhance the functionality of probiotics. Finally, this review introduces the notion of genetically engineered bacterial strains specifically developed to deliver anti-inflammatory molecules to the gut.

  9. Disorders of branched chain amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, I; Venditti, C P

    2016-11-07

    The three essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine and valine, share the first enzymatic steps in their metabolic pathways, including a reversible transamination followed by an irreversible oxidative decarboxylation to coenzyme-A derivatives. The respective oxidative pathways subsequently diverge and at the final steps yield acetyl- and/or propionyl-CoA that enter the Krebs cycle. Many disorders in these pathways are diagnosed through expanded newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is the only disorder of the group that is associated with elevated body fluid levels of the BCAAs. Due to the irreversible oxidative decarboxylation step distal enzymatic blocks in the pathways do not result in the accumulation of amino acids, but rather to CoA-activated small carboxylic acids identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis of urine and are therefore classified as organic acidurias. Disorders in these pathways can present with a neonatal onset severe-, or chronic intermittent- or progressive forms. Metabolic instability and increased morbidity and mortality are shared between inborn errors in the BCAA pathways, while treatment options remain limited, comprised mainly of dietary management and in some cases solid organ transplantation.

  10. Metabolic acid-base disorders in the critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Helio Autran; Bach, Jonathan F; DiBartola, Stephen P

    2008-05-01

    The recognition and management of acid-base disorders is a commonplace activity in the critical care unit, and the role of weak and strong acids in the genesis of metabolic acid-base disorders is reviewed. The clinical approach to patients with metabolic alkalosis and metabolic acidosis is discussed in this article.

  11. Investigation of vitamin D metabolism in non-skeletal disorders of companion animals

    OpenAIRE

    Titmarsh, Helen Faye

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is traditionally known for its role in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. However, it has been demonstrated that numerous types of cells express the vitamin D receptor and it is now clear that the physiological roles of vitamin D extend beyond the maintenance of skeletal health. Vitamin D insufficiency, which is typically assessed by measuring the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been associated with a number of disorders i...

  12. RELATIONS BETWEEN SELECTED INDICATORS OF BLOOD AND MILK OF DAIRY COWS WITH METABOLIC DISORDERS

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    Jaroslav Kováčik

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to monitor the relations between selected indicators of technological properties of milk and blood biochemical parameters of dairy cows with metabolic disorders. Thirty-two cows were chosen, which were divided into 3 groups: first group - cows with metabolic problems of acidosis, second group - cows with metabolic problems of alkalosis, third group - healthy cows. Blood, urine and milk samples were collected. Urea, total lipids, total proteins, glucose and calcium was determined in the blood serum. Pure acidobasic forms, pH and density of urine were determined. Proteins, lactose, non-fat-solids, somatic cells count, calcium, urea, titratable acidity, fermentability, rennetability and thermostability were determined in samples of milk. Significant negative dependences were observed in the group of cows with metabolic problems of acidosis between urea in blood and in milk (r = -0.694, P <0.05, between calcium in blood and in milk (r = -0.653, P <0, 05, and between calcium in milk and glucose in blood (r = -0.648, P <0.05. In the group of cows with alkalosis, statistically significant correlation between total lipids in blood and fat in milk was found (r = -0.879, P <0.05.

  13. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn to calcium-fortified (or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look for calcium-fortified orange juice, soy or rice milk, breads, and cereal. Beans. You can get decent ...

  14. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  15. Secondary psychosis induced by metabolic disorders

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    Olivier eBonnot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are not well recognized by psychiatrists as a possible source of secondary psychoses. Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs are not frequent. Although, their prompt diagnosis may lead to suitable treatments. IEMs are well known to paediatricians, in particular for their most serious forms, having an early expression most of the time. Recent years discoveries have unveiled later expression forms, and sometimes, very discreet first physical signs. There is a growing body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that IEMs can manifest as atypical psychiatric symptoms, even in the absence of clear neurological symptoms. In the present review, we propose a detailed overview at schizophrenia-like and autism-like symptoms that can lead practitioners to bear in mind an IEM. Other psychiatric manifestations are also found, as behavioral., cognitive, learning and mood disorders. However, they are less frequent. Ensuring an accurate IEM diagnosis, in front of these psychiatric symptoms should be a priority, in order to grant suitable and valuable treatment for these pathologies.

  16. Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?

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    Mario J. Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes.

  17. Effects of DFA IV in rats: calcium absorption and metabolism of DFA IV by intestinal microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K; Hira, T; Suzuki, T; Hara, H; Yokota, A; Tomita, F

    1999-04-01

    Di-D-fructose-2,6':6,2'-dianhydride (DFA IV) is a disaccharide consisting of two fructose residues that can be prepared from levan by levan fructotransferase from Arthrobacter nicotinovorans GS-9, and it can be expected to have novel physiological functions from its unique structure. In this study, the effects of DFA IV on calcium absorption and the metabolism of DFA IV by intestinal microorganisms were studied in rats to examine the physiological functions of DFA IV. The apparent calcium absorption in rats fed with DFA IV was significantly higher than that in the control rats, and it seems that calcium absorption had almost been completed at the end of the small intestine. DFA IV also increased the calcium absorption in in vitro experiments, using everted jejunal and ileal sacs, and this result supports the finding obtained in the in vivo experiments. These results indicate that DFA IV may have a function for increasing the calcium absorption in the small intestine of rats. However, the effect in the large intestine could not be clearly observed because of the lack of calcium that reached there. The results of analyses of organic acids in the cecal and colonic contents and of DFA IV in the fecal, cecal, and colonic contents showed that the metabolism of DFA IV by microorganisms in the large intestine progressed gradually, and that DFA IV was converted mainly to acetate, butyrate, and lactate.

  18. Associations of dietary calcium intake with metabolic syndrome and bone mineral density among the Korean population: KNHANES 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M K; Chon, S J; Noe, E B; Roh, Y H; Yun, B H; Cho, S; Choi, Y S; Lee, B S; Seo, S K

    2017-01-01

    Excessive amount of calcium intake increased risk for metabolic syndrome in men. However, modest amount decreased the risk of metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Modest amount of calcium also increased bone mineral density (BMD) in both men and postmenopausal women. The present study aimed to evaluate the associations of dietary calcium intake with metabolic syndrome and bone mineral density (BMD) in Korean men and women, especially postmenopausal women. The study was performed using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2011) and included 14,705 participants (5953 men, 4258 premenopausal women, and 4494 postmenopausal women). Clinical and other objective characteristics, presence of metabolic syndrome, and the BMD of the femur neck and lumbar spine were evaluated according to dietary calcium intake. There was a higher tendency for metabolic syndrome in men with a dietary calcium intake of >1200 mg/day than with ≤400 mg of calcium intake; >400 and ≤800 mg of calcium intake was helpful for postmenopausal women to decrease risk for metabolic syndrome. Overall, the group with calcium intake >400 and ≤800 mg daily had significantly increased BMD in both femoral neck and lumbar spine from both men and postmenopausal women. From both femoral neck and lumbar spine, the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women significantly decreased in the group whose calcium intake was >400 and ≤800 mg daily. Excessive dietary calcium may increase the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men. For postmenopausal women, calcium intake does not increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, but modest amount decreases the risk. It may increase the BMD in men and postmenopausal women, and also reduce the prevalence of both osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  19. Effect of acute acid loading on acid-base and calcium metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acid-base and calcium metabolic responses to acute non-carbonic acid loading in idiopathic calcium stone-formers and healthy males using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h ammonium chloride loading studies were performed in 12...... male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone-formers and 12 matched healthy men using a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Arterialized capillary blood, serum and urine were collected hourly for measurement of electrolytes, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and acid-base...... status. Concentrations of non-metabolizable base (NB) and acid (NA) were calculated from measured concentrations of non-metabolizable ions. RESULTS: The extracellular acid-base status in the stone-formers during basal conditions and acid loading was comparable to the levels in the healthy controls...

  20. Effect of soy protein/animal protein ratio on calcium metabolism of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Gun Ae; Hwang, Hye Jin

    2006-04-01

    This study examined the effects of a ratio of soy protein to animal protein on bone metabolism of rats. Experimental groups were a high soy protein group (200 g of soy protein and 0 g of casein per kilogram of diet; HSoy), a middle soy protein group (100 g of soy protein and 100 g of casein per kilogram of diet; MSoy), a low soy protein group (50 g of soy protein and 150 g of casein per kilogram of diet; LSoy), and a no soy protein group (0 g of soy protein and 200 g of casein per kilogram of diet; NSoy). Calcium excretion and retention, biochemical parametrically related calcium metabolism, and bone mineral density were measured. Statistical analysis was performed with SAS software. Urinary excretion of calcium was significantly high in the LSoy and NSoy groups, and there was no difference in absorption of calcium across experimental groups. Calcium retention was significantly higher in the HSoy and MSoy groups than in the LSoy and NSoy groups. Experimental groups showed no differences in the activity of alkaline phosphatase. The casein group (NSoy) showed a remarkably lower degree of serum osteocalcin concentration. The concentration of deoxypyridinoline in urine showed an increasing tendency, i.e., HSoy and MSoy protein/soy proteins, its concentration increases. Wet weight of the femur appeared to be significantly greater in the MSoy and LSoy groups than in the NSoy group. Ash content of the femur and bone density were highest in the MSoy group, with the ratio of 1:1 between soy protein and animal protein. This study indicated that deoxypyridinoline concentration was lower and the density of osteocalcin was higher in the MSoy group than in the NSoy group, and that calcium retention was high and bone mineral density was the highest in the MSoy group. The ratio of soy to animal protein that seemed to have the most positively significant effect on calcium metabolism was 1:1.

  1. Yield of additional metabolic studies in neurodevelopmental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engbers, Hannelie M; Berger, Ruud; van Hasselt, Peter; de Koning, Tom; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G M; Kroes, Hester Y; Visser, Gepke

    The timing and yield of metabolic studies for patients with neurodevelopmental disorders is a matter of continuing debate. We determined the yield of additional or repeated metabolic studies in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. Patients referred to a tertiary diagnostic center for patients

  2. Calcium effect on the metabolic pathway of phosphorus accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Fang, Cai-Yun; Shao, Li-Min; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) have been found to act as glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) under certain conditions, thus, the deterioration in the performance of enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems is not always attributed to the proliferation of GAOs. In this work, the effects of calcium on the metabolic pathway of PAOs were explored. It was found that when the influent Ca(2+) concentration was elevated, the tendency and extent of extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation increased, and the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate was synthesized, while the microbial population remained almost unchanged. The changes in the ratios of phosphorus released/acetate uptaken, the glycogen degraded/acetate uptaken and the poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates synthesized/acetate uptaken during the anaerobic period confirm that, as the influent Ca(2+) concentration was increased, the polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism was partially shifted to the glycogen-accumulating metabolism. At an influent Ca(2+) around 50 mg/L, in addition to the extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation, the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate synthesis might also be involved in the metabolic change of PAOs. The results of the present work would be beneficial to better understand the biochemical metabolism of PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in Hematology and Calcium Metabolism After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Dorte; Madsbad, Sten; Kristiansen, Viggo B

    2015-01-01

    sexes (p Iron substitution did not prevent anemia, which especially affected premenopausal women. More attention should...... months after surgery. Daily supplement of 800 mg calcium, 800 U vitamin D, a multivitamin, and a vitamin B12 injection (1 mg) every third month was recommended. In subjects with low ferritin and decreasing hemoglobin levels, oral, or intravenous iron was administered. RESULTS: Hemoglobin concentration...... decreased from before surgery to month 24 for both men (9.3 ± 0.05 vs. 8.3 ± 0.08 mmol/L, p anemia was present in 25.8 % of women and 22.1 % of men. Predictors of anemia in both sexes were baseline hemoglobin (p

  4. Requests of laboratory tests for the diagnosis and management of calcium-phosphate disorders in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, María; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Uris, Joaquín; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge about the variability in the request of calcium-phosphate metabolism laboratory tests in primary care is important to design strategies to improve health system efficiency. To compare the inter-practice variability in calcium-phosphate metabolism laboratory tests requested by general practitioners from diverse regions across Spain. One hundred and forty one clinical laboratories were invited to participate in an observational cross-sectional study. They informed the number of serum calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D requested by general practitioners. Appropriateness indicators were calculated as number of test requests per 1,000 inhabitants and ratio of related tests requests. The differences according to hospital setting, region and type of management were analyzed. We recruited 76 laboratories (17,679,195 inhabitants). General practitioners requested 3,260,894 calcium-phosphate metabolism tests. The rate of request ranged from 2.97 per 1,000 inhabitants for 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 98.89 per 1,000 inhabitants for calcium. The rates of request for calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone in some areas were 30, 100 and 340 times higher than in other areas. Parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were highly requested in private management areas. There were also differences in phosphate, parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D requesting between regions across Spain. The high variability observed is difficult to explain by differences in patient case mix between regions. Depending on the area, calcium could be under requested to detect primary hyperparathyroidism.

  5. Metabolic and molecular basis of peroxisomal disorders: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2004-01-01

    The group of peroxisomal disorders now includes 17 different disorders with Zellweger syndrome as prototype. Thanks to the explosion of new information about the functions and biogenesis of peroxisomes, the metabolic and molecular basis of most of the peroxisomal disorders has been resolved. A

  6. The Control of Calcium Metabolism in Zebrafish (Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish is an emerging model for the research of body fluid ionic homeostasis. In this review, we focus on current progress on the regulation of Ca2+ uptake in the context of Ca2+ sensing and hormonal regulation in zebrafish. Na+-K+-ATPase-rich cells (NaRCs, the specialized ionocytes in the embryonic skin and adult gills, play a dominant role in Ca2+ uptake in zebrafish. Transepithelial Ca2+ transport in NaRC, through apical epithelial Ca2+ channels (ECaC, basolateral plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX, is analogous to mammalian renal and intestinal Ca2+-absorption cells. Several hormones were demonstrated to differentially regulate Ca2+ uptake through modulating the expression of Ca2+ transporters and/or the proliferation/differentiation of NaRC in zebrafish. In addition, the counterbalance among these hormones is associated with the maintenance of body fluid Ca2+ homeostasis. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is expressed in several hormone-secreting tissues in zebrafish, and activated CaSR differentially controls calciotropic hormones. The major principles of Ca2+ transport and the hormonal control appear to be conserved from zebrafish to other vertebrates including mammals. The new knowledge gained from zebrafish studies provides new insights into the related issues in vertebrates.

  7. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  8. Simulating antler growth and energy, nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus metabolism in caribou

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    Ron Moen

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available We added antler growth and mineral metabolism modules to a previously developed energetics model for ruminants to simulate energy and mineral balance of male and female caribou throughout an annual cycle. Body watet, fat, protein, and ash are monitored on a daily time step, and energy costs associated with reproduction and body mass changes are simulated. In order to simulate antler growth, we had to predict calcium and phosphorus metabolism as it is affected by antler growth, gestation, and lactation. We used data on dietary digestibility, protein, calcium and phosphorus content, and seasonal patterns in body mass to predict the energy, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus balances of a "generic" male and female caribou. Antler growth in males increased energy requirements during antler growth by 8 to 16%, depending on the efficiency with which energy was used for antler growth. Female energy requirements for antler growth were proportionately much smaller because of the smaller size of female antlers. Protein requirements for antler growth in both males and females were met by forage intake. Calcium and phosphorus must be resorbed from bone during peak antler growth in males, when > 25 g/day of calcium and > 12 g/day of phosphorus are being deposited in antlers. Females are capable of meeting calcium needs during antler growth without bone resorption, but phosphorus was resorbed from bone during the final stages of antler mineralization. After energy, phosphorus was most likely to limit growth of antlers for both males and females in our simulations. Input parameters can be easily changed to represent caribou from specific geographic regions in which dietary nutrient content or body mass patterns differ from those in our "generic" caribou. The model can be used to quantitatively analyze the evolutionary basis for development of antlers in female caribou, and the relationship between body mass and antler size in the Cervidae.

  9. Evaluation of cation-anion diets in calcium metabolism in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alix Mendes de Almeida Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the dietary cation-anion balance (DCAB on the calcium metabolism in male Nellore steers with a mean age of 10 months. Three experimental diets were tested: a cationic diet, a diet consisting of Tifton hay only, and an anionic diet with +15.2, +23.9 and −10.0 mEq/100 g DM of DCAB values in the diet. The anionic diet was calculated as the addition of salts of ammonium chloride and magnesium sulfate. Based on the isotope dilution technique, the negative DCAB value used in this study (−10.0 mEq/100 g DM does not affect calcium metabolism, especially endogenous losses and true absorption.

  10. Effects of a reduced nitrogen diet on calcitriol levels and calcium metabolism in growing goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscher, Alexandra; Huber, Korinna

    2010-07-01

    For monogastric animals, changes in dietary protein content modulate calcium (Ca) metabolism by changing parathyroid hormone and calcitriol concentrations. However, the effects of dietary nitrogen (N) restriction on Ca metabolism are not known in ruminants. Since ruminants express endogenous recycling mechanisms very efficiently to save N, it is known that these recycling mechanisms protect ruminants against N depletion in times of dietary N restriction. Therefore, consequences on Ca metabolism induced by reduction of dietary N supply as observed in monogastric animals should not occur in ruminants. Due to this specific metabolic feature, a reduction of dietary N intake can be used to diminish environmental N pollution. The aim of the present study was to determine the consequences of a reduced N intake on Ca homeostasis and respective regulatory hormone concentrations in ruminants. Growing goats fed with a reduced N diet showed a decrease in ionised calcium (Ca2+) and total Ca concentrations while bone resorption marker carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen increased in plasma. Unexpectedly, despite hypocalcemia, concentrations of calcitriol were decreased in the animals of the N reduction group whereas calcidiol levels were not affected. From this data, it can be concluded that the Ca metabolism of growing goats can be modulated by changes of dietary N content like in monogastric animals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between milk and calcium intake and lipid metabolism in female patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JaeHee; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Kim, Ki Nam; Choi, Young-Ju; Chang, Namsoo; Huh, Kap-Bum

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association between intake of milk and dairy products as well as calcium and biomarkers related to lipid metabolism in Korean female patients with type 2 diabetes. A cohort of 509 female subjects (mean age: 59.0 years; range: 35-80 years) was recruited from Huh's Diabetes Clinic in Seoul between 2005 and 2010. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Subjects were divided into three groups on the basis of their daily intake of milk and dairy products [200 g/day (>200-1201 g/day)] and then further divided into two groups according to their daily calcium intake: below and above the estimated average requirement (EAR). After adjustment for age, body mass index, energy intake, exercise, use of nutritional supplements and cholesterol medication, the level of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly higher in subjects with milk and dairy products consumption of >200 g/day than in subjects in the other two groups. Those subjects with a milk and dairy products consumption of >200 g/day had significantly higher levels of apolipoprotein A-1 and a significantly lower atherogenic index than the other two groups. Patients with a calcium intake above the EAR exhibited a significantly greater serum HDL-cholesterol level than those with a calcium intake below the EAR. Milk and dairy products, good sources of calcium, play a positive role in lipid profiles in female patients with type 2 diabetes.

  12. Dynamics of Bone Metabolism Markers Serum Level in Children with Bronchial Asthma on the Background of Vitamin D3 and Calcium Salt Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Vertehel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim: to optimize the diagnosis of the calcium-phosphorus metabolism disorders and to control the effectiveness of therapeutic and prophylactic use of vitamin D and calcium in children with bronchial asthma. Materials and methods. A total of 120 children in 2 groups, 60 subjects in each, were examined: 1 — children with bronchial asthma; 2 — apparently healthy children (control group. Two courses of therapy with solution of vitamin D3 and calcium carbonate/citrate were applied: 4 weeks — 2,000 IU and 1,000 mg per day, respectively; 8 weeks — 1,000 IU and 500 mg a day, respectively. Results. Among children with bronchial asthma, there was a decrease in the number of patients with normal serum levels of total calcium (P < 0.05, osteocalcin (P < 0.05, parathyroid hormone (P < 0.05, collagen type 1 C-telopeptides (P < 0.05, 25(OHD (P < 0.05, alkaline phosphatase activity (P < 0.05. After 1 month of therapy, the number of children with normal alkaline phosphatase activity (P < 0.05, osteocalcin (P < 0.05, collagen type 1 C-telopeptides (P < 0.05 increased; in 3 months — total calcium (P < 0.05, 25(OHD (P < 0.05. Conclusions. The use of vitamin D3 and calcium solution normalizes bone metabolism parameters in children with bronchial asthma. The optimal time to control the effectiveness of medical recovery of bone metabolism in children with bronchial asthma is 3 months.

  13. Cerebral glucose metabolic differences in patients with panic disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordahl, T.E.; Semple, W.E.; Gross, M.; Mellman, T.A.; Stein, M.B.; Goyer, P.; King, A.C.; Uhde, T.W.; Cohen, R.M. (NIMH, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rates were measured in patients with panic disorder during the performance of auditory discrimination. Those regions examined by Reiman and colleagues in their blood flow study of panic disorder were examined with a higher resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and with the tracer (F-18)-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In contrast to the blood flow findings of Reiman et al., we did not find global gray metabolic differences between patients with panic disorder and normal controls. Consistent with the findings of Reiman et al., we found hippocampal region asymmetry. We also found metabolic decreases in the left inferior parietal lobule and in the anterior cingulate (trend), as well as an increase in the metabolic rate of the medial orbital frontal cortex (trend) of panic disorder patients. It is unclear whether the continuous performance task (CPT) enhanced or diminished findings that would have been noted in a study performed without task.

  14. Inhibition of growth and metabolism of Chlorella and some other plant types by calcium dipicrylamine and other poisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierhuizen, J.F.

    1957-01-01

    If potassium is obtained from sea-water by precipitation with calcium dipicrylamine, potassium fertilizers and sea-water will be contaminated with a little dipicrylamine. The influence of calcium dipicrylamine on metabolism of Chlorella and some other aquatic and terrestrial plants was

  15. Glucose Metabolism Disorders, HIV and Antiretroviral Therapy among Tanzanian Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Maganga

    Full Text Available Millions of HIV-infected Africans are living longer due to long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART, yet little is known about glucose metabolism disorders in this group. We aimed to compare the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders among HIV-infected adults on long-term ART to ART-naïve adults and HIV-negative controls, hypothesizing that the odds of glucose metabolism disorders would be 2-fold greater even after adjusting for possible confounders.In this cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013, consecutive adults (>18 years attending an HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled in 3 groups: 153 HIV-negative controls, 151 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 150 HIV-infected on ART for ≥ 2 years. The primary outcome was the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders as determined by oral glucose tolerance testing. We compared glucose metabolism disorder prevalence between each HIV group vs. the control group by Fisher's exact test and used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders.HIV-infected adults on ART had a higher prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders (49/150 (32.7% vs.11/153 (7.2%, p<0.001 and frank diabetes mellitus (27/150 (18.0% vs. 8/153 (5.2%, p = 0.001 than HIV-negative adults, which remained highly significant even after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity and socioeconomic status (OR = 5.72 (2.78-11.77, p<0.001. Glucose metabolism disorders were significantly associated with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. Awareness of diabetes mellitus was <25%.HIV-infected adults on long-term ART had 5-fold greater odds of glucose metabolism disorders than HIV-negative controls but were rarely aware of their diagnosis. Intensive glucose metabolism disorder screening and education are needed in HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa. Further research should determine how glucose metabolism disorders might be related to immune reconstitution.

  16. Calcium supplementation commencing before or early in pregnancy, or food fortification with calcium, for preventing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Manyame, Sarah

    2017-09-26

    Pre-eclampsia is considerably more prevalent in low- than high-income countries. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is dietary differences, particularly calcium deficiency. Calcium supplementation in the second half of pregnancy reduces the serious consequences of pre-eclampsia and is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for women with low dietary calcium intake, but has limited effect on the overall risk of pre-eclampsia. It is important to establish whether calcium supplementation before and in early pregnancy has added benefit. Such evidence would be justification for population-level fortification of staple foods with calcium. To determine the effect of calcium supplementation or food fortification with calcium, commenced before or early in pregnancy and continued at least until mid-pregnancy, on pre-eclampsia and other hypertensive disorders, maternal morbidity and mortality, as well as fetal and neonatal outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Trials Register (10 August 2017), PubMed (29 June 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (10 August 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials of calcium supplementation or food fortification which include women of child bearing age not yet pregnant, or in early pregnancy. Cluster-RCTs, quasi-RCTs and trials published in abstract form only would have been eligible for inclusion in this review but none were identified. Cross-over designs are not appropriate for this intervention.The scope of this review is to consider interventions including calcium supplementation with or without additional supplements or treatments, compared with placebo or no intervention. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. This review is based on one RCT (involving 60 women) which looked at calcium plus additional supplements

  17. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from dietary supplements are linked to a greater risk of kidney stones, especially among older adults. But calcium from foods does not appear to cause kidney stones. For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have ...

  18. Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptor (PPAR Modulators and Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Chul Cho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity lead to an increased risk for metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose regulation/insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Several molecular drug targets with potential to prevent or treat metabolic disorders have been revealed. Interestingly, the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR, which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has many beneficial clinical effects. PPAR directly modulates gene expression by binding to a specific ligand. All PPAR subtypes (α,γ, and σ are involved in glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy balance. PPAR agonists play an important role in therapeutic aspects of metabolic disorders. However, undesired effects of the existing PPAR agonists have been reported. A great deal of recent research has focused on the discovery of new PPAR modulators with more beneficial effects and more safety without producing undesired side effects. Herein, we briefly review the roles of PPAR in metabolic disorders, the effects of PPAR modulators in metabolic disorders, and the technologies with which to discover new PPAR modulators.

  19. PTERIDINES - METABOLIC FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Bjelakovic

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Pteridines are widely distributed compounds in nature, associated with numerous important physiological functions. BH4 is classified as unconjugated pteridine distinct from folic acid and its metabolites folates representing the group of conjugated pteridines. Unlike folic acid, which is a vitamin, BH4 can be synthesized in organism.Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4 is a cofactor, important for different biological processes, present in probably all cells and tissues of higher organisms. The presence of persistent hyperphenylalaninemia with atypic neurological symptoms in children, resistent to diet poor in phenylalanin, which disappears upon BH4 application, gave a strong impuls to the study of this unconjugated pteridine metabolic functions.BH4 is a natural cofactor of cyclic amino acid hydroxylases - phenylalanin hydroxylase (EC 1.14.16.2, tyrosine-3-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.16.3 and tryptophane-5-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.16.4 as well as all three isoenzymes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. It is neccessary for the activity of glyceryl-ether-monooxygenase (1.14.16.5. The regeneration of tetrahydrobiopterin is neccessary for the catalytic activity of these enzymes.BH4 insufficiency disturbs the function of mentioned hydroxylases leading to disorders of their products synthesis, especially 5-hydroxytryptophane, the precursor of serotonine and L-DOPA (the precursor of catecholamines. These metabolites function as neurotransmitters in brain and their deficit causes CNS diseases (including disturbed psychomotoric development, disfunction of basal ganglia and instability of body temperature. The whole content of BH4 present in organism originates from de novo synthesis of this compound.Tetrahydrobiopterin deficit disturbs the function of all three isoenzymes of NOS: NOS-I or neuronal, macrophagal or inducible (NOS-II and endothelial (NOS-III, leading to decreased production of NO and increased production of superoxide anion. The inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase 1

  20. Peroxisomes, lipid metabolism, and peroxisomal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisomes catalyse a large variety of different cellular functions of which most have to do with lipid metabolism. This paper deals with the role of peroxisomes in three key pathways of lipid metabolism, including: (1) etherphospholipid biosynthesis, (2) fatty acid beta-oxidation, and (3) fatty

  1. Ghrelin: a link between ageing, metabolism and neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century comes the increased risk for development of age-related disorders, including metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. These chronic disorders share two main characteristics:

  2. Disorders of bone-mineral metabolism and their correction with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Shelestova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The processes in bone-mineral metabolism provide normal course of pregnancy, labour and fetus development, women with body weight deficiency are at risk reduction of bone tissue mineral density, progressing of osteopenia and osteoporosis. This shows the necessity of medical and preventive measures that have the aim to correct calcium- phosphorus and bone metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency. Aim. To elaborate and to evaluate medical and preventive measures that have the aim to correct disorders in bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy. Materials and methods. The efficiency of adding combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol and dietary nourishment to traditional treatment that affected the state of bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy was studied. Results. With women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy it is noted statistically considerable reduction in blood of total calcium and bone tissue markers that grows with the course of gestation. The changes in mineral density of bone tissue can be seen from the existence of osteopenic syndrome at pregravid stage that occurs with every third woman who has body weight deficiency and with every second before labour. The use of elaborated medical and preventive measures including combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol allows to normalize the indexes of bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency. Conclusions. Women with body weight deficiency already at pregravid stage have disorders in bone metabolism and coming of pregnancy lead to aggravation of bone metabolism disorders. The additional use of combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol and dietary nourishment made the indexes of calcium-phosphorus and bone metabolism better and osteopenic

  3. Therapeutic Strategies for Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Age-Related Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, J S; Kumar, S; Vijayan, M; Bhatti, G K; Reddy, P H

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are complex, intercellular organelles present in the cells and are involved in multiple roles including ATP formation, free radicals generation and scavenging, calcium homeostasis, cellular differentiation, and cell death. Many studies depicted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in aging and pathogenesis of age-related metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Remarkable advancements have been made in understanding the structure, function, and physiology of mitochondria in metabolic disorders such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke. Further, much progress has been done in the improvement of therapeutic strategies, including lifestyle interventions, pharmacological, and mitochondria-targeted therapeutic approaches. These strategies were mainly focused to reduce the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress and to retain the mitochondrial health in various diseases. In this chapter, we have highlighted the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of various disorders and recent progress in the development of mitochondria-targeted molecules as therapeutic measures for metabolic disorders. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sitosterolemia: A multifaceted metabolic disorder with important clinical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavella, Eleftheria; Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Kostara, Christina; Bairaktari, Eleni; Elisaf, Moses; Tsimihodimos, Vasilis

    Sitosterolemia is a metabolic disorder characterized by increased intestinal absorption and tissue accumulation of phytosterols. Although sitosterolemia is considered a rare disease, its prevalence may be significantly higher than initially thought. Indeed, accumulating evidence suggests that patients with unexplained hematologic abnormalities or premature cardiovascular disease in the absence of classic risk factors may exhibit disordered phytosterol metabolism. In this review, we present a patient with sitosterolemia, describe the pathophysiology and the clinical picture of this disorder, and discuss the clinical value of phytosterol supplementation in patients with primary dyslipidemias. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional Effects of Prebiotic Fructans in Colon Cancer and Calcium Metabolism in Animal Models

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    Marisol Rivera-Huerta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inulin-type fructans are polymers of fructose molecules and are known for their capacity to enhance absorption of calcium and magnesium, to modulate gut microbiota and energy metabolism, and to improve glycemia. We evaluated and compared the effects of Chicory inulin “Synergy 1®” and inulin from Mexican agave “Metlin®” in two experimental models of colon cancer and bone calcium metabolism in mice and rats. Inulins inhibited the development of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and colon cancer in mice; these fructans reduced the concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha and prevented the formation of intestinal polyps, villous atrophy, and lymphoid hyperplasia. On the other hand, inulin treatments significantly increased bone densitometry (femur and vertebra in ovariectomized rats without altering the concentration of many serum biochemical parameters and urinary parameters. Histopathology results were compared between different experimental groups. There were no apparent histological changes in rats treated with inulins and a mixture of inulins-isoflavones. Our results showed that inulin-type fructans have health-promoting properties related to enhanced calcium absorption, potential anticancer properties, and anti-inflammatory effects. The use of inulin as a prebiotic can improve health and prevent development of chronic diseases such as cancer and osteoporosis.

  6. Functional Effects of Prebiotic Fructans in Colon Cancer and Calcium Metabolism in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Huerta, Marisol; Lizárraga-Grimes, Vania Lorena; Castro-Torres, Ibrahim Guillermo; Tinoco-Méndez, Mabel; Macías-Rosales, Lucía; Sánchez-Bartéz, Francisco; Tapia-Pérez, Graciela Guadalupe; Romero-Romero, Laura; Gracia-Mora, María Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Inulin-type fructans are polymers of fructose molecules and are known for their capacity to enhance absorption of calcium and magnesium, to modulate gut microbiota and energy metabolism, and to improve glycemia. We evaluated and compared the effects of Chicory inulin "Synergy 1®" and inulin from Mexican agave "Metlin®" in two experimental models of colon cancer and bone calcium metabolism in mice and rats. Inulins inhibited the development of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and colon cancer in mice; these fructans reduced the concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha and prevented the formation of intestinal polyps, villous atrophy, and lymphoid hyperplasia. On the other hand, inulin treatments significantly increased bone densitometry (femur and vertebra) in ovariectomized rats without altering the concentration of many serum biochemical parameters and urinary parameters. Histopathology results were compared between different experimental groups. There were no apparent histological changes in rats treated with inulins and a mixture of inulins-isoflavones. Our results showed that inulin-type fructans have health-promoting properties related to enhanced calcium absorption, potential anticancer properties, and anti-inflammatory effects. The use of inulin as a prebiotic can improve health and prevent development of chronic diseases such as cancer and osteoporosis.

  7. Bone Mineral Density Accrual in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effects of Calcium Intake and Physical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mahmood; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with autism spectrum disorders. For this reason 60 boy students with autism disorder (age 8-10 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  8. Fitness attenuates the prevalence of increased coronary artery calcium in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblom-Bak, Elin; Ekblom, Örjan; Fagman, Erika; Angerås, Oskar; Schmidt, Caroline; Rosengren, Annika; Börjesson, Mats; Bergström, Göran

    2018-02-01

    Background The association between cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity and coronary artery calcium (CAC) is unclear, and whether higher levels of fitness attenuate CAC prevalence in subjects with metabolic syndrome is not fully elucidated. The present study aims to: a) investigate the independent association of fitness on the prevalence of CAC, after adjustment for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time, and b) study the possible attenuation of increased CAC by higher fitness, in participants with metabolic syndrome. Design Cross-sectional. Methods In total 678 participants (52% women), 50-65 years old, from the SCAPIS pilot study were included. Fitness (VO 2 max) was estimated by submaximal cycle ergometer test and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time were assessed using hip-worn accelerometers. CAC score (CACS) was quantified using the Agatston score. Results The odds of having a significant CACS (≥100) was half in participants with moderate/high fitness compared with their low fitness counterparts. Further consideration of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and number of components of the metabolic syndrome did only slightly alter the effect size. Those with metabolic syndrome had 47% higher odds for significant CAC compared with those without metabolic syndrome. However, moderate/high fitness seems to partially attenuate this risk, as further joint analysis indicated an increased odds for having significant CAC only in the unfit metabolic syndrome participants. Conclusions Being fit is associated with a reduced risk of having significant CAC in individuals with metabolic syndrome. While still very much underutilized, fitness should be taken into consideration in everyday clinical risk prediction in addition to the traditional risk factors of the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Metabolic Disorders in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ourania Papaioannou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung diseases represent complex diseases with gradually increasing incidence, characterized by significant medical and financial burden for both patients and relatives. Their increasing incidence and complexity render a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, and personalized approach critically important. This approach includes the assessment of comorbid conditions including metabolic dysfunctions. Several lines of evidence show that metabolic comorbidities, including diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency, and thyroid dysfunction have a significant impact on symptoms, quality of life, management, economic burden, and disease mortality. Most recently, novel pathogenetic pathways and potential therapeutic targets have been identified through large-scale studies of metabolites, called metabolomics. This review article aims to summarize the current state of knowledge on the prevalence of metabolic comorbidities in chronic lung diseases, highlight their impact on disease clinical course, delineate mechanistic links, and report future perspectives on the role of metabolites as disease modifiers and therapeutic targets.

  10. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdallah, Chadi G; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H; Rothman, Douglas L; Mason, Graeme F; Sanacora, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Research on novel treatments for major depressive disorder focuses quite deeply on glutamate function, and this research would benefit from a brain-imaging technique that precisely quantified glutamate function...

  11. Disorders of fuel metabolism: medical complications associated with starvation, eating disorders, dietary fads, and supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Bryan S; Eisenga, Bernard H

    2005-08-01

    Disorders of fuel metabolism as they relate to abnormal fuel intake,abnormal fuel expenditure, and dietary supplements are the focus of this article. The emergency physician should be aware of the medical complications that can occur as a result of starvation states,eating disorders, fad diets, hypermetabolic states, and ergogenic aids. Knowledge and understanding of the complications associated with these disorders will facilitate the diagnosis and management of patients who present to the emergency department with any of the disorders reviewed.

  12. Changes in energetic metabolism of Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca, Planorbidae in response to exogenous calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is considered an essential element for the metabolism of aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907 in Brazil, and represents a limiting factor to its distribution and adaptation to the environment. This study investigated the effect of different concentrations of exogenous CaCO3 on the energetic metabolism of B. glabrata for better understanding the physiological interference of chemical elements dissolved in the environment with the physiology of this species. Sixty-day-old snails were distributed into six groups, five exposed to different concentrations of CaCO3 (20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg/L and a control group. The exposure to CaCO3 was assessed over time, with analysis of 15 snails of each group in the following intervals: 1, 14, 21 or 30 days for hemolymph extraction. Concentrations of calcium and glucose in the hemolymph were determined by commercial kits, and organic acids were extracted using an ion exchange column and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Concentration of calcium in the hemolymph showed no significant difference (p>0.05 from the control group and between the concentrations tested. Concentration of glucose decreased (p<0.05 in the treatments of exposure to 20 and 40 mg/L and increased when exposed to 80 and 100 mg/L CaCO3 compared to control and to other concentrations tested over 30 days. The organic acids pyruvate, oxaloacetate, citrate, succinate, fumarate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and lactate presented increased concentrations, while propionate and acetoacetate, decreased concentrations, when exposed to CaCO3 compared to control. Considering the influence of different periods of exposure to CaCO3, on the 14th day, there were stronger alterations in the metabolism of B. glabrata. In conclusion, exposure to CaCO3 reduced the concentration of glucose, which is metabolized into pyruvate, the final product of glycolysis, and also

  13. Automated Screening for Three Inborn Metabolic Disorders: A Pilot Study

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    Kavitha S

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inborn metabolic disorders (IMDs form a large group of rare, but often serious, metabolic disorders. Aims: Our objective was to construct a decision tree, based on classification algorithm for the data on three metabolic disorders, enabling us to take decisions on the screening and clinical diagnosis of a patient. Settings and Design: A non-incremental concept learning classification algorithm was applied to a set of patient data and the procedure followed to obtain a decision on a patient’s disorder. Materials and Methods: Initially a training set containing 13 cases was investigated for three inborn errors of metabolism. Results: A total of thirty test cases were investigated for the three inborn errors of metabolism. The program identified 10 cases with galactosemia, another 10 cases with fructosemia and the remaining 10 with propionic acidemia. The program successfully identified all the 30 cases. Conclusions: This kind of decision support systems can help the healthcare delivery personnel immensely for early screening of IMDs.

  14. Can psychiatric childhood disorders be due to inborn errors of metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, A; Eyskens, F; Glazemakers, I; van West, D

    2017-02-01

    Many patients who visit a centre for hereditary metabolic diseases remarkably also suffer from a child psychiatric disorder. Those child psychiatric disorders may be the first sign or manifestation of an underlying metabolic disorder. Lack of knowledge of metabolic disorders in child psychiatry may lead to diagnoses being missed. Patients therefore are also at risk for not accessing efficacious treatment and proper counselling. To search the literature for the co-occurrence of child psychiatric disorders, such as ADHD, autism, psychosis, learning disorders and eating disorders and metabolic disorders. A search of the literature was conducted by performing a broad search on PubMed, using the terms "ADHD and metabolic disorders", "autism and metabolic disorders", "psychosis and metabolic disorders", "learning disorders and metabolic disorders", and "eating disorders and metabolic disorders". Based on inclusion criteria (concerning a clear psychiatric disorder and concerning a metabolic disorder) 4441 titles and 249 abstracts were screened and resulted in 71 relevant articles. This thorough literature search provides child and adolescent psychiatrists with an overview of metabolic disorders associated with child psychiatric symptoms, their main characteristics and recommendations for further investigations.

  15. Ghrelin: a link between ageing, metabolism and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanova, I I

    2014-12-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century comes the increased risk for development of age-related disorders, including metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. These chronic disorders share two main characteristics: 1) neuronal loss in motor, sensory or cognitive systems, leading to cognitive and motor decline; and 2) a strong correlation between metabolic changes and neurodegeneration. In order to treat them, a better understanding of their complexity is required: it is necessary to interpret the neuronal damage in light of the metabolic changes, and to find the disrupted link between the peripheral organs governing energy metabolism and the CNS. This review is an attempt to present ghrelin as part of molecular regulatory interface between energy metabolism, neuroendocrine and neurodegenerative processes. Ghrelin takes part in lipid and glucose metabolism, in higher brain functions such as sleep-wake state, learning and memory consolidation; it influences mitochondrial respiration and shows neuroprotective effect. All these make ghrelin an attractive target for development of biomarkers or therapeutics for prevention or treatment of disorders, in which cell protection and recruitment of new neurons or synapses are needed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. [Metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder: Is sleep the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, H; Boudebesse, C; Henry, C; Godin, O; Leboyer, M; Étain, B

    2016-12-01

    To examine the pathophysiologic mechanisms that may link circadian disorder and metabolic syndrome in bipolar disorder (BP). A systematic review of the literature was conducted from January 2013 to January 2015, using the Medline and Cochrane databases, using the keywords "metabolic syndrome", "obesity", "leptin" and "circadian disorders", "sleeping disorders" and cross-referencing them with "bipolar disorder". The following types of publications were candidates for review: (i) clinical trials; (ii) studies involving patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder; (iii) studies involving patients with sleeping disorder; or (iv) data about metabolic syndrome. Forty articles were selected. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in BP was significantly higher compared to the general population (from 36 to 49% in the USA [Vancampfort, 2013]), and could be explained by several factors including reduced exercise and poor diet, genetic vulnerability, frequent depressive episodes, psychiatric comorbidity and psychotropic treatment. This high frequency of metabolic syndrome worsens the prognosis of these patients, increasing morbidity and mortality. Secondly, patients with BP experienced circadian and sleep disturbance, including modification in melatonin secretion. These perturbations are known to persist in periods of mood stabilization and are found in patients' relatives. Circadian disturbances are factors of relapse in bipolar patients, and they may also have a role in the metabolic comorbidities of these patients. Recent studies show that in populations of patients with bipolar disorder, a correlation between circadian disturbance and metabolic parameters are found. To identify the pathophysiological pathway connecting both could lead to a better comprehension of the disease and new therapeutics. In the overall population, mechanisms have been identified linking circadian and metabolic disorder involving hormones like leptin and ghrelin. These hormones are keys to

  17. Calcium Disorders in the Emergency Department: Independent Risk Factors for Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Sauter

    Full Text Available Calcium disorders are common in both intensive care units and in patients with chronic kidney disease and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. It is unknown whether calcium abnormalities in unselected emergency department admissions have an impact on in-hospital mortality.This cross-sectional analysis included all admissions to the Emergency Department at the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland from 2010 to 2011. For hyper- and hypocalcaemic patients with a Mann-Whitney U-test, the differences between subgroups divided by age, length of hospital stay, creatinine, sodium, chloride, phosphate, potassium and magnesium were compared. Associations between calcium disorders and 28-day in-hospital mortality were assessed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model.8,270 patients with calcium measurements were included in our study. Overall 264 (3.2% patients died. 150 patients (6.13% with hypocalcaemia and 7 patients with hypercalcaemia (6.19% died, in contrast to 104 normocalcaemic patients (1.82%. In univariate analysis, calcium serum levels were associated with sex, mortality and pre-existing diuretic therapy (all p<0.05. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, hypocalcaemia and hypercalcaemia were independent risk factors for mortality (HR 2.00 and HR 1.88, respectively; both p<0.01.Both hypocalcaemia and hypercalcaemia are associated with increased 28-day in-hospital mortality in unselected emergency department admissions.

  18. Microgravity Effecs During Fertilization, Cell Division, Development, and Calcium Metabolism in Sea Urchins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Heide

    1999-01-01

    Calcium loss and muscle atrophy are two of the main metabolic changes experienced by astronauts and crew members during exposure to microgravity in space. For long-term exposure to space it is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms for altered physiological functions. Fundamental occurrences in cell biology which are likely to depend on gravity include cytoskeletal dynamics, chromatin and centrosome cycling, and ion immobilization. These events can be studied during fertilization and embryogenesis within invertebrate systems. We have chosen the sea urchin system to study the effects of microgravity on cytoskeletal processes and calcium metabolism during fertilization, cell division, development, and embryogenesis. Experiments during an aircraft parabolic flight (KC-135) demonstrated: (1) the viability of sea urchin eggs prior to fertilization, (2) the suitability of our specimen containment system, (3) the feasibility of fertilization in a reduced gravity environment (which was achieved during 25 seconds of reduced gravity under parabolic flight conditions). Two newly developed pieces of spaceflight hardware made further investigations possible on a spaceflight (STS-77); (1) the Aquatic Research Facility (ARF), and (2) the Fertilization Syringe Unit (FSU). The Canadian Space Agency developed ARF to conduct aquatic spaceflight experiments requiring controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, illumination, and fixation at predetermined time points. It contained a control centrifuge which simulated the 1 g environment of earth during spaceflight. The FSU was developed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) by the Bionetics Corporation specifically to enable the crew to perform sea urchin fertilization operations in space.

  19. Liver transplantation for hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, and other metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, B Y; Kowdley, K V

    1997-08-01

    Liver transplantation provides an effective means for replacing a failing liver, in addition to correcting the underlying abnormality in many metabolic disorders. Results of liver transplantation for metabolic diseases have been generally encouraging, with the exception of hereditary hemochromatosis, in which infectious and cardiac complications appear to increase post-transplant mortality. Better pretransplant diagnosis of hemochromatosis, utilizing the recently identified putative gene, may help reduce post-transplant complications. In metabolic diseases, improved understanding of the underlying genetic and molecular defects will lead to advances in medical therapy and perhaps a decreased need for liver transplantation. NTBC therapy for hereditary tyrosinemia and purified glucocerebroside therapy for Gaucher disease are two such examples. The prospects of gene therapy are being actively pursued for many metabolic diseases, such as CF, hemophilia, and familial hypercholesterolemia. Until such investigation leads directly to clinical practice, however, liver transplantation remains an effective option for therapy for a wide range of metabolic diseases.

  20. Pathophysiology of incomplete renal tubular acidosis in recurrent renal stone formers: evidence of disturbed calcium, bone and citrate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Bollerslev, Jens; Hansen, A B

    1993-01-01

    RTA compared with 3 of 10 with NUA, and 0 of 10 NC. The citrate/calcium ratio in urine was significantly reduced in iRTA compared with the value in NUA (P formation (serum osteocalcin) and bone resorption (urinary hydroxyproline) were...... significantly increased in iRTA compared with NUA and NC (P calcium, bone and citrate metabolism--the same metabolic abnormalities which characterize classic type 1 RTA. Mild non-carbonic......Urinary acidification, bone metabolism and urinary excretion of calcium and citrate were evaluated in 10 recurrent stone formers with incomplete renal tubular acidosis (iRTA), 10 recurrent stone formers with normal urinary acidification (NUA) and 10 normal controls (NC). Patients with iRTA had...

  1. Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders Associated with Human Immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Many reports have described endocrine and metabolic disorders in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection . This article reviewed various reports in the literature in order to increase the awareness and thus the need for early intervention when necessary. DATA SOURCE: Data were obtained from ...

  2. [Erythropoietic protoporphyria. A rare inherited metabolic disorder with skin symptoms.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Claus; Bathum, Lise; Sommerlund, Mette

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder, resulting from a deficiency of a specific enzyme, ferrochelatase, in the haem biosynthesis pathway. Early and late skin symptoms in EPP are demonstrated by three case stories. Diagnosis depends on characteristic skin...

  3. PHENYLKETONURIA, AN INHERITED METABOLIC DISORDER ASSOCIATED WITH MENTAL RETARDATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CENTERWALL, WILLARD R.; CENTERWALL, SIEGRIED A.

    ADDRESSED TO PUBLIC HEALTH WORKERS AND PHYSICIANS IN GENERAL PRACTICE, THE PAMPHLET INTRODUCES METHODS OF DETECTING AND MANAGING PHENYLKETONURIA, AN INHERITED METABOLIC DISORDER ASSOCIATED WITH MENTAL RETARDATION. INFORMATION, UPDATED FROM THE 1961 EDITION, IS INCLUDED ON THE INCIDENCE AND GENETICS, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND CLINICAL COURSE OF THE…

  4. Visual and Verbal Learning in a Genetic Metabolic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilkin, Amy M.; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Trauner, Doris A.

    2009-01-01

    Visual and verbal learning in a genetic metabolic disorder (cystinosis) were examined in the following three studies. The goal of Study I was to provide a normative database and establish the reliability and validity of a new test of visual learning and memory (Visual Learning and Memory Test; VLMT) that was modeled after a widely used test of…

  5. Metabolic Syndrome in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahi, Gita; LeBlanc, Paul J.; Hay, John A.; Faught, Brent E.; O'Leary, Debra; Cairney, John

    2011-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have higher rates of obesity compared to children with typical motor development, and, as a result may be at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of MetS and its components among children with and without DCD. This…

  6. Altered one-carbon metabolism in posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, G.J. de; Lok, A.; Mocking, R.; Assies, J.; Schene, A.H.; Olff, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality through somatic conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease. The one-carbon metabolism in connection with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis may be an important mediator of this

  7. Risk Factors for the Development of Metabolic Disorders: A Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science Direct, Google Scholar, PubMed, NIH Public Access and PMC literature databases were searched. The identified articles were examined for further relevant references. All articles that referred to hormones, enzyme(s) and metabolic disorders were assessed. About 100 articles and papers were retrieved and 61 of ...

  8. Effects of strontium ranelate administration on calcium metabolism in female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Del Fiacco, Romano; Romagnoli, Elisabetta; Fontana, Andrea; Cipriani, Cristiana; Pepe, Jessica; Minisola, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    We investigated possible changes of parameters of calcium metabolism induced by strontium ranelate (SR). Twenty-three patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PO) and 14 with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) were studied while taking 2 g/day of SR. Women with PO and 10 healthy age-matched control women were also daily supplemented with 1,000 mg calcium and 800 IU vitamin D. All subjects were studied at baseline and after 7 and 30 days; PO women and controls were also investigated at 180 and 360 days of treatment. Serum ionized calcium (iCa), phosphate (sP), magnesium, creatinine, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25[OH]D), 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25[OH](2)D), serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were measured. In spot urine, we assessed calcium and phosphate over creatinine ratios (uCa/Cr, uP/Cr), calcium excretion (Ca ex) and renal phosphate threshold (TmP/GFR); in 24-h urine, calcium and magnesium over creatinine clearance ratios (CaCl/CrCl and MgCl/CrCl). In PO, SR administration was associated with a significant decrease of PTH and 1,25(OH)(2)D levels but an increase of sP (p calcium homeostasis, probably through the calcium-sensing receptor.

  9. Vitamin D and Calcium Status in South African Adolescents with Alcohol Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Fein

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Adequate vitamin D and calcium are essential for optimal adolescent skeletal development. Adolescent vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency and poor calcium intake have been reported worldwide. Heavy alcohol use impacts negatively on skeletal health, which is concerning since heavy adolescent drinking is a rising public health problem. This study aimed to examine biochemical vitamin D status and dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D in 12–16 year-old adolescents with alcohol use disorders (AUD, but without co-morbid substance use disorders, compared to adolescents without AUD. Substance use, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OHD concentrations, energy, calcium and vitamin D intakes were assessed in heavy drinkers (meeting DSM-IV criteria for AUD (n = 81 and in light/non-drinkers without AUD (non-AUD (n = 81, matched for age, gender, language, socio-economic status and education. Lifetime alcohol dose was orders of magnitude higher in AUD adolescents compared to non-AUD adolescents. AUD adolescents had a binge drinking pattern and “weekends-only” style of alcohol consumption. Significantly lower (p = 0.038 s-25(OHD (adjusted for gender, smoking, vitamin D intake were evident in AUD adolescents compared to non-AUD adolescents. High levels of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency (s-25(OHD < 29.9 ng/mL were prevalent in both groups, but was significantly higher (p = 0.013 in the AUD group (90% compared to the non-AUD group (70%. All participants were at risk of inadequate calcium and vitamin D intakes (Estimated Average Requirement cut-point method. Both groups were at risk of inadequate calcium intake and had poor biochemical vitamin D status, with binge drinking potentially increasing the risk of the latter. This may have negative implications for peak bone mass accrual and future osteoporosis risk, particularly with protracted binge drinking.

