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Sample records for cag repeat polymorphism

  1. Association of androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphism with cryptorchidism: A meta-analysis.

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    Wang, Qi; Ge, Xing; Wang, Heng-Xue; Shi, Qiao-Mei; Ding, Zhen; Xu, Li-Chun

    2017-10-18

    Researches on association between variations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene repeat polymorphisms and cryptorchidism (CO) had conflicting results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to analyse the potential effects of AR CAG and/or GGN repeat polymorphism on CO. Studies were independently appraised by two investigators on PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO databases and Foreign Medical Retrieval System. Case-control studies with measurement of CAG and/or GGN repeat length were included. Weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the CAG or GGN repeat polymorphism and CO were calculated. Five reports were included in this analysis. Overall, no difference was identified between patients and fertile men in CAG repeat length. However, when the CO was divided into unilateral and bilateral, longer CAG repeat region was significantly associated with CO in bilateral group (WMD = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.01-1.47; p < .05). In addition, GGN lengths were significantly higher in patients compared with those in controls (WMD = 1.17; 95% CI, 0.28-2.06; p < .05). No obvious effect was found in the GGN length when compared unilateral or bilateral group with control respectively. The results in this meta-analysis indicated that AR CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms may be an important pathogenesis of CO. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Influence of CAG Repeat Polymorphism on the Targets of Testosterone Action

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    Giacomo Tirabassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, ample evidence has demonstrated the growing importance of androgen receptor (AR CAG repeat polymorphism in andrology. This genetic parameter is able to condition the peripheral effects of testosterone and therefore to influence male sexual function and fertility, cardiovascular risk, body composition, bone metabolism, the risk of prostate and testicular cancer, the psychiatric status, and the onset of neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we extensively discuss the literature data and identify a role for AR CAG repeat polymorphism in conditioning the systemic testosterone effects. In particular, our main purpose was to provide an updated text able to shed light on the many and often contradictory findings reporting an influence of CAG repeat polymorphism on the targets of testosterone action.

  3. Mental rotation in intellectually gifted boys is affected by the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism.

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    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Lakatošová, Silvia; Kubranská, Aneta; Laznibatová, Jolana; Ficek, Andrej; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone was shown to organize brain and modulate cognitive functions. It is currently unknown whether mental rotation is also associated with prenatal testosterone exposure and testosterone-related genetic polymorphisms. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between mental rotation performance, the actual testosterone levels, the prenatal testosterone level (expressed as 2D:4D ratio) and the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism in intellectually gifted boys. One hundred forty-seven boys aged 10-18 years with IQ>130 were enrolled. Saliva samples were collected and used for ELISA of actual levels of salivary testosterone. The 2D:4D finger length ratio as an indicator of prenatal testosterone was measured on both hands and averaged. Amthauer mental rotation test was used for the assessment of this spatial ability. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene was analyzed using PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Linear regression revealed that 2D:4D finger length ratio and the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene were associated with mental rotation. Actual levels of testosterone did not correlate significantly with mental rotation. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that after adjustment of age as a confounding variable, only the effect of the genetic polymorphism was significant. The results are in line with our previous genetic analysis of intellectually gifted boys showing the importance of CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene. Details of the interactions between androgen signaling, testosterone levels and its metabolism especially during the prenatal development of brain function remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China: a cross-sectional study

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    Yan-Min Ma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and fifty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG S if they harbored repeat length of ≤20 or as CAG long (CAG L if their CAG repeat length was >20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the specified physicians; CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method; and the serum levels of the sex hormones were detected by radioimmunoassay. Student's t-test or linear regression analysis was used to assess the associations among AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length. This investigation showed that the serum total testosterone (T level was positively associated with the AR CAG repeat length (P = 0.01; whereas, no significant correlation of T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism with the penile length was found (P = 0.593. Interestingly, an inverse association was observed between serum prolactin (PRL levels and penile length by linear regression analyses (β= −0.024, P = 0.039, 95% confidence interval (CI: −0.047, 0. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence that serum PRL, but not T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism, is correlated with penile length in the Han adult population from northwestern China.

  5. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the Androgen receptor gene modifies the risk for hypospadias in Caucasians

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    2012-01-01

    Background Hypospadias is a birth defect of the urethra in males, and a milder form of 46,XY disorder of sexual development (DSD). The disease is characterized by a ventrally placed urinary opening due to a premature fetal arrest of the urethra development. Moreover, the Androgen receptor (AR) gene has an essential role in the hormone-dependent stage of sexual development. In addition, longer AR polyglutamine repeat lengths encoded by CAG repeats are associated with lower transcriptional activity in vitro. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the role of the CAG repeat length in the AR gene in hypospadias cases as compared to the controls. Our study included 211 hypospadias and 208 controls of Caucasian origin. Methods We amplified the CAG repeat region with PCR, and calculated the difference in the mean CAG repeat length between the hypospadias and control group using the T-test for independent groups. Results We detected a significant increase of the CAG repeat length in the hypospadias cases when compared to the controls (contrast estimate: 2.29, 95% Confidence Interval (1.73-2.84); p-value: 0.001). In addition, the odds ratios between the hypospadias and controls revealed that the hypospadias cases are two to 3 times as likely to have longer CAG repeats than a shorter length for each repeat length investigated. Conclusions We have investigated the largest number of hypospadias cases with regards to the CAG repeat length, and we provide evidence that a higher number of the CAG repeat sequence in the AR gene have a clear effect on the risk of hypospadias in Caucasians. PMID:23167717

  6. Association analysis of a highly polymorphic CAG Repeat in the human potassium channel gene KCNN3 and migraine susceptibility

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    Ovcaric Mick

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a polygenic multifactorial disease, possessing environmental and genetic causative factors with multiple involved genes. Mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neurological disorders. KCNN3 is a neuronal small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel gene that contains two polyglutamine tracts, encoded by polymorphic CAG repeats in the gene. This gene plays a critical role in determining the firing pattern of neurons and acts to regulate intracellular calcium channels. Methods The present association study tested whether length variations in the second (more 3' polymorphic CAG repeat in exon 1 of the KCNN3 gene, are involved in susceptibility to migraine with and without aura (MA and MO. In total 423 DNA samples from unrelated individuals, of which 202 consisted of migraine patients and 221 non-migraine controls, were genotyped and analysed using a fluorescence labelled primer set on an ABI310 Genetic Analyzer. Allele frequencies were calculated from observed genotype counts for the KCNN3 polymorphism. Analysis was performed using standard contingency table analysis, incorporating the chi-squared test of independence and CLUMP analysis. Results Overall, there was no convincing evidence that KCNN3 CAG lengths differ between Caucasian migraineurs and controls, with no significant difference in the allelic length distribution of CAG repeats between the population groups (P = 0.090. Also the MA and MO subtypes did not differ significantly between control allelic distributions (P > 0.05. The prevalence of the long CAG repeat (>19 repeats did not reach statistical significance in migraineurs (P = 0.15, nor was there a significant difference between the MA and MO subgroups observed compared to controls (P = 0.46 and P = 0.09, respectively, or between MA vs MO (P = 0.40. Conclusion This association study provides no evidence that length variations of the second polyglutamine array in

  7. CAG repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor and breast cancer risk in women: a meta-analysis of 17 studies

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    Mao Q

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Qixing Mao,1–3,* Mantang Qiu,1–3,* Gaochao Dong,3 Wenjie Xia,1–3 Shuai Zhang,1,3 Youtao Xu,1,3 Jie Wang,3 Yin Rong,1,3 Lin Xu,1,3 Feng Jiang1,3 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, 2Fourth Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, 3Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Cancer Research, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The association between polymorphic CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene in women and breast cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the conclusions regarding this relationship remain conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify whether androgen receptor CAG repeat lengths were related to breast cancer susceptibility. The MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched through to December 2014 to identify eligible studies. Data and study quality were rigorously assessed by two investigators according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The publication bias was assessed by the Begg’s test. Seventeen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis suggested no association between CAG polymorphisms and breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.031, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.855–1.245. However, in the subgroup analysis, we observed that long CAG repeats significantly increased the risk of breast cancer in the Caucasian population (OR 1.447, 95% CI 1.089–1.992. Additionally, the risk was significantly increased in Caucasian women carrying two alleles with CAG repeats ≥22 units compared with those with two shorter alleles (OR 1.315, 95% CI 1.014–1.707. These findings suggest that long CAG repeats increase the risk of breast cancer in Caucasian women. However, larger scale case-control studies are needed to validate our results. Keywords: androgen, CAG repeat polymorphism, women

  8. Negative association between androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome? A systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Wang, Rui; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Xiong, Ting; Wang, Di; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Hanwang

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies focusing on the association between the exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have revealed conflicting results. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the strength of the association and to explore potential sources of heterogeneity that may have influenced the results. Studies matched to search terms from PubMed, EMBASE and HuGE Navigator published through to 31 January 2012 were retrieved. Data extraction from the included studies was carried out by two authors independently. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) of biallelic mean and odds ratios (ORs) of alleles and genotypes were pooled for meta-analysis. Sixteen articles reporting on 17 studies were included. In continuous data analysis, the summary WMD was −0.06 (95% confidence interval −0.29 to 0.16). In dichotomous data analysis, we divided the alleles into short and long alleles and calculated the summary ORs. No statistically significant results were identified by different comparison models or different cut-off point definitions. No publication bias was observed in continuous and dichotomous data analysis. In summary, the current systematic review and meta-analysis found that the AR CAG microsatellite repeat polymorphism is unlikely to be a major determining factor in the development of PCOS. PMID:22695532

  9. Association of the polymorphism of the CAG repeat in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with testicular germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, M; Leffers, H; Petersen, J H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in the DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) gene and the risk of testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) was investigated in this study. The hypothesis was prompted by an earlier preliminary study proposing an association of the absence...

  10. The impact of the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene on muscle and adipose tissues in 20-29-year-old Danish men: Odense Androgen Study

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    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Background: The number of CAG repeats (CAGn) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor. Objective: To examine the impact of CAGn on muscle, fat distribution, and circulating androgen levels. Design, settings...

  11. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine the ...... muscle size increased exponentially with decreasing androgen levels and was tripled at total testosterone levels...... the CAG-repeat number in relation to body fat mass and circulating androgens, and to identify the best hormonal marker of low muscle size amongst total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based study of 783 Danish men aged 20......, chronic disease, and age. The CAG-repeat number correlated positively with total body fat mass adjusted for weight, but not with the concentration of any of the circulating androgens. Total testosterone and dihydrotestosterone correlated positively with all outcomes of muscle size. The prevalence of low...

  12. Bone mass and the CAG and GGN androgen receptor polymorphisms in young men.

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    Amelia Guadalupe-Grau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine whether androgen receptor (AR CAG (polyglutamine and GGN (polyglycine polymorphisms influence bone mineral density (BMD, osteocalcin and free serum testosterone concentration in young men. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole body, lumbar spine and femoral bone mineral content (BMC and BMD, Dual X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA, AR repeat polymorphisms (PCR, osteocalcin and free testosterone (ELISA were determined in 282 healthy men (28.6+/-7.6 years. Individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG(S if harboring repeat lengths of 21, and GGN was considered short (GGN(S or long (GGN(L if GGN 23. There was an inverse association between logarithm of CAG and GGN length and Ward's Triangle BMC (r = -0.15 and -0.15, P<0.05, age and height adjusted. No associations between CAG or GGN repeat length and regional BMC or BMD were observed after adjusting for age. Whole body and regional BMC and BMD values were similar in men harboring CAG(S, CAG(L, GGN(S or GGN(L AR repeat polymorphisms. Men harboring the combination CAG(L+GGN(L had 6.3 and 4.4% higher lumbar spine BMC and BMD than men with the haplotype CAG(S+GGN(S (both P<0.05. Femoral neck BMD was 4.8% higher in the CAG(S+GGN(S compared with the CAG(L+GGN(S men (P<0.05. CAG(S, CAG(L, GGN(S, GGN(L men had similar osteocalcin concentration as well as the four CAG-GGN haplotypes studied. CONCLUSION: AR polymorphisms have an influence on BMC and BMD in healthy adult humans, which cannot be explained through effects in osteoblastic activity.

  13. Positive Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Metabolic Syndrome in a Korean Male Population

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    Jong Wook Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In epidemiological studies, there are various associations of androgen receptor (AR CAG with several diseases or phenotypes. However, the relationship between CAG repeat length and metabolic syndrome (MS remains unclear, especially in Asian populations. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population. Materials and Methods: We explored the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population (n=337 from 2013 to 2014. AR CAG repeat were determined by microsatellite fragment sizing. Components of MS and laboratory data (lipid profile, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] were analyzed with AR CAG repeat length. Results: The mean AR CAG repeat length was 22.3±4.7. Sixty-nine men (20.5% were diagnosed with MS. Men with MS showed significantly longer AR CAG repeat lengths compared with men without MS (26.2 vs. 21.4, p<0.001. With increasing CAG repeat, the number of components meeting the NCEP criteria increased significantly. AR CAG repeat length was associated significantly with high density lipoprotein (HDL, triglyceride, and HbA1c levels. In the multivariate analysis, CAG repeat length, waist circumference, and levels of HDL were independently associated with MS. (odds ratio (OR=1.37, 1.19 and 0.90, p <0.001, 0.045, and 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: AR CAG repeat length was associated with MS and laboratory test results, such as those for HDL, triglycerides, and HbA1c, in Korean males. Longer CAG repeat length was identified as a risk factor for MS in Korean males.

  14. Positive Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Metabolic Syndrome in a Korean Male Population.

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    Kim, Jong Wook; Bae, Young Dae; Ahn, Sun Tae; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Je Jong; Moon, Du Geon

    2018-01-01

    In epidemiological studies, there are various associations of androgen receptor (AR) CAG with several diseases or phenotypes. However, the relationship between CAG repeat length and metabolic syndrome (MS) remains unclear, especially in Asian populations. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population. We explored the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population (n=337) from 2013 to 2014. AR CAG repeat were determined by microsatellite fragment sizing. Components of MS and laboratory data (lipid profile, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)) were analyzed with AR CAG repeat length. The mean AR CAG repeat length was 22.3±4.7. Sixty-nine men (20.5%) were diagnosed with MS. Men with MS showed significantly longer AR CAG repeat lengths compared with men without MS (26.2 vs. 21.4, p<0.001). With increasing CAG repeat, the number of components meeting the NCEP criteria increased significantly. AR CAG repeat length was associated significantly with high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglyceride, and HbA1c levels. In the multivariate analysis, CAG repeat length, waist circumference, and levels of HDL were independently associated with MS. (odds ratio (OR)=1.37, 1.19 and 0.90, p<0.001, 0.045, and 0.001, respectively). AR CAG repeat length was associated with MS and laboratory test results, such as those for HDL, triglycerides, and HbA1c, in Korean males. Longer CAG repeat length was identified as a risk factor for MS in Korean males.

  15. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

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    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten; Skovby, Flemming; Hjermind, Lena E; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2013-06-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective genes leading to pathogenic expansions of polyglutamine stretches in the encoded proteins. In general, unstable CAG repeats have an uninterrupted CAG repeat, whereas stable CAG repeats are either short or interrupted by CAA codons, which - like CAG codons - code for glutamine. Here we report on an infantile SCA2 patient who, due to germ-line CAG repeat instability in her father, inherited an extremely expanded CAG repeat in the SCA2 locus. Surprisingly, the expanded allele of the father was an interrupted CAG repeat sequence. Furthermore, analyses of single spermatozoa showed a high frequency of paternal germ-line repeat sequence instability of the expanded SCA2 locus.

  16. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting*

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    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F.; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the −1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded re...

  17. R loops stimulate genetic instability of CTG.CAG repeats.

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    Lin, Yunfu; Dent, Sharon Y R; Wilson, John H; Wells, Robert D; Napierala, Marek

    2010-01-12

    Transcription stimulates the genetic instability of trinucleotide repeat sequences. However, the mechanisms leading to transcription-dependent repeat length variation are unclear. We demonstrate, using biochemical and genetic approaches, that the formation of stable RNA.DNA hybrids enhances the instability of CTG.CAG repeat tracts. In vitro transcribed CG-rich repeating sequences, unlike AT-rich repeats and nonrepeating sequences, form stable, ribonuclease A-resistant structures. These RNA.DNA hybrids are eliminated by ribonuclease H treatment. Mutation in the rnhA1 gene that decreases the activity of ribonuclease HI stimulates the instability of CTG.CAG repeats in E. coli. Importantly, the effect of ribonuclease HI depletion on repeat instability requires active transcription. We also showed that transcription-dependent CTG.CAG repeat instability in human cells is stimulated by siRNA knockdown of RNase H1 and H2. In addition, we used bisulfite modification, which detects single-stranded DNA, to demonstrate that the nontemplate DNA strand at transcribed CTG.CAG repeats remains partially single-stranded in human genomic DNA, thus indicating that it is displaced by an RNA.DNA hybrid. These studies demonstrate that persistent hybrids between the nascent RNA transcript and the template DNA strand at CTG.CAG tracts promote instability of DNA trinucleotide repeats.

  18. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

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    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective...

  19. The CAG repeat within the androgen receptor gene and its relationship to cryptorchidism

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    M. Silva-Ramos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We examined the significance of the CAG repeat polymorphism in the pathogenesis of cryptorchidism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA was extracted from blood samples from 42 cryptorchid boys and from 31 non-cryptorchid control subjects. In the cryptorchid group, 7 had bilateral cryptorchidism and 6 had patent processus vaginalis in the contralateral side. To determine the number of CAG repeats, the DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. RESULTS: The mean CAG repeat length in the AR gene was 22.5 (range 16 to 28 in patients and 21.5 (range 17 to 26 in controls (non-significant. Patients with bilateral cryptorchidism had a mean length of 24.3 (range 21 to 26 and patients with unilateral cryptorchidism and patent processus vaginalis in the contra lateral side had a mean of 25.2 (range 21 to 28, which was statistically different from controls (p = 0.015 and p = 0.005 respectively. CONCLUSION: CAG repeat length of the AR gene does not seem to play a major role in patients with unilateral cryptorchidism. However, in patients with bilateral undescended testis, a less functional androgen receptor through a longer polyglutamine chain may have a role in its pathogenesis. In the same way, patients with unilateral cryptorchidism a contralateral patent processus vaginalis have longer CAG repeats that might be responsible for a slower testicular descent and incomplete closure of the processus vaginalis.

  20. Population genetics and new insight into range of CAG repeats of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 in the Han Chinese population.

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    Shi-Rui Gan

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, also called Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, is one of the most common SCAs worldwide and caused by a CAG repeat expansion located in ATXN3 gene. Based on the CAG repeat numbers, alleles of ATXN3 can be divided into normal alleles (ANs, intermediate alleles (AIs and expanded alleles (AEs. It was controversial whether the frequency of large normal alleles (large ANs is related to the prevalence of SCA3 or not. And there were huge chaos in the comprehension of the specific numbers of the range of CAG repeats which is fundamental for genetic analysis of SCA3. To illustrate these issues, we made a novel CAG repeat ladder to detect CAG repeats of ATXN3 in 1003 unrelated Chinese normal individuals and studied haplotypes defined by three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs closed to ATXN3. We found that the number of CAG repeats ranged from 13 to 49, among them, 14 was the most common number. Positive skew, the highest frequency of large ANs and 4 AIs which had never been reported before were found. Also, AEs and large ANs shared the same haplotypes defined by the SNPs. Based on these data and other related studies, we presumed that de novo mutations of ATXN3 emerging from large ANs are at least one survival mechanisms of mutational ATXN3 and we can redefine the range of CAG repeats as: ANs≤44, 45 ≤AIs ≤49 and AEs≥50.

  1. Late-onset Huntington disease with intermediate CAG repeats: true or false?

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    Groen, J.L.; de Bie, R.M.A.; Foncke, E.M.J.; Roos, R.A.C.; Leenders, K.L.; Tijssen, M.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the huntingtin gene. 'Intermediate alleles' with 27 to 35 CAG repeats generally do not cause HD but are unstable upon germ-line transmission. Insights in CAG repeat mosaicism and

  2. Quantification of age-dependent somatic CAG repeat instability in Hdh CAG knock-in mice reveals different expansion dynamics in striatum and liver.

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    Jong-Min Lee

    Full Text Available Age at onset of Huntington's disease (HD is largely determined by the CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the HTT gene. Importantly, the CAG repeat undergoes tissue-specific somatic instability, prevalent in brain regions that are disease targets, suggesting a potential role for somatic CAG repeat instability in modifying HD pathogenesis. Thus, understanding underlying mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability may lead to discoveries of novel therapeutics for HD. Investigation of the dynamics of the CAG repeat size changes over time may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying CAG repeat instability.To understand how the HTT CAG repeat length changes over time, we quantified somatic instability of the CAG repeat in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice from 2-16 months of age in liver, striatum, spleen and tail. The HTT CAG repeat in spleen and tail was very stable, but that in liver and striatum expanded over time at an average rate of one CAG per month. Interestingly, the patterns of repeat instability were different between liver and striatum. Unstable CAG repeats in liver repeatedly gained similar sizes of additional CAG repeats (approximately two CAGs per month, maintaining a distinct population of unstable repeats. In contrast, unstable CAG repeats in striatum gained additional repeats with different sizes resulting in broadly distributed unstable CAG repeats. Expanded CAG repeats in the liver were highly enriched in polyploid hepatocytes, suggesting that the pattern of liver instability may reflect the restriction of the unstable repeats to a unique cell type.Our results are consistent with repeat expansion occurring as a consequence of recurrent small repeat insertions that differ in different tissues. Investigation of the specific mechanisms that underlie liver and striatal instability will contribute to our understanding of the relationship between instability and disease and the means to intervene in this process.

  3. Large normal-range TBP and ATXN7 CAG repeat lengths are associated with increased lifetime risk of depression.

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    Gardiner, S L; van Belzen, M J; Boogaard, M W; van Roon-Mom, W M C; Rozing, M P; van Hemert, A M; Smit, J H; Beekman, A T F; van Grootheest, G; Schoevers, R A; Oude Voshaar, R C; Comijs, H C; Penninx, B W J H; van der Mast, R C; Roos, R A C; Aziz, N A

    2017-06-06

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating psychiatric disorders worldwide. Recently, we showed that both relatively short and relatively long cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats in the huntingtin gene (HTT) are associated with an increased risk of lifetime depression. However, to what extent the variations in CAG repeat length in the other eight polyglutamine disease-associated genes (PDAGs) are associated with depression is still unknown. We determined the CAG repeat sizes of ATXN1, ATXN2, ATXN3, CACNA1A, ATXN7, TBP, ATN1 and AR in two well-characterized Dutch cohorts-the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety and the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons-including 2165 depressed and 1058 non-depressed individuals-aged 18-93 years. The association between PDAG CAG repeat size and the risk for depression was assessed via binary logistic regression. We found that the odds ratio (OR) for lifetime depression was significantly higher for individuals with >10, compared with subjects with ≤10, CAG repeats in both ATXN7 alleles (OR=1.90, confidence interval (CI) 1.26-2.85). For TBP we found a similar association: A CAG repeat length exceeding the median in both alleles was associated with an increased risk for lifetime depression (OR=1.33, CI 1.00-1.76). In conclusion, we observed that carriers of either ATXN7 or TBP alleles with relatively large CAG repeat sizes in both alleles had a substantially increased risk of lifetime depression. Our findings provide critical evidence for the notion that repeat polymorphisms can act as complex genetic modifiers of depression.

  4. CAG-encoded polyglutamine length polymorphism in the human genome

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    Hayden Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeats has been identified as the pathogenic mutation in nine different genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. The majority of individuals clinically diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia do not have mutations within known disease genes, and it is likely that additional ataxias or Huntington disease-like disorders will be found to be caused by this common mutational mechanism. We set out to determine the length distributions of CAG-polyglutamine tracts for the entire human genome in a set of healthy individuals in order to characterize the nature of polyglutamine repeat length variation across the human genome, to establish the background against which pathogenic repeat expansions can be detected, and to prioritize candidate genes for repeat expansion disorders. Results We found that repeats, including those in known disease genes, have unique distributions of glutamine tract lengths, as measured by fragment analysis of PCR-amplified repeat regions. This emphasizes the need to characterize each distribution and avoid making generalizations between loci. The best predictors of known disease genes were occurrence of a long CAG-tract uninterrupted by CAA codons in their reference genome sequence, and high glutamine tract length variance in the normal population. We used these parameters to identify eight priority candidate genes for polyglutamine expansion disorders. Twelve CAG-polyglutamine repeats were invariant and these can likely be excluded as candidates. We outline some confusion in the literature about this type of data, difficulties in comparing such data between publications, and its application to studies of disease prevalence in different populations. Analysis of Gene Ontology-based functions of CAG-polyglutamine-containing genes provided a visual framework for interpretation of these genes' functions. All nine known disease genes were involved in DNA

  5. Conformational flexibility in the RNA stem-loop structures formed by CAG repeats.

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    Guo, Pei; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Lam, Sik Lok

    2017-06-01

    The expansion of CAG repeats has been found to be associated with at least nine human genetic disorders. In these disorders, the full-length expanded CAG RNA transcripts are cleaved into small CAG-repeated RNAs which are cytotoxic and known to be capable of forming hairpins. To better understand the RNA pathogenic mechanism, in this study we have performed high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance structural investigations on the RNA hairpins formed by CAG repeats. Our results show the formation of a type III AGCA tetraloop and reveal the effect of stem rigidity on the loop conformational flexibility. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Instability of (CTG)n•(CAG)n trinucleotide repeats and DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Leffak, Michael

    2012-02-27

    Expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n trinucleotide repeat (TNR) microsatellite sequences is the cause of more than a dozen human neurodegenerative diseases. (CTG)n and (CAG)n repeats form imperfectly base paired hairpins that tend to expand in vivo in a length-dependent manner. Yeast, mouse and human models confirm that (CTG)n•(CAG)n instability increases with repeat number, and implicate both DNA replication and DNA damage response mechanisms in (CTG)n•(CAG)n TNR expansion and contraction. Mutation and knockdown models that abrogate the expression of individual genes might also mask more subtle, cumulative effects of multiple additional pathways on (CTG)n•(CAG)n instability in whole animals. The identification of second site genetic modifiers may help to explain the variability of (CTG)n•(CAG)n TNR instability patterns between tissues and individuals, and offer opportunities for prognosis and treatment.

  7. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, J-M; Ramos, E M; Lee, J-H

    2012-01-01

    Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implic...

  8. CAG repeat length variation in the polymerase gamma (POLG) gene: effect on semen quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, G. H.; Kaaij-Visser, L.; Tanck, M.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.

    2008-01-01

    Several case-control studies have investigated the effect of CAG repeat length variation in the POLG gene on male fertility and semen quality. Some described an association between the homozygous not10 CAG-repeat genotype and male subfertility and/or reduced semen quality, whereas others did not.

  9. CAG repeat expansions in bipolar and unipolar disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oruc, L.; Verheyen, G.R.; Raeymaekers, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies consistently have indicated that the familial aggregation of bipolar (BP) disorder and unipolar recurrent major depression (UPR) is accounted for largely by genetic factors. However, the mode of inheritance is complex. One of the possible explanations could be that a gene with variable penetrance and variable expression is involved. Recently there have been reports on a new class of genetic diseases caused by an abnormal trinucleotide-repeat expansion (TRE). In a number of genetic disorders, these dynamic mutations were proved to be the biological basis for the clinically observed phenomenon of anticipation. DNA consisting of repeated triplets of nucleotides becomes unstable and increases in size over generations within families, giving rise to an increased severity and/or an earlier onset of the disorder. It has been recognized for a long time that anticipation occurs in multiplex families transmitting mental illness. More recent studies also suggest that both BP disorder and UPR show features that are compatible with anticipation. Although the findings of anticipation in BP disorders and in UPR must be interpreted with caution because of the possible presence of numerous ascertainment biases, they support the hypothesis that pathological TREs are implicated in the transmission of these disorders. TRE combined with variable penetrance of expression could explain the complex transmission pattern observed in BP disorder. In view of this, the recent reports of an association between CAG-repeat length and BP disorder in a Belgian, Swedish, and British population are promising. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Santanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India. Results Seventy-seven H. pylori strains isolated from patients with various clinical statuses were used to characterize the C-ternimal polymorphic region of CagA. Our analysis showed that there is no correlation between the previously described CagA types and various disease outcomes in Indian context. Further analyses of different CagA structures revealed that the repeat units in the spacer sequences within the EPIYA motifs are actually more discrete than the previously proposed models of CagA variants. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that EPIYA motifs as well as the spacer sequence units are present as distinct insertions and deletions, which possibly have arisen from extensive recombination events. Moreover, we have identified several new CagA types, which could not be typed by the existing systems and therefore, we have proposed a new typing system. We hypothesize that a cagA gene encoding higher number EPIYA motifs may perhaps have arisen from cagA genes that encode lesser EPIYA motifs by acquisition of DNA segments through recombination events.

  11. AuNP-CTG based probing system targeting CAG repeat DNA and RNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Binh Huy; Joo, Han Na; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Kyu Wan; Seo, Young Jun

    2017-08-15

    We have developed a AuNP-CTG based probing system that is applicable to the detection of many units of CAG repeat sequences which was synthesized by a rolling circle amplification (RCA) system with changes in fluorescence. We also demonstrate that our AuNP-CTG based probing system could transfect without using transfection reagent and detect target CAG repeat sequences in HeLa cells with dramatic changes in fluorescence. This AuNP-CTG based probing system could also be used, in conjunction with the CAG repeat RCA system, to detect target DNA. This system was so sensitive to the target DNA that it could detect even picomolar amounts with amplification of the fluorescence signal. Furthermore, we have used our gold-based CAG probing system for the detection of RNA CAG repeat sequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Unusual Structures Are Present in DNA Fragments Containing Super-Long Huntingtin CAG Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzdevich, Daniel; Li, Jinliang; Whang, Jhoon; Takahashi, Hirohide; Takeyasu, Kunio; Dryden, David T. F.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD), expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat length beyond about 300 repeats induces a novel phenotype associated with a reduction in transcription of the transgene. Methodology/Principal Findings We analysed the structure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated DNA containing up to 585 CAG repeats using atomic force microscopy (AFM). As the number of CAG repeats increased, an increasing proportion of the DNA molecules exhibited unusual structural features, including convolutions and multiple protrusions. At least some of these features are hairpin loops, as judged by cross-sectional analysis and sensitivity to cleavage by mung bean nuclease. Single-molecule force measurements showed that the convoluted DNA was very resistant to untangling. In vitro replication by PCR was markedly reduced, and TseI restriction enzyme digestion was also hindered by the abnormal DNA structures. However, significantly, the DNA gained sensitivity to cleavage by the Type III restriction-modification enzyme, EcoP15I. Conclusions/Significance “Super-long” CAG repeats are found in a number of neurological diseases and may also appear through CAG repeat instability. We suggest that unusual DNA structures associated with super-long CAG repeats decrease transcriptional efficiency in vitro. We also raise the possibility that if these structures occur in vivo, they may play a role in the aetiology of CAG repeat diseases such as HD. PMID:21347256

  13. Handedness and the X chromosome: the role of androgen receptor CAG-repeat length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arning, Larissa; Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Schulz, Stefanie; Ness, Vanessa; Gerding, Wanda M; Hengstler, Jan G; Falkenstein, Michael; Epplen, Jörg T; Güntürkün, Onur; Beste, Christian

    2015-02-09

    Prenatal androgen exposure has been suggested to be one of the factors influencing handedness, making the androgen receptor gene (AR) a likely candidate gene for individual differences in handedness. Here, we examined the relationship between the length of the CAG-repeat in AR and different handedness phenotypes in a sample of healthy adults of both sexes (n = 1057). Since AR is located on the X chromosome, statistical analyses in women heterozygous for CAG-repeat lengths are complicated by X chromosome inactivation. We thus analyzed a sample of women that were homozygous for the CAG-repeat length (n = 77). Mixed-handedness in men was significantly associated with longer CAG-repeat blocks and women homozygous for longer CAG-repeats showed a tendency for stronger left-handedness. These results suggest that handedness in both sexes is associated with the AR CAG-repeat length, with longer repeats being related to a higher incidence of non-right-handedness. Since longer CAG-repeat blocks have been linked to less efficient AR function, these results implicate that differences in AR signaling in the developing brain might be one of the factors that determine individual differences in brain lateralization.

  14. Non-linear association between androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeat lengths and reproductive parameters in fertile European and Inuit men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokken, L J S; Rylander, L; Jönsson, B A

    2013-01-01

    Recently the dogma that there is an inverse linear association between androgen receptor (AR) CAG and GGN polymorphisms and receptor activity has been challenged. We analysed the pattern of association between 21 male reproductive phenotypes and AR CAG/GGN repeat lengths in 557 proven-fertile men......-positive germ cells. Subjects with either short or long CAG had increased seminal levels of prostate-specific antigen and neutral α-glucosidase activity. Compared to men with the median GGN length of 23, those with shorter GGN repeats had higher levels of inhibin B, higher proportions of normal and progressive...... sperm, and a higher fraction of Fas-positive sperm, while men with longer GGN had higher oestradiol levels. These data indicate that at least for some markers of male reproductive function the association with CAG or GGN repeat length is curvilinear....

  15. Striatal and extrastriatal atrophy in Huntington's disease and its relationship with length of the CAG repeat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Ruocco

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects the striatum most severely. However, except for juvenile forms, relative preservation of the cerebellum has been reported. The objective of the present study was to perform MRI measurements of caudate, putamen, cerebral, and cerebellar volumes and correlate these findings with the length of the CAG repeat and clinical parameters. We evaluated 50 consecutive patients with HD using MRI volumetric measurements and compared them to normal controls. Age at onset of the disease ranged from 4 to 73 years (mean: 43.1 years. The length of the CAG repeat ranged from 40 to 69 (mean: 47.2 CAG. HD patients presented marked atrophy of the caudate and putamen, as well as reduced cerebellar and cerebral volumes. There was a significant correlation between age at onset of HD and length of the CAG repeat, as well as clinical disability and age at onset. The degree of basal ganglia atrophy correlated with the length of the CAG repeat. There was no correlation between cerebellar or cerebral volume and length of the CAG repeat. However, there was a tendency to a positive correlation between duration of disease and cerebellar atrophy. While there was a negative correlation of length of the CAG repeat with age at disease onset and with striatal degeneration, its influence on extrastriatal atrophy, including the cerebellum, was not clear. Extrastriatal atrophy occurs later in HD and may be related to disease duration.

  16. The Werner syndrome protein promotes CAG/CTG repeat stability by resolving large (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L S; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Yuan, Fenghua; Machwe, Amrita; Huang, Jian; Orren, David K; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-08-31

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats causes certain neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and the formation and subsequent persistence of stable DNA hairpins within these repeats are believed to contribute to CAG/CTG repeat instability. Human cells possess a DNA hairpin repair (HPR) pathway, which removes various (CAG)(n) and (CTG)(n) hairpins in a nick-directed and strand-specific manner. Interestingly, this HPR system processes a (CTG)(n) hairpin on the template DNA strand much less efficiently than a (CAG)(n) hairpin on the same strand (Hou, C., Chan, N. L., Gu, L., and Li, G. M. (2009) Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins in human cell extracts. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 869-875), suggesting the involvement of an additional component for (CTG)(n) HPR. To identify this activity, a functional in vitro HPR assay was used to screen partially purified HeLa nuclear fractions for their ability to stimulate (CTG)(n) HPR. We demonstrate here that the stimulating activity is the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Although WRN contains both a 3'→5' helicase activity and a 3'→5' exonuclease activity, the stimulating activity was found to be the helicase activity, as a WRN helicase mutant failed to enhance (CTG)(n) HPR. Consistently, WRN efficiently unwound large (CTG)(n) hairpins and promoted DNA polymerase δ-catalyzed DNA synthesis using a (CTG)(n) hairpin as a template. We, therefore, conclude that WRN stimulates (CTG)(n) HPR on the template DNA strand by resolving the hairpin so that it can be efficiently used as a template for repair or replicative synthesis.

  17. The Werner Syndrome Protein Promotes CAG/CTG Repeat Stability by Resolving Large (CAG)n/(CTG)n Hairpins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L. S.; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Yuan, Fenghua; Machwe, Amrita; Huang, Jian; Orren, David K.; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats causes certain neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and the formation and subsequent persistence of stable DNA hairpins within these repeats are believed to contribute to CAG/CTG repeat instability. Human cells possess a DNA hairpin repair (HPR) pathway, which removes various (CAG)n and (CTG)n hairpins in a nick-directed and strand-specific manner. Interestingly, this HPR system processes a (CTG)n hairpin on the template DNA strand much less efficiently than a (CAG)n hairpin on the same strand (Hou, C., Chan, N. L., Gu, L., and Li, G. M. (2009) Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins in human cell extracts. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 869–875), suggesting the involvement of an additional component for (CTG)n HPR. To identify this activity, a functional in vitro HPR assay was used to screen partially purified HeLa nuclear fractions for their ability to stimulate (CTG)n HPR. We demonstrate here that the stimulating activity is the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Although WRN contains both a 3′→5′ helicase activity and a 3′→5′ exonuclease activity, the stimulating activity was found to be the helicase activity, as a WRN helicase mutant failed to enhance (CTG)n HPR. Consistently, WRN efficiently unwound large (CTG)n hairpins and promoted DNA polymerase δ-catalyzed DNA synthesis using a (CTG)n hairpin as a template. We, therefore, conclude that WRN stimulates (CTG)n HPR on the template DNA strand by resolving the hairpin so that it can be efficiently used as a template for repair or replicative synthesis. PMID:22787159

  18. Influence of number of CAG repeats on local control in the RTOG 86-10 protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, May; Berkey, Brian A; Krishan, Awtar; O'Brien, Tom; Hammond, Elizabeth; Roach, Mack; Lawton, Colleen; Pilepich, Milijenko; Markoe, Arnold; Pollack, Alan

    2006-02-01

    The number of CAG repeats on the androgen receptor (AR) gene is inversely proportional to transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to determine if short-term androgen deprivation therapy (RT + HT) can improve outcome in patients with tumors with short CAG repeats (LF), distant metastases (DM), prostate cancer survival (PSS), and overall survival (OS) was studied. Pretreatment characteristics and assigned treatment arm were not significantly different between the parent and test groups except for a significantly higher risk of death (P = 0.049) in the test group. The median CAG repeat was 19. There were no significant differences in stage, or Gleason score between high (19 or greater) and low CAG (LF, DM, PSS, and OS. However, when the CAG repeat outcome was studied in conjunction with androgen deprivation therapy, patients with CAG or =19 that received H + RT (P = 0.028). Patients with short CAG repeats show a local control benefit with short-term androgen deprivation therapy, but no improvement in survival.

  19. MutSβ abundance and Msh3 ATP hydrolysis activity are important drivers of CTG•CAG repeat expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Norma; Chan, Kara Y; Li, Guo-Min; Lahue, Robert S

    2017-09-29

    CTG•CAG repeat expansions cause at least twelve inherited neurological diseases. Expansions require the presence, not the absence, of the mismatch repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3 heterodimer). To evaluate properties of MutSβ that drive expansions, previous studies have tested under-expression, ATPase function or polymorphic variants of Msh2 and Msh3, but in disparate experimental systems. Additionally, some variants destabilize MutSβ, potentially masking the effects of biochemical alterations of the variations. Here, human Msh3 was mutated to selectively inactivate MutSβ. Msh3-/- cells are severely defective for CTG•CAG repeat expansions but show full activity on contractions. Msh3-/- cells provide a single, isogenic system to add back Msh3 and test key biochemical features of MutSβ on expansions. Msh3 overexpression led to high expansion activity and elevated levels of MutSβ complex, indicating that MutSβ abundance drives expansions. An ATPase-defective Msh3 expressed at normal levels was as defective in expansions as Msh3-/- cells, indicating that Msh3 ATPase function is critical for expansions. Expression of two Msh3 polymorphic variants at normal levels showed no detectable change in expansions, suggesting these polymorphisms primarily affect Msh3 protein stability, not activity. In summary, CTG•CAG expansions are limited by the abundance of MutSβ and rely heavily on Msh3 ATPase function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Rasekh, Abdorrahman; Mombeini, Hayat; Konar, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (N- TAD). We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12) of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdele- tions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12) patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26) and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25) in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%), while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%). Conclusion Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. PMID:26246877

  1. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  2. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-M; Ramos, E M; Lee, J-H; Gillis, T; Mysore, J S; Hayden, M R; Warby, S C; Morrison, P; Nance, M; Ross, C A; Margolis, R L; Squitieri, F; Orobello, S; Di Donato, S; Gomez-Tortosa, E; Ayuso, C; Suchowersky, O; Trent, R J A; McCusker, E; Novelletto, A; Frontali, M; Jones, R; Ashizawa, T; Frank, S; Saint-Hilaire, M H; Hersch, S M; Rosas, H D; Lucente, D; Harrison, M B; Zanko, A; Abramson, R K; Marder, K; Sequeiros, J; Paulsen, J S; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Myers, R H; MacDonald, M E; Gusella, J F

    2012-03-06

    Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors.