  10. Vitamin D and calcium status in South African adolescents with alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naude, Celeste E; Carey, Paul D; Laubscher, Ria; Fein, George; Senekal, Marjanne

    2012-08-01

    Adequate vitamin D and calcium are essential for optimal adolescent skeletal development. Adolescent vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency and poor calcium intake have been reported worldwide. Heavy alcohol use impacts negatively on skeletal health, which is concerning since heavy adolescent drinking is a rising public health problem. This study aimed to examine biochemical vitamin D status and dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D in 12-16 year-old adolescents with alcohol use disorders (AUD), but without co-morbid substance use disorders, compared to adolescents without AUD. Substance use, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) concentrations, energy, calcium and vitamin D intakes were assessed in heavy drinkers (meeting DSM-IV criteria for AUD) (n = 81) and in light/non-drinkers without AUD (non-AUD) (n = 81), matched for age, gender, language, socio-economic status and education. Lifetime alcohol dose was orders of magnitude higher in AUD adolescents compared to non-AUD adolescents. AUD adolescents had a binge drinking pattern and "weekends-only" style of alcohol consumption. Significantly lower (p = 0.038) s-25(OH)D (adjusted for gender, smoking, vitamin D intake) were evident in AUD adolescents compared to non-AUD adolescents. High levels of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency (s-25(OH)D risk of inadequate calcium and vitamin D intakes (Estimated Average Requirement cut-point method). Both groups were at risk of inadequate calcium intake and had poor biochemical vitamin D status, with binge drinking potentially increasing the risk of the latter. This may have negative implications for peak bone mass accrual and future osteoporosis risk, particularly with protracted binge drinking.

  11. Substrate kinetics in patients with disorders of skeletal muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of the following studies was to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms in fat and carbohydrate metabolism and effect of nutritional interventions in patients with metabolic myopathies and in patients with severe muscle wasting. Yet there is no cure for patients with skeletal muscle disorders. The group of patients is heterozygous and this thesis is focused on patients with metabolic myopathies and low muscle mass due to severe muscle wasting. Disorders of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) are, along with myophosphorylase deficiency (McArdle disease), the most common inborn errors of metabolism leading to recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis in adults. Prolonged exercise, fasting, and fever are the main triggering factors for rhabdomyolysis in these conditions, and can be complicated by acute renal failure. Patients with low muscle mass are in risk of loosing their functional skills and depend on a wheel chair and respiratory support. We used nutritional interventions and metabolic studies with stable isotope technique and indirect calorimetry in patients with metabolic myopathies and patients with low muscle mass to get information of the metabolism of the investigated diseases, and to gain knowledge of the biochemical pathways of intermediary metabolism in human skeletal muscle. We have shown that patients with fat metabolism disorders in skeletal muscle affecting the transporting enzyme of fat into the mitochondria (carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency) and affecting the enzyme responsible for breakdown of the long-chain fatty acids (very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency) have a normal fatty acid oxidation at rest, but enzyme activity is too low to increase fatty acid oxidation during exercise. Furthermore, these patients benefit from a carbohydrate rich diet. Oppositely is exercise capacity worsened by a fat-rich diet in these patients. The patients also benefit from IV glucose, however, when glucose is given orally just before

  12. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully...

  13. Should children with inherited metabolic disorders receive varicella vaccination?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varghese, M

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to determine the rate of varicella infection and complications in children with disorders of intermediary metabolism (IEM) between the ages of 1 and 16 years attending our national metabolic referral centre. Of 126 children identified, a response was received from 122. A history of previous varicella infection was identified in 64 cases (53%) and of varicella vaccination in 5 (4%). Fifty-three (43%) patients apparently did not have a history of clinical varicella infection. Of the 64 children with a history of varicella infection, five required hospitalisation for complications, including life-threatening lactic acidosis in one patient with mitochondrial disease and metabolic decompensation in four patients. In conclusion, varicella infection may cause an increased risk of metabolic decompensation in patients with IEMs. We propose that a trial of varicella vaccination be considered for this cohort of patients with monitoring of its safety and efficacy.

  14. Amlodipine enhances amelioration of vascular insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and metabolic disorders by candesartan in metabolic syndrome rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueta, Daisuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Dong, Yi-Fei; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Toyama, Kensuke; Yasuda, Osamu; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2012-06-01

    The pharmacological advantage of combination of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) and a calcium-channel blocker (CCB) is not fully defined. This study was undertaken to elucidate the potential benefit of their combination in metabolic syndrome. SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHRcp), a rat model of human metabolic syndrome, were divided into four groups, and were administered (i) vehicle, (ii) candesartan (an ARB) 0.3 mg/kg/day, (iii) amlodipine (a CCB) 3 mg/kg/day, and (iv) candesartan 0.3 mg/kg/day plus amlodipine 3 mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. Candesartan, amlodipine, or their combination significantly ameliorated the impairment of vascular endothelium-dependent relaxation with acetylcholine in SHRcp. However, the impairment of insulin-induced vasodilation in SHRcp was partially improved by candesartan alone, but not by amlodipine alone. Interestingly, amlodipine added to candesartan synergistically enhanced the improvement of impaired insulin-induced vasodilation by candesartan, indicating the synergistic improvement of vascular insulin resistance by the combination of these drugs. Candesartan alone, but not amlodipine alone, significantly attenuated vascular superoxide and NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox in SHRcp. Amlodipine added to candesartan synergistically enhanced the reduction of vascular p22phox levels and superoxide by candesartan in SHRcp, suggesting the association of vascular insulin resistance with oxidative stress. Furthermore, the combination of candesartan with amlodipine synergistically decreased the increase in visceral adipocyte size, serum free-fatty acid, and tumor necrosis factor-α in SHRcp. ARB and CCB combination synergistically ameliorated vascular insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome, being associated with the synergistic attenuation of vascular oxidative stress and metabolic disorders.

  15. Metabolic Disorders Presenting as Vacuolar Myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri N

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen cases of vacuolar myopathy (6 males, 7 females, with age range of 4 months to 22 years and diagnosed over a period from 1986 to 1999, could be categorized into acid maltase deficiency (AMD (n=6, carnitine deficiency (CD (n=5, and mitochondria-lipid-glycogen myopathy (MLGM (n=2, cases of AMD presented as floppy infants with reparatory infection, while cases of carnitine deficiency presented with progressive motor weakness with normal initial milestones. Delayed motor milestones and proximal muscle weakness was the presenting complaints in MLGM. The diagnosis in all these cases was established based on the morphological findings on muscle biopsy, namely demonstration of PAS positive material within the vacuoles in AMD, ragged red fibers, vacuoles containing neutral fats and abnormal mitochondria in CD. MLGM was characterized by the presence of PAS positive material and neutral fat. The diagnosis was confirmed by identification of abnormal mitochondria under electron microscope. The storage product appears to affect not only the muscle metabolism but also the normal structure function relationship. The study highlights the importance of supplementing routine histopathology with muscle histochemistry and election microscopy to delineate the conditions, which look similar in routine histology.

  16. Bipolar disorder and metabolic syndrome: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Czepielewski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Summarize data on metabolic syndrome (MS in bipolar disorder (BD. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the Medline, Embase and PsycInfo databases, using the keywords "metabolic syndrome", "insulin resistance" and "metabolic X syndrome" and cross-referencing them with "bipolar disorder" or "mania". The following types of publications were candidates for review: (i clinical trials, (ii studies involving patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or (iii data about metabolic syndrome. A 5-point quality scale was used to assess the methodological weight of the studies. RESULTS: Thirty-nine articles were selected. None of studies reached the maximum quality score of 5 points. The prevalence of MS was significantly higher in BD individuals when compared to a control group. The analysis of MS subcomponents showed that abdominal obesity was heterogeneous. Individuals with BD had significantly higher rates of hypertriglyceridemia than healthy controls. When compared to the general population, there were no significant differences in the prevalence of low HDL-c in individuals with BD. Data on hypertension were also inconclusive. Rates of hyperglycemia were significantly greater in patients with BD compared to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: The overall results point to the presence of an association between BD and MS, as well as between their subcomponents.

  17. Bone Mineral Density Changes after Physical Training and Calcium Intake in Students with Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab ameri, Elahe; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with attention deficit and hyper activity (ADHD) disorder. For this reason 54 male students with ADHD (age 8-12 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  18. Effects of switching from calcium carbonate to lanthanum carbonate on bone mineral metabolism in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Rie; Fukami, Kei; Ando, Ryotaro; Sakai, Kazuko; Kusumoto, Takuo; Hazama, Takuma; Adachi, Takeki; Kaida, Yusuke; Nakayama, Yosuke; Ueda, Seiji; Kohno, Keisuke; Wada, Yoshifumi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Okuda, Seiya

    2013-04-01

    Phosphate binders are useful for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This study was performed to examine the effects of switching from calcium carbonate (CC) to lanthanum carbonate (LC) on bone mineral metabolism and inflammatory markers in HD patients. We conducted 29 stable HD patients receiving CC, which was replaced by LC and followed-up for 12 weeks. Patients underwent determinants of blood chemistries such as serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamin D status, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in whole blood cells were evaluated by real-time PCR just before and after the treatment with LC. Corrected Ca [corrected] levels were significantly reduced, but serum phosphorus levels (P levels) were unchanged after LC treatment. Switching to LC increased whole-PTH, osteocalcin, 1,25(OH)(2) D(3) levels and 1,25(OH)(2) D(3)/25(OH)D(3) ratio. 1,25(OH)(2) D(3)/25(OH)D(3) ratio was negatively correlated with HD duration. Furthermore, whole blood cell IL-6 mRNA levels were significantly reduced by LC treatment. We provided that the switching from CC to LC improved Ca overload and ameliorated vitamin D and inflammatory status in HD patients. These observations suggest that LC may play a protective role for the progression of atherosclerosis and vascular calcification in these patients. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  19. Endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders leading to dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Amitabha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the first steps toward the correct diagnosis of dementia is to segregate out the nondegenerative dementias from possible degenerative dementias. Nondegenerative dementias could be due to traumatic, endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, toxic, infective, and immunological causes. They could also be caused by tumors, subdural hematomas, and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Many of the nondegenerative dementias occur at an earlier age and often progress quickly compared to Alzheimer′s disease and other degenerative dementias. Many are treatable or preventable with simple measures. This review aims to give an overview of some of the more important endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders that may lead to dementia.

  20. Symptoms of pseudoallergy and histamine metabolism disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kacik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Histamine intolerance is a poorly investigated type of hypersensitivity responsible for a number of often serious symptoms, erroneously interpreted as food allergy. Endogenous histamine originates from the histidine amino acid with the help of the histidine decarboxylase enzyme. Apart from the endogenous production histamine may be supplied to the body with food. Slow-maturing and fermenting products are characterised by particularly high levels of histamine. Some food products stimulate excessive release of histamine from stores in the body as well as containing significant amounts of it. These products include spices, herbs, dried fruits and a large group of food additives. Histamine intolerance is considered to be a condition in which the amount of histamine in the body exceeds its tolerance threshold, which leads to the development of adverse reactions. These reactions primarily include skin symptoms (pruritus, urticaria, skin reddening, acne lesions, angioedema, respiratory symptoms (nasal obstruction and watery discharge, sneezing, coughing, wheezing, gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, bloating, nervous system symptoms (headaches, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, panic attacks, cardiovascular symptoms (tachycardia, hypotension, chest pain, primary dysmenorrhoea and many more. It is estimated that nearly 1% of society is susceptible to histamine intolerance. The diagnosis of this disorder is based on observing at least two characteristic symptoms and their disappearance or improvement following histamine-free diet. A new, although not easily accessible diagnostic tool is assay for serum diamine oxidase activity, which correlates to a significant extent with symptoms of histamine intolerance. Normal activity of diamine oxidase is considered to be the amount of >80 HDU/mL, decreased activity – 40–80 HDU/mL and severely decreased activity – <40 HDU/mL. Currently the option of diamine oxidase supplementation is

  1. Effect of Temperature on Precipitation Rate of Calcium Carbonate Produced through Microbial Metabolic Process of Bio Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Yane Putri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most widely used construction material in civil engineering. But plain concrete is a brittle material and has little resistance to cracking. The cracking in concrete promotes deterioration such as the corrosion of reinforcing rebar, therefore, repair in filling the crack is often carried out. Recently, repair methods using bio-based materials associated with microbial metabolic processes leading to precipitation of calcium carbonate have been intensively studied. In this study, influencing factors on the precipitation rate depending on the constituents of bio-based material comprising yeast, glucose and calcium acetate mixed in tris buffer solution was examined for improving the rate of initial reactions. In addition, effect of temperature change on the amount of calcium carbonate precipitation was also investigated. The precipitates were identified by X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the increase of temperature lead to a change on calcium carbonate precipitation and caused the pH decrease under 7.0.

  2. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    . These metabolic disorders are all characterized by reduced plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Quantitatively skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin resistance. Both low plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes...... and cardiovascular disease. In several studies, we have investigated insulin action on glucose and lipid metabolism, and at the molecular level, insulin signaling to glucose transport and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from healthy individuals and in obesity, PCOS and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, we have...... action on glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is impaired. This suggests that the defects in glucose and lipid oxidation in the common metabolic disorders are secondary to other factors. In young women with PCOS, the degree of insulin resistance was similar to that seen in middle-aged patients...

  3. Effect of oligofructose-enriched inulin on bone metabolism in girls with low calcium intakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Corrêa de Souza

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present clinical study, the effect of oligofructose-enriched inulin was studied on bone metabolism in girls from 9 to 12 years old, with low habitual calcium intakes, who attended public schools. Two calcium-enriched formulations, supplemented with oligofructose-enriched inulin (test drink or without (standard drink were made. Sixty pre-pubertal girls were randomized into a double-blind and crossover design, divided into three groups and received one daily portion of either the standard drink (group 1 or test drink (group 2 during 11 weeks, followed by a three-week washout period. Group control did not receive any supplementation. Biochemical evaluations of serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone - iPTH - and bone alkaline phosphatase - BAP - were performed at baseline and after 4, 8 and 11 weeks of each intervention period. In group 1, a significant increase in serum calcium and BAP and a reduction of iPTH were observed after consumption of the test drink.No presente ensaio clínico, o efeito de oligofrutose enriquecida com inulina foi estudado no metabolismo ósseo de meninas de 9 a 12 anos com baixa ingestão habitual de cálcio, matriculadas em escolas públicas. Duas formulações foram suplementadas ou não (bebida padrão com oligofrutose enriquecida com inulina (bebida teste. Sessenta meninas pré-púberes foram aleatorizadas em estudo duplo cego crossover e divididas em três grupos e receberam uma porção diária da bebida padrão (grupo 1 ou teste (grupo 2 durante 11 semanas, seguidos por um período de intervalo de três semanas. O grupo controle não recebeu nenhuma suplementação. As avaliações bioquímicas de cálcio sérico, paratormônio intacto - PTHi e fosfatase alcalina fração óssea - FAO foram executadas ao início e após 4, 8 e 11 semanas de cada período de intervenção. No grupo 1, um aumento significante no cálcio sérico e FAO e uma redução no PTHi foram observadas após o consumo da bebida teste.

  4. A study of serum magnesium and serum calcium in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladri Deb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is arguably the epidemic of our time. In one of the reports of the World Health Organization, it was projected that depression and heart disease will be the most common diseases on Earth by 2020. The paper attempts to determine the relationship between the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD and serum magnesium and serum calcium levels. Methodology: The study is based on a sample of 60 subjects–30 healthy normal individuals and 30 indoor and outdoor patients of the Department of Psychiatry of Gauhati Medical College and Hospital, Guwahati, who were identified by psychiatrist as having MDD as per the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV criteria. Estimation of the parameters of the study was done by using spectrophotometre (Spectra scan UV 2600. The result values of both the groups were compared by using independent ‘t’ test. Further, the correlation between serum magnesium and serum calcium among individuals of control as well as case groups were carried out by using Pearson’s correlation test. Results: Analysis of data reveals the mean value of serum magnesium among subjects of control group was higher than that of the subjects of the case (before treatment group while in case of serum calcium, it was the vice versa. Moreover, in both the cases, the differences in mean values were found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study shows that alterations in the concentrations of magnesium and calcium may play a role in depressive illnesses and thus, may have a possible role in causing various mood disorders like MDD.

  5. A disorder of surfactant metabolism without identified genetic mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Montella, Silvia; Vece, Timothy J.; Langston, Claire; Carrera, Paola; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Hamvas, Aaron; Manna, Angelo; Cervasio, Mara; Santamaria, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant metabolism disorders may result in diffuse lung disease in children. Case presentation We report a 3-years-old boy with dry cough, progressive hypoxemia, dyspnea and bilateral ground glass opacities at chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) who had no variants in genes encoding surfactant proteins or transcription factors. Lung histology strongly suggested an abnormality of surfactant protein. A 7-month course of pulse intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone p...

  6. Visual and Verbal Learning in a Genetic Metabolic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Spilkin, Amy M.; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Trauner, Doris A

    2009-01-01

    Visual and verbal learning in a genetic metabolic disorder (cystinosis) were examined in the following three studies. The goal of Study I was to provide a normative database and establish the reliability and validity of a new test of visual learning and memory (Visual Learning and Memory Test; VLMT) that was modeled after a widely used test of verbal learning and memory (California Verbal Learning Test; CVLT). One hundred seventy-two neurologically intact individuals ages 5 years through 50 y...

  7. Speckle tracking echocardiography in hypertensive males with glucose metabolism disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kolesnyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Early left ventricle (LV abnormalities are hardly detectable by means of standard echocardiography in patients with hypertension (HTN and glucose metabolism disorders. The objective of this study was to assess changes inLVfunction with speckle tracking echocardiography in hypertensive males with different types of glucose metabolism abnormalities. Methods and results. We recruited 158 hypertensive males with different glycemic status. The multidirectionalLVstrain was assessed by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. The patients with HTN and type 2 diabetes mellitus demonstrated significant reduction ofLVglobal longitudinal strain and early diastolic strain rate despite preservedLVejection fraction. Conclusion. Speckle tracking echocardiography can identify subclinical myocardial alterations in hypertensive males with glucose metabolism abnormalities.

  8. Pathophysiological aspect of metabolic acid-base disorders

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    Nešović-Ostojić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaing the arterial pH values (in normal range of 7,35-7,45 is one of the main principles of homeostasis. Regulatory responses, including chemical buffering (extracellular, intracellular, sceletal, the regulation of pCO2 by the respiratory system, and the regulation of [HCO3-] by the kidneys, act in concert to maintain normal arterial pH value. The main extracellular chemical buffer is bicarbonate-carbonic acid buffer system. The kidneys contribute to the regulation of hydrogen (and bicarbonate in body fluids in two ways. Proximal tubules are important in bicarbonate reabsorption and distal tubules excrete hydrogen ion (as ammonium ion or titratable acid. There are four simple acid-base disorders: metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis; respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic acidosis can occur because of an increase in endogenous acid production (such as lactate and ketoacids, loss of bicarbonate (as in diarrhea, or accumulation of endogenous acids (as in renal failure. Metabolic acidosis can also be with high and normal (hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis anion gap. Renal tubular acidosis (RTA is a form of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis which occurs when the renal damage primarily affects tubular function. The main problem in distal RTA is reduced H+ excretion in distal tubule. Type 2 RTA is also called proximal RTA because the main problem is greatly impaired reabsorption of bicarbonate in proximal tubule. Impaired cation exchange in distal tubule is the main problem in RTA type 4. Metabolic alkalosis occurs as a result of net gain of [HCO3-] or loss of nonvolatile acid from extracellular fluids. Metabolic alkalosis can be associated with reduced or increased extracellular volume.

  9. Phosphorus and Calcium Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women with Diabetes Mellitus: Effects of the Type and Duration of the Disease, Time of Menopause and Body Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Kyryliuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM on the phosphorus and calcium metabolism in postmenopausal women, depending on the type and duration of the disease, duration of menopause, body mass and type of hypoglycemic therapy. The state of phosphorus and calcium metabolism in 86 women with type 1 DM (13 patients and type 2 DM (73 patients was studied. In all patients, the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in the blood was within normal limits. It was found that the concentration of ionized calcium, total calcium and inorganic phosphorus in the blood can not be the main criterion for the state of bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with DM. Sulfonylureas and insulin in combination with biguanides have no effect on the status of phosphorus and calcium metabolism in postmenopausal women with type 2 DM.

  10. [Obesity-related metabolic disorders in childhood and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, D; Carrascosa, A

    2011-08-01

    Obesity is the most frequent nutritional disorder in childhood and adolescence. The rise in its prevalence and severity has underlined the numerous and significant obesity-related metabolic disorders. Altered glucose metabolism, manifested as impaired glucose tolerance, appears early in severely obese children and adolescents. Obese young people with glucose intolerance are characterized by marked peripheral insulin resistance and relative beta-cell failure. Lipid deposition in muscle and the visceral compartment, and not only obesity per se, is related to increased peripheral insulin resistance, the triggering factor of the metabolic syndrome. Other elements of the metabolic syndrome, such as dyslipidaemia, and hypertension, are already present in obese youngsters and worsen with the degree of obesity. The long-term impact of obesity-related insulin resistance on cardiovascular morbidity in these patients is expected to emerge as these youngsters become young adults. Copyright © 2011 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of metabolic and respiratory acidosis on intracellular calcium in osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushinsky, David A.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo, metabolic acidosis {decreased pH from decreased bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3−])} increases urine calcium (Ca) without increased intestinal Ca absorption, resulting in a loss of bone Ca. Conversely, respiratory acidosis [decreased pH from increased partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco2)] does not appreciably alter Ca homeostasis. In cultured bone, chronic metabolic acidosis (Met) significantly increases cell-mediated net Ca efflux while isohydric respiratory acidosis (Resp) does not. The proton receptor, OGR1, appears critical for cell-mediated, metabolic acid-induced bone resorption. Perfusion of primary bone cells or OGR1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with Met induces transient peaks of intracellular Ca (Cai). To determine whether Resp increases Cai, as does Met, we imaged Cai in primary cultures of bone cells. pH for Met = 7.07 ([HCO3−] = 11.8 mM) and for Resp = 7.13 (Pco2 = 88.4 mmHg) were similar and lower than neutral (7.41). Both Met and Resp induced a marked, transient increase in Cai in individual bone cells; however, Met stimulated Cai to a greater extent than Resp. We used OGR1-transfected CHO cells to determine whether OGR1 was responsible for the greater increase in Cai in Met than Resp. Both Met and Resp induced a marked, transient increase in Cai in OGR1-transfected CHO cells; however, in these cells Met was not different than Resp. Thus, the greater induction of Cai by Met in primary bone cells is not a function of OGR1 alone, but must involve H+ receptors other than OGR1, or pathways sensitive to Pco2, HCO3−, or total CO2 that modify the effect of H+ in primary bone cells. PMID:20504884

  12. Assessment of Metabolic Parameters For Autism Spectrum Disorders

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    Ananth N Rao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a brain development disorder that first appears during infancy or childhood, and generally follows a steady course without remission. Impairments result from maturation-related changes in various systems of the brain. Autism is one of the five pervasive developmental disorders (PDD, which are characterized by widespread abnormalities of social interactions and communication, and severely restricted interests and highly repetitive behavior. The reported incidence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs has increased markedly over the past decade. The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention has recently estimated the prevalence of ASDs in the United States at approximately 5.6 per 1000 (1 of 155 to 1 of 160 children. Several metabolic defects, such as phenylketonuria, are associated with autistic symptoms. In deciding upon the appropriate evaluation scheme a clinician must consider a host of different factors. The guidelines in this article have been developed to assist the clinician in the consideration of these factors.

  13. Disorders of muscle lipid metabolism: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforêt, Pascal; Vianey-Saban, Christine

    2010-11-01

    Disorders of muscle lipid metabolism may involve intramyocellular triglyceride degradation, carnitine uptake, long-chain fatty acids mitochondrial transport, or fatty acid β-oxidation. Three main diseases leading to permanent muscle weakness are associated with severe increased muscle lipid content (lipid storage myopathies): primary carnitine deficiency, neutral lipid storage disease and multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. A moderate lipidosis may be observed in fatty acid oxidation disorders revealed by rhabdomyolysis episodes such as carnitine palmitoyl transferase II, very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiencies, and in recently described phosphatidic acid phosphatase deficiency. Respiratory chain disorders and congenital myasthenic syndromes may also be misdiagnosed as fatty acid oxidation disorders due to the presence of secondary muscle lipidosis. The main biochemical tests giving clues for the diagnosis of these various disorders are measurements of blood carnitine and acylcarnitines, urinary organic acid profile, and search for intracytoplasmic lipid on peripheral blood smear (Jordan's anomaly). Genetic analysis orientated by the results of biochemical investigation allows establishing a firm diagnosis. Primary carnitine deficiency and multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency may be treated after supplementation with carnitine, riboflavine and coenzyme Q10. New therapeutic approaches for fatty acid oxidation disorders are currently developed, based on pharmacological treatment with bezafibrate, and specific diets enriched in medium-chain triglycerides or triheptanoin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pycnogenol® in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Om P

    2015-07-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological actions of Pycnogenol® in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and related disorders such as obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and hypertension. Pycnogenol® is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. Subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, antiinflammatory, endothelium-dependent vasodilator activity, and also its anti-thrombotic effects make it appropriate for targeting the multifaceted pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, blood pressure in mild to moderate hypertensive patients, and waist circumference, and improve lipid profile, renal and endothelial functions in metabolic syndrome. This review highlights the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and related clinical research findings on the safety and efficacy of Pycnogenol®. The results of clinical research studies performed with Pycnogenol® are discussed using an evidence-based, target-oriented approach following the pathophysiology of individual components as well as in metabolic syndrome overall. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Metabolismo do cálcio na fenilcetonúria Calcium metabolism in phenilke

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    Fabiana Ferreira Martins

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A Fenilcetonúria é um erro inato do metabolismo do aminoácido fenilalanina. O tratamento é essencialmente dietético e envolve uma restrição severa no consumo de alimentos contendo aminoácido fenilalanina. Embora a alimentação seja complementada com fórmulas a fim de suprir as necessidades de vitaminas, minerais e aminoácidos essenciais, carências nutricionais ainda ocorrem. Isto se deve, principalmente, à restrição de fontes protéicas, que acarreta deficiência na ingestão de diversos nutrientes, dentre eles o cálcio. O cálcio possui importante relação com a formação mineral óssea. Estudos recentes demonstram que portadores de fenilcetonúria apresentam freqüentemente osteopenia e fraturas, sendo a maior incidência em crianças acima de 8 anos de idade. O rápido aumento da estatura, a dieta deficiente em cálcio e níveis de aminoácido fenilalanina elevados têm sido descritos como os principais fatores para a aquisição de massa óssea inadequada. A suplementação de cálcio em crianças saudáveis mostrou um efeito positivo sobre a aquisição de massa óssea na fase da pré-puberdade. Assim, torna-se relevante compreender a necessidade da suplementação de cálcio em pacientes fenilcetonúria, a fim de favorecer o desenvolvimento ósseo esperado.Phenylketonuria is an inborn error of the metabolism of the amino acid phenylalanine. The treatment is essentially dietetic and involves a severe restriction in the consumption of foods containing aminoacid phenylalanine. Although the diet is complemented with supplements in order to meet the vitamin, mineral and essential amino acid requirements, nutritional deficiencies still occur. This is mainly due to restricting the consumption of protein sources, which results in low intake of several nutrients, including calcium. Calcium is strongly related to bone mineral formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that patients with phenylketonuria often present osteopenia and

  16. [Features of metabolic syndrome in patients with depressive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, M; Jirák, R; Zák, A; Jáchymová, M; Vecka, M; Tvrzická, E; Vávrová, L; Kodydková, J; Stanková, B

    2009-01-01

    Depressive disorder is a serious illness with a high incidence, proxime accessit after anxiety disorders among the psychiatric diseases. It is accompanied by an increased risk of development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and by increased all-cause mortality. Recently published data have suggested that factors connected with the insulin resistance are at the background of this association. In this pilot study we have investigated parameters of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis in consecutively admitted patients suffering from depressive disorder (DD) (group of 42 people), in 57 patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and in a control group of 49 apparently healthy persons (CON). Depressive patients did not differ from the control group by age or body mass index (BMI) value, but they had statistically significantly higher concentrations of serum insulin, C-peptide, glucose, triglycerides (TG), conjugated dienes in LDL particles (CD-LDL), higher value of microalbuminuria and of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. They simultaneously had significantly lower value of the insulin sensitivity (QUICKI) index. In comparison with the MetS group the depressive patients were characterized by significantly lower both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI , serum TG, apolipoprotein B, uric acid, C-peptide and by higher concentrations of apolipoprotein A-I and HDL-cholesterol. On the contrary, we have not found statistically significant differences between the DD and MetS groups in the concentrations of serum insulin, glucose, HOMA and QUICKI indices, in CD-LDL and MAU. In this pilot study, we have found in patients with depressive disorder certain features of metabolic syndrome, especially insulin resistance and oxidative stress.

  17. Adaptations to climate in candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Hancock

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary pressures due to variation in climate play an important role in shaping phenotypic variation among and within species and have been shown to influence variation in phenotypes such as body shape and size among humans. Genes involved in energy metabolism are likely to be central to heat and cold tolerance. To test the hypothesis that climate shaped variation in metabolism genes in humans, we used a bioinformatics approach based on network theory to select 82 candidate genes for common metabolic disorders. We genotyped 873 tag SNPs in these genes in 54 worldwide populations (including the 52 in the Human Genome Diversity Project panel and found correlations with climate variables using rank correlation analysis and a newly developed method termed Bayesian geographic analysis. In addition, we genotyped 210 carefully matched control SNPs to provide an empirical null distribution for spatial patterns of allele frequency due to population history alone. For nearly all climate variables, we found an excess of genic SNPs in the tail of the distributions of the test statistics compared to the control SNPs, implying that metabolic genes as a group show signals of spatially varying selection. Among our strongest signals were several SNPs (e.g., LEPR R109K, FABP2 A54T that had previously been associated with phenotypes directly related to cold tolerance. Since variation in climate may be correlated with other aspects of environmental variation, it is possible that some of the signals that we detected reflect selective pressures other than climate. Nevertheless, our results are consistent with the idea that climate has been an important selective pressure acting on candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

  18. Investigation of common disease regulatory network for metabolic disorders: A bioinformatics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tasnuba Jesmin; Sajjad Waheed; Abdullah-Al-Emran,

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorder causes the failure of metabolism process is growing concern worldwide. This research predicts a common metabolic pathway that is shared by Obesity, Type-2 Diabetes, Hypertension and Cardiovascular diseases due to metabolic disorder. A protein-protein interaction network is created to show the protein co-expression, co-regulations and interactions among gene and diseases. Genes whose are associated with metabolic diseases have been accumulated from different gene databases w...

  19. Acute effects of different phosphorus sources on calcium and bone metabolism in young women: a whole-foods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, H J; Vaihia, K P; Kärkkäinen, M U M; Niemistö, M J; Lamberg-Allardt, C J E

    2007-04-01

    The recommended dietary phosphorus intake is exceeded in the typical Western diet. However, few studies have been conducted on the bioavailability and metabolic consequences of dietary phosphorus from different food sources. In this study, acute effects of dietary phosphorus from three different food sources and a phosphate supplement on calcium and bone metabolism were investigated. Sixteen healthy women aged 20-30 years were randomized to five controlled 24-hour study sessions, each subject serving as her own control. At the control session, calcium intake was ca. 250 mg and phosphorus intake ca. 500 mg. During the other four sessions, phosphorus intake was about 1,500 mg, 1,000 mg of which was obtained from meat, cheese, whole grains, or a phosphate supplement, respectively. The foods served were exactly the same during the phosphorus sessions and the control session; only phosphorus sources varied. Markers of calcium and bone metabolism were followed. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to compare the study sessions. Only the phosphate supplement increased serum parathyroid hormone (S-PTH) concentration compared with the control session (P = 0.031). Relative to the control session, meat increased markers of both bone formation (P = 0.045) and bone resorption (P = 0.049). Cheese decreased S-PTH (P = 0.0001) and bone resorption (P = 0.008). These data suggest that the metabolic response was different for different foods.

  20. Cerebellar involvement in metabolic disorders: a pattern-recognition approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinlin, M.; Boltshauser, E. [Department of Neurology, University Children`s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Blaser, S. [Division of Paediatric Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-06-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism can affect the cerebellum during development, maturation and later during life. We have established criteria for pattern recognition of cerebellar abnormalities in metabolic disorders. The abnormalities can be divided into four major groups: cerebellar hypoplasia (CH), hyperplasia, cerebellar atrophy (CA), cerebellar white matter abnormalities (WMA) or swelling, and involvement of the dentate nuclei (DN) or cerebellar cortex. CH can be an isolated typical finding, as in adenylsuccinase deficiency, but is also occasionally seen in many other disorders. Differentiation from CH and CA is often difficult, as in carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome or 2-l-hydroxyglutaric acidaemia. In cases of atrophy the relationship of cerebellar to cerebral atrophy is important. WMA may be diffuse or patchy, frequently predominantly around the DN. Severe swelling of white matter is present during metabolic crisis in maple syrup urine disease. The DN can be affected by metabolite deposition, necrosis, calcification or demyelination. Involvement of cerebellar cortex is seen in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Changes in DN and cerebellar cortex are rather typical and therefore most helpful; additional features should be sought as they are useful in narrowing down the differential diagnosis. (orig.) With 6 figs., 6 tabs., 41 refs.

  1. Metabolic connectivity for differential diagnosis of dementing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Dmitry; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Shi, Kuangyu; Perneczky, Robert; Zou, Na; Grimmer, Timo; Li, Jing; Drzezga, Alexander; Yakushev, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Presently, visual and quantitative approaches for image-supported diagnosis of dementing disorders rely on regional intensity rather than on connectivity measurements. Here, we test metabolic connectivity for differentiation between Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose was conducted in 47 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, 52 patients with mild frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and 45 healthy elderly subjects. Sparse inverse covariance estimation and selection were used to identify patterns of metabolic, inter-subject covariance on the basis of 60 regional values. Relative to healthy subjects, significantly more pathological within-lobe connections were found in the parietal lobe of patients with Alzheimer's disease, and in the frontal and temporal lobes of subjects with frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Relative to the frontotemporal lobar degeneration group, more pathological connections between the parietal and temporal lobe were found in the Alzheimer's disease group. The obtained connectivity patterns differentiated between two patients groups with an overall accuracy of 83%. Linear discriminant analysis and univariate methods provided an accuracy of 74% and 69%, respectively. There are characteristic patterns of abnormal metabolic connectivity in mild Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Such patterns can be utilized for single-subject analyses and might be more accurate in the differential diagnosis of dementing disorders than traditional intensity-based analyses. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Stress in Obesity and Associated Metabolic and Cardiovascular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has significant implications for healthcare, since it is a major risk factor for both type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. This syndrome is a common and complex disorder combining obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance. It is associated with high atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk, which can only partially be explained by its components. Therefore, to explain how obesity contributes to the development of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, more and better insight is required into the effects of personal and environmental stress on disease processes. In this paper, we show that obesity is a chronic inflammatory disease, which has many molecular mechanisms in common with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we focus on the role of oxidative stress associated with obesity in the development of the metabolic syndrome. We discuss how several stress conditions are related to inflammation and oxidative stress in association with obesity and its complications. We also emphasize the relation between stress conditions and the deregulation of epigenetic control mechanisms by means of microRNAs and show how this impairment further contributes to the development of obesity, closing the vicious circle. Finally, we discuss the limitations of current anti-inflammation and antioxidant therapy to treat obesity. PMID:24278677

  3. Early growth and development of later life metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Joo-Pin; Mantzoros, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Growth is effected via a complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, environmental and growth factors. Hormonal factors such as the growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling system, the human placental lactogen, and insulin play an integral role in early growth. Genetic factors affecting the GH-IGF system and insulin secretion and actions, and epigenetic mechanisms including DNA methylation have been further implicated as contributory factors. These hormonal systems, on a background of genetic susceptibility, together with other factors including maternal nutrition, placental and environmental factors, regulate not only early growth but also development. These interactions may impact on later health consequences in adult life. Accumulating data in the last few decades on developmental programming and later life metabolic disorders has provided a novel perspective on the possible pathogenesis of metabolic dysregulation. Despite postulations put forward to elucidate the mechanism underlying the association between early growth and later life metabolic disorders, it remains unclear what the dominant factor(s) would be, how any underlying mechanisms interact, or whether these mechanisms are truly causal. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-12-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organelle, the primary cilium, to metabolic disorder, obesity and type II diabetes. Primary cilia are microtubule based hair-like membranous structures, lacking motility and functions such as sensing the environmental cues, and transducing extracellular signals within the cells. Interestingly, the subclass of ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedle and Alström syndrome, manifest obesity and type II diabetes in human and mouse model systems. Moreover, studies on genetic mouse model system indicate that more ciliary genes affect energy homeostasis through multiple regulatory steps such as central and peripheral actions of leptin and insulin. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in primary cilia and metabolic disorders, and propose the possible interaction between primary cilia and the leptin and insulin signal pathways which might enhance our understanding of the unambiguous link of a cell's antenna to obesity and type II diabetes.

  5. Perspective on the impact of weightlessness on calcium and bone metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holick, M. F.

    1998-01-01

    As humans venture into space to colonize the moon and travel to distant planets in the 21st century, they will be confronted with a bone disease that could potentially limit their space exploration activities or put them at risk for fracture when they return to earth. It is now recognized that an unloading of the skeleton, either due to strict bed rest or in zero gravity, leads on average to a 1%-2% reduction in bone mineral density at selected skeletal sites each month. The mechanism by which unloading of the skeleton results in rapid mobilization of calcium stores from the skeleton is not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to down regulation in PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 production. Bone modeling and mineralization in chick embryos is not affected by microgravity, suggesting that bone cells adapt and ultimately become addicted to gravity in order to maintain a structurally sound skeleton. Strategies need to be developed to decrease microgravity-induced bone resorption by either mimicking gravity's effect on bone metabolism, or enhancing physically or pharmacologically bone formation in order to preserve astronauts' bone health.

  6. Alterations in Lipid and Inositol Metabolisms in Two Dopaminergic Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C Schulte

    Full Text Available Serum metabolite profiling can be used to identify pathways involved in the pathogenesis of and potential biomarkers for a given disease. Both restless legs syndrome (RLS and Parkinson`s disease (PD represent movement disorders for which currently no blood-based biomarkers are available and whose pathogenesis has not been uncovered conclusively. We performed unbiased serum metabolite profiling in search of signature metabolic changes for both diseases.456 metabolites were quantified in serum samples of 1272 general population controls belonging to the KORA cohort, 82 PD cases and 95 RLS cases by liquid-phase chromatography and gas chromatography separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Genetically determined metabotypes were calculated using genome-wide genotyping data for the 1272 general population controls.After stringent quality control, we identified decreased levels of long-chain (polyunsaturated fatty acids of individuals with PD compared to both RLS (PD vs. RLS: p = 0.0001 to 5.80x10-9 and general population controls (PD vs. KORA: p = 6.09x10-5 to 3.45x10-32. In RLS, inositol metabolites were increased specifically (RLS vs. KORA: p = 1.35x10-6 to 3.96x10-7. The impact of dopaminergic drugs was reflected in changes in the phenylalanine/tyrosine/dopamine metabolism observed in both individuals with RLS and PD.A first discovery approach using serum metabolite profiling in two dopamine-related movement disorders compared to a large general population sample identified significant alterations in the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in PD and implicated the inositol metabolism in RLS. These results provide a starting point for further studies investigating new perspectives on factors involved in the pathogenesis of the two diseases as well as possible points of therapeutic intervention.

  7. [The role of lipid metabolism disorders in kidney disease in metabolic syndrome associated with obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriachkova, A A; Savel'eva, S A; Kutyrina, I M

    2011-01-01

    To study the role of lipid metabolism impairment in renal disease in patients with metabolic syndrome associated with obesity. Lipid metabolism was studied in 77 patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) aged from 17 to 63 years (mean age 48 +/- 9 years). Lipid abnormalities were analysed in groups of patients with different degree of obesity: group 1 - body mass index (BMI) 25-29.9 kg/m2 (n = 13), group 2 - BMI 30-39.9 kg/m2 (n = 49), group 3 - BMI > 40 kg/m2 (n = 15), and in groups of patients with different insulin resistance (IR) : group 1 - HOMA-IR 4; n = 32). Correlation between plasma lipid composition abnormalities and markers of renal disease were studied with correlation analysis. Lipid disbolism in MS patients was characterized with elevated level of triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC), VLDLP cholesterol, low level of HDLP cholesterol. A significant relationship was detected between defective blood lipid composition and renal dysfunction: rise of microalbuminuria, proteinuria, creatinin, inhibition ofglomerular filtration rate. The changes found characterize lipid metabolism disorder as an independent factor of kidney disease in patients with MS.

  8. Disorders of carbohydrate or lipid metabolism in camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebra, Christopher K

    2009-07-01

    Camelids develop a number of disturbances related to energy metabolism. Some are similar to disorders seen in other species, but most relate to camelids' unusual characteristics of poor glucose tolerance, partial insulin resistance, and low concentrations of circulating insulin. Camelids are especially prone to abnormalities related to stimuli that inhibit insulin release or activity, or that promote activities normally antagonized by insulin. These include stimuli that mobilize glycogen or fat stores, or inhibit glucose uptake or intravascular glycolysis. These stimuli are generally more important than negative energy balance in triggering these disorders. Treatment must concentrate on the hormonal aspects, and not just provision of energy. Treatments related to hormonal aspects include those to decrease catecholamine release and to provide exogenous insulin until the camelid is again able to maintain appropriate energy substrate homeostasis.

  9. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Metabolic Complications of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Katherine; Susi, Apryl; Gorman, Gregory H; Hisle-Gorman, Elizabeth; Erdie-Lalena, Christine R; Nylund, Cade M

    2016-11-01

    To assess for an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Additionally, to determine the rates of prescribed treatment for obesity-related metabolic disorders and to determine whether treatment with psychotropic medications is associated with the development of obesity for children with ASD. A retrospective 1:5 case-control study was performed by use of the Military Health System database from October 2000 to September 2013. For children with ASD and matched controls, International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes for obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and prescriptions were obtained. Conditional logistic regression determined ORs and 95% CIs. A total of 48 762 individuals with ASD and 243 810 matched controls were identified. Children with ASD had significantly greater odds of having obesity (OR 1.85; 95% CI 1.78-1.92), having obesity-related disorders, and being prescribed a medication when they had these diseases. In children with ASD, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, antiepileptic drugs, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were associated with obesity. Children with ASD have an increased risk of obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders. They are more likely to be prescribed medications to treat these complications, suggesting they may have more severe disease. There is a significant association between the use of some psychotropic categories and a diagnosis of obesity, suggesting that obesity in children with ASD may be partially iatrogenic. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Plasma copeptin and metabolic dysfunction in individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Rizzo, Lucas B; Santos, Camila M; Asevedo, Elson; Cunha, Graccielle R; Noto, Mariane N; Pedrini, Mariana; Zeni-Graiff, Maiara; Cordeiro, Quirino; McIntyre, Roger S; Brietzke, Elisa

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to compare plasma copeptin levels, the c-terminal of provasopressin, between individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) and healthy controls and to assess the relation between copeptin and metabolic parameters. We measured plasma levels of copeptin in individuals with BD (n = 55) and healthy controls (n = 21). Information related to psychiatric/medical history, as well as to metabolic comorbidities and laboratorial parameters was also captured. Insulin resistance and β-cell function in basal state were calculated from fasting plasma glucose and C-peptide using the HOMA2 calculator. Impaired glucose metabolism was defined as pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copeptin, adiponectin, and leptin plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma copeptin levels were lower in individuals with BD, relative to healthy controls (P copeptin on β-cell function (rate ratio [RR] = 1.048; P = 0.030) and on leptin levels (RR = 1.087; P = 0.012), indicating that there was a positive correlation between these markers in the BD group, but a negative one in healthy controls. Finally, in individuals with BD only, the association between β-cell function, body mass index (RR = 1.007; P copeptin levels. Copeptin levels were lower in individuals with BD than in healthy controls. There were differential associations between copeptin and metabolic parameters within the BD and healthy control subgroups, suggesting an association between abnormal copeptin and metabolic dysregulation only in the BD population. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  11. Neural melanocortin receptors in obesity and related metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardet, Clemence; Butler, Andrew A

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a global health issue, as it is associated with increased risk of developing chronic conditions associated with disorders of metabolism such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A better understanding of how excessive fat accumulation develops and causes diseases of the metabolic syndrome is urgently needed. The hypothalamic melanocortin system is an important point of convergence connecting signals of metabolic status with the neural circuitry that governs appetite and the autonomic and neuroendocrine system controling metabolism. This system has a critical role in the defense of body weight and maintenance of homeostasis. Two neural melanocortin receptors, melanocortin 3 and 4 receptors (MC3R and MC4R), play crucial roles in the regulation of energy balance. Mutations in the MC4R gene are the most common cause of monogenic obesity in humans, and a large literature indicates a role in regulating both energy intake through the control of satiety and energy expenditure. In contrast, MC3Rs have a more subtle role in energy homeostasis. Results from our lab indicate an important role for MC3Rs in synchronizing rhythms in foraging behavior with caloric cues and maintaining metabolic homeostasis during periods of nutrient scarcity. However, while deletion of the Mc3r gene in mice alters nutrient partitioning to favor accumulation of fat mass no obvious role for MC3R haploinsufficiency in human obesity has been reported. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  13. The influence of ouabain and alpha angelica lactone on calcium metabolism of dog cardiac microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entman, Mark L.; Cook, Joseph W.; Bressler, Rubin

    1969-01-01

    The influence of ouabain and alpha angelica lactone on 45calcium accumulation in cardiac microsomes was studied. Calcium binding (accumulation in the absence of excess oxalate or phosphate) was augmented by both ouabain and alpha angelica lactone in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) but unaffected in its absence. Calcium turnover (defined as the change in 45Ca++ bound to the microsomes after the specific activity is changed) was studied to determine if the augmented bound pool was freely exchangeable at equilibrium. Ouabain and alpha angelica lactone augmented calcium turnover in both the presence and absence of ATP. Calcium-stimulated ATPase was increased by both agents. It is proposed that these two unsaturated lactones, with known cardiotonic activity, may exert their effects by providing an increased contraction-dependent calcium pool to be released upon systolic depolarization. PMID:4236805

  14. ABDOMINAL OBESITY, AN ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETER PREDICTING METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Castellanos González

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Waist circumference perimeter, as an indirect indicator of abdominal obesity, is commonly presented as an essential element in the clinical assessment of obesity. The link between abdominal obesity and insulin resistance is proposed as the core of metabolic syndrome’s pathophysiology and complications. Objective: To determine whether individuals with abdominal obesity present characteristics related to metabolic syndrome’s factors that differ from those observed in individuals with no abdominal obesity. Methods: A comparative analytical study was performed including cases control and design in two different groups. The sample was composed of 98 individuals of both sexes randomly selected out of a universe of 510 workers population at the Medical University of Cienfuegos from September to December 2005. They were all tested as to blood pressure, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, fasting glucose and triglycerides. Results: Abdominal obesity was found in 30.6% of individuals. It was predominant in females (83.3% older than 40 years. The number of cases of obesity linked to hypertension was similar to the number of cases with low HDL cholesterol (53.3%. Impaired glucose was found in 16.7% of cases. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity is a health problem in the population included in this study and it increases as age does. Individuals with abdominal obesity are exposed to a higher risk of metabolic disorders, such as low levels of HDL cholesterol, high levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, glucose alterations and hypertension.

  15. Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kawicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland – they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto’s disease. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones’ activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient’s body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1 and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium. Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the

  16. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  17. Montelukast and irbesartan ameliorate metabolic and hepatic disorders in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Amin, Entesar F; Ibrahim, Salwa A; Abdelzaher, Walaa Y; Abdelrahman, Aly M

    2014-02-05

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a global health problem. Elucidation of the role of 5- lipooxygenase/leukotriene pathway and renin angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of MetS suggests a variety of potential therapies worthy of testing. The present work investigated the effect of montelukast, a leukotriene antagonist and/or irbesartan, an angiotensin II-receptor blocker, in the prevention of fructose-induced MetS in rats. Rats were allocated into 9 groups and treated for 6 weeks as follow: normal control; MetS group (received 20% fructose); MetS+montelukast groups (treated with montelukast, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/day, respectively); MetS+irbesartan groups (treated withirbesartan 15, 30, and 45 mg/kg/day, respectively); and MetS+montelukast+irbesartan group (co treated with montelukast 5 mg/kg plus irbesartan 15 mg/g). Metabolic parameters (visceral fat index, liver index, insulin resistance, and serum lipid profile), oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione, and catalase), and inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α, and uric acid) were measured. Expression of caspase-3 in hepatic tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry. Liver injury was evaluated by histopathological examination and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Montelukast, irbesartan, and their combination caused significant attenuation in metabolic and hepatic disorders. Their effect was associated with attenuation of oxidative stress markers, inflammatory mediators, and caspase-3 expression. This study highlighted the protective effects of montelukast and irbesartan against fructose-induced metabolic and hepatic disorders. The protective effect of either drug relies, at least in part, on their antioxidant and antiinflammatory effect, as well as on the reduction of caspase-3 expression in hepatic tissue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DIAGNOSTICS OF BONE METABOLISM DISORDERS IN ONCOLOGICAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Apolikhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is one of the most significant bone complications of cancer. About 1.5 million cancer patients worldwide have bone metastases. Patients with myeloma, breast cancer, prostate, thyroid, bladder and lung have very high risk of development of bone lesions and related complications. Currently, osteodensitometry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. In recent years we frequently use the innovative imaging techniques for bone metastases, such as CT, MRI, PET/CT. Unfortunately, the diagnostic value of these methods is that it is not always possible to identify abnormalities of bone metabolism in cancer, especially in the early stages. This review shows the world experience of usage of biochemical markers of bone resorption (calcium, hydroxyproline, NTX, CTX, PYD, DPD, TRAP-5b, bone sialoprotein - BSP and markers of bone synthesis (osteocalcin, CSF, ACF, Karlovy vary IFF, their advantages and disadvantages. The level of these markers is increased in most patients with osteoporosis and bone metastases, it is suggesting a potential role in early diagnosis of bone metastases.

  19. Metabolic and Homeostatic Changes in Seizures and Acquired Epilepsy—Mitochondria, Calcium Dynamics and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepana Kovac

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired epilepsies can arise as a consequence of brain injury and result in unprovoked seizures that emerge after a latent period of epileptogenesis. These epilepsies pose a major challenge to clinicians as they are present in the majority of patients seen in a common outpatient epilepsy clinic and are prone to pharmacoresistance, highlighting an unmet need for new treatment strategies. Metabolic and homeostatic changes are closely linked to seizures and epilepsy, although, surprisingly, no potential treatment targets to date have been translated into clinical practice. We summarize here the current knowledge about metabolic and homeostatic changes in seizures and acquired epilepsy, maintaining a particular focus on mitochondria, calcium dynamics, reactive oxygen species and key regulators of cellular metabolism such as the Nrf2 pathway. Finally, we highlight research gaps that will need to be addressed in the future which may help to translate these findings into clinical practice.

  20. Delay in onset of metabolic alkalosis during regional citrate anti-coagulation in continous renal replacement therapy with calcium-free replacement solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See Kay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional citrate anti-coagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy chelates calcium to produce the anti- coagulation effect. We hypothesise that a calcium-free replacement solution will require less citrate and produce fewer metabolic side effects. Fifty patients, in a Medical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary teaching hospital (25 in each group, received continuous venovenous hemofiltration using either calcium-containing or calcium-free replacement solutions. Both groups had no significant differences in filter life, metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypercalcemia. However, patients using calcium-containing solution developed metabolic alkalosis earlier, compared to patients using calcium-free solution (mean 24.6 hours,CI 0.8-48.4 vs. 37.2 hours, CI 9.4-65, P = 0.020. When calcium-containing replacement solution was used, more citrate was required (mean 280ml/h, CI 227.2-332.8 vs. 265ml/h, CI 203.4-326.6, P = 0.069, but less calcium was infused (mean 21.2 ml/h, CI 1.2-21.2 vs 51.6ml/h, CI 26.8-76.4, P ≤ 0.0001.

  1. Astrocyte glycogenolysis is triggered by store-operated calcium entry and provides metabolic energy for cellular calcium homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Margit S; Fox, Rebecca; Schousboe, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glycogen, the only storage form of glucose in the brain, has been shown to play a fundamental role in supporting learning and memory, an effect achieved by providing metabolic support for neurons. We have examined the interplay between glycogenolysis and the bioenergetics of astrocytic...... Ca(2+) homeostasis, by analyzing interdependency of glycogen and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a mechanism in cellular signaling that maintains high endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration and thus provides the basis for store-dependent Ca(2+) signaling. We stimulated SOCE in primary...

  2. Total Serum Calcium and Inorganic Phosphate levels in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is still a very common cause of morbidity and mortality around the globe and the disorder of calcium and inorganic phosphate metabolism has been poorly associated with the infection. This study was aimed at assessing the total serum calcium and inorganic phosphate levels in PTB patients in ...