  3. In vitro repair of DNA hairpins containing various numbers of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyi; Huang, Jian; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-02-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) in humans is associated with a number of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that formation of a stable DNA hairpin within CAG/CTG repeats during DNA metabolism leads to TNR instability. However, the molecular mechanism by which cells recognize and repair CAG/CTG hairpins is largely unknown. Recent studies have identified a novel DNA repair pathway specifically removing (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins, which is considered a major mechanism responsible for TNR instability. The hairpin repair (HPR) system targets the repeat tracts for incisions in the nicked strand in an error-free manner. To determine the substrate spectrum of the HPR system and its ability to process smaller hairpins, which may be the intermediates for CAG/CTG expansions, we constructed a series of CAG/CTG hairpin heteroduplexes containing different numbers of repeats (from 5 to 25) and examined their repair in human nuclear extracts. We show here that although repair efficiencies differ slightly among these substrates, removal of the individual hairpin structures all involve endonucleolytic incisions within the repeat tracts in the nicked DNA strand. Analysis of the repair intermediates defined specific incision sites for each substrate, which were all located within the repeat regions. Mismatch repair proteins are not required for, nor do they inhibit, the processing of smaller hairpin structures. These results suggest that the HPR system ensures CAG/CTG stability primarily by removing various sizes of (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpin structures during DNA metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stabilization of expanded (CTG)•(CAG) repeats by antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Masayuki; Gourdon, Geneviève; Thornton, Charles A

    2011-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the gene DMPK. The expansion is highly unstable in somatic cells, a feature that may contribute to disease progression. The RNA expressed from the mutant allele exerts a toxic gain of function, due to the presence of an expanded CUG repeat (CUG(exp)). This RNA dominant mechanism is amenable to therapeutic intervention with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). For example, CAG-repeat ASOs that bind CUG(exp) RNA are beneficial in DM1 models by altering the protein interactions or metabolism of the toxic RNA. Because CUG(exp) RNA has been shown to aggravate instability of expanded CTG repeats, we studied whether CAG-repeat ASOs may also affect this aspect of DM1. In human cells the instability of (CTG)(800) was suppressed by addition of CAG-repeat ASOs to the culture media. In mice that carry a DMPK transgene the somatic instability of (CTG)(800) was suppressed by direct injection of CAG-repeat ASOs into muscle tissue. These results raise the possibility that early intervention with ASOs to reduce RNA or protein toxicity may have the additional benefit of stabilizing CTG:CAG repeats at subpathogenic lengths.

  5. Molecular view of ligands specificity for CAG repeats in anti-Huntington therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Anna; Rossetti, Giulia; Tabarrini, Oriana; Krauβ, Sybille; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-10-13

    Huntington's disease is a fatal and devastating neurodegenerative genetic disorder for which there is currently no cure. It is characterized by Huntingtin protein's mRNA transcripts with 36 or more CAG repeats. Inhibiting the formation of pathological complexes between these expanded transcripts and target proteins may be a valuable strategy against the disease. Yet, the rational design of molecules specifically targeting the expanded CAG repeats is limited by the lack of structural information. Here, we use well-tempered metadynamics-based free energy calculations to investigate pose and affinity of two ligands targeting CAG repeats for which affinities have been previously measured. The first consists of two 4-guanidinophenyl rings linked by an ester group. It is the most potent ligand identified so far, with Kd = 60(30) nM. The second consists of a 4-phenyl dihydroimidazole and 4-1H-indole dihydroimidazole connected by a C-C bond (Kd = 700(80) nM). Our calculations reproduce the experimental affinities and uncover the recognition pattern between ligands' and their RNA target. They also provide a molecular basis for the markedly different affinity of the two ligands for CAG repeats as observed experimentally. These findings may pave the way for a structure-based hit-to-lead optimization to further improve ligand selectivity toward CAG repeat-containing mRNAs.

  6. Sex-dependent mechanisms for expansions and contractions of the CAG repeat on affected Huntington disease chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, B.; Theilmann, J.; Spence, N. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    A total of 254 affected parent-child pairs with Huntington disease (HD) and 440 parent-child pairs with CAG size in the normal range were assessed to determine the nature and frequency of intergenerational CAG changes in the HD gene. Intergenerational CAG changes are extremely rare (3/440 [0.68%]) on normal chromosomes. In contrast, on HD chromosomes, changes in CAG size occur in {approximately}70% of meioses on HD chromosomes, with expansions accounting for 73% of these changes. These intergenerational CAG changes make a significant but minor contribution to changes in age at onset (r{sup 2}=.19). The size of the CAG repeat influenced larger intergenerational expansions (>7 CAG repeats), but the likelihood of smaller expansions or contractions was not influenced by CAG size. Large expansions (>7 CAG repeats) occur almost exclusively through paternal transmission (0.96%; P<10{sub -7}), while offspring of affected mothers are more likely to show no change (P=.01) or contractions in CAG size (P=.002). This study demonstrates that sex of the transmitting parent is the major determinant for CAG intergenerational changes in the HD gene. Similar paternal sex effects are seen in the evolution of new mutations for HD from intermediate alleles and for large expansions on affected chromosomes. Affected mothers almost never transmit a significantly expanded CAG repeat, despite the fact that many have similar large-sized alleles, compared with affected fathers. The sex-dependent effects of major expansion and contractions of the CAG repeat in the HD gene implicate different effects of gametogenesis, in males versus females, on intergenerational CAG repeat stability. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Prevalence of Huntington's disease gene CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Lee, Jong-Min; Alonso, Isabel; Gusella, James F; Smoller, Jordan W; Sklar, Pamela; MacDonald, Marcy E; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that are caused by huntingtin gene (HTT) CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles of 36 or more units. A greater than expected prevalence of incompletely penetrant HTT CAG repeat alleles observed among individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder raises the possibility that another mood disorder, bipolar disorder, could likewise be associated with Huntington's disease. We assessed the distribution of HTT CAG repeat alleles in a cohort of individuals with bipolar disorder. HTT CAG allele sizes from 2,229 Caucasian individuals diagnosed with DSM-IV bipolar disorder were compared to allele sizes in 1,828 control individuals from multiple cohorts. We found that HTT CAG repeat alleles > 35 units were observed in only one of 4,458 chromosomes from individuals with bipolar disorder, compared to three of 3,656 chromosomes from control subjects. These findings do not support an association between bipolar disorder and Huntington's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cytosine deamination and base excision repair cause R-loop-induced CAG repeat fragility and instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaofeng A; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2017-10-03

    CAG/CTG repeats are structure-forming repetitive DNA sequences, and expansion beyond a threshold of ∼35 CAG repeats is the cause of several human diseases. Expanded CAG repeats are prone to breakage, and repair of the breaks can cause repeat contractions and expansions. In this study, we found that cotranscriptional R-loops formed at a CAG-70 repeat inserted into a yeast chromosome. R-loops were further elevated upon deletion of yeast RNaseH genes and caused repeat fragility. A significant increase in CAG repeat contractions was also observed, consistent with previous human cell studies. Deletion of yeast cytosine deaminase Fcy1 significantly decreased the rate of CAG repeat fragility and contractions in the rnh1Δrnh201Δ background, indicating that Fcy1-mediated deamination is one cause of breakage and contractions in the presence of R-loops. Furthermore, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for causing CAG repeat contractions downstream of Fcy1, but not fragility. The Rad1/XPF and Rad2/XPG nucleases were also important in protecting against contractions, but through BER rather than nucleotide excision repair. Surprisingly, the MutLγ (Mlh1/Mlh3) endonuclease caused R-loop-dependent CAG fragility, defining an alternative function for this complex. These findings provide evidence that breakage at expanded CAG repeats occurs due to R-loop formation and reveal two mechanisms for CAG repeat instability: one mediated by cytosine deamination of DNA engaged in R-loops and the other by MutLγ cleavage. Since disease-causing CAG repeats occur in transcribed regions, our results suggest that R-loop-mediated fragility is a mechanism that could cause DNA damage and repeat-length changes in human cells.

  9. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length Is Associated With Body Fat and Serum SHBG in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    was to evaluate associations between the AR (CAG)n polymorphism and development of pubic hair, levels of androgens, and body fat content in healthy boys. Methods: A longitudinal study of 78 healthy boys (age 6.2-12.4 years at inclusion) from the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study was conducted with clinical examinations...

  10. Shorter CAG repeat in the AR gene is associated with atypical hyperplasia and breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Abreu, Francine Blumental; Pirolo, Leandro Júnior; Canevari, Renata de Azevedo

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous reports into the role of [CAG]n repeat lengths in the androgen receptor (AR) gene indicate that these may play an important part in the development and progression of breast cancer, however, knowledge regarding benign breast lesions is limited. PATIENTS AND METHODS: PCR......-based GeneScan analysis was used to investigate the [CAG]n repeat length at exon 1 of the AR gene in 59 benign breast lesions (27 fibroadenomas, 18 atypical hyperplasias, and 14 hyperplasias without atypia) and 54 ductal breast carcinomas. Seventy-two cancer-free women were used as a control group...

  11. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-M.; Ramos, E.M.; Lee, J.-H.; Gillis, T.; Mysore, J.S.; Hayden, M.R.; Warby, S.C.; Morrison, P.; Nance, M.; Ross, C.A.; Margolis, R.L.; Squitieri, F.; Orobello, S.; Di Donato, S.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Ayuso, C.; Suchowersky, O.; Trent, R.J.A.; McCusker, E.; Novelletto, A.; Frontali, M.; Jones, R.; Ashizawa, T.; Frank, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M.H.; Hersch, S.M.; Rosas, H.D.; Lucente, D.; Harrison, M.B.; Zanko, A.; Abramson, R.K.; Marder, K.; Sequeiros, J.; Paulsen, J.S.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Myers, R.H.; MacDonald, M.E.; Durr, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Adam; Frati, Luigi; Perlman, Susan; Conneally, Patrick M.; Klimek, Mary Lou; Diggin, Melissa; Hadzi, Tiffany; Duckett, Ayana; Ahmed, Anwar; Allen, Paul; Ames, David; Anderson, Christine; Anderson, Karla; Anderson, Karen; Andrews, Thomasin; Ashburner, John; Axelson, Eric; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Roger A.; Barth, Katrin; Barton, Stacey; Baynes, Kathleen; Bea, Alexandra; Beall, Erik; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Biglan, Kevin; Bjork, Kristine; Blanchard, Steve; Bockholt, Jeremy; Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy; Brossman, Bradley; Burrows, Maggie; Calhoun, Vince; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chesire, Amy; Chiu, Edmond; Chua, Phyllis; Connell, R.J.; Connor, Carmela; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Craufurd, David; Cross, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette; Santos, Rachelle Dar; Davis, Jennifer; Decolongon, Joji; DiPietro, Anna; Doucette, Nicholas; Downing, Nancy; Dudler, Ann; Dunn, Steve; Ecker, Daniel; Epping, Eric A.; Erickson, Diane; Erwin, Cheryl; Evans, Ken; Factor, Stewart A.; Farias, Sarah; Fatas, Marta; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Fullam, Ruth; Furtado, Sarah; Garde, Monica Bascunana; Gehl, Carissa; Geschwind, Michael D.; Goh, Anita; Gooblar, Jon; Goodman, Anna; Griffith, Jane; Groves, Mark; Guttman, Mark; Hamilton, Joanne; Harrington, Deborah; Harris, Greg; Heaton, Robert K.; Helmer, Karl; Henneberry, Machelle; Hershey, Tamara; Herwig, Kelly; Howard, Elizabeth; Hunter, Christine; Jankovic, Joseph; Johnson, Hans; Johnson, Arik; Jones, Kathy; Juhl, Andrew; Kim, Eun Young; Kimble, Mycah; King, Pamela; Klimek, Mary Lou; Klöppel, Stefan; Koenig, Katherine; Komiti, Angela; Kumar, Rajeev; Langbehn, Douglas; Leavitt, Blair; Leserman, Anne; Lim, Kelvin; Lipe, Hillary; Lowe, Mark; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Mallonee, William M.; Mans, Nicole; Marietta, Jacquie; Marshall, Frederick; Martin, Wayne; Mason, Sarah; Matheson, Kirsty; Matson, Wayne; Mazzoni, Pietro; McDowell, William; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Miller, Michael; Mills, James; Miracle, Dawn; Montross, Kelsey; Moore, David; Mori, Sasumu; Moser, David J.; Moskowitz, Carol; Newman, Emily; Nopoulos, Peg; Novak, Marianne; O'Rourke, Justin; Oakes, David; Ondo, William; Orth, Michael; Panegyres, Peter; Pease, Karen; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Peterson, Asa; Phillips, Michael; Pierson, Ron; Potkin, Steve; Preston, Joy; Quaid, Kimberly; Radtke, Dawn; Rae, Daniela; Rao, Stephen; Raymond, Lynn; Reading, Sarah; Ready, Rebecca; Reece, Christine; Reilmann, Ralf; Reynolds, Norm; Richardson, Kylie; Rickards, Hugh; Ro, Eunyoe; Robinson, Robert; Rodnitzky, Robert; Rogers, Ben; Rosenblatt, Adam; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Price, Kathy; Price, Kathy; Ryan, Pat; Salmon, David; Samii, Ali; Schumacher, Jamy; Schumacher, Jessica; Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz; Shear, Paula; Sheinberg, Alanna; Shpritz, Barnett; Siedlecki, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A.; Singer, Adam; Smith, Jim; Smith, Megan; Smith, Glenn; Snyder, Pete; Song, Allen; Sran, Satwinder; Stephan, Klaas; Stober, Janice; Sü?muth, Sigurd; Suter, Greg; Tabrizi, Sarah; Tempkin, Terry; Testa, Claudia; Thompson, Sean; Thomsen, Teri; Thumma, Kelli; Toga, Arthur; Trautmann, Sonja; Tremont, Geoff; Turner, Jessica; Uc, Ergun; Vaccarino, Anthony; van Duijn, Eric; Van Walsem, Marleen; Vik, Stacie; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Vuletich, Elizabeth; Warner, Tom; Wasserman, Paula; Wassink, Thomas; Waterman, Elijah; Weaver, Kurt; Weir, David; Welsh, Claire; Werling-Witkoske, Chris; Wesson, Melissa; Westervelt, Holly; Weydt, Patrick; Wheelock, Vicki; Williams, Kent; Williams, Janet; Wodarski, Mary; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Wood, Jessica; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Wu, Shuhua; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Zimbelman, Janice; Zschiegner, Roland; Aaserud, Olaf; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Andrews, Thomasin; Andrich, Jurgin; Antczak, Jakub; Arran, Natalie; Artiga, Maria J. Saiz; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof; di Poggio, Monica Bandettini; Bandmann, Oliver; Barbera, Miguel A.; Barker, Roger A.; Barrero, Francisco; Barth, Katrin; Bas, Jordi; Beister, Antoine; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Bertini, Elisabetta; Biunno, Ida; Bjørgo, Kathrine; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Bohlen, Stefan; Bonelli, Raphael M.; Bos, Reineke; Bourne, Colin; Bradbury, Alyson; Brockie, Peter; Brown, Felicity; Bruno, Stefania; Bryl, Anna; Buck, Andrea; Burg, Sabrina; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Burns, Peter; Burrows, Liz; Busquets, Nuria; Busse, Monica; Calopa, Matilde; Carruesco, Gemma T.; Casado, Ana Gonzalez; Catena, Judit López; Chu, Carol; Ciesielska, Anna; Clapton, Jackie; Clayton, Carole; Clenaghan, Catherine; Coelho, Miguel; Connemann, Julia; Craufurd, David; Crooks, Jenny; Cubillo, Patricia Trigo; Cubo, Esther; Curtis, Adrienne; De Michele, Giuseppe; De Nicola, A.; de Souza, Jenny; de Weert, A. Marit; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Dekker, M.; Descals, A. Martínez; Di Maio, Luigi; Di Pietro, Anna; Dipple, Heather; Dose, Matthias; Dumas, Eve M.; Dunnett, Stephen; Ecker, Daniel; Elifani, F.; Ellison-Rose, Lynda; Elorza, Marina D.; Eschenbach, Carolin; Evans, Carole; Fairtlough, Helen; Fannemel, Madelein; Fasano, Alfonso; Fenollar, Maria; Ferrandes, Giovanna; Ferreira, Jaoquim J.; Fillingham, Kay; Finisterra, Ana Maria; Fisher, K.; Fletcher, Amy; Foster, Jillian; Foustanos, Isabella; Frech, Fernando A.; Fullam, Robert; Fullham, Ruth; Gago, Miguel; García, RocioGarcía-Ramos; García, Socorro S.; Garrett, Carolina; Gellera, Cinzia; Gill, Paul; Ginestroni, Andrea; Golding, Charlotte; Goodman, Anna; Gørvell, Per; Grant, Janet; Griguoli, A.; Gross, Diana; Guedes, Leonor; BascuñanaGuerra, Monica; Guerra, Maria Rosalia; Guerrero, Rosa; Guia, Dolores B.; Guidubaldi, Arianna; Hallam, Caroline; Hamer, Stephanie; Hammer, Kathrin; Handley, Olivia J.; Harding, Alison; Hasholt, Lis; Hedge, Reikha; Heiberg, Arvid; Heinicke, Walburgis; Held, Christine; Hernanz, Laura Casas; Herranhof, Briggitte; Herrera, Carmen Durán; Hidding, Ute; Hiivola, Heli; Hill, Susan; Hjermind, Lena. E.; Hobson, Emma; Hoffmann, Rainer; Holl, Anna Hödl; Howard, Liz; Hunt, Sarah; Huson, Susan; Ialongo, Tamara; Idiago, Jesus Miguel R.; Illmann, Torsten; Jachinska, Katarzyna; Jacopini, Gioia; Jakobsen, Oda; Jamieson, Stuart; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Janik, Piotr; Johns, Nicola; Jones, Lesley; Jones, Una; Jurgens, Caroline K.; Kaelin, Alain; Kalbarczyk, Anna; Kershaw, Ann; Khalil, Hanan; Kieni, Janina; Klimberg, Aneta; Koivisto, Susana P.; Koppers, Kerstin; Kosinski, Christoph Michael; Krawczyk, Malgorzata; Kremer, Berry; Krysa, Wioletta; Kwiecinski, Hubert; Lahiri, Nayana; Lambeck, Johann; Lange, Herwig; Laver, Fiona; Leenders, K.L.; Levey, Jamie; Leythaeuser, Gabriele; Lezius, Franziska; Llesoy, Joan Roig; Löhle, Matthias; López, Cristobal Diez-Aja; Lorenza, Fortuna; Loria, Giovanna; Magnet, Markus; Mandich, Paola; Marchese, Roberta; Marcinkowski, Jerzy; Mariotti, Caterina; Mariscal, Natividad; Markova, Ivana; Marquard, Ralf; Martikainen, Kirsti; Martínez, Isabel Haro; Martínez-Descals, Asuncion; Martino, T.; Mason, Sarah; McKenzie, Sue; Mechi, Claudia; Mendes, Tiago; Mestre, Tiago; Middleton, Julia; Milkereit, Eva; Miller, Joanne; Miller, Julie; Minster, Sara; Möller, Jens Carsten; Monza, Daniela; Morales, Blas; Moreau, Laura V.; Moreno, Jose L. López-Sendón; Münchau, Alexander; Murch, Ann; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Niess, Anke; Nørremølle, Anne; Novak, Marianne; O'Donovan, Kristy; Orth, Michael; Otti, Daniela; Owen, Michael; Padieu, Helene; Paganini, Marco; Painold, Annamaria; Päivärinta, Markku; Partington-Jones, Lucy; Paterski, Laurent; Paterson, Nicole; Patino, Dawn; Patton, Michael; Peinemann, Alexander; Peppa, Nadia; Perea, Maria Fuensanta Noguera; Peterson, Maria; Piacentini, Silvia; Piano, Carla; Càrdenas, Regina Pons i; Prehn, Christian; Price, Kathleen; Probst, Daniela; Quarrell, Oliver; Quiroga, Purificacion Pin; Raab, Tina; Rakowicz, Maryla; Raman, Ashok; Raymond, Lucy; Reilmann, Ralf; Reinante, Gema; Reisinger, Karin; Retterstol, Lars; Ribaï, Pascale; Riballo, Antonio V.; Ribas, Guillermo G.; Richter, Sven; Rickards, Hugh; Rinaldi, Carlo; Rissling, Ida; Ritchie, Stuart; Rivera, Susana Vázquez; Robert, Misericordia Floriach; Roca, Elvira; Romano, Silvia; Romoli, Anna Maria; Roos, Raymond A.C.; Røren, Niini; Rose, Sarah; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Rossi, Fabiana; Rothery, Jean; Rudzinska, Monika; Ruíz, Pedro J. García; Ruíz, Belan Garzon; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Saft, Carston; Salvatore, Elena; Sánchez, Vicenta; Sando, Sigrid Botne; Šašinková, Pavla; Sass, Christian; Scheibl, Monika; Schiefer, Johannes; Schlangen, Christiane; Schmidt, Simone; Schöggl, Helmut; Schrenk, Caroline; Schüpbach, Michael; Schuierer, Michele; Sebastián, Ana Rojo; Selimbegovic-Turkovic, Amina; Sempolowicz, Justyna; Silva, Mark; Sitek, Emilia; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Snowden, Julie; Soleti, Francesco; Soliveri, Paola; Sollom, Andrea; Soltan, Witold; Sorbi, Sandro; Sorensen, Sven Asger; Spadaro, Maria; Städtler, Michael; Stamm, Christiane; Steiner, Tanja; Stokholm, Jette; Stokke, Bodil; Stopford, Cheryl; Storch, Alexander; Straßburger, Katrin; Stubbe, Lars; Sulek, Anna; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Tabrizi, Sarah; Taylor, Rachel; Terol, Santiago Duran-Sindreu; Thomas, Gareth; Thompson, Jennifer; Thomson, Aileen; Tidswell, Katherine; Torres, Maria M. Antequera; Toscano, Jean; Townhill, Jenny; Trautmann, Sonja; Tucci, Tecla; Tuuha, Katri; Uhrova, Tereza; Valadas, Anabela; van Hout, Monique S.E.; van Oostrom, J.C.H.; van Vugt, Jeroen P.P.; vanm, Walsem Marleen R.; Vandenberghe, Wim; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Vergara, Mar Ruiz; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Verstraelen, Nichola; Viladrich, Celia Mareca; Villanueva, Clara; Wahlström, Jan; Warner, Thomas; Wehus, Raghild; Weindl, Adolf; Werner, Cornelius J.; Westmoreland, Leann; Weydt, Patrick; Wiedemann, Alexandra; Wild, Edward; Wild, Sue; Witjes-Ané, Marie-Noelle; Witkowski, Grzegorz; Wójcik, Magdalena; Wolz, Martin; Wolz, Annett; Wright, Jan; Yardumian, Pam; Yates, Shona; Yudina, Elizaveta; Zaremba, Jacek; Zaugg, Sabine W.; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Zielonka, Daniel; Zielonka, Euginiusz; Zinzi, Paola; Zittel, Simone; Zucker, Birgrit; Adams, John; Agarwal, Pinky; Antonijevic, Irina; Beck, Christopher; Chiu, Edmond; Churchyard, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Dorsey, Ray; Drazinic, Carolyn; Dubinsky, Richard; Duff, Kevin; Factor, Stewart; Foroud, Tatiana; Furtado, Sarah; Giuliano, Joe; Greenamyre, Timothy; Higgins, Don; Jankovic, Joseph; Jennings, Dana; Kang, Un Jung; Kostyk, Sandra; Kumar, Rajeev; Leavitt, Blair; LeDoux, Mark; Mallonee, William; Marshall, Frederick; Mohlo, Eric; Morgan, John; Oakes, David; Panegyres, Peter; Panisset, Michel; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Quaid, Kimberly; Raymond, Lynn; Revilla, Fredy; Robertson, Suzanne; Robottom, Bradley; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Scott, Burton; Shannon, Kathleen; Shoulson, Ira; Singer, Carlos; Tabbal, Samer; Testa, Claudia; van, Kammen Dan; Vetter, Louise; Walker, Francis; Warner, John; Weiner, illiam; Wheelock, Vicki; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; Barton, Stacey; Broyles, Janice; Clouse, Ronda; Coleman, Allison; Davis, Robert; Decolongon, Joji; DeLaRosa, Jeanene; Deuel, Lisa; Dietrich, Susan; Dubinsky, Hilary; Eaton, Ken; Erickson, Diane; Fitzpatrick, Mary Jane; Frucht, Steven; Gartner, Maureen; Goldstein, Jody; Griffith, Jane; Hickey, Charlyne; Hunt, Victoria; Jaglin, Jeana; Klimek, Mary Lou; Lindsay, Pat; Louis, Elan; Loy, Clemet; Lucarelli, Nancy; Malarick, Keith; Martin, Amanda; McInnis, Robert; Moskowitz, Carol; Muratori, Lisa; Nucifora, Frederick; O'Neill, Christine; Palao, Alicia; Peavy, Guerry; Quesada, Monica; Schmidt, Amy; Segro, Vicki; Sperin, Elaine; Suter, Greg; Tanev, Kalo; Tempkin, Teresa; Thiede, Curtis; Wasserman, Paula; Welsh, Claire; Wesson, Melissa; Zauber, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. Methods: We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. Results: An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Conclusions: Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695 PMID:22323755

  12. Naphthyridine-Benzoazaquinolone: Evaluation of a Tricyclic System for the Binding to (CAG)n Repeat DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Sakata, Akihiro; He, Hanping; Bai, Li-Ping; Murata, Asako; Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-05

    The expansion of CAG repeats in the human genome causes the neurological disorder Huntington's disease. The small-molecule naphthyridine-azaquinolone NA we reported earlier bound to the CAG/CAG motif in the hairpin structure of the CAG repeat DNA. In order to investigate and improve NA-binding to the CAG repeat DNA and RNA, we conducted systematic structure-binding studies of NA to CAG repeats. Among the five new NA derivatives we synthesized, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay showed that all of the derivatives modified from amide linkages in NA to a carbamate linkage failed to bind to CAG repeat DNA and RNA. One derivative, NBzA, modified by incorporating an additional ring to the azaquinolone was found to bind to both d(CAG)9 and r(CAG)9 . NBzA binding to d(CAG)9 was similar to NA binding in terms of large changes in the SPR assay and circular dichroism (CD) as well as pairwise binding, as assessed by electron spray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometry. For the binding to r(CAG)9 , both NA and NBzA showed stepwise binding in ESI-TOF MS, and NBzA-binding to r(CAG)9 induced more extensive conformational change than NA-binding. The tricyclic system in NBzA did not show significant effects on the binding, selectivity, and translation, but provides a large chemical space for further modification to gain higher affinity and selectivity. These studies revealed that the linker structure in NA and NBzA was suitable for the binding to CAG DNA and RNA, and that the tricyclic benzoazaquinolone did not interfere with the binding. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Highly specific contractions of a single CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat by TALEN in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Guy-Franck; Viterbo, David; Khanna, Varun; Mosbach, Valentine; Castelain, Lauriane; Dujon, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for more than two dozens severe neurological disorders in humans. A double-strand break between two short CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats was formerly shown to induce a high frequency of repeat contractions in yeast. Here, using a dedicated TALEN, we show that induction of a double-strand break into a CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat in heterozygous yeast diploid cells results in gene conversion of the repeat tract with near 100% efficacy, deleting the repeat tract. Induction of the same TALEN in homozygous yeast diploids leads to contractions of both repeats to a final length of 3-13 triplets, with 100% efficacy in cells that survived the double-strand breaks. Whole-genome sequencing of surviving yeast cells shows that the TALEN does not increase mutation rate. No other CAG/CTG repeat of the yeast genome showed any length alteration or mutation. No large genomic rearrangement such as aneuploidy, segmental duplication or translocation was detected. It is the first demonstration that induction of a TALEN in an eukaryotic cell leads to shortening of trinucleotide repeat tracts to lengths below pathological thresholds in humans, with 100% efficacy and very high specificity.

  14. Relation of atrophic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori-CagA(+) and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Rafaela; Une, Clas; Ramirez, Vanessa; Alpizar-Alpizar, Warner; Gonzalez, Maria-I; Ramirez, Jose-A; De Mascarel, Antoine; Cuenca, Patricia; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Megraud, Francis

    2008-11-14

    To determine the association of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) CagA(+) infection and pro-inflammatory polymorphisms of the genes interleukin (IL)-1RN and IL-1B with the risk of gastric atrophy and peptic ulcers in a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, a country with high incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. Seven biopsy specimens, a fasting blood sample and a questionnaire concerning nutritional and sociodemographic factors were obtained from 501 consecutive patients who had undergone endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. A histopathological diagnosis was made. Pepsinogen concentrations were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Infection with H pylori CagA(+) was determined by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IL-1B and IL-1RN polymorphisms genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR respectively. In this dyspeptic population, 86% were H pylori positive and of these, 67.8% were positive for CagA. Atrophic antral gastritis (AAG) was associated with CagA(+) status [odd ratio (OR) = 4.1; P gastritis (ABG) was associated with pepsinogen PGI/PGII < 3.4 (OR = 4.9; P < 0.04) and alcohol consumption (OR = 7.3; P < 0.02). Duodenal ulcer was associated with CagA(+) (OR = 2.9; P < 0.04) and smoking (OR = 2.4; P < 0.04). PGI < 60 microg/L as well as PGI/PGII < 3.4 were associated with CagA(+). In a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, H pylori CagA(+) is not associated with ABG, but it is a risk factor for AAG. The pro-inflammatory cytokine polymorphisms IL-1B + 3945 and IL-1RN are not associated with the atrophic lesions of this dyspeptic population.

  15. Single cell analysis reveals gametic and tissue-specific instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, S.S.; McCall, A.E.; Cota, J. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p22-23. We performed a comparative analysis of the SCA1 CAG repeat from blood and sperm of an affected male. Genomic amplification revealed a broader smear of the SCA1 allele product from sperm compared to that from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). To resolve this observed difference, we analyzed single sperm directly and demonstrate that the SCA1 allele in PBL is also heterogeneous, although the range of variability in allele sizes is much less than that observed in sperm. Limited genome analysis was also performed on PBL DNA from an unaffected individual with an upper normal allele of 36 repeats in parallel with an affected individual with an expanded allele of 40 repeats. The 36 repeat normal allele, which contains a CAT interruption, was completely stable compared to the uninterrupted repeat of the SCA1 allele, demonstrating a direct correlation between absence of a CAT interruption and somatic instability of the repeat. We also analyzed the size of the CAG repeat in tissues derived from various brain regions from a patient with juvenile-onset disease to determine if the size of the expansion correlated with the site of neuropathology. The results clearly show tissue-specific differences in mosaicism of repeat length. More importantly, the pattern of tissue-specific differences in repeat-length mosaicism in SCA1 within the brain parallels those seen in Huntington disease. In both disorders the expanded alleles are smaller in cerebellar tissue. These results suggest that the observed tissue-specific differences in instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat, either within the brain or between blood and sperm, are a function of the intracellular milieu or the intrinsic replicative potential of the various celltypes.

  16. Minimizing carry-over PCR contamination in expanded CAG/CTG repeat instability applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschbach, Lorène; Dion, Vincent

    2017-12-21

    Expanded CAG/CTG repeats underlie the aetiology of 14 neurological and neuromuscular disorders. The size of the repeat tract determines in large part the severity of these disorders with longer tracts causing more severe phenotypes. Expanded CAG/CTG repeats are also unstable in somatic tissues, which is thought to modify disease progression. Routine molecular biology applications involving these repeats, including quantifying their instability, are plagued by low PCR yields. This leads to the need for setting up more PCRs of the same locus, thereby increasing the risk of carry-over contamination. Here we aimed to reduce this risk by pre-treating the samples with a Uracil N-Glycosylase (Ung) and using dUTP instead of dTTP in PCRs. We successfully applied this method to the PCR amplification of expanded CAG/CTG repeats, their sequencing, and their molecular cloning. In addition, we optimized the gold-standard method for measuring repeat instability, small-pool PCR (SP-PCR), such that it can be used together with Ung and dUTP-containing PCRs, without compromising data quality. We performed SP-PCR on myotonic-dystrophy-derived samples containing an expansion as large as 1000 repeats, demonstrating the applicability to clinically-relevant material. Thus, we expect the protocols herein to be applicable for molecular diagnostics of expanded repeat disorders.

  17. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorain Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  18. Atomic resolution structure of CAG RNA repeats: structural insights and implications for the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Ryszard; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Rypniewski, Wojciech

    2010-12-01

    CAG repeats occur predominantly in the coding regions of human genes, which suggests their functional importance. In some genes, these sequences can undergo pathogenic expansions leading to neurodegenerative polyglutamine (poly-Q) diseases. The mutant transcripts containing expanded CAG repeats possibly contribute to pathogenesis in addition to the well-known pathogenic effects of mutant proteins. We have analysed two crystal forms of RNA duplexes containing CAG repeats: (GGCAGCAGCC)(2). One of the structures has been determined at atomic resolution (0.95 Å) and the other at 1.9 Å. The duplexes include non-canonical A-A pairs that fit remarkably well within a regular A-helix. All the adenosines are in the anti-conformation and the only interaction within each A-A pair is a single C2-H2···N1 hydrogen bond. Both adenosines in each A-A pair are shifted towards the major groove, although to different extents; the A which is the H-bond donor stands out more (the 'thumbs-up' conformation). The main effect on the helix conformation is a local unwinding. The CAG repeats and the previously examined CUG structures share a similar pattern of electrostatic charge distribution in the minor groove, which could explain their affinity for the pathogenesis-related MBNL1 protein.

  19. Altered Replication in Human Cells Promotes DMPK (CTG)n · (CAG)n Repeat Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomi; Gao, Yanzhe; Lewis, Todd; Barthelemy, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is associated with expansion of (CTG)n · (CAG)n trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the DMPK gene. Replication origins are cis-acting elements that potentiate TNR instability; therefore, we mapped replication initiation sites and prereplication complex protein binding within the ∼10-kb DMPK/SIX5 locus in non-DM1 and DM1 cells. Two origins, ISDMPK and ISSIX5, flanked the (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs in control cells and in DM1 cells. Orc2 and Mcm4 bound near each of the replication initiation sites, but a dramatic change in (CTG)n · (CAG)n replication polarity was not correlated with TNR expansion. To test whether (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs are cis-acting elements of instability in human cells, model cell lines were created by integration of cassettes containing the c-myc replication origin and (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs in HeLa cells. Replication forks were slowed by (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs in a length-dependent manner independent of replication polarity, implying that expanded (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs lead to replication stress. Consistent with this prediction, TNR instability increased in the HeLa model cells and DM1 cells upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of the fork stabilization protein Claspin, Timeless, or Tipin. These results suggest that aberrant DNA replication and TNR instability are linked in DM1 cells. PMID:22354993

  20. Altered replication in human cells promotes DMPK (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Gao, Yanzhe; Lewis, Todd; Barthelemy, Joanna; Leffak, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is associated with expansion of (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the DMPK gene. Replication origins are cis-acting elements that potentiate TNR instability; therefore, we mapped replication initiation sites and prereplication complex protein binding within the ~10-kb DMPK/SIX5 locus in non-DM1 and DM1 cells. Two origins, IS(DMPK) and IS(SIX5), flanked the (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs in control cells and in DM1 cells. Orc2 and Mcm4 bound near each of the replication initiation sites, but a dramatic change in (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) replication polarity was not correlated with TNR expansion. To test whether (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs are cis-acting elements of instability in human cells, model cell lines were created by integration of cassettes containing the c-myc replication origin and (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs in HeLa cells. Replication forks were slowed by (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs in a length-dependent manner independent of replication polarity, implying that expanded (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs lead to replication stress. Consistent with this prediction, TNR instability increased in the HeLa model cells and DM1 cells upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of the fork stabilization protein Claspin, Timeless, or Tipin. These results suggest that aberrant DNA replication and TNR instability are linked in DM1 cells.

  1. Repeat Associated Non-AUG Translation (RAN Translation Dependent on Sequence Downstream of the ATXN2 CAG Repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Scoles

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the ATXN2 gene. The SCA2 disease phenotype is characterized by cerebellar atrophy, gait ataxia, and slow saccades. ATXN2 mutation causes gains of toxic and normal functions of the ATXN2 gene product, ataxin-2, and abnormally slow Purkinje cell firing frequency. Previously we investigated features of ATXN2 controlling expression and noted expression differences for ATXN2 constructs with varying CAG lengths, suggestive of repeat associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation. To determine whether RAN translation occurs for ATXN2 we assembled various ATXN2 constructs with ATXN2 tagged by luciferase, HA or FLAG tags, driven by the CMV promoter or the ATXN2 promoter. Luciferase expression from ATXN2-luciferase constructs lacking the ATXN2 start codon was weak vs AUG translation, regardless of promoter type, and did not increase with longer CAG repeat lengths. RAN translation was detected on western blots by the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 for constructs driven by the CMV promoter but not the ATXN2 promoter, and was weaker than AUG translation. Strong RAN translation was also observed when driving the ATXN2 sequence with the CMV promoter with ATXN2 sequence downstream of the CAG repeat truncated to 18 bp in the polyglutamine frame but not in the polyserine or polyalanine frames. Our data demonstrate that ATXN2 RAN translation is weak compared to AUG translation and is dependent on ATXN2 sequences flanking the CAG repeat.

  2. Relation of atrophic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori-CagA+ and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Rafaela; Une, Clas; Ramírez, Vanessa; Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; González, María I; Ramírez, José A; de Mascarel, Antoine; Cuenca, Patricia; Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo; Mégraud, Francis

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the association of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) CagA+ infection and pro-inflammatory polymorphisms of the genes interleukin (IL)-1RN and IL-1B with the risk of gastric atrophy and peptic ulcers in a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, a country with high incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. METHODS: Seven biopsy specimens, a fasting blood sample and a questionnaire concerning nutritional and sociodemographic factors were obtained from 501 consecutive patients who had undergone endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. A histopathological diagnosis was made. Pepsinogen concentrations were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Infection with H pylori CagA+ was determined by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IL-1B and IL-1RN polymorphisms genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR respectively. RESULTS: In this dyspeptic population, 86% were H pylori positive and of these, 67.8% were positive for CagA. Atrophic antral gastritis (AAG) was associated with CagA+ status [odd ratio (OR) = 4.1; P gastritis (ABG) was associated with pepsinogen PGI/PGII risk factor for AAG. The pro-inflammatory cytokine polymorphisms IL-1B + 3945 and IL-1RN are not associated with the atrophic lesions of this dyspeptic population. PMID:19030199

  3. Massive CAG repeat expansion and somatic instability in maternally transmitted infantile spinocerebellar ataxia type 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Heather; Stanley, Sabrina Y; Thorner, Paul; Faghfoury, Hannaneh; Schulze, Andreas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Pearson, Christopher E; Yoon, Grace

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case to date of maternally transmitted infantile spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), in which a tract of (CAG)45 expands to lengths as large as (CAG)92-250. A 38-year-old woman with classic SCA7 (and a son, who died at age 3 years) had pronounced cerebellar atrophy and a renal biopsy specimen that showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with abnormal podocytes containing cytoplasmic inclusions. Polymerase chain reaction amplification across the SCA7 repeat tract assessed expansion levels in tissues of the affected son. High levels of somatic CAG instability were observed in blood, kidney, and skeletal muscle. This transmitted expansion is considerably larger than previously reported maternal transmission expansions of 5 to 10 gained repeats. We document the first intertissue CAG instability reported to date in patients with SCA7, similar to SCA7 mouse models. Infantile SCA7, which is often paternally transmitted, can rarely arise by maternal transmission, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling among families of patients with SCA7.

  4. Contracting CAG/CTG repeats using the CRISPR-Cas9 nickase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinesi, Cinzia; Aeschbach, Lorène; Yang, Bin; Dion, Vincent

    2016-11-09

    CAG/CTG repeat expansions cause over 13 neurological diseases that remain without a cure. Because longer tracts cause more severe phenotypes, contracting them may provide a therapeutic avenue. No currently known agent can specifically generate contractions. Using a GFP-based chromosomal reporter that monitors expansions and contractions in the same cell population, here we find that inducing double-strand breaks within the repeat tract causes instability in both directions. In contrast, the CRISPR-Cas9 D10A nickase induces mainly contractions independently of single-strand break repair. Nickase-induced contractions depend on the DNA damage response kinase ATM, whereas ATR inhibition increases both expansions and contractions in a MSH2- and XPA-dependent manner. We propose that DNA gaps lead to contractions and that the type of DNA damage present within the repeat tract dictates the levels and the direction of CAG repeat instability. Our study paves the way towards deliberate induction of CAG/CTG repeat contractions in vivo.