  3. [METABOLIC SYNDROME AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, BIPOLAR DISORDER AND SCHIZOAFFECTIVE DISORDER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Calero Franco, Paloma; Sánchez Sánchez, Blanca; Rodríguez Criado, Natalia; Pinilla Santos, Berta; Bravo Herrero, Sandra; Cruz Fourcade, José Fernando; Martín Aragón, Rubén

    2015-12-01

    patients with severe mental ilness such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder die at least 20 years earlier than general population. Despite preventive strategies, cardiovascular disease is the first cause of death. analyse the percentage of patients with a high body mass index, metabolic syndrome and their cardiovascular risk at 10 years in patients with a diagnosis, based in DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder. These patients were hospitalized because and acute condition of their mental ilness in the Brief Hospitalization Unit of Hospital Universitario de Móstoles between November of 2014 and June of 2015. in 53 patients, 34 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 16 with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 3 with a schizoaffective disorder, weight, size abdominal perimeter measures and blood pressure were collected. The body mass index was assesed. Blood tests were taken and we use sugar, triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels as paramethers for the ATP III and Framingham criteria. We also review the clinical history of the patients and lifestyle and use of toxic substances were registered. 51% of the patients were men and 49% were women. The average age was 40. 38% of the patients were overweighed, 22% obese and 4% had morbid obesity. 26% of the patients had metabolic syndrome, the clinical evolution of the majority of these patients was of more tan 10 years and they also have been treated with different antypsychotics and antidepressants. Using the Framingham criteria, 11% of the patients had a cardiovascular risk higher than 10 % in the next 10 years. overweight and its consequences in patients with a severe mental ilness are intimately related with their lifestyle, disparities in the access to health resources, the clinical evolution of the disease and pharmacotherapy. Strategies to promote physical health in these patients in the spanish health sistme are insufficient

  4. Psychosocial determinants of metabolic disorders in individuals with psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Łopuszańska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The analysis of metabolic disorders in people with mental disorders due to psychological factors, healthy and unhealthy behaviour as well as the material situation and employment status. Material and methods: Ninety-one adults diagnosed with a mental disorder who use community support centres, whose metabolic rates were examined with the use of the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR indicator, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and glucose concentration. Cognitive function examinations were performed by using various testing methods to assess general cognitive function, direct and delayed memory, verbal fluency (letter and semantic. Additionally, a test to determine the severity of depression, and also a sociodemographic survey were performed. Results: Cigarette smoking was associated with a decrease of cognitive functions (p < 0.01 and letter fluency (p < 0.04. Physically active people have lower WHR indicators (p < 0.008, decreased severity of depressive symptoms (p < 0.002 and a lower rate of hospitalisations (p < 0.001. They achieved better results in terms of short-term memory (p < 0.02 than physically inactive people. People employed in sheltered work conditions had lower rates of abdominal obesity WHR (p < 0.01, and achieved better results in the tests measuring their general cognitive functions – Short Test of Mental Status (p < 0.02. Conclusions: Cigarette smoking, low physical activity, and a lack of employment are associated with metabolic rate disorders, especially in relation to the indicators of overweight and obesity, as well as the general decrease in cognitive functions and the ability of learning and memorisation.

  5. Adipose tissue remodeling: its role in energy metabolism and metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sik eChoe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue (WAT functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue (BAT accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secret various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic over-nutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response.

  6. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response.

  7. Hypothalamic actions of apelin on energy metabolism: new insight on glucose homeostasis and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, C; Drougard, A; Fournel, A; Duparc, T; Valet, P

    2013-12-01

    Hypothalamus is key area implicated in control of glucose homeostasis. This structure integrates nervous and peripheral informations to adapt a response modifying peripheral glucose utilization and maintaining energetic balance. Among peripheral signals, adipokines such as adiponectin and leptin are of special importance since deregulations of their actions are closely associated to metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. During the past ten years, we have identified a new adipokine named apelin which has emerging role in the control of metabolism. The originality of the apelinergic system is to be largely represented in peripheral tissues (adipose tissue, intestine, etc.) and in the brain. Then, apelin is released by adipose tissue as all adipokines, but also present another crucial role as neurotransmitter in hypothalamic neurons. By acting in the whole body, apelin exerts pleiotropic actions and is now considered as a major determinant of physiological functions. Besides its general beneficial effects on peripheral targets, central action of apelin remains still a matter of debate. In this review, we have made a parallel between peripheral vs. central actions of apelin in term of signalization and effects. Then, we have focused our attention on hypothalamic apelin and its potential role in glucose metabolism and associated pathologies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Epilepsy in inherited metabolic disorders: a pediatric series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, G; De Clemente, V; Della Casa, R; Romano, A; Rosa, M; Pascarella, A; Riccitelli, M; Parenti, G; Del Giudice, E

    2012-10-01

    Our study aims at further defining the characteristics of epilepsy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders (IMDs). We reviewed the medical records of 345 patients with IMDs followed at the Metabolic Diseases Unit of our Department of Pediatrics and found the presence of an epileptic syndrome in 45 cases. An overview is given based on various criteria such as pathogenetic background, seizure type, age of onset, EEG, neuroimaging data, treatability. Seizure types were: focal (24 patients), generalized (13 patients), febrile (3 patients), and hypoglycemic (8 patients with glycogenoses). Some patients presented with more than one type of seizures. Age of onset was mainly during the first year of life (N.=19), between 2 and 6 years in 13 patients, and after the 6th year in 9 patients. Available EEGs showed either focal (N.=21) or generalized epileptiform abnormalities (N.=11); multifocal paroxysms were evident in 3 patients while the remaining 3 patients had normal findings. Available neuroimages (CT/MRI) showed either normal findings (N.=6) or white matter abnormalities (N.=6), cerebral and/or cerebellar cortical atrophy (N.=11), hydrocephalus (N.=1), corpus callosum hypoplasia (N.=2), pontocerebellar hypoplasia (N.=1), gliosis in trigone area (N.=4). Most patients showed a favorable response to antiepileptic treatment (AEDs) with either complete control or reduced seizure frequency. IMDs are a relatively rare cause of epilepsy in children but their diagnosis is very important with respect to treatment, prognosis and genetic counselling.

  9. Chronic alcoholism-mediated metabolic disorders in albino rat testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayakhmetova, Ganna M; Bondarenko, Larysa B; Matvienko, Anatoliy V; Kovalenko, Valentina M

    2014-09-01

    There is good evidence for impairment of spermatogenesis and reductions in sperm counts and testosterone levels in chronic alcoholics. The mechanisms for these effects have not yet been studied in detail. The consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on the structure and/or metabolism of testis cell macromolecules require to be intensively investigated. The present work reports the effects of chronic alcoholism on contents of free amino acids, levels of cytochrome P450 3A2 (CYP3A2) mRNA expression and DNA fragmentation, as well as on contents of different cholesterol fractions and protein thiol groups in rat testes. Wistar albino male rats were divided into two groups: I - control (intact animals), II - chronic alcoholism (15% ethanol self-administration during 150 days). Following 150 days of alcohol consumption, testicular free amino acid content was found to be significantly changed as compared with control. The most profound changes were registered for contents of lysine (-53%) and methionine (+133%). The intensity of DNA fragmentation in alcohol-treated rat testes was considerably increased, on the contrary CYP3A2 mRNA expression in testis cells was inhibited, testicular contents of total and etherified cholesterol increased by 25% and 45% respectively, and protein SH-groups decreased by 13%. Multidirectional changes of the activities of testicular dehydrogenases were detected. We thus obtained complex assessment of chronic alcoholism effects in male gonads, affecting especially amino acid, protein, ATP and NADPH metabolism. Our results demonstrated profound changes in testes on the level of proteome and genome. We suggest that the revealed metabolic disorders can have negative implication on cellular regulation of spermatogenesis under long-term ethanol exposure.

  10. Chronic alcoholism-mediated metabolic disorders in albino rat testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayakhmetova Ganna M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is good evidence for impairment of spermatogenesis and reductions in sperm counts and testosterone levels in chronic alcoholics. The mechanisms for these effects have not yet been studied in detail. The consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on the structure and/or metabolism of testis cell macromolecules require to be intensively investigated. The present work reports the effects of chronic alcoholism on contents of free amino acids, levels of cytochrome P450 3A2 (CYP3A2 mRNA expression and DNA fragmentation, as well as on contents of different cholesterol fractions and protein thiol groups in rat testes. Wistar albino male rats were divided into two groups: I - control (intact animals, II - chronic alcoholism (15% ethanol self-administration during 150 days. Following 150 days of alcohol consumption, testicular free amino acid content was found to be significantly changed as compared with control. The most profound changes were registered for contents of lysine (-53% and methionine (+133%. The intensity of DNA fragmentation in alcohol-treated rat testes was considerably increased, on the contrary CYP3A2 mRNA expression in testis cells was inhibited, testicular contents of total and etherified cholesterol increased by 25% and 45% respectively, and protein SH-groups decreased by 13%. Multidirectional changes of the activities of testicular dehydrogenases were detected. We thus obtained complex assessment of chronic alcoholism effects in male gonads, affecting especially amino acid, protein, ATP and NADPH metabolism. Our results demonstrated profound changes in testes on the level of proteome and genome. We suggest that the revealed metabolic disorders can have negative implication on cellular regulation of spermatogenesis under long-term ethanol exposure.

  11. Calcium channels in the brain as targets for the calcium-channel modulators used in the treatment of neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Thies; WILFFERT, B; VANHOUTTE, PM; VANZWIETEN, PA

    1991-01-01

    Recent investigations of calcium channels in brain cells by voltage-clamp techniques have revealed that, in spite of electrophysiological similarities, the pharmacological properties of these channels differ considerably from channels in peripheral tissues, e.g., heart and smooth muscle. Therefore,

  12. The effect of short chain fatty acid administration on hepatic glucose, phosphate, magnesium and calcium metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veech, R L; Gitomer, W L; King, M T; Balaban, R S; Costa, J L; Eanes, E D

    1986-01-01

    Intra peritoneal administration of the short chain fatty acids, acetate, propionate and butyrate, in amounts calculated to reach 20 mM in total body water were given to fed and 48 hour starved male Wistar rats. One half hour after administration, the livers were freeze-clamped and the hepatic contents of various intermediary metabolites were measured. The liver content of total glycolytic intermediates was elevated by short chain fatty acids. In fed animals, the portion of glycolysis from fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) to PEP was elevated 2 to 4 fold. In 48 hour starved animals, where gluconeogenesis is active, the portion of the gluconeogenetic pathway from FBP to glucose was elevated 1.5 to 3.5 fold with the exception of the butyrate treated animals where blood glucose was not elevated. The metabolites of the hexose-monophosphate pathway that were measured, namely 6-phosphogluconate, ribulose 5-phosphate and xylose 5-phosphate were increased in both fed and starved animals. The free cytoplasmic [NAD+]/[NADH], [NADP+]/[NADPH], and [epsilon ATP]/[epsilon ADP] X [epsilon Pi] ratios were all decreased in both fed and starved animals after short chain fatty acid administration. The liver content of calcium increased 1.2 to 2 fold in fed animals and 2 to 3 fold in starved animals while total liver magnesium was either unchanged or increased only 1.2 times. The liver pyrophosphate (PPi) content increased a minimum of 10 fold in fed animals and over 100 fold in starved animals. In all cases no PPi could be detected in vivo by 31P NMR even though in the starved rats the PPi levels approached those of ATP. The liver content of inorganic Pi increased 1.3 to 1.5 fold in fed animals and 1.5 to 2 fold in starved animals. The total "rapidly metabolizing" Pi pool, that includes adenine and guanine nucleotides, glycolytic and shunt intermediates, Pi and PPi increased 1.3 times in fed animals (from 13.8 mumole/g fresh weight) and 1.5 to 1.7 fold in starved animals (from 15

  13. Noninvasive metabolic profiling for painless diagnosis of human diseases and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, Mainak

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic profiling provides a powerful diagnostic tool complementary to genomics and proteomics. The pain, discomfort and probable iatrogenic injury associated with invasive or minimally invasive diagnostic methods, render them unsuitable in terms of patient compliance and participation. Metabolic profiling of biomatrices like urine, breath, saliva, sweat and feces, which can be collected in a painless manner, could be used for noninvasive diagnosis. This review article covers the noninvasive metabolic profiling studies that have exhibited diagnostic potential for diseases and disorders. Their potential applications are evident in different forms of cancer, metabolic disorders, infectious diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, rheumatic diseases and pulmonary diseases. Large scale clinical validation of such diagnostic methods is necessary in future.

  14. Effects on anionic salts in a pre-partum dairy ration on calcium metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Van Dijk

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of anionic salts in the transition diet on serum and urine calcium at calving and on peripartal health, subsequent milk production and fertility performance were studied in a well-managed, high-producing Friesland dairy herd. Over a period of a year, approximately 21 days before the expected date of calving, 28 pre-partum heifers and 44 multiparous dry cows were randomly allocated within parity to 1 of 2 transition diets, designated control and experimental anionic diets. The anionic diet contained the same quantities of the basic transition ration fed to the control group as well as a standard anionic salt mixture containing 118 g NH4Cl, 36 g (NH42SO4 and 68 g MgSO4 (total 222 g per animal per day. This reduced the DCAD to -11.68 mEq/100 g dietary dry matter compared to +13.57 for the control diet. Blood and urine were randomly sampled from 7 to 8 animals within each category within 3 hours post-partum. Serum calcium (total and ionised and creatinine, urine calcium and creatinine and the fractional clearance of calcium were assessed. Relevant clinical, milk production, and fertility data were collected. The total serum calcium (2.07 versus 1.60 mmol/ , serum ionised calcium (1.12 vs 1.02 mmol/ , urine calcium (0.92 vs 0.10 mmol/ and the fractional clearance of calcium (1.88 vs 0.09 % were significantly higher (P <0.01 at calving for multiparous cows fed the anionic diet compared to those fed the control diet. In the primiparous cows there were no significant differences in serumcalcium levels. However, the urine calcium (1.07 vs 0.43 mmol/ and the fractional clearance of calcium was higher (1.75 vs 0.45 % in cows fed the anionic diet (P <0.05 and 0.01 respectively. These results illustrated that there were benefits, although no differences were demonstrated with respect to health, milk production or fertility. The supplementation of diets with anionic salts in the last 2-3 weeks before calving has the potential to significantly

  15. The influence of smoking on vitamin D status and calcium metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brot, C; Jorgensen, N R; Sorensen, O H

    1999-01-01

    To assess the influence of smoking on serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum vitamin D metabolites, serum ionized calcium, serum phosphate, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in a cohort of 510 healthy Danish perimenopausal women.......To assess the influence of smoking on serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum vitamin D metabolites, serum ionized calcium, serum phosphate, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in a cohort of 510 healthy Danish perimenopausal women....

  16. Phosphate binders and metabolic acidosis in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis—sevelamer hydrochloride, calcium carbonate, and bixalomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanai, Toru; Tada, Hideo; Ono, Takashi; Fukumitsu, Toma

    2015-01-01

    The serum bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) levels are decreased in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients treated with sevelamer hydrochloride (SH). We assessed the effects of bixalomer on the chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients. We examined 12 of the 122 consecutive Japanese patients with end-stage renal disease on HD, who orally ingested a dose of SH (≥2250 mg), and an arterial blood gas analysis and biochemical analysis were performed before HD. Patients whose serum HCO3(-) levels were under 18 mmol/L were changed from SH to the same dose of bixalomer. A total of 12 patients were treated with a large amount of SH. Metabolic acidosis (a serum HCO3(-) level under 18 mmol/L) was found in eight patients. These patients were also treated with or without small dose of calcium carbonate (1.2 ± 1.1 g). The dose of SH was changed to that of bixalomer. After 1 month, the serum HCO3(-) levels increased from 16.3 ± 1.4 to 19.6 ± 1.7 mmol/L (P calcium carbonate with SH. In the present study, the development of chronic metabolic acidosis was induced by HCl containing phosphate binders, such as SH, and partially ameliorated by calcium carbonate, then subsequently improved after changing the treatment to bixalomer. © 2014 Fukumitsu Hospital. Hemodialysis International published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Hemodialysis.

  17. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent, P., E-mail: pascal.sirvent@univ-bpclermont.fr [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l' Exercice en conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques (AME2P), BP 80026, F-63171 Aubière cedex (France); Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Hillaire-Buys, D. [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  18. Bone mineral density and calcium metabolism in adolescents with beta-thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawy, Azza A; El Kholy, Mohamed; Moustafa, Tarek; Elsedfy, Heba H

    2008-10-01

    Bone disease in thalassemia in the form of low bone mass remains a frequent, debilitating and poorly understood problem, even among well transfused and chelated pre-pubertal and adult patients. In this work we attempted to delineate calcium status and bone mineral density in a group of transfusion dependent thalassemic adolescents of both sexes. Bone mineral density (BMD) at both the lumbar spine and femoral neck was measured in 40 adolescents with beta thalassemia major (TM) by DXA scanning and correlated to biochemical parameters including calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, bone alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone and 25-OH vitamin D as well as vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms at exon 2 (Fok1). Z-score of BMD at the lumbar spine (-3.3, +/-1.4) was significantly lower than at the femoral neck (-0.68, -/+1.3), (p=0.001). Serum ferritin and VDR genotype were related to BMD only at the femoral neck indicating that the factors determining the BMD at these 2 sites might be different. Seventy-five percent of patients had a low calcium level and hypoparathyroidism was present in 72.5% of patients. The low calcium level was probably caused by a combination of hypoparathyroidism and osteomalacia evidenced by elevated bone alkaline phosphatase presumably resulting from deficient calcium intake. To optimize BMD in TM, it is important to ensure adequate iron chelation and adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D.

  19. [CALCIUM LEVELS IN URINE SAMPLE IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH PREECLAPMSIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaliev, G; Uchikova, E; Dimitrakova, E; Amaliev, I; Mladenova, M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are still leading cause for maternal and perinatal death. Calcium metabolism is impaired significantly in women with preeclampsia. Measurement of calcium levels in 24 hours urine sample is easy, modern, fast and not expensive predictive test to reveal women in high risk of developing preeclampsia in late pregnancy. The severity of condition strongly correlates with decrease level of calcium excretion in urine.

  20. On the nature of structural disorder in calcium silicate hydrates with a calcium/silicon ratio similar to tobermorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grangeon, Sylvain, E-mail: S.Grangeon@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3, Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Claret, Francis; Lerouge, Catherine [BRGM, 3, Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Warmont, Fabienne [CRMD, UMR 6619 – CNRS, 1b rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Sato, Tsutomu; Anraku, Sohtaro [Laboratory of Environmental Geology, Research Group of Geoenvironmental/Engineering Division of Solid Waste, Resources and Geoenvironmental/Engineering Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Numako, Chiya [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokushima, 1-1, Minami-Josanjima, Tokushima, 770-8502 (Japan); Linard, Yannick [ANDRA, Centre de Meuse/Haute Marne, 55290 Bure (France); Lanson, Bruno [ISTerre, Grenoble University, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2013-10-15

    Four calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) with structural calcium/silicon (Ca/Si) ratios ranging from 0.82 ± 0.02 to 0.87 ± 0.02 were synthesized at room temperature, 50, 80, and 110 °C. Their structure was elucidated by collating information from electron probe micro-analysis, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). A modeling approach specific to defective minerals was used because sample turbostratism prevented analysis using usual XRD refinement techniques (e.g. Rietveld analysis). It is shown that C-S-H with Ca/Si ratio of ∼ 0.8 are structurally similar to nano-crystalline turbostratic tobermorite, a naturally occurring mineral. Their structure thus consists of sheets of calcium atoms in 7-fold coordination, covered by ribbons of silicon tetrahedra with a dreierketten (wollastonite-like) organization. In these silicate ribbons, 0.42 Si per bridging tetrahedron are missing. Random stacking faults occur systematically between successive layers (turbostratic stacking). Layer-to-layer distance is equal to 11.34 Å. Crystallites have a mean size of 10 nm in the a–b plane, and a mean number of 2.6–2.9 layers stacked coherently along the c* axis.

  1. Metabolic-mineral study in patients with renal calcium lithiasis, severe lithogenic activity and loss of bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Angel; Arrabal-Martin, Miguel; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Garrido-Gomez, Juan; De Haro-Muñoz, Tomas De; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the presence of osteoporosis/osteopenia in patients with severe lithogenic activity and compared their metabolisms with those in patients without lithiasis or with mild lithogenic activity. From a sample of 182 patients, those with osteopenia/osteoporosis at the hip and lumbar spine were studied separately in a two-pronged study. 66 patients with bone mineral densities (BMDs) lithiasis (n = 15); group A2 with lithiasis and mild lithogenic activity (n = 22); and group A3 with lithiasis and severe lithogenic activity (n = 29). Similarly, 86 patients with BMDs lithiasis (n = 15); group B2 with lithiasis and mild lithogenic activity (n = 29); and group B3 with lithiasis and severe lithogenic activity (n = 42). Patients from group A3 exhibited significantly higher levels of bone remodelling markers as compared to groups A1 and A2. Urinalysis also revealed higher excretion of calcium in 24-hour assessments in this group. Patients from group B3 differed from groups B1 and B2 mainly in bone remodelling markers and 24-hour urinary calcium excretion, which were significantly elevated in patients from group B3. Patients with calcium lithiasis and severe lithogenic activity in addition to osteopenia/osteoporosis present with higher levels of hypercalciuria and negative osseous balance, which possibly perpetuate and favour lithiasic activity.

  2. Dairy product consumption, calcium intakes, and metabolic syndrome-related factors over 5 years in the STANISLAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Anastasia; Herbeth, Bernard; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Fumeron, Fréderic; Billod, Stéphanie; Siest, Gérard; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2013-03-01

    We assessed the associations of total dairy products; milk, yogurt, and cottage cheese; cheese; and calcium with 5-y changes in components of the metabolic syndrome. Two hundred eighty-eight men and 300 women 28 to 60 y of age from the suivi temporaire annuel non invasif de la santé des lorrains assurés sociaux (STANISLAS) cohort completed at baseline a 3-d dietary record. Statistics were performed using multivariate regression analysis. In men, no relation was found between the four dietary indices and components of the metabolic syndrome measured at baseline. Conversely, the consumption of milk, yogurt, and cottage cheese at entry was inversely associated with 5-y changes in glucose levels (P ≤ 0.05, P ≤ 0.01 for sex interaction) and positively with 5-y changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P ≤ 0.05). Higher calcium intakes were significantly related to a lower 5-y increase of the body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in men (P ≤ 0.01, P ≤ 0.05 for sex interaction). In addition, changes in diastolic blood pressure were inversely associated with the consumption of milk, yogurt, and cottage cheese only in men with a normal BMI (P ≤ 0.05 for BMI interaction). In women, unlike men, associations were shown for some components measured at baseline: total dairy positively related to BMI and waist circumference; total dairy, milk, yogurt, and cottage cheese, and calcium were positively related to triacylglycerols and negatively to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, no significant association was found for any 5-y-changes. In men only, a higher consumption of dairy products was associated with positive changes in the metabolic profile in a 5-y period; a higher calcium consumption was associated with a lower 5-y increase of the BMI and waist circumference. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. WAYS TO CORRECT CALCIUM DEFFICIT AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Taibulatov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the urgent issue of the pediatrics — calcium deficit among children. The authors provide modern data on the scheme of the normal calcium exchange in the human body. They also review the main diseases related to the disorders of the pho sphorocalcic metabolism, requiring prompt prevention and treatment by calcium based medications. The researchers stress the diseases of the musculoskeletal system, as insufficient calcium, phosphorus and vitamins supply of the child's body chiefly effects the state of the skeletal and muscular tissue. They give recommendations how to use the vitamin and mineral complex to correct calcium deficit.Key words: calcium deficit, diseases of the musculoskeletal system, vitamin and mineral complex, children.

  4. SHIFTWORK AS ONE OF RISK FACTORS OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Dzherieva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Shiftwork is considered as one of risk factors of arterial hypertension (HT and metabolic disorders. Aim. To study effects of different types of shift plan on HT and the metabolic disorders development. Material and Methods. 1091 men were included in the study. Patients were split into subgroups according to age (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59 years old and shift plan (steady or shiftable work schedule. HT (blood pressure >130/85 mm Hg, abdominal obesity (waist circumference >94 cm, disorders of glucose metabolism were revealed. Results. HT prevalence in patients with shiftwork was significantly higher than that in employees with steady work schedule (34.4 vs 27.4%, respectively; р<0.01. In patients with shift and steady work schedule significant differences in abdominal obesity (69.2 vs. 19.3%, respectively; p<0.001 and glucose metabolism disorders rates (19.0 vs. 10.6%, respectively; p<0.001 were also found. Differences between groups in prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and metabolic disorders cluster were not significant. HT associated with metabolic disorders dominated among steady work patients aged 40-49 years (56.7% in comparison with shiftable work patients (20.0%, p<0.01. Conclusion. Shiftwork may be considered as a risk factor of HT and metabolic disorders in males.

  5. SHIFTWORK AS ONE OF RISK FACTORS OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Dzherieva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Shiftwork is considered as one of risk factors of arterial hypertension (HT and metabolic disorders. Aim. To study effects of different types of shift plan on HT and the metabolic disorders development. Material and Methods. 1091 men were included in the study. Patients were split into subgroups according to age (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59 years old and shift plan (steady or shiftable work schedule. HT (blood pressure >130/85 mm Hg, abdominal obesity (waist circumference >94 cm, disorders of glucose metabolism were revealed. Results. HT prevalence in patients with shiftwork was significantly higher than that in employees with steady work schedule (34.4 vs 27.4%, respectively; р<0.01. In patients with shift and steady work schedule significant differences in abdominal obesity (69.2 vs. 19.3%, respectively; p<0.001 and glucose metabolism disorders rates (19.0 vs. 10.6%, respectively; p<0.001 were also found. Differences between groups in prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and metabolic disorders cluster were not significant. HT associated with metabolic disorders dominated among steady work patients aged 40-49 years (56.7% in comparison with shiftable work patients (20.0%, p<0.01. Conclusion. Shiftwork may be considered as a risk factor of HT and metabolic disorders in males.

  6. Metabolism and insulin signaling in common metabolic disorders and inherited insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højlund, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are common metabolic disorders which are observed with increasing prevalences, and which are caused by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, including increased calorie intake and physical inactivity. These metabolic disorders are all characterized by reduced plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Quantitatively skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin resistance. Both low plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In several studies, we have investigated insulin action on glucose and lipid metabolism, and at the molecular level, insulin signaling to glucose transport and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from healthy individuals and in obesity, PCOS and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, we have described a novel syndrome characterized by postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and insulin resistance. This syndrome is caused by a mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene (INSR). We have studied individuals with this mutation as a model of inherited insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes, obesity and PCOS are characterized by pronounced defects in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, in particular glycogen synthesis and to a lesser extent glucose oxidation, and the ability of insulin to suppress lipid oxidation. In inherited insulin resistance, however, only insulin action on glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is impaired. This suggests that the defects in glucose and lipid oxidation in the common metabolic disorders are secondary to other factors. In young women with PCOS, the degree of insulin resistance was similar to that seen in middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. This supports the hypothesis of an unique pathogenesis of insulin resistance in PCOS. Insulin in physiological concentrations stimulates glucose uptake in human skeletal

  7. The Absence of the Calcium-buffering Protein Calbindin is Associated with Faster Age-related Decline in Hippocampus Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Nesha S.; Vela-Duarte, Daniel; Masciotti, James; Hua, Fan; Fenton, André A.; Schwaller, Beat; Small, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Although reductions in the expression of the calcium-buffering proteins calbindin D-28K (CB) and parvalbumin (PV) have been observed in the aging brain, it is unknown whether these changes contribute to age-related hippocampal dysfunction. To address this issue, we measured basal hippocampal metabolism and hippocampal structure across the lifespan of C57BL/6J, calbindin D-28k knockout (CBKO) and parvalbumin knockout (PVKO) mice. Basal metabolism was estimated using steady state relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), which is a variant of fMRI that provides the highest spatial resolution, optimal for the analysis of individual subregions of the hippocampal formation. We found that like primates, normal aging in C57BL/6J mice is characterized by an age-dependent decline in rCBV-estimated dentate gyrus metabolism. Although abnormal hippocampal fMRI signals were observed in CBKO and PVKO mice, only CBKO mice showed accelerated age-dependent decline of rCBV-estimated metabolism in the dentate gyrus. We also found age-independent structural changes in CBKO mice, which included an enlarged hippocampus and neocortex as well as global brain hypertrophy. These metabolic and structural changes in CBKO mice correlated with a deficit in hippocampus-dependent learning in the active place avoidance task. Our results suggest that the decrease in CB that occurs during normal aging is involved in age-related hippocampal metabolic decline. Our findings also illustrate the value of using multiple MRI techniques in transgenic mice to investigate mechanisms involved in the functional and structural changes that occur during aging. PMID:21630373

  8. Influence of diseases and metabolic disorders on cow weight changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Podlahová

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Requirements on increasing economic efficiency of cattle breeding force farmers to use the latest up-to-datetechnology for monitoring and management of farming quality. Regular weighing and data processing can forinstance discover mistakes that can indicate defects, e.g. nutrition deficiencies, incorrect embryonic development,health problems, demanding nursing intervention. The aim of the research was to monitor manifestations of diseasesand metabolic disorders in the course of weight curve based on data from an automated system for weighing the liveweight of dairy cows. There was used in the weighing unit for milking robots Astronaut A3 (Lely company to obtainweight data of individual cows. There were selected dairy cows with the longest period of lactation or already dryingoff, and especially dairy cows with various health problems for study. Limiting values of weight changes wereestablished after assembling a general equation of mass curve. In the sphere of the diseases there was manifestedonly ketosis in the weight curves with a loss of 10.2 kg / day (38% weight loss. The results of the study will beapplied for compiling algorithm that will be implemented in the complete management system of cattle breeding,monitoring the dairy cows every day and highlight possible deviations exceeding of physiological changes in weight.

  9. [Homocysteine metabolism disorders as a potential predictor of preeclamsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajdy, Anna; Niemiec, Tomasz

    2008-11-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the main causes of maternal and fetal mortality. We lack a reliable test that would identify the "at risk" group of pregnant women, thus allowing us to implement a specific prevention, management and treatment program. Recently, a number of theories regarding the pathophysiology of preeclampsia has been published. The role of vascular pathology as a result of an increase in homocysteine level is often mentioned. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature related to the pathology of preeclampsia and to evaluate the usefulness of assessment of homocysteine level and homocysteine metabolism disorders as a potential predictor of preeclamsia. Hiperhomocysteinemia is a known risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and hypertension. Different sources report a similar correlation between an increase in homocysteine level and the incidence of preeclampsia. As far as the topic of homocysteine in pregnancy is concerned, numerous questions and problems remain unanswered and unsolved. Although there exists a relationship between an increased values of homocysteine and the incidence of preeclampsia, there is not enough information about what group of patients should be included in the screening test to increase the rate of diagnosis and prevention of the most dangerous sequele.

  10. Acute effects of nasal salmon calcitonin on calcium and bone metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamsborg, G; Skousgaard, S G; Daugaard, H

    1993-01-01

    and urine samples were collected for 26 hours. There was a significant decrease in serum ionized calcium with a nadir 4 hours after administration of nasal SCT accompanied by a significant increase in serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.01) and serum calcitriol (P = 0.04). Nasal SCT did not reduce urinary...

  11. The Role of Nutrition in the Changes in Bone and Calcium Metabolism During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    On Earth, the primary purpose of the skeleton is provide structural support for the body. In space, the support function of the skeleton is reduced since, without gravity, structures have only mass and no weight. The adaptation to space flight is manifested by shifts in mineral distribution, altered bone turnover, and regional mineral deficits in weight-bearing bones. The shifts in mineral distribution appear to be related to the cephalic fluid shift. The redistribution of mineral from one bone to another or to and from areas in the same bone in response to alterations in gravitational loads is more likely to affect skeletal function than quantitative whole body losses and gains. The changes in bone turnover appear dependent upon changes in body weight with weight loss tending to increase bone resorption as well as decrease bone formation. During bedrest, the bone response to unloading varies depending upon the routine activity level of the subjects with more active subjects showing a greater suppression of bone formation in the iliac crest with inactivity. Changes in body composition during space flight are predicted by bedrest studies on Earth which show loss of lean body mass and increase tn body fat in adult males after one month. In ambulatory studies on Earth, exercising adult males of the same age, height, g weight, body mass index, and shoe size show significantly higher whole body mineral and lean body mass. than non-exercising subjects. Nutritional preference appears to change with activity level. Diet histories in exercisers and nonexercisers who maintain identical body weights show no differences in nutrients except for slightly higher carbohydrate intake in the exercisers. The absence of differences in dietary calcium in men with higher total body calcium is noteworthy. In this situation, the increased bone mineral content was facilitated by the calcium endocrine system. This regulatory system can be by-passed by raising dietary calcium. Increased

  12. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties.

  13. Increased white matter metabolic rates in autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelman, Serge A; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Young, Derek S; Haznedar, M Mehmet; Hollander, Eric; Shihabuddin, Lina; Hazlett, Erin A; Bralet, Marie-Cecile

    2017-11-22

    Both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia are often characterized as disorders of white matter integrity. Multimodal investigations have reported elevated metabolic rates, cerebral perfusion and basal activity in various white matter regions in schizophrenia, but none of these functions has previously been studied in ASD. We used 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to compare white matter metabolic rates in subjects with ASD (n = 25) to those with schizophrenia (n = 41) and healthy controls (n = 55) across a wide range of stereotaxically placed regions-of-interest. Both subjects with ASD and schizophrenia showed increased metabolic rates across the white matter regions assessed, including internal capsule, corpus callosum, and white matter in the frontal and temporal lobes. These increases were more pronounced, more widespread and more asymmetrical in subjects with ASD than in those with schizophrenia. The highest metabolic increases in both disorders were seen in the prefrontal white matter and anterior limb of the internal capsule. Compared to normal controls, differences in gray matter metabolism were less prominent and differences in adjacent white matter metabolism were more prominent in subjects with ASD than in those with schizophrenia. Autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia are associated with heightened metabolic activity throughout the white matter. Unlike in the gray matter, the vector of white matter metabolic abnormalities appears to be similar in ASD and schizophrenia, may reflect inefficient functional connectivity with compensatory hypermetabolism, and may be a common feature of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. MT2013-31: Allo HCT for Metabolic Disorders and Severe Osteopetrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-19

    Mucopolysaccharidosis Disorders; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha-Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Glycoprotein Metabolic Disorders; Sphingolipidoses; Recessive Leukodystrophies; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Niemann-Pick B; Niemann-Pick C Subtype 2; Sphingomyelin Deficiency; Peroxisomal Disorders; Adrenoleukodystrophy With Cerebral Involvement; Zellweger Syndrome; Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy; Infantile Refsum Disease; Acyl-CoA Oxidase Deficiency; D-Bifunctional Enzyme Deficiency; Multifunctional Enzyme Deficiency; Alpha-methylacyl-CoA Racmase Deficiency; Mitochondrial Neurogastrointestingal Encephalopathy; Severe Osteopetrosis; Hereditary Leukoencephalopathy With Axonal Spheroids (HDLS; CSF1R Mutation); Inherited Metabolic Disorders

  15. The Energy Metabolism Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disorders Postmortem Brains: Focus on Proteomic Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana S. Zuccoli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders represent a great medical and social challenge and people suffering from these conditions face many impairments regarding personal and professional life. In addition, a mental disorder will manifest itself in approximately one quarter of the world's population at some period of their life. Dysfunction in energy metabolism is one of the most consistent scientific findings associated with these disorders. With this is mind, this review compiled data on disturbances in energy metabolism found by proteomic analyses of postmortem brains collected from patients affected by the most prevalent psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia (SCZ, bipolar disorder (BPD, and major depressive disorder (MDD. We searched in the PubMed database to gather the studies and compiled all the differentially expressed proteins reported in each work. SCZ studies revealed 92 differentially expressed proteins related to energy metabolism, while 95 proteins were discovered in BPD, and 41 proteins in MDD. With the compiled data, it was possible to determine which proteins related to energy metabolism were found to be altered in all the disorders as well as which ones were altered exclusively in one of them. In conclusion, the information gathered in this work could contribute to a better understanding of the impaired metabolic mechanisms and hopefully bring insights into the underlying neuropathology of psychiatric disorders.

  16. Adiponectin: an attractive marker for metabolic disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Turchiarelli, Viviana; Nigro, Ersilia; Corbi, Graziamaria; Scudiero, Olga; Sofia, Matteo; Daniele, Aurora

    2013-10-14

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease which may be complicated by development of co-morbidities including metabolic disorders. Metabolic disorders commonly associated with this disease contribute to lung function impairment and mortality. Systemic inflammation appears to be a major factor linking COPD to metabolic alterations. Adipose tissue seems to interfere with systemic inflammation in COPD patients by producing a large number of proteins, known as "adipokines", involved in various processes such as metabolism, immunity and inflammation. There is evidence that adiponectin is an important modulator of inflammatory processes implicated in airway pathophysiology. Increased serum levels of adiponectin and expression of its receptors on lung tissues of COPD patients have recently highlighted the importance of the adiponectin pathway in this disease. Further, in vitro studies have demonstrated an anti-inflammatory activity for this adipokine at the level of lung epithelium. This review focuses on mechanisms by which adiponectin is implicated in linking COPD with metabolic disorders.

  17. Measures of metabolism and complexity in the brain of patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bodart

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We propose that jointly measuring the metabolic activity and the electrophysiological complexity of cortical circuits is a useful complement to the diagnosis and stratification of patients with disorders of consciousness.

  18. Correction of metabolic disorders in acetonemic syndrome in children with functional disorders of the biliary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Belousova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acetonemic syndrome (AS is one of the common pathological conditions in children. The most important part of the therapy for AS is to prevent the metabolic disorders in acetonemic crisis in children. Purpose — to study the effectiveness of Gepargin® in the treatment of children with acetonemic syndrome and to assess the dynamics of clinical and laboratory indicators. Materials and methods. We have analyzed the results of the medical examination and treatment of 40 children aged 3–10 years with AS and functional disorders of the biliary tract. The survey was conducted according to the generally accepted scheme [6]. To determine the level of ketone bodies in urine, a standard laboratory method for determining acetoacetate in urine was used. The degree of ketonuria was recorded from “+” to “++++”. All patients received basic therapy, according to the unified treatment protocols, and Gepargin®. The contents of the vial were diluted in half a glass (100 ml of drinking water and taken in 3–4 doses during the day. Duration of treatment was 5 days (before arresting the acetonemic crisis. The effectiveness of the therapy was assessed by the dynamics of complaints, state of health, clinical symptoms and laboratory data. Results. During the observation, we noted positive dynamics in the course of acetonemic syndrome. On admission to the hospital, 17 (42.5 % children had ketonuria “++++”, 15 children (37.5 % — “+++”, 3 (7.5 % — “++”, and 5 (12.5 % — “+”. In the process of Gepargin® treatment, we noted a significant decrease (by 76.5 % in the number of children with ketonuria “++++”, and by 87 % — with ketonuria “+++”. From the 3rd day of Gepargin® treatment, none of the children had ketonuria. Conclusions. The effectiveness of Gepargin® in the comprehensive therapy of AS in children consisted in the relief of clinical symptoms. This use of this drug is pathogenetically substantiated for the

  19. The disorders of the calcium release unit of skeletal muscles: what have we learned from mouse models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canato, Marta; Capitanio, Paola; Reggiani, Carlo; Cancellara, Lina

    2015-02-01

    Calcium storage, release, and reuptake are essential for normal physiological function of muscle. Several human skeletal muscle disorders can arise from dysfunction in the control and coordination of these three critical processes. The release from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum stores (SR) is handled by a multiprotein complex called Calcium Release Unit and composed of DiHydroPyridine Receptor or DHPR, Ryanodine Receptor or RYR, Calsequestrin or CASQ, junctin, Triadin, Junctophilin and Mitsugumin 29. Malignant hyperthermia (MH), Central Core Disease (CCD), Exertional/environmental Heat Stroke (EHS) and Multiminicore disease (MmD) are inherited disorders of calcium homeostasis in skeletal muscles directly related to mutations of genes coding for proteins of the CRU, primarily ryanodine receptor (RYR1). To understand the pathophysiology of MH and CCD, four murine lines carrying point mutations of human RYR1 have been developed: Y524S, R163C, I4898T and T4826I. Mice carrying those mutations show a phenotype with the traits of MH and/or CCD. Interestingly, also ablation of skeletal muscle calsequestrin (CASQ1) leads to a phenotype with MH-like lethal episodes in response to halothane and heat stress and development of central cores. In this review, we aim to describe the murine lines with RYR mutations or CASQ ablation, which show a phenotype similar to human MH or CCD, to underline their specific phenotypes and their differences and to discuss their contribution to the understanding of the pathophysiology of the disorders and the development of therapeutic strategies.

  20. The effects of UV light on calcium metabolism in ball pythons (Python regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, J; Eatwell, K

    2013-10-12

    Despite the popularity of keeping snakes in captivity, there has been limited investigation into the effects of UV radiation on vitamin D levels in snakes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of UV-b radiation on plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels and ionised calcium concentrations in ball pythons (Python regius). Blood samples were taken from 14 ball pythons, which had never been exposed to UV-b light, to obtain baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels and ionised calcium concentrations. Blood samples were then taken again from the same snakes 70 days later after one group (Group 1, n=6 females) were exposed to UV-b radiation daily, and the other group (Group 2, n=5 males and 3 females) were exposed to no UV-b radiation. Mean±sd 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels on day 0 in Group 1 were 197±35 nmol/l, and on day 70 were 203.5±13.8 nmol/l. Mean±sd 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels in Group 2 on day 0 were 77.7±41.5 nmol/l, and on day 70 were 83.0±41.9 nmol/l. Mean±sd ionised calcium levels at day 0 were 1.84±0.05 mmol/l for Group 1, and on day 70 were 1.78±0.07 mmol/l. Mean±sd ionised calcium levels at day 0 were 1.79±0.07 mmol/l for Group 2, and on day 70 were 1.81±0.05 mmol/l. No association was demonstrated between exposure to UV-b radiation and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and ionised calcium concentrations. These results may provide baseline parameters for future studies in this and other snake species to determine ability to utilise UV-b light for vitamin D production.

  1. Recent Advances in the Development of Pharmaceutical Agents for Metabolic Disorders: A Computational Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhan, Sridhara; Dubovskaja, Varvara; Lagunin, Alexey; Rao, Venkateswara; Sastry, Narahari; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2017-10-02

    Metabolic disorders comprise a set of different disorders varying from epidemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus to inborn metabolic orphan diseases such as phenylketonuria. Despite considerable evidence showing the importance of the computational methods in discovery and development of new pharmaceuticals, there are no systematic reviews outlining how they are utilized in the field of metabolic disorders. This review aims to discuss the necessity of the development of web-based tools and databases by integration of available information for solving Big Data problems in network pharmacology of metabolic disorders. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was appraised using standard tools. The alterations in metabolic pathways cause various cardiovascular, hematological, neurological, gastrointestinal, immune disorders and cancer. In this regard, informatics, Big Data and modeling techniques aid in the design of novel therapeutic agents for metabolic diseases by addressing various Big Data problems in the network polypharmacology (drugs/pharmaceutical agents, proteins, genes, diseases, bioassays, ADMET and metabolic pathways), identification of privileged scaffolds, developing new diagnostic biomarkers, understanding the pathophysiology of disease and progress in personalized medicine. The recent advances of developing pharmaceutical agents for various metabolic disorders by considering their pathogenesis, mechanisms of action, therapeutic and adverse effects have been summarized. We have highlighted the role of computational techniques, drug repurposing, and network-based polypharmacological approaches in the identification of new/existing medicines with improved drug-likeness properties for the rare metabolic disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. [Do we successfully treat anemia and calcium-phosphate disorders in children with chronic kidney disease at the beginning of the twenty-first century?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drożdż, Dorota; Kwinta, Przemko; Sztefko, Krystyna; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Miklaszewska, Monika; Drożdż, Tomasz; Łatka, Monika; Pietrzyk, Jacek A

    2015-01-01

    In children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) anemia and calcium-phosphate disturbances are already present at early stages of the disease and require a comprehensive treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment of biochemical disturbances, depending on the severity of CKD in children. The study included 71 children (44 boys, 27 girls) with CKD stage 1-5. Mean age was 11 ± 5 years, mean height: 135.7 ± 28 cm and mean eGFR 32 ml/min/1.73 m2. The serum hemoglobin, urea, creatinine, cystatin C, calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were measured. eGFR was calculated according to Schwartz and Filler formulas, employing creatinine and cystatin C as markers. Patients were divided into groups depending on the stage of CKD [group 1: CKD stage 1+2 (GFR > 60), group 2: CKD stage 3 (GFR = 30-59) Group 3: CKD stage 4 (GFR = 15-29 ml/min/1.73 m2), group 4 - dialyzed children]. The concentration of he- moglobin depending on the stage of CKD (group 1 vs. group 2 vs. group 3 vs group 4) was 12.95 vs. 12.68 vs. 12.47 vs. 11.3 g/dI, respectively. The concentration of total and ionized calcium was significantly lower in children on dialysis compared to patients treated conservatively. With the progression of CKD the concentration of phosphorus (1.39 vs. 1.4 vs. 1.49 vs. 1.82 mmolI) and PTH (21.7 vs 48.6 vs 99.9 vs. 219 pg/ml) significantly increased. Treatment with erythropoietin was used in 48% of children, calcium carbonate in 55% and alphacalcidol in 56% of patients. Despite the use of regular treatment, with the progression of CKD a progression of anemia, increased serum phosphate and parathyroid hormone and a decrease in calcium levels in studied children was observed. The severity of metabolic disorders in dialyzed children indicates the need for administration of new and more effective drugs, to prevent early enough complications of CKD in the form of mineral bone disease and cardiovascular complications.

  3. Calcium Dynamics of Ex Vivo Long-Term Cultured CD8+ T Cells Are Regulated by Changes in Redox Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Rivet

    Full Text Available T cells reach a state of replicative senescence characterized by a decreased ability to proliferate and respond to foreign antigens. Calcium release associated with TCR engagement is widely used as a surrogate measure of T cell response. Using an ex vivo culture model that partially replicates features of organismal aging, we observe that while the amplitude of Ca2+ signaling does not change with time in culture, older T cells exhibit faster Ca2+ rise and a faster decay. Gene expression analysis of Ca2+ channels and pumps expressed in T cells by RT-qPCR identified overexpression of the plasma membrane CRAC channel subunit ORAI1 and PMCA in older T cells. To test whether overexpression of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel is sufficient to explain the kinetic information, we adapted a previously published computational model by Maurya and Subramaniam to include additional details on the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE process to recapitulate Ca2+ dynamics after T cell receptor stimulation. Simulations demonstrated that upregulation of ORAI1 and PMCA channels is not sufficient to explain the observed alterations in Ca2+ signaling. Instead, modeling analysis identified kinetic parameters associated with the IP3R and STIM1 channels as potential causes for alterations in Ca2+ dynamics associated with the long term ex vivo culturing protocol. Due to these proteins having known cysteine residues susceptible to oxidation, we subsequently investigated and observed transcriptional remodeling of metabolic enzymes, a shift to more oxidized redox couples, and post-translational thiol oxidation of STIM1. The model-directed findings from this study highlight changes in the cellular redox environment that may ultimately lead to altered T cell calcium dynamics during immunosenescence or organismal aging.

  4. Comparison of metabolic syndrome prevalence in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayerifard, Razieh; Bureng, Majid Akbari; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Namjoo, Massood; Rajezi, Sepideh

    2017-11-01

    Research has shown that the metabolic syndrome is more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder. Given the scarcity of research on the disorders, this paper aims to compare the prevalence of the syndrome among the two groups of patients. A total of 120 individuals participated in this cross sectional study: 60 patients with schizophrenia (26 males and 34 females) and 60 patients with bipolar I disorder (32 males and 28 females). The psychological disorders were diagnosed by some experienced psychiatrists according to the DSM-V. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to ATP III guidelines. Metabolic syndrome prevalence among schizophrenic and bipolar I patients was 28 and 36 percent, respectively; the disparity in prevalence is not significant. According to the results, compared to their male counterparts, females were more prone significant to metabolic syndrome. Moreover, diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher among bipolar I patients. On the other hand, schizophrenic males were observed to have higher fasting blood sugar levels in comparison to bipolar I males patients. Age, consumption of second generation antipsychotics or antidepressants, and the duration of the disorder were found to be related to metabolic syndrome. This study showed that metabolic syndrome is not more prevalent among bipolar I patients, compared to those with schizophrenia. Also, women are more likely to be affected by the syndrome. A number of factors such as age, consumption of medication, and duration of the disorder are associated with the likelihood of the syndrome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid metabolism in bovine neutrophils and platelets: effect of calcium ionophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.M.; Laegreid, W.W.; Heidel, J.R.; Straub, K.M.; Liggitt, H.D.; Silflow, R.M.; Breeze, R.G.; Leid, R.W.

    1987-09-01

    Substitution of dietary fatty acids has potential for altering the inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to define the metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) secreted by bovine peripheral blood neutrophils and platelets. High performance liquid chromatography was used to characterize cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites secreted in response to the calcium ionophore A23187. Cells were prelabelled with /sup 3/H-AA or /sup 3/H-EPA prior to challenge with the calcium ionophore. Bovine neutrophils secreted leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) as the major metabolites of AA, as well as the corresponding leukotriene B5 (LTB5) and 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (5-HEPE) metabolites of EPA. Peptidoleukotrienes derived from /sup 3/H-AA or /sup 3/H-EPA were not detected under these conditions. The major tritiated metabolites secreted from bovine platelets were: thromboxane A2, measured as the stable metabolite thromboxane B2 (TXB2); hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) and 12-HETE derived from /sup 3/H-AA; and the omega-3 analogs TXB3 and 12-HEPE, derived from /sup 3/H-EPA. Preferred substrate specificities existed amongst the AA- and EPA-derived metabolites for the intermediary enzymes involved in the arachidonic acid cascade. These findings support the hypothesis that substitution of membrane-bound AA by EPA has potential for modulation of the host inflammatory response following cellular phospholipid mobilization.

  6. Microgravity effects during fertilization, cell division, development, and calcium metabolism in sea urchins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Heide

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to explore the role of microgravity during fertilization, early development, cytoskeletal organization, and skeletal calcium deposition in a model development system: the sea urchin eggs and embryos. While pursuing these objectives, we have also helped to develop, test, and fly the Aquatic Research Facility (ARF) system. Cells were fixed at preselected time points to preserve the structures and organelles of interest with regards to cell biology events during development. The protocols used for the analysis of the results had been developed during the earlier part of this research and were applied for post-flight analysis using light and (immuno)fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The structures of interest are: microtubules during fertilization, cell division, and cilia movement; microfilaments during cell surface restructuring and cell division; centrosomes and centrioles during cell division, cell differentiation, and cilia formation and movement; membranes, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and chromosomes at all stages of development; and calcium deposits during spicule formation in late-stage embryos. In addition to further explore aspects important or living in space, several aspects of this research are also aimed at understanding diseases that affect humans on Earth which may be accelerated in space.

  7. [Relationship of menopause with cardiovascular disease and related metabolic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L; Tang, X; Hu, Y H

    2016-06-18

    To explore the associations of menopause with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related metabolic disorders (including hypertension, diabetes or higher blood sugar, obesity, dyslipidemia) in Chinese females aged 45-59 years . Data were acquired from a national cross-sectional survey conducted in 2013, China, which was also the second follow-up survey of China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). In the study, 4 702 Chinese perimenopausal women aged 45-59 years were enrolled, including 1 769 premenopausal women and 2 933 postmenopausal women. Information was collected from questionnaires of health status and functioning and physical examination. General liner models were employed to calculate age-adjusted or age-and-body-mass-index-adjusted or multiple-factor-adjusted means and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs). The comparisons of CVD and its risk factors according to menopausal status, and calculation of adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95%CIs for the associations of menopause with CVD and its risk factors were performed by multivariate Logistic regression models separately. After adjustment for age and other confounders (including body mass index, marriage, education, current smoking, drink alcohol more than once per month), statistically significant associations of menopause with cardiovascular disease, which referred to having a history of heart disease or stroke in this study,were observed in the participants (OR=1.34,95%CI: 1.04-1.74); prevalence of hypertension (OR=1.42, 95%CI: 1.10-1.84), prevalence of CRFs clustering number≥2 (OR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.02-1.68) and average waist circumference level (87.11 cm, 95%CI: 86.81-87.42 cm in post-menopausal group vs. 86.41 cm, 95%CI: 85.99-86.84 cm in premenopausal group) were presented higher in postmenopausal group, compared with the premenopausal one. However, diabetes or higher blood sugar (OR= 0.96, 95%CI: 0.60-1.52), dyslipidemia (OR= 0.84, 95%CI: 0

  8. Persistent Low Rates of Treatment of Metabolic Risk Factors in People With Psychotic Disorders : A PHAMOUS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Jojanneke; Pijnenborg, Gerdina H M; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Visser, Ellen; Corpeleijn, Eva; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A; Bruggeman, Richard; Jörg, Frederike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: People with psychotic disorders have an increased metabolic risk and a shortened life expectancy compared to the general population. Two large studies showed that metabolic disorders were untreated in a majority of the patients. Since then, guidelines have urged monitoring of metabolic

  9. Impact of Calcium and Two Doses of Vitamin D on Bone Metabolism in the Elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahme, Maya; Sharara, Sima Lynn; Baddoura, Rafic

    2017-01-01

    The optimal dose of vitamin D to optimize bone metabolism in the elderly is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D, at a dose higher than recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), has a beneficial effect on bone remodeling and mass. In this double-blind trial we randomized 257 ove...

  10. Associations between metabolic disorders and risk of cancer in Danish men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Siv Mari; Gislason, Gunnar; Moore, Lynn L

    2016-01-01

    -up of 12.6 (± 5.7 standard deviations [SD]) years, 4,826,142 individuals (50.2% women) with a mean age of 41.4 (± 18.9 SD) years had 423,942 incident cancers. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of all-site cancer in patients with diabetes or hypertension were highest immediately following diagnosis of metabolic......BACKGROUND: The prevalence of metabolic disorders is increasing and has been suggested to increase cancer risk, but the relation between metabolic disorders and risk of cancer is unclear, especially in young adults. We investigated the associations between diabetes, hypertension......, and hypercholesterolemia on risk of all-site as well as site-specific cancers. METHODS: We consecutively included men and women from nationwide Danish registries 1996-2011, if age 20-89 and without cancer prior to date of entry. We followed them throughout 2012. Metabolic disorders were defined using discharge diagnosis...

  11. Is the Gut Microbiota a New Factor Contributing to Obesity and Its Metabolic Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota refers to the trillions of microorganisms residing in the intestine and is integral in multiple physiological processes of the host. Recent research has shown that gut bacteria play a role in metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. The mechanisms by which the gut microbiota affects metabolic diseases are by two major routes: (1 the innate immune response to the structural components of bacteria (e.g., lipopolysaccharide resulting in inflammation and (2 bacterial metabolites of dietary compounds (e.g., SCFA from fiber, which have biological activities that regulate host functions. Gut microbiota has evolved with humans as a mutualistic partner, but dysbiosis in a form of altered gut metagenome and collected microbial activities, in combination with classic genetic and environmental factors, may promote the development of metabolic disorders. This paper reviews the available literature about the gut microbiota and aforementioned metabolic disorders and reveals the gaps in knowledge for future study.

  12. Clinical features of neuromuscular disorders in patients with N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Totzeck

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular junction disorders affect the pre- or postsynaptic nerve to muscle transmission due to autoimmune antibodies. Members of the group like myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome have pathophysiologically distinct characteristics. However, in practice, distinction may be difficult. We present a series of three patients with a myasthenic syndrome, dropped-head syndrome, bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness and positive testing for anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. In two cases anti-acetylcholin receptor antibodies were elevated, anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. All patients initially responded to pyridostigmine with a non-response in the course of the disease. While one patient recovered well after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, 3,4-diaminopyridine, steroids and later on immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil, a second died after restriction of treatment due to unfavorable cancer diagnosis, the third patient declined treatment. Although new antibodies causing neuromuscular disorders were discovered, clinical distinction has not yet been made. Our patients showed features of pre- and postsynaptic myasthenic syndrome as well as severe dropped-head syndrome and bulbar and axial muscle weakness, but only anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were positive. When administered, one patient benefited from 3,4-diaminopyridine. We suggest that this overlap-syndrome should be considered especially in patients with assumed seronegative myasthenia gravis and lack of improvement under standard therapy.

  13. Intrinsically disordered and pliable Starmaker-like protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes) controls the formation of calcium carbonate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Jakób, Michał; Stigloher, Christian; Grzeszkowiak, Mikołaj; Mazur, Maciej; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Fish otoliths, biominerals composed of calcium carbonate with a small amount of organic matrix, are involved in the functioning of the inner ear. Starmaker (Stm) from zebrafish (Danio rerio) was the first protein found to be capable of controlling the formation of otoliths. Recently, a gene was identified encoding the Starmaker-like (Stm-l) protein from medaka (Oryzias latipes), a putative homologue of Stm and human dentine sialophosphoprotein. Although there is no sequence similarity between Stm-l and Stm, Stm-l was suggested to be involved in the biomineralization of otoliths, as had been observed for Stm even before. The molecular properties and functioning of Stm-l as a putative regulatory protein in otolith formation have not been characterized yet. A comprehensive biochemical and biophysical analysis of recombinant Stm-l, along with in silico examinations, indicated that Stm-l exhibits properties of a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein. Stm-l possesses an elongated and pliable structure that is able to adopt a more ordered and rigid conformation under the influence of different factors. An in vitro assay of the biomineralization activity of Stm-l indicated that Stm-l affected the size, shape and number of calcium carbonate crystals. The functional significance of intrinsically disordered properties of Stm-l and the possible role of this protein in controlling the formation of calcium carbonate crystals is discussed.

  14. Prevalence and characteristics of lipid metabolism disorders in children from Krasnodar region of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Shadrin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of lipid metabolism disorders in children Krasnodar region of Russia. Overall 6,000 children 10-17 years were included in the study. Lipid disorders were observed in 11.3 %, excess body weight in 6.3%, and obesity in 5.0% of children. The above pathologies were more common in boys (14% than girls (8.8%. The study revealed that hormonal disorders were the cause of every second obesity as an increased thyroid-stimulating hormone was observed in 9.5 %, increased prolactin - in 38.8 %, and hyperinsulinemia - in 22.0 % of children. Metabolic disorders that were observed were: hypercholesterolemia - in 24.0 % of children with obesity, impaired glucose tolerance - in 13.0%, and the presence of three or four components of the metabolic syndrome in various combinations, identified in 18.0 % of children with obesity.

  15. Strategies for reversing the effects of metabolic disorders induced as a consequence of developmental programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H Vickers

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the metabolic syndrome have reached epidemic proportions worldwide with far-reaching health care and economic implications. The rapid increase in the prevalence of these disorders suggests that environmental and behavioural influences, rather than genetic causes, are fuelling the epidemic. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis has highlighted the link between the periconceptual, fetal and early infant phases of life and the subsequent development of metabolic disorders in later life. In particular, the impact of poor maternal nutrition on susceptibility to later life metabolic disease in offspring is now well documented. Several studies have now shown, at least in experimental animal models, that some components of the metabolic syndrome, induced as a consequence of developmental programming, are potentially reversible by nutritional or targeted therapeutic interventions during windows of developmental plasticity. This review will focus on critical windows of development and possible therapeutic avenues that may reduce metabolic and obesogenic risk following an adverse early life environment.

  16. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant for Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-09

    Mucopolysaccharidosis; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD); Krabbe Disease; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Sphingolipidoses; Peroxisomal Disorders

  17. The influence of potassium and calcium ions on nitrogen metabolism of cucumber seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genowefa Kubik-Dobosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found that K+ or Ca2+ deficiency in a nitrate or ammonium medium increased the amount of accumulated total and non-protein nitrogen in some organs of cucumber seedlings, as also caused changes in accumulated potassium and calcium. Lack of K+ or Ca2+ in a medium which did not contain nitrogen led to an increased level of glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity in the cotyledons and roots of cucumbers. Similar changes in the activity of these enzymes were noted in certain organs of seedlings growing in nitrate or ammonium medium with decreased K+ or Ca2+ contents, although the magnitude of these changes depended upon the applied dosage of these cations, the form of mineral nitrogen, developmental phase of plants and the plant organ dealt with.

  18. Metabolic disorder of pregnancy (understanding pathophysiology of diabetes and preeclampsia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Liat; Tenenbaum-Gavish, Kinneret; Hod, Moshe

    2015-04-01

    The role of insulin resistance in human disease is implicated in the pathogenesis of some of the chief western chronic diseases: ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and essential hypertension. The occurrence of these diseases, alongside obesity, is termed the metabolic syndrome. Pregnancy is normally attended by progressive insulin resistance that begins near midpregnancy and progresses through the third trimester to levels that approximate the insulin resistance seen in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may be the basic common ground for the metabolic syndrome of pregnancy - elevated blood pressure and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the metabolic syndrome is also associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and attenuated inflammatory responses. In this review, we discuss the development of insulin resistance during pregnancy, hormones and newly discovered factors associated with insulin resistance and secretion, lipid metabolism, and the pathogenesis of hypertension during pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rho-kinase inhibition ameliorates metabolic disorders through activation of AMPK pathway in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Noda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabolic disorders, caused by excessive calorie intake and low physical activity, are important cardiovascular risk factors. Rho-kinase, an effector protein of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA, is an important cardiovascular therapeutic target and its activity is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome. We aimed to examine whether Rho-kinase inhibition improves high-fat diet (HFD-induced metabolic disorders, and if so, to elucidate the involvement of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK, a key molecule of metabolic conditions. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice were fed a high-fat diet, which induced metabolic phenotypes, such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia and glucose intolerance. These phenotypes are suppressed by treatment with selective Rho-kinase inhibitor, associated with increased whole body O2 consumption and AMPK activation in the skeletal muscle and liver. Moreover, Rho-kinase inhibition increased mRNA expression of the molecules linked to fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial energy production and glucose metabolism, all of which are known as targets of AMPK in those tissues. In systemic overexpression of dominant-negative Rho-kinase mice, body weight, serum lipid levels and glucose metabolism were improved compared with littermate control mice. Furthermore, in AMPKα2-deficient mice, the beneficial effects of fasudil, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, on body weight, hypercholesterolemia, mRNA expression of the AMPK targets and increase of whole body O2 consumption were absent, whereas glucose metabolism was restored by fasudil to the level in wild-type mice. In cultured mouse myocytes, pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rho-kinase increased AMPK activity through liver kinase b1 (LKB1, with up-regulation of its targets, which effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor, compound C. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Rho-kinase inhibition ameliorates metabolic disorders through activation of the LKB1/AMPK pathway, suggesting that

  20. A novel mutation in the calcium-sensing receptor gene in an Irish pedigree showing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elamin, Wael F

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by asymptomatic and non-progressive hypercalcemia due to mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor gene. Disorders of calcium metabolism are very common in the elderly, and they can coexist with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia in affected families.

  1. Associations between Body Composition Indices and Metabolic Disorders in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: This study identified positive associations between all evaluated body composition indices and metabolic parameters in Chinese adults. Among the body composition indices, BMI predicted four of the five evaluated metabolic disorders in both gender groups.

  2. [Bipolar disorders and somatic comorbidities: a focus on metabollic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet-Gélinier, Jean-Christophe; Gaubil, Isabelle; Kaladjian, Arthur; Bonin, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Bipolar Disorders (BD) are currently regarded as a multidimensional disease involving both psychological and physical determinants. If mood dimension and thymic instability have usually been considered as the « core » aspect of bipolar disorders, it's crucial to note that somatic problems frequently occur in BD, deeply worsening the prognosis of this affection. Indeed, comorbid somatic illnesses of bipolar disorder are mainly represented by cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, which are shortening life expectancy by 25 to 30 years as compared to the general population. In this review, the authors examine epidemiological data about this comorbidity, then they attempt to provide etiologic and physiopathologic hypotheses about the links between bipolar disorders and metabolic diseases. Despite the absence of strong scientific explanation for this link, its existence highlights the need for more integrated care and interdisciplinary collaboration in order to improve patients'outcome. Copyright © 2012 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  3. Converging roles of ion channels, calcium, metabolic stress, and activity pattern of Substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in health and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Johanna; Pötschke, Christina; Liss, Birgit

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine-releasing neurons within the Substantia nigra (SN DA) are particularly vulnerable to degeneration compared to other dopaminergic neurons. The age-dependent, progressive loss of these neurons is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), as the resulting loss of striatal dopamine causes its major movement-related symptoms. SN DA neurons release dopamine from their axonal terminals within the dorsal striatum, and also from their cell bodies and dendrites within the midbrain in a calcium- and activity-dependent manner. Their intrinsically generated and metabolically challenging activity is created and modulated by the orchestrated function of different ion channels and dopamine D2-autoreceptors. Here, we review increasing evidence that the mechanisms that control activity patterns and calcium homeostasis of SN DA neurons are not only crucial for their dopamine release within a physiological range but also modulate their mitochondrial and lysosomal activity, their metabolic stress levels, and their vulnerability to degeneration in PD. Indeed, impaired calcium homeostasis, lysosomal and mitochondrial dysfunction, and metabolic stress in SN DA neurons represent central converging trigger factors for idiopathic and familial PD. We summarize double-edged roles of ion channels, activity patterns, calcium homeostasis, and related feedback/feed-forward signaling mechanisms in SN DA neurons for maintaining and modulating their physiological function, but also for contributing to their vulnerability in PD-paradigms. We focus on the emerging roles of maintained neuronal activity and calcium homeostasis within a physiological bandwidth, and its modulation by PD-triggers, as well as on bidirectional functions of voltage-gated L-type calcium channels and metabolically gated ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channels, and their probable interplay in health and PD. We propose that SN DA neurons possess several feedback and feed-forward mechanisms to protect and adapt

  4. Psychosocial and metabolic function by smoking status in individuals with binge eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoko; White, Marney A; Barnes, Rachel D; Ivezaj, Valentina; Morgan, Peter; Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with binge eating disorder (BED) report smoking to control appetite and weight. Smoking in BED is associated with increased risk for comorbid psychiatric disorders, but its impact on psychosocial functioning and metabolic function has not been evaluated. Participants were 429 treatment-seeking adults (72.4% women; mean age 46.2±11.0years old) with BED comorbid with obesity. Participants were categorized into current smokers (n=66), former smokers (n=145), and never smokers (n=218). Smoking status was unrelated to most historical eating/weight variables and to current eating disorder psychopathology. Smoking status was associated with psychiatric, psychosocial, and metabolic functioning. Compared with never smokers, current smokers were more likely to meet lifetime diagnostic criteria for alcohol (OR=5.51 [95% CI=2.46-12.33]) and substance use disorders (OR=7.05 [95% CI=3.37-14.72]), poorer current physical quality of life, and increased risk for metabolic syndrome (OR=1.80 [95% CI=0.97-3.35]) and related metabolic risks (reduced HDL, elevated total cholesterol). On the other hand, the odds of meeting criteria for lifetime psychiatric comorbidity or metabolic abnormalities were not significantly greater in former smokers, relative to never smokers. Our findings suggest the importance of promoting smoking cessation in treatment-seeking patients with BED and obesity for its potential long-term implications for psychiatric and metabolic functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Autonomic nervous system and lipid metabolism: findings in anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistorio, Elisabetta; Luca, Maria; Luca, Antonina; Messina, Vincenzo; Calandra, Carmela

    2011-10-28

    To correlate lipid metabolism and autonomic dysfunction with anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders. To propose the lipid index (LI) as a new possible biomarker. 95 patients and 60 controls were enrolled from the University Psychiatry Unit of Catania and from general practitioners (GPs). The patients were divided into four pathological groups: Anxiety, Depression, Anxious-Depressive Disorder and Eating Disorders [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) official/appendix criteria]. The levels of the cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoproteins A and B were determined. The LI, for each subject, was obtained through a mathematical operation on the values of the cholesterol and triglycerides levels compared with the maximum cut-off of the general population. The autonomic functioning was tested with Ewing battery tests. Particularly, the correlation between heart rate variability (HRV) and lipid metabolism has been investigated. Pathological and control groups, compared among each other, presented some peculiarities in the lipid metabolism and the autonomic dysfunction scores. In addition, a statistically significant correlation has been found between HRV and lipid metabolism. Lipid metabolism and autonomic functioning seem to be related to the discussed psychiatric disorders. LI, in addition, could represent a new possible biomarker to be considered.

  6. Autonomic nervous system and lipid metabolism: findings in anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messina Vincenzo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To correlate lipid metabolism and autonomic dysfunction with anxious-depressive spectrum and eating disorders. To propose the lipid index (LI as a new possible biomarker. Methods 95 patients and 60 controls were enrolled from the University Psychiatry Unit of Catania and from general practitioners (GPs. The patients were divided into four pathological groups: Anxiety, Depression, Anxious-Depressive Disorder and Eating Disorders [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR official/appendix criteria]. The levels of the cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoproteins A and B were determined. The LI, for each subject, was obtained through a mathematical operation on the values of the cholesterol and triglycerides levels compared with the maximum cut-off of the general population. The autonomic functioning was tested with Ewing battery tests. Particularly, the correlation between heart rate variability (HRV and lipid metabolism has been investigated. Results Pathological and control groups, compared among each other, presented some peculiarities in the lipid metabolism and the autonomic dysfunction scores. In addition, a statistically significant correlation has been found between HRV and lipid metabolism. Conclusions Lipid metabolism and autonomic functioning seem to be related to the discussed psychiatric disorders. LI, in addition, could represent a new possible biomarker to be considered.

  7. Effects of altering dietary cation-anion difference on calcium and energy metabolism in peripartum cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S J; VandeHaar, M J; Sharma, B K; Pilbeam, T E; Beede, D K; Bucholtz, H F; Liesman, J S; Horst, R L; Goff, J P

    2000-09-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of varying dietary cation-anion differences (DCAD: meq[(Na + K) - (Cl + S)]/100 g of dry matter) in prepartum diets on Ca, energy, and endocrine status prepartum and postpartum. Holstein cows (n = 21) and heifers (n = 34) were fed diets with varying amounts of CaCl2, CaSO4, and MgSO4 to achieve a DCAD of +15 (control), 0, or -15 meq/100 g of dry matter for the last 24 d before expected calving. Dietary Ca concentration was increased (by CaCO3 supplementation) with decreasing DCAD. Plasma ionized Ca concentrations prepartum and at calving in both cows and heifers increased with reduced DCAD in the diet. At calving, plasma ionized Ca concentration was 3.67, 3.85, and 4.35 for cows and 4.44, 4.57, and 4.62 mg/dl for heifers fed diets containing +15, 0, and -15 DCAD, respectively. All heifers had normal concentrations of plasma ionized Ca (>4 mg/dl) at calving. Also at calving, plasma concentrations ofparathyroid hormone and calcitriol were less in cows and heifers fed diets containing reduced DCAD, but the plasma concentration of hydroxyproline was not affected by diet. Prepartum dry matter intake, energy balance, and body weight gains were lower and concentration of liver triglyceride was higher for heifers but not cows fed the -15 DCAD diet. Also, nonesterified fatty acids the last week prepartum were positively correlated with liver triglyceride for heifers but not cows. Feeding of anionic salts plus CaCO3 to reduce DCAD to -15 and increase Ca in prepartum diets prevents hypocalcemia at calving in cows, but decreases prepartum dry matter intake and increases the concentration of liver triglyceride in heifers. That heifers maintained calcium homeostasis at calving regardless of diet but ate less when fed the -15 DCAD diet suggests that they should not be fed anionic salts before calving.

  8. Physical activity for the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, Luca; Moscatiello, Simona; Malavolti, Marcella; Marzocchi, Rebecca; Marchesini, Giulio

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its various features (obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) are increasing worldwide and constitute a severe risk for the sustainability of the present universal Italian health care system. Lifestyle interventions should be the first therapeutic strategy to prevent/treat metabolic diseases, far before pharmacologic treatment. The role of diet and weight loss has been fully ascertained, whereas the role of physical activity is frequently overlooked both by physicians and by patients. Physical activity has favorable effects on all components of the metabolic syndrome and on the resulting cardiovascular risk, the cornerstone in the development of cardiometabolic diseases. The quantity and the frequency of physical activity necessary to produce beneficial effects has not been defined as yet, but brisk walking is considered particularly appropriate, as it can be practiced by a large number of individuals, without any additional cost, and has a low rate of injury. The effects of exercise and leisure time physical activity extend from prevention to treatment of the various components of the metabolic syndrome, as well as to mood and quality of life. Any effort should be done to favor adherence to protocols of physical activity in the community.

  9. Mendelian Disorders of High-Density Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldoni, Federico; Sinke, Richard J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are a highly heterogeneous and dynamic group of the smallest and densest lipoproteins present in the circulation. This review provides the current molecular insight into HDL metabolism led by articles describing mutations in genes that have a large affect on HDL

  10. Clinical approach to inherited metabolic disorders in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saudubray, J. M.; Narcy, C.; Lyonnet, L.; Bonnefont, J. P.; Poll The, B. T.; Munnich, A.

    1990-01-01

    Most inborn errors of intermediary metabolism presenting in the neonatal period fall schematically into three clinical categories: (1) those which lead to a neurological distress 'intoxication type' with a symptom-free interval, vomiting, comas, hypertonia, abnormal movements and frequent humoral

  11. Metabolic risk factors in depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reedt Dortland, Arianne Klaartje Beraldine van

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to clarify which aspects of depression and anxiety are related to an increased metabolic risk, and which factors contribute to these associations. Taken together, our findings indicate that people with more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety are at particular risk

  12. Disorders of water metabolism: diabetes insipidus and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of body fluids are among the most commonly encountered problems in the practice of clinical medicine. This is in large part because many different disease states can potentially disrupt the finely balanced mechanisms that control the intake and output of water and solute. It therefore behooves clinicians treating such patients to have a good understanding of the pathophysiology, the differential diagnosis and the management of these disorders. Since body water is the primary determinant of the osmolality of the extracellular fluid (ECF), disorders of body water homeostasis can be divided into hypoosmolar disorders, in which there is an excess of body water relative to body solute, and hyperosmolar disorders, in which there is a deficiency of body water relative to body solute. The classical hyperosmolar disorder is diabetes insipidus (DI), and the classical hypoosmolar disorder is the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This chapter first reviews the regulatory mechanisms underlying water and sodium metabolism, the two major determinants of body fluid homeostasis. The major disorders of water metabolism causing hyperosmolality and hypoosmolality, DI and SIADH, are then discussed in detail, including the pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Is the Gut Microbiota a New Factor Contributing to Obesity and Its Metabolic Disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina Harris; Amira Kassis; Geneviève Major; Chou, Chieh J.

    2012-01-01

    The gut microbiota refers to the trillions of microorganisms residing in the intestine and is integral in multiple physiological processes of the host. Recent research has shown that gut bacteria play a role in metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. The mechanisms by which the gut microbiota affects metabolic diseases are by two major routes: (1) the innate immune response to the structural components of bacteria (e.g., lipopolysaccharide) resulting in inf...

  14. Vitamin D homeostasis, bone mineral metabolism, and seasonal affective disorder during 1 year of Antarctic residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, M; Sable, T; Dhanwal, D; Dewan, R

    2013-01-01

    Low serum vitamin D and increased parathormone levels were found to be associated with depression and stress in a wintering expedition of 20 healthy male subjects over a period of 1 year in Antarctica. The continuous daylight during summer and the dark polar winter affect endogenous vitamin D production. Long-term effects on bone health need to be studied further. Vitamin D plays a significant role in calcium and bone mineral metabolism and also affects cardiovascular, psychological, and cognitive functions. The ultraviolet B radiation component of sunlight, which shows marked seasonal variation in Antarctica, influences the synthesis of vitamin D. Depression and mood disorders are associated with this extreme photoperiod. In this study, we attempted to gauge the alteration of vitamin D homeostasis in Antarctica and its effect on bone mineral metabolism and mood over a period of 1 year. Twenty male subjects who wintered over at India's Antarctic base Maitri (70°45'57″ S, 11°44'09″ E) from November 2010 to December 2011 were studied. Fasting serum samples were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium, and phosphate. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS X), and Perceived Stress Scale were used to measure depression, affect, and stress. Mild vitamin D deficiency was present in two (10 %) subjects on arrival, which increased to seven (35 %) subjects during the polar winter at 6 months. The mean score on the BDI-II screen for depression was significantly higher during midwinter (4.8 ± 3.9) when compared with the baseline value (2.9 ± 2.1). Only 2/20 (10 %) of subjects met the criteria for minor depression. Higher PTH levels at 6 months correlated with a higher PANAS X score (p = 0.021). The mean values of calcium, inorganic phosphorus, and ALP were comparable during the course of the

  15. Probiotics and Prebiotics: Present Status and Future Perspectives on Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Youn; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-03-18

    Metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), present an increasing public health concern and can significantly undermine an individual's quality of life. The relative risk of CVD, the primary cause of death in T2DM patients, is two to four times higher in people with T2DM compared with those who are non-diabetic. The prevalence of metabolic disorders has been associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake and lifestyle changes over recent decades. Recently, the scientific community has considered alteration in gut microbiota composition to constitute one of the most probable factors in the development of metabolic disorders. The altered gut microbiota composition is strongly conducive to increased adiposity, β-cell dysfunction, metabolic endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress. Probiotics and prebiotics can ameliorate T2DM and CVD through improvement of gut microbiota, which in turn leads to insulin-signaling stimulation and cholesterol-lowering effects. We analyze the currently available data to ascertain further potential benefits and limitations of probiotics and prebiotics in the treatment of metabolic disorders, including T2DM, CVD, and other disease (obesity). The current paper explores the relevant contemporary scientific literature to assist in the derivation of a general perspective of this broad area.

  16. Probiotics and Prebiotics: Present Status and Future Perspectives on Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Youn Yoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes (T2DM and cardiovascular disease (CVD, present an increasing public health concern and can significantly undermine an individual’s quality of life. The relative risk of CVD, the primary cause of death in T2DM patients, is two to four times higher in people with T2DM compared with those who are non-diabetic. The prevalence of metabolic disorders has been associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake and lifestyle changes over recent decades. Recently, the scientific community has considered alteration in gut microbiota composition to constitute one of the most probable factors in the development of metabolic disorders. The altered gut microbiota composition is strongly conducive to increased adiposity, β-cell dysfunction, metabolic endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress. Probiotics and prebiotics can ameliorate T2DM and CVD through improvement of gut microbiota, which in turn leads to insulin-signaling stimulation and cholesterol-lowering effects. We analyze the currently available data to ascertain further potential benefits and limitations of probiotics and prebiotics in the treatment of metabolic disorders, including T2DM, CVD, and other disease (obesity. The current paper explores the relevant contemporary scientific literature to assist in the derivation of a general perspective of this broad area.

  17. Probiotics and Prebiotics: Present Status and Future Perspectives on Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Youn; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), present an increasing public health concern and can significantly undermine an individual’s quality of life. The relative risk of CVD, the primary cause of death in T2DM patients, is two to four times higher in people with T2DM compared with those who are non-diabetic. The prevalence of metabolic disorders has been associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake and lifestyle changes over recent decades. Recently, the scientific community has considered alteration in gut microbiota composition to constitute one of the most probable factors in the development of metabolic disorders. The altered gut microbiota composition is strongly conducive to increased adiposity, β-cell dysfunction, metabolic endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress. Probiotics and prebiotics can ameliorate T2DM and CVD through improvement of gut microbiota, which in turn leads to insulin-signaling stimulation and cholesterol-lowering effects. We analyze the currently available data to ascertain further potential benefits and limitations of probiotics and prebiotics in the treatment of metabolic disorders, including T2DM, CVD, and other disease (obesity). The current paper explores the relevant contemporary scientific literature to assist in the derivation of a general perspective of this broad area. PMID:26999199

  18. Metabolic syndrome and inflammation markers in patients with schizophrenia and recurrent depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasić, Davor; Bevanda, Milenko; Bošnjak, Nada; Uglešić, Boran; Glavina, Trpimir; Franić, Tomislav

    2014-09-01

    The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with psychiatric disorders, almost double the prevalence reported for the general population, is worrying. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of metabolic syndrome and inflammatory marker levels in patients with schizophrenia and recurrent depressive disorder in a Croatian psychiatric sample. This study included 62 inpatients with schizophrenia and 62 with recurrent depressive disorder treated at the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Centre Split, enrolled from November 2011 until May 2012. The cases were compared to 124 healthy subjects from the general population. The presence of metabolic syndrome was found in 56.5% of the patients with schizophrenia and 53.2% of the patients with depression, which was significantly more prevalent than in the control group (32.3%). The levels of inflammation markers (i.e., C-reactive protein and PAI-1) were significantly higher among patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia and recurrent depressive disorder demonstrate a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome that is also related to inflammation processes. In the context of integrative medicine, clinicians and researchers should consider psychiatric patients within a holistic approach.

  19. Adipose tissue remodeling: its role in energy metabolism and metabolic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sung Sik eChoe; Jin Young eHuh; In Jae eHwang; Jong In eKim; Jae Bum eKim

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue (WAT) functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue (BAT) accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secret various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic a...

  20. Fatty Acids Consumption: The Role Metabolic Aspects Involved in Obesity and Its Associated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Silva Figueiredo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and its associated disorders, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, metabolic inflammation, dysbiosis, and non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis, are involved in several molecular and inflammatory mechanisms that alter the metabolism. Food habit changes, such as the quality of fatty acids in the diet, are proposed to treat and prevent these disorders. Some studies demonstrated that saturated fatty acids (SFA are considered detrimental for treating these disorders. A high fat diet rich in palmitic acid, a SFA, is associated with lower insulin sensitivity and it may also increase atherosclerosis parameters. On the other hand, a high intake of eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic (DHA fatty acids may promote positive effects, especially on triglyceride levels and increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL levels. Moreover, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs are effective at limiting the hepatic steatosis process through a series of biochemical events, such as reducing the markers of non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis, increasing the gene expression of lipid metabolism, decreasing lipogenic activity, and releasing adiponectin. This current review shows that the consumption of unsaturated fatty acids, MUFA, and PUFA, and especially EPA and DHA, which can be applied as food supplements, may promote effects on glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as on metabolic inflammation, gut microbiota, and hepatic metabolism.

  1. Influence of diet on calcium metabolism, tissue calcification and urinary sludge in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, M; Burger, B; Liesegang, A; Del Chicca, F; Kaufmann-Bart, M; Riond, B; Hässig, M; Hatt, J-M

    2012-10-01

    Rabbits absorb more calcium (Ca) from their diet than they require, and excrete surplus via urine, which therefore contains a typical 'sludge'. This makes rabbits susceptible to Ca-containing uroliths. But given the Ca content of diets of free-ranging specimens, and the limited reports of urinary sludge and Ca contents in free-ranging lagomorphs, we can suspect that rabbits are naturally adapted to high urinary Ca loads. We fed four groups of New Zealand hybrid rabbits [n = 28, age at start 5-6 weeks) pelleted diets consisting of lucerne hay only (L, Ca 2.32% dry matter (DM)], lucerne:oats 1:1 (LG, Ca 1.36%), grass hay only (G, Ca 1.04%), or grass:oats 1:1 (GG, 0.83%) for 25 weeks, with water available ad libitum. Diets were not supplemented with Ca, phosphorus, or vitamin D. Rabbits on diets LG and GG had lower food and water intakes, lower faeces and urine output, grew faster and had higher body mass at slaughter (mainly attributable to adipose tissue). Apparent Ca digestibility decreased in the order L-LG-G/GG. Rabbits on L had larger and heavier kidneys, more urinary sediment at sonography, and a higher urinary Ca content than the other groups. No animal showed signs of urolithiasis/calcinosis at X-ray, sonography, or gross pathology. Kidney/aorta histology only sporadically indicated Ca deposits, with no systematic difference between groups. Under the conditions of the experiment, dietary Ca loads in legume hay do not appear problematic for rabbits, and other factors, such as water supply and level of activity may be important contributors to urolithiasis development in veterinary patients. However, due to the lower Ca content of grass hay, the significantly lower degree of urinary sludge formation, and the significantly higher water intake related with grass hay feeding, grass hay-dominated diets are to be recommended for rabbits in which urolithiasis prevention is an issue. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Interleukin-22 alleviates metabolic disorders and restores mucosal immunity in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Ota, Naruhisa; Manzanillo, Paolo; Kates, Lance; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Eidenschenk, Celine; Zhang, Juan; Lesch, Justin; Lee, Wyne P; Ross, Jed; Diehl, Lauri; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Kolumam, Ganesh; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2014-10-09

    The connection between an altered gut microbiota and metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease is well established. Defects in preserving the integrity of the mucosal barriers can result in systemic endotoxaemia that contributes to chronic low-grade inflammation, which further promotes the development of metabolic syndrome. Interleukin (IL)-22 exerts essential roles in eliciting antimicrobial immunity and maintaining mucosal barrier integrity within the intestine. Here we investigate the connection between IL-22 and metabolic disorders. We find that the induction of IL-22 from innate lymphoid cells and CD4(+) T cells is impaired in obese mice under various immune challenges, especially in the colon during infection with Citrobacter rodentium. While innate lymphoid cell populations are largely intact in obese mice, the upregulation of IL-23, a cytokine upstream of IL-22, is compromised during the infection. Consequently, these mice are susceptible to C. rodentium infection, and both exogenous IL-22 and IL-23 are able to restore the mucosal host defence. Importantly, we further unveil unexpected functions of IL-22 in regulating metabolism. Mice deficient in IL-22 receptor and fed with high-fat diet are prone to developing metabolic disorders. Strikingly, administration of exogenous IL-22 in genetically obese leptin-receptor-deficient (db/db) mice and mice fed with high-fat diet reverses many of the metabolic symptoms, including hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance. IL-22 shows diverse metabolic benefits, as it improves insulin sensitivity, preserves gut mucosal barrier and endocrine functions, decreases endotoxaemia and chronic inflammation, and regulates lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissues. In summary, we identify the IL-22 pathway as a novel target for therapeutic intervention in metabolic diseases.

  3. The metabolic impact of β-hydroxybutyrate on neurotransmission: Reduced glycolysis mediates changes in calcium responses and KATP channel receptor sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Ploug, K.B.; Iversen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    -hydroxybutyrate might change neuronal function as there is a known coupling between metabolism and neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the effects of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on glycolysis and neurotransmission in cultured murine glutamatergic neurons. Previous studies have shown...... an effect of β-hydroxybutyrate on glucose metabolism, and the present study further specified this by showing attenuation of glycolysis when β-hydroxybutyrate was present in these neurons. In addition, the NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses in the neurons were diminished in the presence of β...... to a combination of glucose and R-β-hydroxybutyrate in cultured neurons. Using the latter combination, glycolysis was diminished, NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses were lower, and the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide caused a higher transmitter release....

  4. [Calcium and bone metabolism across women's life stages. Stress fracture in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes, especially in long-distance runner, jumping sports and gymnastics in female athletes. The pathology of stress fracture mainly includes repeated biomechanical loading, which leads to bone micro-damage and failure of bone structure. Female athlete triad(FAT), which includes low energy availability with or without an eating disorder, functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and osteoporosis, is a serious healthcare concern in female athletes. For prevention and treatment of stress fracture, management of biomechanical factors modifying the load applied to a bone is important, and especially in female athletes, management for FAT is one of the important factors. This report outlines the current knowledge on the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of stress fracture, relating to FAT in female athletes.

  5. Newborn screening of inherited metabolic disorders: the Italian situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focardi, M; Pinchi, V; Defraia, B; Gualco, B; Varvara, G; Norelli, G A

    2016-01-01

    Starting from an international overview of the current status of screening programs, the present paper focuses on the legal situation in Italy and the great differences among Italian regions. Since the introduction of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in the ‘90s the paradigm “one spot-one disease” changed. Only recently, some regions issued legislative acts to promote expanded newborn screening with MS/MS. This approach raises medico-legal and ethical issues because a fast neonatal diagnosis of an inborn error of metabolism (IEM) could increase chances of an early treatment and reduce disabilities, therefore citizens ought to have the same access to care countrywide. Enacting a mandatory standard for a disease screening panel using MS/MS and a few centers specialized in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients affected by IEM (inborn errors of metabolism) can reduce legal and ethical issues.

  6. Labeling the human skeleton with {sup 41}Ca to assess changes in bone calcium metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denk, E.; Hurrell, R.F.; Walczyk, T. [Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hillegonds, D.; Vogel, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Livermore, CA (United States); Synal, A. [Paul Scherrer Institute/ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Particle Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Geppert, C.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg University, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Fattinger, K. [University Hospital Bern, Department of General Internal Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Hennessy, C.; Berglund, M. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), European Commission Joint Research Centre, Geel (Belgium)

    2006-11-15

    Bone research is limited by the methods available for detecting changes in bone metabolism. While dual X-ray absorptiometry is rather insensitive, biochemical markers are subject to significant intra-individual variation. In the study presented here, we evaluated the isotopic labeling of bone using {sup 41}Ca, a long-lived radiotracer, as an alternative approach. After successful labeling of the skeleton, changes in the systematics of urinary {sup 41}Ca excretion are expected to directly reflect changes in bone Ca metabolism. A minute amount of {sup 41}Ca (100 nCi) was administered orally to 22 postmenopausal women. Kinetics of tracer excretion were assessed by monitoring changes in urinary {sup 41}Ca/{sup 40}Ca isotope ratios up to 700 days post-dosing using accelerator mass spectrometry and resonance ionization mass spectrometry. Isotopic labeling of the skeleton was evaluated by two different approaches: (i) urinary {sup 41}Ca data were fitted to an established function consisting of an exponential term and a power law term for each individual; (ii) {sup 41}Ca data were analyzed by population pharmacokinetic (NONMEM) analysis to identify a compartmental model that describes urinary {sup 41}Ca tracer kinetics. A linear three-compartment model with a central compartment and two sequential peripheral compartments was found to best fit the {sup 41}Ca data. Fits based on the use of the combined exponential/power law function describing urinary tracer excretion showed substantially higher deviations between predicted and measured values than fits based on the compartmental modeling approach. By establishing the urinary {sup 41}Ca excretion pattern using data points up to day 500 and extrapolating these curves up to day 700, it was found that the calculated {sup 41}Ca/{sup 40}Ca isotope ratios in urine were significantly lower than the observed {sup 41}Ca/{sup 40}Ca isotope ratios for both techniques. Compartmental analysis can overcome this limitation. By identifying

  7. Metabolic screening and metabolomics analysis in the Intellectual Developmental Disorders Mexico Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Ibarra-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM are genetic conditions that are sometimes associated with intellectual  developmental disorders (IDD. The aim of this study is to contribute to the metabolic characterization of IDD of unknown etiology in Mexico. Materials and methods. Metabolic screening using tandem mass spectrometry and fluorometry will be performed to rule out IEM. In addition,target metabolomic analysis will be done to characterize the metabolomic profile of patients with IDD. Conclusion. Identification of new metabolomic profiles associated withIDD of unknown etiology and comorbidities will contribute to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic schemes for the prevention and treatment of IDD in Mexico.

  8. Disorders of Lipid Metabolism and its Correction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Melnyk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease — a proven risk factor of the development and progression of lipid metabolism disorders. The basis of these disorders — an increase in blood plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins and decreased levels of high density lipoproteins, apo AI and apo AII. There has been a decrease in the activity of enzymes: lipoprotein lipase, hepatic triglyceride lipase, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase. The use of lipid-modifying drugs — statins, fibrates, nicotinic acid was proposed.

  9. Role of MicroRNAs in Obesity-Induced Metabolic Disorder and Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In all living organisms, metabolic homeostasis and the immune system are the most fundamental requirements for survival. Recently, obesity has become a global public health issue, which is the cardinal risk factor for metabolic disorder. Many diseases emanating from obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction are responsible for the activated immune system, including innate and adaptive responses. Of note, inflammation is the manifest accountant signal. Deeply studied microRNAs (miRNAs have participated in many pathways involved in metabolism and immune responses to protect cells from multiple harmful stimulants, and they play an important role in determining the progress through targeting different inflammatory pathways. Thus, immune response and metabolic regulation are highly integrated with miRNAs. Collectively, miRNAs are the new targets for therapy in immune dysfunction.

  10. Cerebral glucose metabolism in childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swedo, S.E.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Cheslow, D.L.; Leonard, H.L.; Kumar, A.; Friedland, R.; Rapoport, S.I.; Rapoport, J.L.

    1989-06-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in 18 adults with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and in age- and sex-matched controls using positron emission tomography and fludeoxyglucose F 18. Both groups were scanned during rest, with reduced auditory and visual stimulation. The group with OCD showed an increased glucose metabolism in the left orbital frontal, right sensorimotor, and bilateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate regions as compared with controls. Ratios of regional activity to mean cortical gray matter metabolism were increased for the right prefrontal and left anterior cingulate regions in the group with OCD as a whole. Correlations between glucose metabolism and clinical assessment measures showed a significant relationship between metabolic activity and both state and trait measurements of OCD and anxiety as well as the response to clomipramine hydrochloride therapy. These results are consistent with the suggestion that OCD may result from a functional disturbance in the frontal-limbic-basal ganglia system.

  11. Investigation of common disease regulatory network for metabolic disorders: A bioinformatics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnuba Jesmin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorder causes the failure of metabolism process is growing concern worldwide. This research predicts a common metabolic pathway that is shared by Obesity, Type-2 Diabetes, Hypertension and Cardiovascular diseases due to metabolic disorder. A protein-protein interaction network is created to show the protein co-expression, co-regulations and interactions among gene and diseases. Genes whose are associated with metabolic diseases have been accumulated from different gene databases with verification and 'mined' them to establish gene interaction network models for expressing the molecular linkages among genes and diseases which affect disease progression. The number of associated genes identified for Type 2 Diabetes (T2D is 250, Hypertension (HT is 156, Obesity (OB is 185 and cardiovascular disease (CVD is 178. Among the sorted candidate gene 10 common genes are identified whose are directly or indirectly associated with four diseases by doing linkage filtering. By analysing the gene network model and PPI network a common metabolic pathway among metabolic diseases has been investigated.

  12. Relation between Hormonal Disorders and Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Primary Hypothyroidism

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    Т.Yu. Yuzvenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade plenty of the researches dedicated to the problem of hypothyroidism were published, that radically changed views to the value of thyroid pathology on the whole. Neurohumoral changes are considered as a nosotropic factor of hypothyroidism development in persons with metabolic syndrome (MS. Aim of the research is to study the features of hormonal disorders and their correlation with the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and methods. The study involved 80 patients with primary hypothyroidism: 61 had metabolic syndrome and 19 did not have metabolic syndrome. Results. Statistically significant increased levels of leptin, insulin, cortisol, C-peptide were revealed in patients with hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome while the most marked changes were found in patients with multiple metabolic abnormalities. Conclusions. The interrelations between hyperleptinemia and fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, insulin levels, thyroid-stimulating hormone, index HOMA were determined indicating the modulating role of chronic hyperglycemia, hormonal disorders and insulin resistance in the expression and realization of the biological action of leptin in patients with hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome.

  13. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF MECHANOSTAT THEORY PART II. STABILITY OF MECHANO-METABOLIC SKELETON ENVIRONMENT AND HOMEOSTATIC PARAMETERS OF CALCIUM IN ORGANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avrunin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Basing on own and literature date to characterize biological necessity of modification the ability of bone structures to be deformed and carrying capacity of lacunar-channel system to provide the basis for interaction between this pathways and parameters of calcium homeostasis. Results: There are two ways of bone matrix remodeling. The first group of pathways is responsible for slow adaptation of bone structures ability to be deformed within physiological range during weeks, months, years. The second group ensures rapid response of carrying capacity of lacunar-channel system (minutes and ours. This two mechanisms function in conjunction with hierarchically organized calcium metabolism. The first level of the latter is direct two-phase exchange of ionized calcium between extracellular liquid of bone tissue and blood: a paracellular arrival of ionized calcium from blood into the bone; b transcellular arrival of ionized calcium from extracellular liquid of bone into blood. The second hierarchical level is remodeling of perilacunar matrix by osteocytes. The third hierarchical level is bone remodeling with collaboration both osteoclasts and osteoblasts.

  14. The effect of supplementation of calcium, vitamin D, boron, and increased fluoride intake on bone mechanical properties and metabolic hormones in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, G; Babaei, M; Naghii, Mohammad Reza; Mofid, M; Torkaman, G; Hedayati, M

    2014-04-01

    Evidence indicates that optimal nutrition plays a role in bone formation and maintenance. Besides major components of mineralization such as calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D, other nutrients like boron and fluoride have beneficial role, too. In this study, 34 male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: control diet, fluoride, fluoride + boron, fluoride + calcium + vitamin D, and fluoride + boron + calcium + vitamin D. Boron equal to 1.23 mg, calcium and vitamin D equal to 210 mg + 55 IU and fluoride equal to 0.7 mg/rat/day was added to their drinking water for 8 weeks. Plasma blood samples and bones were collected. Findings are evidence that fluoride + boron intake revealed significant positive effects on bone mechanical properties and bone metabolic hormones. These findings suggest that combined intake of these two elements has beneficial effects on bone stiffness and breaking strength comparing to even calcium + vitamin D supplementation. This evidence dealing with health problems related to bone and skeletal system in humans should justify further investigation of the role of boron and fluoride with other elements in relation to bone.

  15. Persistent disorders of mineral metabolism after one year of kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Larissa Kruger; Custódio, Melani Ribeiro; Contieri, Fabiana Loss de Carvalho; Riella, Miguel C; Nascimento, Marcelo Mazza do

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of mineral metabolism disorders after renal transplant (RT) appears to possess a negative impact over graft and patient's survival. To evaluate the parameters of mineral metabolism and the persistence of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in transplanted patients for a 12-month period after the procedure. Retrospective analysis of 41 transplants (18 women- 44%, mean age of 39 ± 15 years) performed in a University Hospital, evaluating changes of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the prevalence of persistent HPT. The patients were divided into two groups accordingly to PTH levels prior to Tx: Group 1 with PTH ≤ 300 pg/mL (n = 21) and Group 2 with PTH > 300 pg/mL (n = 20). The persistency of HPT after transplant was defined as PTH ≥ 100 pg/mL. The evolution of biochemical parameters and the persistency of HPT were analyzed in each group after 1 year of transplant. After a one-year of follow up, 5% of the patients presented hypophosphatemia (p 10.2 mg/dL) and 48% persistency of HPT (PTH ≥ 100 pg/mL). There was a positive correlation between the PTH pre and post Tx (r = 0.42/p = 0.006) and a negative correlation between PTH and Ca pre-Tx (r = -0.45/p = 0.002). However, there was no significant difference among groups 1 and 2 regarding PTH levels pre and post Tx. The findings in this article suggest that mineral metabolism alterations and the persistency of HPT may occur after one year of renal Tx, mainly in patients which present high PTH levels prior toTx. A persistência de distúrbios do metabolismo mineral ósseo após o transplante renal (Tx) parece possuir um impacto negativo sobre a sobrevida do enxerto e do paciente. avaliar os parâmetros do metabolismo mineral e a persistência de hiperparatiroidismo (pHPT) 12 meses após o Tx. Análise retrospectiva de 41 transplantes (18 mulheres- 44%, idade de 39 ± 15 anos) realizados em um Hospital Universitário, avaliando cálcio (Ca), fósforo (P), hormônio da paratire

  16. Newborn screening of inherited metabolic disorders by tandem mass spectrometry: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scaturro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of metabolism are inherited biochemical disorders caused by lack of a functional enzyme, transmembrane transporter, or similar protein, which then results in blockage of the corresponding metabolic pathway. Taken individually, inborn errors of metabolism are rare. However, as a group these diseases are relatively frequent and they may account for most of neonatal mortality and need of health resources. The detection of genetic metabolic disorders should occur in a pre-symptomatic phase. Recently, the introduction of the tandem mass spectrometric methods for metabolite analysis has changed our ability to detect intermediates of metabolism in smaller samples and provides the means to detect a large number of metabolic disorders in a single analytical run. Screening panels now include a large number of disorders that may not meet all the criteria that have been used as a reference for years. The rationale behind inclusion or exclusion of a respective disorder is difficult to understand in most cases and it may impose an ethical dilemma. The current organization is an important tool of secondary preventive medicine, essential for children’s healthcare, but the strong inhomogeneity of the regional models of screening applied today create in the Italian neonatal population macroscopic differences with regards to healthcare, which is in effect mainly diversified by the newborn’s place of birth, in possible violation of the universal criterion of the equality of all citizens. Carefully weighed arguments are urgently needed since patient organizations, opinion leaders and politicians are pressing to proceed with expansion of neonatal population screening.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by frataxin deficiency is associated with cellular senescence and abnormal calcium metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolinches-Amorós, Arantxa; Mollá, Belén; Pla-Martín, David; Palau, Francesc; González-Cabo, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is considered a neurodegenerative disorder involving both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are the major target tissue structures. This neuropathy is caused by mutations in the FXN gene that encodes frataxin. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial and cell consequences of frataxin depletion in a cellular model based on frataxin silencing in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, a cell line that has been used widely as in vitro models for studies on neurological diseases. We showed that the reduction of frataxin induced mitochondrial dysfunction due to a bioenergetic deficit and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the mitochondria that were associated with oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses. The depletion of frataxin did not cause cell death but increased autophagy, which may have a cytoprotective effect against cellular insults such as oxidative stress. Frataxin silencing provoked slow cell growth associated with cellular senescence, as demonstrated by increased SA-βgal activity and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. We postulate that cellular senescence might be related to a hypoplastic defect in the DRG during neurodevelopment, as suggested by necropsy studies. PMID:24860428

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by frataxin deficiency is associated with cellular senescence and abnormal calcium metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantxa eBolinches-Amorós

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is considered a neurodegenerative disorder involving both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG are the major target tissue structures. This neuropathy is caused by mutations in the FXN gene that encodes frataxin. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial and cell consequences of frataxin depletion in a cellular model based on frataxin silencing in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, a cell line that has been used widely as in vitro models for studies on neurological diseases. We showed that the reduction of frataxin induced mitochondrial dysfunction due to a bioenergetic deficit and abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the mitochondria that were associated with oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses. The depletion of frataxin did not cause cell death but increased autophagy, which may have a cytoprotective effect against cellular insults such as oxidative stress. Frataxin silencing provoked slow cell growth associated with cellular senescence, as demonstrated by increased SA-βgal activity and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. We postulate that cellular senescence might be related to a hypoplastic defect in the DRG during neurodevelopment, as suggested by necropsy studies.

  19. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-01-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organell...

  20. Chronic alcoholism-mediated metabolic disorders in albino rat testes

    OpenAIRE

    Shayakhmetova Ganna M.; Bondarenko Larysa B.; Matvienko Anatoliy V.; Kovalenko Valentina M.

    2014-01-01

    There is good evidence for impairment of spermatogenesis and reductions in sperm counts and testosterone levels in chronic alcoholics. The mechanisms for these effects have not yet been studied in detail. The consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on the structure and/or metabolism of testis cell macromolecules require to be intensively investigated. The present work reports the effects of chronic alcoholism on contents of free amino acids, levels of cytochrome P450 3A2 (CYP3A2) mRNA exp...

  1. Association between vitamin deficiency and metabolic disorders related to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Valdés, Samanta; Tostes, Maria das Graças V; Anunciação, Pamella C; da Silva, Bárbara P; Sant'Ana, Helena M Pinheiro

    2017-10-13

    Inappropriate food behavior contributes to obesity and leads to vitamin deficiency. This review discusses the nutritional status of water- and fat-soluble vitamins in obese subjects. We verified that most vitamins are deficient in obese individuals, especially the fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid, vitamin B 12 and vitamin C. However, some vitamins have been less evaluated in cases of obesity. The adipose tissue is considered a metabolic and endocrine organ, which in excess leads to changes in body homeostasis, as well as vitamin deficiency which can aggravate the pathological state. Therefore, the evaluation of vitamin status is of fundamental importance in obese individuals.

  2. Metabolic syndrome in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: dietary and lifestyle factors compared to the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, Michael J; Taylor, Stephan F; Dalack, Gregory; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Burghardt, Kyle J; Evans, Simon J; McInnis, Melvin I; Grove, Tyler B; Brook, Robert D; Zöllner, Sebastian K; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2014-05-01

    Since a poor diet is often cited as a contributor to metabolic syndrome for subjects diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, we sought to examine dietary intake, cigarette smoking, and physical activity in these populations and compare them with those for the general population. Individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder (n = 116) and schizophrenia (n = 143) were assessed for dietary intake, lifestyle habits, and metabolic syndrome and compared to age-, gender-, and race-matched subjects from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2000. Additionally, matched subgroups within the patient populations were compared to elicit any differences. As expected, the metabolic syndrome rate was higher in the samples with bipolar disorder (33%) and schizophrenia (47%) compared to matched NHANES controls (17% and 11%, respectively), and not different between the patient groups. Surprisingly, both subjects with bipolar disorder and those with schizophrenia consumed fewer total calories, carbohydrates and fats, as well as more fiber (p schizophrenia had significantly lower total and low-density cholesterol levels (p disorder smoked less (p = 0.001), exercised more (p = 0.004), and had lower body mass indexes (p = 0.009) compared to subjects with schizophrenia. Counter to predictions, few dietary differences could be discerned between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and NHANES control groups. The subjects with bipolar disorder exhibited healthier behaviors than the patients with schizophrenia. Additional research regarding metabolic syndrome mechanisms, focusing on non-dietary contributions, is needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Adherence issues in inherited metabolic disorders treated by low natural protein diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MaCdonald, A; van Rijn, M; Feillet, F

    2012-01-01

    Common inborn errors of metabolism treated by low natural protein diets [amino acid (AA) disorders, organic acidemias and urea cycle disorders] are responsible for a collection of diverse clinical symptoms, each condition presenting at different ages with variable severity. Precursor...... on their neuropsychological profile. There are little data about their ability to self-manage their own diet or the success of any formal educational programs that may have been implemented. Trials conducted in non-phenylketonuria (PKU) patients are rare, and the development of specialist L-AAs for non-PKU AA disorders has...