  5. Effects of testosterone replacement therapy on bone metabolism in male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: focus on the role of androgen receptor CAG polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, G; delli Muti, N; Gioia, A; Biagioli, A; Lenzi, A; Balercia, G

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between androgen receptor (AR) CAG polymorphism and bone metabolism is highly controversial. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate the independent role of AR CAG repeat polymorphism on bone metabolism improvement induced by testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition frequently associated with hypopituitarism and in which the effects of TRT have to be distinguished from those resulting from concomitant administration of pituitary function replacing hormones. 12 men affected by post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism [mean duration of hypogonadism 8.3 ± 2.05 (SD) months] were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT (from 74 to 84 weeks after the beginning of therapy). The following measures were studied: parameters of bone metabolism [serum markers and bone mineral density (BMD)], pituitary dependent hormones and genetic analysis (AR CAG repeat number). Total testosterone, estradiol, free T4 (FT4) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased between the two phases, while follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) decreased. While serum markers did not vary significantly between the two phases, BMD improved slightly but significantly in all the studied sites. The number of CAG triplets correlated negatively and significantly with all the variations (Δ-) of BMDs. Conversely, Δ-testosterone correlated positively and significantly with all studied Δ-BMDs, while Δ-FSH, Δ-estradiol, Δ-FT4, and Δ-IGF-1 did not correlate significantly with any of the Δ-BMDs. Multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for Δ-testosterone, showed that CAG repeat length was negatively and significantly associated with ∆-BMD of all measured sites. Our data suggest that, in post-surgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, shorter AR CAG tract is independently associated with greater TRT-induced improvement of BMD.

  6. Progress study on the mechanism of CAG repeats dynamic mutation in polyQ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun-rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyglutamine (polyQ disease is a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormal expansion of CAG repeats within coding regions of certain causative genes, which are translated into a series of abnormally expanded polyQ tracts causing cytotoxicity. So far, nine diseases caused by expanded polyQ tracts have been demonstrated including Huntington's disease (HD, spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA and several spinocerebellar ataxias subtypes (SCA. In human, long CAG repeats tend to expand during transmissions from parent to offspring, named as dynamic mutation, leading to an earlier age of disease onset and more severe symptoms in subsequent generations. The review presents some novel mechanisms based on dynamic mutation.

  7. A comprehensive endocrine description of Kennedy's disease revealing androgen insensitivity linked to CAG repeat length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejager, S; Bry-Gauillard, H; Bruckert, E; Eymard, B; Salachas, F; LeGuern, E; Tardieu, S; Chadarevian, R; Giral, P; Turpin, G

    2002-08-01

    Our study aims to provide a comprehensive view of the endocrine features in Kennedy's disease (KD). Twenty-two men with KD underwent detailed endocrine investigations. Clinical signs of partial androgen resistance were present in more than 80% of the patients, with gynecomastia being the most prominent. Gynecomastia was postpubertal but appeared before muscular weakness in most cases. Thirteen patients had alteration of testicular exocrine function. Hormonal profile of partial androgen resistance was present in 86% of the patients, with an elevated testosterone level in 68%. Androgen insensitivity seems to appear later in life in KD, similar to the development of neurological signs. Although we confirm the previously reported correlation between the CAG repeat length and the early onset of the neurological disease, we describe a significant correlation between repeat length and the age of onset of gynecomastia as well as biological indexes of androgen insensitivity. This is supported by numerous in vitro data correlating variations in the CAG tract with androgen receptor activity; the longer the CAG repeats, the weaker the receptor transactivation. Ours is the first study to show such a clear and prominent pattern of androgen insensitivity in KD. In clinical practice, KD patients are often misdiagnosed as having amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Careful examination of the endocrine component could avoid such a deleterious misdiagnosis.

  8. Large normal-range TBP and ATXN7 CAG repeat lengths are associated with increased lifetime risk of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardiner, S. L.; van Belzen, M. J.; Boogaard, M. W.

    2017-01-01

    —the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety and the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons—including 2165 depressed and 1058 non-depressed individuals—aged 18–93 years. The association between PDAG CAG repeat size and the risk for depression was assessed via binary logistic regression. We found......Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating psychiatric disorders worldwide. Recently, we showed that both relatively short and relatively long cytosine–adenine–guanine (CAG) repeats in the huntingtin gene (HTT) are associated with an increased risk of lifetime depression. However......, to what extent the variations in CAG repeat length in the other eight polyglutamine disease-associated genes (PDAGs) are associated with depression is still unknown. We determined the CAG repeat sizes of ATXN1, ATXN2, ATXN3, CACNA1A, ATXN7, TBP, ATN1 and AR in two well-characterized Dutch cohorts...

  9. Polymorphism in the Helicobacter pylori CagA and VacA toxins and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Dacie R.; Merrell, D. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Half of the world’s population is infected with Helicobacter pylori and approximately 20% of infected individuals develop overt clinical disease such as ulcers and stomach cancer. Paradoxically, despite its classification as a class I carcinogen, H. pylori has been shown to be protective against development of asthma, allergy, and esophageal disease. Given these conflicting roles for H. pylori, researchers are attempting to define the environmental, host, and pathogen interactions that ultimately result in severe disease in some individuals. From the bacterial perspective, the toxins, CagA and VacA, have each been shown to be polymorphic and to contribute to disease in an allele-dependent manner. Based on the notable advances that have recently been made in the CagA field, herein we review recent studies that have begun to shed light on the role of CagA polymorphism in H. pylori disease. Moreover, we discuss the potential interaction of CagA and VacA as a mediator of gastric disease. PMID:23380646

  10. Polymorphism in the Helicobacter pylori CagA and VacA toxins and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Dacie R; Merrell, D Scott

    2013-01-01

    Half of the world's population is infected with Helicobacter pylori and approximately 20% of infected individuals develop overt clinical disease such as ulcers and stomach cancer. Paradoxically, despite its classification as a class I carcinogen, H. pylori has been shown to be protective against development of asthma, allergy, and esophageal disease. Given these conflicting roles for H. pylori, researchers are attempting to define the environmental, host, and pathogen interactions that ultimately result in severe disease in some individuals. From the bacterial perspective, the toxins, CagA and VacA, have each been shown to be polymorphic and to contribute to disease in an allele-dependent manner. Based on the notable advances that have recently been made in the CagA field, herein we review recent studies that have begun to shed light on the role of CagA polymorphism in H. pylori disease. Moreover, we discuss the potential interaction of CagA and VacA as a mediator of gastric disease.

  11. Replication stalling and heteroduplex formation within CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats by mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterbo, David; Michoud, Grégoire; Mosbach, Valentine; Dujon, Bernard; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2016-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David

    2016-03-16

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  13. Serum testosterone levels and androgen receptor CAG polymorphism correlate with hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute liver failure in male HBV carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Yan Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Augmentation of androgen/androgen receptor (AR pathway may influence chronic hepatitis B (CHB more likely in males. AR activity is modulated by a polymorphic CAG repeat sequence in AR exon 1. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum testosterone levels, CAG repeat numbers and hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute liver failure (ALF. METHODS: Three hundred and seventy eight male CHB patients with ALF and 441 asymptomatic HBV carriers (AsCs were recruited. AR CAG repeats numbers were analyzed. The serum testosterone levels of AsCs, ALFs and patients with hepatitis B flare groups, and sequential serum samples, were assessed quantitatively. RESULTS: The median CAG repeat (M-CAG frequency was significantly higher in ALF patients than AsCs (P<0.001. Patients with M-CAG alleles (P<0.001, OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.1-4.2 had the highest risk for ALF. Serum testosterone levels were significantly higher (P<0.001 at hepatitis flare point (8.2 ± 3.0 ng/mL than inactive phase (6.4 ± 2.0 ng/mL. CHB (8.30 ± 2.71 ng/mL, P = 7.6 × 10(-6 and ALF group (2.61 ± 1.83 ng/mL, P = 1.7 × 10(-17 had significantly different levels of testosterone in comparison with AsCs group (6.56 ± 2.36 ng/mL. The serum testosterone levels sharply decreased from hepatitis flare phase to liver failure phase, and tended to be normal at the recovery phase. Male AsCs with M-CAG alleles had significantly lower serum testosterone levels (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: There was a serum testosterone fluctuation during hepatitis B flare and HBV-related ALF, and the median CAG repeats in AR gene exon 1 were associated with lower serum testosterone levels in asymptomatic HBV carriers and an increased susceptibility to HBV-related ALF.

  14. CAG/CTG Repeats Alter Affinity for the Histone Core and Positioning of DNA in the Nucleosome†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, Catherine B.; Delaney, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) occur throughout the genome and their expansion has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington’s Disease. TNRs have been studied using both oligonucleotides and plasmids; however, less is know about how repetitive DNA responds to genomic packaging. Here, we investigate the behavior of CAG/CTG repeats incorporated into nucleosome core particles, the most basic unit of chromatin packaging. To assess the general interaction between CAG/CTG repeats and the histone core, we determined the efficiency with which various TNR-containing DNA substrates form nucleosomes, revealing that even short CAG/CTG tracts are robust incorporators. However, presence of the Huntingtin gene flanking sequence (htt) decreases incorporation. Enzymatic and chemical probing revealed repositioning of the DNA in the nucleosome as the number of CAG/CTG repeats increased, regardless of the flanking sequence. Notably, the periodicity of the repeat tract remained unchanged as a function of length and is consistently 10.7 base pairs per helical turn. In contrast, the periodicity of the non-repetitive flanking sequence varies, and is smaller than the repeat tract at ~10.0–10.5 base pairs per turn. Furthermore, while the CAG/CTG repeats remain as canonical duplex in the nucleosome, nucleosome formation causes kinking in a secondary repeat tract in the htt gene, comprised of CCG/CGG repeats. This work highlights the innate ability of CAG/CTG repeats to incorporate and to position in nucleosomes and how that behavior is modulated by the htt flanking sequence. In addition, it illuminates the differences in packaging of healthy and diseased length repeat tracts within the genome. PMID:23157165

  15. CAG/CTG repeats alter the affinity for the histone core and the positioning of DNA in the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, Catherine B; Delaney, Sarah

    2012-12-11

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) occur throughout the genome, and their expansion has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease. TNRs have been studied using both oligonucleotides and plasmids; however, less is know about how repetitive DNA responds to genomic packaging. Here, we investigate the behavior of CAG/CTG repeats incorporated into nucleosome core particles, the most basic unit of chromatin packaging. To assess the general interaction between CAG/CTG repeats and the histone core, we determined the efficiency with which various TNR-containing DNA substrates form nucleosomes, revealing that even short CAG/CTG tracts are robust incorporators. However, the presence of the Huntington gene flanking sequence (htt) decreases the rate of incorporation. Enzymatic and chemical probing revealed repositioning of the DNA in the nucleosome as the number of CAG/CTG repeats increased, regardless of the flanking sequence. Notably, the periodicity of the repeat tract remained unchanged as a function of length and is consistently 10.7 bp per helical turn. In contrast, the periodicity of the nonrepetitive flanking sequence varies and is smaller than the repeat tract at ~10.0-10.5 bp per turn. Furthermore, while the CAG/CTG repeats remain as a canonical duplex in the nucleosome, nucleosome formation causes kinking in a secondary repeat tract in the htt gene, comprised of CCG/CGG repeats. This work highlights the innate ability of CAG/CTG repeats to incorporate and to position in nucleosomes and how that behavior is modulated by the htt flanking sequence. In addition, it illuminates the differences in packaging of healthy and diseased length repeat tracts within the genome.

  16. Length-dependent CTG·CAG triplet-repeat expansion in myotonic dystrophy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jintang; Campau, Erica; Soragni, Elisabetta; Jespersen, Christine; Gottesfeld, Joel M

    2013-12-20

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an inherited dominant muscular dystrophy caused by expanded CTG·CAG triplet repeats in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK1 gene, which produces a toxic gain-of-function CUG RNA. It has been shown that the severity of disease symptoms, age of onset and progression are related to the length of the triplet repeats. However, the mechanism(s) of CTG·CAG triplet-repeat instability is not fully understood. Herein, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from DM1 and Huntington's disease patient fibroblasts. We isolated 41 iPSC clones from DM1 fibroblasts, all showing different CTG·CAG repeat lengths, thus demonstrating somatic instability within the initial fibroblast population. During propagation of the iPSCs, the repeats expanded in a manner analogous to the expansion seen in somatic cells from DM1 patients. The correlation between repeat length and expansion rate identified the interval between 57 and 126 repeats as being an important length threshold where expansion rates dramatically increased. Moreover, longer repeats showed faster triplet-repeat expansion. However, the overall tendency of triplet repeats to expand ceased on differentiation into differentiated embryoid body or neurospheres. The mismatch repair components MSH2, MSH3 and MSH6 were highly expressed in iPSCs compared with fibroblasts, and only occupied the DMPK1 gene harboring longer CTG·CAG triplet repeats. In addition, shRNA silencing of MSH2 impeded CTG·CAG triplet-repeat expansion. The information gained from these studies provides new insight into a general mechanism of triplet-repeat expansion in iPSCs.

  17. CAG repeat length does not associate with the rate of cerebellar degeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shang-Ran; Wu, Yu-Te; Jao, Chii-Wen; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Wang, Po-Shan

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the correlation between the CAG repeat length and the degeneration of cerebellum in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) patients based on neuroimaging approaches. Forty SCA3 patients were recruited and classified into two subgroups according to their CAG repeat lengths (≥ 74 and Ataxia (SARA) score, N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) ratios based on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and 3-dimensional fractal dimension (3D-FD) values derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Furthermore, the 3D-FD values were used to construct structural covariance networks based on graph theoretical analysis. The results revealed that SCA3 patients with a longer CAG repeat length demonstrated earlier disease onset. However, the CAG repeat length did not significantly correlate with their SARA scores, cerebellar NAA/Cr ratios or cerebellar 3D-FD values. Network dissociation between cerebellar regions and parietal-occipital regions was found in SCA3 patients with CAG ≥ 74, but not in those with CAG cerebellar function and cerebellar structure in SCA3. Nevertheless, a longer CAG repeat length may indicate early structural covariance network dissociation.

  18. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  19. The nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location, and protein stoichiometry influence the base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E; Wilson, David M; Merienne, Karine

    2012-05-08

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >14 genetic disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases, the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights into how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, the repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely because of the lower level of APE1, FEN1, and LIG1. Damage located toward the 5' end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired, with the accumulation of incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the center or at the 3' end of the repeats or within control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5' end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly at the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that the BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence, and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome and suggest that a suboptimal long-patch BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability.

  20. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  1. Androgen receptor gene (CAG)n repeat analysis in the differential diagnosis between Kennedy disease and other motoneuron disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferlini, A.; Patrosso, M.C.; Repetto, M. [Instituto di Tecnologie Biomediche Avanzate CNR, Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    An increase in the number of (CAG)n repeats in the first coding exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene has been strongly associated with Kennedy disease (KD) (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy). This is an X-linked hereditary disorder characterized by motoneuron degeneration occurring in adults together with gnecomastia and hyperestrogenemia. We have performed AR gene molecular analysis in several members of a large family with KD as well as in 26 sporadic patients suffering from heterogeneous motoneuron disease (MND). An increase in the length of the (CAG)n repeats was detected, as expected, in all the affected males and in obligatory carrier females, some of which had minor signs of lower motoneuron involvement. There was only one possible exception, one young male with initial signs of the disease, who had an apparent normal length allele. An increased pathological allele was also found in 3 patients with MND. This indicates that the analysis of (CAG)n repeats of the AR gene plays a role in the differential diagnosis of this heterogeneous group of neurological diseases. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. MutSβ promotes trinucleotide repeat expansion by recruiting DNA polymerase β to nascent (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpins for error-prone DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinzhen; Gu, Liya; Leffak, Michael; Li, Guo-Min

    2016-07-01

    Expansion of (CAG)•(CTG) repeats causes a number of familial neurodegenerative disorders. Although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown, components involved in DNA mismatch repair, particularly mismatch recognition protein MutSβ (a MSH2-MSH3 heterodimer), are implicated in (CAG)•(CTG) repeat expansion. In addition to recognizing small insertion-deletion loop-outs, MutSβ also specifically binds DNA hairpin imperfect heteroduplexes formed within (CAG)n•(CTG)n sequences. However, whether or not and how MutSβ binding triggers expansion of (CAG)•(CTG) repeats remain unknown. We show here that purified recombinant MutSβ physically interacts with DNA polymerase β (Polβ) and stimulates Polβ-catalyzed (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpin retention. Consistent with these in vitro observations, MutSβ and Polβ interact with each other in vivo, and colocalize at (CAG)•(CTG) repeats during DNA replication. Our data support a model for error-prone processing of (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpins by MutSβ and Polβ during DNA replication and/or repair: MutSβ recognizes (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpins formed in the nascent DNA strand, and recruits Polβ to the complex, which then utilizes the hairpin as a primer for extension, leading to (CAG)•(CTG) repeat expansion. This study provides a novel mechanism for trinucleotide repeat expansion in both dividing and non-dividing cells.

  3. Association of androgen receptor GGN repeat length polymorphism and male infertility in Khuzestan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mohamad; Khatami, Saied Reza; Galehdari, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Androgens play critical role in secondary sexual and male gonads differentiations such as spermatogenesis, via androgen receptor. The human androgen receptor (AR) encoding gene contains two regions with three nucleotide polymorphic repeats (CAG and GGN) in the first exon. Unlike the CAG repeats, the GGN has been less studied because of technical difficulties, so the functional role of these polymorphic repeats is still unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate any relationship between GGN repeat length in the first exon of AR gene and idiopathic male infertility in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is the first study on GGN repeat of AR gene in infertile male in Khuzestan, Iran. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to categorize GGN repeat lengths in 72 infertile and 72 fertile men. Afterwards we sequenced the PCR products to determine the exact length of GGN repeat in each category. Our samples included 36 azoospermic and 36 oligozoospermic men as cases and 72 fertile men as control group. Results: We found that the numbers of repeats in the cases range from 18 to 25, while in the controls this range is from 20 to 28. The results showed a significant relation between the length of GGN repeat and fertility (p=0.015). The most frequent alleles were alleles with 24 and 25 repeats respectively in case and control groups. On the other hand no significant differences were found between Arab and non-Arab cases by considering GGN repeat lengths (p=0.234). Conclusion: Due to our results, there is a significant association between the presence of allele with 24 repeats and susceptibility to male infertility. Therefore this polymorphism should be considered in future studies to clarify etiology of disorders related to androgen receptor activity. PMID:26221130

  4. Association of androgen receptor GGN repeat length polymorphism and male infertility in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Moghadam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgens play critical role in secondary sexual and male gonads differentiations such as spermatogenesis, via androgen receptor. The human androgen receptor (AR encoding gene contains two regions with three nucleotide polymorphic repeats (CAG and GGN in the first exon. Unlike the CAG repeats, the GGN has been less studied because of technical difficulties, so the functional role of these polymorphic repeats is still unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate any relationship between GGN repeat length in the first exon of AR gene and idiopathic male infertility in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is the first study on GGN repeat of AR gene in infertile male in Khuzestan, Iran. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to categorize GGN repeat lengths in 72 infertile and 72 fertile men. Afterwards we sequenced the PCR products to determine the exact length of GGN repeat in each category. Our samples included 36 azoospermic and 36 oligozoospermic men as cases and 72 fertile men as control group. Results: We found that the numbers of repeats in the cases range from 18 to 25, while in the controls this range is from 20 to 28. The results showed a significant relation between the length of GGN repeat and fertility (p=0.015. The most frequent alleles were alleles with 24 and 25 repeats respectively in case and control groups. On the other hand no significant differences were found between Arab and non-Arab cases by considering GGN repeat lengths (p=0.234. Conclusion: Due to our results, there is a significant association between the presence of allele with 24 repeats and susceptibility to male infertility. Therefore this polymorphism should be considered in future studies to clarify etiology of disorders related to androgen receptor activity.

  5. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Jacquet

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  6. Extrahelical (CAG)/(CTG) triplet repeat elements support proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading and MutLα endonuclease activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Burdett, Vickers; Baitinger, Celia; Iyer, Ravi R; Shi, Kevin; Modrich, Paul

    2013-07-23

    MutLα endonuclease can be activated on covalently continuous DNA that contains a MutSα- or MutSβ-recognizable lesion and a helix perturbation that supports proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading by replication factor C, providing a potential mechanism for triggering mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA. Because mouse models for somatic expansion of disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n triplet repeat sequences have implicated both MutSβ and MutLα and have suggested that expansions can occur in the absence of replication, we have asked whether an extrahelical (CAG)n or (CTG)n element is sufficient to trigger MutLα activation. (CAG)n and (CTG)n extrusions in relaxed closed circular DNA do in fact support MutSβ-, replication factor C-, and PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, which can incise either DNA strand. Extrahelical elements of two or three repeat units are the preferred substrates for MutLα activation, and extrusions of this size also serve as moderately effective sites for loading the PCNA clamp. Relaxed heteroduplex DNA containing a two or three-repeat unit extrusion also triggers MutSβ- and MutLα-endonuclease-dependent mismatch repair in nuclear extracts of human cells. This reaction occurs without obvious strand bias at about 10% the rate of that observed with otherwise identical nicked heteroduplex DNA. These findings provide a mechanism for initiation of triplet repeat processing in nonreplicating DNA that is consistent with several features of the model of Gomes-Pereira et al. [Gomes-Pereira M, Fortune MT, Ingram L, McAbney JP, Monckton DG (2004) Hum Mol Genet 13(16):1815-1825]. They may also have implications for triplet repeat processing at a replication fork.

  7. Extrahelical (CAG)/(CTG) triplet repeat elements support proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading and MutLα endonuclease activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Burdett, Vickers; Baitinger, Celia; Iyer, Ravi R.; Shi, Kevin; Modrich, Paul

    2013-01-01

    MutLα endonuclease can be activated on covalently continuous DNA that contains a MutSα- or MutSβ-recognizable lesion and a helix perturbation that supports proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading by replication factor C, providing a potential mechanism for triggering mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA. Because mouse models for somatic expansion of disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n triplet repeat sequences have implicated both MutSβ and MutLα and have suggested that expansions can occur in the absence of replication, we have asked whether an extrahelical (CAG)n or (CTG)n element is sufficient to trigger MutLα activation. (CAG)n and (CTG)n extrusions in relaxed closed circular DNA do in fact support MutSβ-, replication factor C-, and PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, which can incise either DNA strand. Extrahelical elements of two or three repeat units are the preferred substrates for MutLα activation, and extrusions of this size also serve as moderately effective sites for loading the PCNA clamp. Relaxed heteroduplex DNA containing a two or three-repeat unit extrusion also triggers MutSβ- and MutLα-endonuclease-dependent mismatch repair in nuclear extracts of human cells. This reaction occurs without obvious strand bias at about 10% the rate of that observed with otherwise identical nicked heteroduplex DNA. These findings provide a mechanism for initiation of triplet repeat processing in nonreplicating DNA that is consistent with several features of the model of Gomes-Pereira et al. [Gomes-Pereira M, Fortune MT, Ingram L, McAbney JP, Monckton DG (2004) Hum Mol Genet 13(16):1815–1825]. They may also have implications for triplet repeat processing at a replication fork. PMID:23840062

  8. A pharmacogenetic survey of androgen receptor (CAG)n and (GGN)n polymorphisms in patients experiencing long term side effects after finasteride discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Erika; De Mattia, Elena; Mazzon, Giorgio; Cauci, Sabina; Trombetta, Carlo; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2014-12-09

    Finasteride is a steroid 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and benign prostate hyperplasia. In some patients the treatment is associated with adverse side effects that could become persistent after therapy discontinuation, resulting in the so-called post-finasteride syndrome (PFS). A pharmacogenetic component in the response to finasteride treatment was previously demonstrated. Two polymorphisms (CAG) rs4045402 and (GGN) rs3138869 in the gene encoding for the androgen receptor (AR) have been hypothesized to play a role in finasteride sensitivity. We aimed to compare the rs4045402 and rs3138869 polymorphisms prevalence in a group of 69 selected subjects (AGA+PFS) that used finasteride to treat alopecia and developed persistent side effects, with that in a group of 91 untreated subjects with AGA (AGA), and a group of 76 untreated subjects without AGA (NO-AGA). The rs4045402 and rs3138869 polymorphisms extreme-lengths alleles were more frequent among AGA+PFS (odds ratio, 5.88; 95% CI, 1.87-18.52) and AGA subjects (odds ratio, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.13-11.21) than among NO-AGA subjects, probably reflecting the genetic predisposing factors for AGA development. In conclusion, we described a predictive effect of the less common repeats' length CAG-rs4045402 and GGN-rs3138869 on AGA development. Prospective trials are required to confirm our findings also in other ethnicities, and to highlight possible further pharmacogenetic predictive markers of susceptibility to adverse effects.

  9. DM2 CCTG*CAGG repeats are crossover hotspots that are more prone to expansions than the DM1 CTG*CAG repeats in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Ruhee; Wells, Robert D

    2006-06-30

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is caused by the extreme expansion of the repeating tetranucleotide CCTG*CAGG sequence from DM2 tetranucleotide repeats to also expand during this process. Both gene conversion and unequal crossing over are attractive mechanisms to effect these very large expansions. (CCTG*CAGG)n (where n=30, 75, 114 or 160) repeats showed high recombination crossover frequencies (up to 27-fold higher than the non-repeating control) in an intramolecular plasmid system in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, a distinct orientation effect was observed where orientation II (CAGG on the leading strand template) was more prone to recombine. Expansions of up to double the length of the tetranucleotide repeats were found. Also, the repeating tetranucleotide sequence was more prone to expansions (to give lengths longer than a single repeating tract) than deletions as observed for the CTG*CAG and GAA*TTC repeats. We determined that the DM2 tetranucleotide repeats showed a lower thermodynamic stability when compared to the DM1 trinucleotide repeats, which could make them better targets for DNA repair events, thus explaining their expansion-prone behavior. Genetic studies in SOS-repair mutants revealed high frequencies of recombination crossovers although the SOS-response itself was not induced. Thus, the genetic instabilities of the CCTG*CAGG repeats may be mediated by a recombination-repair mechanism that is influenced by DNA structure.

  10. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Tawani

    Full Text Available In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein to expanded r(CAG repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG motif.

  11. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat length as modifier of the association between Persistent Organohalogen Pollutant exposure markers and semen characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Aleksander; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed...... to investigate whether the CAG and GGN polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene modify the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure on human sperm characteristics. METHODS: Semen and blood from 680 men [mean (SD) age 34 (10) years] from Greenland, Sweden, Warsaw (Poland) and Kharkiv (Ukraine......) were collected. Persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure was assessed by measuring serum levels of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE). Semen characteristics (volume, sperm concentration, total count, proportion of progressively motile...

  12. Androgen Receptor Repeat Length Polymorphism Associated with Male-to-Female Transsexualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Lauren; Bernard, Pascal; Sánchez, Francisco J.; Baird, Paul N.; Vilain, Eric; Kennedy, Trudy; Harley, Vincent R.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a likely genetic component to transsexualism, and genes involved in sex steroidogenesis are good candidates. We explored the specific hypothesis that male-to-female transsexualism is associated with gene variants responsible for undermasculinization and/or feminization. Specifically, we assessed the role of disease-associated repeat length polymorphisms in the androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and aromatase (CYP19) genes. Methods Subject-control analysis included 112 male-to-female transsexuals and 258 non-transsexual males. Associations and interactions were investigated between CAG repeat length in the AR gene, CA repeat length in the ERβ gene, and TTTA repeat length in the CYP19 gene and male-to-female transsexualism. Results A significant association was identified between transsexualism and the AR allele, with transsexuals having longer AR repeat lengths than non-transsexual male control subjects (p = .04). No associations for transsexualism were evident in repeat lengths for CYP19 or ERβ genes. Individuals were then classified as short or long for each gene polymorphism on the basis of control median polymorphism lengths in order to further elucidate possible combined effects. No interaction associations between the three genes and transsexualism were identified. Conclusions This study provides evidence that male gender identity might be partly mediated through the androgen receptor. PMID:18962445

  13. ATXN2 with intermediate-length CAG/CAA repeats does not seem to be a risk factor in hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Svenstrup, Kirsten; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, has been shown to be a modulator of TDP-43 induced toxicity in ALS animal and cell models. Finally, it has been shown that ATXN2 with non-pathogenic intermediate-length CAG/CAA repeat elongations (encoding the polyglutamine tract) is a genetic risk factor of ALS. Considering...... the similarities in the disease phenotype and the neuropathological link between ALS and HSP we hypothesized that intermediate-length CAG/CAA repeats in ATXN2 could be a modulator of HSP. We show that in a cohort of 181 HSP patients 4.9 % of the patients had intermediate-length CAG/CAA repeats in ATXN2 which...... was not significantly different from the frequencies in a Danish control cohort or in American and European control populations. However, the mean age of onset was significantly lower in HSP patients with intermediate-length CAG/CAA repeats in ATXN2 compared to patients with normal length repeats. Based...

  14. Coordinated processing of 3' slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins by DNA polymerases β and δ preferentially induces repeat expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L S; Guo, Jinzhen; Zhang, Tianyi; Mao, Guogen; Hou, Caixia; Yuan, Fenghua; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yanbin; Wu, Jianxin; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2013-05-24

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats causes certain familial neurological disorders. Hairpin formation in the nascent strand during DNA synthesis is considered a major path for CAG/CTG repeat expansion. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We show here that removal or retention of a nascent strand hairpin during DNA synthesis depends on hairpin structures and types of DNA polymerases. Polymerase (pol) δ alone removes the 3'-slipped hairpin using its 3'-5' proofreading activity when the hairpin contains no immediate 3' complementary sequences. However, in the presence of pol β, pol δ preferentially facilitates hairpin retention regardless of hairpin structures. In this reaction, pol β incorporates several nucleotides to the hairpin 3'-end, which serves as an effective primer for the continuous DNA synthesis by pol δ, thereby leading to hairpin retention and repeat expansion. These findings strongly suggest that coordinated processing of 3'-slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins by polymerases δ and β on during DNA synthesis induces CAG/CTG repeat expansions.

  15. Coordinated Processing of 3′ Slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n Hairpins by DNA Polymerases β and δ Preferentially Induces Repeat Expansions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L. S.; Guo, Jinzhen; Zhang, Tianyi; Mao, Guogen; Hou, Caixia; Yuan, Fenghua; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yanbin; Wu, Jianxin; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats causes certain familial neurological disorders. Hairpin formation in the nascent strand during DNA synthesis is considered a major path for CAG/CTG repeat expansion. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We show here that removal or retention of a nascent strand hairpin during DNA synthesis depends on hairpin structures and types of DNA polymerases. Polymerase (pol) δ alone removes the 3′-slipped hairpin using its 3′-5′ proofreading activity when the hairpin contains no immediate 3′ complementary sequences. However, in the presence of pol β, pol δ preferentially facilitates hairpin retention regardless of hairpin structures. In this reaction, pol β incorporates several nucleotides to the hairpin 3′-end, which serves as an effective primer for the continuous DNA synthesis by pol δ, thereby leading to hairpin retention and repeat expansion. These findings strongly suggest that coordinated processing of 3′-slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins by polymerases δ and β on during DNA synthesis induces CAG/CTG repeat expansions. PMID:23585564

  16. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Song Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk.

  17. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-Induced (CTG⋅CAG)nRepeat Instability in the Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Locus: Implications for Therapeutic Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agtmaal, Ellen L; André, Laurène M; Willemse, Marieke; Cumming, Sarah A; van Kessel, Ingeborg D G; van den Broek, Walther J A A; Gourdon, Geneviève; Furling, Denis; Mouly, Vincent; Monckton, Darren G; Wansink, Derick G; Wieringa, Bé

    2017-01-04

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by (CTG⋅CAG) n -repeat expansion within the DMPK gene and thought to be mediated by a toxic RNA gain of function. Current attempts to develop therapy for this disease mainly aim at destroying or blocking abnormal properties of mutant DMPK (CUG)n RNA. Here, we explored a DNA-directed strategy and demonstrate that single clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-cleavage in either its 5' or 3' unique flank promotes uncontrollable deletion of large segments from the expanded trinucleotide repeat, rather than formation of short indels usually seen after double-strand break repair. Complete and precise excision of the repeat tract from normal and large expanded DMPK alleles in myoblasts from unaffected individuals, DM1 patients, and a DM1 mouse model could be achieved at high frequency by dual CRISPR/Cas9-cleavage at either side of the (CTG⋅CAG)n sequence. Importantly, removal of the repeat appeared to have no detrimental effects on the expression of genes in the DM1 locus. Moreover, myogenic capacity, nucleocytoplasmic distribution, and abnormal RNP-binding behavior of transcripts from the edited DMPK gene were normalized. Dual sgRNA-guided excision of the (CTG⋅CAG)n tract by CRISPR/Cas9 technology is applicable for developing isogenic cell lines for research and may provide new therapeutic opportunities for patients with DM1. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A dynamic structural model of expanded RNA CAG repeats: A refined X-ray structure and computational investigations using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, Hajeung; Disney, Matthew D.; Schatz, George C.

    2013-01-01

    One class of functionally important RNA is repeating transcripts that cause disease through various mechanisms. For example, expanded r(CAG) repeats can cause Huntington’s and other disease through translation of toxic proteins. Herein, crystal structure of r[5ʹUUGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, a model of CAG expanded transcripts, refined to 1.65 Å resolution is disclosed that show both anti-anti and syn-anti orientations for 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using Amber force field in explicit solvent were run for over 500 ns on model systems r(5ʹGCGCAGCGC)2 (MS1) and r(5ʹCCGCAGCGG)2 (MS2). In these MD simulations, both anti-anti and syn-anti AA base pairs appear to be stable. While anti-anti AA base pairs were dynamic and sampled multiple anti-anti conformations, no syn-anti↔anti-anti transformations were observed. Umbrella sampling simulations were run on MS2, and a 2D free energy surface was created to extract transformation pathways. In addition, over 800 ns explicit solvent MD simulation was run on r[5ʹGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, which closely represents the refined crystal structure. One of the terminal AA base pairs (syn-anti conformation), transformed to anti-anti conformation. The pathway followed in this transformation was the one predicted by umbrella sampling simulations. Further analysis showed a binding pocket near AA base pairs in syn-anti conformations. Computational results combined with the refined crystal structure show that global minimum conformation of 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops in r(CAG) repeats is anti-anti but can adopt syn-anti depending on the environment. These results are important to understand RNA dynamic-function relationships and develop small molecules that target RNA dynamic ensembles. PMID:23441937

  20. Huntington disease in subjects from an Israeli Karaite community carrying alleles of intermediate and expanded CAG repeats in the HTT gene: Huntington disease or phenocopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herishanu, Yuval O; Parvari, Ruti; Pollack, Yaakov; Shelef, Ilan; Marom, Batia; Martino, Tiziana; Cannella, Milena; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2009-02-15

    We report a cluster of patients from a Karaite Jew community with a movement disorder suggestive of Huntington disease (HD), in some cases associated with repeat lengths below the edge of 36 CAG repeats. The study describes the clinical and genetic features of four patients who were followed over several years. Patients belonged to an inbred family in whom progressive chorea, manifesting predominantly with dystonia and cerebellar features, developed during middle age. Although severe psychiatric symptoms ultimately developed in two of the four patients, cognitive function remained reasonably well preserved in all of them even after several disease years. Moderate cognitive deficits were limited to the visuomotor organization and abstract thinking subtests in three of the four patients. Qualitative brain imaging showed atrophy of brain predominantly involving cortex and cerebellum. Genetic testing revealed a variable mutation penetrance among family members, some affected members showing an upper allele size ranging from 34 to 49, whereas others remained unaffected despite the presence of the full mutation beyond 40 CAG repeats. Co-morbidity with recessive hereditary inclusion body myopathy was found in two subjects from one family. Although the main diagnosis of HD remains to be confirmed by further neuropathological studies, these cases may suggest that HD could manifest with as few as 34 CAG repeats, in some geographic areas, the disease phenotype most probably being influenced by additional, as yet unidentified, genes.

  1. CAG-repeat length and the age of onset in Huntington disease (HD): a review and validation study of statistical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbehn, Douglas R; Hayden, Michael R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-03-05

    CAG-repeat length in the gene for HD is inversely correlated with age of onset (AOO). A number of statistical models elucidating the relationship between CAG length and AOO have recently been published. In the present article, we review the published formulae, summarize essential differences in participant sources, statistical methodologies, and predictive results. We argue that unrepresentative sampling and failure to use appropriate survival analysis methodology may have substantially biased much of the literature. We also explain why the survival analysis perspective is necessary if any such model is to undergo prospective validation. We use prospective diagnostic data from the PREDICT-HD longitudinal study of CAG-expanded participants to test conditional predictions derived from two survival models of AOO of HD. A prior model of the relationship of CAG and AOO originally published by Langbehn et al. yields reasonably accurate predictions, while a similar model by Gutierrez and MacDonald substantially overestimates diagnosis risk for all but the highest risk participants in this sample. The Langbehn et al. model appears accurate enough to have substantial utility in various research contexts. We also emphasize remaining caveats, many of which are relevant for any direct application to genetic counseling. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. The SCA1 (Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and MJD (Machado-Joseph disease CAG repeats in normal individuals: segregation analysis and allele frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiezel Cláudia Emília Vieira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3 are autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by expansions of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the SCA1 and MJD genes. These expanded sequences are unstable upon transmission, leading to an intergeneration increase in the number of repeats (dynamic mutation. The transmission of the CAG repeat was studied in normal mother-father-child trios, referred for paternity testing (SCA1, n = 367; MJD, n = 879. No segregation distortion was detected. The CAG allele frequencies were determined in 330 unrelated individuals (fathers from couples tested for paternity. The allele frequency distributions did not differ from those previously reported for European populations. The estimated values for the statistic parameters indicating diversity at the SCA1 locus did not differ much from those reported previously for other STRs in the Brazilian population, while those for the MJD locus were close to or higher than the maximum values of previous reports. This shows that SCA1 and MJD are highly informative loci for applications in genetic and population studies and for forensic analysis.

  3. Identification of restriction endonucleases sensitive to 5-cytosine methylation at non-CpG sites, including expanded (CAG)n/(CTG)n repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Castel, Arturo; Nakamori, Masayuki; Thornton, Charles A; Pearson, Christopher E

    2011-04-01

    Most epigenetic studies assess methylation of 5'-CpG-3' sites but recent evidence indicates that non-CpG cytosine methylation occurs at high levels in humans and other species. This is most prevalent at 5'-CHG-3', where H = A, C or T, and it preferentially occurs at 5'-CpA-3' and 5'-CpT-3' sites. With the goal of facilitating the detection of non-CpG methylation, the restriction endonucleases ApeKI, BbvI, EcoP15I, Fnu 4HI, MwoI and TseI were assessed for their sensitivity to 5-methylcytosine at GpCpA, GpCpT, GpCpC or GpCpG sites, where methylation is catalyzed by the DNA 5-cytosine 5'-GpC-3' methyltransferase M.CviPI. We tested a variety of sequences including various plasmid-based sites, a cloned disease-associated (CAG)83•(CTG)83 repeat and in vitro synthesized tracts of only (CAG)500•(CTG)500 or (CAG)800•(CTG)800. The repeat tracts are enriched for the preferred CpA and CpT motifs. We found that none of the tested enzymes can cleave their recognition sequences when they are 5'-GpC-3' methylated. A genomic site known to convert its non-CpG methylation levels upon C2C12 differentiation was confirmed through the use of these enzymes. These enzymes can be useful in rapidly and easily determining the most common non-CpG methylation status in various sequence contexts, as well as at expansions of (CAG)n•(CTG)n repeat tracts associated with diseases like myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease.

  4. Study of simple sequence repeat (SSR) polymorphism for biotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as recurrent parent was investigated using 128 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers covered on chromosome number 1-12. The results reveal that 36 HRM primers showed distinct polymorphism among the donor and recurrent parents studied indicating the robust nature of microsatellites in revealing polymorphism.