  4. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Meng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient–host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control and hippocampus (cognitive processing from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  5. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Utilization of targeted array comparative genomic hybridization, MitoMet, in prenatal diagnosis of metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsverk, Megan L; Wang, Jing; Schmitt, Eric S; Pursley, Amber N; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2011-06-01

    Metabolic disorders are inborn errors that often present in the neonatal period with a devastating clinical course. If not treated promptly, these diseases can result in severe, irreversible disease or death. Determining the molecular defects in metabolic diseases is important in providing a definitive diagnosis for patient management. Therefore, prenatal diagnosis for families with known mutations causing metabolic disorders is crucial for timely intervention. Here we present three families in which standard Sanger sequencing failed to provide a definitive diagnosis, but the detection of genomic deletions by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) specifically targeted to mitochondrial and metabolic disease genes, MitoMet®, was fundamental in providing accurate prenatal diagnosis. In addition, to our knowledge, two deletions are the smallest detected by oligonucleotide array CGH reported for their respective genes, OTC and ARG1. These data highlight the importance of targeted array CGH in patients with suspected metabolic disorders and incomplete or negative sequencing results, as well as its emerging role in prenatal diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Obese Patients With a Binge Eating Disorder Have an Unfavorable Metabolic and Inflammatory Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succurro, Elena; Segura-Garcia, Cristina; Ruffo, Mariafrancesca; Caroleo, Mariarita; Rania, Marianna; Aloi, Matteo; De Fazio, Pasquale; Sesti, Giorgio; Arturi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate whether obese patients with a binge eating disorder (BED) have an altered metabolic and inflammatory profile related to their eating behaviors compared with non-BED obese.A total of 115 White obese patients consecutively recruited underwent biochemical, anthropometrical evaluation, and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Patients answered the Binge Eating Scale and were interviewed by a psychiatrist. The patients were subsequently divided into 2 groups according to diagnosis: non-BED obese (n = 85) and BED obese (n = 30). Structural equation modeling analysis was performed to elucidate the relation between eating behaviors and metabolic and inflammatory profile.BED obese exhibited significantly higher percentages of altered eating behaviors, body mass index (P Binge eating disorder obese also had a worse metabolic and inflammatory profile, exhibiting significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P eating behaviors of BED and the metabolic and inflammatory profile.Binge eating disorder obese exhibited an unfavorable metabolic and inflammatory profile, which is related to their characteristic eating habits.

  8. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrast, R.; Saher, G.; Nave, K.A.; Verheijen, M.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid

  9. Disorders of lipid metabolism in 3 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Huijberts, M.S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Disorders of lipid metabolism in 3 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2] [Article in Dutch] Wolffenbuttel BH, Huijberts MS. Academisch Ziekenhuis, afd. Endocrinologie, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastrict. bwo@sint.azm.nl Three patients with diabetes mellitus (type 2) and cardiovascular disease had

  10. Laboratory Diagnosis of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders. Diagnosis Algorithm in Hyperglycemic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Pankiv

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the laboratory diagnosis of disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Presents criteria for diagnosis of diabetes, an algorithm for oral glucose tolerance test, determine type of diabetes based on clinical and laboratory data. The article also raised the issues of diagnosis of gestational diabetes and a diagnostic algorithm of hyperglycemia conditions during pregnancy.

  11. Metabolic syndrome in drug naïve patients with substance use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathla, Manish; Singh, Manpreet; Anjum, Shazia; Kulhara, Parmanand; Jangli, Satyarth

    Metabolic syndrome is a combination of insulin resistance, impaired glucose regulation, dyslipidemia, hypertension, microalbuminuria and obesity and this increases the risk for diabetes, myocardial infarction and thus increases the risk of mortality. Substance dependence is considered as a prominent risk factor for metabolic syndrome, but not much work has been done in this field. Thus this study is aimed to know the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in drug naïve substance users. A total of 50 consecutive indoor drug naive patients with substance dependence (as per ICD 10) were included. Metabolic syndrome was assessed as per WHO criteria for metabolic syndrome. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0 software and Chi square test was applied. Of the 50 subjects (46% used alcohol; 26% used opioid and 28% were multiple substance users), a total of 20% of the subjects met the WHO criteria for metabolic syndrome and all of them were only alcoholics. Commonest abnormalities were low HDL (48%), raised SBP/DBP (26%/22%) and TG's (18%). Age, weight, height, DBP and BMI were significant predictors of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a common entity seen in patients with substance abuse, especially in patients with alcohol use disorder, as seen in our study. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Glycemic index: is it a predictor of metabolic and vascular disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkalla, Salwa W

    2014-07-01

    The role of glycemic index on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors received considerable attention in light of the current increase in cardiometabolic disorders. We aimed to deal and identify the recently published prospective epidemiological studies as well as randomized controlled studies investigating the associations of metabolic and cardiovascular risk markers with dietary intake of carbohydrates and with measures of the induced glycemic index. The main prospective studies and meta-analysis grouping the recent prospective and clinical interventions are discussed. Recently, during the last few years, evidence exists that high glycemic index/glycemic load diets contribute to risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Additionally, low glycemic index/glycemic load diets were found to be effective in the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders. The use of the low glycemic index notion in the dietary recommendations for children, adolescents and adults might play a role in the prevention, and or treatment, of metabolic diseases and their cardiovascular complications.

  13. Should metabolic diseases be systematically screened in nonsyndromic autism spectrum disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Schiff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the investigation of autism spectrum disorders (ASD, a genetic cause is found in approximately 10-20%. Among these cases, the prevalence of the rare inherited metabolic disorders (IMD is unknown and poorly evaluated. An IMD responsible for ASD is usually identified by the associated clinical phenotype such as dysmorphic features, ataxia, microcephaly, epilepsy, and severe intellectual disability (ID. In rare cases, however, ASD may be considered as nonsyndromic at the onset of a related IMD. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the utility of routine metabolic investigations in nonsyndromic ASD. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the results of a metabolic workup (urinary mucopolysaccharides, urinary purines and pyrimidines, urinary creatine and guanidinoacetate, urinary organic acids, plasma and urinary amino acids routinely performed in 274 nonsyndromic ASD children. RESULTS: The metabolic parameters were in the normal range for all but 2 patients: one with unspecific creatine urinary excretion and the other with persistent 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide the largest ever reported cohort of ASD patients for whom a systematic metabolic workup has been performed; they suggest that such a routine metabolic screening does not contribute to the causative diagnosis of nonsyndromic ASD. They also emphasize that the prevalence of screened IMD in nonsyndromic ASD is probably not higher than in the general population (<0.5%. A careful clinical evaluation is probably more reasonable and of better medical practice than a costly systematic workup.

  14. High-fat diets: modeling the metabolic disorders of human obesity in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Roland; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Bollheimer, L Cornelius

    2007-04-01

    High-fat (HF) diet feeding can induce obesity and metabolic disorders in rodents that resemble the human metabolic syndrome. However, this dietary intervention is not standardized, and the HF-induced phenotype varies distinctly among different studies. The question which HF diet type is best to model the metabolic deterioration seen in human obesity remains unclear. Therefore, in this review, metabolic data obtained with different HF diet approaches are compiled. Both whole-body and organ-specific diet effects are analyzed. On the basis of these results, we conclude that animal fats and omega-6/omega-9-containing plant oils can be used to generate an obese and insulin-resistant phenotype in rodents, whereas fish oil-fed animals do not develop these disorders. Looking at the present data, it does not seem possible to define an ideal HF diet, and an exact definition of diet composition and a thorough metabolic characterization of the HF diet effects in a researcher's specific laboratory setting remains essential for metabolic studies with this model.

  15. Depression and anxiety disorders and the link to physician diagnosed cardiac disease and metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, D Jolene; Lowry, Helen; Katz, Cara; Jacobi, Frank; Jassal, Davinder S; Sareen, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the relationship between cardiac and metabolic conditions with mental illness. Many studies have found associations between these conditions and depression but results with anxiety disorders have been mixed. We explore these relationships in a nationally representative survey using physician diagnoses of physical conditions and DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. Data came from the nationally representative German Health Survey (N=4181, age 18-65). Physician diagnoses of angina, myocardial infarction, congestive heart, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and obesity were examined in relation to depression and anxiety disorders, which were assessed through a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between these conditions. After adjusting for sociodemographics, psychiatric comorbidity, and substance use, having an anxiety disorder was associated with increased odds of cardiac conditions and metabolic risk factors with odds ratios ranging from 1.3 to 3.3. Depression was not associated with any of the conditions but was associated with poor medical compliance for health conditions on two outcomes measured. Anxiety was also associated with reduced medical compliance for one health behaviour measured. Anxiety disorders, but not depression, were associated with metabolic and cardiac conditions in our sample. Both conditions were related to some aspects of poor self-care for health conditions and therefore may be linked to negative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathogenesis of permeability barrier abnormalities in the ichthyoses: inherited disorders of lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Holleran, Walter M.; Jiang, Yan J.; Schmuth, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many of the ichthyoses are associated with inherited disorders of lipid metabolism. These disorders have provided unique models to dissect physiologic processes in normal epidermis and the pathophysiology of more common scaling conditions. In most of these disorders, a permeability barrier abnormality “drives” pathophysiology through stimulation of epidermal hyperplasia. Among primary abnormalities of nonpolar lipid metabolism, triglyceride accumulation in neutral lipid storage disease as a result of a lipase mutation provokes a barrier abnormality via lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation within the extracellular matrix of the stratum corneum (SC). Similar mechanisms account for the barrier abnormalities (and subsequent ichthyosis) in inherited disorders of polar lipid metabolism. For example, in recessive X-linked ichthyosis (RXLI), cholesterol sulfate (CSO4) accumulation also produces a permeability barrier defect through lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation. However, in RXLI, the desquamation abnormality is in part attributable to the plurifunctional roles of CSO4 as a regulator of both epidermal differentiation and corneodesmosome degradation. Phase separation also occurs in type II Gaucher disease (GD; from accumulation of glucosylceramides as a result of to β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency). Finally, failure to assemble both lipids and desquamatory enzymes into nascent epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) accounts for both the permeability barrier and desquamation abnormalities in Harlequin ichthyosis (HI). The barrier abnormality provokes the clinical phenotype in these disorders not only by stimulating epidermal proliferation, but also by inducing inflammation. PMID:18245815

  17. Importance of acylcarnitine profile analysis for disorders of lipid metabolism in adolescent patients with recurrent rhabdomyolysis: Report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Yasemin Topçu; Erhan Bayram; Pakize Karaoglu; Uluç Yis; Semra Hiz Kurul

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies due to disorders of lipid metabolism are a heterogeneous group of diseases. Newborns may present with hypotonia and convulsions, while progressive proximal muscle weakness or recurrent episodes of muscle weakness accompanied by rhabdomyolysis/myoglobinuria may be seen in older ages. There is little knowledge on detection of disorders of lipid metabolism by acylcarnitine profile (ACP) analysis by tandem mass spectrometry outside the neonatal period particularly in cases wi...

  18. Evaluation of Periaortic Adiposity and Metabolic Disorders in Obese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklioğlu, Beray Selver; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Akyürek, Nesibe; Alp, Hayrullah

    2016-03-05

    To evaluate the relationship between periaortic fat thickness (PAFT) and parameters involved in the development of metabolic complications of the cardiovascular system in obese children and to assess the usefulness of echocardiographic measurements of PAFT in correlation with cardiovascular risk factors. The study was conducted with 263 obese and 100 healthy children and adolescents. PAFT was measured with echocardiography method which was recently performed in obese children and adolescents. PAFT was significantly higher in the obese group (0.258±0.031 mm) than in the control group (0.137±0.032 mm) (pobese children and adolescents (sensitivity=1, specificity=0.97). The measurement of PAFT in obese children and adolescents may be a good method to reveal the presence of early cardiovascular risk.

  19. Stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 by metabolic acidosis requires osteoblastic intracellular calcium signaling and prostaglandin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy S; Bushinsky, David A

    2017-10-01

    Serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) increases progressively in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased mortality. FGF23 is synthesized in osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the factors regulating its production are not clear. Patients with CKD have decreased renal acid excretion leading to metabolic acidosis (MET). During MET, acid is buffered by bone with release of mineral calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P). MET increases intracellular Ca signaling and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-induced prostaglandin production in the osteoblast, leading to decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption. We found that MET directly stimulates FGF23 in mouse bone organ cultures and primary osteoblasts. We hypothesized that MET increases FGF23 through similar pathways that lead to bone resorption. Neonatal mouse calvariae were incubated in neutral (NTL, pH = 7.44, Pco2 = 38 mmHg, [HCO3-] = 27 mM) or acid (MET, pH = 7.18, Pco2 = 37 mmHg, [HCO3-] = 13 mM) medium without or with 2-APB (50 μM), an inhibitor of intracellular Ca signaling or NS-398 (1 μM), an inhibitor of COX2. Each agent significantly inhibited MET stimulation of medium FGF23 protein and calvarial FGF23 RNA as well as bone resorption at 48 h. To exclude the potential contribution of MET-induced bone P release, we utilized primary calvarial osteoblasts. In these cells each agent inhibited MET stimulation of FGF23 RNA expression at 6 h. Thus stimulation of FGF23 by MET in mouse osteoblasts utilizes the same initial signaling pathways as MET-induced bone resorption. Therapeutic interventions directed toward correction of MET, especially in CKD, have the potential to not only prevent bone resorption but also lower FGF23 and perhaps decrease mortality. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Calcium chloride effects on salinity-induced oxidative stress, proline metabolism and indole alkaloid accumulation in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul; Manivannan, Paramasivam; Sankar, B; Kishorekumar, Ashok; Panneerselvam, Rajaram

    2007-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. plants were grown with NaCl and CaCl2 in order to study the effect of CaCl2 on NaCl-induced oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation (TBARS content), H2O2 content, osmolyte concentration, proline (PRO)-metabolizing enzymes, antioxidant enzyme activities, and indole alkaloid accumulation. The plants were treated with solutions of 80 mM NaCl, 80 mM NaCl with 5 mM CaCl2 and 5 mM CaCl2 alone. Groundwater was used for irrigation of control plants. Plants were uprooted randomly on 90 days after sowing (DAS). NaCl-stressed plants showed increased TBARS, H2O2, glycine betaine (GB) and PRO contents, decreased proline oxidase (PROX) activity, and increased gamma-glutamyl kinase (gamma-GK) activity when compared to control. Addition of CaCl2 to NaCl-stressed plants lowered the PRO concentration by increasing the level of PROX and decreasing the gamma-GK activities. Calcium ions increased the GB contents. CaCl2 appears to confer greater osmoprotection by the additive role with NaCl in GB accumulation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) were increased under salinity and further enhanced due to CaCl2 treatment. The NaCl-with-CaCl2-treated C. roseus plants showed an increase in total indole alkaloid content in shoots and roots when compared to NaCl-treated and untreated plants.

  1. Water deficit stress mitigation by calcium chloride in Catharanthus roseus: effects on oxidative stress, proline metabolism and indole alkaloid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Sankar, B; Kishorekumar, A; Gopi, R; Somasundaram, R; Panneerselvam, R

    2007-10-15

    The present investigation was conducted to determine whether CaCl(2) increases Catharanthus roseus drought tolerance and if such tolerance is correlated with changes in oxidative stress, osmoregulation and indole alkaloid accumulation. C. roseus plants were grown under water deficit environments with or without CaCl(2). Drought induced oxidative stress was measured in terms of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and H(2)O(2) contents, osmolyte concentration, proline (PRO) metabolizing enzymes and indole alkaloid accumulation. The plants under pot culture were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 days interval drought (DID) stress and drought stress with 5mM CaCl(2) and 5mM CaCl(2) alone from 30 days after planting (DAP) and regular irrigation was kept as control. The plants were uprooted on 41 DAS (10 DID), 46 DAS (15 DID) and 51 DAS (20 DID). Drought stressed plants showed increased LPO, H(2)O(2), glycine betaine (GB) and PRO contents and decreased proline oxidase (PROX) activity and increased gamma-glutamyl kinase (gamma-GK) activity when compared to control. Addition of CaCl(2) to drought stressed plants lowered the PRO concentration by increasing the level of PROX and decreasing the gamma-GK activities. Calcium ions increased the GB contents. CaCl(2) appears to confer greater osmoprotection by the additive role with drought in GB accumulation. The drought with CaCl(2)-treated C. roseus plants showed an increase in total indole alkaloid content in shoots and roots when compared to drought stressed and well-watered plants.

  2. Defects in enzyme regulation versus defects in enzyme synthesis as cause of metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfiore, F

    1980-01-01

    Based on the consideration that normal metabolic processes depend upon the activity of key enzymes (and membrane carriers) as modulated by regulatory factors (hormones, diet, endogenous compounds, age, physical activity, environmental agents), metabolic disorders might be classified into two groups: (I) defects in enzyme synthesis, leading to enzyme deficiency (classical inborn errors of metabolism) or to qualitative (structural) enzyme alterations (entailing unresponsiveness to regulation), in the presence of normal regulatory factors; (II) defects in enzyme regulation, which include metabolic syndromes such as diabetes mellitus, obesity and hyperlipoproteinemias (other than type I), and are due to changes in enzyme activities caused by alterations in regulatory factor(s) (secondary to various causes), in the presence of normally responsive enzymes.

  3. Calcium Signalling: Fishing Out Molecules of Mitochondrial Calcium Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins — MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 — to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport.

  4. Metabolic Disorders in the Transition Period Indicate that the Dairy Cows’ Ability to Adapt is Overstressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundrum, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Metabolic disorders are a key problem in the transition period of dairy cows and often appear before the onset of further health problems. Problems derive from difficulties animals have to adapt to large variations and disturbances occurring both outside and inside the organism. A lack of success in solving these issues may be due to predominant approaches in farm management and agricultural science, dealing with such disorders as merely negative side effects. Instead, a successful adaptation of animals to their living conditions should be seen as an important end in itself. Both farm management and agricultural sciences should support animals in their ability to cope with nutritional and metabolic challenges by employing a functional and result-driven approach. Abstract Metabolic disorders are a key problem in the transition period of dairy cows and often appear before the onset of further health problems. They mainly derive from difficulties the animals have in adapting to changes and disturbances occurring both outside and inside the organisms and due to varying gaps between nutrient supply and demand. Adaptation is a functional and target-oriented process involving the whole organism and thus cannot be narrowed down to single factors. Most problems which challenge the organisms can be solved in a number of different ways. To understand the mechanisms of adaptation, the interconnectedness of variables and the nutrient flow within a metabolic network need to be considered. Metabolic disorders indicate an overstressed ability to balance input, partitioning and output variables. Dairy cows will more easily succeed in adapting and in avoiding dysfunctional processes in the transition period when the gap between nutrient and energy demands and their supply is restricted. Dairy farms vary widely in relation to the living conditions of the animals. The complexity of nutritional and metabolic processes and their large variations on various scales

  5. From “Kidneys Govern Bones” to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of “Kidneys Govern Bones.” Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes.

  6. Calcium, Magnesium, and Phosphorus Metabolism, and Parathyroid- Calcitonin Function during Prolonged Exposure to Elevated CO2 Concentrations on Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    de sous-marins. Undersea Biomed. Res. Sub. Suppl.: S57-S70.—On a etudie le metabolisme du calcium et du phosphore et I’equilibre acido -basique chez...du calcium soit regie par la consomma- tion et l’elimination osseuses de COj. L’equtlibre acido -basique serait regie par les phases de tamponnage

  7. [Consensus statement on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risks in patients with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This consensus document is an update of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk (CVR) guidelines for HIV-infected patients. This document has been approved by an expert panel of GEAM, SPNS and GESIDA after reviewing the results of efficacy and safety of clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendation strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on the GRADE system. A healthy lifestyle is recommended, no smoking and at least 30min of aerobic exercise daily. In diabetic patients the same treatment as non-HIV infected patients is recommended. HIV patients with dyslipidemia should be considered as high CVR, thus its therapeutic objective is an LDL less than 100mg/dL. The antihypertensive of ACE inhibitors and ARAII families are better tolerated and have a lower risk of interactions. In HIV-patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome and elevated transaminases with no defined etiology, the recommended is to rule out a hepatic steatosis Recommendations for action in hormone alterations are also updated. These new guidelines update previous recommendations regarding all those metabolic disorders involved in CVR. Hormone changes and their management and the impact of metabolic disorders on the liver are also included. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Interleukin-17 as a factor linking the pathogenesis of psoriasis with metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-03-01

    Psoriasis is a systemic disease with numerous concomitant metabolic disorders. Apparently, T-helper 17 lymphocytes and interleukin (IL)-17 constitute an important element linking those disorders. The role of IL-17 has been confirmed by numerous studies, although it remains not completely understood, and the study results are controversial. Based on the studies performed so far, it is assumed that IL-17 contributes to development of atherosclerosis by means of: stimulation of production of proinflammatory compounds; induction of apoptosis of endothelial cells and heart muscle cells; stimulation of von Willebrand factor production; and induction of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (atherosclerotic plaque rupture). On the other hand, IL-17 may exert protective activity due to inhibition of proatherogenic interferon-γ and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and production of type I collagen by smooth muscle cells. The role of IL-17 in the pathogenesis of obesity is as important as other proinflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, its deficiency increases diet-induced obesity and accelerates adipose tissue accumulation. Although the role of IL-17A in the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders in humans remains controversial, introduction of anti-IL-17A treatments brings hope that development of metabolic disorders in patients with psoriasis may be inhibited. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Posttraumatic stress disorder is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome in an impoverished urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tamara; Skelton, Kelly; Phifer, Justine; Jovanovic, Tanja; Gillespie, Charles F; Smith, Alicia; Umpierrez, Guillermo; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes and has increased prevalence in low-income African Americans, which constitutes a significant health disparity. The mechanisms responsible for this disparity remain unclear; the current study investigated the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and metabolic syndrome. We assessed childhood and adult trauma history, major depressive disorder, PTSD and the components of metabolic syndrome in an urban population. We recruited 245 low-socioeconomic-status, primarily African American subjects from general medical clinics in an inner-city hospital. Trauma exposure was extremely prevalent, with 90.6% of subjects reporting at least one significant trauma and 18.8% of subjects meeting criteria for current PTSD. Metabolic syndrome was also prevalent in this population (33.2%), with significantly higher rates among patients with current PTSD (47.8%, Pimpoverished urban population. Further studies should investigate if PTSD treatment may reduce the rates of metabolic syndrome, improve overall health outcomes and decrease health care disparities in minority populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Central role of E3 ubiquitin ligase MG53 in insulin resistance and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruisheng; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Fengxiang; Wu, Hong-Kun; Guo, Jiaojiao; Cao, Yongxing; Pi, Yanbin; Zhang, Xin; Jin, Li; Zhang, Mao; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Fenghua; Meng, Shaoshuai; Zhang, Xiuqin; Jiang, Ping; Cao, Chun-Mei; Xiao, Rui-Ping

    2013-02-21

    Insulin resistance is a fundamental pathogenic factor present in various metabolic disorders including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although skeletal muscle accounts for 70-90% of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal, the mechanism underlying muscle insulin resistance is poorly understood. Here we show in mice that muscle-specific mitsugumin 53 (MG53; also called TRIM72) mediates the degradation of the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), and when upregulated, causes metabolic syndrome featuring insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. MG53 expression is markedly elevated in models of insulin resistance, and MG53 overexpression suffices to trigger muscle insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome sequentially. Conversely, ablation of MG53 prevents diet-induced metabolic syndrome by preserving the insulin receptor, IRS1 and insulin signalling integrity. Mechanistically, MG53 acts as an E3 ligase targeting the insulin receptor and IRS1 for ubiquitin-dependent degradation, comprising a central mechanism controlling insulin signal strength in skeletal muscle. These findings define MG53 as a novel therapeutic target for treating metabolic disorders and associated cardiovascular complications.

  11. Relationship of the anxiety-depressive disorder with coronary heart disease, comorbid with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Michaylovskaya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. It is expected that combination of anxiety and depressive disorders with components of the metabolic syndrome can summarize their effects that can significantly affect the prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease. Methods and results. In order to establish an interconnections of the anxiety and depressive disorders with components of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary artery disease and to assess their impact on the course of the disease 81 patients with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease: angina pectoris II-III functional class were examined. The 1st group consisted of the 35 patients with isolated coronary heart disease, group 2 - 46 patients with coronary heart disease and metabolic syndrome. With the help of clinical and biochemical analysis, daily ECG monitoring, Seattle Angina Questionnaire, SF-36 questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS we investigated the severity of anxiety and depression and life quality of the patients , depending on higher overall levels of anxiety and depression on the scale of HADS. Conclusion. It was found that for coronary heart disease concomitant with the metabolic syndrome is associated with higher overall levels of anxiety and depression on the scale of HADS, correlated with components of metabolic syndrome such as abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. The presence of anxiety and depressive disorders in patients with metabolic syndrome, accompanied by more severe clinical course coronary heart disease according to Seattle questionnaire, reduced quality of life for patients, an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system in the direction of increased activity of the sympathetic part.

  12. Improvements in metabolic abnormalities among overweight schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglio, A; Gentile, A; Baldessarini, R J; Martone, S; Vitrani, G; La Marca, A; Bellomo, A

    2014-09-01

    As weight-gain and metabolic abnormalities during treatment with psychotropic drugs are of great concern, we evaluated effects of psycho-education and medical monitoring on metabolic changes among severely mentally ill patients. During repeated, systematic psycho-education about general health among 66 consecutive patients diagnosed with DSM-IV-TR schizophrenia (n=33) or type-I bipolar disorder (n=33), we evaluated (at intake 1, 2, 3, and 6 months) clinical psychiatric status, treatments and doses, recorded physiological parameters, and assessed attitudes about medication. At intake, patients with schizophrenia vs bipolar disorder were receiving 3-7 times more psychotropic medication, with 14% higher initial body-mass index (BMI: 29.1 vs 25.6 kg/m²), 12 times more obesity, and significantly higher serum lipid concentrations. During 6-months follow-up, among bipolar disorder patients, polytherapy and serum lipid concentrations declined more than among schizophrenia patients (e.g., total cholesterol+triglycerides, by 3.21 vs 1.75%/month). BMI remained stable. Declining lipid levels were associated with older age, bipolar disorder, being unemployed, higher antipsychotic doses, and lower initial BPRS scores (all P ≤ 0.001). Psychotropic treatments were more complex, and metabolic measures more abnormal among bipolar disorder than schizophrenia patients. Intensive psycho-education, clinical monitoring, and encouragement of weight-control for six months were associated with improvements in metabolic measures (but not to BMI), and more realistic attitudes about medication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome-related disorders in a large adult population in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokusoglu Mehmet

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few existing large population studies on the epidemiology of metabolic syndrome-related disorders of Turkey. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome-related disorders in the Turkish adult population, to address sex, age, educational and geographical differences, and to examine blood pressure, body mass index, fasting blood glucose and serum lipids in Turkey. Methods This study was executed under the population study "The Healthy Nutrition for Healthy Heart Study" conducted between December 2000 and December 2002 by the Health Ministry of Turkey. Overall, 15,468 Caucasian inhabitants aged over 30 were recruited in 14 centers in the seven main different regions of Turkey. The data were analyzed with the Students' t, ANOVA or Chi-Square tests. Results Overall, more than one-third (35.08 % of the participants was obese. The hypertensive people ratio in the population was 13.66 %, while these ratios for DM and metabolic syndrome were 4.16 % and 17.91 %, respectively. The prevalence of hypertension, metabolic syndrome and obesity were higher in females than males, whereas diabetes mellitus was higher in males than females. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and related disorders were found to be significantly different across educational attainments for both men and women. The prevalence of hypertension increased with age, while it was remarkable that in the age group of 60–69 years, prevalence of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome reached a peak value and than decreased. For obesity, the peak prevalence occurred in the 50–59 year old group. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and related disorders were found to be significantly different according to geographical region. Conclusion In conclusion, high prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome, particularly among women, is one of the major public health problems in Turkey. Interestingly, obesity prevalence is relatively

  14. Use of copper radioisotopes in investigating disorders of copper metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Genetics; Smith, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division; Mercer, J. [Deakin University, Rusden Campus, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Centre of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Copper is an essential trace element for life as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease in humans which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency. Using copper radioisotopes {sup 64}Cu (t 1/2 = 12.8 hr) and {sup 67}Cu (t 1/2 = 61 hr) we have studied the protein which is mutated in Menkes disease. This is a transmembrane copper pump which is responsible for absorption of copper into the body and also functions to pump out excess Cu from cells when Cu is elevated. It is therefore a vital component of normal Cu homeostasis. We have provided the first biochemical evidence that the Menkes protein functions as a P-type ATPase Cu pump (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press) and these data will be discussed. The assay involved pumping of radiocopper into purified membrane vesicles. Furthermore we have transfected normal and mutant Menkes genes into cells and are carrying out structure-function studies. We are also studying the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a Cu transport protein in order to determine how Cu regulates this protein and its cleavage products. These studies will provide vital information on the relationship between Cu and APP and processes which lead to Alzheimers disease

  15. Metabolic syndrome among individuals with heroin use disorders on methadone therapy: Prevalence, characteristics, and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Robles, María José; Torrens, Marta; Samos, Pilar; Roquer, Albert; Martires, Paula K; Sanvisens, Arantza; Muga, Roberto; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2017-08-03

    Observational studies have reported a high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in subjects on methadone therapy; there are, however, limited data about metabolic syndrome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and related factors in individuals with heroin use disorder on methadone therapy. A cross-sectional study in individuals with heroin use disorder on methadone therapy at a drug abuse outpatient center. Medical examinations and laboratory analyses after a 12-hour overnight fast were recorded. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. One hundred and twenty-two subjects were included, with a mean age of 46.1 ± 9 years, a median body mass index (BMI) of 25.3 kg/m 2 (interquartile range [IQR]: 21.2-28), and 77.9% were men. Median exposure to methadone therapy was 13 years (IQR: 5-20). Overweight and obesity were present in 29.5% and 17.2% of the participants, respectively. Metabolic syndrome components were low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (51.6%), hypertriglyceridemia (36.8%), high blood pressure (36.8%), abdominal obesity (27.0%), and raised blood glucose levels (18.0%). Abdominal obesity was more prevalent in women (52% vs. 20%, P = >0.01) and high blood pressure more prevalent in men (41.1% vs. 22.2%, P = .07). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 29.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 16.6-31.8). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, BMI (per 1 kg/m 2 increase odds ratio [OR]: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.27-1.76) and exposure time to methadone therapy (per 5 years of treatment increase OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.28-1.48) were associated with metabolic syndrome. Overweight and metabolic syndrome are prevalent findings in individuals with heroin use disorder on methadone therapy. Of specific concern is the association of methadone exposure with metabolic syndrome. Preventive measures and clinical routine screening should be

  16. DISORDERED PORPHYRIN METABOLISM: A POTENTIAL BIOLOGICAL MARKER FOR AUTISM RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Nicholas J.; Echeverria, Diana; Woods, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Autism (AUT) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that, together with Asperger Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), comprises the expanded classification of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). The heterogeneity of ASD underlies the need to identify biomarkers or clinical features that can be employed to identify meaningful subtypes of ASD, define specific etiologies, and inform intervention and treatment options. Previous studies have shown that disordered porphyrin metabolism, manifested principally as significantly elevated urinary concentrations of pentacarboxyl- (penta) and copro- porphyrins, is commonly observed among some children with ASD. Here, we extend these observations by specifically evaluating penta and copro porphyrins as biological indicators of ASD among 76 male children comprising 30 with validated AUT, 14 with PDD-NOS and 32 neurotypical (NT) controls. ASD children (AUT and PDD-NOS) had higher mean urinary penta (p porphyrin measures are strong predictors of both AUT and PDD-NOS and support the potential clinical utility of urinary porphyrin measures for identifying a subgroup of ASD subjects in whom disordered porphyrin metabolism may be a salient characteristic. PMID:22298513

  17. High-fat diet induces significant metabolic disorders in a mouse model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hao; Jia, Xiao; Yu, Qiuxiao; Zhang, Chenglu; Qiao, Jie; Guan, Youfei; Kang, Jihong

    2014-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common female endocrinopathy associated with both reproductive and metabolic disorders. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is currently used to induce a PCOS mouse model. High-fat diet (HFD) has been shown to cause obesity and infertility in female mice. The possible effect of an HFD on the phenotype of DHEA-induced PCOS mice is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate both reproductive and metabolic features of DHEA-induced PCOS mice fed a normal chow or a 60% HFD. Prepubertal C57BL/6 mice (age 25 days) on the normal chow or an HFD were injected (s.c.) daily with the vehicle sesame oil or DHEA for 20 consecutive days. At the end of the experiment, both reproductive and metabolic characteristics were assessed. Our data show that an HFD did not affect the reproductive phenotype of DHEA-treated mice. The treatment of HFD, however, caused significant metabolic alterations in DHEA-treated mice, including obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and pronounced liver steatosis. These findings suggest that HFD induces distinct metabolic features in DHEA-induced PCOS mice. The combined DHEA and HFD treatment may thus serve as a means of studying the mechanisms involved in metabolic derangements of this syndrome, particularly in the high prevalence of hepatic steatosis in women with PCOS. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  18. THE DISORDER OF KATHECHOLAMINE METABOLISM AFTER A KIDNEY RESECTION AND NEPHRECTOMY IN THE EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Ivanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental modeling of a kidney resection and nephrectomy in a series on 100 laboratory rats in comparison with group of the control animals has revealed essential authentic (p < 0,05 the disorder of kathecholamine metabolism not only in operating kidney, but also in opposite, and also in heart and Central nerve System. As a result of 30-day's supervision over animals is revealed, that the specified the disorder of kathecholamine metabolism in the early postoperative period after nephrectomy are expressed much in the greater degree and up to the end of experiment is saved in comparison with group of a kidney resection, in which by 30 day of experience all investigated parameters were normalized. The given study is an experimental substantiation the greater pathophysiological safety of a kidney resection in comparison with nephrectomy.

  19. THE DISORDER OF KATHECHOLAMINE METABOLISM AFTER A KIDNEY RESECTION AND NEPHRECTOMY IN THE EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Ivanov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The experimental modeling of a kidney resection and nephrectomy in a series on 100 laboratory rats in comparison with group of the control animals has revealed essential authentic (p < 0,05 the disorder of kathecholamine metabolism not only in operating kidney, but also in opposite, and also in heart and Central nerve System. As a result of 30-day's supervision over animals is revealed, that the specified the disorder of kathecholamine metabolism in the early postoperative period after nephrectomy are expressed much in the greater degree and up to the end of experiment is saved in comparison with group of a kidney resection, in which by 30 day of experience all investigated parameters were normalized. The given study is an experimental substantiation the greater pathophysiological safety of a kidney resection in comparison with nephrectomy.

  20. [Complex metabolic disorders revealing a gastric ulcer of the bulb. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neffati, F; Hellara, I; Jelizi, M A; Bahri, J; Douki, W; Amor, A Ben; Najjar, M F

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 54-year-old man, without particular pathological antecedents admitted to the emergency of the university hospital of Monastir, for right renal colic. Radiography of the urinary tract without preparation and renal echography showed bilateral renal lithiasis and a right ureteral lithiasis. The interrogation revealed concept of vomiting after which the patient felt relieved. The biological assessment objectified an hypochloremic metabolic alcalosis, an increase in the anion gap, a severe impaired renal function of obstructive origin and an hypokaliemia. The presence of the lithiasis did not explain on its own the metabolic disorders of this patient. The other investigations showed that initial pathology was an evolutionary bulb ulcer into pre-stenosis justifying treatment by omeprazole and explaining the biological disorders.

  1. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Modulation in the Management of Cardio-Metabolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulis, Ludovit; Foulquier, Sébastien; Namsolleck, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or obesity are linked with chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Consequently, RAS inhibition by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R......) blockers is the evidence-based standard for cardiovascular risk reduction in high-risk patients, including diabetics with albuminuria. In addition, RAS inhibition reduces the new onset of diabetes mellitus. Yet, the high and increasing prevalence of metabolic disorders, and the high residual risk even...... in properly treated patients, calls for additional means of pharmacological intervention. In the past decade, the stimulation of the angiotensin AT2 receptor (AT2R) has been shown to reduce inflammation, improve cardiac and vascular remodeling, enhance insulin sensitivity and increase adiponectin production...

  2. OPG Treatment Prevents Bone Loss During Lactation But Does Not Affect Milk Production or Maternal Calcium Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Laleh; Dumitru, Cristina; Dann, Pamela; Sterpka, John; VanHouten, Joshua; Kim, Wonnam; Kostenuik, Paul; Wysolmerski, John

    2015-08-01

    Lactation is associated with increased bone turnover and rapid bone loss, which liberates skeletal calcium used for milk production. Previous studies suggested that an increase in the skeletal expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells ligand (RANKL) coupled with a decrease in osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels likely triggered bone loss during lactation. In this study, we treated lactating mice with recombinant OPG to determine whether bone loss during lactation was dependent on RANKL signaling and whether resorption of the maternal skeleton was required to support milk production. OPG treatment lowered bone resorption rates and completely prevented bone loss during lactation but, surprisingly, did not decrease osteoclast numbers. In contrast, OPG was quite effective at lowering osteoblast numbers and inhibiting bone formation in lactating mice. Furthermore, treatment with OPG during lactation prevented the usual anabolic response associated with reversal of lactational bone loss after weaning. Preventing bone loss had no appreciable effect on milk production, milk calcium levels, or maternal calcium homeostasis when mice were on a standard diet. However, when dietary calcium was restricted, treatment with OPG caused maternal hypocalcemia, maternal death, and decreased milk production. These studies demonstrate that RANKL signaling is a requirement for bone loss during lactation, and suggest that osteoclast activity may be required to increase osteoblast numbers during lactation in preparation for the recovery of bone mass after weaning. These data also demonstrate that maternal bone loss is not absolutely required to supply calcium for milk production unless dietary calcium intake is inadequate.

  3. Determination of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Patients with Different Zinc Metabolic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    KECHRID, Zine; KENOUZ, Rabah

    2003-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the effect of different zinc metabolic disorders on alkaline phosphatase activity. Serum zinc, glucose and alkaline phosphatase activity were studied in 32 patients with liver cirrhosis, 30 with chronic renal failure and 42 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) compared to 42 healthy volunteers. Serum glucose concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in IDDM and liver cirrhosis patients (P < 0.05) compared to the controls. Serum ...

  4. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in mixture and obesity, diabetes and related metabolic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Le Magueresse-Battistoni, Brigitte; Labaronne, Emmanuel; Vidal, Hubert; Naville, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and associated metabolic disorders represent a major societal challenge in health and quality of life with large psychological consequences in addition to physical disabilities. They are also one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Although, different etiologic factors including excessive food intake and reduced physical activity have been well identified, they cannot explain the kinetics of epidemic evolution of obesity and diabetes with prevalence rates reaching pandem...

  5. A study of changes in bone metabolism in cases of gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Yoon Taek; Oda, Hiromi

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of increasing estrogen and decreasing androgen in males and increasing androgen and decreasing estrogen in females on bone metabolism in patients with gender identity disorder (GID). We measured and examined bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism markers retrospectively in GID patients who were treated in our hospital. In addition, we studied the effects of treatment on those who had osteoporosis. Patients who underwent a change from male to female (MtF) showed inhibition of bone resorption and increased L2-4 BMD whereas those who underwent a change from female to male (FtM) had increased bone resorption and decreased L2-4 BMD. Six months after administration of risedronate to FtM patients with osteoporosis, L2-4 BMD increased and bone resorption markers decreased. These results indicate that estrogen is an important element with regard to bone metabolism in males.

  6. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis – impact of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dąbrowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation – the crucial pathogenic mechanism of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis – is the main cause of accelerated atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and well-known consequences related to it. The conservative treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis may provide a significant influence on glucose metabolism. The paper is a literature overview concerning insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism during treatment with disease-modifying drugs including biologic DMARDs (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, corticosteroids and commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID. It has been found that the risk of carbohydrate disorders among those patients is much lower after therapy with hydroxychloroquine, methotrexate and TNF blockers – particularly with infliximab. The NSAID may play an important protective role in reducing risk of diabetes. The recent data show, contrary to general opinion, the advantageous outcome for glucose metabolism after treatment with corticosteroids, especially in the early active stage of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Pathogenesis of CNS involvement in disorders of amino and organic acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölker, S; Sauer, S W; Hoffmann, G F; Müller, I; Morath, M A; Okun, J G

    2008-04-01

    Inherited disorders of amino and organic acid metabolism have a high cumulative frequency, and despite heterogeneous aetiology and varying clinical presentation, the manifestation of neurological disease is common. It has been demonstrated for some of these diseases that accumulating pathological metabolites are directly involved in the manifestation of neurological disease. Various pathomechanisms have been suggested in different in vitro and in vivo models including an impairment of brain energy metabolism, an imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, altered transport across the blood-brain barrier and between glial cells and neurons, impairment of myelination and disturbed neuronal efflux of metabolic water. This review summarizes recent knowledge on pathomechanisms involved in phenylketonuria, glutaric aciduria type I, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency and aspartoacylase deficiency with examples, highlighting general as well as disease-specific concepts and their putative impact on treatment.

  8. Computational modeling to predict nitrogen balance during acute metabolic decompensation in patients with urea cycle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Erin L; Hall, Kevin D; McGuire, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional management of acute metabolic decompensation in amino acid inborn errors of metabolism (AA IEM) aims to restore nitrogen balance. While nutritional recommendations have been published, they have never been rigorously evaluated. Furthermore, despite these recommendations, there is a wide variation in the nutritional strategies employed amongst providers, particularly regarding the inclusion of parenteral lipids for protein-free caloric support. Since randomized clinical trials during acute metabolic decompensation are difficult and potentially dangerous, mathematical modeling of metabolism can serve as a surrogate for the preclinical evaluation of nutritional interventions aimed at restoring nitrogen balance during acute decompensation in AA IEM. A validated computational model of human macronutrient metabolism was adapted to predict nitrogen balance in response to various nutritional interventions in a simulated patient with a urea cycle disorder (UCD) during acute metabolic decompensation due to dietary non-adherence or infection. The nutritional interventions were constructed from published recommendations as well as clinical anecdotes. Overall, dextrose alone (DEX) was predicted to be better at restoring nitrogen balance and limiting nitrogen excretion during dietary non-adherence and infection scenarios, suggesting that the published recommended nutritional strategy involving dextrose and parenteral lipids (ISO) may be suboptimal. The implications for patients with AA IEM are that the medical course during acute metabolic decompensation may be influenced by the choice of protein-free caloric support. These results are also applicable to intensive care patients undergoing catabolism (postoperative phase or sepsis), where parenteral nutritional support aimed at restoring nitrogen balance may be more tailored regarding metabolic fuel selection.

  9. The paradox of the contrasting roles of chronic magnesium deficiency in metabolic disorders and field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg(2+)) deficiency is common in metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and insulin resistance. These disorders are also associated with a high incidence of cancer. Mg(2+) is the regulator par excellence of metabolism, largely through its role as a cofactor for all phosphoryl transfers in the cell. Because Mg(2+) deficiency inhibits energy production it might be expected to inhibit tumor production. However, the high incidence of cancer in metabolic disorders makes that seem unlikely. In order to understand this seeming paradox, it is important to understand the regulatory role of Mg(2+) in normal and neoplastic cells. Free Mg(2+) is the primary regulator of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. It also acts as a second messenger for growth factors in regulating protein synthesis. Varying Mg(2+) concentrations result in the same set of coordinated responses as varying serum concentrations. Selection by serial rounds of high cell density or reduced serum concentration at low cell density results in progressive stages of field cancerization. Highly transformed cells proliferate in much lower concentrations of Mg(2+) and grow to much higher saturation densities than normal cells. It remains to be seen whether reduction in Mg(2+) in sparse, exponentially proliferating cultures selects for increases in saturation density and transformed foci.

  10. Microbiome Remodeling via the Montmorillonite Adsorption-Excretion Axis Prevents Obesity-related Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and its related metabolic disorders are closely correlated with gut dysbiosis. Montmorillonite is a common medicine used to treat diarrhea. We have previously found that dietary lipid adsorbent-montmorillonite (DLA-M has an unexpected role in preventing obesity. The aim of this study was to further investigate whether DLA-M regulates intestinal absorption and gut microbiota to prevent obesity-related metabolic disorders. Here, we show that DLA-M absorbs free fatty acids (FFA and endotoxins in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the combination of fluorescent tracer technique and polarized light microscopy showed that DLA-M crystals immobilized BODIPY® FL C16 and FITC-LPS, respectively, in the digestive tract in situ. HFD-fed mice treated with DLA-M showed mild changes in the composition of the gut microbiota, particularly increases in short-chain fatty acids (SCFA-producing Blautia bacteria and decreases in endotoxin-producing Desulfovibrio bacteria, these changes were positively correlated with obesity and inflammation. Our results indicated that DLA-M immobilizes FFA and endotoxins in the digestive tract via the adsorption-excretion axis and DLA-M may potentially be used as a prebiotic to prevent intestinal dysbiosis and obesity-associated metabolic disorders in obese individuals.

  11. Dynapenic obesity as an associated factor to lipid and glucose metabolism disorders and metabolic syndrome in older adults - Findings from SABE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Carvalho, Lívia Pinheiro; Máximo, Roberta de Oliveira; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Brito, Tábatta Renata Pereira de; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Licio Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2017-06-10

    There is little evidence showing that dynapenic obesity is associated with lipid and glucose metabolism disorders, high blood pressure, chronic disease and metabolic syndrome. Our aim was to analyze whether dynapenic abdominal obesity can be associated with lipid and glucose metabolism disorders, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases in older adults living in São Paulo. This cross-sectional study included 833 older adults who took part of the third wave of the Health, Well-being and Aging Study in 2010. Based on waist circumference (>88 cm women and >102 cm men) and handgrip strength (metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Logistic regression was used to analyze the associations between dynapenia and abdominal obesity status and lipid and glucose metabolic profiles, blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. The fully adjusted models showed that D/AO individuals had higher prevalence of low HDL plasma concentrations (OR = 2.51, 95%CI: 1.40-4.48), hypertriglyceridemia (OR = 2.53, 95%CI: 1.43-4.47), hyperglycemia (OR = 2.05, 95%CI: 1.14-3.69), high glycated-haemoglobin concentrations (OR = 1.84, 95%CI: 1.03-3.30) and metabolic syndrome (OR = 12.39, 95%CI: 7.38-20.79) than ND/NAO. Dynapenic and D/AO individuals had higher prevalence of heart disease (OR = 2.05, 95%CI: 1.17-3.59 and OR = 1.92, 95%CI: 1.06-3.48, respectively) than ND/NAO. D/AO was associated with high prevalence of lipid and glucose metabolism disorders and metabolic syndrome while dynapenia and D/AO were associated with high prevalence of heart disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic decoupling in daily life in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaltz, Monique C; Kolodyazhniy, Vitaliy; Blechert, Jens; Margraf, Jürgen; Grossman, Paul; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2015-09-01

    Various studies have assessed autonomic and respiratory underpinnings of panic attacks, yet the psychophysiological functioning of panic disorder (PD) patients has rarely been examined under naturalistic conditions at times when acute attacks were not reported. We hypothesized that emotional activation in daily life causes physiologically demonstrable deviations from efficient metabolic regulation in PD patients. Metabolic coupling was estimated as within-individual correlations between heart rate (HR) and indices of metabolic activity, i.e., physical activity (measured by 3-axial accelerometry, Acc), and minute ventilation (Vm, measured by calibrated inductive plethysmography, as proxy for oxygen consumption). A total of 565 daytime hours were recorded in 19 PD patients and 20 healthy controls (HC). Pairwise cross-correlations of minute-by-minute averages of these metabolic indices were calculated for each participant and then correlated with several indices of self-reported anxiety. Ambulatory HR was elevated in PD (p = .05, d = 0.67). Patients showed reduced HR-Acc (p < .006, d = 0.97) and HR-Vm coupling (p < .009, d = 0.91). Combining Vm and Acc to predict HR showed the strongest group separation (p < .002, d = 1.07). Discriminant analyses, based on the combination of Vm and Acc to predict HR, classified 77% of all participants correctly. In PD, HR-Acc coupling was inversely related to trait anxiety sensitivity, as well as tonic and phasic daytime anxiety. The novel method that was used demonstrates that anxiety in PD may reduce efficient long-term metabolic coupling. Metabolic decoupling may serve as physiological characteristic of PD and might aid diagnostics for PD and other anxiety disorders. This measure deserves further study in research on health consequences of anxiety and psychosocial stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sleep architecture variation: a mediator of metabolic disturbance in individuals with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlow, P A; Cha, D S; Lam, R W; McIntyre, R S

    2013-10-01

    Remarkable proportions of individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) have comorbid metabolic disturbances (i.e., obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, dyslipidemia), and vice versa. Accumulating evidence suggests that common pathophysiologic pathways such as a chronic, low-grade, proinflammatory state mediate this frequent co-occurrence. However, it remains unclear what traits precede the onset and increase the risk for these pathologic states. The aim of our review was to evaluate the evidentiary base supporting the hypothesis that the increased hazard for metabolic disturbance in MDD subpopulations (and vice versa) is mediated in part by endophenotypic variations in sleep architecture. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language literature with the following search terms: sleep disturbance, circadian rhythm, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, obesity, MDD, mood disorder, prodrome, T2DM, cytokine, interleukin, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Longitudinal and meta-analysis data indicate that specific variations in sleep architecture (i.e., decreased slow-wave sleep [SWS], increased rapid eye movement [REM] density) precede the onset of depressive symptomatology for a subpopulation of individuals. The same sleep architecture variations also are associated with obesity, T2DM, and hypertension. Decreased SWS and increased REM density is correlated with an increase in proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor, etc.). This proinflammatory state has been independently shown to be associated with MDD and metabolic disturbances. Taken together, our review suggests that sleep architecture variation of increased REM density and decreased SWS may be an endophenotypic trait, which serves to identify a subpopulation at increased risk for depressive symptoms and metabolic disturbances. Future research is needed to discern the predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity of using sleep

  14. Risk of metabolic syndrome and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon; Mitchell, Alex J; De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Ward, Philip B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components are highly predictive of cardiovascular diseases. The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of MetS and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, comparing subjects with different disorders and taking into account demographic variables and psychotropic medication use. The secondary aim was to compare the MetS prevalence in persons with any of the selected disorders versus matched general population controls. The pooled MetS prevalence in people with severe mental illness was 32.6% (95% CI: 30.8%-34.4%; N = 198; n = 52,678). Relative risk meta-analyses established that there was no significant difference in MetS prevalence in studies directly comparing schizophrenia versus bipolar disorder, and in those directly comparing bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder. Only two studies directly compared people with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, precluding meta-analytic calculations. Older age and a higher body mass index were significant moderators in the final demographic regression model (z = -3.6, p = 0.0003, r(2)  = 0.19). People treated with all individual antipsychotic medications had a significantly (pantipsychotic-naïve participants. MetS risk was significantly higher with clozapine and olanzapine (except vs. clozapine) than other antipsychotics, and significantly lower with aripiprazole than other antipsychotics (except vs. amisulpride). Compared with matched general population controls, people with severe mental illness had a significantly increased risk for MetS (RR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.35-1.86; pantipsychotics should be considered when making treatment choices. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  15. Folate receptor alpha defect causes cerebral folate transport deficiency: a treatable neurodegenerative disorder associated with disturbed myelin metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinfeld, R.; Grapp, M.; Kraetzner, R.; Dreha-Kulaczewski, S.; Helms, G.; Dechent, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Grosso, S.; Gartner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Sufficient folate supplementation is essential for a multitude of biological processes and diverse organ systems. At least five distinct inherited disorders of folate transport and metabolism are presently known, all of which cause systemic folate deficiency. We identified an inherited

  16. INFLUENCE OF ENALAPRIL, DIGOXIN, ATENOLOL AND DILTIAZEM ON LIPID PEROXIDATION IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF COMPLEX METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Usanova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study influence of enalapril, digoxin, atenolol and diltiazem on lipid peroxidation and antioxidative protection in experimental disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism.Material and methods. White nonlinear mice were used for modeling of the complex metabolic disorders by alloxan and cholesterol infusion. Evaluation of acute drug toxicity and indicators of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection was performed. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, malondialdehyde concentration were evaluated.Results. Toxicity of digoxin, diltiazem, atenolol in complex metabolic disorders was increased, and toxicity of enalapril was unchanged. Enalapril had antioxidant effect. Atenolol had prooxidative effect in myocardium and kidneys, and diltiazem - in kidneys.Conclusion. Enalapril showed antioxidant effect and decreased concentration of secondary products of lipid peroxidation in renal tissue. It may be considered as the first line drug in complex metabolic disorders.

  17. INFLUENCE OF ENALAPRIL, DIGOXIN, ATENOLOL AND DILTIAZEM ON LIPID PEROXIDATION IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF COMPLEX METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Usanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study influence of enalapril, digoxin, atenolol and diltiazem on lipid peroxidation and antioxidative protection in experimental disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism.Material and methods. White nonlinear mice were used for modeling of the complex metabolic disorders by alloxan and cholesterol infusion. Evaluation of acute drug toxicity and indicators of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection was performed. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, malondialdehyde concentration were evaluated.Results. Toxicity of digoxin, diltiazem, atenolol in complex metabolic disorders was increased, and toxicity of enalapril was unchanged. Enalapril had antioxidant effect. Atenolol had prooxidative effect in myocardium and kidneys, and diltiazem - in kidneys.Conclusion. Enalapril showed antioxidant effect and decreased concentration of secondary products of lipid peroxidation in renal tissue. It may be considered as the first line drug in complex metabolic disorders.

  18. Depression, anxiety disorders, and metabolic syndrome in a population at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Kai G; Schweiger, Ulrich; Correll, Christoph; Müller, Conrad; Busch, Marie-Luise; Bauer, Michael; Schwarz, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Depressive symptoms have been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but less is known about anxiety disorders that can be comorbid or exist without depression. We evaluated the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in subjects consecutively examined at an outpatient clinic for diabetes prevention who were at-risk for T2DM, defined by FINDRISK scores, and compared metabolic syndrome (MetS) frequencies between subjects with and without psychiatric morbidity, entering also relevant variables for MetS into multivariate analyses. All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Psychiatric diagnosis was confirmed using a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Of 260 consecutively screened subjects, 150 (56.9±8.1 years old, males=56.7%, BMI=27.2±4.1 kg/m2) were at-risk for T2DM and were included. MetS, present in 27% of males and 25% of females, was significantly associated with having a current anxiety disorder (Pregression analysis, MetS was significantly associated with lifetime major depression, presence of any anxiety disorder, body weight, and physical activity. Our data in a high-risk group for T2DM support the association between depressive disorders and MetS, pointing to a similar role of anxiety disorders. Screening for anxiety and depression is recommended in this group at risk for T2DM.

  19. [Role of calcium ions in the mechanism of action of acetylcholine on energy metabolism in rat liver mitochondria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatamaniuk, M Z; Artym, V V; Kuka, O B; Doliba, M M; Shostakovs'ka, I V

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that administration of acetylcholine to animals (50 micrograms per 100 g of body weight) leads to the activation of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in the rat liver mitochondria under oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate; this effect depends on the concentration of calcium ions in the incubation medium of mitochondria. The rate of ADP-stimulated respiration of mitochondria of experimental animals reaches its maximum level under lower concentrations of Ca2+ than in the control animals. The results of investigation of dependence of acetyl choline effect on respiration of mitochondria on the concentration of alpha-ketoglutarate in calcium and calcium-free incubation medium have shown that the half-maximum effect of acetylcholine is observed in calcium medium at lower concentration of the substrate than in calcium-free medium. The latter indicates to the increase of affinity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase to alpha-ketoglutarate under these conditions. It is found out that acetylcholine (1.10(-8) M) increases the rate of ADP- and Ca(2+)-stimulated respiration of mitochondria of isolated perfused rat liver, while mutual effect of verapamyl and niphedipin removes this effect.

  20. Modulation of Gut Microbiota in the Management of Metabolic Disorders: The Prospects and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Sulaiman, Siti A.; Ab Wahab, Mohd S.

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a number of important roles including digestion, metabolism, extraction of nutrients, synthesis of vitamins, prevention against pathogen colonization, and modulation of the immune system. Alterations or changes in composition and biodiversity of the gut microbiota have been associated with many gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. Recent evidence suggests that altered composition and diversity of gut microbiota may play a role in the increased prevalence of metabolic diseases. This review article has two main objectives. First, it underscores approaches (such as probiotics, prebiotics, antimicrobial agents, bariatric surgery, and weight loss strategies) and their prospects in modulating the gut microbiota in the management of metabolic diseases. Second, it highlights some of the current challenges and discusses areas of future research as it relates to the gut microbiota and metabolic diseases. The prospect of modulating the gut microbiota seems promising. However, considering that research investigating the role of gut microbiota in metabolic diseases is still in its infancy, more rigorous and well-designed in vitro, animal and clinical studies are needed. PMID:24608927

  1. Modulation of gut microbiota in the management of metabolic disorders: the prospects and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O; Sulaiman, Siti A; Ab Wahab, Mohd S

    2014-03-07

    The gut microbiota plays a number of important roles including digestion, metabolism, extraction of nutrients, synthesis of vitamins, prevention against pathogen colonization, and modulation of the immune system. Alterations or changes in composition and biodiversity of the gut microbiota have been associated with many gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. Recent evidence suggests that altered composition and diversity of gut microbiota may play a role in the increased prevalence of metabolic diseases. This review article has two main objectives. First, it underscores approaches (such as probiotics, prebiotics, antimicrobial agents, bariatric surgery, and weight loss strategies) and their prospects in modulating the gut microbiota in the management of metabolic diseases. Second, it highlights some of the current challenges and discusses areas of future research as it relates to the gut microbiota and metabolic diseases. The prospect of modulating the gut microbiota seems promising. However, considering that research investigating the role of gut microbiota in metabolic diseases is still in its infancy, more rigorous and well-designed in vitro, animal and clinical studies are needed.

  2. Modulation of Gut Microbiota in the Management of Metabolic Disorders: The Prospects and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotayo O. Erejuwa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota plays a number of important roles including digestion, metabolism, extraction of nutrients, synthesis of vitamins, prevention against pathogen colonization, and modulation of the immune system. Alterations or changes in composition and biodiversity of the gut microbiota have been associated with many gastrointestinal tract (GIT disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. Recent evidence suggests that altered composition and diversity of gut microbiota may play a role in the increased prevalence of metabolic diseases. This review article has two main objectives. First, it underscores approaches (such as probiotics, prebiotics, antimicrobial agents, bariatric surgery, and weight loss strategies and their prospects in modulating the gut microbiota in the management of metabolic diseases. Second, it highlights some of the current challenges and discusses areas of future research as it relates to the gut microbiota and metabolic diseases. The prospect of modulating the gut microbiota seems promising. However, considering that research investigating the role of gut microbiota in metabolic diseases is still in its infancy, more rigorous and well-designed in vitro, animal and clinical studies are needed.

  3. Neonatal seizures: the overlap between diagnosis of metabolic disorders and structural abnormalities. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Alessandra; Casella, Erasmo B; Valente, Marcelo; Buchpiguel, Carlos A; Valente, Kette D R

    2003-06-01

    Inborn metabolic errors (IME) and cortical developmental malformations are uncommon etiologies of neonatal seizures, however they may represent treatable causes of refractory epilepsy and for this reason must be considered as possible etiological factors. This case report aims to demonstrate the importance of neuroimaging studies in one patient with neonatal seizures, even when there are clues pointing to a metabolic disorder. A previously healthy 14 day-old child started presenting reiterated focal motor seizures (FMS) which evolved to status epilepticus. Exams showed high serum levels of ammonia and no other abnormalities. A metabolic investigation was conducted with normal results. During follow-up, the patient presented developmental delay and left side hemiparesia. Seizures remained controlled with anti-epileptic drugs for four months, followed by relapse with repetitive FMS on the left side. Temporary improvement was obtained with anti-epileptic drug adjustment. At the age of 6 months, during a new episode of status epilepticus, high ammonia levels were detected. Other metabolic exams remained normal. The child was referred to a video-electroencephalographic monitoring and continuous epileptiform discharges were recorded over the right parasagittal and midline regions, with predominance over the posterior quadrant. A new neuroimaging study was performed and displayed a malformation of cortical development. Our case illustrates that because newborns are prone to present metabolic disarrangement, an unbalance such as hyperammonemia may be a consequence of acute events and conduct to a misdiagnosis of IME.

  4. Neonatal seizures: the overlap between diagnosis of metabolic disorders and structural abnormalities. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Alessandra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn metabolic errors (IME and cortical developmental malformations are uncommon etiologies of neonatal seizures, however they may represent treatable causes of refractory epilepsy and for this reason must be considered as possible etiological factors. This case report aims to demonstrate the importance of neuroimaging studies in one patient with neonatal seizures, even when there are clues pointing to a metabolic disorder. CASE REPORT: A previously healthy 14 day-old child started presenting reiterated focal motor seizures (FMS which evolved to status epilepticus. Exams showed high serum levels of ammonia and no other abnormalities. A metabolic investigation was conducted with normal results. During follow-up, the patient presented developmental delay and left side hemiparesia. Seizures remained controlled with anti-epileptic drugs for four months, followed by relapse with repetitive FMS on the left side. Temporary improvement was obtained with anti-epileptic drug adjustment. At the age of 6 months, during a new episode of status epilepticus, high ammonia levels were detected. Other metabolic exams remained normal. The child was referred to a video-electroencephalographic monitoring and continuous epileptiform discharges were recorded over the right parasagittal and midline regions, with predominance over the posterior quadrant. A new neuroimaging study was performed and displayed a malformation of cortical development. Our case illustrates that because newborns are prone to present metabolic disarrangement, an unbalance such as hyperammonemia may be a consequence of acute events and conduct to a misdiagnosis of IME.

  5. Evaluation of the Association between Maternal Smoking, Childhood Obesity, and Metabolic Disorders: A National Toxicology Program Workshop Review

    OpenAIRE

    Behl, Mamta; Rao, Deepa; Aagaard, Kjersti; Davidson, Terry L.; Levin, Edward D.; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Srinivasan, Supriya; Wallinga, David; White, Morris F.; Walker, Vickie R.; Thayer, Kristina A.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An emerging literature suggests that environmental chemicals may play a role in the development of childhood obesity and metabolic disorders, especially when exposure occurs early in life. Objective: Here we assess the association between these health outcomes and exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy as part of a broader effort to develop a research agenda to better understand the role of environmental chemicals as potential risk factors for obesity and metabolic disorder...

  6. Evening chronotype is associated with metabolic disorders and body composition in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji Hee; Yun, Chang-Ho; Ahn, Jae Hee; Suh, Sooyeon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoo, Hye Jin; Seo, Ji A; Kim, Sin Gon; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop; Shin, Chol; Kim, Nan Hee

    2015-04-01

    Chronotype is a trait determining individual circadian preference in behavioral and biological rhythm relative to external light-dark cycle. However, little is known about the relationship between chronotype and metabolic disorders. The aim of this study was to examine whether late chronotype is related to metabolic abnormalities and body composition in middle-aged adults, independent of sleep duration and lifestyle. A total of 1620 participants aged 47-59 years were recruited from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study. Chronotype was assessed by the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire. Associations of chronotype with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, sarcopenia, and visceral obesity were analyzed. All participants underwent the oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition was measured with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Visceral obesity was designated as visceral fat area, measured by abdominal computed tomography, of >100 cm(2). Chronotype was classified as morning in 29.6% of subjects, evening in 5.9%, neither morning nor evening in 64.5%. Evening type, when compared with morning type, was significantly associated with diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-2.95), metabolic syndrome (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.05-2.87), and sarcopenia (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.36-7.33) after adjusting for confounding factors. Gender differences in the associations were evident. In men, evening type was associated with diabetes (OR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.39-6.39) and sarcopenia (OR, 3.89; 95% CI, 1.33-11.33). Only metabolic syndrome was associated with evening type in women (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.11-4.43). At the population level, evening chronotype was independently associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and sarcopenia. These results support the importance of circadian rhythms in metabolic regulation.

  7. Nrg4 promotes fuel oxidation and a healthy adipokine profile to ameliorate diet-induced metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Chen

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Nrg4 exerts pleiotropic beneficial effects on energy balance and glucose and lipid metabolism to ameliorate obesity-associated metabolic disorders. Biologic therapeutics based on Nrg4 may improve both type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in patients.

  8. Aluminum chloride caused liver dysfunction and mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feibo; Liu, Yanfen; Zhao, Hansong; Yu, Kaiyuan; Song, Miao; Zhu, Yanzhu; Li, Yanfei

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) is known to exert hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms mostly are unclear. Liver is a metabolism organ that maintains the energy level and structural stability of body, mitochondria are the main sites of energy metabolism, thus, we hypothesized that mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder contributes to liver dysfunction in aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) treatment rat. To verify the hypothesis, forty male Wistar rats were randomly allocated and orally exposed to 0, 64mg/kg, 128mg/kg and 256mg/kg body weight AlCl 3 in drinking water for 120days, respectively. We found that AlCl 3 exposure reduced the electron transport chain complexes I-V activities and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level, as well as disturbed mitochondrial DNA transcript, presenting as the inhibited mRNA expressions of NADH dehydrogenase 1, NADH dehydrogenase 2, cytochrome b, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 and ATP synthase 6, indicating that AlCl 3 exposure disturbs the mitochondrial energy metabolism, and it caused an increase in liver enzymes (Aspartate aminotransferase and Alanine aminotransferase) and histopathological lesions. Additionally, we found that reactive oxygen species accumulation and decreased superoxide dismutase activity in mitochondria, and increased 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels in mitochondrial DNA, demonstrating AlCl 3 exposure promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress, which may be a contributing factor to mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder and liver dysfunction. The study displayed that mitochondria are the potential target of liver damage induced by AlCl 3 , providing considerable direction for the prevention and clinical intervention of liver diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Metabolic correction for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A biochemical-physiological therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikirova NA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective: This investigation was undertaken to determine the reference values of specific biochemical markers that have been have been associated with behavior typical of ADHD in a group of patients before and after metabolic correction.Background: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD affects approximately two million American children, and this condition has grown to become the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder of childhood. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH, the cause of the condition, once called hyperkinesis, is not known.The cause of ADHD is generally acknowledged to be multifactorial, involving both biological and environmental influence. Molecular, genetic, and pharmacological studies suggest the involvement of the neurotransmitter systems in the pathogenesis of ADHD. Polymorphic variants in several genes involved in regulation of dopamine have been identified, and related neurotransmitter pathways alterations are reported to be associated with the disease.Nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in fatty acids (EPA, DHA, the amino acid methionine, and the trace minerals zinc and selenium, have been shown to influence neuronal function and produce defects in neuronal plasticity, as well as impact behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.Materials/Methods: This study was based on data extracted from our patient history database covering a period of over ten years. We performed laboratory tests in 116 patients 2.7-25 years old with a diagnosis of ADHD. Sixty-six percent (66% of patients were males. Patients were followed from 3 month to 3 years. We compared the distributions of fatty acids, essential metals, and the levels of metabolic stress factors with established reference ranges before and after interventions. In addition, we analyzed the association between toxic metal concentrations and the levels of essential metals.Results: This study was based

  10. The Role of Vaspin in the Development of Metabolic and Glucose Tolerance Disorders and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumyana Dimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, most research efforts have been focused on studying insulin-sensitizing adipokines. One of the most recently discovered adipokines is vaspin, a visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor. Vaspin levels have been found significantly increased in mice with obesity and insulin resistance. It has been assumed that vaspin serves as an insulin sensitizer with anti-inflammatory effects and might act as a compensatory mechanism in response to decreased insulin sensitivity. Most studies in humans have shown a positive correlation between vaspin gene expression and serum levels, and metabolic syndrome parameters. Vaspin gene expression is influenced by age and gender, and the administration of insulin sensitizers enhances it in mice, whereas the use of metformin decreases serum vaspin levels in humans, probably due to different regulatory mechanisms. Presumably vaspin plays local and endocrine role in the development of initial and advanced atherosclerosis in obese subjects and might be used as a predictor of coronary and cerebrovascular disease. It is believed that vaspin could be regarded as a new link between obesity and related metabolic disorders, including glucose intolerance. The entire understanding of vaspin intimate mechanism of action might enable the development of novel etiology-based treatment strategies, targeting metabolic and glucose tolerance disorders.

  11. Designing medical foods for inherited metabolic disorders: why intact protein is superior to amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Denise Marie; Etzel, Mark Raymond

    2017-04-01

    Phenylketonuria and tyrosinemia are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by high blood levels of phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr), due to mutations in genes affecting Phe and Tyr metabolism, respectively. The primary management is a lifelong diet restricted in protein from natural foods in combination with medical foods comprised mixtures of synthetic amino acids. Compliance is often poor after childhood leading to neuropsychological sequela. Glycomacropeptide, an intact 64 amino acid glycophosphopeptide isolated from cheese whey, provides a new paradigm for the management of phenylketonuria and tyrosinemia because glycomacropeptide contains no Phe and Tyr in its pure form, and is also a prebiotic. Medical foods made from glycomacropeptide have been used successfully for the management of phenylketonuria and tyrosinemia. Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that intact protein from glycomacropeptide provides a more acceptable and physiologic source of defined protein compared to amino acids in medical foods. For example, harmful gut bacteria were reduced, beneficial short chain fatty acids increased, renal workload decreased, protein utilization increased, and bone fragility decreased using intact protein versus amino acids. Advances in biotechnology will propel the transition from synthetic amino acids to intact proteins for the management of inherited metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes in oculopalatal myoclonus: implication for neural pathways, underlying the disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Moon, So Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is characterized by rhythmic involuntary jerky movements of the soft palate of the throat. When associated with eye movements, it is called oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM). Ordinary PM is characterized by hypertrophic olivary degeneration, a trans-synaptic degeneration following loss of neuronal input to the inferior olivary nucleus due to an interruption of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle usually by a hemorrhage. However, the neural pathways underlying the disorder are uncertain. In an attempt to understand the pathologic neural pathways, we examined the metabolic correlates of this tremulous condition. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 patients with OPM (age, 49.9{+-}4.6 y: all males: 7 with pontine hemorrhage, 1 with diffuse brainstem infarction) and age-matched 50 healthy males (age, 50.7{+-} 9.0) and the regional glucose metabolism compared using SPM99. For group analysis, the hemispheres containing lesions were assigned to the right side of the brain. Patients with OPM had significant hypometabolism in the ipsilateral (to the lesion) brainstem and superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri (P < 0.05 corrected, k = 100). By contrast, there was significant hypermetabolism in the contralateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, thalamus, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus (P < 0.05 corrected, k=l00). Our data demonstrate the distinct metabolic changes between several ipsilateral and contralateral brain regions (hypometabolism vs. hypermetabolism) in patients with OPM. This may provide clues for understanding the neural pathways underlying the disorder.

  13. Preventive Effects of Salacia reticulata on Obesity and Metabolic Disorders in TSOD Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Akase

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracts of Salacia reticulata (Salacia extract, a plant that has been used for the treatment of early diabetes, rheumatism and gonorrhea in Ayurveda, have been shown to have an anti-obesity effect and suppress hyperglycemia. In this study, the effects of Salacia extract on various symptoms of metabolic disorder were investigated and compared using these TSOD mice and non-obese TSNO mice. Body weight, food intake, plasma biochemistry, visceral and subcutaneous fat (X-ray and CT, glucose tolerance, blood pressure and pain tolerance were measured, and histopathological examination of the liver was carried out. A significant dose-dependent decline in the gain in body weight, accumulation of visceral and subcutaneous fat and an improvement of abnormal glucose tolerance, hypertension and peripheral neuropathy were noticed in TSOD mice. In addition, hepatocellular swelling, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, inflammatory cell infiltration and single-cell necrosis were observed on histopathological examination of the liver in TSOD mice. Salacia extract markedly improved these symptoms upon treatment. Based on the above results, it is concluded that Salacia extract has remarkable potential to prevent obesity and associated metabolic disorders including the development of metabolic syndrome.

  14. Abnormal barrier function in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis: therapeutic implications for lipid metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Peter M; Williams, Mary L; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2012-01-01

    Ichthyoses, including inherited disorders of lipid metabolism, display a permeability barrier abnormality in which the severity of the clinical phenotype parallels the prominence of the barrier defect. The pathogenesis of the cutaneous phenotype represents the consequences of the mutation for epidermal function, coupled with a "best attempt" by affected epidermis to generate a competent barrier in a terrestrial environment. A compromised barrier in normal epidermis triggers a vigorous set of metabolic responses that rapidly normalizes function, but ichthyotic epidermis, which is inherently compromised, only partially succeeds in this effort. Unraveling mechanisms that account for barrier dysfunction in the ichthyoses has identified multiple, subcellular, and biochemical processes that contribute to the clinical phenotype. Current treatment of the ichthyoses remains largely symptomatic: directed toward reducing scale or corrective gene therapy. Reducing scale is often minimally effective. Gene therapy is impeded by multiple pitfalls, including difficulties in transcutaneous drug delivery, high costs, and discomfort of injections. We have begun to use information about disease pathogenesis to identify novel, pathogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the ichthyoses. The clinical phenotype often reflects not only a deficiency of pathway end product due to reduced-function mutations in key synthetic enzymes but often also accumulation of proximal, potentially toxic metabolites. As a result, depending upon the identified pathomechanism(s) for each disorder, the accompanying ichthyosis can be treated by topical provision of pathway product (eg, cholesterol), with or without a proximal enzyme inhibitor (eg, simvastatin), to block metabolite production. Among the disorders of distal cholesterol metabolism, the cutaneous phenotype in Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform Erythroderma and Limb Defects (CHILD syndrome) and X-linked ichthyosis reflect metabolite

  15. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisman, Nachum; Shaltiel, Galit; Daniely, Michal; Meiron, Oren E; Shechter, Assaf; Abrams, Steven A; Niv, Eva; Shapira, Yami; Sagi, Amir

    2014-10-01

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (CCC) using the dual stable isotope technique. The study was conducted in the Unit of Clinical Nutrition, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel. The study population included 15 early postmenopausal women aged 54.9 ± 2.8 (mean ± SD) years with no history of major medical illness or metabolic bone disorder, excess calcium intake, or vitamin D deficiency. Standardized breakfast was followed by randomly provided CCC or ACC capsules containing 192 mg elemental calcium labeled with 44Ca at intervals of at least 3 weeks. After swallowing the capsules, intravenous CaCl2 labeled with 42Ca on was administered on each occasion. Fractional calcium absorption (FCA) of ACC and CCC was calculated from the 24-hour urine collection following calcium administration. The results indicated that FCA of ACC was doubled (± 0.96 SD) on average compared to that of CCC (p calcium supplementation. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Effect of Intermittent Exposure to 3% CO2 on Respiration, Acid-Base Balance, and Calcium-Phosphorus Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    d’expositions intermittentes, ä 3% C02 sur la respiration, l’equilibre acido -basique, et le f metabolisme du calcium et du phosphore. Undersea Biomed...periode de quinze heures. L’exposition a ete suivie de 9 heures en air. Pour evaluer ; l’equilibre acido -basique, du sang capillaire "arterialise" est

  17. [Cardiac and metabolic risk factors in severe mental disorders. Task of a prevention manager].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederbogen, F; Schwarz, P; Häfner, S; Schweiger, U; Bohus, M; Deuschle, M

    2015-07-01

    People with severe mental disorders have a reduction in life expectancy of 13-30 % compared with the general population. This severe disadvantage is primarily due to an increased prevalence of cardiac and metabolic disorders, especially coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are the result of untoward health behavior characterized by smoking, low levels of physical activity and unhealthy dietary habits. Obesity, arterial hypertension and lipid disorders are also associated with this behavior and further increase the risk of CHD and type 2 diabetes. Thus, people with mental disorders constitute a population with a high risk of cardiovascular events. Appropriate measures for prevention and therapy are urgently indicated but rarely applied. This article presents new organizational structures to overcome this deficit with a prevention manager playing a central role in organizing and applying preventive and therapeutic care. Results from cardiology and diabetic medicine have shown the effectiveness of pooling this responsibility. The measure has the potential to reduce the increased mortality of people with severe mental disorders.

  18. Magnesium/calcium related neurological disorders in the ALS focus of the Kii Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Masayuki; Yoshida, Munehito; Tamaki, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Yasunori; Minamide, Akihito; Ota, Kiichiro [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan); Sasajima, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Current epidemiological surveys in the Western Pacific area and Kii Peninsula have suggested that low calcium(Ca), magnesium(Mg) and high aluminum(Al) and manganese(Mn) in river, soil and drinking water may be implicated in the pathogenetic process of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) and Parkinsonism-dementia(PD). The condition of unbalanced minerals was experimentally mimicked in this study using rats. Male Wistar rats, weighing 200 g, were maintained for 90 days on the following diets: (A) standard diet, (B) low Ca diet, (C) low Ca-Mg diet, (D) low Ca-Mg diet with high Al. In the groups maintained on unbalanced mineral diets, Ca and Mg contents of the bones were lower than standard diet. On the other hand, Ca content of CNS showed higher values in the unbalanced diet groups than those in the standard diet group. This was determined by neutron activation analysis(NAA) at KUR. Also, Ca content in soft tissues of rats given unbalanced mineral diets was higher than those on standard diet. Mg content of soft tissues and spinal cord of rats was markedly lower in the low Ca-Mg plus high Al diet group than the other three groups as determined by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry(ICP). Six Kii cases with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) also showed higher Ca and lower Mg contents in the CNS tissues than those of neurologically normal controls. The calcification of the spinal ligaments(CSL) has been reported in only 120 cases in the world and 28 cases of CSL in the Kii Peninsula have been found in the same foci as ALS. We analyzed Mg content of 7 spinal bones and 10 ligaments of the CSL and Ca content of 5 spinal bones compared with controls. The CSL showed lower values of Mg contents in bones and ligaments compared to controls. The Ca content in bones of CSL was significantly lower than that of controls. This suggests that the environmental factor may contribute to the pathogenesis of CSL due to low Ca and Mg intake as well as for ALS. (J.P.N.)

  19. Leptin is associated with mood status and metabolic homeostasis in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Nam Young; Yu, Han Young; Kim, Yong Sik; Ahn, Yong Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder are at a high risk for becoming obese. Adipokines are associated with depression and obesity via the inflammatory process. However, few studies have investigated the associations between depression and leptin, adiponectin and resistin levels in patients with bipolar disorder. We explored the associations between serum levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin and mood and metabolic status in patients with bipolar disorder. Body mass index (BMI) and serum leptin, adiponectin and resistin levels were assessed in 94 Korean patients with bipolar disorder. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-17 and the Young Mania Rating Scale were used to assess mood state. Leptin (17.19 ± 13.08 vs. 10.47 ± 10.05 ng/ml; p = 0.008) and adiponectin (10.51 ± 8.37 vs. 5.91 ± 2.82 μg/ml; p = 0.001) levels were higher in female than in male patients. After adjusting for mood state, age, smoking, alcohol habit, and BMI in a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), leptin (17.86 ± 1.22 vs. 10.05 ± 1.48 ng/ml; p MANCOVA, leptin levels were also significantly higher in depressed (16.78 ± 1.34 ng/ml) than in euthymic patients (10.73 ± 1.22 ng/ml; p = 0.001). Leptin is closely associated with the regulation of mood and metabolic homeostasis in patients with bipolar disorder. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Effects of elevated calcium on motor and exploratory activities of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godinho A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of serum and brain calcium concentration on rat behavior were tested by maintaining animals on either distilled water (N = 60 or water containing 1% calcium gluconate (N = 60 for 3 days. Animals that were maintained on high calcium drinking water presented increased serum calcium levels (control = 10.12 ± 0.46 vs calcium treated = 11.62 ± 0.51 µg/dl. Increase of brain calcium levels was not statistically significant. In the behavioral experiments each rat was used for only one test. Rats that were maintained on high calcium drinking water showed increased open-field behavior of ambulation (20.68% and rearing (64.57%. On the hole-board, calcium-supplemented animals showed increased head-dip (67% and head-dipping (126%, suggesting increased ambulatory and exploratory behavior. The time of social interaction was normal in animals maintained on drinking water containing added calcium. Rats supplemented with calcium and submitted to elevated plus-maze tests showed a normal status of anxiety and elevated locomotor activity. We conclude that elevated levels of calcium enhance motor and exploratory behavior of rats without inducing other behavioral alterations. These data suggest the need for a more detailed analysis of several current proposals for the use of calcium therapy in humans, for example in altered blood pressure states, bone mineral metabolism disorders in the elderly, hypocalcemic states, and athletic activities.

  1. Structural and functional deficits in a neuronal calcium sensor-1 mutant identified in a case of autistic spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T W Handley

    Full Text Available Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 is a Ca(2+ sensor protein that has been implicated in the regulation of various aspects of neuronal development and neurotransmission. It exerts its effects through interactions with a range of target proteins one of which is interleukin receptor accessory protein like-1 (IL1RAPL1 protein. Mutations in IL1RAPL1 have recently been associated with autism spectrum disorders and a missense mutation (R102Q on NCS-1 has been found in one individual with autism. We have examined the effect of this mutation on the structure and function of NCS-1. From use of NMR spectroscopy, it appeared that the R102Q affected the structure of the protein particularly with an increase in the extent of conformational exchange in the C-terminus of the protein. Despite this change NCS-1(R102Q did not show changes in its affinity for Ca(2+ or binding to IL1RAPL1 and its intracellular localisation was unaffected. Assessment of NCS-1 dynamics indicated that it could rapidly cycle between cytosolic and membrane pools and that the cycling onto the plasma membrane was specifically changed in NCS-1(R102Q with the loss of a Ca(2+ -dependent component. From these data we speculate that impairment of the normal cycling of NCS-1 by the R102Q mutation could have subtle effects on neuronal signalling and physiology in the developing and adult brain.

  2. [Peculiarities of epileptic syndrome in children with metabolic disorders of nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulariani, T D; Geladze, N M; Khachapuridze, N S; Mindadze, A B

    2005-11-01

    Metabolic diseases of the nervous system vary considerably in their clinical and pathological aspects. In neurological presentations of these disorders dominate mental retardation and epileptic syndrome. We have studied 27 patients of age from 3 months to 3 years: PKU -- 15 cases; homocystinuria -- 4; hyper-prolinemia -- 1; methylmalonic acidemia -- 5 and combined disorders -- 2. Epileptic syndrome was revealed in 21 patients, mental retardation in 1, spasticity in 5 and ataxia in 1 patient. Epileptic syndrome was presented with generalized seizures (grand mal -- 6 cases, myoclonic absences -- 13 cases) and partial seizures (simple motor -- 2 cases). Investigations did not found reliable correlations between certain forms of enzymophaties and EEG patterns. Patients were treated by pathogenic (dietary management with protein-modified diet and vitamin therapy) and symptomatic (anticonvulsants) treatment. We have achieved the positive therapeutic effect by pathogenic and anticonvulsive treatment in 11 patients. All these patients were from the first group (1-3 year). The best outcome was observed in the cases of the early diagnosed PKU. The most severe mental retardation and resistant epilepsy were revealed in patients with combined disorders of metabolism and vitamin-non-responsive forms of MMA and HCS.

  3. Metabolic disorders with typical alterations in MRI; Stoffwechselstoerungen mit typischen Veraenderungen im MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmuth-Metz, M. [Klinikum der Universitaet Wuerzburg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    The classification of metabolic disorders according to the etiology is not practical for neuroradiological purposes because the underlying defect does not uniformly transform into morphological characteristics. Therefore typical MR and clinical features of some easily identifiable metabolic disorders are presented. Canavan disease, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, Alexander disease, X-chromosomal adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenomyeloneuropathy, mitochondrial disorders, such as MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) and Leigh syndrome as well as L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria are presented. (orig.) [German] Die Einteilung von Stoffwechselstoerungen nach ihrer Aetiologie ist fuer den diagnostischen Neuroradiologen nicht sinnvoll, da sich aus der zugrunde liegenden Stoerung keine Rueckschluesse auf die zu erwartende MR-Morphologie ziehen lassen. Deshalb sollen anhand typischer bildmorphologischer Veraenderungen in Zusammenschau mit den jeweiligen klinischen Charakteristika einige leicht einzuordnende Stoffwechselstoerungen dargestellt werden. Es handelt sich um den Morbus Canavan, Morbus Pelizaeus-Merzbacher, Morbus Alexander, die X-chromosomal vererbte Adrenoleukodystrophie und Adrenomyeloneuropathie, die mitochondrialen Stoerungen MELAS (mitochondriale Enzephalomyopathie, Laktazidose und Stroke-like-Episoden) und Leigh-Syndrom sowie die L-2-Hydroxyglutarazidurie. (orig.)

  4. Outcomes of Lung Transplantation for Infants and Children with Genetic Disorders of Surfactant Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Whitney B; Zhang, Qunyuan; Faro, Albert; Sweet, Stuart C; Eghtesady, Pirooz; Hamvas, Aaron; Cole, F Sessions; Wambach, Jennifer A

    2017-05-01

    To compare outcomes of infants and children who underwent lung transplantation for genetic disorders of surfactant metabolism (SFTPB, SFTPC, ABCA3, and NKX2-1) over 2 epochs (1993-2003 and 2004-2015) at St Louis Children's Hospital. We retrospectively reviewed clinical characteristics, mortality, and short- and long-term morbidities of infants (transplanted at children (transplanted >1 year; n = 16) and compared outcomes by age at transplantation (infants vs children) and by epoch of transplantation. Infants underwent transplantation more frequently for surfactant protein-B deficiency, whereas children underwent transplantation more frequently for SFTPC mutations. Both infants and children underwent transplantation for ABCA3 deficiency. Compared with children, infants experienced shorter times from listing to transplantation (P = .014), were more likely to be mechanically ventilated at the time of transplantation (P children (P = .076) or between epochs. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated that children transplanted in epoch 1 (1993-2003) were more likely to develop systemic hypertension (P = .049) and less likely to develop post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder compared with children transplanted in epoch 2 (2004-2015) (P = .051). Post-lung transplantation morbidities and mortality remain substantial for infants and children with genetic disorders of surfactant metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Creatine metabolism and psychiatric disorders: Does creatine supplementation have therapeutic value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Athletes, body builders, and military personnel use dietary creatine as an ergogenic aid to boost physical performance in sports involving short bursts of high-intensity muscle activity. Lesser known is the essential role creatine, a natural regulator of energy homeostasis, plays in brain function and development. Creatine supplementation has shown promise as a safe, effective, and tolerable adjunct to medication for the treatment of brain-related disorders linked with dysfunctional energy metabolism, such as Huntington’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease. Impairments in creatine metabolism have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, leaving clinicians, researchers and patients alike wondering if dietary creatine has therapeutic value for treating mental illness. The present review summarizes the neurobiology of the creatine-phosphocreatine circuit and its relation to psychological stress, schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders. While present knowledge of the role of creatine in cognitive and emotional processing is in its infancy, further research on this endogenous metabolite has the potential to advance our understanding of the biological bases of psychopathology and improve current therapeutic strategies. PMID:22465051

  6. Creatine metabolism and psychiatric disorders: Does creatine supplementation have therapeutic value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patricia J

    2012-05-01

    Athletes, body builders, and military personnel use dietary creatine as an ergogenic aid to boost physical performance in sports involving short bursts of high-intensity muscle activity. Lesser known is the essential role creatine, a natural regulator of energy homeostasis, plays in brain function and development. Creatine supplementation has shown promise as a safe, effective, and tolerable adjunct to medication for the treatment of brain-related disorders linked with dysfunctional energy metabolism, such as Huntington's Disease and Parkinson's Disease. Impairments in creatine metabolism have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, leaving clinicians, researchers and patients alike wondering if dietary creatine has therapeutic value for treating mental illness. The present review summarizes the neurobiology of the creatine-phosphocreatine circuit and its relation to psychological stress, schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders. While present knowledge of the role of creatine in cognitive and emotional processing is in its infancy, further research on this endogenous metabolite has the potential to advance our understanding of the biological bases of psychopathology and improve current therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Disorders of phospholipid metabolism: an emerging class of mitochondrial disease due to defects in nuclear genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wen eLu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear and mitochondrial genomes co-exist within each cell. While the mitochondrial genome encodes for a limited number of proteins, transfer RNAs, and ribosomal RNAs, the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. Of the multitude of mitochondrial disorders known to date, only a fifth are maternally inherited. The recent characterization of the mitochondrial proteome therefore serves as an important step towards delineating the nosology of a large spectrum of phenotypically heterogeneous diseases. Following the identification of the first nuclear gene defect to underlie a mitochondrial disorder, a plenitude of genetic variants that provoke mitochondrial pathophysiology have been molecularly elucidated and classified into six categories that impact: 1 oxidative phosphorylation (subunits and assembly factors; 2 mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression; 3 mitochondrial protein import and assembly; 4 mitochondrial quality control (chaperones and proteases; 5 iron-sulfur cluster homeostasis; and 6 mitochondrial dynamics (fission and fusion. Here, we propose that an additional class of genetic variant be included in the classification schema to acknowledge the role of genetic defects in phospholipid biosynthesis, remodeling, and metabolism in mitochondrial pathophysiology. This seventh class includes a small but notable group of nuclear-encoded proteins whose dysfunction impacts normal mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism. The resulting human disorders present with a diverse array of pathologic consequences that reflect the variety of functions that phospholipids have in mitochondria and highlight the important role of proper membrane homeostasis in mitochondrial biology.

  8. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and metabolic abnormalities in patients with major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of prevalences and moderating variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, D; Correll, C U; Wampers, M; Sienaert, P; Mitchell, A J; De Herdt, A; Probst, M; Scheewe, T W; De Hert, M

    2014-07-01

    Individuals with depression have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important risk factor for CVD. We aimed to clarify the prevalence and correlates of MetS in persons with robustly defined major depressive disorder (MDD). We searched Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL up until June 2013 for studies reporting MetS prevalences in individuals with MDD. Medical subject headings 'metabolic' OR 'diabetes' or 'cardiovascular' or 'blood pressure' or 'glucose' or 'lipid' AND 'depression' OR 'depressive' were used in the title, abstract or index term fields. Manual searches were conducted using reference lists from identified articles. The initial electronic database search resulted in 91 valid hits. From candidate publications following exclusions, our search generated 18 studies with interview-defined depression (n = 5531, 38.9% male, mean age = 45.5 years). The overall proportion with MetS was 30.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 26.3-35.1] using any standardized MetS criteria. Compared with age- and gender-matched control groups, individuals with MDD had a higher MetS prevalence [odds ratio (OR) 1.54, 95% CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001]. They also had a higher risk for hyperglycemia (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.03-1.73, p = 0.03) and hypertriglyceridemia (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04-1.30, p = 0.008). Antipsychotic use (p related cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. MetS risk may be highest in those prescribed antipsychotics.

  10. [Effects of SERMs on bone health. Changes in bone metabolism in cases of gender identity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Tsuyoshi

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is that to investigate the influence of the sex hormones of different genders on adjustments for their bone metabolism. we retrospectively investigated changes in bone metabolism in patients with gender identity disorder and Klinefelter's Syndrome. In the patients who had been reassigned from male to female, we observed suppression of bone resorption and increment of BMD, and in the patients who had been reassigned from female to male, we observed acceleration of bone resorption and diminution of BMD. This indicates that estrogen is more important than testosterone for male and female bones and the efficacy of testosterone for female bones does not compensate for a shortage of estrogen. This result may suggest that SERM is also effective for male osteoporosis.

  11. The role of cholesterol metabolism and various steroid abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders: A hypothesis paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth; Kočovská, Eva; Minnis, Helen; Bourgeron, Thomas; Thompson, Lucy; Allely, Clare S

    2017-06-01

    Based on evidence from the relevant research literature, we present a hypothesis that there may be a link between cholesterol, vitamin D, and steroid hormones which subsequently impacts on the development of at least some of the "autisms" [Coleman & Gillberg]. Our hypothesis, driven by the peer reviewed literature, posits that there may be links between cholesterol metabolism, which we will refer to as "steroid metabolism" and findings of steroid abnormalities of various kinds (cortisol, testosterone, estrogens, progesterone, vitamin D) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Further research investigating these potential links is warranted to further our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying ASD. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1022-1044. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research.

  12. Metabolic control of the proteotoxic stress response: implications in diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuo-Hui; Dai, Chengkai

    2016-11-01

    Proteome homeostasis, or proteostasis, is essential to maintain cellular fitness and its disturbance is associated with a broad range of human health conditions and diseases. Cells are constantly challenged by various extrinsic and intrinsic insults, which perturb cellular proteostasis and provoke proteotoxic stress. To counter proteomic perturbations and preserve proteostasis, cells mobilize the proteotoxic stress response (PSR), an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional program mediated by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). The HSF1-mediated PSR guards the proteome against misfolding and aggregation. In addition to proteotoxic stress, emerging studies reveal that this proteostatic mechanism also responds to cellular energy state. This regulation is mediated by the key cellular metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In this review, we present an overview of the maintenance of proteostasis by HSF1, the metabolic regulation of the PSR, particularly focusing on AMPK, and their implications in the two major age-related diseases-diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Longitudinal study of the diagnosis of components of the metabolic syndrome in individuals with binge-eating disorder123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, James I; Lalonde, Justine K; Coit, Caitlin E; Tsuang, Ming T; McElroy, Susan L; Crow, Scott J; Bulik, Cynthia M; Hudson, Margo S; Yanovski, Jack A; Rosenthal, Norman R; Pope, Harrison G

    2010-01-01

    Background: Binge-eating disorder may represent a risk factor for the metabolic syndrome. Objective: The objective was to assess longitudinally the relation between binge-eating disorder and components of the metabolic syndrome. Design: At 2.5 and 5 y of follow-up, 134 individuals with binge-eating disorder and 134 individuals with no history of eating disorders, who were frequency-matched for age, sex, and baseline body mass index (BMI), were interviewed during the follow-up interval regarding new diagnoses of 3 metabolic syndrome components: hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes. Results: A comparison of individuals with and without a binge-eating disorder in analyses adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, and interval BMI change had hazard ratios (95% CIs) for reporting new diagnoses of metabolic syndrome components of 2.2 (1.2, 4.2; P = 0.023) for dyslipidemia, 1.5 (0.76, 2.9; P = 0.33) for hypertension, 1.6 (0.77, 3.9; P = 0.29) for type 2 diabetes, 1.7 (1.1, 2.6; P = 0.023) for any component, and 2.4 (1.1, 5.7; P = 0.038) for ≥2 components. Conclusion: Binge-eating disorder may confer a risk of components of the metabolic syndrome over and above the risk attributable to obesity alone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00777634. PMID:20427731

  14. Brain metabolic alterations in adolescents and young adults with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Ase; Heikkinen, Sami; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Korkman, Marit; Timonen, Marjut; Kuusi, Tuomo; Riley, Edward P; Lundbom, Nina

    2006-12-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure affects brain structure and function. This study examined brain metabolism using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and searched for regions of specific vulnerability in adolescents and young adults prenatally exposed to alcohol. Ten adolescents and young adults with confirmed heavy prenatal alcohol exposure and a diagnosis within the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) were included. Three of them had fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), 3 had partial FAS (PFAS), and 4 had alcohol-related neurobehavioral disorder (ARND). The control group consisted of 10 adolescents matched for age, sex, head circumference, handedness, and body mass. Exclusionary criteria were learning disorders and prenatal alcohol exposure. Three-dimensional (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI) was performed in the cerebrum and cerebellum. Metabolite ratios N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho), NAA/creatine (Cr) and Cho/Cr, and absolute metabolite intensities were calculated for several anatomic regions. In patients with FASD, lower NAA/Cho and/or NAA/Cr compared with controls were found in parietal and frontal cortices, frontal white matter, corpus callosum, thalamus, and cerebellar dentate nucleus. There was an increase in the absolute intensity of the glial markers Cho and Cr but no change in the neuronal marker NAA. Our results suggest that prenatal alcohol exposure alters brain metabolism in a long-standing or permanent manner in multiple brain areas. These changes are in accordance with previous findings from structural and functional studies. Metabolic alterations represent changes in the glial cell pool rather than in the neurons.

  15. The ripening disorder berry shrivel affects anthocyanin biosynthesis and sugar metabolism in Zweigelt grape berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, Michaela; Martinez, Sara Crespo; Eitle, Markus W; Warth, Benedikt; Andre, Christelle M; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Forneck, Astrid

    2017-10-26

    Timescale analyses suggest the berry shrivel (BS) disorder is induced before veraison with strong effects on anthocyanin biosynthesis, and minor effects on sugar transport and metabolism. Berry shrivel (BS)-affected grapes have low sugar contents, high acidity, less anthocyanins and flaccid berries. To date no pathogenic causes are known, and studies to elucidate the molecular basis leading to symptom induction and development are limited. Here we present a study on pre-symptomatic as well as symptomatic BS berries to characterize early metabolic changes, with focus on anthocyanin biosynthesis and sugars metabolism. Healthy and BS berries from six sampling time points were used (BBCH79-BBCH89). Our objectives are (1) to search for the beginning of BS-related physiological processes; (2) to search for key enzymes and sugar transporters involved in BS induction and development and (3) to understand the consequences on polyphenol biosynthesis. We employed high performance anion exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology for sugar and polyphenol analyses, respectively. Additionally we conducted expression analyses (qPCR) of key genes and enzymatic activity assays. Our results show that BS-related processes start before veraison, as determined by slightly reduced hexose contents and reduced expression levels of a vacuolar invertase (VviGIN1), two monosaccharide transporters (VviTMT2, VviTMT3) and the anthocyanin biosynthesis (VviUFGT, VviMYBA1/2) genes. Lower amounts of delphinidin and cyanidin glycosidic forms were determined, while caftaric acid, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide and (+)-catechin were increased in BS berries. Although not all results were conclusive, especially for the sugar metabolism, our data provide important knowledge to improve the understanding of the highly complex berry shrivel ripening disorder.

  16. Resting regional brain metabolism in social anxiety disorder and the effect of moclobemide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doruyter, Alex; Dupont, Patrick; Taljaard, Lian; Stein, Dan J; Lochner, Christine; Warwick, James M

    2017-11-03

    While there is mounting evidence of abnormal reactivity of several brain regions in social anxiety disorder, and disrupted functional connectivity between these regions at rest, relatively little is known regarding resting regional neural activity in these structures, or how such activity is affected by pharmacotherapy. Using 2-deoxy-2-(F-18)fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography, we compared resting regional brain metabolism between SAD and healthy control groups; and in SAD participants before and after moclobemide therapy. Voxel-based analyses were confined to a predefined search volume. A second, exploratory whole-brain analysis was conducted using a more liberal statistical threshold. Fifteen SAD participants and fifteen matched controls were included in the group comparison. A subgroup of SAD participants (n = 11) was included in the therapy effect comparison. No significant clusters were identified in the primary analysis. In the exploratory analysis, the SAD group exhibited increased metabolism in left fusiform gyrus and right temporal pole. After therapy, SAD participants exhibited reductions in regional metabolism in a medial dorsal prefrontal region and increases in right caudate, right insula and left postcentral gyrus. This study adds to the limited existing work on resting regional brain activity in SAD and the effects of therapy. The negative results of our primary analysis suggest that resting regional activity differences in the disorder, and moclobemide effects on regional metabolism, if present, are small. While the outcomes of our secondary analysis should be interpreted with caution, they may contribute to formulating future hypotheses or in pooled analyses.

  17. A novel predicted calcium-regulated kinase family implicated in neurological disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Dudkiewicz

    Full Text Available The catalogues of protein kinases, the essential effectors of cellular signaling, have been charted in Metazoan genomes for a decade now. Yet, surprisingly, using bioinformatics tools, we predicted protein kinase structure for proteins coded by five related human genes and their Metazoan homologues, the FAM69 family. Analysis of three-dimensional structure models and conservation of the classic catalytic motifs of protein kinases present in four out of five human FAM69 proteins suggests they might have retained catalytic phosphotransferase activity. An EF-hand Ca(2+-binding domain in FAM69A and FAM69B proteins, inserted within the structure of the kinase domain, suggests they may function as Ca(2+-dependent kinases. The FAM69 genes, FAM69A, FAM69B, FAM69C, C3ORF58 (DIA1 and CXORF36 (DIA1R, are by large uncharacterised molecularly, yet linked to several neurological disorders in genetics studies. The C3ORF58 gene is found deleted in autism, and resides in the Golgi. Unusually high cysteine content and presence of signal peptides in some of the family members suggest that FAM69 proteins may be involved in phosphorylation of proteins in the secretory pathway and/or of extracellular proteins.

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, impaired glucose metabolism, and bipolar disorder course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Santos, Camila M; Rizzo, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in bipolar disorder (BD). However, current evidence is limited and results have been highly heterogeneous. This study aimed to assess the moderating effect of impaired glucose metabolism...... mellitus. Information related to current and past psychiatric/medical history, as well as prescription of pharmacological treatments was also captured. RESULTS: Individuals with BD had lower levels of BDNF, relative to healthy controls, after adjustment for age, gender, current medications, smoking...

  19. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Modulation in the Management of Cardio-Metabolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulis, Ludovit; Foulquier, Sébastien; Namsolleck, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or obesity are linked with chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Consequently, RAS inhibition by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R...... in properly treated patients, calls for additional means of pharmacological intervention. In the past decade, the stimulation of the angiotensin AT2 receptor (AT2R) has been shown to reduce inflammation, improve cardiac and vascular remodeling, enhance insulin sensitivity and increase adiponectin production...

  20. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... Urine calcium level can help your provider: Decide on the best treatment for the most common type of kidney ...

  1. Apelin Role in the Development of Glucose Metabolism Disorders (Review of the Literature and Our Own Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Demidenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The physiological and pathogenetic role of adipokine apelin, endogenous ligand of apelin (APJ or APLNR receptors in the development of glucose metabolism disorders has been analyzed. Established correlations of apelin with components of carbohydrate metabolism confirm the effect on glucose metabolism manifestations. Ambiguous data about apelin level at insulin resistance syndrome, prediabetes, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension require further detailed study. The close association of apelin with development of diabetes mellitus type 2 and prediction of cardiovascular events in patients with metabolic syndrome has been found.

  2. MR spectroscopy in metabolic disorders of the brain; MR-Spektroskopie bei Stoffwechselerkrankungen des Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Metabolic disorders of the brain often present a particular challenge for the neuroradiologist, since the disorders are rare, changes on conventional MR are often non-specific and there are numerous differential diagnoses for the white substance lesions. As a complementary method to conventional brain MRI, MR spectroscopy may help to reduce the scope of the differential diagnosis. Entities with specific MR spectroscopy patterns are Canavan disease, maple syrup urine disease, nonketotic hyperglycinemia and creatine deficiency. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnostik metabolischer Erkrankungen des Gehirns stellt eine besondere Herausforderung in der Neuroradiologie dar, da die Erkrankungen insgesamt selten, die bildmorphologischen Befunde haeufig unspezifisch sind und es eine Vielzahl von Differenzialdiagnosen fuer die Veraenderungen der weissen Substanz gibt. Als zusaetzliche Technik kann die MR-Spektroskopie bei Stoffwechselerkrankungen helfen, die Diagnose einzugrenzen. Krankheitsentitaeten, die spezifische Veraenderungen in der Spektroskopie aufweisen, sind der Morbus Canavan, die Ahornsirupkrankheit, die nichtketotische Hyperglyzinaemie und Kreatinmangelsyndrome. (orig.)

  3. Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Patterns in Metabolic and Toxic Brain Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N. [Ege Univ. Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate metabolic and toxic brain disorders that manifest with restricted, elevated, or both restricted and elevated diffusion patterns on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Echo-planar diffusion MRI examinations were obtained in 34 pediatric patients with metabolic and toxic brain disorders proved by appropriate laboratory studies. The MRI unit operated at 1.5T with a gradient strength of 30 mT/meter, and a rise time of 600 s. b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with ADC values were studied. Results: Three patterns were observed: 1. A restricted diffusion pattern (high signal on b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images and low ADC values); 2. an elevated diffusion pattern (normal signal on b=1000 s/mm2 images and high ADC values); and 3. a mixed pattern (coexistent restricted and increased diffusion patterns in the same patient). Disorders manifesting with a restricted diffusion pattern included metachromatic leukodystrophy (n=2), phenylketonuria (n=3), maple syrup urine disease (intermediate form) (n=1), infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (n=1), Leigh (n=2), Wilson (n=3), and Canavan disease (n=1). Disorders with an elevated diffusion pattern included phenylketonuria (n=1), adrenoleukodystrophy (n=1), merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (n=2), mucopolysaccharidosis (n=2), Lowe syndrome (n=1), Leigh (n=2), Alexander (n=1), Pelizaeus-Merzbacher (n=1), and Wilson (n=3) disease. Disorders with a mixed pattern included L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria (n=2), non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (n=1), infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (n=2), maple syrup urine disease (n=1), and Leigh (n=1) disease. Conclusion: The findings suggested that the three different diffusion patterns reflect the histopathological changes associated with the disorders and different stages of a particular disorder. It is likely that the restricted diffusion pattern corresponds to abnormalities related to myelin, and the elevated

  4. Hereditary angioedema as a metabolic liver disorder: novel therapeutic options and prospects for cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Ameratuga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HAE is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations of the SERPING1 or the Factor 12 genes. It is potentially fatal, particularly if not identified at an early stage. Apart from androgens, which are contraindicated in children and in pregnant women, a range of effective, albeit very expensive treatments have recently become available for HAE patients. The cost of these new treatments is beyond the reach of most developing countries. At this time, there is no cure for the disorder. In spite of mutations of the SERPING1 gene, autoimmunity and infections are not prominent features of the condition. Here we present the argument that HAE should be viewed primarily as a metabolic liver disorder. This conceptual paradigm shift will stimulate basic research and may facilitate new therapeutic approaches to HAE outlined in this paper. We suggest several novel potential treatment options for HAE from the perspectives of clinical immunology, molecular biology and liver transplantation. Many of these offer the prospect of curing the disorder. The effectiveness of these options are rapidly improving in many cases and their risks are decreasing. Given the very high costs of treating HAE, some of these curative options may become feasible in the next decade.