  5. CagA EPIYA polymorphisms in Colombian Helicobacter pylori strains and their influence on disease-associated cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Carlos Alberto; Quiroga, Andrés Javier; Coronado, Andrea; Labrador, Karen; Acosta, Nicole; Delgado, Pilar; Jaramillo, Carlos; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2013-03-15

    To investigate the influence of the CagA diversity in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains from Colombia on the host cell biology. Eighty-four H. pylori-cagA positive strains with different Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs patterns, isolated from patients with gastritis (n = 17), atrophic gastritis (n = 17), duodenal ulcer (n = 16), intestinal metaplasia (n = 16) and gastric cancer (n = 18), were included. To determine the integrity of the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) we evaluated the presence of cagA, cagT, cagE, and cag10 genes by polymerase chain reaction. AGS gastric epithelial cells were infected with each strain and assayed for translocation and tyrosine phosphorylation of CagA by western blot, secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay after taking supernatants from cocultures and cell elongation induction. For cell elongation quantification, coculture photographs were taken and the proportion of "hummingbird" cells (> 15 μm) was determined. Overall 72% (60/84) of the strains were found to harbor a functional cagPAI. Levels of phosphorylated CagA were significantly higher for isolates from duodenal ulcer than the ones in strains from gastritis, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer (49.1% ± 23.1% vs 21.1% ± 19.5%, P < 0.02; 49.1% ± 23.1% vs 26.2% ± 14.8%, P < 0.045; 49.1% ± 23.1% vs 21.5% ± 19.5%, P < 0.043 and 49.1% ± 23.1% vs 29.5% ± 27.1%, P < 0.047 respectively). We observed variable IL-8 expression levels ranging from 0 to 810 pg/mL and from 8.8 to 1442 pg/mL at 6 h and 30 h post-infection, respectively. cagPAI-defective strains did not induce detectable levels of IL-8 at 6 h post-infection. At 30 h post-infection all strains induced IL-8 expression in AGS cells, although cagPAI-defective strains induced significantly lower levels of IL-8 than strains with a functional cagPAI (57.1 ± 56.6 pg/mL vs 513.6 ± 338.6 pg/mL, P < 0.0001). We did not observe differences in the extent of

  6. Differential requirement of Srs2 helicase and Rad51 displacement activities in replication of hairpin-forming CAG/CTG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jennifer H G; Viterbo, David; Anand, Ranjith P; Verra, Lauren; Sloan, Laura; Richard, Guy-Franck; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2017-05-05

    Trinucleotide repeats are a source of genome instability, causing replication fork stalling, chromosome fragility, and impaired repair. Specialized helicases play an important role in unwinding DNA structures to maintain genome stability. The Srs2 helicase unwinds DNA hairpins, facilitates replication, and prevents repeat instability and fragility. However, since Srs2 is a multifunctional protein with helicase activity and the ability to displace Rad51 recombinase, it was unclear which functions were required for its various protective roles. Here, using SRS2 separation-of-function alleles, we show that in the absence of Srs2 recruitment to PCNA or in helicase-deficient mutants, breakage at a CAG/CTG repeat increases. We conclude that Srs2 interaction with PCNA allows the helicase activity to unwind fork-blocking CAG/CTG hairpin structures to prevent breaks. Independently of PCNA binding, Srs2 also displaces Rad51 from nascent strands to prevent recombination-dependent repeat expansions and contractions. By 2D gel electrophoresis, we detect two different kinds of structured intermediates or joint molecules (JMs). Some JMs are Rad51-independent and exhibit properties of reversed forks, including being processed by the Exo1 nuclease. In addition, in a helicase-deficient mutant, Rad51-dependent JMs are detected, probably corresponding to recombination between sisters. These results clarify the many roles of Srs2 in facilitating replication through fork-blocking hairpin lesions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity associated with expansion of a CAG repeat sequence at the spinocerebellar ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph disease locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancel, G.; Abbas, N.; Stevanin, G. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropathological findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Marked Phenotypic Heterogeneity Associated with Expansion of a CAG Repeat Sequence at the Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph Disease Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancel, Géraldine; Abbas, Nacer; Stevanin, Giovanni; Dürr, Alexandra; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Néri, Christian; Duyckaerts, Charles; Penet, Christiane; Cann, Howard M.; Agid, Yves; Brice, Alexis

    1995-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropatho-logical findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5 PMID:7573040

  9. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation and transcriptional inhibition by long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates targeting CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamitsu, Sefan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Hashiya, Kaori; Yamamoto, Makoto; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Introducing novel building blocks to solid-phase peptide synthesis, we readily synthesized long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates 3 and 4 via the introduction of an amino group into a GABA (γ-turn) contained in 3, to target CAG/CTG repeat sequences, which are associated with various hereditary disorders. A high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gel revealed sequence-specific alkylation both strands at the N3 of adenines or guanines in CAG/CTG repeats by conjugates 3 and 4, with 11bp recognition. In vitro transcription assays using conjugate 4 revealed that specific alkylation inhibited the progression of RNA polymerase at the alkylating sites. Chiral substitution of the γ-turn with an amino group resulted in higher binding affinity observed in SPR assays. These assays suggest that conjugates 4 with 11bp recognition has the potential to cause specific DNA damage and transcriptional inhibition at the alkylating sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk of lymphoid follicle development in patients with chronic antral gastritis: role of endoscopic features, histopathological parameters, CagA status and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyut, B R; Moorchung, N; Srivastava, A N; Gupta, N K; Mittal, B

    2008-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastritis, lymphoid follicle formation and development of MALT lymphoma. We evaluated endoscopic, histological, serological and genetic risk factors associated with lymphoid follicle development in gastritis. After upper GI endoscopy, 3 antral biopsies were taken from 120 patients for histological examination. H. pylori was diagnosed using rapid urease test (RUT), modified Giemsa stain and IgG anti-CagA ELISA. Genotyping of IL-1B (-511C/T) and IL-1RN (86 bp VNTR) genes were performed by PCR-RFLP/PCR. In 120 patients, 45 (37.5%) showed presence of lymphoid follicles in antral gastric mucosa. H. pylori was positive by modified Giemsa stain (26%) RUT (50%) and anti-CagA IgG in 67.5%, The presence of nodularity (p = 0.030), neutrophilic infiltration (p = 0.010), lymphocytic infiltration (p = 0.002), glandular atrophy (p = 0.0001), glandular shortening (p = 0.001), fibrosis (p = 0.0001), plasma cells (p = 0.007), eosinophils (p = 0.012), anti-CagA antibodies (p = 0.003) and H. pylori density (p = 0.020) were associated with risk (odds ratio = 11.5, 3.8, 11.0, 8.4, 3.8, 4.6, 5.8, 16.0, 10.8 and 2.8 respectively) of lymphoid follicle. However, IL-1 gene polymorphisms did not influence lymphoid follicle development The presence of modularity, lymphocytic infiltration, glandular atrophy, glandular shortening, fibrosis, plasma cells, eosinophils and anti-CagA IgG antibodies are risk factors for lymphoid follicle development in patients with gastritis.

  11. Motor neurone disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with intermediate-length CAG repeat expansions in Ataxin-2 does not have 1C2-positive polyglutamine inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highley, John Robin; Lorente Pons, Alejandro; Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Wharton, Stephen B; Ince, Paul G; Shaw, Pamela J; Wood, Jon; Kirby, Janine

    2016-06-01

    Intermediate-length cytosine-adenine-guanine repeat expansions in the ATXN2 gene (which encodes for Ataxin-2 protein) have been linked to increased risk for motor neurone disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We screened DNA from cases for which we had post-mortem brain tissue to enable characterization of the neuropathology associated with this mutation. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of DNA from frozen brain tissue on a cohort of 178 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) autopsy cases from the north of England and 159 controls was performed. This was followed by tinctorial staining and immunohistochemistry (including for Ataxin-2) on selected blocks from ALS cases with intermediate-length expansions (ATXN2-ALS), sporadic ALS cases and neurologically healthy controls. Four ALS cases with intermediate-length CAG repeat expansions within ATXN2 were identified. One such case also had a mutation of the C9ORF72 gene. All had lower motor neurone depletion, and three out of four cases had transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (predominantly skein-like). No inclusions of aggregated polyglutamine proteins were identified. Ataxin-2 protein expression was largely granular and cytoplasmic with the most prominent staining observed in larger neurones. Ataxin-2 staining was variable both within and between cases, but no staining pattern that was specific for cases with ATXN2 mutations was seen. Intermediate expansions of the CAG repeat in ATXN2 are associated with ALS. They are mostly associated with TDP-43 proteinopathy, but not with 1C2-positive polyglutamine inclusions. In the nervous system, Ataxin-2 protein expression is predominantly seen in large neurones. There is no consistent histopathological hallmark that is unique to ATXN2-ALS. © 2015 British Neuropathological Society.

  12. Ubiquitous expression of CUG or CAG trinucleotide repeat RNA causes common morphological defects in a Drosophila model of RNA-mediated pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kynan T Lawlor

    Full Text Available Expanded DNA repeat sequences are known to cause over 20 diseases, including Huntington's disease, several types of spinocerebellar ataxia and myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2. A shared genetic basis, and overlapping clinical features for some of these diseases, indicate that common pathways may contribute to pathology. Multiple mechanisms, mediated by both expanded homopolymeric proteins and expanded repeat RNA, have been identified by the use of model systems, that may account for shared pathology. The use of such animal models enables identification of distinct pathways and their 'molecular hallmarks' that can be used to determine the contribution of each pathway in human pathology. Here we characterise a tergite disruption phenotype in adult flies, caused by ubiquitous expression of either untranslated CUG or CAG expanded repeat RNA. Using the tergite phenotype as a quantitative trait we define a new genetic system in which to examine 'hairpin' repeat RNA-mediated cellular perturbation. Further experiments use this system to examine whether pathways involving Muscleblind sequestration or Dicer processing, which have been shown to mediate repeat RNA-mediated pathology in other model systems, contribute to cellular perturbation in this model.

  13. Ubiquitous Expression of CUG or CAG Trinucleotide Repeat RNA Causes Common Morphological Defects in a Drosophila Model of RNA-Mediated Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Kynan T.; O’Keefe, Louise V.; Samaraweera, Saumya E.; van Eyk, Clare L.; Richards, Robert I.

    2012-01-01

    Expanded DNA repeat sequences are known to cause over 20 diseases, including Huntington’s disease, several types of spinocerebellar ataxia and myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2. A shared genetic basis, and overlapping clinical features for some of these diseases, indicate that common pathways may contribute to pathology. Multiple mechanisms, mediated by both expanded homopolymeric proteins and expanded repeat RNA, have been identified by the use of model systems, that may account for shared pathology. The use of such animal models enables identification of distinct pathways and their ‘molecular hallmarks’ that can be used to determine the contribution of each pathway in human pathology. Here we characterise a tergite disruption phenotype in adult flies, caused by ubiquitous expression of either untranslated CUG or CAG expanded repeat RNA. Using the tergite phenotype as a quantitative trait we define a new genetic system in which to examine ‘hairpin’ repeat RNA-mediated cellular perturbation. Further experiments use this system to examine whether pathways involving Muscleblind sequestration or Dicer processing, which have been shown to mediate repeat RNA-mediated pathology in other model systems, contribute to cellular perturbation in this model. PMID:22715390

  14. Dog genetic polymorphism revealed by synthetic tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariat, D; Robert, L

    1993-01-01

    We are studying the genetic polymorphism associated with Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) loci in 13 breeds of dogs, namely: Alaskan Malamute, Barzoi, Beagle, Belgian Shepherd, Fox Terrier, Griffon, Labrador, Irish Setter, Spaniel, Dachshund, Irish Terrier, Shar Pei and Poodle. Our approach is based upon synthetic tandem repeats (STRs). Using a panel of these arbitrary unit polymers to detect minisatellites, we are attempting to develop paternity testing systems on pure bred dog pedigrees. We are evaluating the potential importance of STRs as a tool for the isolation of minisatellites in dogs, as well as for the characterization of dog genetic markers.

  15. Short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms in Turkish population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. forensic science; population genetics; short tandem repeat; polymorphism; human genetics; Turkey. Author Affiliations. Üner Ülküer1 Melahat Kurtuluş-Ülküer2 Cüneyt Elma1 Tahsin Kesici3 Sevda Menevşe4. General Directory of Security, Criminal Police Laboratories, Biyoloji Bölümü, Aniteppe, Ankara, Turkey ...

  16. GAA repeat polymorphism in Turkish Friedreich's ataxia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, M Bertan; Koç, A Filiz; Kasap, Halil; Güzel, A Irfan; Sarica, Yakup; Süleymanova, Dilara

    2006-05-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), the most common subtype of early onset hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by unstable GAA tri-nucleotide expansions in the first intron of FRDA gene located at 9q13-q21.1 position. Results of GAA repeat polymorphism in 80 Turkish SCA patients and 38 family members of 11 typical FRDA patients were reported. GAA triplet repeat size ranged from approximately 7 to 34 in normal alleles and from approximately 66 to 1300 in mutant alleles. Twenty six patients were homozygous for GAA expansion and size of expanded alleles differed from approximately 425 to 1300 repeats. Children 2 and 6 years old (showing no ataxia symptoms) of one family had homozygous GAA expansions reaching approximately 925 repeats. All 11 families studied had at least 1 afflicted child and 9 parents and 2 siblings were carrier (heterozygous) with mutant alleles ranging from 66 to 850 repeats. Family studies confirmed the meiotic instability and stronger effect of expansion in the smaller alleles on phenotype and a negative correlation between GAA repeat expansion size and onset-age of the disease.

  17. Lack of concordance and linkage disequilibrium among brothers for androgenetic alopecia and CAG/GGC haplotypes of the androgen receptor gene in Mexican families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga-Vázquez, Jazmín; López-Hernández, María A; Svyryd, Yevgeniya; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M

    2015-12-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) or common baldness is the most prevalent form of hair loss in males. Familial predisposition has been recognized, and heritability estimated in monozygotic twins suggests an important genetic predisposition. Several studies indicate that the numbers of CAG/GGC repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene (AR) maybe associated with AGA susceptibility. To investigate a possible correlation between AR CAG/GGC haplotypes and the presence or not of alopecia in sibships with two or more brothers among them at least one of them has AGA. Thirty-two trios including an alopecic man, one brother alopecic or not, and their mother were enrolled. Sanger sequencing of the exon 1 of the AR gene was conducted to ascertain the number of CAG/GGC repeats in each individual. Heterozygous mother for the CAG/GGC haplotypes was an inclusion criterion to analyze the segregation haplotype patterns in the family. Concordance for the number of repeats and AGA among brothers was evaluated using kappa coefficient and the probability of association in the presence of genetic linkage between CAG and GGC repeats and AGA estimated by means of the family-based association test (FBAT). The median for the CAG and GGC repeats in the AR is similar to that reported in other populations. The CAG/GGC haplotypes were less polymorphic than that reported in other studies, especially due to the GGC number of repeats found. Kappa coefficient resulted in a concordance of 37.3% (IC 95%, 5.0-69.0%) for the AGA phenotype and identical CAG/GGC haplotypes. There was no evidence of linkage disequilibrium. Our results do not confirm a possible correlation or linkage disequilibrium between the CAG/GGC haplotypes of the AR gene and androgenetic alopecia in Mexican brothers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. An influence of androgen receptor (AR gene СAG-polymorphism on spermatogenesis in infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Chernykh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the results of semen examination in 200 infertile men with various numbers of GAG-repeats in the exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR gene. The number of repeats ranged from 7 to 31, the average number of repeats was 22.2 ± 1.6, with the most common variant (13 % present 21 repeats. Our findings confirm that of AR gene СAG-polymorphism can an effect on sperm parameters and male fertility. The spermatogenesis can be impaired in infertile men with “short” CAG-repeats not less than with “long” CAG-repeats.

  19. Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butovskaya, Marina L.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Vasilyev, Vasiliy A.; Dronova, Daria A.; Karelin, Dmitri V.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Shibalev, Dmitri V.; Shackelford, Todd K.; Fink, Bernhard; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)—the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17–70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born. PMID:26291982

  20. Variation in the number of EPIYA-C repeats in CagA protein from Colombian Helicobacter pylori strains and its ability to induce hummingbird phenotype in gastric epithelial cells Variación en el número de repeticiones EPIYA-C en la proteína CagA de aislamientos colombianos de Helicobacter pylori y su capacidad para inducir fenotipo colibrí en células epiteliales gástricas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes Bravo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Studies using Western Helicobacter pylori strains have shown that a risk factor for gastric cancer is the number of EPIYA-C motifs in the cytotoxin-associated A protein. CagA is delivered into epithelial cells, where it becomes tyrosine phosphorylated in their EPIYA repeats and induces cytoskeleton rearrangements.
    Objectives. The objective of this study was to evaluate H. pylori cagA positive strains isolated from Colombian patients with gastroduodenal diseases for the number of EPIYA-C repeats in cagA and their ability to induce cytoskeleton rearrangements in epithelial cells.
    Materials and methods. We analyzed the 3' EPIYA repeats region of cagA by PCR in 93 H. pylori cagA positive strains from 49 patients with gastritis, 17 with gastric cancer, and 24 with duodenal ulcer. AGS cells exposed to the various H. pylori isolates were evaluated for rearrangements in their cytoskeleton.
    Results. Strains with one EPIYA-C were the most frequent in gastritis and duodenal ulcer patients. Strains with three EPIYA-C were mainly found in gastric cancer. We found a significantly higher risk of gastric cancer for individuals infected with strains harboring three EPIYA-C motifs (OR=12.4, CI95%: 2.32-66.3. Strains from gastric cancer showed significantly higher percentages of induction of cytoskeleton rearrangements in comparison with those from gastritis (p Mann-Whitney<0.005.
    Conclusions. H. pylori strains with three EPIYA-C repeats can confer an increased risk of cancer to infected individuals.Introducción. En los aislamientos de Helicobacter pylori del hemisferio occidental, se ha observado que el número de repeticiones EPIYA-C en la proteína CagA es un factor de riesgo para cáncer gástrico. La proteína CagA es introducida en la célula epitelial y, posteriormente, es fosforilada en las tirosinas presentes en los motivos EPIYA e induce rearreglos en el citoesqueleto.
    Objetivos. Nuestro propósito fue evaluar el n

  1. EGFR CA repeat polymorphism predict clinical outcome in EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther Larsen, Anne; Nissen, Peter Henrik; Meldgaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are predictors of efficacy for treatment with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A CA repeat polymorphism in intron 1 of the EGFR gene influences the transcription...

  2. 5′CAG and 5′CTG Repeats Create Differential Impediment to the Progression of a Minimal Reconstituted T4 Replisome Depending on the Concentration of dNTPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Delagoutte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Instability of repetitive sequences originates from strand misalignment during repair or replicative DNA synthesis. To investigate the activity of reconstituted T4 replisomes across trinucleotide repeats (TNRs during leading strand DNA synthesis, we developed a method to build replication miniforks containing a TNR unit of defined sequence and length. Each minifork consists of three strands, primer, leading strand template, and lagging strand template with a 5′ single-stranded (ss tail. Each strand is prepared independently, and the minifork is assembled by hybridization of the three strands. Using these miniforks and a minimal reconstituted T4 replisome, we show that during leading strand DNA synthesis, the dNTP concentration dictates which strand of the structure-forming 5′CAG/5′CTG repeat creates the strongest impediment to the minimal replication complex. We discuss this result in the light of the known fluctuation of dNTP concentration during the cell cycle and cell growth and the known concentration balance among individual dNTPs.

  3. [Association of serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region 44 bp variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism with Tourette syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Nailun; Wang, Guiju; Cui, Jiajia; Yi, Mingji; Liu, Shiguo

    2014-10-01

    To assess the association between the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) 44 bp variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and Tourette syndrome (TS) in ethnic Han Chinese trios. A total of 252 TS trios (patients and their parents) were recruited. Genetic contribution of the 5-HTTLPR 44 bp VNTR polymorphism was evaluated by genotyping, haplotype relative risk (HRR) analysis and transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) statistics. To enhance the efficiency of the test, haplotype-based HRR (HHRR) was also performed. The TDT, HRR and HHRR analyses have revealed a significant association of the 5-HTTLPR 44 bp VNTR polymorphism with TS, and provided a strong evidence for an over-transmission of L allele from parents to the affected children (TDT: χ² = 6.680, df= 1, P= 0.012; HRR: χ² = 9.345, P= 0.002, OR= 1.739, 95% CI for 1.218-2.483). For 204 male and 48 female TS trios, TDT and HRR were analyzed separately. The results showed a significant association between 5-HTTLPR and male TS (for males. TDT: χ² = 4.643, df= 1, P= 0.038; for females, TDT: χ² = 2.189, df= 1, P= 0.188). 5-HTTLPR may be the susceptibility gene for male TS patients among the Chinese Han population. However, the results need to be replicated in datasets collected from different populations.

  4. Fen1 does not control somatic hypermutability of the (CTG)(n)*(CAG)(n) repeat in a knock-in mouse model for DM1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, W.J.A.A. van den; Nelen, M.R.; Heijden, G.W. van der; Wansink, D.G.; Wieringa, B.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of trinucleotide repeat expansion, an important cause of neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases, is poorly understood. We report here on the study of the role of flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1), a structure-specific nuclease with both 5' flap endonuclease and 5'-3' exonuclease

  5. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci including D2S1772, D6S1043, D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D12S391, D13S325, D18S1364 and D22GATA198B05 in Chinese Han population of Henan province and to assess its value in forensic science.

  6. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Bolton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case–control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively, but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013. This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012. Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported.

  7. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S. [Ott Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Helicobacter pylori cagA gene variants in Malaysians of different ethnicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Mohamed (Ramelah); A. Hanafiah (Alfizah); I.M. Rose (Isa); M.R.A. Manaf; S.A. Abdullah (Shiekh Anwar); I. Sagap (Ismail); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); J.A. Yaacob (Jasmi)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe have defined DNA repeat variability in the 3?-terminus of the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori strains from Malaysian patients of different ethnicities. We identified different alleles based on the EPIYA repeats. cagA types A-B-D and A-B-B-D are more similar to the sequence of

  9. The p. R151C Polymorphism in MC1R Gene Modifies the Age of Onset in Spanish Huntington's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell-Marti, Gemma; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Gimenez-Xavier, Pol; Segu-Roig, Ariadna; Potrony, Miriam; Badenas, Celia; Alvarez, Victoria; Millán, José M; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Ramos-Arroyo, María A; Milà, Montserrat; Puig, Susana

    2017-07-01

    The expansion of CAG repeats (≥36 CAG) in the HTT gene is the only known genetic cause of Huntington's disease (HD) and the main determinant of the course of the disease. The length of the expanded CAG repeats correlates inversely with the age of onset (AOO) but does not completely determine it. We investigated the role of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene as a modifier factor of AOO in 600 HD patients from Spain. We sequenced the entire region of the MC1R gene and analyzed all the nonsynonymous MC1R genetic variants with a minor allele frequency of at least 0.01 in HD patients. The variability in AOO attributable to the CAG repeats and MC1R polymorphisms was evaluated using a multiple linear regression model. We found that the loss-of-function p. R151C MC1R polymorphism has a significant influence on the AOO (P = 0.004; Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.032) which explains 1.42% of the variance in AOO that cannot be accounted for by the expanded CAG repeat. Our results suggest that the MC1R gene could modify the AOO in Spanish HD patients and encourage the evaluation of loss-of-function MC1R polymorphisms in other HD populations with a higher frequency of these MC1R polymorphisms.

  10. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Selma E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop.

  11. Novel repeat polymorphisms of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter genes among dogs and wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejjas, Krisztina; Vas, Judit; Kubinyi, Eniko; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Miklosi, Adam; Ronai, Zsolt

    2007-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of the neurotransmission systems are intensively studied in the human because of a possible influence on personality traits and the risk of psychiatric disorders. The investigation of genetic variations of the dog genome has recently been a promising approach, as a considerable similarity can be observed between dogs and humans, in both genetic and social aspects, suggesting that the dog could become an appropriate animal model of human behavioral genetic studies. The aim of our study was the identification and analysis of variable number of tandem repeats polymorphisms (VNTRs) in the genes of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system of dogs. The in silico search was followed by the development of PCR-based techniques for the analysis of the putative VNTRs. Highly variable repetitive sequence regions were found in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) genes. Allele frequency and genotype distribution of these novel polymorphisms together with the exon 3 and exon 1 VNTR of the dopamine D4 receptor gene were determined in a large sample involving four dog breeds (German Shepherd, Belgian Tervueren, Groenandael, and Malinois) and European Grey Wolves. A significant difference of allele and genotype frequencies was demonstrated among the analyzed breeds; therefore, an association analysis was also carried out between the activity-impulsivity phenotype and the described VNTRs. Preliminary findings are presented that polymorphisms of the DRD4, DBH, and DAT genes can be associated with attention deficit among Belgian Tervuerens.

  12. Modulation of trinucleotide repeat instability by DNA polymerase β polymorphic variant R137Q

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yaou; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E.; Lei, Ruipeng; Rein, Hayley L.

    2017-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) instability is associated with human neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Recent studies have pointed out that DNA base excision repair (BER) mediated by DNA polymerase β (pol β) plays a crucial role in governing somatic TNR instability in a damage-location dependent manner. It has been shown that the activities and function of BER enzymes and cofactors can be modulated by their polymorphic variations. This could alter the function of BER in regulating TNR instability. However, the roles of BER polymorphism in modulating TNR instability remain to be elucidated. A previous study has shown that a pol β polymorphic variant, polβR137Q is associated with cancer due to its impaired polymerase activity and its deficiency in interacting with a BER cofactor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In this study, we have studied the effect of the pol βR137Q variant on TNR instability. We showed that pol βR137Q exhibited weak DNA synthesis activity to cause TNR deletion during BER. We demonstrated that similar to wild-type pol β, the weak DNA synthesis activity of pol βR137Q allowed it to skip over a small loop formed on the template strand, thereby facilitating TNR deletion during BER. Our results further suggest that carriers with pol βR137Q polymorphic variant may not exhibit an elevated risk of developing human diseases that are associated with TNR instability. PMID:28475635

  13. Conservation of human chromosome 13 polymorphic microsatellite (CA){sub n} repeats in chimpanzees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, R.; Shriver, M.D.; Yu, L.M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    Tandemly repeated (dC-dA){sub n} {center_dot} (dG-dT){sub n} sequences occur abundantly and are found in most eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the level of conservation of these repeat sequences in nonhuman primates, the authors have analyzed seven human chromosome 13 dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeat loci in chimpanzees by DNA amplification using primers designed for analysis of human loci. Comparable levels of polymorphism at these loci in the two species, revealed by the number of alleles, heterozygosity, and allele sizes, suggest that the (CA){sub n} repeat arrays and their genomic locations are highly conserved. Even though the proportion of shared alleles between the two species varies enormously and the modal alleles are not the same, allelic lengths at each locus in the chimpanzees are detected within the bounds of the allele size range observed in humans. A similar observation has been noted in a limited number of gorillas and orangutans. Using a new measure of genetic distance that takes into account the size of alleles, they have compared the genetic distance between humans and chimpanzees. The genetic distance between these two species was found to be ninefold smaller than expected assuming there is no selection or mutational bias toward retention of (CA){sub n} repeat arrays. These findings suggest a functional significance for these microsatellite loci. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Simple sequence repeats in Neurospora crassa: distribution, polymorphism and evolutionary inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jongsun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple sequence repeats (SSRs have been successfully used for various genetic and evolutionary studies in eukaryotic systems. The eukaryotic model organism Neurospora crassa is an excellent system to study evolution and biological function of SSRs. Results We identified and characterized 2749 SSRs of 963 SSR types in the genome of N. crassa. The distribution of tri-nucleotide (nt SSRs, the most common SSRs in N. crassa, was significantly biased in exons. We further characterized the distribution of 19 abundant SSR types (AST, which account for 71% of total SSRs in the N. crassa genome, using a Poisson log-linear model. We also characterized the size variation of SSRs among natural accessions using Polymorphic Index Content (PIC and ANOVA analyses and found that there are genome-wide, chromosome-dependent and local-specific variations. Using polymorphic SSRs, we have built linkage maps from three line-cross populations. Conclusion Taking our computational, statistical and experimental data together, we conclude that 1 the distributions of the SSRs in the sequenced N. crassa genome differ systematically between chromosomes as well as between SSR types, 2 the size variation of tri-nt SSRs in exons might be an important mechanism in generating functional variation of proteins in N. crassa, 3 there are different levels of evolutionary forces in variation of amino acid repeats, and 4 SSRs are stable molecular markers for genetic studies in N. crassa.

  15. Higher number of Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA C phosphorylation sites increases the risk of gastric cancer, but not duodenal ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Rodrigo C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common infections worldwide and is associated with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Bacterial virulence factors such as CagA have been shown to increase the risk of both diseases. Studies have suggested a causal role for CagA EPIYA polymorphisms in gastric carcinogenesis, and it has been shown to be geographically diverse. We studied associations between H. pylori CagA EPIYA patterns and gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer, in an ethnically admixed Western population from Brazil. CagA EPIYA was determined by PCR and confirmed by sequencing. A total of 436 patients were included, being 188 with gastric cancer, 112 with duodenal ulcer and 136 with gastritis. Results The number of EPIYA C segments was significantly associated with the increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.08, 95% CI = 1.74 to 5.45, p -3 even after adjustment for age and gender. Higher number of EPIYA C segments was also associated with gastric atrophy (p = 0.04 and intestinal metaplasia (p = 0.007. Furthermore, patients infected by cagA strains possessing more than one EPIYA C segment showed decreased serum levels of pepsinogen I in comparison with those infected by strains containing one or less EPIYA C repeat. Otherwise, the number of EPIYA C segments did not associate with duodenal ulcer. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that infection with H. pylori strains harbouring more than one CagA EPIYA C motif was clearly associated with gastric cancer, but not with duodenal ulcer. Higher number of EPIYA C segments was also associated with gastric precancerous lesions as demonstrated by histological gastric atrophic and metaplastic changes and decreased serum levels of pepsinogen I.

  16. Polymorphism in the HASPB repeat region of East African Leishmania donovani strains.

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    Arie Zackay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL caused by Leishmania donovani is a major health problem in Ethiopia. Parasites in disparate regions are transmitted by different vectors, and cluster in distinctive genotypes. Recently isolated strains from VL and HIV-VL co-infected patients in north and south Ethiopia were characterized as part of a longitudinal study on VL transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixty-three L. donovani strains were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting three regions: internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1, cysteine protease B (cpb, and HASPB (k26. ITS1- and cpb--PCR identified these strains as L. donovani. Interestingly, the k26--PCR amplicon size varied depending on the patient's geographic origin. Most strains from northwestern Ethiopia (36/40 produced a 290 bp product with a minority (4/40 giving a 410 bp amplicon. All of the latter strains were isolated from patients with HIV-VL co-infections, while the former group contained both VL and HIV-VL co-infected patients. Almost all the strains (20/23 from southwestern Ethiopia produced a 450 bp amplicon with smaller products (290 or 360 bp only observed for three strains. Sudanese strains produced amplicons identical (290 bp to those found in northwestern Ethiopia; while Kenyan strains gave larger PCR products (500 and 650 bp. High-resolution melt (HRM analysis distinguished the different PCR products. Sequence analysis showed that the k26 repeat region in L. donovani is comprised of polymorphic 13 and 14 amino acid motifs. The 13 amino acid peptide motifs, prevalent in L. donovani, are rare in L. infantum. The number and order of the repeats in L. donovani varies between geographic regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HASPB repeat region (k26 shows considerable polymorphism among L. donovani strains from different regions in East Africa. This should be taken into account when designing diagnostic assays and vaccines based on this antigen.

  17. H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 prime higher integrin α5β1 in adverse pH condition to enhance hypochlorhydria vicious cycle for gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Chang, Wei-Lun; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori CagL amino acid polymorphisms such as Y58/E59 can increase integrin α5β1 expression and gastric cancer risk. Hypochlorhydria during chronic H. pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis. The study test whether CagL-Y58/E59 isolates may regulate integrin α5β1 to translocate CagA via the type IV secretory system even under adverse pH conditions, and whether the integrin α5β1 expression primed by H. pylori is a pH-dependent process involving hypochlorhydria in a vicious cycle to promote gastric carcinogenesis. The expressions of integrin α5 and β1, CagA phosphorylation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation of AGS cells exposed to CagL-Y58/E59 H. pylori, isogenic mutants, and different H. pylori CagL amino acid replacement mutants under different pH values were determined. Differences in the pepsinogen I/II ratio (indirectly indicating gastric acidity) and gastric integrin α5β1 expression were compared among the 172 H. pylori-infected patients with different cancer risks. Even under adversely low pH condition, H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 still keep active integrin β1 with stronger binding affinity, CagA translocation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation than the other mutants (phypochlorhydria (phypochlorhydria vicious cycle for gastric carcinogenesis, and thus require an early eradication.

  18. Interferon-γ (IFNG) microsatellite repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes of IFN-α receptor (IFNAR1) associated with enhanced malaria susceptibility in Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Kanika; Jha, Pankaj; Pati, Sudhanshu S; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj K; Sharma, Surya K; Awasthi, Shally; Venkatesh, Vimala; Habib, Saman

    2015-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and IFNα function through their cellular receptors IFNγR1 and IFNαR1, respectively to mediate immune processes during malaria infection. A total of 21 SNPs, 2 ins/del polymorphisms and a microsatellite repeat, selected on the basis of their reported association with infectious diseases including malaria in world populations, were analysed for association with Plasmodium falciparum malaria susceptibility in a case-control study with adult patients and ethnically-matched controls drawn from a disease meso- to hyperendemic and a nonendemic region of India. Among the five IFNG SNPs tested, an intron 3 and a 3'UTR SNP associated with disease in the endemic region. In addition, large (CA)n repeats of IFNG intron 1 associated with protection from severe malaria in the endemic region (severe vs. control, odds ratio=0.21, 95% CI=0.08-0.52, P=1.3 × 10(-4)). The TA11CAG haplotype (rs2069705 T/C, rs2430561 A/T, rs3138557 (CA)n, rs2069718 T/C, rs2069727 A/G, rs2069728 G/A) carrying a short CA11 repeat also exhibited very strong association with severe malaria, particularly in the endemic region (severe vs. control, OR=14.56, 95% CI=3.39-85.81, P=3 × 10(-5)). One SNP each from the IFNA8 and IFNA17 of IFNA gene cluster had a protective effect in the non-endemic region but not in the endemic region. A promoter and an intron 2 SNP of IFNAR1 were risk factors for disease and the IFNAR1 haplotype GCCAGG (rs2843710 C/G, rs2850015 C/T, +6993 C/T, rs2243594 A/G, rs1012335 G/C, rs2257167 G/C) carrying both the risk alleles strikingly associated with disease manifestation in the endemic region (severe vs. control, OR=27.14, 95% CI=3.12-1254, P=2 × 10(-5); non-severe vs. control, OR=61.87, 95% CI=10.08-2521, P=1 × 10(-8)). The data indicates dissimilar contribution of cytokine and cytokine receptor variants to disease in populations residing in areas of differential malaria endemicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Repeat polymorphisms in the Homo sapiens heme oxygenase-1 gene in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Gibbons

    Full Text Available Idiopathic and diabetic gastroparesis in Homo sapiens cause significant morbidity. Etiology or risk factors have not been clearly identified. Failure to sustain elevated heme oxygenase-1 (HO1 expression is associated with delayed gastric emptying in diabetic mice and polymorphisms in the HO1 gene (HMOX1, NCBI Gene ID:3162 are associated with worse outcomes in other diseases.Our hypothesis was that longer polyGT alleles are more common in the HMOX1 genes of individuals with gastroparesis than in controls without upper gastrointestinal motility disorders.Repeat length was determined in genomic DNA. Controls with diabetes (84 type 1, 84 type 2 and without diabetes (n = 170 were compared to diabetic gastroparetics (99 type 1, 72 type 2 and idiopathic gastroparetics (n = 234. Correlations of repeat lengths with clinical symptom sub-scores on the gastroparesis cardinal symptom index (GCSI were done. Statistical analyses of short (32 repeat alleles and differences in allele length were used to test for associations with gastroparesis.The distribution of allele lengths was different between groups (P = 0.016. Allele lengths were longest in type 2 diabetics with gastroparesis (29.18±0.35, mean ± SEM and longer in gastroparetics compared to non-diabetic controls (28.50±0.14 vs 27.64±0.20 GT repeats/allele, P = 0.0008. Type 2 diabetic controls had longer alleles than non-diabetic controls. In all gastroparetic groups, allele lengths were longer in African Americans compared to other racial groups, differences in the proportion of African Americans in the groups accounted for the differences between gastroparetics and controls. Diabetic gastroparetics with 1 or 2 long alleles had worse GCSI nausea sub-scores (3.30±0.23 as compared to those with 0 long alleles (2.66±0.12, P = 0.022.Longer poly-GT repeats in the HMOX1 gene are more common in African Americans with gastroparesis. Nausea symptoms are worse in subjects with longer alleles.

  20. Repeat polymorphisms in the Homo sapiens heme oxygenase-1 gene in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Simon J; Grover, Madhusudan; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Wadhwa, Akhilesh; Zubair, Adeel; Wilson, Laura A; Wu, Yanhong; Abell, Thomas L; Hasler, William L; Koch, Kenneth L; McCallum, Richard W; Nguyen, Linda A B; Parkman, Henry P; Sarosiek, Irene; Snape, William J; Tonascia, James; Hamilton, Frank A; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic and diabetic gastroparesis in Homo sapiens cause significant morbidity. Etiology or risk factors have not been clearly identified. Failure to sustain elevated heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) expression is associated with delayed gastric emptying in diabetic mice and polymorphisms in the HO1 gene (HMOX1, NCBI Gene ID:3162) are associated with worse outcomes in other diseases. Our hypothesis was that longer polyGT alleles are more common in the HMOX1 genes of individuals with gastroparesis than in controls without upper gastrointestinal motility disorders. Repeat length was determined in genomic DNA. Controls with diabetes (84 type 1, 84 type 2) and without diabetes (n = 170) were compared to diabetic gastroparetics (99 type 1, 72 type 2) and idiopathic gastroparetics (n = 234). Correlations of repeat lengths with clinical symptom sub-scores on the gastroparesis cardinal symptom index (GCSI) were done. Statistical analyses of short (32) repeat alleles and differences in allele length were used to test for associations with gastroparesis. The distribution of allele lengths was different between groups (P = 0.016). Allele lengths were longest in type 2 diabetics with gastroparesis (29.18±0.35, mean ± SEM) and longer in gastroparetics compared to non-diabetic controls (28.50±0.14 vs 27.64±0.20 GT repeats/allele, P = 0.0008). Type 2 diabetic controls had longer alleles than non-diabetic controls. In all gastroparetic groups, allele lengths were longer in African Americans compared to other racial groups, differences in the proportion of African Americans in the groups accounted for the differences between gastroparetics and controls. Diabetic gastroparetics with 1 or 2 long alleles had worse GCSI nausea sub-scores (3.30±0.23) as compared to those with 0 long alleles (2.66±0.12), P = 0.022. Longer poly-GT repeats in the HMOX1 gene are more common in African Americans with gastroparesis. Nausea symptoms are worse in subjects with longer alleles.

  1. Aggrecan variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism and lumbar disc degeneration: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiaao; Guan, Fulin; Guan, Guofa; Xu, Gongping; Wang, Xintao; Zhao, Wei; Ji, Ye; Yan, Jinglong

    2013-12-01

    Data on the association between the ACAN (encoded for aggrecan core protein) variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and lumbar disc degeneration are conflicting, so we performed a meta-analysis. Aggrecan is involved in the shock absorbing function of the lumbar disc; we performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between ACAN VNTR and lumbar degeneration. To perform a meta-analysis, we searched for studies published until September 2012, using electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure). Eight studies involving 965 cases of lumbar disc degeneration and 982 control subjects were identified. Assessment for eligibility and extraction of data were performed by 2 independent investigators. We extracted allele frequency for each study. We calculated the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the strength of the association between the ACAN VNTR polymorphism and lumbar disc degeneration risk. Results from the allele model suggested an increased risk of lumbar disc degeneration for the shorter alleles carriers compared with the normal alleles and longer alleles (OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.04-2.30, P = 0.03). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significant increased risks were found among Asians with shorter alleles (OR=1.65, 95% CI: 1.17-2.33, P = 0.004). Our results suggest an increased risk of shorter alleles compared with normal alleles and longer alleles against lumbar disc degeneration among populations especially among Asian descent. Such association may not be statistically significant in European populations.

  2. Selected estrogen receptor 1 and androgen receptor gene polymorphisms in relation to risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions among Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Lori C; Blackston, Christie R; Doherty, Jennifer A; Ray, Roberta M; Lin, Ming Gang; Gao, Dao Li; Stalsberg, Helge; Feng, Ziding; Thomas, David B; Chen, Chu

    2011-02-01

    Polymorphisms in sex hormone receptor-encoding genes may alter the activity of sex hormone receptors and thereby affect susceptibility to breast cancer and related outcomes. In a case-control study of women from Shanghai, China, we examined the risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions associated with the ESR1 PvuII (rs2234693) and XbaI (rs9340799) and AR CAG repeat ((CAG)(n)) and GGC repeat ((GGC)(n)) polymorphisms among 614 women with breast cancer, 467 women with fibrocystic conditions, and 879 women without breast disease. We also evaluated whether risk differed by the presence/absence of proliferative changes (in the extratumoral epithelium or fibrocystic lesion), menopausal status, or body mass index (BMI). Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Only associations with AR (CAG)(n) and (GGC)(n) genotypes were detected. Allocating AR (CAG)(n) genotypes into six categories, with the (CAG)(22-24)/(CAG)(22-24) genotype category designated as the reference group, the (CAG)(>24)/(CAG)(>24) genotype category was associated with an increased risk of fibrocystic breast conditions (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.0). Relative to the AR (GGC)(17)/(GGC)(17) genotype, the (GGC)(17)/(GGC)(14) genotype was associated with elevated risks of incident breast cancer (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.4) and fibrocystic conditions (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5). Results did not differ according to proliferation status, menopausal status, or BMI. Although these data lend support for a link between AR variation and breast disease development, given the low frequency of the putative risk-conferring genotypes and other constraints, further confirmation of our results is needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tandem repeat polymorphisms: Mediators of genetic plasticity, modulators of biological diversity and dynamic sources of disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    Tandem repetitive DNA elements (tandem repeats), including microsatellites and simple sequence repeats, are extremely common throughout the genomes of a wide range of species. Tandem repeat expansions have been found to cause a range of monogenic diseases, such as Huntington's disease, various ataxias and other neurological diseases. The human genome contains hundreds ofthousands of distinct tandem repeats, many of which appear to have evolved to regulate specific aspects of gene expression, RNA function and protein function. Tandem repeat polymorphisms (TRPs) provide a unique source of genetic variability that has an extended digital distribution, as opposed to the usual binary nature of single nucleotide polymorphisms. In this chapter I will review studies in which tandem repeats have been implicated in a multitude of molecular and cellular processes associated with the development, behavior and evolution of a variety of animal species, including mammals. Recent data suggesting that these repetitive sequences can increase the 'evolvability' of genomes provides further evidence that TRPs not only have functional consequences but also provide a rich source of genetic diversity that can facilitate evolutionary processes. I propose that a readily mutable subclass of tandem repeats may provide an important template for stochastic genetic variation, which could in turn generate diversity in epigenetics, development and organismal function, thus impacting upon evolution. Furthermore, the distinctive characteristics ofTRPs also uniquely position them as contributors to complex polygenic disorders. Ultimately, there is much to be gained from systematic analysis of the 'repeatome', defined as the entire set of tandem repeats and other repetitive DNA in a genome, as well as their transcribed and translated expression products. Applying such approaches not only to the human genome but to other species will yield new insights into the genetic regulation of a wide range of

  4. Baldness and the androgen receptor: the AR polyglycine repeat polymorphism does not confer susceptibility to androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Justine A; Scurrah, Katrina J; Cobb, Joanna E; Zaloumis, Sophie G; Duncan, Anna E; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, is a complex condition with a strong heritable component. In 2001, we published the first significant evidence of a genetic association between baldness and a synonymous coding SNP (rs6152) in the androgen receptor gene, AR. Recently, this finding was replicated in three independent studies, confirming an important role for AR in the baldness phenotype. In one such replication study, it was claimed that the causative variant underlying the association was likely to be the polyglycine (GGN) repeat polymorphism, one of two apparently functional triplet repeat polymorphisms located in the exon 1 transactivating domain of the gene. Here, we extend our original association finding and present comprehensive evidence from approximately 1,200 fathers and sons drawn from 703 families of the Victorian Family Heart Study, a general population Caucasian cohort, that neither exon 1 triplet repeat polymorphism is causative in this condition. Seventy-eight percent of fathers (531/683) and 30% of sons (157/520) were affected to some degree with AGA. We utilised statistical methods appropriate for the categorical nature of the phenotype and familial structure of the cohort, and determined that whilst SNP rs6152 was strongly associated with baldness (P baldness, but also for the many other complex conditions that have thus far been linked to AR.

  5. (AC)n dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in 5' beta-globin gene in native and Mestizo Mexican populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, R; Delgado, P; Arenas, D; Barrientos, C; Buentello, L; Loeza, F; Salamanca, F

    2001-12-01

    Repeated sequences are dispersed along the human genome. These sequences are useful as markers in diagnosis of inherited diseases, in forensic medicine, and in tracking the origin and evolution of human populations. The (AC)n repeated element is the most frequent in the human genome. In this paper, the (AC)n repeated element located in the 5' flanking region of the beta-globin gene was studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Four ethnic Mexican groups (Mixteca, Nahua, Otomí, Purépecha) and a Mestizo population were analyzed. We observed three alleles, A [(AC)16, B [(AC)14], and C [(AC)18], with a frequency of between 68.2% and 86.9%, 13.1% and 18.2%, and 6.7% and 13.7%, respectively. Allele C was present only in Purépecha and Mestizo groups. The absence of this allele in the other ethnic groups studied suggests that there is low genetic admixture of Purépecha and that this is a relatively isolated population. However, it could be that the C allele occurs in low frequencies in the other groups as a result of small sample sizes. The (AC)n repeat polymorphism in the beta-globin gene has not been previously studied in Amerindian populations.

  6. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen prevents trinucleotide repeat expansions by promoting repeat deletion and hairpin removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Jill M.; Lai, Yanhao; Rolle, Shantell J.; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    DNA base lesions and base excision repair (BER) within trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tracts modulate repeat instability through the coordination among the key BER enzymes DNA polymerase β, flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and DNA ligase I (LIG I). However, it remains unknown whether BER cofactors can also alter TNR stability. In this study, we discovered that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cofactor of BER, promoted CAG repeat deletion and removal of a CAG repeat hairpin during BER in a duplex CAG repeat tract and CAG hairpin loop, respectively. We showed that PCNA stimulated LIG I activity on a nick across a small template loop during BER in a duplex (CAG)20 repeat tract promoting small repeat deletions. Surprisingly, we found that during BER in a hairpin loop, PCNA promoted reannealing of the upstream flap of a double-flap intermediate, thereby facilitating the formation of a downstream flap and stimulating FEN1 cleavage activity and hairpin removal. Our results indicate that PCNA plays a critical role in preventing CAG repeat expansions by modulating the structures of dynamic DNA via cooperation with BER enzymes. We provide the first evidence that PCNA prevents CAG repeat expansions during BER by promoting CAG repeat deletion and removal of a TNR hairpin. PMID:27793507

  7. Linkage and association of the CA repeat polymorphism of the IL6 gene, obesity-related phenotypes, and bone mineral density (BMD) in two independent Caucasian populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Qing-Yang; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Yi; Conway, Theresa; Davies, K Michael; Li, Jin-Long; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2003-01-01

    .... We investigated the relationships between obesity-related phenotypes, bone mineral density (BMD) and the CA repeat polymorphism of the IL6 gene in two large independent samples using the quantitative transmission disequilibrium test...

  8. Thymidylate synthase (TS tandem repeat promoter polymorphism and susceptibility to colorectal cancer of romanian subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai TOMA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC is influence by polymorphisms located in the genes encoding enzymes of the folate pathway. The aim of this study was to evaluate if 2R/3R TS (rs34743033 polymorphism is involved in predisposition for colorectal in Romanian subjects. In the present case-control study, 75 sporadic CRC subjects and 60 healthy controls were genotyped by PCR method. The frequency of 3R/3R genotype was 40% in control group and 42.7% in cancer group. We found that there was no statistically significant association between the risk for CRC and 2R/3R TS polymorphism in Romanian subjects.

  9. The Role of XPG in Processing (CAG)n/(CTG)n DNA Hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Tian, Lei; Huang, Jian; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2011-03-09

    During DNA replication or repair, disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n expansion can result from formation of hairpin structures in the repeat tract of the newly synthesized or nicked DNA strand. Recent studies identified a nick-directed (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpin repair (HPR) system that removes (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins from human cells via endonucleolytic incisions. Because the process is highly similar to the mechanism by which XPG and XPF endonucleases remove bulky DNA lesions during nucleotide excision repair, we assessed the potential role of XPG in conducting (CAG)n/(CTG)n HPR. To determine if the XPG endonuclease is involved in (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpin removal, two XPG-deficient cell lines (GM16024 and AG08802) were examined for their ability to process (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins in vitro. We demonstrated that the GM16024 cell line processes all hairpin substrates as efficiently as HeLa cells, and that the AG08802 cell line is partially defective in HPR. Analysis of repair intermediates revealed that nuclear extracts from both XPG-deficient lines remove CAG/CTG hairpins via incisions, but the incision products are distinct from those generated in HeLa extracts. We also show that purified recombinant XPG protein greatly stimulates HPR in XPG-deficient extracts by promoting an incision 5' to the hairpin. Our results strongly suggest that 1) human cells possess multiple pathways to remove (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins located in newly synthesized (or nicked) DNA strand; and 2) XPG, although not essential for (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpin removal, stimulates HPR by facilitating a 5' incision to the hairpin. This study reveals a novel role for XPG in genome-maintenance and implicates XPG in diseases caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion.

  10. Length polymorphism and head shape association among genes with polyglutamine repeats in the stalk-eyed fly, Teleopsis dalmanni

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    Pitts Marie L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms of single amino acid repeats (SARPs are a potential source of genetic variation for rapidly evolving morphological traits. Here, we characterize variation in and test for an association between SARPs and head shape, a trait under strong sexual selection, in the stalk-eyed fly, Teleopsis dalmanni. Using an annotated expressed sequence tag database developed from eye-antennal imaginal disc tissues in T. dalmanni we identified 98 genes containing nine or more consecutive copies of a single amino acid. We then quantify variation in length and allelic diversity for 32 codon and 15 noncodon repeat regions in a large outbred population. We also assessed the frequency with which amino acid repeats are either gained or lost by identifying sequence similarities between T. dalmanni SARP loci and their orthologs in Drosophila melanogaster. Finally, to identify SARP containing genes that may influence head development we conducted a two-generation association study after assortatively mating for extreme relative eyespan. Results We found that glutamine repeats occur more often than expected by amino acid abundance among 3,400 head development genes in T. dalmanni and D. melanogaster. Furthermore, glutamine repeats occur disproportionately in transcription factors. Loci with glutamine repeats exhibit heterozygosities and allelic diversities that do not differ from noncoding dinucleotide microsatellites, including greater variation among X-linked than autosomal regions. In the majority of cases, repeat tracts did not overlap between T. dalmanni and D. melanogaster indicating that large glutamine repeats are gained or lost frequently during Dipteran evolution. Analysis of covariance reveals a significant effect of parental genotype on mean progeny eyespan, with body length as a covariate, at six SARP loci [CG33692, ptip, band4.1 inhibitor LRP interactor, corto, 3531953:1, and ecdysone-induced protein 75B (Eip75B]. Mixed model

  11. Allelic polymorphisms in the repeat and promoter regions of the interleukin-4 gene and malaria severity in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyan, B A; Goka, B; Cvetkovic, J T

    2004-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E has been associated with severe malaria suggesting a regulatory role for interleukin (IL)-4 and/or IgE in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. We have investigated possible associations between polymorphisms in the IL-4 repeat region (intron 3) and promoter regions (IL-4 +33CT...... groups. Carriers of IL-4 +33T/-590T with cerebral malaria had elevated total IgE compared to non-carriers (P = 0.03). Our data suggest that IL-4 and/or IgE play a regulatory role in the pathogenesis of severe or complicated malaria....

  12. Evolution of cagA oncogene of Helicobacter pylori through recombination.

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    Yoshikazu Furuta

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half the human population and causes gastritis, ulcers, and cancer. The cagA gene product is a major virulence factor associated with gastric cancer. It is injected into epithelial cells, undergoes phosphorylation by host cell kinases, and perturbs host signaling pathways. CagA is known for its geographical, structural, and functional diversity in the C-terminal half, where an EPIYA host-interacting motif is repeated. The Western version of CagA carries the EPIYA segment types A, B, and C, while the East Asian CagA carries types A, B, and D and shows higher virulence. Many structural variants such as duplications and deletions are reported. In this study, we gained insight into the relationships of CagA variants through various modes of recombination, by analyzing all known cagA variants at the DNA sequence level with the single nucleotide resolution. Processes that occurred were: (i homologous recombination between DNA sequences for CagA multimerization (CM sequence; (ii recombination between DNA sequences for the EPIYA motif; and (iii recombination between short similar DNA sequences. The left half of the EPIYA-D segment characteristic of East Asian CagA was derived from Western type EPIYA, with Amerind type EPIYA as the intermediate, through rearrangements of specific sequences within the gene. Adaptive amino acid changes were detected in the variable region as well as in the conserved region at sites to which no specific function has yet been assigned. Each showed a unique evolutionary distribution. These results clarify recombination-mediated routes of cagA evolution and provide a solid basis for a deeper understanding of its function in pathogenesis.

  13. Detection of short tandem repeat polymorphisms from human nails using direct polymerase chain reaction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Jian; Uchigasaki, Seisaku

    2014-11-01

    Human nail is an important forensic material for parental testing and individual identification in large-scale disasters. Detection of STR polymorphism from hard tissues generally requires DNA purification, which is technically complicated and time consuming. In the present study, we attempted to detect STR polymorphisms from untreated human nail samples by direct PCR amplification method using the primer mixture supplied with the GenePrint® SilverSTR® III System or the AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® PCR Amplification Kit, and Tks Gflex DNA polymerase known to be effective for amplification from crude samples. A nail fragment measuring approximately 1.5 mm in breadth and 0.5 mm in length was placed directly into a PCR tube, and various PCR conditions were tested. The PCR products were analyzed by denaturing acrylamide gel electrophoresis or CE. Multiple STR polymorphisms were detected successfully. This method that detects STR polymorphisms not only from fresh human fingernails, but also from old nail fragments stored at room temperature for up to 10 years is expected to become a novel DNA analytical method in forensic medicine and genetic studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Polymorphism of Repeated Regions of Pertactin in Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursaux-Eude, Caroline; Guiso, Nicole

    2000-01-01

    Pertactin is an outer membrane protein expressed by Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica that induces protective immunity to Bordetella infections. The immunodominant and immunoprotective epitopes of pertactin include two repeated regions, I and II. Comparison of these two repeated regions showed that B. parapertussis pertactin is invariant, whereas B. pertussis pertactin varies mostly in region I and B. bronchiseptica pertactin varies in both repeated regions I and II, but mostly in region II. These differences may result from specific characteristics of these Bordetella species. PMID:10899896

  15. Empirical Comparison of Simple Sequence Repeats and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Assessment of Maize Diversity and Relatedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Martha T.; Warburton, Marilyn L.; Buckler, Edward S.

    2007-01-01

    While Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) are extremely useful genetic markers, recent advances in technology have produced a shift toward use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The different mutational properties of these two classes of markers result in differences in heterozygosities and allele frequencies that may have implications for their use in assessing relatedness and evaluation of genetic diversity. We compared analyses based on 89 SSRs (primarily dinucleotide repeats) to analyses based on 847 SNPs in individuals from the same 259 inbred maize lines, which had been chosen to represent the diversity available among current and historic lines used in breeding. The SSRs performed better at clustering germplasm into populations than did a set of 847 SNPs or 554 SNP haplotypes, and SSRs provided more resolution in measuring genetic distance based on allele-sharing. Except for closely related pairs of individuals, measures of distance based on SSRs were only weakly correlated with measures of distance based on SNPs. Our results suggest that 1) large numbers of SNP loci will be required to replace highly polymorphic SSRs in studies of diversity and relatedness and 2) relatedness among highly-diverged maize lines is difficult to measure accurately regardless of the marker system. PMID:18159250

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene intron 4, 27 bp repeat polymorphism and essential hypertension in the Kazakh Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fengmei; Hu, Qinghua; Tang, Bin; He, Fang; Guo, Shuxia; Chen, Jiang; Li, Feng; Wu, Xuehua; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Huimin; Zhao, Juan; Zhong, Hua; He, Ling; Li, Jun; Zhang, Le; Wang, Shuren

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between 27 bp repeat polymorphism in intron 4 in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS4) gene and essential hypertension in the Kazakh Chinese population, 151 patients with essential hypertension and 138 healthy people were selected from the Boertonggu countryside of Shawan region in the Xinjiang uygur autonomous region of China in 2006. The polymorphism of eNOS in the two groups was detected with polymerase chain reaction assays and the genotype frequencies in each group were calculated following the Hardy-Weinberg law. Four and five tandem 27 bp repeats were designated as "a" and "b", respectively. It was found that the frequencies of b/b, b/a and a/a genotypes of the eNOS4 gene were 84.06%, 15.22% and 0.72% in the control group, and 81.46%, 15.89% and 2.65% in the hypertension group, respectively. The frequencies of gene "a" and "b" were 91.67% and 8.33% in the control group and 89.40% and 10.60% in the hypertension group, respectively. It was found that plasma eNOS activity was not associated with genotypes and alleles of eNOS gene. Plasma eNOS activity in the hypertension group was significantly decreased compared with the control group (P<0.01). The results suggest that eNOS4 gene polymorphisms are unlikely to be the major genetic susceptibility factors for essential hypertension in the Xinjiang Kazakh population. However, a positive association between plasma eNOS activity and essential hypertension has been revealed.

  17. Role of homozygous DC-SIGNR 5/5 tandem repeat polymorphism in HIV-1 exposed seronegative North Indian individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag; Chatterjee, Animesh; Sivarama, P; Yamamoto, Naohiko; Dhole, Tapan N

    2008-01-01

    Despite multiple sexual exposures to HIV-1 virus, some individuals remain HIV-1 seronegative. Although several genetic factors have been related to HIV-1 resistance, the homozygosity for a mutation in CCR5 gene (the 32-bp deletion, i.e., CCR5-Delta32 allele) is presently considered the most relevant one. The C-type lectins, DC-SIGN (present on dendritic cells and macrophages) and DC-SIGNR (present on endothelial cells in liver and lymph nodes) efficiently bind and transmit HIV-1 to susceptible cell in trans, thereby augmenting the infection. A potential association of the DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR neck domain repeat polymorphism and risk of HIV-1 infection is currently under debate. To determine the influence of host genetic factors on HIV-1 resistance, we conducted genetic risk association study in HIV-1-exposed seronegative (n = 47) individuals, HIV-1 seronegative (n = 262) healthy control, and HIV-1-infected seropositive patients (n = 168) for polymorphism in neck domain of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR genes. The DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR genotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction method in DNA extracted from peripheral blood and confirmed by sequencing. Fisher exact or chi (2) test was used for static analysis. DC-SIGN genotype and allele distribution was fairly similar in HIV-1-exposed seronegative, HIV-1 seropositive, and HIV-1 seronegative control. There was no statistical significance in the differences in the distribution of DC-SIGN genotypes. A total of 13 genotypes were found in DC-SIGNR neck repeat region polymorphism. Among all the genotypes, only 5/5 homozygous showed significant reduced risk of HIV-1 infection in HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals (p = 0.009). A unique genotype 8/5 heterozygous was also found in HIV-1 seropositive individual, which is not reported elsewhere.

  18. Intergenic Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Polymorphism Upstream of rocA Alters Toxin Production and Enhances Virulence in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J; Horstmann, Nicola; Shelburne, Samuel A; Fan, Jia; Hu, Ye; Musser, James M

    2016-07-01

    Variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms are ubiquitous in bacteria. However, only a small fraction of them has been functionally studied. Here, we report an intergenic VNTR polymorphism that confers an altered level of toxin production and increased virulence in Streptococcus pyogenes The nature of the polymorphism is a one-unit deletion in a three-tandem-repeat locus upstream of the rocA gene encoding a sensor kinase. S. pyogenes strains with this type of polymorphism cause human infection and produce significantly larger amounts of the secreted cytotoxins S. pyogenes NADase (SPN) and streptolysin O (SLO). Using isogenic mutant strains, we demonstrate that deleting one or more units of the tandem repeats abolished RocA production, reduced CovR phosphorylation, derepressed multiple CovR-regulated virulence factors (such as SPN and SLO), and increased virulence in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. The phenotypic effect of the VNTR polymorphism was nearly the same as that of inactivating the rocA gene. In summary, we identified and characterized an intergenic VNTR polymorphism in S. pyogenes that affects toxin production and virulence. These new findings enhance understanding of rocA biology and the function of VNTR polymorphisms in S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins in human cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Caixia; Chan, Nelson L S; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2009-08-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats is associated with certain familial neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that formation of a stable DNA hairpin within CAG/CTG repeats during DNA metabolism contributes to their expansion. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which cells remove CAG/CTG hairpins remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that human cell extracts can catalyze error-free repair of CAG/CTG hairpins in a nick-directed manner. The repair system specifically targets CAG/CTG tracts for incisions in the nicked DNA strand, followed by DNA resynthesis using the continuous strand as a template, thereby ensuring CAG/CTG stability. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is required for the incision step of the hairpin removal, which uses distinct endonuclease activities for individual CAG/CTG hairpins depending on their strand locations and/or secondary structures. We discuss the implications of these data for understanding the etiology of neurological diseases and trinucleotide repeat instability.

  20. CagI is an essential component of the Helicobacter pylori Cag type IV secretion system and forms a complex with CagL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieu Thuy Pham

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of type B gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma, uses the Cag type IV secretion system to induce a strong proinflammatory response in the gastric mucosa and to inject its effector protein CagA into gastric cells. CagA translocation results in altered host cell gene expression profiles and cytoskeletal rearrangements, and it is considered as a major bacterial virulence trait. Recently, it has been shown that binding of the type IV secretion apparatus to integrin receptors on target cells is a crucial step in the translocation process. Several bacterial proteins, including the Cag-specific components CagL and CagI, have been involved in this interaction. Here, we have examined the localization and interactions of CagI in the bacterial cell. Since the cagI gene overlaps and is co-transcribed with the cagL gene, the role of CagI for type IV secretion system function has been difficult to assess, and conflicting results have been reported regarding its involvement in the proinflammatory response. Using a marker-free gene deletion approach and genetic complementation, we show now that CagI is an essential component of the Cag type IV secretion apparatus for both CagA translocation and interleukin-8 induction. CagI is distributed over soluble and membrane-associated pools and seems to be partly surface-exposed. Deletion of several genes encoding essential Cag components has an impact on protein levels of CagI and CagL, suggesting that both proteins require partial assembly of the secretion apparatus. Finally, we show by co-immunoprecipitation that CagI and CagL interact with each other. Taken together, our results indicate that CagI and CagL form a functional complex which is formed at a late stage of secretion apparatus assembly.

  1. Analysis of the AHR gene proximal promoter GGGGC-repeat polymorphism in lung, breast, and colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spink, Barbara C. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Bloom, Michael S. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Wu, Susan [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Sell, Stewart; Schneider, Erasmus [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Ding, Xinxin [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Spink, David C., E-mail: spink@wadsworth.org [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates expression of numerous genes, including those of the CYP1 gene family. With the goal of determining factors that control AHR gene expression, our studies are focused on the role of the short tandem repeat polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, located in the proximal promoter of the human AHR gene. When luciferase constructs containing varying GGGGC repeats were transfected into cancer cell lines derived from the lung, colon, and breast, the number of GGGGC repeats affected AHR promoter activity. The number of GGGGC repeats was determined in DNA from 327 humans and from 38 samples representing 5 species of non-human primates. In chimpanzees and 3 species of macaques, only (GGGGC){sub 2} alleles were observed; however, in western gorilla, (GGGGC){sub n} alleles with n = 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 were identified. In all human populations examined, the frequency of (GGGGC){sub n} was n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6. When frequencies of the (GGGGC){sub n} alleles in DNA from patients with lung, colon, or breast cancer were evaluated, the occurrence of (GGGGC){sub 2} was found to be 8-fold more frequent among lung cancer patients in comparison with its incidence in the general population, as represented by New York State neonates. Analysis of matched tumor and non-tumor DNA samples from the same individuals provided no evidence of microsatellite instability. These studies indicate that the (GGGGC){sub n} short tandem repeats are inherited, and that the (GGGGC){sub 2} allele in the AHR proximal promoter region should be further investigated with regard to its potential association with lung cancer susceptibility. - Highlights: • The AHR proximal promoter contains a polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, where n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6 • Matched tumor and non-tumor DNA did not show (GGGGC){sub n} microsatellite instability • AHR promoter activity of a construct with (GGGGC){sub 2} was lower than that of (GGGGC){sub 4} • The frequency of (GGGGC){sub 2} in lung

  2. A polymorphic GGC repeat in the NPAS2 gene and its association with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoni, Alessandra; Markova-Car, Elitza; Dević-Pavlić, Sanja; Jurišić, Davor; Puppin, Cinzia; Mio, Catia; De Luca, Marila; Petruz, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Pavelić, Sandra Kraljević

    2017-09-01

    Circadian clock regulation in mammals is controlled by feedback loops of a set of circadian genes. One of these circadian genes, NPAS2, encodes for a member of the bHLH-PAS class of transcription factors and is expressed in the forebrain and in some peripheral organs such as liver and skin. Other biological processes are also regulated by circadian genes. For example, NPAS2 is involved in cell proliferation, DNA damage repair and malignant transformation. Aberrant expression of clock genes has been previously observed in melanoma which led to our effort to sequence the NPAS2 promoter region in this cancer type. The NPAS2 putative promoter and 5' untranslated region of ninety-three melanoma patients and ninety-six control subjects were sequenced and several variants were identified. Among these is a novel microsatellite comprising a GGC repeat with different alleles ranging from 7 to 13 repeats located in the 5' untranslated exon. Homozygosity of an allele with nine repeats (9/9) was more prevalent in melanoma than in control subjects (22.6% and 13.5%, respectively, P: 0.0206) suggesting that some NPAS2 variants might contribute to melanoma susceptibility. Impact statement This report describes a variable microsatellite repeat sequence located in the 5' untranslated exon of NSPAS2, a gene encoding a clock transcription factor. Significantly, this study is the first to show that a variant copy number GGC repeat sequence in the NPAS2 clock gene associates with melanoma risk and which may be useful in the assessment of melanoma predisposition.

  3. MSX1 intronic CA repeat polymorphism is associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with/without palate in a Turkish family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkut Ulucan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Several genes play role in the etiology of non-syndromic cleft lip with/without palate (NS-CL/P. One of the candidate genes is a member of homeobox gene family, muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1. To date several different variations were reported in MSX1, some of these variations associated the anomaly with intronic CA repeat allele. The aim of the present study was to examine the related variations within MSX1 and intronic CA repeat alleles in a Turkish family. Family consists of 3 affected girls and 2 unaffected boys. Their mother was also affected and father was not affected. MSX1 exons, exon-intron boundaries and intronic CA repeat polymorphism was examined in all of the family members. We detected no mutation in exons and their boundaries to intron. For the CA repeat polymorphism, all the affected members had 169/ 175 bp CA repeat alleles and the unaffected members had 175/ 175 bp repeat alleles. These findings suggested the possible role of 169- bp repeat allele polymorphism in the studied Turkish family. The exact mechanism of the allele in the etiology of the anomaly is still being investigated. [Dis Mol Med 2013; 1(3.000: 68-71

  4. Large-scale studies of the HphI insulin gene variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism in relation to Type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S K; Gjesing, A P; Rasmussen, S K

    2004-01-01

    The class III allele of the variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism located 5' of the insulin gene (INS-VNTR) has been associated with Type 2 diabetes and altered birthweight. It has also been suggested, although inconsistently, that the class III allele plays a role in glucose-induced ins......The class III allele of the variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism located 5' of the insulin gene (INS-VNTR) has been associated with Type 2 diabetes and altered birthweight. It has also been suggested, although inconsistently, that the class III allele plays a role in glucose...

  5. Molecular Analysis of Date Palm Genetic Diversity Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sharabasy, Sherif F; Soliman, Khaled A

    2017-01-01

    The date palm is an ancient domesticated plant with great diversity and has been cultivated in the Middle East and North Africa for at last 5000 years. Date palm cultivars are classified based on the fruit moisture content, as dry, semidry, and soft dates. There are a number of biochemical and molecular techniques available for characterization of the date palm variation. This chapter focuses on the DNA-based markers random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) techniques, in addition to biochemical markers based on isozyme analysis. These techniques coupled with appropriate statistical tools proved useful for determining phylogenetic relationships among date palm cultivars and provide information resources for date palm gene banks.

  6. Simple tandem repeat (TTTAn polymorphism in CYP19 (aromatase gene and breast cancer risk in Nigerian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in women worldwide. The incidence of the disease is increasing globally and this increase is occurring at a faster rate in population groups that hirtherto enjoyed low incidence. This study was designed to evaluate the role of a simple tandem repeat polymorphism (STRP in the aromatase (CYP19 gene in breast cancer susceptibility in Nigerian women, a population of indigenous sub-Saharan African ancestry. Methods A case-control study recruiting 250 women with breast cancer and 250 women without the disease from four University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria was carried out between September 2002 and April 2004. Participants were recruited from the surgical outpatient clinics and surgical wards of the Nigerian institutions. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based assay was employed for genotyping and product sizes were detected with an ABI 3730 DNA Analyzer. Results Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that harboring the putative high risk genotypes conferred a 29% increased risk of breast cancer when all women in the study were considered (Odds ratio [OR] = 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–2.00, although this association was not statistically significant. Subgroup analysis based on menopausal status showed similar results among premenopausal women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 0.76–2.41 and postmenopausal women (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 0.64–2.49. The data also demonstrated marked differences in the distribution of (TTTAn repeats in Nigerian women compared with other populations. Conclusion This study has shown that harboring 10 or more repeats of the microsatellite (TTTAn repeats of the CYY19 gene is associated with a modest increased risk of breast cancer in Nigerian women.

  7. Tissue identity testing of cancer by short tandem repeat polymorphism: pitfalls of interpretation in the presence of microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much, Melissa; Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei

    2014-03-01

    Tissue identity testing by short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism offers discriminating power in resolving tissue mix-up or contamination. However, one caveat is the presence of microsatellite unstable tumors, in which genetic alterations may drastically change the STR wild-type polymorphism leading to unexpected allelic discordance. We examined how tissue identity testing results can be altered by the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI). Eleven cases of MSI-unstable (9 intestinal and 2 endometrial adenocarcinomas) and 10 cases of MSI-stable tumors (all colorectal adenocarcinomas) were included. All had been previously tested by polymerase chain reaction testing at 5 National Cancer Institute (NCI) recommended MSI loci and/or immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2). Tissue identity testing targeting 15 STR loci was performed using AmpF/STR Identifiler Amplification. Ten of 11 MSI-unstable tumors demonstrated novel alleles at 5 to 12 STR loci per case and frequently with 3 or more allelic peaks. However, all affected loci showed identifiable germline allele(s) in MSI-high tumors. A wild-type allelic profile was seen in 7 of 10 MSI-stable tumors. In the remaining 3 cases, isolated novel alleles were present at a unique single locus in addition to germline alleles. Loss of heterozygosity was observed frequently in both MSI-stable (6/11 cases) and MSI-unstable tumors (8/10 cases). In conclusion, MSI may significantly alter the wild-type allelic polymorphism, leading to potential interpretation errors of STR genotyping. Careful examination of the STR allelic pattern, high index of suspicion, and follow-up MSI testing are crucial to avoid erroneous conclusions and subsequent clinical and legal consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 prime higher integrin α5β1 in adverse pH condition to enhance hypochlorhydria vicious cycle for gastric carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Yeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: H. pylori CagL amino acid polymorphisms such as Y58/E59 can increase integrin α5β1 expression and gastric cancer risk. Hypochlorhydria during chronic H. pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis. The study test whether CagL-Y58/E59 isolates may regulate integrin α5β1 to translocate CagA via the type IV secretory system even under adverse pH conditions, and whether the integrin α5β1 expression primed by H. pylori is a pH-dependent process involving hypochlorhydria in a vicious cycle to promote gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS: The expressions of integrin α5 and β1, CagA phosphorylation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation of AGS cells exposed to CagL-Y58/E59 H. pylori, isogenic mutants, and different H. pylori CagL amino acid replacement mutants under different pH values were determined. Differences in the pepsinogen I/II ratio (indirectly indicating gastric acidity and gastric integrin α5β1 expression were compared among the 172 H. pylori-infected patients with different cancer risks. RESULTS: Even under adversely low pH condition, H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 still keep active integrin β1 with stronger binding affinity, CagA translocation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation than the other mutants (p<0.05. The in vitro assay revealed higher priming of integrin α5β1 by H. pylori under elevated pH as hypochlorhydria (p<0.05. In the H. pylori-infected patients, the gastric integrin α5β1 expressions were higher in those with pepsinogen I/II ratio <6 than in those without (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 prime higher integrin under adverse pH and may involve to enhance hypochlorhydria vicious cycle for gastric carcinogenesis, and thus require an early eradication.

  9. COMT Val158Met Polymorphism Modulates Huntington's Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeix, Isabelle; Dupoux, Emmanuel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Charles, Perrine; Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Youssov, Katia; Verny, Christophe; Damotte, Vincent; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Goizet, Cyril; Simonin, Clémence; Tranchant, Christine; Maison, Patrick; Rialland, Amandine; Schmitz, David; Jacquemot, Charlotte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic factors modulating the progression of Huntington’s disease (HD). Dopamine levels are affected in HD and modulate executive functions, the main cognitive disorder of HD. We investigated whether the Val158Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, which influences dopamine (DA) degradation, affects clinical progression in HD. We carried out a prospective longitudinal multicenter study from 1994 to 2011, on 438 HD gene carriers at different stages of the disease (34 pre-manifest; 172 stage 1; 130 stage 2; 80 stage 3; 17 stage 4; and 5 stage 5), according to Total Functional Capacity (TFC) score. We used the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale to evaluate motor, cognitive, behavioral and functional decline. We genotyped participants for COMT polymorphism (107 Met-homozygous, 114 Val-homozygous and 217 heterozygous). 367 controls of similar ancestry were also genotyped. We compared clinical progression, on each domain, between groups of COMT polymorphisms, using latent-class mixed models accounting for disease duration and number of CAG (cytosine adenine guanine) repeats. We show that HD gene carriers with fewer CAG repeats and with the Val allele in COMT polymorphism displayed slower cognitive decline. The rate of cognitive decline was greater for Met/Met homozygotes, which displayed a better maintenance of cognitive capacity in earlier stages of the disease, but had a worse performance than Val allele carriers later on. COMT polymorphism did not significantly impact functional and behavioral performance. Since COMT polymorphism influences progression in HD, it could be used for stratification in future clinical trials. Moreover, DA treatments based on the specific COMT polymorphism and adapted according to disease duration could potentially slow HD progression. PMID:27657697

  10. Association of CTG repeat polymorphism in carnosine dipeptidase 1 (CNDP1) gene with diabetic nephropathy in north Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ashok K; Sinha, Nisha; Kumar, Vinod; Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Jha, Vivekanand

    2016-07-01

    CNDP1 gene, present on chromosome 18q22.3-23, encodes carnosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in hydrolysis of carnosine to ß-alanine and L-histidine. Linkage of CTG trinucleotide (leucine) repeat polymorphism in CNDP1 gene with diabetic nephropathy has been observed in several populations. However, this association is conflicting and population-dependent. We investigated this association in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with and without nephropathy in north India. A total of 564 individuals [199 T2DM without nephropathy (DM), 185 T2DM with nephropathy (DN) and 180 healthy individuals (HC)] were enrolled. CNDP1 CTG repeat analysis was done by direct sequencing of a 377 base pair fragment in exon 2. The most frequent leucine (L) repeats were 5L-5L, 6L-5L and 6L-6L. 5L-5L genotype frequency was reduced in DN (24.3%) as compared to DM (34.7%, P=0.035) and HC (38.4%, P=0.005). Similarly, 5L allele frequency was lower in DN (46.8%) as compared to DM (57.3%, P=0.004) and HC (60.5%, P<0.001). The genotype and allelic frequencies were similar in DM and HC groups. No gender specific difference was observed in the genotype or allelic frequencies between groups. Compared to healthy individuals and those with diabetes but no kidney disease, patients with diabetic nephropathy exhibited lower frequencies of 5L-5L genotype and 5L allele of CNDP1 gene, suggesting that this allele might confer protection against development of kidney disease in this population.

  11. Allelic polymorphic investigation of 21 autosomal short tandem repeat loci in a Chinese Bai ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun-mei; Wang, Hong-dan; Liu, Wen-juan; Fan, Shuan-liang; Yang, Guang; Qin, Hai-Xia; Xie, Tong; Li, Shao-bo; Yan, Jiang-wei; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-03-01

    Population genetic data of 21 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) were obtained in a sample of 106 unrelated healthy individuals of Bai ethnic minority born in the Dali Bai Autonomous Prefecture in Yunnan Province. We observed 138 alleles with corresponding allelic frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 0.575. The genotypic frequency distributions at those STR loci were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (Bonferroni's correction was used for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium tests). The combined probability of exclusion, power of discrimination, probability of matching value for all 21 STR loci were 0.9999975729, 0.999999999999999999872 and 1.28×10(-19), respectively. The population data in this study showed significant differences from the previously published population data of Tibetan and Salar groups in some loci. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  13. Huntingtin gene repeat size variations affect risk of lifetime depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardiner, Sarah L.; van Belzen, Martine J.; Boogaard, Merel W.

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder caused by a cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeat expansion in the HTT gene. Although HD is frequently complicated by depression, it is still unknown to what extent common HTT CAG repeat size variations in the normal range could affect...... as hitherto unappreciated but complex genetic modifiers of depression.......Huntington disease (HD) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder caused by a cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeat expansion in the HTT gene. Although HD is frequently complicated by depression, it is still unknown to what extent common HTT CAG repeat size variations in the normal range could affect...... depression risk in the general population. Using binary logistic regression, we assessed the association between HTT CAG repeat size and depression risk in two well-characterized Dutch cohorts─the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety and the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons...

  14. Comprehensive mutation analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms included in the AmpF lSTR® Yfiler® PCR amplification kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Goedbloed (Miriam); M. Vermeulen (Mark); R.N. Fang (Rixun); M. Lembring (Maria); A. Wollstein (Andreas); K. Ballantyne (Kaye); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); S. Brauer (Silke); C. Krüger (Carmen); L. Roewer (Lutz); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); R. Ploski (Rafal); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); J. Henke (Jürgen); M.R. Furtado (Manohar); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) polymorphisms included in the AmpF lSTR® Yfiler® polymerase chain reaction amplification kit have become widely used for forensic and evolutionary applications where a reliable knowledge on mutation properties is necessary for correct data

  15. Improving global and regional resolution of male lineage differentiation by simple single-copy Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Vermeulen (Mark); A. Wollstein (Andreas); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); Y. Xue (Yali); Q. Wang (Qiuju); L. Roewer (Lutz); H. Knoblauch (Hans); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe analyzed 67 short tandem repeat polymorphisms from the non-recombining part of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs), including 49 rarely studied simple single-copy (ss)Y-STRs and 18 widely used Y-STRs, in 590 males from 51 populations belonging to 8 worldwide regions (HGDP-CEPH panel). Although

  16. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, M.N.; Kremer, K.; Lan, N.T.; Buu, T.N.; Cobelens, F.G.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Haas, P. de; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard

  17. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, Mai N. T.; Kremer, Kristin; Lan, Nguyen T. N.; Buu, Tran N.; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; Tiemersma, Edine W.; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard in typing of

  18. Determining Phylogenetic Relationships Among Date Palm Cultivars Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships among date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars is useful for their conservation and genetic improvement. Various molecular markers such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), simple sequence repeat (SSR), representational difference analysis (RDA), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) have been developed to molecularly characterize date palm cultivars. PCR-based markers random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) are powerful tools to determine the relatedness of date palm cultivars that are difficult to distinguish morphologically. In this chapter, the principles, materials, and methods of RAPD and ISSR techniques are presented. Analysis of data generated from these two techniques and the use of these data to reveal phylogenetic relationships among date palm cultivars are also discussed.

  19. Prion octapeptide-repeat polymorphism in Polish Black-and-White cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walawski, Krzysztof; Czarnik, Urszula

    2003-01-01

    The study was carried out in a Polish Black-and-White cattle population, represented by 167 AI sires, 200 young tested bulls, 190 bull-dams, and 606 randomly chosen cows from commercial herds. The fragment of the bovine prion protein gene (PRNP) coding the octapeptide-repeat sequence, was identified by PCR analysis. Two different gene variants of 349 bp and 373 bp in size, produced three genotypes: PRNP 6/6, PRNP 6/5 and PRNP 5/5, respectively. Allele frequency in all examined populations, on average 0.894 for PRNP 6 and 0.106 for PRNP 5, shows a significant difference between the group of cows from commercial herds, characterised by high frequency of PRNP 5 (q = 0.137) in comparison to AI sires (q = 0.077), young tested bulls (q = 0.052) and bull-dams (q = 0.084). Moreover, both analysed female groups of bull-dams and cows from commercial herds are distinguished by the presence of PRNP 5/5 homozygous animals, which were not recorded in the AI sires and young tested bulls, and had never been recognised in earlier examined Holstein-Friesian populations. Analysis of the genetic equilibrium indicates a very high conformity between observed and expected number of animals in the separate PRNP genotype groups. However, some tendency of difference is observed in highly selected cows, qualified as bull-dams on the basis of very high level of milk performance traits.

  20. Polymorphic variation in the androgen receptor gene: association with risk of testicular germ cell cancer and metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Västermark, Åke; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg; Hagströmer, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    ) gene polymorphisms in relation to the risk, histological type and progression of TGCC was undertaken. In 367 TGCC cases and 214 controls, AR CAG and GGN repeat lengths were determined and 11 haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. By binary logistic regression, odds...... ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for the risk of TGCC, non-seminoma versus seminoma and metastatic versus localised (stage I) disease. For the non-coding SNP, rs12014709, the minor genotype (G) was found in 10% of the cases and in 5.1% of the controls, conferring...