  5. Imazalil exposure induces gut microbiota dysbiosis and hepatic metabolism disorder in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cuiyuan; Luo, Ting; Zhu, Zhihong; Pan, Zihong; Yang, Jiajing; Wang, Wenchao; Fu, Zhengwei; Jin, Yuanxiang

    2017-11-01

    The fungicide imazalil (IMZ) is used extensively to preserve freshness, prevent decay and control fungal infections in fruits, vegetables or other plants. Recently, some studies have reported that the real in aquatic systems have reached very high levels. Here, male adult zebrafish were exposed to 100 and 1000μg/L IMZ for 1, 7, 21days, and the gut microbiota and hepatic metabolism were evaluated. Exposure to a high concentration of IMZ for 21days decreased mucin secretion in the gut. Sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed a significant increase in the diversity of gut microbiota in male zebrafish. At the phylum level, the composition of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes was decreased, while those Fusobacteria and Firmicutes increased in the gut after exposure to 1000μg/L IMZ for 21days. At the genus level, 29 species of microorganisms were significantly changed after IMZ exposure. Based on GC/MS metabolomics analysis, 101 metabolites were observably significantly altered in the 1000μg/L IMZ-treatment group. These changed metabolites were mainly associated with the pathway of glycolysis, amino acid metabolism, and lipid metabolism. In addition, the transcription of some genes related to glycolysis and lipid metabolism, including Aco, Cpt1, Acc1, Srebp1a and Fas, was decreased significantly in the liver of zebrafish when exposed to 100 and 1000μg/L IMZ for 7 or 21days. These results indicated that exposure to IMZ could cause gut microbiota dysbiosis and metabolic disorders in adult zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucose and lipid metabolism disorders in the chickens with dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Z-P; Peng, Y-Z; Zhang, B-B; Fan, H; Liu, D; Guo, Y-M

    2017-11-03

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term treatment with dexamethasone (DEX) on the antioxidation and nutrition metabolism in broiler chickens. Broilers were placed on a high-nutrient diet for 41 days, and half were given orally DEX-supplemented water at 20 mg/L every other day from 19 to 41 days of age. DEX treatment downregulated superoxide dismutase activity as well as the mRNA expression of CuZn-superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase with a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio and an increase in malondialdehyde level in the liver of broilers. DEX treatment aggravated oxidative damage in the liver and, therefore, increased the sensitivity of broilers to ascites syndrome with higher mortality and reduced growth performance. Serum metabolomics analysis showed that DEX treatment significantly increased the levels of glucose, intermediates in protein metabolism (valine, proline, serine, threonine and urea) and lipid metabolism-related products (palmitic acid, stearic acid and cholesterol) while decreasing the levels of β-hydroxy butyric acid, succinic acid and malic acid, demonstrating that DEX treatment inhibited the Krebs cycle and the oxidation of fatty acids, and promoted the de novo synthesis of fatty acids as well as protein decomposition in the liver of broilers. Additionally, detection of metabolism-related enzymes revealed that DEX treatment inhibited glycolysis and promoted glycogen decomposition. In summary, DEX treatment resulted in oxidative stress and glucose and lipid metabolism disorders in the broilers. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. ROLE OF BREASTFEEDING IN PREVENTING LONG-TERM METABOLIC DISORDERS: REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Belyaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review is dedicated to the preventive role of breastfeeding in preserving long-term health of individuals and the population in whole. The issue is urgent due to high prevalence of multifactor metabolic diseases (obesity, pancreatic diabetes, hypertonic disease etc. in adolescents and adults; these socially significant have started to set on in younger persons in the recent years. The article presents results of the studies dedicated to the association between the nature of the infant's feeding and risk of metabolic pathology conducted in the recent decades in various countries. Most works put premature infants in the high risk group, as the diets involving special formulas contributing to "catching-up" growth of neonates with low birth weight are statistically significantly associated with high risk of long-term cardiovascular diseases. According to numerous studies, artificial feeding significantly increases the risk of excess weight and obesity, hypertonic disease and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Possible mechanisms of realization of hereditary susceptibility to metabolic disorders in the setting of artificial feeding are enhanced insulin burst paired with further development of insulin resistance; preventive role of breast milk is associated with the hormones therein, which program the individual's metabolism. Along with that, breastfeeding provides metabolic and immunological programming by means of forming optimal intestinal microbiota in a child. All the studies indicate importance of prolonged breastfeeding during infancy, which is why medical administrative support provided by medical personnel of medical and preventive facilities is important for preventing hypolactasia. District pediatricians and nurses not only control, but also organize the process of breastfeeding; when necessary, they recommend special devices intended to optimize lactation (breast pumps, nipple shields; if breast latching is not feasible – feeding

  8. Emerging Role of Corticosteroid Binding Globulin in Glucocorticoid-driven Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Moisan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs are critical for survival since they ensure energy supply necessary to the body in an ever challenging environment. GCs are known to act on appetite, glucose metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and storage. However, in order to be beneficial to the body, GC levels should be maintained in an optimal window of concentrations. Not surprisingly, conditions of GC excess or deficiency, e.g. Cushing’s syndrome or Addison’s disease are associated with severe alterations of energy metabolism. Corticosteroid Binding Globulin (CBG, through its high specific affinity for GCs, plays a critical role in regulating plasma GC levels. Genetic studies in various species including humans have revealed that CBG is the major factor influencing inter-individual genetic variability of plasma GC levels, both in basal and stress conditions. Some, but not all of these genetic studies have also provided data linking CBG levels to body composition. The examination of CBG-deficient mice submitted to hyperlipidic diets unveiled specific roles for CBG in lipid storage and metabolism. The importance of CBG is even more striking when animals are submitted to high-fat diet combined to chronic stress, mimicking our occidental lifestyle. An influence of CBG on appetite has not been reported but remains to be more finely analyzed. Overall, a role of CBG in GC-driven metabolic disorders is emerging in recent studies. Although subtle, the influence of CBG in these diseases could open the way to new therapeutic interventions since CBG is easily accessible in the blood.

  9. Menopause and metabolic syndrome in obese individuals with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoko; McKee, Sherry A; White, Marney A; Masheb, Robin M; Barnes, Rachel D; Grilo, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    Menopausal transition has been associated with the emergence of metabolic abnormalities, which may increase risk for chronic medical conditions in women. This study compared metabolic function between premenopausal women (n = 152), postmenopausal women (n = 88), and men (n =9 8) recruited for treatment studies for obesity co-occurring with binge eating disorder (BED), a high-risk population for developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). Postmenopausal women were more likely than premenopausal women to show elevated total cholesterol (OR = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.56-4.80) and poor glycemic control (OR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.32-6.33) but were more likely to have lower HDL levels (OR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.19-0.68). These became non-significant after adjusting for age. Both pre- and postmenopausal women were less likely than age-matched men to show elevated levels of triglycerides (OR = 0.27; 95% CI = 0.13-0.53 [postmenopausal], OR = 0.29; 95% CI = 0.16-0.53 [premenopausal]), blood pressure (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.25-0.91 [postmenopausal], OR=0.40; 95% CI = 0.23-0.69 [premenopausal]), and less likely to have MetS (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.21-0.78 [postmenopausal], OR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.79 [premenopausal]). Premenopausal women were also less likely to have elevated fasting glucose level (OR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.26-0.97) than age-matched men. Among obese women with BED, aging may have a more profound impact on metabolic abnormalities than menopause, suggesting the importance of early intervention of obesity and symptoms of BED. The active monitoring of metabolic function in obese men with BED may also be critical. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of calcium propionate by different numbers of applications in first week postpartum of dairy cows on hypocalcemia, milk production and reproductive disorders

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    Arda Kovanlıkaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate effects of calcium propionate on hypocalcemia, dry matter intake, body condition score, milk production and reproductive disorders in dairy cows. Twenty four multiparous Holstein cows were sorted by parity, body condition score (BCS in close-up period and season of calving and assigned to one of the three treatments. The cows in treatment 1 (T1 received two drenches at calving and 24h after calving. The cows in treatment 2 (T2 received three drenches at calving, 24h after calving and 7 days after calving. The cows in treatment 3 (T3 were the control. Each drench contained 143g of calcium as calcium propionate (0.68kg. Parameters studied were serum calcium, glucose and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA concentrations, dry matter intake (DMI, BCS, milk production (MP, incidence of retained placenta (RP and metritis. Milk fever developed in 5 of 8 cows, in 3 of 8 cows and in 3 of 8 cows in T1, T2 and T3, respectively, at calving. There was no cow with milk fever in T1 and T2 at 4h after second drench (about 28h after calving but 3 of 8 cows in T3 had still milk fever at this time. The cows receiving two drenches recovered from milk fever in a shorter term as compared to the cows in T3. There were no differences among treatments for DMI, BCS, MP, RP, serum glucose and NEFA concentrations during the experimental period. There was no difference for metritis between T1 and T3 but incidence of metritis in T2 was significantly lower as compared to T3 (P<0.05. Two drenches of calcium propionate were beneficial in treating milk fever and three drenches of calcium propionate were considered to have had a preventive effect for metritis.

  11. Breast milk feeding in infants with inherited metabolic disorders other than phenylketonuria - a 10-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Karin; Michel, Miriam; Zlamy, Manuela; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine; Ralser, Elisabeth; Jörg-Streller, Monika; Karall, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Published data on breast milk feeding in infants suffering from inherited metabolic disorders (IMDs) other than phenylketonuria (PKU) are limited and described outcome is variable. We aimed to evaluate retrospectively whether breastfeeding and/or breast milk feeding are feasible in infants with IMDs including organic acidemias, fatty acid oxidation disorders, urea cycle disorders, aminoacidopathies or disorders of galactose metabolism. Data on breastfeeding and breast milk feeding as well as monitoring and neurological outcome were collected retrospectively from our database of patients with the mentioned IMD, who were followed in our metabolic center within the last 10 years. Twenty patients were included in the study, who were either breast fed on demand or received expressed breast milk. All the infants were evaluated clinically and biochemically at 2-4-week intervals, with weight gain as the leading parameter to determine metabolic control. Good metabolic control and adequate neurological development were achieved in all patients but one, who experienced the only metabolic crisis observed within the study period. Breast milk feeding with close clinical and biochemical monitoring is feasible in most IMD and should be considered as it offers nutritional and immunological benefits.

  12. Improvement of metabolic disorders by an EP2receptor agonist via restoration of the subcutaneous adipose tissue in pulmonary emphysema.

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    Tsuji, Takao; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Ryota; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Ryoichi; Nagai, Atsushi; Aoshiba, Kazutetsu

    2017-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with co-morbidities. Metabolic disorders like hyperlipidemia and diabetes occur also in underweight COPD patients, although the mechanism is uncertain. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) plays an important role in energy homeostasis, since restricted capacity to increase fat cell number with increase in fat cell size occurring instead, is associated with lipotoxicity and metabolic disorders. The aim of this study is to show the protective role of SAT for the metabolic disorders in pulmonary emphysema of a murine model. We found ectopic fat accumulation and impaired glucose homeostasis with wasting of SAT in a murine model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema (EIE mice) reared on a high-fat diet. ONO-AE1-259, a selective E-prostanoid (EP) 2 receptor agonist, improved angiogenesis and subsequently adipogenesis, and finally improved ectopic fat accumulation and glucose homeostasis with restoration of the capacity for storage of surplus energy in SAT. These results suggest that metabolic disorders like hyperlipidemia and diabetes occured in underweight COPD is partially due to the less capacity for storage of surplus energy in SAT, though the precise mechanism is uncertained. Our data pave the way for the development of therapeutic interventions for metabolic disorders in emphysema patients, e.g., use of pro-angiogenic agents targeting the capacity for storage of surplus energy in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does Adding Intravenous Phosphorus to Parenteral Nutrition Has Any Effects on Calcium and Phosphorus Metabolism and Bone Mineral Content in Preterm Neonates?

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    Ali Mazouri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of parenteral nutritional supplementation of phosphorus may lead to exhibit higher plasma phosphate concentrations and less radiological features in premature neonates susceptible to osteopenia. The present study aimed to assess the beneficial effects of adding intravenous phosphorus to total parenteral nutrition (TPN on calcium and phosphorus metabolism in preterm neonates by measuring bone mineral content. This open-labeled randomized clinical trial was conducted on premature neonates who were hospitalized at NICU. The neonates were randomly assigned to two groups received TPN with intravenous sodium glycerophosphate or Glycophos (1.5 mmol/kg/day or TPN without sodium glycerophosphate. At the end of the four weeks of treatment, the presence of osteopenia was examined using DEXA Scan. After completing treatment protocols, the group received TPN with intravenous Glycophos had significantly lower serum alkaline phosphatase (360±60 versus 762±71, P<0.001, as well as higher serum calcium to creatinine ratio (1.6±0.3 versus 0.44±0.13, P<0.001 compared to the control group received TPN without Glycophos. Those who received TPN with intravenous Glycophos experienced more increase in bone mineral density than those in control group (0.13±0.01 versus 0.10±0.02, P<0.001. There was no significant difference in serum calcium and serum vitamin D between the case and control groups. Adding intravenous sodium glycerophosphate to TPN in premature neonates can compensate the lack of bone mineral content and help to prevent osteopenia.

  14. Functional and metabolic disorders in celiac disease: new implications for nutritional treatment.

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    Farnetti, Sara; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Garcovich, Matteo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Capristo, Esmeralda

    2014-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic disease causing the inflammation of the proximal small intestine, in genetically predisposed individuals. This is triggered by the consumption of the gluten protein and the side effects of the disease are mitigated by a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD) treatment. The predominant consequence of CD is malnutrition due to malabsorption (with diarrhea, weight loss, nutritional deficiencies, and altered blood parameters), especially in patients who do not show strict adherence to GFD treatment. Recent evidence shows that, despite a lifelong GFD, some functional disorders persist, such as compromised gallbladder function and motility, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, increased gut permeability, small-intestinal bowel overgrowth, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), lactose intolerance, and milk allergy. These abnormalities may predispose to the occurrence of overweight and obesity even in CD patients. This review focuses on the principal functional and metabolic disorders in both treated and untreated CD, ranging from alterations of the gastrointestinal system to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin secretion with the aim of providing new implications beyond a GFD, for an ad hoc nutrition treatment in these patients.

  15. Associations of sodium intake with obesity, metabolic disorder, and albuminuria according to age.

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    Oh, Se Won; Koo, Ho Seok; Han, Kum Hyun; Han, Sang Youb; Chin, Ho Jun

    2017-01-01

    Sodium intake is associated with obesity and metabolic disorder in the general population. However, sodium intake is significantly reduced according to the decrease of energy intake in older adults although the prevalence of obesity is higher than younger adults. We evaluate the association of sodium excretion (UNa) with blood pressure, obesity, metabolic disorders, and albuminuria according to age. An observational study using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV-V (2008-2011) was performed (N = 18,146). The 24 hour UNa was estimated from a single fasting urine sample.Participants aged≥75 years showed the highest risk for hypertension (HTN) in the highest quartile of UNa (1.769, 95% CI, 1.174-2.665), and the risks for HTN increased with advancing age. Obesity was not associated with UNa in participants aged≥75 years, and hypertriglyceridemia and body fat were not related to UNa in participants aged≥65 years, although these values were significantly associated with UNa in participants agedalbuminuria in those aged 20-39 years (95% CI, 1.130-12.630), and a 1.885 fold increased risk (95% CI, 1.156-3.075) among participants aged 40-64 years. In participants aged≥65 years, albuminuria was not associated with UNa. In contrast with HTN, UNa was not associated with albuminuria, obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, IFG, and IR in older adults despite a strong association in younger adults.

  16. Fat and cholesterol diet induced lipid metabolic disorders and insulin resistance in rabbit.

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    Zheng, H; Zhang, C; Yang, W; Wang, Y; Lin, Y; Yang, P; Yu, Q; Fan, J; Liu, E

    2009-09-01

    Lipid disorder has been found to result in insulin resistance (IR). IR often is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors. However, the pathogenesis of human IR is not completely understood. The present study was designed to examine if rabbits were fed with a diet containing high fat and high-cholesterol diet (HFCD) could develop lipid disorder and subsequently IR. Male Japanese white rabbits were fed either a normal chow diet or HFCD for 20 weeks. Plasma levels of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), glucose, and insulin were measured. To evaluate glucose metabolism, we performed an intravenous glucose tolerance test. In addition, we compared adipose tissue accumulation and aortic atherosclerosis lesions in HFCD-fed rabbits with those in control rabbits. In HFCD-fed rabbits there was an increase in plasma levels of TC and TG as well as visceral adipose tissue accumulation. Severe aortic atherosclerotic lesions were found in HFCD-fed rabbits. Although there were no differences in body weight, plasma insulin and blood pressure between the two groups, HFCD-fed rabbits showed higher insulin IR index compared to control rabbits. Our results showed that HFCD induced IR, increased adipose accumulation and atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits, suggesting that the HFCD-fed rabbits can serve as a model for the research on human IR and lipid metabolism abnormalities. J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  17. A cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on diabetic metabolic disorders.

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    Li, Wenwen; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiaoyong; Huang, Yanping; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Shouquan; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-02-26

    Breath acetone is a known biomarker for diabetes mellitus in breath analysis. In this work, a cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on clinical metabolic disorders of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was carried out. Breath acetone concentrations of 113 T2DM patients and 56 apparently healthy individuals were measured at a single time point. Concentrations varied from 0.22 to 9.41 ppmv (mean 1.75 ppmv) for T2DM, which were significantly higher than those for normal controls (ranged from 0.32 to 1.96 ppmv, mean 0.72 ppmv, p = 0.008). Observations in our work revealed that breath acetone concentrations elevated to different degrees, along with the abnormality of blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride and cholesterol. Breath acetone showed obviously positive correlations with blood ketone and urine ketone. Possible metabolic relations between breath acetone and diabetic disorders were also discussed. This work aimed at giving an overall assessment of breath acetone from the perspective of clinical parameters for type 2 diabetes.

  18. Hepcidin and iron metabolism disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Jelić Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Hepcidin may play a pathogenetic role in iron metobolism disorders. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between hepcidin concentration and parameters of iron metabolism in patients with different stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Methods. The study involved 104 patients with CKD: 64 on hemodialysis (HD and 40 patients in pre-dialysis stadium (pre-HD with adequate erythropoetin therapy and iron supplementation. The HD group was divided in four subgroups according to the level of serum ferritin (up to 100; 100-199; 200-499 and over 500 ng/mL. Parameters of anemia, iron status, inflamation and hepcidin level were evaluated. Results. The HD patients had a significantly lower eritrocyte count, erythrocytes indexes, hemoglobin and transferrin saturation and significantly higher iron, ferritin, hepcidin and total iron binding capacity (TIBC. The HD subgroups up to 199 ng/mL of serum feritin had lower high-sensitivity Creactive protein (hsCRP, iron and higher unbuffered iron binding capacity (UIBC, transferrin saturation and TIBC compared to the HD subgroups over 200 ng/mL. The lowest and the highest ferritin subgroups had the highest hepcidin level and it showed significant correlation with ferritin. Conclusion. Hepcidin may serve as a marker for better diagnosing and monitoring anemia and iron metabolism disorders in CKD.

  19. Glucose metabolism disorders and vestibular manifestations: evaluation through computerized dynamic posturography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Santos, Maruska D'Aparecida; Mezzalira, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Global sugar consumption has increased in the past 50 years; its abusive intake is responsible for peripheral insulin resistance, which causes the metabolic syndrome - obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. To evaluate the effect of a fractionated diet without glucose as treatment for labyrinthine disorders associated with glucose-insulin index. The study design was a prospective randomized controlled trial. Fifty-one patients were divided into two groups: the diet group (DG), which comprised subjects treated with a fractionated diet with glucose restriction, and the control group (CG), in which individuals were not counseled regarding diet. Patients underwent computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) and visual analog scale (VAS) on the first and 30th days of the study. There was improvement in the assessed posturographic conditions and VAS self-assessment in the DG group after 30 days when compared to the control group. The fractionated diet with glucose restriction was effective for the treatment of vestibular dysfunction associated with glucose metabolism disorders. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Untargeted metabolomic analysis of urine samples in the diagnosis of some inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeckova, Hana; Kalivodova, Alzbeta; Najdekr, Lukas; Friedecky, David; Hron, Karel; Bruheim, Per; Adam, Tomas

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is becoming an important tool in clinical research and the diagnosis of human diseases. It has been used in the diagnosis of inherited metabolic disorders with pronounced biochemical abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine if it could be applied in the diagnosis of inherited metabolic disorders (IMDs) with less clear biochemical profiles from urine samples using an untargeted metabolomic approach. A total of 14 control urine samples and 21 samples from infants with cystinuria, maple syrup urine disease, adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency and galactosemia were tested. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography on aminopropyl column in aqueous normal phase separation system using gradient elution of acetonitrile/ammonium acetate. Detection was performed by time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with electrospray ionisation in positive mode. The data were statistically processed using principal component analysis (PCA), principal component discriminant function analysis (PCA-DFA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression. All patient samples were first distinguished from controls using unsupervised PCA. Discrimination of the patient samples was then unambiguously verified using supervised PCA-DFA. Known markers of the diseases in question were successfully confirmed and a potential new marker emerged from the PLS regression. This study showed that untargeted metabolomics can be applied in the diagnosis of mild IMDs with less clear biochemical profiles.

  1. The Assessment of Relation Between Lipids Metabolism Disorder and Periodontal Diseases in Cardiovascular Patients

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    AK.Khoshkhoo Nejad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are many risk factor for periodontal diseases and from this point the disorders of lipid metabolism also may be a risk factor for pcriodononlal diseases.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation of periodontal disease and disorder of lipids metabolism in cardio vascular patients.Materials and Methods: In this sectional study, 45 patients who were hospitalized in shahid rajaee hospital divided and studied in two group, (included test group with 27 patents and control group with 18 patient. In both group the level of serum lipids including triglycerid, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol were determined and periodontal status were estimated by CPITN index. Then statistical result processed by Mann-Whiney U test and spearman- correlation.Results: The results showed thai CPITN index in high lipid group was more than low lipid group and spearman correlation between triglycerid and CPITN was 0.2S3 between cholesterol and CPITN was 0.372 and between LDL and CPITN was 0.230.Conclusion: In this study we found that there is a specific and significant relation between periodontal disease and serum lipids in cardio vascular patients.

  2. Experimental Models of Maternal Obesity and Neuroendocrine Programming of Metabolic Disorders in Offspring

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    Clare M. Reynolds

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies have clearly shown that disease risk in later life is increased following a poor early life environment, a process preferentially termed developmental programming. In particular, this work clearly highlights the importance of the nutritional environment during early development with alterations in maternal nutrition, including both under- and overnutrition, increasing the risk for a range of cardiometabolic and neurobehavioral disorders in adult offspring characterized by both adipokine resistance and obesity. Although the mechanistic basis for such developmental programming is not yet fully defined, a common feature derived from experimental animal models is that of alterations in the wiring of the neuroendocrine pathways that control energy balance and appetite regulation during early stages of developmental plasticity. The adipokine leptin has also received significant attention with clear experimental evidence that normal regulation of leptin levels during the early life period is critical for the normal development of tissues and related signaling pathways that are involved in metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. There is also increasing evidence that alterations in the epigenome and other underlying mechanisms including an altered gut–brain axis may contribute to lasting cardiometabolic dysfunction in offspring. Ongoing studies that further define the mechanisms between these associations will allow for identification of early risk markers and implementation of strategies around interventions that will have obvious beneficial implications in breaking a programmed transgenerational cycle of metabolic disorders.

  3. Biotin deprivation impairs mitochondrial structure and function and has implications for inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Ruiz, Estefanía; Díaz-Ruiz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Vázquez, Alaín de J; Ibarra-González, Isabel; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Rembao, Daniel; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Viollet, Benoit; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Corella, José Ahmed; Velázquez-Arellano, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Certain inborn errors of metabolism result from deficiencies in biotin containing enzymes. These disorders are mimicked by dietary absence or insufficiency of biotin, ATP deficit being a major effect,whose responsible mechanisms have not been thoroughly studied. Here we show that in rats and cultured cells it is the result of reduced TCA cycle flow, partly due to deficient anaplerotic biotin-dependent pyruvate carboxylase. This is accompanied by diminished flow through the electron transport chain, augmented by deficient cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) activity with decreased cytochromes and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. There was also severe mitochondrial damage accompanied by decrease of mitochondria, associated with toxic levels of propionyl CoA as shown by carnitine supplementation studies, which explains the apparently paradoxical mitochondrial diminution in the face of the energy sensor AMPK activation, known to induce mitochondria biogenesis. This idea was supported by experiments on AMPK knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The multifactorial ATP deficit also provides a plausible basis for the cardiomyopathy in patients with propionic acidemia, and other diseases.Additionally, systemic inflammation concomitant to the toxic state might explain our findings of enhanced IL-6, STAT3 and HIF-1α, associated with an increase of mitophagic BNIP3 and PINK proteins, which may further increase mitophagy. Together our results imply core mechanisms of energy deficit in several inherited metabolic disorders.

  4. Mitochondria, metabolic disturbances, oxidative stress and the kynurenine system, with focus on neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, Katalin; Robotka, Hermina; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2007-06-15

    The mitochondria have several important functions in the cell. A mitochondrial dysfunction causes an abatement in ATP production, oxidative damage and the induction of apoptosis, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of numerous disorders. This review focuses on mitochondrial dysfunctions and discusses their consequences and potential roles in the pathomechanism of neurodegenerative disorders. Other pathogenetic factors are also briefly surveyed. The second part of the review deals with the kynurenine metabolic pathway, its alterations and their potential association with cellular energy impairment in certain neurodegenerative diseases. During energy production, most of the O(2) consumed by the mitochondria is reduced fully to water, but 1-2% of the O(2) is reduced incompletely to give the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)). If the function of one or more respiratory chain complexes is impaired for any reason, the enhanced production of free radicals further worsens the mitochondrial function by causing oxidative damage to macromolecules, and by opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pores thereby inducing apoptosis. These high-conductance pores offer a pathway which can open in response to certain stimuli, leading to the induction of the cells' own suicide program. This program plays an essential role in regulating growth and development, in the differentiation of immune cells, and in the elimination of abnormal cells from the organism. Both failure and exaggeration of apoptosis in a human body can lead to disease. The increasing amount of superoxide anions can react with nitric oxide to yield the highly toxic peroxynitrite anion, which can destroy cellular macromolecules. The roles of oxidative, nitrative and nitrosative damage are discussed. Senescence is accompanied by a higher degree of reactive oxygen species production, and by diminished functions of the endoplasmic reticulum and the proteasome system, which are responsible for maintenance of the

  5. Calcium and Vitamin D Supplement Prescribing Practices among Providers Caring for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Are We Addressing Bone Health?

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    Shylaja Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD have several risk factors for low bone mineral density. The gluten-free, casein-free (GFCF diet is a complementary therapy sometimes used in ASD that raises concerns for the adequacy of calcium and vitamin D intake. This study evaluated the prescribing practices of calcium and vitamin D supplements and the practice of checking 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OHD levels by providers in 100 children with ASD, 50 of whom were on the GFCF diet. Fifty-two percent and 46% of children on the GFCF diet were on some form of vitamin D and calcium supplements, respectively, compared to 18% and 14% of those not on this diet. Twenty-four percent of children in the GFCF group had a documented 25(OHD level compared to none in the non-GFCF group. The data highlight a gap in calcium and vitamin D supplement prescribing practices among providers caring for children with ASD as well as a gap in the practice of checking 25(OHD levels.

  6. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among patients with major depressive disorder--differences between newly diagnosed first episode and recurrent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubicic, Rudolf; Jakovac, Hrvoje; Bistrović, Ivana Ljubicić; Franceski, Tanja; Mufić, Ana Kovak; Karlović, Dalibor

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess differences in prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among depressed patients in regard to the duration of the illness (first episode versus recurrent episodes). A total of 190 patients suffering from major depressive disorder were included in the study, diagnosed according to International classification of disorders, 10th revision. The same criteria were used to divide participants into two groups: first episode major depressive disorder and major depressive disorder with recurrent episodes. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the American National Cholesterol Education Program-Treatment Panel III. Results showed that metabolic syndrome is significantly more prevalent in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (45.2%) compared to patients with first episode of major depressive disorder (27.3%), mainly due to differences in plasma glucose, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol levels. These findings indicate the importance of the duration of depression and the number of recurring episodes as factors involved in etiopathogenesis of the associated metabolic syndrome.

  7. Novel adipokines: their potential role in the pathogenesis of obesity and metabolic disorders

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    Emilia Korek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since identification in 1994 of leptin, a hormone produced by adipocytes, adipose tissue has become the subject of intensive research. These studies contributed to the discovery that adipocytes have the ability to synthesize and secrete biologically active substances called „adipokines”. Adipokines include a variety of cytokines, peptide hormones and enzymes that play a role in a wide variety of biological functions. For example, they are involved in the regulation of appetite, energy homeostasis, vascular hemostasis, blood pressure, inflammatory and immune processes and play a role in the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats. In obese patients, the secretion of adipokines is frequently abnormal. These changes may predispose to the development of insulin resistance, hypertension and inflammation. Therefore, adipokines are the subject of ongoing clinical trials. The family of adipokines is increasing by the newly discovered peptides. This paper presents the current state of knowledge about retinol binding protein 4 (RBP-4, fasting-induced adipose factor/angiopoietin-like protein 4 (FIAF/ANGPTL4, fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4, irisin and their potential role in the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders associated with obesity. The knowledge of the role of newly discovered adipokines may help in the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  8. Androgen excess and metabolic disorders in women with PCOS: beyond the body mass index.

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    Condorelli, R A; Calogero, A E; Di Mauro, M; Mongioi', L M; Cannarella, R; Rosta, G; La Vignera, S

    2017-09-23

    Insulin resistance is a common feature among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), especially in those patients with hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. PCOS women are at risk for developing metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance and type II diabetes mellitus (DM II). The aim of this review is to explore the existing knowledge of the interplay between androgen excess, pancreatic β-cell function, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), intra-abdominal and subcutaneous (SC) abdominal adipocytes in PCOS, providing a better comprehension of the molecular mechanisms of diabetologic interest. A comprehensive MEDLINE ® search was performed using relevant key terms for PCOS and DM II. Insulin-induced hyperandrogenism could impair pancreatic β-cell function, the SC abdominal adipocytes' lipid storage capacity, leading to intra-abdominal adipocyte hypertrophy and lipotoxicity, which in turn promotes insulin resistance, and could enhance NAFLD. Fetal hyperandrogenism exposure prompts to metabolic disorders. Treatment with flutamide showed to partially reverse insulin resistance. Metabolic impairment seems not to be dependent only on the total fat mass content and body weight in women with PCOS and might be ascribed to the androgen excess.

  9. Natural molecules for the therapy of hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders in PCOS.

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    Cappelli, V; Musacchio, M C; Bulfoni, A; Morgante, G; De Leo, V

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy of women of reproductive age and a complex endocrine condition, due to its heterogeneity and uncertainty about its etiology. However, PCOS is also associated with other metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes. There are few medications that are approved for the most common symptoms of PCOS, leading to the off-label use of medications that were approved for other indications. One of the most common medications being used off label for PCOS is metformin. Research of other effective therapeutic options has included the utility of inositol. A systematic literature search of PubMed was performed using the following combination of terms: 'PCOS', 'hyperandrogenism' 'inositol', 'natural molecules'. Only papers published between 2000 and 2016 were included in our analysis. The present review analyzes all aspects of the choice of natural molecules in the treatment of hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders in PCOS women. The rationale underlying the use of inositols as a therapeutic application in PCOS derives from their activities as insulin mimetic agents and their salutary effects on metabolism and hyperandrogenism without side effects. In this review will discuss the role of a number of natural associations between inositol and different substances in the treatment of hyperandrogenic symptoms in PCOS women.

  10. Natural Products to Counteract the Epidemic of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders

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    Birgit Waltenberger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural products have always been exploited to promote health and served as a valuable source for the discovery of new drugs. In this review, the great potential of natural compounds and medicinal plants for the treatment or prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, global health problems with rising prevalence, is addressed. Special emphasis is laid on natural products for which efficacy and safety have already been proven and which are in clinical trials, as well as on plants used in traditional medicine. Potential benefits from certain dietary habits and dietary constituents, as well as common molecular targets of natural products, are also briefly discussed. A glimpse at the history of statins and biguanides, two prominent representatives of natural products (or their derivatives in the fight against metabolic disease, is also included. The present review aims to serve as an “opening” of this special issue of Molecules, presenting key historical developments, recent advances, and future perspectives outlining the potential of natural products for prevention or therapy of cardiovascular and metabolic disease.

  11. L-Carnitine intake prevents irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder.

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    Wu, Tao; Guo, Anqi; Shu, Qingyu; Qi, Yangjian; Kong, Ying; Sun, Zhiping; Sun, Shumin; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-10

    L-Carnitine supplementation has been used to reduce obesity caused by high-fat diet, which is beneficial for lowering blood and hepatic lipid levels, and for ameliorating fatty liver. However, whether l-carnitine may affect irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder is still largely unknown. In the present study, we developed a time-delayed pattern of eating, and investigated the effects of l-carnitine on the irregular eating induced adiposity in mice. After an experimental period of 8 weeks with l-carnitine supplementation, l-carnitine significantly inhibited body weight increase and epididymal fat weight gain induced by the time-delayed feeding. In addition, l-carnitine administration decreased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (GPT), glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and triglyceride (TG), which were significantly elevated by the irregular feeding. Moreover, mice supplemented with l-carnitine did not display glucose intolerance-associated hallmarks, which were found in the irregular feeding-induced obesity. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that l-carnitine counteracted the negative alterations of lipid metabolic gene expression (fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase) in the liver and fat of mice caused by the irregular feeding. Therefore, our results suggest that the time-delayed pattern of eating can induce adiposity and lipid metabolic disorders, while l-carnitine supplementation might prevent these negative symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Can Hematologic Parameters be an Indicator of Metabolic Disorders Accompanying Rosacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin Belli, Asli; Kara, Asude; Ozbas Gok, Seyran

    2017-07-01

    Recently, diverse hematologic parameters have been used as an indicator of the presence or severity of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. Our aim was to investigate the ratios of neutrophils to lymphocytes (NL), monocytes to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (MHC), and platelets to lymphocytes (PL) in patients with rosacea in comparison with the control group and determine whether there was a correlation between these ratios and metabolic disorders in patients with rosacea. We conducted a case-control study on 61 patients with rosacea and 60 healthy controls between January 2015 and January 2016 at the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic, Mugla, Turkey. Demographic data, biochemical parameters, hematologic parameters and ratios, the presence of metabolic syndrome (MS), and the presence of insulin resistance (IR) in the participants were recorded. Sixty one patients with rosacea (16 men, 45 women) and 60 controls (13 men, 47 women) were included in the study. The NL ratio, mean levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and total cholesterol, triglyceride, C-reactive protein (CRP), systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and the presence of IR were significantly higher in patients with rosacea than in controls. In the rosacea group, the MHC ratio was significantly higher in patients with rosacea with IR and MS. Moreover, only the MHC ratio was an independent predictor of MS according to univariate logistic regression analysis. The cutoff value of MHC on admission for predicting MS in patients with rosacea was 0.013.The higher levels of NL ratio and IR in the rosacea group corroborate the previous studies demonstrating a high level of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rosacea. The MHC ratio may be used as a simple and inexpensive method to predict metabolic disorders in patients with rosacea.

  13. Ovulation, implantation and placentation in females with obesity and metabolic disorders: life in the balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio; Pallares, Pilar; Ovilo, Cristina

    2011-12-01

    Obesity due to endocrine and metabolic disorders causing dysfunctions of appetite-regulating pathways and energy balance is an increasingly concerning issue. Such form of obesity is mainly caused by the failure of elevated levels of the hormone leptin (LEP) to suppress feeding and mediate weight loss; the syndrome, caused by disruptions of signal transduction processes at the level of leptin receptors (LEPR), has been named as leptin resistance. Alterations in genes coding for LEPR and other hypothalamic factors in obese individuals have been related to low rates of pregnancies and deliveries. Fertility depends mainly on the success of processes involving ovulation, fertilization, implantation, placentation and embryo development; processes that seem to be affected in obese females. However, mechanistical research in human beings is very difficult to undertake, especially in reproductive issues, for both technical and ethical reasons. Thus, investigation is usually taken on animal models. Most of the studies have been carried out in mice, in which mutations in LEP and LEPR genes cause severe obese phenotypes (Leprob/ob and Leprdb/db mouse); in addition, such genotypes are infertile. However, total loss of LEPR function by monogenic disorders in humans, unlike mice, are really scarce. Functional alterations by LEPR gene polymorphisms are more common; the same has been found in the swine, an animal model very close to human. This review outlines, from results of translational animal research and clinical studies, the factors, mechanisms and pathways involved in the reproductive failures of individuals with metabolic disorders during the critical period from ovulation to completion of placentation and early-embryo development.

  14. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in patients with depressive disorder on antidepressive medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Albina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent depression is a psychiatric disorder of which etiology and pathogenesis might be related to immune response. Metabolic Syndrome (MetS and its components are also strongly associated with elevated inflammatory indicators, as so as the body mass index (BMI and total cholesterol levels. Objective. Objective of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels in patients with recurrent depressive disorder, treated with antidepressants, compared to a healthy control group of subjects and if there was an association between increased CRP levels and the presence of MetS in these two groups. Methods. Sixty subjects entered the study; of these 35 patients with the diagnosis of recurrent depressive disorder, while the healthy control group included 25 subjects. MetS was defined according to the NCEP ATP III criteria. The cut-off point for CRP was set at >5 mg /L. Results. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of MetS and CRP values between the studied groups. Waist circumference and total cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the experimental group. Patients that fulfilled the criteria for MetS showed significantly higher values of central obesity and arterial hypertension in the experimental group as well. The elevated CRP levels were associated with increased frequency of MetS in depressed patients. Conclusion. Both CRP levels and metabolic risk profile screening, according to the international criteria, may be beneficial in order to obtain better assessment for depressive long term medicated patients.

  15. Immunochemical and mass-spectrometry-based serum hepcidin assays for iron metabolism disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroot, Joyce J C; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke J; Grebenchtchikov, Nicolaï; Pickkers, Peter; van Ede, Annelies E; Peters, Hilde P E; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée; Wetzels, Jack F M; Sweep, Fred C G J; Tjalsma, Harold; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2010-10-01

    Hepcidin is an iron-regulatory peptide hormone that consists of 3 isoforms: bioactive hepcidin-25, and inactive hepcidin-22 and hepcidin-20. Hepcidin is instrumental in the diagnosis and monitoring of iron metabolism disorders, but reliable methods for its quantification in serum are sparse, as is knowledge of their relative analytical strengths and clinical utility. We developed a competitive (c)-ELISA and an immunocapture TOF mass-spectrometry (IC-TOF-MS) assay. Exploiting these 2 methods and our previously described weak cation exchange (WCX)-TOF-MS assay, we measured serum hepcidin concentrations in 186 patients with various disorders of iron metabolism and in 23 healthy controls. We found that (a) the relative differences in median hepcidin concentrations in various diseases to be similar, although the absolute concentrations measured with c-ELISA and WCX-TOF-MS differed; (b) hepcidin isoforms contributed to differences in hepcidin concentrations between methods, which were most prominent in patients with chronic kidney disease; and (c) hepcidin concentrations measured by both the c-ELISA and IC-TOF-MS correlated with ferritin concentrations <60 μg/L, and were suitable for distinguishing between iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the combination of IDA and anemia of chronic disease. c-ELISA is the method of choice for the large-scale quantification of serum hepcidin concentrations, because of its low limit of detection, low cost, and high-throughput. Because of its specificity for bioactive hepcidin-25, WCX-TOF-MS can be regarded as a valuable special-purpose assay for disorders with variable concentrations of hepcidin isoforms, such as chronic kidney disease.

  16. Conservative treatment of bone tissue metabolic disorders among patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II with genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Martsyniak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the article is to determine the effect of conservative therapy on genetically caused disorders of bone tissue metabolism in patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II and genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation (VDDR(COL1. Materials and methods. At the premises of consulting and outpatient department of SI “Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics of the NAMS of Ukraine”, 13 patients having VDDR type II and genetic damage of type I collagen formation were examined and treated. The medical treatment was conducted in four stages. The first stage included full examination of patients (calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood serum and their urinary excretion, as well as determination of calcidiol and calcitriol serum levels, indicators of parathyroid hormone and osteocalcin, and a marker of bone formation P1NP and osteoresorption b-CTx. At this stage, children were obligated to undergo a genetic test to detect changes (polymorphism in alleles of receptors to vitamin D and type I collagen. Besides genetic tests, examinations at the other stages were conducted in full. Results. The study has shown the following. The genetically caused abnormality of reception to vitamin D results into substantial accumulation of vitamin D active metabolite in the blood serum. When combined with gene­tic abnormality of type I collagen formation, it significantly affected bone formation and destruction processes that causes development of osteomalacia (parathormone — vitamin D — osteocalcin system. The comprehensive study of vitamin D metabolism and biochemical vitals of bone tissue in patients having VDDR (COL1 brought us to understanding of some issues related to pathogenesis and nature of osteomalacia and, in future, osteoporotic changes on different levels, ensured us to express these changes by corresponding indices in the biochemical research and, finally, to develop appropriate schemes for the treatment of

  17. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the skin, kidneys, lungs, and intestines. continue The Endocrine System Several of the hormones of the endocrine system ... Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine System What Are Glands? Diabetes Center Other Diseases ...

  18. Metabolic syndrome: relative risk associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity and antipsychotic medication use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Pia S; Lohr, James B; Kash, Taylor P; Jin, Hua; Wang, Hongjun; Baker, Dewleen G

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, numerous lines of converging evidence have revealed an association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and impaired physical health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Although these findings have been interpreted as indicating a direct association of PTSD with metabolic syndrome and obesity, previous studies have not addressed the important confound of antipsychotic drug usage in this population. Second generation antipsychotic medications themselves are associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity, and it is unclear whether the common utilization of these drugs in PTSD may account for some if not all of the observed metabolic problems. The present study examined the relative contributions of PTSD severity and use of antipsychotic medications to risk of metabolic syndrome among veterans. Cross-sectional clinical data, including five factors representing metabolic syndrome, psychiatric diagnoses, and medications were gathered from 253 veterans enrolling in mental health services. We used a logistic regression model to measure the relative association of antipsychotic medication use and PTSD severity on risk of metabolic syndrome. We found that antipsychotic medication usage was not uniquely associated with elevated risk of metabolic syndrome (Wald = 0.30, ns) when PTSD severity and other sociodemographic, psychiatric, and behavioral variables were accounted for. Furthermore, PTSD severity continued to be a significant and unique predictor of risk for metabolic syndrome (Wald = 4.04, p PTSD, independent of antipsychotic medications, is associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Self-Reported Physical Complaints in Patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Sienaert, Pascal; Wyckaert, Sabine; De Hert, Marc; Stubbs, Brendon; Kinyanda, Eugene; Probst, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients with bipolar disorder is 35 to 40%. It is, however, not established yet whether MetS influences participation in physical activity, walking capacity and global functioning. Sixty-five patients (36 ♀) received a full-fasting laboratory screening, performed a walk test including self-report of pre- and post-test pain, and completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self Report (QIDS-SR16). Patients with (n=24) and without (n=41) MetS did not significantly differ in age, gender, psychotropic medication doses, physical activity, smoking behaviour and global functioning. In contrast, patients with MetS had a significantly (a) longer illness duration, (b) higher BMI, and (c) lower walking capacity. Moreover, patients with MetS scored significantly higher on the QIDS. Patients with MetS reported more pain before and after the walking test and more dyspnea following 6 minutes of walking, indicating the physical health challenges facing people with bipolar disorder and MetS seeking to engage in physical activity. The current data give further credence to the importance of interventions promoting the walking capacity in people with bipolar disorder, in particular in these patients at a high risk for cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Placebo cessation in binge eating disorder: effect on anthropometric, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Thomas J; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Casuto, Leah S; McElroy, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cessation of binge eating in response to placebo treatment in binge eating disorder (BED) on anthropometric, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables. We pooled participant-level data from 10 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of medication for BED. We then compared patients who stopped binge eating with those who did not on changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse, and fasting lipids and glucose. Of 234 participants receiving placebo, 60 (26%) attained cessation from binge eating. Patients attaining cessation showed modestly decreased diastolic blood pressure compared with patients who continued to binge eat. Weight and BMI remained stable in patients who stopped binge eating, but increased somewhat in those who continued to binge eat. Patients who stopped binge eating with placebo had greater reductions in diastolic blood pressure and gained less weight than patients who continued to binge eat. Self-report of eating pathology in BED may predict physiologic variables. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  1. Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Patients With Binge-Eating Disorder in Primary Care Clinics: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeka, Abbe G.; McKenzie, Katherine C.; Genao, Inginia; Garcia, Rina L.; Ellman, Matthew S.; Ellis, Peter J.; Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The distribution and nature of metabolic syndrome in obese patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) are largely unknown and require investigation, particularly in general internal medicine settings. The objectives of this study were to (1) examine the frequency of metabolic syndrome and (2) explore its eating- and weight-related correlates in obese patients with BED. Method: This was a cross-sectional analysis of 81 consecutive treatment-seeking obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2) patients (21 men, 60 women) who met DSM-IV-TR research criteria for BED (either subthreshold criteria: ≥ 1 binge weekly, n = 19 or full criteria: ≥ 2 binges weekly, n = 62). Participants were from 2 primary care facilities in a large university-based medical center in an urban setting. Patients with and without metabolic syndrome were compared on demographic features and current and historical eating- and weight-related variables. Data were collected from December 2007 through March 2009. Results: Forty-three percent of patients met criteria for metabolic syndrome. A significantly higher proportion of men (66%) than women (35%) met criteria for metabolic syndrome (P = .012). Patients with versus without metabolic syndrome did not differ significantly in ethnicity or body mass index. Patients with versus without metabolic syndrome did not differ significantly in binge-eating frequency, severity of eating disorder psychopathology, or depression. Analyses of covariance controlling for gender revealed that patients without metabolic syndrome started dieting at a significantly younger age (P = .037), spent more of their adult lives dieting (P = .017), and reported more current dietary restriction (P = .018) than patients with metabolic syndrome. Conclusions: Metabolic syndrome is common in obese patients with BED in primary care settings and is associated with fewer dieting behaviors. These findings suggest that certain lifestyle behaviors, such as increased dietary

  2. Executive summary of the consensus document on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; Von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the metabolic disorders and their impact on patients with HIV infection requires an individualized study and continuous updating. HIV patients have the same cardiovascular risk factors as the general population. The HIV infection per se increases the cardiovascular risk, and metabolic disorders caused by some antiretroviral drugs are added risk factors. For this reason, the choice of drugs with a good metabolic profile is essential. The most common metabolic disorders of HIV infected-patients (insulin resistance, diabetes, hyperlipidemia or osteopenia), as well as other factors of cardiovascular risk, such as hypertension, should also be dealt with according to guidelines similar to the general population, as well as insisting on steps to healthier lifestyles. The aim of this document is to provide a query tool for all professionals who treat HIV-patients and who may present or display any metabolic disorders listed in this document. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Cationic Polystyrene Resolves Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis, Obesity, and Metabolic Disorders by Promoting Eubiosis of Gut Microbiota and Decreasing Endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Airu; Chen, Jingjing; Wu, Pengfei; Luo, Mei; Zeng, Yilan; Liu, Yong; Zheng, Han; Zhang, Li; Chen, Zishou; Sun, Qun; Li, Wenwen; Duan, Yixiang; Su, Danmei; Xiao, Zhixiong; Duan, Zhongping; Zheng, Sujun; Bai, Li; Zhang, Xiaohui; Ju, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan; Hu, Richard; Pandol, Stephen J; Han, Yuan-Ping

    2017-08-01

    A pandemic of metabolic diseases, consisting of type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and obesity, has imposed critical challenges for societies worldwide, prompting investigation of underlying mechanisms and exploration of low-cost and effective treatment. In this report, we demonstrate that metabolic disorders in mice generated by feeding with a high-fat diet without dietary vitamin D can be prevented by oral administration of polycationic amine resin. Oral administration of cholestyramine, but not the control uncharged polystyrene, was able to sequester negatively charged bacterial endotoxin in the gut, leading to 1) reduced plasma endotoxin levels, 2) resolved systemic inflammation and hepatic steatohepatitis, and 3) improved insulin sensitivity. Gut dysbiosis, characterized as an increase of the phylum Firmicutes and a decrease of Bacteroidetes and Akkermansia muciniphila, was fully corrected by cholestyramine, indicating that the negatively charged components in the gut are critical for the dysbiosis. Furthermore, fecal bacteria transplant, derived from cholestyramine-treated animals, was sufficient to antagonize the metabolic disorders of the recipient mice. These results indicate that the negatively charged components produced by dysbiosis are critical for biogenesis of metabolic disorders and also show a potential application of cationic polystyrene to treat metabolic disorders through promoting gut eubiosis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Biochemical markers for assessment of calcium economy and bone metabolism: application in clinical trials from pharmaceutical agents to nutritional products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; Kohrt, Wendy; Levasseur, Régis; Warren, Michelle; Whiting, Susan; Kraenzlin, Marius

    2014-12-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Substantial progress in both laboratory analyses and clinical use of biochemical markers has modified the strategy of anti-osteoporotic drug development. The present review examines the use of biochemical markers in clinical research aimed at characterising the influence of foods or nutrients on bone metabolism. The two types of markers are: (i) specific hormonal factors related to bone; and (ii) bone turnover markers (BTM) that reflect bone cell metabolism. Of the former, vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-I indicate responses to variations in the supply of bone-related nutrients, such as vitamin D, Ca, inorganic phosphate and protein. Thus modification in bone remodelling, the key process upon which both pharmaceutical agents and nutrients exert their anti-catabolic or anabolic actions, is revealed. Circulating BTM reflect either osteoclastic resorption or osteoblastic formation. Intervention with pharmacological agents showed that early changes in BTM predicted bone loss and subsequent osteoporotic fracture risk. New trials have documented the influence of nutrition on bone-tropic hormonal factors and BTM in adults, including situations of body-weight change, such as anorexia nervosa, and weight loss by obese subjects. In osteoporosis-prevention studies involving dietary manipulation, randomised cross-over trials are best suited to evaluate influences on bone metabolism, and insight into effects on bone metabolism may be gained within a relatively short time when biochemical markers are monitored.

  5. Associations Between Body Mass Index and Development of Metabolic Disorders in Fertile Women—A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle Dalgas; Andersson, Charlotte; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic disorders are relatively uncommon in young women, but may increase with obesity. The associations between body mass index (BMI) and risks of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in apparently healthy, young women have been insufficiently investigated, and are the aims...... of this study. METHODS AND RESULTS: Women giving birth during the years 2004-2009, with no history of cardiovascular disease, renal insufficiency, pregnancy-associated metabolic disorders, diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia were identified in nationwide registers. Women were categorized as underweight (BMI...... women, pre-pregnancy BMI was strongly associated with an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia within 5.5 years following childbirth....

  6. Metabolic Disorder in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients: Towards a Personalized Approach Using Marine Drug Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamonaca, Palma; Prinzi, Giulia; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; Cardaci, Vittorio; Fini, Massimo; Russo, Patrizia

    2017-03-20

    Metabolic disorder has been frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, the exact correlation between obesity, which is a complex metabolic disorder, and COPD remains controversial. The current study summarizes a variety of drugs from marine sources that have anti-obesity effects and proposed potential mechanisms by which lung function can be modulated with the anti-obesity activity. Considering the similar mechanism, such as inflammation, shared between obesity and COPD, the study suggests that marine derivatives that act on the adipose tissues to reduce inflammation may provide beneficial therapeutic effects in COPD subjects with high body mass index (BMI).

  7. Associations Between Body Mass Index and Development of Metabolic Disorders in Fertile Women—A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle Dalgas; Andersson, Charlotte; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    of this study. METHODS AND RESULTS: Women giving birth during the years 2004-2009, with no history of cardiovascular disease, renal insufficiency, pregnancy-associated metabolic disorders, diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia were identified in nationwide registers. Women were categorized as underweight (BMI...... women, pre-pregnancy BMI was strongly associated with an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia within 5.5 years following childbirth.......BACKGROUND: Metabolic disorders are relatively uncommon in young women, but may increase with obesity. The associations between body mass index (BMI) and risks of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in apparently healthy, young women have been insufficiently investigated, and are the aims...