  1. Frequency of FMR1 gene mutation and CGG repeat polymorphism in intellectually disabled children in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Tasneem; Zaidi, Syed Aley Hasan; Sarfraz, Noorjehan; Perween, Siddiqa; Khurshid, Faraz; Imtiaz, Fauzia

    2014-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is considered the most common heritable form of X-linked intellectual disability (ID). The syndrome is caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (Xq27.3) due to hypermethylation. This mutation results in absence or deficit of its protein product, the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) that affects synaptic plasticity in neurons, hence leads to brain dysfunction. The syndrome is widely distributed throughout the world. This study reported for the first time the frequency of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene mutations in intellectually disabled children in Pakistan. We recruited 333 intellectually disabled children and 250 normal children with age ranging from 5 to 18 years for this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and full mutations were identified by methylation sensitive PCR using primers corresponding to modified methylated and unmethylated DNA. Southern blot was used for confirmation of the results. The frequency of fragile X syndrome with full mutation was found as 4.8%. It was 6.5% in males as opposed to 0.9% in females; 29 CGG repeats were found as the most common allele; 31.5% in the intellectually disabled and 34% in control subjects. In Pakistan intellectual disability is considered as a social stigma for the individuals and their families. Due to lack of knowledge and cultural background people make such patients and families isolated. This study will increase public awareness about the intellectual disability and importance of prenatal screening and genetic counseling for vulnerable families. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Biochemical Analysis of CagE: A VirB4 Homologue of Helicobacter pylori Cag-T4SS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shariq

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori are among the most successful human pathogens that harbour a distinct genomic segment called cag Pathogenicity Island (cag-PAI. This genomic segment codes for a type IV secretion system (Cag-T4SS related to the prototypical VirB/D4 system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Ag, a plant pathogen. Some of the components of Cag-T4SS share homology to that of VirB proteins including putative energy providing CagE (HP0544, the largest VirB4 homologue. In Ag, VirB4 is required for the assembly of the system, substrate translocation and pilus formation, however, very little is known about CagE. Here we have characterised the protein biochemically, genetically, and microscopically and report that CagE is an inner membrane associated active NTPase and has multiple interacting partners including the inner membrane proteins CagV and Cagβ. Through CagV it is connected to the outer membrane sub-complex proteins. Stability of CagE is not dependent on several of the cag-PAI proteins tested. However, localisation and stability of the pilus associated CagI, CagL and surface associated CagH are affected in its absence. Stability of the inner membrane associated energetic component Cagβ, a VirD4 homologue seems to be partially affected in its absence. Additionally, CagA failed to cross the membrane barriers in its absence and no IL-8 induction is observed under infection condition. These results thus suggest the importance of CagE in Cag-T4SS functions. In future it may help in deciphering the mechanism of substrate translocation by the system.

  3. Association of ECRG2 TCA short tandem repeat polymorphism with the risk of oesophageal cancer in a North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Meenu; Kumar, Shaleen; Ghoshal, Uday C; Mittal, Balraj

    2008-06-01

    Oesophageal cancer-related gene (ECRG2) is a tumour suppressor gene and it has been suggested that a triplet TCA short tandem repeat (STR) in the noncoding region of exon 4 plays a role in genetic susceptibility to oesophageal cancer. In the present study, ECRG2 STR polymorphism was studied in 134 patients with oesophageal cancer and 194 controls, using PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results showed a higher frequency of the ECRG2 TCA (3)/TCA (4) genotype in cancer patients than in controls (odds ratio 2.6, 95% CI 1.0-6.4, p = 0.03). The association of the ECRG2 TCA (3)/TCA (4) genotype with clinical characteristics showed an increased risk for squamous cell histology (2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.1, p = 0.03), while no association with tumor location or lymph node involvement was observed. Interaction of tobacco, alcohol and occupational exposure with the ECRG2 genotypes did not show modulation of risk. In conclusion, the ECRG2 TCA (3)/TCA (4) genotype is associated with the risk of oesophageal carcinoma in a North Indian population.

  4. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease

    KAUST Repository

    Shimada, Makoto K.

    2016-06-11

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in β-tubulin selected in Onchocerca volvulus following repeated ivermectin treatment: possible indication of resistance selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nana-Djeunga, Hugues; Bourguinat, Catherine; Pion, Sébastien D S; Kamgno, Joseph; Gardon, Jacques; Njiokou, Flobert; Boussinesq, Michel; Prichard, Roger K

    2012-09-01

    The control of onchocerciasis or river blindness by mass treatment of the population with ivermectin (IVM) has been a great success until now, so that in certain foci its elimination has become feasible. However, after more than 20 years of repeated IVM mass treatment, the disease still persists in many endemic countries. Sub-optimal responses and genetic changes have been reported in Onchocerca volvulus populations under high IVM pressure but more work is needed to determine whether resistance is developing. The situation needs to be urgently clarified to preserve the achievements of onchocerciasis control programs. In this study, O. volvulus adult worms were collected from the same individuals, before IVM exposure and following three years of annual or three-monthly treatments at 150 μg/kg or 800 μg/kg. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring in the β-tubulin gene of these parasites were investigated. We found changes in genotype frequencies in O. volvulus β-tubulin gene associated with IVM treatments. The SNP at position 1545 (A/G) showed a significant increase in frequency of the less common nucleotide in the female worms following treatment. After 13 three-monthly treatments, female worm homozygotes with the less common genotype, prior to treatment, increased in frequency. The selected homozygotes, as well as heterozygotes, appeared to be less fertile (without or with very few embryonic stages in their uteri) than the wild-type homozygotes. These results provide additional evidence for genetic selection and strengthen the warning that selection for IVM resistance may be occurring in some O. volvulus populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty

    2011-01-01

    results from 121 laboratories across 15 countries. We report on 1326 duplicate results; a discrepancy in reporting the upper allele occurred in 51% of cases, this reduced to 13.3% and 9.7% when we applied acceptable measurement errors proposed by the American College of Medical Genetics and the Draft...... range. We strongly recommend that laboratories state an error rate for their measurement on the report, participate in EQA schemes and use reference materials regularly to adjust their own internal standards....... in the discrepancy rate among 10 of the countries participating in this study. Out of 1326 samples, 348 were re-analysed by an accredited diagnostic laboratory, based in Germany, with concordance rates of 93% and 94% for the upper and lower alleles, respectively. This became 100% if the acceptable measurement errors...

  7. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten; Skovby, Flemming; Hjermind, Lena E; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms...

  8. The association of CLOCK gene T3111C polymorphism and hPER3 gene 54-nucleotide repeat polymorphism with Chinese Han people schizophrenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liao, Ga; Liu, Chang; Sun, Lei; Liu, Yanyou; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Wang, Zhengrong

    2011-01-01

    Many reports have shown that the biologic rhythm could be altered due to mutations of circadian gene hClock or hPeriod, and the mutations of circadian genes have some relationship with psychosis according to recent studies. A preliminary study has been conducted to examine wether the T3111C single nucleotide polymorphism of the hClock gene or the length polymorphism of the hPer3 gene is associated with the development of schizophrenia. The samples from schizophrenics (n=148, male: 57.4%, female: 42.6%) and normal controls (n=199, male: 59.3%, female: 40.7%) were examined. Allele frequencies of T3111C SNP of hClock were significantly different between schizophrenics and controls (χ2=19.738, P0.05). Our results suggest that the T3111C (RS1801260) polymorphism of hClock gene is associated with schizophrenia, but it seems that the length polymorphism of 18 exon of hPer3 may not be associated with schizophrenia. It is important to address of the relationship between circadian gene polymorphisms and dopamine functions in further study.

  9. Comparative Study of IS6110 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in the Netherlands, Based on a 5-Year Nationwide Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, J.L. de; Ingen, J. van; Vries, G. de; Erkens, C.; Sebek, M.; Mulder, A.; Sloot, R.; Brandt, A.M. van den; Enaimi, M.; Kremer, K.; Supply, P.; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    In order to switch from IS6110 and polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence (PGRS) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to 24-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in the national tuberculosis control program in The Netherlands, a

  10. In silico polymorphism analysis for the development of simple sequence repeat and transposon markers and construction of linkage map in cultivated peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Kenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea is an autogamous allotetraploid legume (2n = 4x = 40 that is widely cultivated as a food and oil crop. More than 6,000 DNA markers have been developed in Arachis spp., but high-density linkage maps useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding have not been constructed due to extremely low genetic diversity. Polymorphic marker loci are useful for the construction of such high-density linkage maps. The present study used in silico analysis to develop simple sequence repeat-based and transposon-based markers. Results The use of in silico analysis increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development by more than 3-fold. In total, 926 (34.2% of 2,702 markers showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the mapping population. Linkage analysis of the 926 markers along with 253 polymorphic markers selected from 4,449 published markers generated 21 linkage groups covering 2,166.4 cM with 1,114 loci. Based on the map thus produced, 23 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for 15 agronomical traits were detected. Another linkage map with 326 loci was also constructed and revealed a relationship between the genotypes of the FAD2 genes and the ratio of oleic/linoleic acid in peanut seed. Conclusions In silico analysis of polymorphisms increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development, and contributed to the construction of high-density linkage maps in cultivated peanut. The resultant maps were applicable to QTL analysis. Marker subsets and linkage maps developed in this study should be useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding in Arachis. The data are available at the Kazusa DNA Marker Database (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp.

  11. Generation of Hypertension-Associated STK39 Polymorphism Knockin Cell Lines With the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandai, Shintaro; Mori, Takayasu; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-12-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies identified serine threonine kinase 39 (STK39), encoding STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase, as one of a limited number of hypertension susceptibility genes. A recent meta-analysis confirmed the association of STK39 intronic polymorphism rs3754777 with essential hypertension, among previously reported hypertension-associated STK39 polymorphisms. However, the biochemical function of this polymorphism in the mechanism responsible for hypertension is yet to be clarified. We generated rs3754777G>A knockin human cell lines with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-mediated genome engineering. Homozygous (A/A) and heterozygous (G/A) knockin human embryonic kidney cell lines were generated using a double nickase, single-guide RNAs targeting STK39 intron 5 around single-nucleotide polymorphism, and a 100-bp donor single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction with sequencing analyses revealed the identical STK39 transcripts among the wild-type and both knockin cell lines. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed increased STK39 mRNA expression, and immunoblot analysis revealed increases in total and phosphorylated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase with increased phosphorylated Na-K-Cl cotransporter isoform 1 in both knockin cell lines. The largest increases in these molecules were observed in the homozygous cell line. These findings indicated that this intronic polymorphism increases STK39 transcription, leading to activation of the STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase-solute carrier family 12A signaling cascade. Increased interactions between STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and the target cation-chloride cotransporters may be responsible for hypertension susceptibility in individuals with this polymorphism. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Analysis of genetic diversity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from eggplant by mycelial compatibility, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD and simple sequence repeat (SSR analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Tok

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity and pathogenicity/virulence among 60 eggplant Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates collected from six different geographic regions of Turkey were analysed using mycelial compatibility groupings (MCGs, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and simple sequence repeat (SSR polymorphism. By MCG tests, the isolates were classified into 22 groups. Out of 22 MCGs, 36% were represented each by a single isolate. The isolates showed great variability for virulence regardless of MCG and geographic origin. Based on the results of RAPD and SSR analyses, 60 S. sclerotiorum isolates representing 22 MCGs were grouped in 2 and 3 distinct clusters, respectively. Analyses using RAPD and SSR markers illustrated that cluster groupings or genetic distance of S. sclerotiorum populations from eggplant were not distinctly relative to the MCG, geographical origin and virulence diversity. The patterns obtained revealed a high heterogeneity of genetic composition and suggested the occurrence of clonal and sexual reproduction of S. sclerotiorum on eggplant in the areas surveyed.

  13. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity among species of Chrysanthemum and its related genera using inter-simple sequence repeat and sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Zhang, F; Zhao, H; Guan, Z; Chen, S; Jiang, J; Fang, W; Chen, F

    2014-10-20

    In this study, inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) were applied to assess the genetic diversity in 38 species of Chrysanthemum and related genera. A total of 204 and 567 bands were amplified by 24 ISSR and 25 SRAP primers, of which 196 (97%) and 557 (99%) were polymorphic, respectively. The ISSR-based genetic similarity ranged from 0.016 to 0.886 and averaged 0.201, while the SRAP-based genetic similarity varied from 0.010 to 0.811 and averaged 0.122. Both the ISSR and SRAP techniques revealed similar clustering patterns and grouped species of Chrysanthemum and Ajania together. The results of principal coordinate analysis corroborated the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average clustering. Additionally, results from ISSR and SRAP data were significantly correlated (r = 0.89, P chrysanthemum in future distant interspecific breeding.

  14. Helicobacter pylori cagA Promoter Region Sequences Influence CagA Expression and Interleukin 8 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Wen, Xiaogang; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-02-15

    Heterogeneity at the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene promoter region has been linked to variation in CagA expression and gastric histopathology. Here, we characterized the cagA promoter and expression in 46 H. pylori strains from Portugal. Our results confirm the relationship between cagA promoter region variation and protein expression originally observed in strains from Colombia. We observed that individuals with intestinal metaplasia were all infected with H. pylori strains containing a specific cagA motif. Additionally, we provided novel functional evidence that strain-specific sequences in the cagA promoter region and CagA expression levels influence interleukin 8 secretion by the host gastric epithelial cells. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Identification of repeat sequence heterogeneity at the polymorphic short tandem repeat locus HUMTH01[AATG][sub n] and reassignment of alleles in population analysis by using a locus-specific allelic ladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puers, C. (Institute for Forensic Medicine, Muenster (Germany)); Schumm, J.W. (Promega Corp., Madison, WI (United States)); Hammond, H.A.; Caskey, C.T.; Jin, L.

    1993-10-01

    An allelic ladder containing amplified sequences of seven alleles of the polymorphic human tyrosine hydroxylase locus, HUMTH01, was constructed and employed as a standard marker. Sequence analysis of each ladder component indicates that fragments differ by integral multiples of the AATG core repeat sequence characteristic of this locus. Individual alles are designated [open quotes]5[close quotes] through [open quotes]11,[close quotes] according to the number of complete reiterations of the core repeat contained within them. Comparison of the HUMTH01 allelic ladder with DNA samples amplified at this locus revealed core repeat length heterogeneity (i.e., deletions or insertions shorter than one core repeat) within the human population. In particular, a common allele was identified which migrates more quickly than allele 10, but more slowly than allele 9, on electrophoresis through a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Sequence analysis of this allele, designated [open quotes]10-1,[close quotes] reveals lack of a single adenine normally present in the seventh copy of the AATG. The allelic ladder was used to reevaluate previously published population data. Results of testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population substructure were not altered significantly by these modifications. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Characterization of the patterns of polymorphism in a [open quotes]cryptic repeat[close quotes] reveals a novel type of hypervariable sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D.P.; Schmeling, P.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Alternating purine and pyrimidine repeats (RY(i)) are an abundant source of polymorphism. The subset with long tandem repeats of GT or AC (GT(i)) have been studied extensively, but cryptic RY(i) (i.e., no single tandem repeat predominates) have received little attention. The factor IX gene has a polymorphic cryptic RY(i) of 142-216 bp. Previously, there were four known polymorphic alleles, of the form AB, A[sub 2]B, A[sub 2]B[sub 2], and A[sub 3]B[sub 2], where A = (GT)(AC)[sub 3](AT)[sub 3](GT)(AT)[sub 4] and B = A with an additional 3' AT dinucleotide. To further characterize this locus, the authors examined more than 1,700 additional human chromosomes and determined the sequences of the homologous sites in orangutans and chimpanzees. The novel alleles found in humans expand the repertoire of A/B alleles to A[sub 0-4]B[sub 1] and A[sub 1-3]B[sub 2]. The A[sub n]B[sub 2] series are abundant in Caucasians but are absent in blacks and Asians. Conversely, the A[sub 0]B[sub 1] allele is common in blacks but is not found in more than 1,700 Caucasian chromosomes. The data are compatible with a model in which recombination is more frequent than polymerase slippage at this locus. In orangutans, the RY(i) is present, but the sequence is markedly different. An A/B-type of pattern was discerned in which B differs from A by an additional six (AT) dinucleotides at the 3' end. In chimpanzees, the size of the RY(i) locus was greatly expanded, and the sequence showed a novel pattern of hypervariability in which there are many tandem repeats of the form (GT)[sub n](AC)[sub 0](AT)[sub p](GT)[sub q](AT)[sub s], where n, o, p, q, and s are different integers. The sequences of the factor IX intron 1 cryptic RY(i) in three primates provide perspective on the range of possible patterns of polymorphism. Analysis of the patterns suggests how the RY(i) can be conserved during evolution, while the precise sequence varies. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Association of STin2 Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) Polymorphism of Serotonin Transporter Gene with Lifelong Premature Ejaculation: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiansheng; Gao, Jingjing; Tang, Dongdong; Gao, Pan; Peng, Dangwei; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-01-01

    Background The STin2 VNTR polymorphism has a variable number of tandem repeats in intron 2 of the serotonin transporter gene. We aimed to explore the relationship between STin2 VNTR polymorphism and lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE). Material/Methods We recruited a total of 115 outpatients who complained of ejaculating prematurely and who were diagnosed as LPE, and 101 controls without PE complaint. Allelic variations of STin2 VNTR were genotyped using PCR-based technology. We evaluated the associations between STin2 VNTR allelic and genotypic frequencies and LPE, as well as the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of different STin2 VNTR genotypes among LPE patients. Results The patients and controls did not differ significantly in terms of any characteristic except age. A significantly higher frequency of STin2.12/12 genotype was found among LPE patients versus controls (P=0.026). Frequency of patients carrying at least 1 copy of the 10-repeat allele was significantly lower compared to the control group (28.3% vs. 41.8%, OR=0.55; 95%CI=0.31–0.97, P=0.040). In the LPE group, the mean IELT showed significant difference in STin2.12/12 genotype when compared to those with STin2.12/10 and STin2.10/10 genotypes. The mean IELT in10-repeat allele carriers was 50% longer compared to homozygous carriers of the STin2.12 allele. Conclusions Our results indicate the presence of STin2.10 allele is a protective factor for LPE. Men carrying the higher expression genotype STin2. 12/12 have shorter IELT than 10-repeat allele carriers. PMID:27713390

  18. Variable number of tandem repeat polymorphisms of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene IL-1RN: a novel association with the athlete status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryckman Kelli K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interleukin-1 (IL-1 family of cytokines is involved in the inflammatory and repair reactions of skeletal muscle during and after exercise. Specifically, plasma levels of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra increase dramatically after intense exercise, and accumulating evidence points to an effect of genetic polymorphisms on athletic phenotypes. Therefore, the IL-1 family cytokine genes are plausible candidate genes for athleticism. We explored whether IL-1 polymorphisms are associated with athlete status in European subjects. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained from 205 (53 professional and 152 competitive non-professional Italian athletes and 458 non-athlete controls. Two diallelic polymorphisms in the IL-1β gene (IL-1B at -511 and +3954 positions, and a variable number tandem repeats (VNTR in intron 2 of the IL-1ra gene (IL-1RN were assessed. Results We found a 2-fold higher frequency of the IL-1RN 1/2 genotype in athletes compared to non-athlete controls (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.37-2.74, 41.0% vs. 26.4%, and a lower frequency of the 1/1 genotype (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.40-0.77, 43.9% vs. 58.5%. Frequency of the IL-1RN 2/2 genotype did not differ between groups. No significant differences between athletes and controls were found for either -511 or +3954 IL-1B polymorphisms. However, the haplotype (-511C-(+3954T-(VNTR2 was 3-fold more frequent in athletes than in non-athletes (OR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.16-7.87. Interestingly, the IL-1RN 1/2 genotype was more frequent in professional than in non-professional athletes (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.02-3.61, 52.8% vs. 36.8%. Conclusions Our study found that variants at the IL-1ra gene associate with athletic status. This confirms the crucial role that cytokine IL-1ra plays in human physical exercise. The VNTR IL-1RN polymorphism may have implications for muscle health, performance, and/or recovery capacities. Further studies are needed to assess these specific issues. As VNTR IL-1RN

  19. Molecular and behavioral analysis of the intron 2 repeat polymorphism in the canine dopamine D4 receptor gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hejjas, K; Kubinyi, E; Ronai, Z; Szekely, A; Vas, J; Miklósi, A; Sasvari-Szekely, M; Kereszturi, E

    2009-01-01

    ...), have been related to several psychiatric disorders and personality traits. A homologous exon 3 VNTR has been described in dogs, and we previously showed an association between the DRD4 exon 3 polymorphism and activity/impulsivity trait in German shepherds...

  20. Comparison of single nucleotide polymorphisms and simple sequence repeats in genotype identification and diversity assessment of cacao germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate identification of individual genotypes in an efficient manner is especially important for cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) germplasm conservation and breeding. The development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in cacao offers the opportunity to use a high throughput genotyping syste...

  1. Allelic ladder characterization of the short tandem repeat polymorphism located in the 5{prime} flanking region to the human coagulation factor XIII A subunit gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puers, C. [Promega Corp., Madison, WI (United States)]|[Institute for Forensic Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Lins, A.M.; Sprecher, C.J. [Promega Corp., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism present within the 5{prime} untranslated region of the human coagulation factor XIII A subunit gene, HUM-F13A01 [AAAG]{sub n}, was evaluated using an allelic ladder, i.e., a standard size marker consisting of amplified alleles from the locus. The allelic ladder was constructed by pooling 12 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified alleles identified by their differential migration in denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This standard marker was used to distinguish 14 different alleles observed at this locus. Sequence analyses indicate that 13 of the alleles contain 4 through 16 iterations of the tandemly repeated AAAG sequence, respectively. The remaining allele carries four repeats and displays a deletion of two consecutive nucleotides (GT), one base distal to the repeat region. The allelic ladder was employed to type 326 F13A01 chromosomes rapidly and reliably in representatives of a German Caucasian population. Population data were analyzed with respect to Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) and compared with those of a previously studied Houston, Texas, Caucasian population. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Neutral polymorphisms in putative housekeeping genes and tandem repeats unravels the population genetics and evolutionary history of Plasmodium vivax in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Surendra K; Joshi, Hema; Carlton, Jane M; Rizvi, M Alam

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary history and age of Plasmodium vivax has been inferred as both recent and ancient by several studies, mainly using mitochondrial genome diversity. Here we address the age of P. vivax on the Indian subcontinent using selectively neutral housekeeping genes and tandem repeat loci. Analysis of ten housekeeping genes revealed a substantial number of SNPs (n = 75) from 100 P. vivax isolates collected from five geographical regions of India. Neutrality tests showed a majority of the housekeeping genes were selectively neutral, confirming the suitability of housekeeping genes for inferring the evolutionary history of P. vivax. In addition, a genetic differentiation test using housekeeping gene polymorphism data showed a lack of geographical structuring between the five regions of India. The coalescence analysis of the time to the most recent common ancestor estimate yielded an ancient TMRCA (232,228 to 303,030 years) and long-term population history (79,235 to 104,008) of extant P. vivax on the Indian subcontinent. Analysis of 18 tandem repeat loci polymorphisms showed substantial allelic diversity and heterozygosity per locus, and analysis of potential bottlenecks revealed the signature of a stable P. vivax population, further corroborating our ancient age estimates. For the first time we report a comparable evolutionary history of P. vivax inferred by nuclear genetic markers (putative housekeeping genes) to that inferred from mitochondrial genome diversity.

  3. Neutral polymorphisms in putative housekeeping genes and tandem repeats unravels the population genetics and evolutionary history of Plasmodium vivax in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra K Prajapati

    Full Text Available The evolutionary history and age of Plasmodium vivax has been inferred as both recent and ancient by several studies, mainly using mitochondrial genome diversity. Here we address the age of P. vivax on the Indian subcontinent using selectively neutral housekeeping genes and tandem repeat loci. Analysis of ten housekeeping genes revealed a substantial number of SNPs (n = 75 from 100 P. vivax isolates collected from five geographical regions of India. Neutrality tests showed a majority of the housekeeping genes were selectively neutral, confirming the suitability of housekeeping genes for inferring the evolutionary history of P. vivax. In addition, a genetic differentiation test using housekeeping gene polymorphism data showed a lack of geographical structuring between the five regions of India. The coalescence analysis of the time to the most recent common ancestor estimate yielded an ancient TMRCA (232,228 to 303,030 years and long-term population history (79,235 to 104,008 of extant P. vivax on the Indian subcontinent. Analysis of 18 tandem repeat loci polymorphisms showed substantial allelic diversity and heterozygosity per locus, and analysis of potential bottlenecks revealed the signature of a stable P. vivax population, further corroborating our ancient age estimates. For the first time we report a comparable evolutionary history of P. vivax inferred by nuclear genetic markers (putative housekeeping genes to that inferred from mitochondrial genome diversity.

  4. Chemical correction of pre-mRNA splicing defects associated with sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein by expanded r(CAG) transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Parkesh, Raman; Sznajder, Lukasz J.; Childs-Disney, Jessica; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that expanded r(CAG) triplet repeats (r(CAG)exp) associated with untreatable neurological diseases cause pre-mRNA mis-splicing likely due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) splicing factor. Bioactive small molecules that bind the 5’CAG/3’GAC motif found in r(CAG)exp hairpin structure were identified by using RNA binding studies and virtual screening/chemical similarity searching. Specifically, a benzylguanidine-containing small molecule was found to improve pre-mRNA alternative splicing of MBNL1-sensitive exons in cells expressing the toxic r(CAG)exp. The compound was identified by first studying the binding of RNA 1×1 nucleotide internal loops to small molecules known to have affinity for nucleic acids. Those studies identified 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) as a specific binder to RNAs with the 5’CAG/3’GAC motif. DAPI was then used as a query molecule in a shape- and chemistry alignment-based virtual screen to identify compounds with improved properties, which identified 4-guanidinophenyl 4-guanidinobenzoate as small molecule capable of improving pre-mRNA splicing defects associated with the r(CAG)exp-MBNL1 complex. This compound may facilitate the development of therapeutics to treat diseases caused by r(CAG)exp and could serve as a useful chemical tool to dissect the mechanisms of r(CAG)exp toxicity. The approach used in these studies, defining the small RNA motifs that bind known nucleic acid binders and then using virtual screening to optimize them for bioactivity, may be generally applicable for designing small molecules that target other RNAs in human genomic sequence. PMID:22252896

  5. Chemical correction of pre-mRNA splicing defects associated with sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein by expanded r(CAG)-containing transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Parkesh, Raman; Sznajder, Lukasz J; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-03-16

    Recently, it was reported that expanded r(CAG) triplet repeats (r(CAG)(exp)) associated with untreatable neurological diseases cause pre-mRNA mis-splicing likely due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) splicing factor. Bioactive small molecules that bind the 5'CAG/3'GAC motif found in r(CAG)(exp) hairpin structure were identified by using RNA binding studies and virtual screening/chemical similarity searching. Specifically, a benzylguanidine-containing small molecule was found to improve pre-mRNA alternative splicing of MBNL1-sensitive exons in cells expressing the toxic r(CAG)(exp). The compound was identified by first studying the binding of RNA 1 × 1 nucleotide internal loops to small molecules known to have affinity for nucleic acids. Those studies identified 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) as a specific binder to RNAs with the 5'CAG/3'GAC motif. DAPI was then used as a query molecule in a shape- and chemistry alignment-based virtual screen to identify compounds with improved properties, which identified 4-guanidinophenyl 4-guanidinobenzoate, a small molecule that improves pre-mRNA splicing defects associated with the r(CAG)(exp)-MBNL1 complex. This compound may facilitate the development of therapeutics to treat diseases caused by r(CAG)(exp) and could serve as a useful chemical tool to dissect the mechanisms of r(CAG)(exp) toxicity. The approach used in these studies, defining the small RNA motifs that bind small molecules with known affinity for nucleic acids and then using virtual screening to optimize them for bioactivity, may be generally applicable for designing small molecules that target other RNAs in the human genomic sequence.

  6. Single-Tube Dodecaplex PCR Panel of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers Closely Linked to theDMPKCTG Repeat for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Mulias; Zhao, Mingjue; Lee, Caroline G; Chong, Samuel S

    2017-06-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) currently uses conventional PCR to detect nonexpanded dystrophia myotonica protein kinase ( DMPK ) alleles or triplet-primed PCR to detect the CTG-expanded alleles, coupled with analysis of linked microsatellite markers to increase diagnostic accuracy. We aimed to simplify the process of identification and selection of informative linked markers for application to DM1 PGD. An in silico search was performed to identify all markers within 1-1.5 Mb flanking the DMPK gene. Five previously known (D19S559, APOC2, D19S543, D19S112, and BV209569) and 7 novel (DM45050, DM45178, DM45209, DM45958, DM46513, DM46892, and DM47004.1) markers with potentially high heterozygosity values and polymorphism information content were selected and optimized in a single-tube multiplex PCR panel. Analysis of 184 DNA samples of Chinese and Caucasian individuals (91 from unrelated, anonymized cord blood of Chinese babies born at the National University Hospital, Singapore, and 93 Caucasian DNA samples from the Human Variation Panel HD100CAU) confirmed the high polymorphism indices of all markers (polymorphism information content >0.5), with observed heterozygosity values ranging from 0.62-0.93. All individuals were heterozygous for at least 6 markers, with 99.5% of individuals heterozygous for at least 2 markers on either side of the DMPK CTG repeat. The dodecaplex marker assay was successfully validated on 42 single cells and 12 whole genome amplified single cells. The DM1 multiplex PCR panel is suitable for use in DM1 PGD either as a standalone linkage-based assay or as a complement to DMPK CTG repeat expansion-mutation detection. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  7. Stress perception and (GT)n repeat polymorphism in haem oxygenase 1 promoter are both risk factors in development of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slachtová, L; Kaminská, D; Chvál, M; Králík, L; Martásek, P; Papežová, H

    2013-01-01

    Haem oxygenase 1 (HO-1) plays a pivotal role in metabolic stress protecting cells in dependence on reactive oxygen species. This study investigated a potential gene environment interaction between the (GT)n repeat HO1 polymorphism and the stress perception in patients with eating disorder and in controls. Stress perception and (GT)n polymorphism were measured in 127 patients with eating disorders and in 78 healthy controls using Stress and Coping Inventory and genotyping. Based on the inventory, overall, specific and weighted stress scores were defined. Clinical stress score was generated according to the patient's history and interviews. According to our hypothesis, 1) all stress scores describing subjective stress perception were significantly higher in patients compared to controls (P ≤ 0.001; P ≤ 0.002; P ≤ 0.001), 2) the L/L genotype of GT promoter repeats (L stress score (P ≤ 0.005) compared to the L/S variant, and 3) Pearson's correlation of clinical versus objective stress scores showed not very tight relationship (0.198; 0.287; 0.224, respectively). We assume potential risk of the L allele of HO1 promoter polymorphism for the stress response and contribution of the subjective stress perception together with the L/L genotype to the development of eating disorder. Decreased HO1 expression in the presence of L/L genotype plus more intensive stress perception in the patients can lead to secondary stress, with increasing severity of the symptoms and aggravation of the disease.

  8. Analysis of polyglutamine-coding repeats in the TATA-binding protein in different human populations and in patients with schizophrenia an bipolar affective disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J. [Addenbrooke`s National Health Service Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Crow, T.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-20

    A new class of disease (including Huntington disease, Kennedy disease, and spinocerebellar ataxias types 1 and 3) results from abnormal expansions of CAG trinucleotides in the coding regions of genes. In all of these diseases the CAG repeats are thought to be translated into polyglutamine tracts. There is accumulating evidence arguing for CAG trinucleotide expansions as one of the causative disease mutations in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We and others believe that the TATA-binding protein (TBP) is an important candidate to investigate in these diseases as it contains a highly polymorphic stretch of glutamine codons, which are close to the threshold length where the polyglutamine tracts start to be associated with disease. Thus, we examined the lengths of this polyglutamine repeat in normal unrelated East Anglians, South African Blacks, sub-Saharan Africans mainly from Nigeria, and Asian Indians. We also examined 43 bipolar affective disorder patients and 65 schizophrenic patients. The range of polyglutamine tract-lengths that we found in humans was from 26-42 codons. No patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia had abnormal expansions at this locus. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Global analysis of genetic variations in a 56-bp variable number of tandem repeat polymorphisms within the human deoxyribonuclease I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Junko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Iida, Reiko; Ueki, Misuzu; Sano, Rie; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Inoue, Ken; Kimura-Kataoka, Kaori; Takeshita, Haruo

    2015-07-01

    A 56-bp variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism is confirmed in intron 4 of the human deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) gene (HumDN1). The purpose of the present study was to document global ethnic variations of allelic frequencies in HumDN1 VNTR polymorphisms. In this study, HumDN1 VNTR polymorphisms in 11 worldwide populations were examined by polymerase chain reaction and compared with those reported previously. Fifteen genotypes were identified in these 11 populations. Novel genotypes were found: 1/2 was observed in Ghanaians and mestizos, 3/6 was in Tamangs, 4/6 was in Tibetans and Nahuas, 6/6 was in Sinhalese. The African population showed the highest frequency for the HumDN1(∗)3 allele. Among Asian populations, the different genotype distribution was observed. The predominant allele in Mongolian, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese populations was HumDN1(∗)3, followed by HumDN1(∗)4, and then HumDN1(∗)5. In Chinese from South China, Tamangs, and Sinhalese, HumDN1(∗)4 and HumDN1(∗)5 were predominant. The allele frequency for HumDN1(∗)4 was high in three Mexican populations, but a significant difference was observed between Nahuas and Huicoles. Germans and Turks showed a similar distribution. This study is the first to show the existence of a certain genetic heterogeneity in the worldwide distribution of HumDN1 VNTR polymorphism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Melon Transcriptome Characterization: Simple Sequence Repeats and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery for High Throughput Genotyping across the Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Blanca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Melon ( L. ranks among the highest-valued fruit crops worldwide. Some genomic tools are available for this crop, including a Sanger transcriptome. We report the generation of 689,054 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs from two 454 sequencing runs, using normalized and nonnormalized complementary DNA (cDNA libraries prepared from four genotypes belonging to the two subspecies and the main commercial types. 454 ESTs were combined with the Sanger available ESTs and de novo assembled into 53,252 unigenes. Over 63% of the unigenes were functionally annotated with Gene Ontology (GO terms and 21% had known orthologs of (L. Heynh. Annotation distribution followed similar tendencies than that reported for , suggesting that the dataset represents a fairly complete melon transcriptome. Furthermore, we identified a set of 3298 unigenes with microsatellite motifs and 14,417 sequences with single nucleotide variants of which 11,655 single nucleotide polymorphism met criteria for use with high-throughput genotyping platforms, and 453 could be detected as cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS. A set of markers were validated, 90% of them being polymorphic in a number of variable accessions. This transcriptome provides an invaluable new tool for biological research, more so when it includes transcripts not described previously. It is being used for genome annotation and has provided a large collection of markers that will allow speeding up the process of breeding new melon varieties.

  11. Maternal germline-specific effect of DNA ligase I on CTG/CAG instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Stéphanie; Panigrahi, Gagan B; López Castel, Arturo; Foiry, Laurent; Melton, David W; Gourdon, Geneviève; Pearson, Christopher E

    2011-06-01

    The instability of (CTG)•(CAG) repeats can cause >15 diseases including myotonic dystrophy, DM1. Instability can arise during DNA replication, repair or recombination, where sealing of nicks by DNA ligase I (LIGI) is a final step. The role of LIGI in CTG/CAG instability was determined using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Cell extracts from a human (46BR) harbouring a deficient LIGI (∼3% normal activity) were used to replicate CTG/CAG repeats; and DM1 mice with >300 CTG repeats were crossed with mice harbouring the 46BR LigI. In mice, the defective LigI reduced the frequency of CTG expansions and increased CTG contraction frequencies on female transmissions. Neither male transmissions nor somatic CTG instability was affected by the 46BR LigI - indicating a post-female germline segregation event. Replication-mediated instability was affected by the 46BR LIGI in a manner that depended upon the location of Okazaki fragment initiation relative to the repeat tract; on certain templates, the expansion bias was unaltered by the mutant LIGI, similar to paternal transmissions and somatic tissues; however, a replication fork-shift reduced expansions and increased contractions, similar to maternal transmissions. The presence of contractions in oocytes suggests that the DM1 replication profile specific to pre-meiotic oogenesis replication of maternal alleles is distinct from that occurring in other tissues and, when mediated by the mutant LigI, is predisposed to CTG contractions. Thus, unlike other DNA metabolizing enzymes studied to date, LigI has a highly specific role in CTG repeat maintenance in the maternal germline, involved in mediating CTG expansions and in the avoidance of maternal CTG contractions.

  12. Glycoprotein I of herpes simplex virus type 1 contains a unique polymorphic tandem-repeated mucin region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norberg, Peter; Olofsson, Sigvard; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein I (gI) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains a tandem repeat (TR) region including the amino acids serine and threonine, residues that can be utilized for O-glycosylation. The length of this TR region was determined for 82 clinical HSV-1 isolates and the results revealed...

  13. Summary of the 2002 CAG Strategic Planning Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Sherman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this Journal, we have recently highlighted the progress of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG in meeting the goals and objectives outlined in the first Strategic Plan developed in 1993 (1. In September 2002, a Strategic Planning survey was mailed to all members of the CAG (a copy of the cover letter and survey are present for viewing on the CAG Web site www.cag-acg.org/whatsnew/strat_plann_surv.htm. The results of the responses to this survey were collated and presented to the Past Presidents of the CAG at a retreat held during the summer of 2003. These findings were then employed to develop a Strategic Plan for the CAG to guide its progress and development over the next five to ten years. A subsequent issue of this Journal will include a presentation of the CAG 2004 Strategic Plan, which was finalized and approved by the CAG Governing Board during the annual fall meeting in October 2003.

  14. The role of break-induced replication in large-scale expansions of (CAG)n/(CTG)nrepeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane C; Harris, Samantha T; Dinter, Teresa; Shah, Kartik A; Mirkin, Sergei M

    2017-01-01

    Expansions of (CAG) n /(CTG) n trinucleotide repeats are responsible for over a dozen neuromuscular and neurodegenerative disorders. Large-scale expansions are commonly observed in human pedigrees and may be explained by iterative small-scale events such as strand slippage during replication or repair DNA synthesis. Alternatively, a distinct mechanism may lead to a large-scale repeat expansion as a single step. To distinguish between these possibilities, we developed a novel experimental system specifically tuned to analyze large-scale expansions of (CAG) n /(CTG) n repeats in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The median size of repeat expansions was ∼60 triplets, although we also observed additions of more than 150 triplets. Genetic analysis revealed that Rad51, Rad52, Mre11, Pol32, Pif1, and Mus81 and/or Yen1 proteins are required for large-scale expansions, whereas proteins previously implicated in small-scale expansions are not involved. From these results, we propose a new model for large-scale expansions, which is based on the recovery of replication forks broken at (CAG) n /(CTG) n repeats via break-induced replication.

  15. Molecular diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome: Parent-of-origin dependent methylation sites and non-isotopic detection of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerer, I.; Meiner, V.; Pashut-Lavon, I.; Abeliovich, D.

    1994-08-01

    We describe our experience in the molecular diagnosis of 22 patients suspected of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) using a DNA probe PW71 (D15S63) which detects a parent-of-origin specific methylated site in the PWS critical region. The cause of the syndrome was determined as deletion or uniparental disomy according to the segregation of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms of the PWS/AS region and more distal markers of chromosome 15. In 10 patients the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the segregation of (CA){sub n}, probably due to paternal microdeletion in the PWs critical region which did not include the loci D15S97, D15S113, GABRB3, and GABRA5. This case demonstrates the advantage of the DNA probe PW71 in the diagnosis of PWS. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Three novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the glaucoma locus GLC1B by datamining tetranucleotide repeats on chromosome 2p12-q12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Murga-Zamalloa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify new markers around the glaucoma locus GLC1B as a tool to refine its critical region at 2p11.2-2q11.2, we searched the critical region sequence obtained from the UCSC database for tetranucleotide (GATAn and (GTCTn repeats of at least 10 units in length. Three out of four potential microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic, heterozygosity ranging from 64.56% to 79.59%. The identified markers are useful not only for GLC1B locus but also for the study of other disease loci at 2p11.2-2q11.2, a region with scarcity of microsatellite markers.

  17. Three novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the glaucoma locus GLC1B by datamining tetranucleotide repeats on chromosome 2p12-q12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Guevara-Fujita, Maria Luisa; Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Fujita, Ricardo

    2009-10-01

    In order to identify new markers around the glaucoma locus GLC1B as a tool to refine its critical region at 2p11.2-2q11.2, we searched the critical region sequence obtained from the UCSC database for tetranucleotide (GATA)n and (GTCT)n repeats of at least 10 units in length. Three out of four potential microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic, heterozygosity ranging from 64.56% to 79.59%. The identified markers are useful not only for GLC1B locus but also for the study of other disease loci at 2p11.2-2q11.2, a region with scarcity of microsatellite markers.

  18. Linkage and association of the CA repeat polymorphism of the IL6 gene, obesity-related phenotypes, and bone mineral density (BMD) in two independent Caucasian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing-Yang; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Yi; Conway, Theresa; Davies, K Michael; Li, Jin-Long; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2003-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in osteoporosis and obesity, two serious public health problems in the world. We investigated the relationships between obesity-related phenotypes, bone mineral density (BMD) and the CA repeat polymorphism of the IL6 gene in two large independent samples using the quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT). The first sample consisted of 1,816 individuals from 79 multigenerational pedigrees. Each pedigree was identified through a proband with BMD Z-scores BMD and for association with hip BMD in the sample of multigenerational pedigrees. Our results suggest that genetic variation in or near the IL6 locus may be involved in the etiology of obesity and osteoporosis.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of short tandem repeat loci D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634 in the Han population of Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfang; Li, Xiaozhou; Ju, Duan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers, also known as microsatellites, are extensively used in mapping studies, forensics and disease diagnosis due to their small dimension and low mutation and high polymorphism rates. In recent years quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) has been successfully used to amplify STR markers in the prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal abnormalities. This method provides a diagnosis of common aneuploidies 24-48 h after sampling with low error rates and cost; however, the size of different alleles, frequency, heterozygosity and distribution of STR markers vary among different populations. In the present study three STR markers, D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634, on chromosome 13 were analyzed in 350 unrelated individuals (200 males and 150 females) from the Han population of Tianjin, China using QF-PCR. Eleven, seven and 11 alleles of each marker were observed, respectively. The frequencies of the genotypes were in good agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The results showed that these three STR markers were highly polymorphic in the Han population of Tianjin, China. The study has provided basic data for use in the prenatal diagnosis of Patau syndrome.

  20. Polyalanine repeat polymorphism in RUNX2 is associated with site-specific fracture in post-menopausal females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel A Morrison

    Full Text Available Runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2 is a key regulator of osteoblast differentiation. Several variations within the RUNX2 gene have been found to be associated with significant changes in BMD, which is a major risk factor for fracture. In this study we report that an 18 bp deletion within the polyalanine tract (17A>11A of RUNX2 is significantly associated with fracture. Carriers of the 11A allele were found to be nearly twice as likely to have sustained fracture. Within the fracture category, there was a significant tendency of 11A carriers to present with fractures of distal radius and bones of intramembranous origin compared to bones of endochondral origin (p = 0.0001. In a population of random subjects, the 11A allele was associated with decreased levels of serum collagen cross links (CTx, p = 0.01, suggesting decreased bone turnover. The transactivation function of the 11A allele showed a minor quantitative decrease. Interestingly, we found no effect of the 11A allele on BMD at multiple skeletal sites. These findings suggest that the 11A allele is a biologically relevant polymorphism that influences serum CTx and confers enhanced fracture risk in a site-selective manner related to intramembranous bone ossification.

  1. Genetic relationships and evolution in Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin, squash, gourd) as revealed by simple sequence repeat polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li; Paris, Harry S; Nee, Michael H; Stift, Gertraud; Pachner, Martin; Vollmann, Johann; Lelley, Tamas

    2012-03-01

    Genetic relationships among 104 accessions of Cucurbita pepo were assessed from polymorphisms in 134 SSR (microsatellite) and four SCAR loci, yielding a total of 418 alleles, distributed among all 20 linkage groups. Genetic distance values were calculated, a dendrogram constructed, and principal coordinate analyses conducted. The results showed 100 of the accessions as distributed among three clusters representing each of the recognized subspecies, pepo, texana, and fraterna. The remaining four accessions, all having very small, round, striped fruits, assumed central positions between the two cultivated subspecies, pepo and texana, suggesting that they are relicts of undescribed wild ancestors of the two domesticated subspecies. In both, subsp. texana and subsp. pepo, accessions belonging to the same cultivar-group (fruit shape) associated with one another. Within subsp. pepo, accessions grown for their seeds or that are generalists, used for both seed and fruit consumption, assumed central positions. Specialized accessions, grown exclusively for consumption of their young fruits, or their mature fruit flesh, or seed oil extraction, tended to assume outlying positions, and the different specializations radiated outward from the center in different directions. Accessions of the longest-fruited cultivar-group, Cocozelle, radiated bidirectionally, indicating independent selection events for long fruits in subsp. pepo probably driven by a common desire to consume the young fruits. Among the accessions tested, there was no evidence for crossing between subspecies after domestication.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms related to testosterone metabolism in intellectually gifted boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities.

  3. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms in waterfowl (family Anatidae): Characterization of a sex-linked (Z-specific) and 14 autosomal loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, W.G.; Pearce, J.M.; Pierson, B.J.; Scribner, K.T.

    1998-01-01

    Canada goose (Branta Canadensis) and harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) DNAs were digested with Sau3AI, and size selected (300-700 bp) fragments were ligated into BamHI-digested pBluscriptII KS+. The enrichment protocol of Ostrander et al.1 was followed. The resulting libraries were screened using a [ƴ-32P]ATP end-labelled (CA)20 oligonucleotides as a hybridization probe. Positive clones were sequenced using cycle-sequencing protocols (Epicentre Technologies, Madison, WI) and primers flanking the inserts. PCR primers were designed to amplify the repeat and yield amplification products of ≈100-200 bp. DNA  samples were screened for variation at these loci using [ƴ-32P]ATP end-labelled primers. The products were resolved using 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gels and autoradiography.

  4. Structures and Polymorphic Interactions of Two Heptad-Repeat Regions of the SARS Virus S2 Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng,Y.; Liu, J.; Zheng, Q.; Yong, W.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Entry of SARS coronavirus into its target cell requires large-scale structural transitions in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein in order to induce fusion of the virus and cell membranes. Here we describe the identification and crystal structures of four distinct a-helical domains derived from the highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) regions of the S2 fusion subunit. The four domains are an antiparallel four-stranded coiled coil, a parallel trimeric coiled coil, a four-helix bundle, and a six-helix bundle that is likely the final fusogenic form of the protein. When considered together, the structural and thermodynamic features of the four domains suggest a possible mechanism whereby the HR regions, initially sequestered in the native S glycoprotein spike, are released and refold sequentially to promote membrane fusion. Our results provide a structural framework for understanding the control of membrane fusion and should guide efforts to intervene in the SARS coronavirus entry process.

  5. Analysis of Helicobacter pylori cagA promoter elements required for salt-induced upregulation of CagA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, John T; Friedman, David B; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Bravo, Luis E; Wilson, Keith T; Peek, Richard M; Correa, Pelayo; Cover, Timothy L

    2012-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection and consumption of a high-salt diet are each associated with an increased risk for the development of gastric cancer. To investigate potential synergism between these factors, we used a global proteomic approach to analyze H. pylori strains cultured in media containing varying salt concentrations. Among the differentially expressed proteins identified, CagA exhibited the greatest increase in expression in response to high salt concentrations. Analysis of 36 H. pylori strains isolated from patients in two regions of Colombia with differing incidences of gastric cancer revealed marked differences among strains in salt-responsive CagA expression. Sequence analysis of the cagA promoter region in these strains revealed a DNA motif (TAATGA) that was present in either one or two copies. Salt-induced upregulation of CagA expression was detected more commonly in strains containing two copies of the TAATGA motif than in strains containing one copy. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed that two copies of the TAATGA motif are required for salt-induced upregulation of CagA expression. In summary, there is considerable heterogeneity among H. pylori strains in salt-regulated CagA expression, and these differences are attributable to variation in a specific DNA motif upstream of the cagA transcriptional start site.

  6. DNA polymorphism among Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis populations from oil palm, using a repeated and dispersed sequence "Palm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouyna, I; Renard, J L; Brygoo, Y

    1996-07-31

    A worldwide collection, of 76 F. oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis isolates (Foe), and of 21 F. oxysporum isolates from the soil of several palm grove was analysed by RFLP. As a probe, we used a random DNA fragment (probe 46) from a genomic library of a Foe isolate. This probe contains two different types of sequence, one being repeated and dispersed in the genome "Palm", the other being a single-copy sequence. All F. oxysporum isolates from the palm-grove soils were non-pathogenic to oil palm. They all had a simple restriction pattern with one band homologous to the single-copy sequence of probe 46. All Foe isolates were pathogenic to oil palm and they all had complex patterns due to hybridization with "Palm". This repetitive sequence reveals that Foe isolates are distinct from the other F. oxysporum palm-grove soils isolates. The sequence can reliably discriminate pathogenic from non-pathogenic oil palm isolates. Based on DNA fingerprint similarities, Foe populations were divided into ten groups consisting of isolates with the same geographic origin. Isolates from Brazil and Ecuador were an exception to that rule as they had the same restriction pattern as a few isolates from the Ivory Coast, suggesting they may originated from Africa.

  7. New Repeat Polymorphism in the AKT1 Gene Predicts Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability and Stimulant-Induced Dopamine Release in the Healthy Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumay, Elena; Wiers, Corinde E; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Kim, Sung Won; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Sun, Hui; Tomasi, Dardo; Wong, Christopher T; Weinberger, Daniel R; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Volkow, Nora D

    2017-05-10

    The role of the protein kinase Akt1 in dopamine neurotransmission is well recognized and has been implicated in schizophrenia and psychosis. However, the extent to which variants in the AKT1 gene influence dopamine neurotransmission is not well understood. Here we investigated the effect of a newly characterized variant number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in AKT1 [major alleles: L- (eight repeats) and H- (nine repeats)] on striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (DRD2) availability and on dopamine release in healthy volunteers. We used PET and [11C]raclopride to assess baseline DRD2 availability in 91 participants. In 54 of these participants, we also measured intravenous methylphenidate-induced dopamine release to measure dopamine release. Dopamine release was quantified as the difference in specific binding of [11C]raclopride (nondisplaceable binding potential) between baseline values and values following methylphenidate injection. There was an effect of AKT1 genotype on DRD2 availability at baseline for the caudate (F(2,90) = 8.2, p = 0.001) and putamen (F(2,90) = 6.6, p = 0.002), but not the ventral striatum (p = 0.3). For the caudate and putamen, LL showed higher DRD2 availability than HH; HL were in between. There was also a significant effect of AKT1 genotype on dopamine increases in the ventral striatum (F(2,53) = 5.3, p = 0.009), with increases being stronger in HH > HL > LL. However, no dopamine increases were observed in the caudate (p = 0.1) or putamen (p = 0.8) following methylphenidate injection. Our results provide evidence that the AKT1 gene modulates both striatal DRD2 availability and dopamine release in the human brain, which could account for its association with schizophrenia and psychosis. The clinical relevance of the newly characterized AKT1 VNTR merits investigation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The AKT1 gene has been implicated in schizophrenia and psychosis. This association is likely to reflect modulation of dopamine signaling by Akt1 kinase

  8. Risk for HIV-1 infection is not associated with repeat-region polymorphism in the DC-SIGN neck domain and novel genetic DC-SIGN variants among North Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag; Chatterjee, Animesh; Sood, Vikas; Khan, Sohrab Z; Banerjea, Akhil C; Yamamoto, Naohiko; Dhole, Tapan N

    2008-05-01

    Several genetic factors have been related to HIV-1 resistance, the homozygosity for a mutation in CCR5 gene (CCR5Delta 32 allele) is presently considered the most relevant one. The C-type lectin, DC-SIGN efficiently binds and transmits HIV-1 to susceptible cell in trans thereby augmenting the infection. A potential association of the DC-SIGN neck domain repeats polymorphism and risk of HIV-1 infection is currently under debate. Genetic risk association study was conducted in HIV-1 exposed seronegative (HES; n=50) individuals, HIV-1 seronegative (HSN; n=314) healthy control and HIV-1 infected seropositive patients (HSP; n=190) for polymorphism in neck domain of DC-SIGN gene. The DC-SIGN genotypes were identified by PCR from DNA extracted from peripheral blood and confirmed by sequencing. Fisher exact or chi(2) test was used for statistical analysis. One HSN and HSP individual who were heterozygous (7/8) with respect to DC-SIGN repeat regions were found. The DC-SIGN neck repeat polymorphism among North Indian individuals was not associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, inheritance study of heterozygous mutation (7/8) in HSN individual's family showed that one parent, two brothers, one sister and one daughter were heterozygous (7/8) for DC-SIGN mutant allele. Sequence analyses of DC-SIGN exon 4 repeat region of randomly selected 25 North Indian individuals from HSP, HSN and HES revealed four conserved intronic mutations. These mutations were at nucleotide position 1283, 1306, 1308 upstream and 1906 downstream of the DC-SIGN exon 4 repeat region when compared with the wild type sequence (NCBI Acc. No. AF209479). The polymorphism in DC-SIGN neck repeats region was rare and not associated with HIV-1 susceptibility among North Indians. Sequencing analysis of DC-SIGN gene confirmed four novel genetic variants in intronic region flanking exon 4 coding region.

  9. Genetic and physical mapping of 2q35 in the region of NRAMP and IL8R genes: Identification of a polymorphic repeat in exon 2 of NRAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.K.; Shaw, M.A.; Barton, C.H. [Addenbrooke`s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    Recent interest has focused on the region of conserved synteny between mouse chromosome 1 and human 2q33-q37, particularly over the region encoding the murine macrophage resistance gene Ity/Lsh/Bcg (candidate Nramp) and members of the Il8r interleukin-8 (IL8) receptor gene cluster. In this paper, identification of a restriction fragment length polymorphism in the Il8RB gene in 35 pedigrees previously typed for markers in the 2q33-37 interval provided evidence (lod scores > 3) for linkage between Il8RB and the 2q34-135 markers FN1, TNP1, VIL1, and DES. Physical mapping, using yeast artificial chromosomes isolated with VIL1, confirmed that IL8RA, IL8RB and the IL8RB pseudogene map within the NRAMP-VIL1 interval, with the physical distance (155 kb) from 5{prime} LSH to 3{prime} VIL1 representing {approx}3-fold that observed in the mouse. Partial sequencing of NRAMP confirmed the presence of the N-terminal proline/serine-rich putative SH3 binding domain in exon 2 of the human gene. Further analysis of Brazilian leprosy and visceral leishmaniasis pedigrees identified a rare second allele varying in a 9-nucleotide repeat motif of the exon 2 sequence but segregating independently of the disease phenotype. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Genetic diversity in domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor (Glycine soja) for simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Hui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Liang; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Gaut, Brandon S; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2010-10-01

    • The study of genetic diversity between a crop and its wild relatives may yield fundamental insights into evolutionary history and the process of domestication. • In this study, we genotyped a sample of 303 accessions of domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor Glycine soja with 99 microsatellite markers and 554 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. • The simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci averaged 21.5 alleles per locus and overall Nei's gene diversity of 0.77. The SNPs had substantially lower genetic diversity (0.35) than SSRs. A SSR analyses indicated that G. soja exhibited higher diversity than G. max, but SNPs provided a slightly different snapshot of diversity between the two taxa. For both marker types, the primary division of genetic diversity was between the wild and domesticated accessions. Within taxa, G. max consisted of four geographic regions in China. G. soja formed six subgroups. Genealogical analyses indicated that cultivated soybean tended to form a monophyletic clade with respect to G. soja. • G. soja and G. max represent distinct germplasm pools. Limited evidence of admixture was discovered between these two species. Overall, our analyses are consistent with the origin of G. max from regions along the Yellow River of China.

  11. Anti-CagA IgG Antibody is Independent from Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori strains have two classical virulence genes, the cytotoxinassociated A (cagA gene and the vacuolating cytotoxin A (vacA gene, which are located in thecag pathogenicity island (cagPAI. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies to H. pylori,especially, the CagA antigen may be a reliable marker for selection of dyspeptic patients for upperendoscopy.Methods: Serum sample of 129 dyspeptic patients with positive H. pylori, were tested for serumIgG Anti-CagA antibody by ELISA. The presence of the cagA and vacA genotypes weredetermined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR on biopsy samples taken via endoscopy.Results: Positive serum IgG anti-CagA antibodies in patients with cagA+/vacA+ and cagA+/vacA- genotypes were 22/23 (95.6% and 18/19 (94.7%, respectively. In addition, serum IgG anti-CagAantibodies in patients with cagA-/vacA+ and cagA-/vacA- genotypes were 22/47 (46.8% and 33/40(82.5%, respectively.Conclusions: It can be concluded that the serum IgG anti-CagA antibody alone could selectpatients with dyspepsia following upper endoscopy. The assessment of vacuolating cytotoxinactivity of H. Pylori is, therefore, not required, even when vacA gene is positive. This hypothesisneeds to be studied in a large number of patients with dyspepsia.

  12. Failure to confirm influence of methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms on age at onset of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Wiebke; Saft, Carsten; Andrich, Jürgen; Müller, Thomas; Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Jörg T; Arning, Larissa

    2005-12-22

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fully penetrant, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder associated with abnormal expansions of a stretch of perfect CAG repeats in the 5' part of the IT15 gene. The number of repeat units is highly predictive for the age at onset (AO) of the disorder. But AO is only modestly correlated with repeat length when intermediate HD expansions are considered. Recently, suggestive association has been reported between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs1801131, also known as A1298C) in the methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and AO of HD. 5,10-MTHFR is a key enzyme in the folate metabolism, diverting metabolites toward methylation reactions or nucleotide synthesis. Using part of a previously established study cohort plus additional patients and appropriate statistical methods, we reinvestigated two polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, as well as their association with AO in 167 HD patients. There was no statistically significant impact on AO for HD patients, neither of MTHFR SNPs nor of the combinations thereof. Contrary to previously described evidence the A1298C polymorphism in the MTHFR gene does not appear to modulate AO of HD patients.

  13. Failure to confirm influence of Methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms on age at onset of Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek Stefan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington disease (HD is a fully penetrant, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder associated with abnormal expansions of a stretch of perfect CAG repeats in the 5' part of the IT15 gene. The number of repeat units is highly predictive for the age at onset (AO of the disorder. But AO is only modestly correlated with repeat length when intermediate HD expansions are considered. Recently, suggestive association has been reported between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs1801131, also known as A1298C in the methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene and AO of HD. 5,10-MTHFR is a key enzyme in the folate metabolism, diverting metabolites toward methylation reactions or nucleotide synthesis. Using part of a previously established study cohort plus additional patients and appropriate statistical methods, we reinvestigated two polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, as well as their association with AO in 167 HD patients. Results There was no statistically significant impact on AO for HD patients, neither of MTHFR SNPs nor of the combinations thereof. Conclusion Contrary to previously described evidence the A1298C polymorphism in the MTHFR gene does not appear to modulate AO of HD patients.

  14. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  15. Construction of a high-density linkage map of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) using restriction fragment length polymorphism, amplified fragment length polymorphism, and telomeric repeat associated sequence markers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inoue M; Gao Z; Hirata M; Fujimori M; Cai H

    2004-01-01

    ...: restriction fragment length polymorphism markers, which we detected by using genomic probes from Italian ryegrass as well as heterologous anchor probes from other species belonging to the Poaceae...

  16. The Role of a CA Repeat Polymorphism in the Promoter Region of the Insulin like Growth Factor-I gene in Physiology and the Pathophysiology of Diabetes Mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Rietveld (Ingrid)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA polymorphism in the promoter region of the IGF-I gene is amongst others related to total IGF-I serum levels, body height and type 2 diabetes. In this thesis, we investigated the influence of this polymorphism on the age-related decline, secular trend in body height, beta cell function,

  17. The (CA)n polymorphism of ERβ gene is associated with FtM transsexualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rosa; Esteva, Isabel; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Rumbo, Teresa; Almaraz, Mari Cruz; Roda, Ester; Haro-Mora, Juan-Jesús; Guillamón, Antonio; Pásaro, Eduardo

    2014-03-01

    Transsexualism is a gender identity disorder with a multifactorial etiology. Neurodevelopmental processes and genetic factors seem to be implicated. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of the sex hormone-related genes ERβ (estrogen receptor β), AR (androgen receptor), and CYP19A1 (aromatase) in the etiology of female-to-male (FtM) transsexualism. In 273 FtMs and 371 control females, we carried out a molecular analysis of three variable regions: the CA repeats in intron 5 of ERβ; the CAG repeats in exon 1 of AR, and the TTTA repeats in intron 4 of CYP19A1. We investigated the possible influence of genotype on transsexualism by performing a molecular analysis of the variable regions of genes ERβ, AR, and CYP19A1 in 644 individuals (FtMs and control females). FtMs differed significantly from control group with respect to the median repeat length polymorphism ERβ (P = 0.002) but not with respect to the length of the other two studied polymorphisms. The repeat numbers in ERβ were significantly higher in FtMs than in control group, and the likelihood of developing transsexualism was higher (odds ratio: 2.001 [1.15-3.46]) in the subjects with the genotype homozygous for long alleles. There is an association between the ERβ gene and FtM transsexualism. Our data support the finding that ERβ function is directly proportional to the size of the analyzed polymorphism, so a greater number of repeats implies greater transcription activation, possibly by increasing the function of the complex hormone ERβ receptor and thereby encouraging less feminization or a defeminization of the female brain and behavior. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  18. Detection of Helicobacter pylori vacA, cagA and iceA1 virulence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of Helicobacter pylori vacA, cagA and iceA1 virulence genes associated with gastric diseases in Egyptian patients. ... of cagA/iceA type and we could not detect cagA. The overall vacA, iceA1and cagA genes identified were 61.6%, 38.8%, 26.6% respectively, by PCR-based molecular testing. The vacA gene status ...

  19. 5meCpG epigenetic marks neighboring a primate-conserved core promoter short tandem repeat indicate X-chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Brum Machado

    Full Text Available X-chromosome inactivation (XCI is the epigenetic transcriptional silencing of an X-chromosome during the early stages of embryonic development in female eutherian mammals. XCI assures monoallelic expression in each cell and compensation for dosage-sensitive X-linked genes between females (XX and males (XY. DNA methylation at the carbon-5 position of the cytosine pyrimidine ring in the context of a CpG dinucleotide sequence (5meCpG in promoter regions is a key epigenetic marker for transcriptional gene silencing. Using computational analysis, we revealed an extragenic tandem GAAA repeat 230-bp from the landmark CpG island of the human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 RP2 promoter whose 5meCpG status correlates with XCI. We used this RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat to develop an allele-specific 5meCpG-based PCR assay that is highly concordant with the human androgen receptor (AR exonic tandem CAG repeat-based standard HUMARA assay in discriminating active (Xa from inactive (Xi X-chromosomes. The RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat contains neutral features that are lacking in the AR disease-linked tandem CAG repeat, is highly polymorphic (heterozygosity rates approximately 0.8 and shows minimal variation in the Xa/Xi ratio. The combined informativeness of RP2/AR is approximately 0.97, and this assay excels at determining the 5meCpG status of alleles at the Xp (RP2 and Xq (AR chromosome arms in a single reaction. These findings are relevant and directly translatable to nonhuman primate models of XCI in which the AR CAG-repeat is monomorphic. We conducted the RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat assay in the naturally occurring chimeric New World monkey marmoset (Callitrichidae and found it to be informative. The RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat will facilitate studies on the variable phenotypic expression of dominant and recessive X-linked diseases, epigenetic changes in twins, the physiology of aging hematopoiesis, the pathogenesis of age-related hematopoietic

  20. Effects of Recent Stress and Variation in the Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) on Depressive Symptoms: A Repeated-Measures Study of Adults Age 50 and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpawong, Thalida E; Lee, Jinkook; Phillips, Drystan F; Crimmins, Eileen M; Levine, Morgan E; Prescott, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Depending on genetic sensitivity to it, stress may affect depressive symptomatology differentially. Applying the stress-diathesis hypothesis to older adults, we postulate: (1) recent stress will associate with increased depressive symptom levels and (2) this effect will be greater for individuals with at least one short allele of the serotonin transporter gene promoter region (5-HTTLPR). Further, we employ a design that addresses specific limitations of many prior studies that have examined the 5-HTTLPR × SLE relation, by: (a) using a within-person repeated-measures design to address fluctuations that occur within individuals over time, increase power for detecting G × E, and address GE correlation; (b) studying reports of exogenous stressful events (those unlikely to be caused by depression) to help rule out reverse causation and negativity bias, and in order to assess stressors that are more etiologically relevant to depressive symptomatology in older adults. The sample is drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a U.S. population-based study of older individuals (N = 28,248; mean age = 67.5; 57.3 % female; 80.7 % Non-Hispanic White, 14.9 % Hispanic/Latino, 4.5 % African American; genetic subsample = 12,332), from whom measures of depressive symptoms and exogenous stressors were collected biannually (1994-2010). Variation in the 5-HTTLPR was characterized via haplotype, using two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ordered logit models were constructed to predict levels of depressive symptoms from 5-HTTLPR and stressors, comparing results of the most commonly applied statistical approaches (i.e., comparing allelic and genotypic models, and continuous and categorical predictors) used in the literature. All models were stratified by race/ethnicity. Overall, results show a main effect of recent stress for all ethnic groups, and mixed results for the variation in 5-HTTLPR × stress interaction, contingent upon statistical model used. Findings

  1. Polymorphisms in the AR and PSA genes as markers of susceptibility and aggressiveness in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuasne, Hellen; Rodrigues, Iara Sant'Ana; Fuganti, Paulo Emílio

    2010-01-01

    The study of genes involved in androgen pathway can contribute to a better knowledge of prostate cancer. Our aim was to examine if polymorphisms in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) genes were involved in prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness. Genotypes were determined...... by PCR-RFLP (PSA) or using a 377 ABI DNA Sequencer (AR). PSA(G/G) genotype (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.06–2.99) and AR short CAG repeats (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.21–2.96) increased risk for prostate cancer and were related with tumor aggressiveness. About 38.3% of tumors showed microsatellite instability...

  2. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnett, D. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Association of CagPAI integrity with severeness of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Ghalehnoei, H; Farzi, N; Yadegar, A; Alebouyeh, M; Aghdaei, H A; Molaei, M; Zali, M R; Pour Hossein Gholi, M A

    2015-12-01

    The Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is involved in delivery of CagA effector protein and peptidoglycan into host cells and also in IL-8 induction in the human gastric tissue. Diversity of cagPAI may affect disease status and clinical outcome of the infected patients. Our study was aimed to investigate diversity of this island and its intactness in Iranian patients to investigate possible associations between cagPAI integrity and pathological changes of the infected tissue. Out of the 75 patients, H. pylori strains were obtained from 30 patients with severe active gastritis (SAG) (n=11), moderate chronic gastritis (CG) (n=14) and intestinal metaplasia/dysplasia (IM) (n=5). Intactness of the cagPAI was determined using 12 sets of primer pairs specific for functionally important loci of cagPAI by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cagPAI positive strains were significantly observed in patients with SAG (52.4%) in comparison to those presenting CG (33.3%) and IM (14.3%). In addition, the presence of intact cagPAI was 87.5% in H. pylori strains isolated from patients with SAG, which was higher than those obtained from patients with CG (12.5%) or IM (0%). A significant increase in the frequency of cagα-cagY and cagW-cagT segments, as exterior proteins of the CagPAI, was illustrated in strains from SAG patients compared with those from patients with CG. Overall, these results strongly proposed an association between the severity of histopathological changes and intactness of cagPAI in the gastric tissue of patients infected with H. pylori. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Androgen receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with aggression in Japanese Akita Inu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Akitsugu; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2011-10-23

    We tested for an association between variable number of tandem repeats in the canine androgen receptor (AR) gene and personality differences in Japanese Akita Inu dogs. The polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG) repeat region coding for glutamine in exon 1 of the AR gene was genotyped using genomic DNA obtained from 171 dogs. Three alleles (23, 24 and 26 repeats) were detected, and the allele frequency differed with the coat colour. We assessed the personality profiles of 100 fawn-coloured dogs (54 males and 46 females) based on a questionnaire answered by each dog's owner. The questionnaire consisted of five sub-scales (sociability, playfulness, neuroticism, aggressiveness, distractibility), and the psychometric properties were acceptable based upon internal consistency of the subscales. We found that male dogs with a short allele conferring increased AR function had higher aggressiveness scores than male dogs with longer alleles. By contrast, no evidence was found for a relationship between AR gene variants and personality in females. To our knowledge, our findings provide the first evidence of polymorphism in the AR gene being associated with canine aggression.

  5. Repetições CAG: candidatos na gênese das psicoses funcionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Ivanor Velloso Meira

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O autor discorre sobre a instabilidade do DNA em regiões de repetições CAG e sua associação com doenças que afetam o SNC e apresentam o fenômeno da antecipação genética. Revisa também os achados de antecipação em famílias com transtorno bipolar e esquizofrenia, assim como as investigações com o método RED (Repeat Expansion Detection e com o anticorpo 1C2, que apontam para uma participação desse mecanismo mutacional na determinação genética das psicoses funcionais.

  6. Heterogeneity of cag genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in the esophageal mucosa of dyspeptic patients and its relation to histopathological outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Contreras

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: H. pylori may coexist in similar proportions without dominance of one cag genotype, suggesting a heterogeneous distribution in the esophagus. The cagE and virB11 genes can be used as markers of cag-PAI in the esophagus. The single cag-PAI genotype in both mucosae confers an increased risk of developing histological damage.

  7. DNA CTG triplet repeats involved in dynamic mutations of neurologically related gene sequences form stable duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. K.; Jie, J.; Fox, G. E.; Gao, X.

    1995-01-01

    DNA triplet repeats, 5'-d(CTG)n and 5'-d(CAG)n, are present in genes which have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. To investigate possible stable structures formed by these repeating sequences, we have examined d(CTG)n, d(CAG)n and d(CTG).d(CAG)n (n = 2 and 3) using NMR and UV optical spectroscopy. These studies reveal that single stranded (CTG)n (n > 2) forms stable, antiparallel helical duplexes, while the single stranded (CAG)n requires at least three repeating units to form a duplex. NMR and UV melting experiments show that the Tm increases in the order of [(CAG)3]2 CTG)3]2 CTG)3. The (CTG)3 duplex is stable and exhibits similar NMR spectra in solutions containing 0.1-4 M NaCl and at a pH range from 4.6 to 8.8. The (CTG)3 duplex, which contains multiple-T.T mismatches, displays many NMR spectral characteristics similar to those of B-form DNA. However, unique NOE and 1H-31P coupling patterns associated with the repetitive T.T mismatches in the CTG repeats are discerned. These results, in conjunction with recent in vitro studies suggest that longer CTG repeats may form hairpin structures, which can potentially cause interruption in replication, leading to dynamic expansion or deletion of triplet repeats.

  8. ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat length correlates with risk of ALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sproviero, William; Shatunov, Aleksey; Stahl, Daniel; Shoai, Maryam; van Rheenen, Wouter; Jones, Ashley R; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Andersen, Peter M.; Bonini, Nancy M; Conforti, Francesca L; Van Damme, Philip; Daoud, Hussein; Del Mar Amador, Maria; Fogh, Isabella; Forzan, Monica; Gaastra, Ben; Gellera, Cinzia; Gitler, Aaron D; Hardy, John; Fratta, Pietro; La Bella, Vincenzo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Langenhove, Tim; Lattante, Serena; Lee, Yi-Chung; Malaspina, Andrea; Meininger, Vincent; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Orrell, Richard W; Rademakers, Rosa; Robberecht, Wim; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ross, Owen A; Salachas, Francois; Sidle, Katie; Smith, Bradley N; Soong, Bing-Wen; Sorarù, Gianni; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kabashi, Edor; Troakes, Claire; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Veldink, Jan H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Shaw, Christopher E; Powell, John F.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Two new case-control studies, a British dataset of 1474 ALS cases and 567 controls, and a Dutch dataset of 1328 ALS cases and 691 controls were analyzed. In addition, to increase power, we

  9. Functional association between the Helicobacter pylori virulence factors VacA and CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, Richard H; Thomas, Rachael J; Letley, Darren P; Rittig, Michael G; Hardie, Kim R; Atherton, John C

    2008-02-01

    The Helicobacter pylori virulence factors CagA and VacA are implicated in the development of gastroduodenal diseases. Most strains possessing CagA also possess the more virulent vacuolating form of VacA. This study assessed the significance of possession of both virulence factors in terms of their effect on gastric epithelial cells, using a set of minimally passaged, isogenic VacA, CagA and CagE mutants in H. pylori strains 60190 and 84-183. The cagA and cagE mutants were found to significantly increase VacA-induced vacuolation of epithelial cells, and the vacA mutants significantly increased CagA-induced cellular elongations, compared with wild-type strains, indicating that CagA reduces vacuolation and VacA reduces hummingbird formation. Although epithelial cells incubated with the wild-type H. pylori strains may display both vacuolation and hummingbird formation, it was found that (i) hummingbird length was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells compared with those without vacuolation; (ii) the number of vacuoles was significantly reduced in vacuolated cells with hummingbird formation compared with those without hummingbirds; and (iii) cells displaying extensive vacuolation did not subsequently form hummingbirds and vice versa. VacA did not affect the phosphorylation of CagA. These data show that VacA and CagA downregulate each other's effects on epithelial cells, potentially allowing H. pylori interaction with cells whilst avoiding excessive cellular damage.

  10. Association of heterogenicity of Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island with peptic ulcer diseases and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, J; Prasad, K N; Prakash Rai, R; Ghoshal, U C; Krishnani, N

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the frequency and integrity of certain cag pathogenicity island genes (cagPAI) in Helicobacter pylori strains and their association with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastric cancer. We enrolled 240 adult patients [120 with functional dyspepsia (FD), 50 with PUD and 70 with gastric cancer] undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. H. pylori infection was diagnosed when either culture or any two of the three tests (rapid urease test, histopathology and specific ureA PCR) were positive. DNA extracted from H. pylori isolates and positive gastric tissues were tested by PCR for the presence of different genes of cagPAI using specific primers. A total of 122 (51%) patients were H. pylori positive. Frequencies of cagPAI genes cagA, cagE, cagT and cagM in H. pylori strains from different groups of patients were as follows: functional dyspepsia 73, 83, 76 and 60%, PUD 70, 94, 91, 70% and gastric cancer 75, 95, 90 and 70%, respectively. Risk associated for the presence of PUD and gastric cancer with cagPAI genes cagE, cagT and cagM was 5.0-, 4.6- and 4.1- and 3.0-, 2.8- and 2.5-folds, respectively. Prevalence of intact cagPAI was significantly higher in PUD and gastric cancer compared to functional dyspepsia (PUD vs. functional dyspepsia, 71% vs. 38%, P = 0.01; gastric cancer vs. functional dyspepsia, 75% vs. 38%, P integrity and its different genes are linked to different forms of gastric disease and so may have a role in pathogenesis, diagnosis and management.

  11. Trinucleotide repeat expansion of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1) found in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T; Yu, P; Chen, X; Lopa, M

    1998-02-01

    To investigate the gene mutation and the ratio of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) in Chinese patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (ADSCA). The family material and DNA samples were collected from thirteen families with ADSCA. To determine the characteristics of the CAG trinucleotide repeats in SCA1 gene, the PCR products of the Rep1 and Rep2 primers were analyzed, and the bands with CAG repeat expansion were cloned by PCR2. 1 vector and sequenced. One family was found to have an expanded CAG repeat in the 13 families with ADSCA. The clinically affected individual was heterozygous with one disease allele being 55 CAG repeats, whereas the mean size of the CAG repeats on 104 chromosomes generated from unrelated control Chinese individuals is 29.3 (ranging from 18 to 34). The frequency of the SCA1 mutation is about 7% in the 13 Chinese families with ADSCA, suggesting that this type of genetic defect is not the main cause involved in the pathogenesis of ADSCA in China. Since the mutation has also been found in Caucasian, Japanese, Malaysian, and Bangladeshi kindreds, it is suggested that this genetic defect may well have multiple origins in different ethnic groups.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaiyong; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhan, Gangming; Wei, Guorong; Zhou, Xinli; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyong Luo

    Full Text Available The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus.

  14. Molecular analysis of the eTG trinucleotide repeat in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -4 When amplified, this trinucleotide repeat is responsible for DNA instability and molecular pathology. A similar mechanism of trinucleotide repeat expansion has been described in fragile X mental retardation syndrome. (CGG):·· spinobulbar muscular atrophy (CAG)' and, more. MRC Human Ecogenetics Research Unit, ...

  15. Helicobacter Pylori and CagA: Relationships With Esophageal and Gastroduodenal Disorders in Iranian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Teymournejad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The severity of Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with virulence factors of the bacteria and host immune response. H. pylori has several virulence factors which a number of them are essential to emerge clinical outcomes. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA is the most important H. pylori virulence factor. Objectives: The aim of our study was to assess a significant relationship between presence of cagA and severity of clinical manifestation in esophageal and gastroduodenal disorders. Patients and Methods: A total of 240 gastric biopsies were collected between March 2012 and August 2013 from Tehran's hospitals. Three sets of biopsy specimens were obtained from the antrum and rapid urease tests, histological examination, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assay were performed on the biopsy specimens. Results: One hundred and eight (45% of biopsy specimens were positive with rapid urease test and ureC gene PCR. Moreover, thirty eight (35.1% of positive specimens had cagA gene. The rate of gastric and duodenum inflammation was more in patients who carried CagA positive H. pylori strains. Whereas less inflammation and sever lesions in esophagus were found in CagA negative H. pylori strains. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a strong relationship between CagA and esophageal and gastroduodenal disorders. The number of CagA negative H. pylori was larger than CagA positive in esophagus lesion grade A, C, and D. Therefore, cagA may have a protective effect on some esophageal diseases. In addition, the number of CagA positives was larger than CagA negative H. pylori in gastric antrum and duodenum ulcer. Thus, CagA play a role to emerge peptic and duodenal ulcers.

  16. Absence of MutSbeta leads to the formation of slipped-DNA for CTG/CAG contractions at primate replication forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M.; Panigrahi, Gagan B.; Castel, Arturo López; Pearson, August B.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Pearson, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Typically disease-causing CAG/CTG repeats expand, but rare affected families can display high levels of contraction of the expanded repeat amongst offspring. Understanding instability is important since arresting expansions or enhancing contractions could be clinically beneficial. The MutSβ mismatch repair complex is required for CAG/CTG expansions in mice and patients. Oddly, by unknown mechanisms MutSβ-deficient mice incur contractions instead of expansions. Replication using CTG or CAG as the lagging strand template is known to cause contractions or expansions respectively; however, the interplay between replication and repair leading to this instability remains unclear. Towards understanding how repeat contractions may arise, we performed in vitro SV40-mediated replication of repeat-containing plasmids in the presence or absence of mismatch repair. Specifically, we separated repair from replication: Replication mediated by MutSβ- and MutSα-deficient human cells or cell extracts produced slipped-DNA heteroduplexes in the contraction- but not expansion-biased replication direction. Replication in the presence of MutSβ disfavoured the retention of replication products harbouring slipped-DNA heteroduplexes. Post-replication repair of slipped-DNAs by MutSβ-proficient extracts eliminated slipped-DNAs. Thus, a MutSβ-deficiency likely enhances repeat contractions because MutSβ protects against contractions by repairing template strand slip-outs. Replication deficient in LigaseI or PCNA-interaction mutant LigaseI revealed slipped-DNA formation at lagging strands. Our results reveal that distinct mechanisms lead to expansions or contractions and support inhibition of MutSβ as a therapeutic strategy to enhance the contraction of expanded repeats. PMID:27155933

  17. Absence of MutSβ leads to the formation of slipped-DNA for CTG/CAG contractions at primate replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Castel, Arturo López; Pearson, August B; Tomkinson, Alan E; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-06-01

    Typically disease-causing CAG/CTG repeats expand, but rare affected families can display high levels of contraction of the expanded repeat amongst offspring. Understanding instability is important since arresting expansions or enhancing contractions could be clinically beneficial. The MutSβ mismatch repair complex is required for CAG/CTG expansions in mice and patients. Oddly, by unknown mechanisms MutSβ-deficient mice incur contractions instead of expansions. Replication using CTG or CAG as the lagging strand template is known to cause contractions or expansions respectively; however, the interplay between replication and repair leading to this instability remains unclear. Towards understanding how repeat contractions may arise, we performed in vitro SV40-mediated replication of repeat-containing plasmids in the presence or absence of mismatch repair. Specifically, we separated repair from replication: Replication mediated by MutSβ- and MutSα-deficient human cells or cell extracts produced slipped-DNA heteroduplexes in the contraction- but not expansion-biased replication direction. Replication in the presence of MutSβ disfavoured the retention of replication products harbouring slipped-DNA heteroduplexes. Post-replication repair of slipped-DNAs by MutSβ-proficient extracts eliminated slipped-DNAs. Thus, a MutSβ-deficiency likely enhances repeat contractions because MutSβ protects against contractions by repairing template strand slip-outs. Replication deficient in LigaseI or PCNA-interaction mutant LigaseI revealed slipped-DNA formation at lagging strands. Our results reveal that distinct mechanisms lead to expansions or contractions and support inhibition of MutSβ as a therapeutic strategy to enhance the contraction of expanded repeats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  19. The 5S rRNA-histone repeat in the crustacean Artemia: structure, polymorphism and variation of the 5S rRNA segment in different populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Cruces, Jesús; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita; Gil, Inés; Renart, Jaime

    1989-01-01

    5S rRNA genes are linked to the histonc genes in the 13 populations of the crustacean Artemia that we have studied. In all cases, two types of repeat units arc found. Southern blot analysis of all populations shows that they can be grouped into three classes: a) American bisexuals; b) Eurasian bisexuals, and c) parthenogenetic organisms (all from Eurasia). Restriction analysis of a bisexual population from San Francisco Bay shows that the two repeat units are of 9.0 and 8.5 kb (with minor het...