  8. The vitamin D, ionised calcium and parathyroid hormone axis of cerebral capillary function: therapeutic considerations for vascular-based neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallabage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Giles, Corey; Mamo, John C L

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX), or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX) and hippocampal formation (HPF). Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa) and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of vascular

  9. The vitamin D, ionised calcium and parathyroid hormone axis of cerebral capillary function: therapeutic considerations for vascular-based neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Lam

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX, or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX and hippocampal formation (HPF. Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of

  10. Calcium Overload Accelerates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Calcification Via Pit-1, but not the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Asuka; Sonou, Tomohiro; Ohya, Masaki; Yashiro, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Yuri; Okuda, Kouji; Iwashita, Yuko; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder is an important problem in patients with renal failure. Abnormal levels of serum phosphate and calcium affect CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder and contribute to bone disease, VC, and cardiovascular disease. Hypercalcemia is a contributing factor in progression of VC in patients with CKD. However, the mechanisms of how calcium promotes intracellular calcification are still unclear. This study aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcification in a rat aortic tissue culture model. Aortic segments from 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in serum-supplemented medium for 10 days. We added high calcium (HiCa; calcium 3.0 mM) to high phosphate (HPi; phosphate 3.8 mM) medium to accelerate phosphate and calcium-induced VC. We used phosphonoformic acid and the calcimimetic R-568 to determine whether the mechanism of calcification involves Pit-1 or the calcium-sensing receptor. Medial VC was significantly augmented by HPi+HiCa medium compared with HPi alone (300%, p<0.05), and was associated with upregulation of Pit-1 protein. Pit-1 protein concentrations in HPi+HiCa medium were greater than those in HPi medium. Phosphonoformic acid completely negated the augmentation of medial VC induced by HPi+HiCa. R-568 had no additive direct effect on medial VC. These results indicated that exposure to HPi+HiCa accelerates medial VC, and this is mediated through Pit-1, not the calcium-sensing receptor.

  11. Alendronate and Resistive Exercise Countermeasures Against Bed Rest-Induced Bone Loss: Biochemical Markers of Bone and Calcium Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Nillen, Jeannie L.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; DeKerlegand, Diane E.; LeBlanc, Adrian; Shackelford, Linda C.

    2001-01-01

    Weightlessness-induced bone loss must be counteracted to ensure crew health during extendedduration space missions. Studies were conducted to assess two bone loss countermeasures in a ground-based model: horizontal bed rest. Following a 3-wk ambulatory adaptation period, male and female subjects (aged 21-56 y) completed a 17-wk bed rest protocol. Subjects were assigned to one of three treatments: alendronate (ALEN; 10 mg/d, n=6), resistive exercise (RE; 1.5 h/d, 6 d/wk, n=8), or control (CN; no countermeasure, n=8). Dietary intake was adjusted to maintain body weight. Endocrine and biochemical indices were measured in blood and urine using standard laboratory methods. All data reported are expressed as percent change from individual pre-bedrest data. Serum calcium changed little during bed rest, and tended to decrease (4-8%) in ALEN subjects. In RE subjects, bone alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were increased >65 and >30%, respectively, during bed rest, while these were unchanged or decreased in ALEN and CN subjects. Urinary calcium was increased 50% in CN subjects, but was unchanged or decreased in both ALEN and RE groups. Urinary n-telopeptide excretion was increased 40-50% in CN and RE subjects, but decreased 20% in ALEN subjects. Pyridinium crosslink and deoxypyridinoline excretion were increased 20-50% during bed rest. These data suggest that RE countermeasures are effective at increasing markers of bone formation in an analog of weightlessness, while ALEN reduces markers of bone resorption. Counteracting the bone loss of space flight may require both pharmacologic and exercise countermeasures.

  12. Design and synthesis of novel arctigenin analogues for the amelioration of metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shudong; Huang, Suling; Gong, Jian; Shen, Yu; Zeng, Limin; Feng, Ying; Ren, Wenming; Leng, Ying; Hu, Youhong

    2015-04-09

    Analogues of the natural product (-)-arctigenin, an activator of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase, were prepared in order to evaluate their effects on 2-deoxyglucose uptake in L6 myotubes and possible use in ameliorating metabolic disorders. Racemic arctigenin 2a was found to display a similar uptake enhancement as does (-)-arctigenin. As a result, the SAR study was conducted utilizing racemic compounds. The structure-activity relationship study led to the discovery of key substitution patterns on the lactone motif that govern 2-deoxyglucose uptake activities. The results show that replacement of the para-hydroxyl group of the C-2 benzyl moiety of arctigenin by Cl has a pronounced effect on uptake activity. Specifically, analogue 2p, which contains the p-Cl substituent, stimulates glucose uptake and fatty acid oxidation in L6 myotubes.

  13. The role of cholesterol metabolism and various steroid abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders: A hypothesis paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth; Kočovská, Eva; Minnis, Helen; Bourgeron, Thomas; Thompson, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Based on evidence from the relevant research literature, we present a hypothesis that there may be a link between cholesterol, vitamin D, and steroid hormones which subsequently impacts on the development of at least some of the “autisms” [Coleman & Gillberg]. Our hypothesis, driven by the peer reviewed literature, posits that there may be links between cholesterol metabolism, which we will refer to as “steroid metabolism” and findings of steroid abnormalities of various kinds (cortisol, testosterone, estrogens, progesterone, vitamin D) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Further research investigating these potential links is warranted to further our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying ASD. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1022–1044. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28401679

  14. Disorders of cholesterol metabolism and their unanticipated convergent mechanisms of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Frances M; Wassif, Christopher; Colaco, Alexandria; Dardis, Andrea; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Bembi, Bruno; Porter, Forbes D

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol plays a key role in many cellular processes, and is generated by cells through de novo biosynthesis or acquired from exogenous sources through the uptake of low-density lipoproteins. Cholesterol biosynthesis is a complex, multienzyme-catalyzed pathway involving a series of sequentially acting enzymes. Inherited defects in genes encoding cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes or other regulators of cholesterol homeostasis result in severe metabolic diseases, many of which are rare in the general population and currently without effective therapy. Historically, these diseases have been viewed as discrete disorders, each with its own genetic cause and distinct pathogenic cascades that lead to its specific clinical features. However, studies have recently shown that three of these diseases have an unanticipated mechanistic convergence. This surprising finding is not only shedding light on details of cellular cholesterol homeostasis but also suggesting novel approaches to therapy.

  15. Biochemical markers for assessment of calcium economy and bone metabolism: application in clinical trials from pharmaceutical agents to nutritional products

    OpenAIRE

    Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; Kohrt, Wendy; Levasseur, Régis; Warren, Michelle; Whiting, Susan; Kraenzlin, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Substantial progress in both laboratory analyses and clinical use of biochemical markers has modified the strategy of anti-osteoporotic drug development. The present review examines the use of biochemical markers in clinical research aimed at characterising the influence of foods or nutrients on bone metabolism. The two types of markers are: (i) specific hormonal factors related to bone; and (ii) bone turnover markers...

  16. Kinetic activity, membrane mitochondrial potential, lipid peroxidation, intracellular pH and calcium of frozen/thawed bovine spermatozoa treated with metabolic enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, R; Gallo, A; Cecchini, S

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the progressive decline of sperm motility during storage there is a need to find substances capable of enhancing sperm energy metabolism and motility and/or preserving it from oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate in frozen/thawed bovine spermatozoa the effect of several compounds, such as myo-inositol, pentoxifylline, penicillamine + hypotaurine + epinephrine mixture (PHE), caffeine and coenzyme Q10+ zinc + d-aspartate mixture (CZA), on either kinetic or metabolic parameters. Sperm kinetics was evaluated by Sperm Class Analyser whereas specific fluorochromes were used to evaluated mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular pH, intracellular calcium concentration and lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxidation was also evaluated by TBARS analysis. Treatments significantly affected total and progressive motility with different dynamics in relation to the incubation time. After the first hour of incubation, CZA treatment produced the best performance in total and progressive sperm motility as well as in curvilinear velocity, average path velocity and amplitude of head displacement, whereas pentoxifylline stimulated the highest straight-line velocity. MMP showed higher values (p lipid peroxidation were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the incubation time rather than the treatments. Intracellular pH varied significantly (p < 0.01) in relation to either the incubation time or treatments. In particular, it showed a progressive increase throughout incubation with values in control group significantly higher than in myo-inositol, PHE, caffeine, pentoxifylline and CZA groups (7.37 ± 0.03 vs. 7.29 ± 0.03, 7.28 ± 0.03, 7.26 ± 0.03, 7.22 ± 0.03 and 7.00 ± 0.03, respectively; p < 0.01).; however, among treatments, CZA displayed the lowest values. Significant correlations were found between sperm kinetic and metabolic parameters. These findings provide new comparative information on the effects of putative metabolic

  17. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  18. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  19. Metabolic inflammation in hepatic and vascular disorders: Strategies to attenuate disease development [Metabole ziekten voorkomen door gezonder te eten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Bij de preventie of behandeling van metabole ziekten zoals type 2 diabetes, leververvetting en aderverkalking denken we al gauw aan medicijnen. Maar ook het aanpassen van ons voedingspatroon kan helpen om de ontwikkeling van metabole ziekten tegen te gaan, of om de onderliggende processen in ieder

  20. Maternal Obesity and Developmental Programming of Metabolic Disorders in Offspring: Evidence from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity and overweight has reached epidemic proportions in the developed world as well as in those countries transitioning to first world economies, and this represents a major global health problem. Concern is rising over the rapid increases in childhood obesity and metabolic disease that will translate into later adult obesity. Although an obesogenic nutritional environment and increasingly sedentary lifestyle contribute to our risk of developing obesity, a growing body of evidence links early life nutritional adversity to the development of long-term metabolic disorders. In particular, the increasing prevalence of maternal obesity and excess maternal weight gain has been associated with a heightened risk of obesity development in offspring in addition to an increased risk of pregnancy-related complications. The mechanisms that link maternal obesity to obesity in offspring and the level of gene-environment interactions are not well understood, but the early life environment may represent a critical window for which intervention strategies could be developed to curb the current obesity epidemic. This paper will discuss the various animal models of maternal overnutrition and their importance in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying altered obesity risk in offspring.

  1. Towards the development of an enzyme replacement therapy for the metabolic disorder propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish-Damavandi, Mahnaz; Ho, Han Kiat; Kang, Tse Siang

    2016-09-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a life-threatening disease caused by the deficiency of a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme known as propionyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (PCC). This enzyme is responsible for degrading the metabolic intermediate, propionyl coenzyme-A (PP-CoA), derived from multiple metabolic pathways. Currently, except for drastic surgical and dietary intervention that can only provide partial symptomatic relief, no other form of therapeutic option is available for this genetic disorder. Here, we examine a novel approach in protein delivery by specifically targeting and localizing our protein candidate of interest into the mitochondrial matrix of the cells. In order to test this concept of delivery, we have utilized cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS) to form specific fusion PCC protein, capable of translocating and localizing across cell membranes. In vitro delivery of our candidate fusion proteins, evaluated by confocal images and enzymatic activity assay, indicated effectiveness of this strategy. Therefore, it holds immense potential in creating a new paradigm in site-specific protein delivery and enzyme replacement therapeutic for PA.

  2. Towards the development of an enzyme replacement therapy for the metabolic disorder propionic acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Darvish-Damavandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acidemia (PA is a life-threatening disease caused by the deficiency of a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme known as propionyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (PCC. This enzyme is responsible for degrading the metabolic intermediate, propionyl coenzyme-A (PP-CoA, derived from multiple metabolic pathways. Currently, except for drastic surgical and dietary intervention that can only provide partial symptomatic relief, no other form of therapeutic option is available for this genetic disorder. Here, we examine a novel approach in protein delivery by specifically targeting and localizing our protein candidate of interest into the mitochondrial matrix of the cells. In order to test this concept of delivery, we have utilized cell penetrating peptides (CPPs and mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS to form specific fusion PCC protein, capable of translocating and localizing across cell membranes. In vitro delivery of our candidate fusion proteins, evaluated by confocal images and enzymatic activity assay, indicated effectiveness of this strategy. Therefore, it holds immense potential in creating a new paradigm in site-specific protein delivery and enzyme replacement therapeutic for PA.

  3. Priming dendritic cells for Th2 polarization: lessons learned from helminths and implications for metabolic disorders

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    Leonie eHussaarts

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one quarter of the world’s population is infected with helminth parasites. A common feature of helminth infections is the manifestation of a type 2 immune response, characterized by T helper 2 (Th2 cells that mediate anti-helminth immunity. In addition, recent literature described a close association between type 2 immune responses and wound repair, suggesting that a Th2 response may concurrently mediate repair of parasite-induced damage. The molecular mechanisms that govern Th2 responses are poorly understood, although it is clear that dendritic cells (DCs, which are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells in the immune system, play a central role. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms by which DCs polarize Th2 cells, examining both helminth antigens and helminth-mediated tissue damage as Th2-inducing triggers. Finally, we discuss the implication of these findings in the context of metabolic disorders, as recent literature indicates that various aspects of the Th2-associated inflammatory response contribute to metabolic homeostasis.

  4. Gender Differences in Metabolic Disorders and Related Diseases in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii-Leprfa Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Leprfa (SDT fatty rat is a novel type 2 diabetic model wherein both male and female rats develop glucose and lipid abnormalities from a young age. In this study, we investigated gender differences in abnormalities and related complications in SDT fatty rats. Food intake was higher in males compared to female rats; however, body weight was not different between genders. Progression of diabetes, including increases in blood glucose and declines in blood insulin, was observed earlier in male rats than in females, and diabetic grade was more critical in male rats. Blood lipids tended to increase in female rats. Gonadal dysfunction was observed in both male and female rats with aging. Microangiopathies, such as nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, and osteoporosis, were seen in both genders, and pathological grade and progression were more significant in males. Qualitative and quantitative changes were observed for metabolic disease gender differences in SDT fatty rats. The SDT fatty rat is a useful model for researching gender differences in metabolic disorders and related diseases in diabetes with obesity.

  5. Sleep duration and disorders in pregnancy: implications for glucose metabolism and pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, M; St-Onge, M-P

    2013-06-01

    Humans have an innate requirement for sleep that is intrinsically governed by circadian and endocrine systems. More recently, reduced sleep duration has gained significant attention for its possible contribution to metabolic dysfunction. Significant evidence suggests that reduced sleep duration may elevate the risk for impaired glucose functioning, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, to date, few studies have determined the implications of reduced sleep duration with regard to glucose control during pregnancy. With the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of reproductive age, the occurrence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing. GDM results in elevated risk of maternal and fetal complications, as well as increased risk of type 2 diabetes postpartum. Infants born to women with GDM also carry a life-long risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The impact of reduced sleep on glucose management during pregnancy has not yet been fully assessed and a paucity of literature currently exits. Herein, we review the association between reduced sleep and impaired carbohydrate metabolism and propose how reduced sleep during pregnancy may result in further dysfunction of the carbohydrate axis. A particular focus will be given to sleep-disordered breathing, as well as GDM-complicated pregnancies. Putative mechanisms of action by which reduced sleep may adversely affect maternal and infant outcomes are also discussed. Finally, we will outline important research questions that need to be addressed.

  6. Inhibitor of Differentiation-3 and Estrogenic Endocrine Disruptors: Implications for Susceptibility to Obesity and Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Doke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The rising global incidence of obesity cannot be fully explained within the context of traditional risk factors such as an unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, aging, or genetics. Adipose tissue is an endocrine as well as a metabolic organ that may be susceptible to disruption by environmental estrogenic chemicals. Since some of the endocrine disruptors are lipophilic chemicals with long half-lives, they tend to bioaccumulate in the adipose tissue of exposed populations. Elevated exposure to these chemicals may predispose susceptible individuals to weight gain by increasing the number and size of fat cells. Genetic studies have demonstrated that the transcriptional regulator inhibitor of differentiation-3 (ID3 promotes high fat diet-induced obesity in vivo. We have shown previously that PCB153 and natural estrogen 17β-estradiol increase ID3 expression. Based on our findings, we postulate that ID3 is a molecular target of estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EEDs in the adipose tissue and a better understanding of this relationship may help to explain how EEDs can lead to the transcriptional programming of deviant fat cells. This review will discuss the current understanding of ID3 in excess fat accumulation and the potential for EEDs to influence susceptibility to obesity or metabolic disorders via ID3 signaling.

  7. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its association with metabolic disorders in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Koziarska-Rościszewska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background . Vitamin D is considered to be an important co-factor of metabolic processes. However, the available data is ambiguous. Some data indicates an important role of vitamin D in adipocyte metabolism, and hence also in obesity – a well-known risk factor of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Objectives . To assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and to evaluate the relationship between serum 25(OHD concentration and metabolic disorders in elderly patients attending primary care. Material and methods . This observational study was performed on 110 elderly patients: 88 females, 22 males, Caucasian, > 60 years. A questionnaire was completed concerning lifestyle and chronic diseases. Clinical examination, anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests (25(OHD, lipids, glycemia, blood morphology, serum creatinine, PT H were performed. BMI and WHR were calculated. Patients reporting physical activity (walking, Nordic walking, swimming, cycling, other ≥ 150 minutes per week were classified as “physically active”. Results . Vitamin D deficiency (25(OHD < 30 ng/ml; < 75 nmol/l was found in 84.5%, extreme deficiency (< 10 ng/ml; < 25 nmol/l in 6.3%. A significant correlation between serum vitamin D deficiency and visceral obesity was found (p = 0.02. No correlation was found with BMI, physical activity, lipids, diabetes or CVD. Conclusions . Vitamin D deficiency was found to be highly prevalent in the examined group of elderly people. Visceral obesity in the elderly is associated with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D supplementation may supposedly contribute to prevention of obesity and its treatment.

  8. Rare inborn errors of metabolism with movement disorders : a case study to evaluate the impact upon quality of life and adaptive functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Hendriekje; Kuiper, Anouk; Peall, Kathryn J.; Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Bosch, Annet M.; Post, Bart; Sival, Deborah A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; de Koning, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) form an important cause of movement disorders in children. The impact of metabolic diseases and concordant movement disorders upon children's health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its physical and psychosocial domains of functioning has never been

  9. Rare inborn errors of metabolism with movement disorders: a case study to evaluate the impact upon quality of life and adaptive functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Hendriekje; Kuiper, Anouk; Peall, Kathryn J.; Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Bosch, Annet M.; Post, Bart; Sival, Deborah A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; de Koning, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) form an important cause of movement disorders in children. The impact of metabolic diseases and concordant movement disorders upon children's health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its physical and psychosocial domains of functioning has never been investigated.

  10. Protective effects of exercise in metabolic disorders are mediated by inhibition of mitochondrial-derived sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeri, Maghsoud; Amiri, Shayan

    2015-12-01

    While beneficial properties of physical activity and exercise on human health have been extensively reported in literature, the exact mechanism(s) underpinning impacts of exercise are not well understood. Focusing on metabolic disorders, as the main causes of social and economic burden in current century, exercise exhibited promising effects in prevention, alleviation and retardation of these disorders including, type 2 diabetes (T2D), Alzheimer's disease (AD), major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity. Recent evidence has unmasked the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and chronic inflammation in pathophysiology of these disorders. Despite of the wealth of research on the etiology of metabolic disorders, intimate connections between these diseases, complex pathophysiology and their comorbidity still remains a challenging dilemma. In addition, although physical activity has improving effects on human health, it is not clear that how exercise is able to exert its modulatory effects on outcomes of metabolic disorders. Among several mechanisms, we assumed the hypothesis that exercise mitigates the production of mitochondrial-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) as the main triggering factors for inflammasome formation. Since inflammasomes are of highly deleterious molecules relevant to pathogenesis of metabolic disorders, we hypothesized that beneficial effects of exercise may be associated with its ability to enhance the mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose transportation through generation of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Also, we proposed that boosting impact of exercise on autophagy process accelerates the elimination of damaged mitochondria and thus, results in considerable decrease in production of ROS and DAMPs and consequently sterile inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dementia due to metabolic causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic brain - metabolic; Mild cognitive - metabolic; MCI - metabolic ... Possible metabolic causes of dementia include: Hormonal disorders, such as Addison disease , Cushing disease Heavy metal exposure, such as ...

  12. Mechanisms of action for the medium-chain triglyceride ketogenic diet in neurological and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Katrin; Khabbush, Aziza; Williams, Sophie; Eaton, Simon; Orford, Michael; Cross, J Helen; Heales, Simon J R; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2018-01-01

    High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, known as ketogenic diets, have been used as a non-pharmacological treatment for refractory epilepsy. A key mechanism of this treatment is thought to be the generation of ketones, which provide brain cells (neurons and astrocytes) with an energy source that is more efficient than glucose, resulting in beneficial downstream metabolic changes, such as increasing adenosine levels, which might have effects on seizure control. However, some studies have challenged the central role of ketones because medium-chain fatty acids, which are part of a commonly used variation of the diet (the medium-chain triglyceride ketogenic diet), have been shown to directly inhibit AMPA receptors (glutamate receptors), and to change cell energetics through mitochondrial biogenesis. Through these mechanisms, medium-chain fatty acids rather than ketones are likely to block seizure onset and raise seizure threshold. The mechanisms underlying the ketogenic diet might also have roles in other disorders, such as preventing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, the proliferation and spread of cancer, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Analysing medium-chain fatty acids in future ketogenic diet studies will provide further insights into their importance in modified forms of the diet. Moreover, the results of these studies could facilitate the development of new pharmacological and dietary therapies for epilepsy and other disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Disorders of water and electrolyte metabolism and changes in acid-base balance in patients with ascitic liver cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfriedová, Halima; Horáčková, Miroslava; Čáslavská, Milena; Špičák, Julius; Schück, Otto

    2017-01-01

    In patients with advanced cirrhosis with ascites disorders of water and electrolyte metabolism are often present and they are associated with changes in acid-base balance. These changes can be very complicated, their diagnosis and treatment difficult. Dilutional hyponatremia is the most common disorder. Hyponatremia in these patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality before and after liver transplantation. Other common disorders include hyperchloremic acidosis, hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, lactic acidosis, respiratory alkalosis. If renal impairment occurs (for example hepatorenal syndrome), metabolic acidosis and retention of acid metabolites may develop. The pathogenesis of these conditions applies primarily hemodynamic changes. Activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and non-osmotic stimulation of antidiuretic hormone trigger serious changes in water and natrium-chloride metabolism. This activation is clinically expressed like oedema, ascites, hydrothorax, low to zero natrium concentration in urine and increased urinary osmolality, which is higher than serum osmolality. In practice, the evaluation can be significantly modified by the ongoing diuretic therapy. Closer monitoring of water and electrolyte metabolism together with acid-base balance in patients with ascitic liver cirrhosis is important, not only in terms of diagnosis but especially in terms of therapy.

  14. Cranial ultrasound in metabolic disorders presenting in the neonatal period : characteristic features and comparison with MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijser, L M; de Vries, L S; Rutherford, M A; Manzur, A Y; Groenendaal, F; de Koning, T J; van der Heide-Jalving, M; Cowan, F M

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brain imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic work-up for metabolic disorders, and the bedside availability of cranial ultrasonography (cUS) allows very early brain imaging in symptomatic neonates. Our aim was to investigate the role and range of abnormalities seen on

  15. Evidence for treatable inborn errors of metabolism in a cohort of 187 Greek patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilioti, M.; Evangeliou, A.E.; Tramma, D.; Theodoridou, Z.; Metaxas, S.; Michailidi, E.; Bonti, E.; Frysira, H.; Haidopoulou, A.; Asprangathou, D.; Tsalkidis, A.J.; Kardaras, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Jakobs, C.A.J.M.; Gibson, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    We screened for the presence of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) in 187 children (105 males; 82 females, ages 4-14years old) who presented with confirmed features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Twelve patients (7%) manifested increased 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-OH-IVA) excretion in urine, and

  16. Oral administration of iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin-loaded ceramic nanocapsules for breast cancer therapy and influence on iron and calcium metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahidhara, Ganesh; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    We determined the anticancer efficacy and internalization mechanism of our polymeric-ceramic nanoparticle system (calcium phosphate nanocores, enclosed in biodegradable polymers chitosan and alginate nanocapsules/nanocarriers [ACSC NCs]) loaded with iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin (Fe-bLf) in a breast cancer xenograft model. ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs with an overall size of 322±27.2 nm were synthesized. In vitro internalization and anticancer efficacy were evaluated in the MDA-MB-231 cells using multicellular tumor spheroids, CyQUANT and MTT assays. These NCs were orally delivered in a breast cancer xenograft mice model, and their internalization, cytotoxicity, biodistribution, and anticancer efficacy were evaluated. Chitosan-coated calcium phosphate Fe-bLf NCs effectively (59%, P≤0.005) internalized in a 1-hour period using clathrin-mediated endocytosis (P≤0.05) and energy-mediated pathways (P≤0.05) for internalization; 3.3 mg/mL of ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs completely disintegrated (~130-fold reduction, P≤0.0005) the tumor spheroids in 72 hours and 96 hours. The IC50 values determined for ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs were 1.69 mg/mL at 10 hours and 1.62 mg/mL after 20 hours. We found that Fe-bLf-NCs effectively (P≤0.05) decreased the tumor size (4.8-fold) compared to the void NCs diet and prevented tumor recurrence when compared to intraperitoneal injection of Taxol and Doxorubicin. Receptor gene expression and micro-RNA analysis confirmed upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and transferrin receptor (liver, intestine, and brain). Several micro-RNAs responsible for iron metabolism upregulated with NCs were identified. Taken together, orally delivered Fe-bLf NCs offer enhanced antitumor activity in breast cancer by internalizing via low-density lipoprotein receptor and transferrin receptor and regulating the micro-RNA expression. These NCs also restored the body iron and calcium levels and increased the hematologic counts.

  17. Investigation of Calcium Channel Blockers as Antiprotozoal Agents and Their Interference in the Metabolism of Leishmania (L. infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Quero Reimão

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis and Chagas disease are neglected parasitic diseases endemic in developing countries; efforts to find new therapies remain a priority. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs are drugs in clinical use for hypertension and other heart pathologies. Based on previous reports about the antileishmanial activity of dihydropyridine-CCBs, this work aimed to investigate whether the in vitro anti-Leishmania infantum and anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activities of this therapeutic class would be shared by other non-dihydropyridine-CCBs. Except for amrinone, our results demonstrated antiprotozoal activity for fendiline, mibefradil, and lidoflazine, with IC50 values in a range between 2 and 16 μM and Selectivity Index between 4 and 10. Fendiline demonstrated depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential, with increased reactive oxygen species production in amlodipine and fendiline treated Leishmania, but without plasma membrane disruption. Finally, in vitro combinations of amphotericin B, miltefosine, and pentamidine against L. infantum showed in isobolograms an additive interaction when these drugs were combined with fendiline, resulting in overall mean sum of fractional inhibitory concentrations between 0.99 and 1.10. These data demonstrated that non-dihydropyridine-CCBs present antiprotozoal activity and could be useful candidates for future in vivo efficacy studies against Leishmaniasis and Chagas’ disease.

  18. Calcium ionophore (A-23187 induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis: a rapid method to evaluate inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Rao

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation characterizes calcium ionophore (A-23187 induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis in the rat. Intraperitoneal injection of A-23187 (20 μg/rat stimulated marked biosynthesis of 6-keto-PGF1α (6-KPA, TxB2, LTC4 and LTB4, with no detectable changes on levels of PGE2. Levels of all eicosanoids decreased rapidly after a peak which was seen as early as 5 min. Enzyme markers of cellular contents of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, MPO and NAG respectively, decreased rapidly after ionophore injection; this was followed by increases after 60 min. Indomethacin, a selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and zileuton and ICI D-2138, two selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors attenuated prostaglandin and leukotriene pathways respectively. Oral administration of zileuton (20 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited LTB4 biosynthesis for up to 6 h suggesting a long duration of pharmacological activity in the rats consistent with its longer half-life. The rapid onset and the magnitude of increases in levels of eicosanoids render the ionophore induced peritoneal eicosanoid biosynthesis a useful model to evaluate pharmacological profiles of inhibitors of eicosanoid pathways in vivo.

  19. Mid-term effects of sleeve gastrectomy on calcium metabolism parameters, vitamin D and parathormone (PTH) in morbid obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Tomas, Andres; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Calero, Alicia; Martinez-Blasco, Amparo; Calpena, Rafael

    2012-05-01

    Despite routine supplementation of vitamins and minerals after bariatric surgery, an important number of patients suffer from deficiencies. Little is still known about the novel restrictive procedure, sleeve gastrectomy. A retrospective study of 30 morbidly obese patients undergoing a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, between May 2008 and September 2010, was performed. Baseline albumin, ferritin, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D, parathormone (PTH), vitamin B12, and folic acid were obtained before operation and postoperative determinations 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery. Before surgery, 96.7% of the patients presented vitamin D deficiency, 20% had elevated PTH, 3.3% hypoalbuminemia, and 3.3% folic acid deficiency. One year after surgery, only one patient (3.3%) presented vitamin D deficiency and had elevated PTH. The rest of parameters were within normal range. The second year after surgery, the results remain similar. A significant difference was obtained when comparing preoperative vitamin D values and postoperative determinations 12 months after surgery (increase of 51.9 ng/dl, 95% confidence interval (CI) (41.8-61.3); p levels. We have demonstrated an inverse correlation between weight loss and vitamin D increase at the third month after surgery.

  20. Is there a "metabolic-mood syndrome"? A review of the relationship between obesity and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Brietzke, Elisa; McIntyre, Roger S

    2015-05-01

    Obesity and mood disorders are highly prevalent and co-morbid. Epidemiological studies have highlighted the public health relevance of this association, insofar as both conditions and its co-occurrence are associated with a staggering illness-associated burden. Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity and mood disorders are intrinsically linked and share a series of clinical, neurobiological, genetic and environmental factors. The relationship of these conditions has been described as convergent and bidirectional; and some authors have attempted to describe a specific subtype of mood disorders characterized by a higher incidence of obesity and metabolic problems. However, the nature of this association remains poorly understood. There are significant inconsistencies in the studies evaluating metabolic and mood disorders; and, as a result, several questions persist about the validity and the generalizability of the findings. An important limitation in this area of research is the noteworthy phenotypic and pathophysiological heterogeneity of metabolic and mood disorders. Although clinically useful, categorical classifications in both conditions have limited heuristic value and its use hinders a more comprehensive understanding of the association between metabolic and mood disorders. A recent trend in psychiatry is to move toward a domain specific approach, wherein psychopathology constructs are agnostic to DSM-defined diagnostic categories and, instead, there is an effort to categorize domains based on pathogenic substrates, as proposed by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria Project (RDoC). Moreover, the substrates subserving psychopathology seems to be unspecific and extend into other medical illnesses that share in common brain consequences, which includes metabolic disorders. Overall, accumulating evidence indicates that there is a consistent association of multiple abnormalities in neuropsychological constructs, as well as

  1. The association of posttraumatic stress disorder and metabolic syndrome: a study of increased health risk in veterans

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    Hauger Richard L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is accumulating evidence for a link between trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and diminished health status. To assess PTSD-related biological burden, we measured biological factors that comprise metabolic syndrome, an important established predictor of morbidity and mortality, as a correlate of long-term health risk in PTSD. Methods We analyzed clinical data from 253 male and female veterans, corresponding to five factors linked to metabolic syndrome (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist-to-hip ratio and fasting measures of high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, serum triglycerides and plasma glucose concentration. Clinical cut-offs were defined for each biological parameter based on recommendations from the World Health Organization and the National Cholesterol Education Program. Controlling for relevant variables including sociodemographic variables, alcohol/substance/nicotine use and depression, we examined the impact of PTSD on metabolic syndrome using a logistic regression model. Results Two-fifths (40% of the sample met criteria for metabolic syndrome. Of those with PTSD (n = 139, 43% met criteria for metabolic syndrome. The model predicted metabolic syndrome well (-2 log likelihood = 316.650, chi-squared = 23.731, p = 0.005. Veterans with higher severity of PTSD were more likely to meet diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome (Wald = 4.76, p = 0.03. Conclusion These findings provide preliminary evidence linking higher severity of PTSD with risk factors for diminished health and increased morbidity, as represented by metabolic syndrome.

  2. Prevalence of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders in Urban Population of Ukraine Depending on the Degree and Type of Obesity

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    O.I. Mitchenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was subanalysis of the prevalence and detection of carbohydrate metabolism disorders in patients with overweight and obesity depending on the degree and type of obesity in a large population study of risk factors carried out in Ukraine on urban population in 2009–2013. It is found that in analyzed urban population of Ukraine, only 29.3 % of subjects had normal body weight, and 70.7 % had total overweight and obesity of I–III degree. There was a trend to increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity with age in both men and women being examined. It is revealed that with increasing body weight and age, detection rate for carbohydrate metabolism disorders in the population increases. The total prevalence of all carbohydrate metabolism disorders in the population was 77.2 %. The percentage of carbohydrate metabolism disorders detection increased with increasing degree of obesity and age. With increasing body weight, insulin resistance (IR detection rate increased from 16.8 % at normal body weight to 77.2 % at obesity of II–III degree, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT — from 23.4 % at normal body weight to 36.9 % at obesity of II–III degree and detection rate for diabetes mellitus (DM — from 3.4 to 16.3 %, respectively. The onset of abdominal obesity in men is associated with worsening of carbohydrate metabolism disorders and growth of IR detection rate by 35.4 %, IGT — by 5.6 %, DM — by 8.3 %. In women, the onset of abdominal obesity is associated with increased IR detection by 7.8 % and IGT — by 5.0 %, compared with women without signs of abdominal obesity.

  3. Prevalence of Lipid Metabolism Disorders in the Urban Population of Ukraine Depending on the Degree and Type of Obesity

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    O.I. Mitchenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was subanalysis of the prevalence of lipid metabolism disorders among a cohort of respondents with overweight and obesity depending on the degree and type of obesity in a large population determination of risk factors we have carried out in Ukraine on urban population in 2009–2013. It was found that in the urban Ukrainian population being analyzed only 29.3 % had a normal body weight, and 70.7 % summarily had overweight and obesity I–III degree. Upward trend in the prevalence of overweight and obesity has been detected with aging of subjects, among both men and women. It was found that with increasing body weight and the age, a proportion of the lipid metabolism disorders in the population rises. The prevalence of hypercholesterolemia in the population was 69.4 %, and all manifestations of the lipid metabolism disorders increased with increasing degree of obesity and age. It was found that in parallel with an increase in body weight, there is an increase in the prevalence of isolated hypertriglyceridemia on the background of reduced isolated hypercholesterolemia, which is caused by redistribution, in parallel with increasing body mass index, of lipid metabolism disorders due to increasing the share of combined dyslipidemia detection — from 7.9 % at normal body weight to 44.4 % at obesity III degree. It has been established that the occurrence and progression of abdominal type of obesity in men is associated with increased lipid metabolism disorders, whereas in women similar clear patterns were not found.

  4. Effects of calcium sources and soluble silicate on bone metabolism and the related gene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehira, Fusako; Miyagi, Ikuko; Eguchi, Yukinori

    2009-05-01

    The effects of five calcium (Ca) sources were compared for bone biochemical and mechanical properties and the related gene expression using mice, from the viewpoint of their soluble silicon (Si) content. Weanling male mice were fed diets containing 1% Ca supplemented with CaCO(3) as the control (CT), coral sand (CS), fossil stony coral (FSC), fish bone (FC) and eggshell (EC) powders, and 50 ppm of Si in the CT diet for 6 mo. The mRNA expressions related to bone remodeling were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Soluble Si content was 9.83, 7.17, 2.48, 0.29, and 0.20 ppm for the CS, FC, FSC, EC, and Ca-deficient basal diets, respectively. Si, CS, and FSC, in order, significantly increased dry and ash weights, Ca and hydroxyproline contents, and alkaline phosphatase and decreased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and urinary excretion of hydroxyproline compared with the CT group. Si significantly increased and FC decreased femoral strength and stiffness. In the mRNA expression related to osteoblastogenesis, Si and CS significantly increased runt-related transcription factor 2. Si, CS, and FSC, in order, significantly decreased and FC and EC increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma. In the mRNA expression related to osteoclastogenesis, Si and CS significantly increased and FC and EC decreased the osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand ratio, whereas Si and CS decreased transforming growth factor-beta. The results indicated that soluble silicate and CS, with the highest Si content among Ca sources, improved bone biochemical and mechanical properties through stimulation of gene expression related to osteoblastogenesis and suppression of that related to osteoclastogenesis.

  5. The study of calcitriol, cinacalcet combined with nursing intervention effect of SHPT, calcium, phosphorus metabolism and parathyroid hormone on MHD patients

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    Le Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate calcitriol, cinacalcet plus comprehensive intervention on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT calcium (Ca, phosphorus (P metabolism and parathyroid hormone (PTH effect. Methods: A total of 80 cases of patients with SHPT from January 2014 to January 2016 in our hospital were randomly divided into observation group and control group, control group to eat the whole piece of cinacalcet hydrochloride oral tablets, the initial dose of 25 mg/d, every 2 to 4 weeks, according to Ca×P, parathyroid hormone (iPTH test results adjust the dose, the maximum dose of not more than 75 mg/d, the observation group in the control group on the basis of oral administration of Calcitriol Soft Capsules 0.25 g/d, 3 times/week, 2 groups were given comprehensive intervention measures, to evaluate the curative effect after 3 months of treatment. The 2 groups before and after treatment collected fasting peripheral venous blood, the determination of Ca, P and alkaline phosphatase by colorimetric method (ALP, Ca, P product calculation (Ca×P, to detect the level of iPTH before and after treatment by ELISA method; TY-6858-HI type ultrasound instrument, measuring length, width and thickness of the parathyroid glands, and calculate the parathyroid gland volume. Results: in the observation group after treatment, Ca, Ca×P increased degree, P, ALP, iPTH lower than the control group, the size of the parathyroid gland was better than the control group. Conclusion: calcitriol, cinacalcet combined intervention therapy has good clinical effect in patients with MHD SHPT, Ca, P can effectively improve the metabolism, reduce the level of iPTH, reduce the parathyroid gland volume is worthy of promotion.

  6. Calcium and fat metabolic balance, and gastrointestinal tolerance in term infants fed milk-based formulas with and without palm olein and palm kernel oils: a randomized blinded crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Efigênia de Queiroz; Lasekan, John; Baggs, Geraldine; Ribeiro, Tereza; Menezes-Filho, Jose; Pontes, Mariana; Druzian, Janice; Barreto, Danile Leal; de Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Mattos, Ângela; Costa-Ribeiro, Hugo

    2013-12-24

    Effects of palm olein (POL) on calcium and fat metabolic balance and gastrointestinal (GI) tolerance have been clinically evaluated but its use in combination with palm kernel oil (PKO), and canola oil has not been similarly assessed in infants. Calcium and fat balance and GI tolerance were evaluated in 33 healthy term infants (age = 68-159 d) in a randomized, double-blinded, 14 d crossover trial at a day care center in Salvador, Brazil; followed by a 4d hospital ward metabolic balance study in 17 of the male subjects. The study compared two commercially available milk-based powdered formulas in Brazil; one containing POL (44% of total fat), PKO (21.7%) and canola oil (18.5%) as predominant fats (PALM), and the other containing none (NoPALM). Occasional human milk (HM) supplementation was allowed at home. Formula and HM intakes, and growth were not different (p > 0.05). Calcium absorption (%) for infants fed NoPALM (58.8 ± 16.7%; means ± SD) was higher (p = 0.023) than those fed PALM (42.1 ± 19.2%), but was not significant (p = 0.104) when calcium intake was used as a covariate. Calcium intake was higher (p Fat absorption (%) for NoPALM was greater than PALM fed infants (NoPALM = 96.9 ± 1.2 > PALM = 95.1 ± 1.5; p = 0.020 in Study Period I). Mean rank stool consistency was softer in infants fed NoPALM versus PALM (p 0.05). Formula acceptability was high and comparable for both formula feedings, regardless of HM supplementation. Term infants fed PALM based formula (containing palm olein, palm kernel and canola oils) demonstrated lower calcium retention and fat absorption, and less softer stool consistency versus infants fed NoPALM based formula. Study suggested formula fat differences may affect GI function in infants.

  7. Calcium signalling: fishing out molecules of mitochondrial calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-10-26

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins - MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 - to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of a high dose of simvastatin on muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtier, F., E-mail: f-galtier@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); CPID, Faculté de Pharmacie, 15 Av. Charles Flahault, BP 14491, 34093 Montpellier Cedex 5, Montpellier (France); Mura, T., E-mail: t-mura@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Raynaud de Mauverger, E., E-mail: eric.raynaud-de-mauverger@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Université Montpellier 1, 5 bd Henri IV CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier Cedex 2 (France); Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, U1046, 371 Avenue du Doyen G. Giraud, CHU Arnaud de Villeneuve, Bâtiment INSERM Crastes de Paulet, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Chevassus, H., E-mail: h-chevassus@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Farret, A., E-mail: a-farret@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Gagnol, J.-P., E-mail: jp-gagnol@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Costa, F., E-mail: francoisecosta@sfr.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Dupuy, A., E-mail: am-dupuy@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-09-15

    Statin use may be limited by muscle side effects. Although incompletely understood to date, their pathophysiology may involve oxidative stress and impairments of mitochondrial function and of muscle Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. In order to simultaneously assess these mechanisms, 24 male healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either simvastatin for 80 mg daily or placebo for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples and a stress test were performed at baseline and at follow-up, and mitochondrial respiration and Ca{sup 2+} spark properties were evaluated on a muscle biopsy 4 days before the second stress test. Simvastatin-treated subjects were separated according to their median creatine kinase (CK) increase. Simvastatin treatment induced a significant elevation of aspartate amino transferase (3.38 ± 5.68 vs − 1.15 ± 4.32 UI/L, P < 0.001) and CK (− 24.3 ± 99.1 ± 189.3vs 48.3 UI/L, P = 0.01) and a trend to an elevation of isoprostanes (193 ± 408 vs12 ± 53 pmol/mmol creatinine, P = 0.09) with no global change in mitochondrial respiration, lactate/pyruvate ratio or Ca{sup 2+} sparks. However, among statin-treated subjects, those with the highest CK increase displayed a significantly lower Vmax rotenone succinate and an increase in Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude vs both subjects with the lowest CK increase and placebo-treated subjects. Moreover, Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude was positively correlated with treatment-induced CK increase in the whole group (r = 0.71, P = 0.0045). In conclusion, this study further supports that statin induced muscular toxicity may be related to alterations in mitochondrial respiration and muscle calcium homeostasis independently of underlying disease or concomitant medication. -- Highlights: ► Statin use may be limited by side effects, particularly myopathy. ► Statins might impair mitochondrial function and muscle Ca2+ signaling in muscle. ► This was tested among healthy volunteers receiving simvastatin 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. ► CK

  9. Novel two-step derivation method for the synchronous analysis of inherited metabolic disorders using urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiao-Qi; Wang, Yi-Chao

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct preliminary clinical screening and monitoring using a novel two-step derivatization process of urine in five categories of inherited metabolic disease (IMD). Urine samples (100 µl, containing 2.5 mmol/l creatinine) were taken from patients with IMDs. The collected urine was then treated using a two-step derivatization method (with oximation and silylation at room temperature), where urea and protein were removed. In the first step of the derivatization, α-ketoacids and α-aldehyde acids were prepared by oximation using novel oximation reagents. The second-step of the derivatization was that residues were silylated for analysis. Urine samples were examined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and a retention time-locking technique. The simultaneous analysis and identification of >400 metabolites in >130 types of IMD was possible from the GC/MS results, where the IMDs included phenylketonuria, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency, β-ureidopropionase deficiency and mitochondrial metabolic disorders. This method was demonstrated to have good repeatability. Considering α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) as an example, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the α-KG retention time and peak area were 0.8 and 3.9%, respectively, the blank spiked recovery rate was between 89.6 and 99.8%, and the RSD was ≤7.5% (n=5). The method facilitates the analysis of thermally non-stable and semi-volatile metabolites in urine, and greatly expands the range of materials that can be synchronously screened by GC/MS. Furthermore, it provides a comprehensive, effective and reliable biochemical analysis platform for the pathological research of IMDs.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, impaired glucose metabolism, and bipolar disorder course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Santos, Camila M; Rizzo, Lucas B; Asevedo, Elson; Cunha, Graccielle R; Noto, Mariane N; Pedrini, Mariana; Zeni-Graiff, Maiara; Cordeiro, Quirino; Vinberg, Maj; Kapczinski, Flavio; McIntyre, Roger S; Brietzke, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in bipolar disorder (BD). However, current evidence is limited and results have been highly heterogeneous. This study aimed to assess the moderating effect of impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) on plasma levels of BDNF in individuals with BD, and on the relationship between BDNF and variables of illness course. We measured and compared the plasma levels of BDNF in individuals with BD (n=57) and healthy controls (n=26). IGM was operationalized as pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Information related to current and past psychiatric/medical history, as well as prescription of pharmacological treatments was also captured. Individuals with BD had lower levels of BDNF, relative to healthy controls, after adjustment for age, gender, current medications, smoking, alcohol use, and IGM (P=.046). There was no effect of IGM (P=.860) and no interaction between BD diagnosis and IGM (P=.893). Peripheral BDNF levels were positively correlated with lifetime depressive episodes (P<.001), psychiatric hospitalizations (P=.001) and suicide attempts (P=.021). IGM moderated the association between BDNF and the number of previous mood episodes (P<.001), wherein there was a positive correlation in euglycemic participants and a negative correlation in individuals with IGM. BD is independently associated with lower levels of BDNF; IGM may modify the relationship between BDNF and BD course, suggesting an interactive effect of BDNF with metabolic status on illness progression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Importance of acylcarnitine profile analysis for disorders of lipid metabolism in adolescent patients with recurrent rhabdomyolysis: Report of two cases

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    Yasemin Topçu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic myopathies due to disorders of lipid metabolism are a heterogeneous group of diseases. Newborns may present with hypotonia and convulsions, while progressive proximal muscle weakness or recurrent episodes of muscle weakness accompanied by rhabdomyolysis/myoglobinuria may be seen in older ages. There is little knowledge on detection of disorders of lipid metabolism by acylcarnitine profile (ACP analysis by tandem mass spectrometry outside the neonatal period particularly in cases with recurrent rhabdomyolysis first presenting in adolescence and adulthood. Two adolescent female cases presented with episodes of rhabdomyolysis and muscle weakness. A 13-year-old patient had five episodes of rhabdomyolysis triggered by infections. Tandem mass spectrometry was normal. A 16-year-old female patient was hospitalized eight times due to recurrent rhabdomyolysis. Increased levels of C14:2, C14:1, and C14 were determined in tandem mass spectrometry. Final diagnoses were carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II deficiency and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD deficiency. Increased serum levels of long-chain acylcarnitine can guide to the diagnosis of lipid metabolism disorders. Serum ACP should be performed before enzyme assay and genetic studies.

  12. Importance of acylcarnitine profile analysis for disorders of lipid metabolism in adolescent patients with recurrent rhabdomyolysis: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçu, Yasemin; Bayram, Erhan; Karaoğlu, Pakize; Yiş, Uluç; Kurul, Semra Hız

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic myopathies due to disorders of lipid metabolism are a heterogeneous group of diseases. Newborns may present with hypotonia and convulsions, while progressive proximal muscle weakness or recurrent episodes of muscle weakness accompanied by rhabdomyolysis/myoglobinuria may be seen in older ages. There is little knowledge on detection of disorders of lipid metabolism by acylcarnitine profile (ACP) analysis by tandem mass spectrometry outside the neonatal period particularly in cases with recurrent rhabdomyolysis first presenting in adolescence and adulthood. Two adolescent female cases presented with episodes of rhabdomyolysis and muscle weakness. A 13-year-old patient had five episodes of rhabdomyolysis triggered by infections. Tandem mass spectrometry was normal. A 16-year-old female patient was hospitalized eight times due to recurrent rhabdomyolysis. Increased levels of C14:2, C14:1, and C14 were determined in tandem mass spectrometry. Final diagnoses were carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. Increased serum levels of long-chain acylcarnitine can guide to the diagnosis of lipid metabolism disorders. Serum ACP should be performed before enzyme assay and genetic studies.

  13. The Effects of an Exercise Program on Anxiety Levels and Metabolic Functions in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Fen; Wu, Po-Lun; Su, Chia-Hsien; Yang, Tzu-Ching

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based (HB) exercise program on anxiety levels and metabolic functions in patients with anxiety disorders in Taiwan. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 86 participants for this randomized, experimental study. Participants were asked to complete a pretest before the 3-month exercise program, a posttest at 1 week, and a follow-up test at 3 months after the exercise program. Study measures included four Self-Report Scales and biophysical assessments to collect and assess personal data, lifestyle behaviors, anxiety levels, and metabolic control functions. Of the 86 study participants, 83 completed the posttest and the 3-month follow-up test, including 41 in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. Participants in the experimental group showed significant improvements in body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and the level of moderate exercise after the program relative to the control group, as analyzed by generalized estimating equations mixed-model repeated measures. State and trait anxiety levels were also significantly improved from pretest to follow-up test in the experimental group. Finally, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome declined for participants in the experimental group. The HB exercise program produced positive effects on the metabolic indicators and anxiety levels of Taiwanese adults with anxiety disorders. Health providers should consider using similar HB exercise programs to help improve the mental and physical health of patients with anxiety disorders in their communities.

  14. Prognostic value of adipokines in patients with myocardial infarction and glucose metabolism disorders

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    Kamila Kahramonzhonovna Kholmatova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AimsTo evaluate the prognostic value of adipokines in patients with myocardial infarction (MI and various glucose metabolism disorders.Materials and MethodsConsecutive patients aged ≤80 years and diagnosed with MI (380 patients, 63.4% males were examined. The patients were classified into four groups: I, with normal glucose tolerance; II, with prediabetes; III and IV - with newly detected and previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively. Levels of insulin, C-peptide and cortisol during glucose tolerance test and basal levels of apolipoproteins AI, B100, leptin and adiponectin were determined in 113 patients with Q MI. Cardiovascular events were analysed for the next 2 years after MI. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors of poor prognosis after MI.ResultsElevated levels of leptin with decreased levels of adiponectin were observed in all MI patients independent of the degree of glucose metabolism disturbance. A linear trend of leptin level increase was observed starting from group I to group IV (Jonckheere’s test: J=2218.0; z=3.411; р=0.001. Multiple regression analysis showed that the basal insulin level was an independent predictor of death during the 2 years after MI (OR=0.639; р=0.033. MI prior to hospitalisation (OR=5.633; р=0.013, basal hypercortisolaemia (OR=5.435; р=0.016, glycaemia (OR=1.213; р=0.023 and heart rate (OR=1.051; р=0.032 on admission were associated with the occurrence of repeated MI. Leptin levels (OR=1.018; р=0.031 and creatine kinase-MB fraction (OR=1.009; р=0.018 were risk factors of the occurrence of the combined end-point of cardiovascular events.ConclusionAn imbalance of adipokines was observed in MI patients regardless of the presence of glucose disorders. The levels of leptin, glycaemia, insulin and basal hypercortisolaemia were significantly associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events during the late post-infarction period.

  15. The metabolic pattern of idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder reflects early-stage Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meles, Sanne Katherina; Renken, Remco J; Janzen, Annette H O; Vadasz, David; Pagani, Marco; Arnaldi, Dario; Morbelli, Silvia; Nobili, Flavio; Mayer, Geert; Leenders, Klaus L; Oertel, Wolfgang H O

    2018-02-23

    Rationale: Idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is considered a prodromal stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other Lewy-body disorders. Spatial covariance analysis of [ 18 F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) data has disclosed a specific brain pattern of altered glucose metabolism in PD. In this study, we identify the metabolic pattern underlying iRBD and compare it to the known PD pattern. To understand the relevance of the iRBD pattern to disease progression, we study the expression of the iRBD pattern in de novo PD patients. Methods: The iRBD-related pattern was identified in 18 F-FDG-PET scans of 21 patients with polysomnographically-confirmed iRBD and 19 controls using spatial covariance analysis. Expression of the iRBD-related pattern was subsequently computed in 18 F-FDG-PET scans of 44 controls and 38 de novo, treatment-naïve PD patients. Of these 38 PD patients, 24 had probable RBD according to the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire. Neuropsychological evaluation showed mild cognitive impairment in 20 PD patients (PD-MCI), of whom sixteen also had concomitant RBD and roughly half (11/20) had bilateral motor symptoms. Results: The iRBD-related pattern was characterized by relative hypermetabolism in cerebellum, brainstem, thalamus, sensorimotor cortex, and hippocampus, and by relative hypometabolism in middle cingulate, temporal, occipital and parietal cortices. This topography partially overlapped with the PD-related pattern (PDRP). The iRBD-related pattern was significantly expressed in PD patients compared to controls (Ppattern expression was not significantly different between PD patients with and without probable RBD, or between PD patients with unilateral or bilateral parkinsonism. iRBD-related pattern expression was higher in PD-MCI patients, compared to PD patients with preserved cognition ( P = 0.001). Subject scores on the iRBD-related pattern were highly correlated to subject scores on the PDRP (r=0.94, Ppatterns

  16. Metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in people living with HIV/AIDS without the use of antiretroviral therapy

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    Mariana Amaral Raposo

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Metabolic disorders in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLH have been described even before the introduction of antiretroviral (ARV drugs in the treatment of HIV infection and are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Based on this, the purpose of this study was to assess metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in PLH before the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of 87 PLH without the use of ART, which was carried out between January and September 2012 at a specialized infectious diseases center in Minas Gerais, Brazil. RESULTS: The main metabolic disorders in the population were low serum levels of HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia and abdominal obesity. Dyslipidemia was prevalent in 62.6% of the study population, whereas