  20. High-Affinity LNA-DNA Mixmer Probes for Detection of Chromosome-Specific Polymorphisms of 5S rDNA Repeats in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lauriane; Probst, Aline V

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization is a standard technique to visualize specific DNA sequences by hybridization with fluorescent probes and, most commonly, relies on DNA probes generated by nick translation. In this chapter, we describe the use of directly labeled LNA-DNA mixmer probes for the rapid detection of repetitive sequences on Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei spreads. We further demonstrate that due to the high thermal stability of the heteroduplexes and the resulting elevated binding affinity of LNA-DNA mixmer probes for their target DNA, these probes can be used to discriminate between repetitive sequences differing by only a few single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  1. The 5S rRNA-histone repeat in the crustacean Artemia: structure, polymorphism and variation of the 5S rRNA segment in different populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, J; Díaz-Guerra, M; Gil, I; Renart, J

    1989-08-11

    5S rRNA genes are linked to the histone genes in the 13 populations of the crustacean Artemia that we have studied. In all cases, two types of repeat units are found. Southern blot analysis of all populations shows that they can be grouped into three classes: a) American bisexuals; b) Eurasian bisexuals, and c) parthenogenetic organisms (all from Eurasia). Restriction analysis of a bisexual population from San Francisco Bay shows that the two repeat units are of 9.0 and 8.5 kb (with minor heterogeneities of restriction sites). In parthenogenetic organisms, the two repeat units are of approximately 12 kb. Sequencing data from the region of the 5S rRNA from the San Francisco Bay population, shows that in both types of units, the single 5S rRNA gene (315 bp in length), is located 430 bp downstream the 3' regulatory sequences of the H2A gene, the last gene in the histone cluster. We have isolated three clones that contain 5S rRNA sequences. Two of them (one from an American bisexual and the other from a parthenogenetic population) contain histone and 5S rRNA genes, both with the same transcriptional polarity. The third clone, lacking histone genes, is likely to be an orphon derived from the parthenogenetic population.

  2. Discovery and mapping of a new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism and simple sequence repeat panel for large-scale genetic studies and breeding of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegre, Mathilde; Argout, Xavier; Boccara, Michel; Fouet, Olivier; Roguet, Yolande; Bérard, Aurélie; Thévenin, Jean Marc; Chauveau, Aurélie; Rivallan, Ronan; Clement, Didier; Courtois, Brigitte; Gramacho, Karina; Boland-Augé, Anne; Tahi, Mathias; Umaharan, Pathmanathan; Brunel, Dominique; Lanaud, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Theobroma cacao is an economically important tree of several tropical countries. Its genetic improvement is essential to provide protection against major diseases and improve chocolate quality. We discovered and mapped new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (EST-SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and constructed a high-density genetic map. By screening 149 650 ESTs, 5246 SNPs were detected in silico, of which 1536 corresponded to genes with a putative function, while 851 had a clear polymorphic pattern across a collection of genetic resources. In addition, 409 new SSR markers were detected on the Criollo genome. Lastly, 681 new EST-SNPs and 163 new SSRs were added to the pre-existing 418 co-dominant markers to construct a large consensus genetic map. This high-density map and the set of new genetic markers identified in this study are a milestone in cocoa genomics and for marker-assisted breeding. The data are available at http://tropgenedb.cirad.fr.

  3. An RGD helper sequence in CagL of Helicobacter pylori assists in interactions with integrins and injection of CagA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens eConradi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a specific gastric pathogen that colonizes the stomach in more than 50% of the world’s human population. Infection with this bacterium can induce several types of gastric pathology, ranging from chronic gastritis to peptic ulcers and even adenocarcinoma. Virulent H. pylori isolates encode components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS, which form a pilus for the injection of virulence proteins such as CagA into host target cells. This is accomplished by a specialized adhesin on the pilus surface, the protein CagL, a putative VirB5 ortholog, which binds to host cell β1 integrin, triggering subsequent delivery of CagA across the host cell membrane. Like the human extracellular matrix protein fibronectin, CagL contains an RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif and is able to trigger intracellular signaling pathways by RGD-dependent binding to integrins. While CagL binding to host cells is mediated primarily by the RGD motif, we identified an auxiliary binding motif for CagL-integrin interaction. Here, we report on a surface-exposed FEANE (Phe-Glu-Ala-Asn-Glu interaction motif in spatial proximity to the RGD sequence, which enhances the interactions of CagL with integrins. It will be referred to as RGD helper sequence (RHS. Competitive cell adhesion assays with recombinant wild type CagL and point mutants, competition experiments with synthetic cyclic and linear peptides, and peptide array experiments revealed amino acids essential for the interaction of the RHS motif with integrins. Infection experiments indicate that the RHS motif plays a role in the early interaction of H. pylori T4SS with integrin, to trigger signaling and to inject CagA into host cells. We thus postulate that CagL is a versatile T4SS surface protein equipped with at least two motifs to promote binding to integrins, thereby causing aberrant signaling within host cells and facilitating translocation of CagA into host cells, thus contributing directly to H. pylori

  4. Exploration of CAG triplet repeat in nontranslated region of SCA12 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Department of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Kamineni Hospitals, LB Nagar, Hyderabad 500 068, India; Department of Genetic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Princess Al-Jawhara Centre of Excellence in Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah 21589, Kingdom ...

  5. Exploration of CAG triplet repeat in nontranslated region of SCA12 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    linkage disequilibrium information from Indian Genome Vari- ation Database for mapping mutations: SCA12 case study. J. Genet. 88, 55–60. Brussino A., Graziano C., Giobbe D., Ferrone M., Dragone E.,. Arduino C. et al. 2010 Spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 identified in two Italian families may mimic sporadic ataxia. Mov.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of RNA Repeat Expansions That Cause Huntington's Disease and Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; VanEtten, Damian M; Fountain, Matthew A; Yildirim, Ilyas; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-07-11

    RNA repeat expansions cause a host of incurable, genetically defined diseases. The most common class of RNA repeats consists of trinucleotide repeats. These long, repeating transcripts fold into hairpins containing 1 × 1 internal loops that can mediate disease via a variety of mechanism(s) in which RNA is the central player. Two of these disorders are Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1, which are caused by r(CAG) and r(CUG) repeats, respectively. We report the structures of two RNA constructs containing three copies of a r(CAG) [r(3×CAG)] or r(CUG) [r(3×CUG)] motif that were modeled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics. The 1 × 1 internal loops of r(3×CAG) are stabilized by one-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) AA pairs, while those of r(3×CUG) prefer one- or two-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) UU pairs. Assigned chemical shifts for the residues depended on the identity of neighbors or next nearest neighbors. Additional insights into the dynamics of these RNA constructs were gained by molecular dynamics simulations and a discrete path sampling method. Results indicate that the global structures of the RNA are A-form and that the loop regions are dynamic. The results will be useful for understanding the dynamic trajectory of these RNA repeats but also may aid in the development of therapeutics.

  7. ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat length correlates with risk of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproviero, William; Shatunov, Aleksey; Stahl, Daniel; Shoai, Maryam; van Rheenen, Wouter; Jones, Ashley R; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Andersen, Peter M; Bonini, Nancy M; Conforti, Francesca L; Van Damme, Philip; Daoud, Hussein; Del Mar Amador, Maria; Fogh, Isabella; Forzan, Monica; Gaastra, Ben; Gellera, Cinzia; Gitler, Aaron D; Hardy, John; Fratta, Pietro; La Bella, Vincenzo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Langenhove, Tim; Lattante, Serena; Lee, Yi-Chung; Malaspina, Andrea; Meininger, Vincent; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Orrell, Richard; Rademakers, Rosa; Robberecht, Wim; Rouleau, Guy; Ross, Owen A; Salachas, Francois; Sidle, Katie; Smith, Bradley N; Soong, Bing-Wen; Sorarù, Gianni; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kabashi, Edor; Troakes, Claire; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Shaw, Christopher E; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-03-01

    We investigated a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Two new case-control studies, a British dataset of 1474 ALS cases and 567 controls, and a Dutch dataset of 1328 ALS cases and 691 controls were analyzed. In addition, to increase power, we systematically searched PubMed for case-control studies published after 1 August 2010 that investigated the association between ATXN2 intermediate repeats and ALS. We conducted a meta-analysis of the new and existing studies for the relative risks of ATXN2 intermediate repeat alleles of between 24 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats and ALS. There was an overall increased risk of ALS for those carrying intermediate sized trinucleotide repeat alleles (odds ratio 3.06 [95% confidence interval 2.37-3.94]; p = 6 × 10(-18)), with an exponential relationship between repeat length and ALS risk for alleles of 29-32 repeats (R(2) = 0.91, p = 0.0002). No relationship was seen for repeat length and age of onset or survival. In contrast to trinucleotide repeat diseases, intermediate ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat expansion in ALS does not predict age of onset but does predict disease risk. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rediscovery of historical Vitis vinifera varieties from the South Anatolia region by using amplified fragment length polymorphism and simple sequence repeat DNA fingerprinting methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cetiner, Selim

    2013-05-01

    Anatolia played an important role in the diversification and spread of economically important Vitis vinifera varieties. Although several biodiversity studies have been conducted with local cultivars in different regions of Anatolia, our aim is to gain a better knowledge on the biodiversity of endangered historical V. vinifera varieties in the northern Adana region of southern Anatolia, particularly those potentially displaying viticulture characteristics. We also demonstrate the genetic relatedness in a selected subset of widely cultivated and commercialized V. vinifera collection cultivars, which were obtained from the National Grapevine Germplasm located at the Institute of Viticulture, Turkey. In the present study, microsatellites were used in narrowing the sample size from 72 accessions down to a collection of 27 varieties. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms were then employed to determine genetic relatedness among this collection and local V. vinifera cultivars. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster and principal component analyses revealed that Saimbeyli local cultivars form a distinct group, which is distantly related to a selected subset of V. vinifera collection varieties from all over Turkey. To our knowledge, this is the first study conducted with these cultivars. Further preservation and use of these potential viticultural varieties will be helpful to avoid genetic erosion and to promote continued agriculture in the region.

  9. R-loops: targets for nuclease cleavage and repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2018-01-11

    R-loops form when transcribed RNA remains bound to its DNA template to form a stable RNA:DNA hybrid. Stable R-loops form when the RNA is purine-rich, and are further stabilized by DNA secondary structures on the non-template strand. Interestingly, many expandable and disease-causing repeat sequences form stable R-loops, and R-loops can contribute to repeat instability. Repeat expansions are responsible for multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, and several types of ataxias. Recently, it was found that R-loops at an expanded CAG/CTG repeat tract cause DNA breaks as well as repeat instability (Su and Freudenreich, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114, E8392-E8401, 2017). Two factors were identified as causing R-loop-dependent breaks at CAG/CTG tracts: deamination of cytosines and the MutLγ (Mlh1-Mlh3) endonuclease, defining two new mechanisms for how R-loops can generate DNA breaks (Su and Freudenreich, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114, E8392-E8401, 2017). Following R-loop-dependent nicking, base excision repair resulted in repeat instability. These results have implications for human repeat expansion diseases and provide a paradigm for how RNA:DNA hybrids can cause genome instability at structure-forming DNA sequences. This perspective summarizes mechanisms of R-loop-induced fragility at G-rich repeats and new links between DNA breaks and repeat instability.

  10. Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Brucella Typing Reveals Multiple Lineages in Brucella melitensis Currently Endemic in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. In China, brucellosis is recognized as a reemerging disease mainly caused by Brucella melitensis specie. To better understand the currently endemic B. melitensis strains in China, three Brucella genotyping methods were applied to 110 B. melitensis strains obtained in past several years. By MLVA genotyping, five MLVA-8 genotypes were identified, among which genotypes 42 (1-5-3-13-2-2-3-2 was recognized as the predominant genotype, while genotype 63 (1-5-3-13-2-3-3-2 and a novel genotype of 1-5-3-13-2-4-3-2 were second frequently observed. MLVA-16 discerned a total of 57 MLVA-16 genotypes among these Brucella strains, with 41 genotypes being firstly detected and the other 16 genotypes being previously reported. By BruMLSA21 typing, six sequence types (STs were identified, among them ST8 is the most frequently seen in China while the other five STs were firstly detected and designated as ST137, ST138, ST139, ST140, and ST141 by international multilocus sequence typing database. Whole-genome sequence (WGS-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based typing and phylogenetic analysis resolved Chinese B. melitensis strains into five clusters, reflecting the existence of multiple lineages among these Chinese B. melitensis strains. In phylogeny, Chinese lineages are more closely related to strains collected from East Mediterranean and Middle East countries, such as Turkey, Kuwait, and Iraq. In the next few years, MLVA typing will certainly remain an important epidemiological tool for Brucella infection analysis, as it displays a high discriminatory ability and achieves result largely in agreement with WGS-SNP-based typing. However, WGS-SNP-based typing is found to be the most powerful and reliable method in discerning Brucella strains and will be popular used in the future.

  11. Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Brucella Typing Reveals Multiple Lineages in Brucella melitensis Currently Endemic in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingjun; Jing, Zhigang; Di, Dongdong; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Zhicheng; Xu, Quangang; Zhang, Xiyue; Wang, Xun; Ni, Bo; Sun, Xiangxiang; Yan, Chengxu; Yang, Zhen; Tian, Lili; Li, Jinping; Fan, Weixing

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. In China, brucellosis is recognized as a reemerging disease mainly caused by Brucella melitensis specie. To better understand the currently endemic B. melitensis strains in China, three Brucella genotyping methods were applied to 110 B. melitensis strains obtained in past several years. By MLVA genotyping, five MLVA-8 genotypes were identified, among which genotypes 42 (1-5-3-13-2-2-3-2) was recognized as the predominant genotype, while genotype 63 (1-5-3-13-2-3-3-2) and a novel genotype of 1-5-3-13-2-4-3-2 were second frequently observed. MLVA-16 discerned a total of 57 MLVA-16 genotypes among these Brucella strains, with 41 genotypes being firstly detected and the other 16 genotypes being previously reported. By BruMLSA21 typing, six sequence types (STs) were identified, among them ST8 is the most frequently seen in China while the other five STs were firstly detected and designated as ST137, ST138, ST139, ST140, and ST141 by international multilocus sequence typing database. Whole-genome sequence (WGS)-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based typing and phylogenetic analysis resolved Chinese B. melitensis strains into five clusters, reflecting the existence of multiple lineages among these Chinese B. melitensis strains. In phylogeny, Chinese lineages are more closely related to strains collected from East Mediterranean and Middle East countries, such as Turkey, Kuwait, and Iraq. In the next few years, MLVA typing will certainly remain an important epidemiological tool for Brucella infection analysis, as it displays a high discriminatory ability and achieves result largely in agreement with WGS-SNP-based typing. However, WGS-SNP-based typing is found to be the most powerful and reliable method in discerning Brucella strains and will be popular used in the future. PMID:29312964

  12. Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis and Polymorphisms of the , , and Genes in Men with Graves Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyeon Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis characterized by acute attacks of muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Recently, variation in several genes was suggested to be associated with TPP. This study evaluated the genetic predisposition to TPP in terms of the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, androgen receptor (AR, and γ-aminobutyric acid receptor α3 subunit (GABRA3 genes.MethodsThis study enrolled 48 men with Graves disease (GD and TPP, and 48 GD patients without TPP. We compared the frequencies of candidate polymorphisms between the two groups.ResultsThe frequency of the Gly16/Gly16 genotype in ADRB2 was not significantly associated with TPP (P=0.32. More CAG repeats (≥26 in the AR gene were not correlated with TPP (odds ratio [OR], 2.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81 to 8.09; P=0.08. The allele frequency of the TT genotype in the GABRA3 gene was not associated with TPP (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 0.54 to 6.74; P=0.41.ConclusionThe polymorphisms in the ADRB2, AR, and GABRA3 genes could not explain the genetic susceptibility to TPP in Korean men with GD.

  13. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori CagA-Induced Pathogenesis by Methylantcinate B from Antrodia camphorata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jung Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the leading risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Hp virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA interacted with cholesterol-enriched microdomains and leads to induction of inflammation in gastric epithelial cells (AGS. In this study, we identified a triterpenoid methylantcinate B (MAB from the medicinal mushroom Antrodia camphoratawhich inhibited the translocation and phosphorylation of CagA and caused a reduction in hummingbird phenotype in HP-infected AGS cells. Additionally, MAB suppressed the Hp-induced inflammatory response by attenuation of NF-κB activation, translocation of p65 NF-κB, and phosphorylation of IκB-α, indicating that MAB modulates CagA-mediated signaling pathway. Additionally, MAB also suppressed the IL-8 luciferase activity and its secretion in HP-infected AGS cells. On the other hand, molecular structure simulations revealed that MAB interacts with CagA similarly to that of cholesterol. Moreover, binding of cholesterol to the immobilized CagA was inhibited by increased levels of MAB. Our results demonstrate that MAB is the first natural triterpenoid which competes with cholesterol bound to CagA leading to attenuation of Hp-induced pathogenesis of epithelial cells. Thus, this study indicates that MAB may have a scope to develop as a therapeutic candidate against Hp CagA-induced inflammation.

  14. Detection of Helicobacter pylori vacA, cagA and iceA1 virulence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed El-Shenawy

    could not detect cagA. The overall vacA, iceA1and cagA genes identified were 61.6%, 38.8%, 26.6% respec- tively, by PCR-based molecular testing. The vacA gene status was highly significant related to gastritis patient (P. 0.036). The vacA s1m1 and s2m2 alleles were significantly found in 50% of H. pylori infected patients ...

  15. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backert Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA and HopZ and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS. The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Backert, Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA\\/B, SabA, AlpA\\/B, OipA and HopZ) and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA\\/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  17. A peptidylic inhibitor for neutralizing expanded CAG RNA-induced nucleolar stress in polyglutamine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Zhefan Stephen; An, Ying; Liu, Haizhen; Hou, Yonghui; Li, Wen; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Koon, Alex; Ngo, Jacky; Chan, Edwin

    2018-01-02

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are a set of progressive neurodegenerative disorders ascribed by the expression of both expanded CAG RNA and misfolded polyQ protein. We previously reported that the direct interaction between expanded CAG RNA and nucleolar protein nucleolin (NCL) leads to impediment of pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) transcription, and eventually triggers nucleolar stress-induced apoptosis in polyQ diseases. Here, we report a 21-amino acid peptide, named beta-structured inhibitor for neurodegenerative disease (BIND), effectively suppresses expanded CAG RNA toxicity. When administrated to cell model, BIND potently inhibited expanded CAG RNA-induced cell death with an IC50 value of ~0.7 µM. We showed that Glu2, Lys13, Gly14, Ile18, Glu19 and Phe20 of BIND are essential for its function. BIND treatment restored the subcellular localization of nucleolar marker protein and the expression level of pre-45s rRNA. Our isothermal titration calorimetry analysis demonstrates that BIND suppresses nucleolar stress via a direct interaction with CAG RNA in a length preference manner. The mean binding constant (KD) of BIND to SCA2CAG22/42/55/72 RNA is 17.28, 5.60, 4.83 and 0.66 µM respectively. In vivo, BIND ameliorates eye degeneration, climbing defect and extends lifespan of Drosophila solely expressed expanded CAG RNA. It could also suppress neurodegeneration in diverse polyQ disease models in vivo and in vitro without eliciting any observed cytotoxicity. Collectively, BIND is considered as an effective inhibitor targeting expanded CAG RNA toxicity in polyQ diseases. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. The effect of CagA status on response to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in Western Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saruç

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available If cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA status affects the response rates of therapy, then it may be possible to predict Helicobacter pylori eradication rates. We aimed to evaluate the response to eradication treatment of H. pylori infection in CagA-positive and CagA-negative patients. A total of 184 patients (93 males, 91 females, mean age 42.6 ± 12.8 years with H. pylori-positive chronic gastritis were studied. Subjects underwent a gastroscopy and biopsy specimens were taken from the gastric antrum, body, and fundus. Before the eradication therapy was given all patients were tested for CagA, TNF-alpha and gastrin levels. They were then prescribed lansoprazole (30 mg bid, clarithromycin (500 mg bid, and amoxicillin (1.0 mg bid for one week. On the 8th week a second endoscopy was performed and further biopsy specimens were obtained from the same sites as in the initial endoscopy. One hundred and twenty-seven patients (69.1% were found to be CagA positive and 57 patients (30.9% were CagA negative. The total eradication rate was 82.6%. In the CagA-positive group this rate was 87.4%, and in the CagA-negative group it was 71.9% (P = 0.019. TNF-alpha levels were higher in the CagA-positive than in the CagA-negative group (P = 0.001. However, gastrin levels were not different between groups (P = 0.421. Our findings revealed that CagA-negative status might be a risk factor for failure of H. pylori triple therapies. The CagA pathogenicity island gives a growth advantage to H. pylori strains and has been associated with an increase in the inflammatory response at the gastric mucosal level. These properties could make CagA-positive H. pylori strains more susceptible to antibiotics.

  19. PSA and androgen-related gene (AR, CYP17, and CYP19) polymorphisms and the risk of adenocarcinoma at prostate biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Mattos; de Jesus, Carlos Márcio Nóbrega; Trindade Filho, José Carlos Souza

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of polymorphisms in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and androgen-related genes (AR, CYP17, and CYP19) on prostate cancer (PCa) risk in selected high-risk patients who underwent prostate biopsy. Blood samples and prostate tissues were obtained...... for DNA analysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 50-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the PSA (substitution A>G at position-158) and CYP17 (substitution T>C at 50-UTR) genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism assays. The CAG and TTTA repeats...... in the AR and CYP19 genes, respectively, were genotyped by PCR-based GeneScan analysis. Patients with the GG genotype of the PSA gene had a higher risk of PCa than those with the AG or AA genotype (OR=3.79, p=0.00138). The AA genotype was associated with lower PSA levels (6.44 +/- 1.64 ng=mL) compared...

  20. Fragmentation of CagA Reduces Hummingbird Phenotype Induction by Helicobactor pylori.

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    Chih-Chi Chang

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori has been linked to various gastro-intestinal diseases; nevertheless it remains to be clarified why only a minority of infected individuals develop illness. Studies from the West have indicated that the cagA gene and the associated EPIYA genotype of H. pylori is closely linked to the development of severe gastritis and gastric carcinoma; however, as yet no consistent correlation has been found among the bacteria from East Asia. In addition to genotype variation, the CagA protein undergoes fragmentation; however, the functional significance of fragmentation with respect to H. pylori infection remains unknown. In this study, we isolated 594 H. pylori colonies from 99 patients and examined the fragmentation patterns of CagA protein using immunoblotting. By analyzing the ability of the isolates to induce the host cell morphological transition to the highly invasive hummingbird phenotype, we demonstrated that H. pylori colonies with substantial CagA fragmentation are less potent in terms of causing this morphological transition. Our results uncovered a functional role for CagA fragmentation with respect to H. pylori-induced hummingbird phenotype formation and these findings suggest the possibility that the post-translational processing of CagA may be involved in H. pylori infection pathogenesis.

  1. Association of CCR5-59029 A/G and CCL3L1 copy number polymorphism with HIV type 1 transmission/progression among HIV type 1-seropositive and repeatedly sexually exposed HIV type 1-seronegative North Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag; Chatterjee, Animesh; Sivarama, P; Yamamoto, Naohiko; Singhal, Pradeep K; Dhole, Tapan N

    2009-11-01

    The CCR5Delta32 mutation does not account for HIV-1 resistance in the majority of persons who are repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 by high-risk activities but remain seronegative and uninfected. Therefore, we investigated the impact of CCR5 59029 A/G and CCL3L1 copy number polymorphism on HIV-1 disease susceptibility and progression among HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-exposed seronegative North Indians. HIV-1-seropositive (HSP, n = 196) patients, stratified on the basis of disease severity (Stages I, II, and III) and HIV-1-exposed seronegative (HES, n = 47) individuals were genotyped for CCR5-59029 A/G polymorphism by PCR-RFLP and CCL3L1 copy number by the real-time TaqMan PCR method. A group of ethnically matched HIV-1-seronegative (HSN, n = 315) healthy volunteers were also genotyped as controls. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS software. The CCR5-59029 AG genotype was significantly higher in the HES compared with the HSP group (57.44% vs. 37.24%, p = 0.014). The CCL3L1 mean copy number of HES was higher compared with the HSP groups (3.148 +/- 0.291 vs. 2.795 +/- 0.122, p = 0.212), but was not significant when compared with independent samples t test. Possession of CCL3L1 copies 2 was not associated with enhanced or reduced risk of HIV-1 acquisition. Gene-gene interaction studies showed enrichment of the CCR5-59029AG*CCL3L1>2 genotype in the HES group when compared with the HSP group (31.91% vs. 15.81%, p = 0.021, OR = 0.401, CI = 0.194-0.826). The increased frequency of the CCR5-59029AG*CCL3L1>2 genotype among HES individuals led us to conclude that the CCR5-59029 AG genotype and CCL3L1 gene dose appeared to have synergistic or interactive effects and are expected to be involved in the host innate resistance to HIV-1 infection.

  2. Burden of Hospital Admission and Repeat Angiography in Angina Pectoris Patients with and without Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lasse; Abildstrom, Steen Z; Hvelplund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    -, and 3-vessel disease, respectively (all Prepeat CAG with multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries being 2.3(1.9-2.9), for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 5.5(4.4-6.8) and for obstructive CAD...... 6.6-9.4(range)(all Pnon-obstructive CAD suffer from considerably greater CVD burdens in terms of hospitalization for CVD and repeat CAG compared with asymptomatic reference......AIMS: To evaluate risk of hospitalization due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and repeat coronary angiography (CAG) in stable angina pectoris (SAP) with no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) versus obstructive CAD, and asymptomatic reference individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed 11...

  3. Helicobacter pylori cagA+ Is Associated with Milder Duodenal Histological Changes in Chilean Celiac Patients

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    Yalda Lucero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available HIGHLIGHTSWhat is already known about this subject?Celiac disease (CD has a high clinical and histological diversity and the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain elusive.H. pylori is a bacterium that chronically infect gastric and duodenal mucosa activating both a Th1/Th17 and T-reg pathways.The role of H. pylori (and the effect of their virulence factors in CD have not yet completely elucidated.What are the new findings?cagA+ H. pylori strains are associated to milder histological damage in infected CD patients.In active-CD patients the presence of cagA+ H. pylori is associated to an increase in T-reg markers, contrasting with a downregulation in cagA+ infected potential-CD individuals.How might it impact on clinical practice in the foreseeable future?The identification of microbiological factors that could modulate inflammation and clinical expression of CD may be used in the future as preventive strategies or as supplementary treatment in patients that cannot achieve complete remission, contributing to the better care of these patients.Background: Mechanisms underlying the high clinical and histological diversity of celiac disease (CD remain elusive. Helicobacter pylori (Hp chronically infects gastric and duodenal mucosa and has been associated with protection against some immune-mediated conditions, but its role (specifically of cagA+ strains in CD is unclear.Objective: To assess the relationship between gastric Hp infection (cagA+ strains and duodenal histological damage in patients with CD.Design: Case-control study including patients with active-CD, potential-CD and non-celiac individuals. Clinical presentation, HLA genotype, Hp/cagA gene detection in gastric mucosa, duodenal histology, Foxp3 positive cells and TGF-β expression in duodenal lamina propria were analyzed.Results: We recruited 116 patients, 29 active-CD, 37 potential-CD, and 50 non-CD controls. Hp detection was similar in the three groups (~30–40%, but cag

  4. Size matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbo, T; Macek, M; Chrudimska, J

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell (GC) expressed androgen receptors (AR) and intrafollicular androgens are central to fertility. The transactivating domain of the AR contains a polymorphic CAG repeat sequence, which is linked to the transcriptional activity of AR and may influence the GC function. This study aims...... to evaluate the effects of the AR CAG repeat length on the intrafollicular hormone profiles, and the gene expression profiles of GC from human small antral follicles. In total, 190 small antral follicles (3-11 mm in diameter) were collected from 58 women undergoing ovarian cryopreservation for fertility...... preservation. The biallelic mean of the CAG repeat lengths were calculated for each woman, and grouped in three groups: Long CAG repeats (23-26 mean CAG); medium CAG repeats (20.5-22.5 mean CAG) and short CAG repeats (17.5-20.0 mean CAG). The following parameters were measured: follicle diameter...

  5. Use of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat Sequence Polymorphisms for Specific Detection of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Strains of Serotypes O26:H11, O45:H2, O103:H2, O111:H8, O121:H19, O145:H28, and O157:H7 by Real-Time PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar; Fach, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We explored the genetic diversity of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) to design simplex real-time PCR assays for each of the seven most important EHEC serotypes worldwide. A panel of 958 E. coli strains investigated for their CRISPR loci by high-throughput real-time PCR showed that CRISPR polymorphisms in E. coli strongly correlated with both O:H serotypes and the presence of EHEC virulence factors (stx ...

  6. Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genotypes in Cuban and Venezuelan populations

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    Diana Ortiz-Princz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA/vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA among patients with chronic gastritis in Cuba and Venezuela. Gastric antrum biopsies were taken for culture, DNA extraction and PCR analysis. Amplification of vacA and cagA segments was performed using two regions of cagA: 349 bp were amplified with the F1/B1 primers and the remaining 335 bp were amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers. The VA1-F/VA1-R set of primers was used to amplify the 259-bp (s1 or 286-bp (s2 product and the VAG-R/VAG-F set of primers was used to amplify the 567-bp (m1 or 642-bp (m2 regions of vacA. cagA was detected in 87% of the antral samples from Cuban patients and 80.3% of those from Venezuelan patients. All possible combinations of vacA regions were found, with the exception of s2/m1. The predominant combination found in both countries was s1/m1. The percentage of cagA+ strains was increased by the use of a second set of primers and a greater number of strains was amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers in the Cuban patients (p = 0.0001. There was no significant difference between the presence of the allelic variants of vacA and cagA in both populations. The predominant genotype was cagA+/s1m1 in both countries. The results support the necessary investigation of isolates circulating among the human population in each region.

  7. A novel basolateral type IV secretion model for the CagA oncoprotein of Helicobacter pylori

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    Silja Wessler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular junctions are crucial structural elements for the formation and maintenance of epithelial barrier functions to control homeostasis or protect against intruding pathogens in humans. Alterations in these complexes represent key events in the development and progression of numerous cancers as well as multiple infectious diseases. Many bacterial pathogens harbor type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, which translocate virulence factors into host cells to hijack cellular processes. The pathology of the gastric pathogen and type-I carcinogen Helicobacter pylori strongly depends on a T4SS encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI. This T4SS forms a needle-like pilus and its activity is accomplished by the pilus-associated factors CagL, CagI and CagY which target the host integrin-β1 receptor followed by injection of the CagA oncoprotein into non-polarized AGS gastric epithelial cells. The finding of a T4SS receptor, however, suggested the presence of a sophisticated control mechanism for the injection of CagA. In fact, integrins constitute a group of basolateral receptors, which are normally absent at apical surfaces of the polarized epithelium in vivo. Our new results demonstrate that T4SS-pilus formation during H. pylori infection of polarized epithelial cells occurs preferentially at basolateral sites, and not at apical membranes (Tegtmeyer et al., 2017. We propose a stepwise process how H. pylori interacts with components of intercellular tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs, followed by contacting integrin-based focal adhesions to disrupt and transform the epithelial cell layer in the human stomach. The possible impact of this novel signaling cascade on pathogenesis during infection is reviewed.

  8. Evaluation of the Epidemiological Relevance of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis and Comparison of the Method with IS6110 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis and Spoligotyping†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allix, Caroline; Walravens, Karl; Saegerman, Claude; Godfroid, Jacques; Supply, Philip; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse

    2006-01-01

    Sources of Mycobacterium bovis contamination remain unclear for many cases of animal and human disease. A major limitation is the lack of sufficiently informative or epidemiologically well evaluated molecular methods for typing. Here, we report an evaluation of a high-throughput method based on 29 mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) loci to genotype 127 M. bovis isolates from cattle from 77 different Belgian farms, representative of a nationwide collection obtained from 1995 to 2003. MIRU-VNTR stability was demonstrated by analyzing a series of 74 isolates in total, obtained from different animals from a single farm or from different farms with an identified epidemiological link. The genotyping results and the genotypic diversity (h) were compared with those obtained by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and spoligotyping. Among 68 isolates with no known epidemiological link, MIRU-VNTR typing discriminated better than either RFLP analysis or spoligotyping, with isolates taken individually (32 versus 16 and 17 genotypes; h = 0.91 versus 0.73 and 0.85, respectively) or in combination (32 versus 28 genotypes; h = 0.91 versus 0.92). Maximal resolution was already achieved with a subset of 9 loci. The observed congruence of the genetic relationships based on IS6110 RFLP analysis, spoligotyping, and MIRU-VNTR markers is consistent with a clonal population structure of M. bovis. These results support MIRU-VNTR typing as a convenient and discriminatory technique for analysis of the population structure of M. bovis in much greater detail and for addressing some still unresolved issues in the epidemiology of the pathogen. PMID:16757584

  9. Differential Mechanisms for SHP2 Binding and Activation Are Exploited by Geographically Distinct Helicobacter pylori CagA Oncoproteins

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    Takeru Hayashi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori East Asian CagA is more closely associated with gastric cancer than Western CagA. Here we show that, upon tyrosine phosphorylation, the East Asian CagA-specific EPIYA-D segment binds to the N-SH2 domain of pro-oncogenic SHP2 phosphatase two orders of magnitude greater than Western CagA-specific EPIYA-C. This high-affinity binding is achieved via cryptic interaction between Phe at the +5 position from phosphotyrosine in EPIYA-D and a hollow on the N-SH2 phosphopeptide-binding floor. Also, duplication of EPIYA-C in Western CagA, which increases gastric cancer risk, enables divalent high-affinity binding with SHP2 via N-SH2 and C-SH2. These strong CagA bindings enforce enzymatic activation of SHP2, which endows cells with neoplastic traits. Mechanistically, N-SH2 in SHP2 is in an equilibrium between stimulatory “relaxed” and inhibitory “squeezed” states, which is fixed upon high-affinity CagA binding to the “relaxed” state that stimulates SHP2. Accordingly, East Asian CagA and Western CagA exploit distinct mechanisms for SHP2 deregulation.

  10. Repeat associated non-ATG translation initiation: one DNA, two transcripts, seven reading frames, potentially nine toxic entities!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Pearson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Diseases associated with unstable repetitive elements in the DNA, RNA, and amino acids have consistently revealed scientific surprises. Most diseases are caused by expansions of trinucleotide repeats, which ultimately lead to diseases like Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, fragile X syndrome, and a series of spinocerebellar ataxias. These repeat mutations are dynamic, changing through generations and within an individual, and the repeats can be bi-directionally transcribed. Unsuspected modes of pathogenesis involve aberrant loss of protein expression; aberrant over-expression of non-mutant proteins; toxic-gain-of-protein function through expanded polyglutamine tracts that are encoded by expanded CAG tracts; and RNA-toxic-gain-of-function caused by transcripts harboring expanded CUG, CAG, or CGG tracts. A recent advance reveals that RNA transcripts with expanded CAG repeats can be translated in the complete absence of a starting ATG, and this Repeat Associated Non-ATG translation (RAN-translation occurs across expanded CAG repeats in all reading frames (CAG, AGC, and GCA to produce homopolymeric proteins of long polyglutamine, polyserine, and polyalanine tracts. Expanded CTG tracts expressing CUG transcripts also show RAN-translation occurring in all three frames (CUG, UGC, and GCU, to produce polyleucine, polycysteine, and polyalanine. These RAN-translation products can be toxic. Thus, one unstable (CAG•(CTG DNA can produce two expanded repeat transcripts and homopolymeric proteins with reading frames (the AUG-directed polyGln and six RAN-translation proteins, yielding a total of potentially nine toxic entities. The occurrence of RAN-translation in patient tissues expands our horizons of modes of disease pathogenesis. Moreover, since RAN-translation counters the canonical requirements of translation initiation, many new questions are now posed that must be addressed. This review covers RAN-translation and some of the pertinent

  11. Early Molecular Events in Murine Gastric Epithelial Cells Mediated by Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Basu, Malini; Blanchard, Thomas G; Chintalacharuvu, Subba R; Guang, Wei; Lillehoj, Erik P; Czinn, Steven J

    2016-10-01

    Murine models of Helicobacter pylori infection are used to study host-pathogen interactions, but lack of severe gastritis in this model has limited its usefulness in studying pathogenesis. We compared the murine gastric epithelial cell line GSM06 to the human gastric epithelial AGS cell line to determine whether similar events occur when cultured with H. pylori. The lysates of cells infected with H. pylori isolates or an isogenic cagA-deficient mutant were assessed for translocation and phosphorylation of CagA and for activation of stress pathway kinases by immunoblot. Phosphorylated CagA was detected in both cell lines within 60 minutes. Phospho-ERK 1/2 was present within several minutes and distinctly present in GSM06 cells at 60 minutes. Similar results were obtained for phospho-JNK, although the 54 kDa phosphoprotein signal was dominant in AGS, whereas the lower molecular weight band was dominant in GSM06 cells. These results demonstrate that early events in H. pylori pathogenesis occur within mouse epithelial cells similar to human cells and therefore support the use of the mouse model for the study of acute CagA-associated host cell responses. These results also indicate that reduced disease in H. pylori-infected mice may be due to lack of the Cag PAI, or by differences in the mouse response downstream of the initial activation events. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) in an Egyptian family presenting with polyphagia and marked CAG expansion in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aleem, Alice; Zaki, Maha S

    2008-03-01

    We describe an Egyptian family having SCA2 affecting three generations with marked molecular and clinical anticipation observed in the index case. Our proband was a male child starting as early as 2 years old with progressive extrapyramidal manifestations, slow eye movements and cognitive impairment. A history of nonspecific mild developmental delay was recorded. The patient lost all cognitive functions, had persistent dystonic posture, trophic changes, vasomotor instability, dysphagia and died at the age of 7 years. The age at presentation among other affected family members varied between 11 and 45 years old across three generations. The early common neurological symptoms were choreoathetotic movements, myoclonic jerk, gait difficulty, expressionless face and emotional liability. Later, overt ataxia, incoordination, dysarthria, mild dementia and slow eye saccades predominated. Brisk tendon reflexes were detected in three cases. Peripheral nerve affection was a late manifestation. Interestingly, polyphagia and obesity were striking manifestations in the middle stage of the disease; an observation that might support a previously suggested relation between the ataxin-2 gene and body weight. The proband showed an amplified allele with marked CAG expansion in the form of a smear sized 69-75 repeats resulted from maternal transmission. To our knowledge, our index case is the second report in the literature presenting with infantile onset SCA2 and intermediate repeat expansion. This family expands the phenotypic spectrum of early onset SCA2 and points out the importance of considering SCA2 gene analysis in children with progressive neurological impairment and abnormal movements with or without polyphagia.

  13. Structural basis for triplet repeat disorders: a computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, P; Brunak, S; Chauvin, Y; Pedersen, A G

    1999-11-01

    Over a dozen major degenerative disorders, including myotonic distrophy, Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome, result from unstable expansions of particular trinucleotides. Remarkably, only some of all the possible triplets, namely CAG/CTG, CGG/CCG and GAA/TTC, have been associated with the known pathological expansions. This raises some basic questions at the DNA level. Why do particular triplets seem to be singled out? What is the mechanism for their expansion and how does it depend on the triplet itself? Could other triplets or longer repeats be involved in other diseases? Using several different computational models of DNA structure, we show that the triplets involved in the pathological repeats generally fall into extreme classes. Thus, CAG/CTG repeats are particularly flexible, whereas GCC, CGG and GAA repeats appear to display both flexible and rigid (but curved) characteristics depending on the method of analysis. The fact that (1) trinucleotide repeats often become increasingly unstable when they exceed a length of approximately 50 repeats, and (2) repeated 12-mers display a similar increase in instability above 13 repeats, together suggest that approximately 150 bp is a general threshold length for repeat instability. Since this is about the length of DNA wrapped up in a single nucleosome core particle, we speculate that chromatin structure may play an important role in the expansion mechanism. We furthermore suggest that expansion of a dodecamer repeat, which we predict to have very high flexibility, may play a role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorder multiple system atrophy (MSA). pfbaldi@ics.uci.edu, yves@netid.com, brunak@cbs.dtu.dk, gorm@cbs.dtu.dk.

  14. Characterization of the Cag pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori from naturally infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Emma C; Deck, Samuel L; Entwistle, Hasan D; Hansen, Lori M; Solnick, Jay V

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori commonly infects the epithelial layer of the human stomach and in some individuals causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma or gastric lymphoma. Helicobacter pylori is a genetically diverse species, and the most important bacterial virulence factor that increases the risk of developing disease, versus asymptomatic colonization, is the cytotoxin associated gene pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Socially housed rhesus macaques are often naturally infected with H. pylori similar to that which colonizes humans, but little is known about the cagPAI. Here we show that H. pylori strains isolated from naturally infected rhesus macaques have a cagPAI very similar to that found in human clinical isolates, and like human isolates, it encodes a functional type IV secretion system. These results provide further support for the relevance of rhesus macaques as a valid experimental model for H. pylori infection in humans. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Antibacterial activity of grape extracts on cagA-positive and -negative Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, S; D'Addario, C; Braconi, D; Bernardini, G; Salvini, L; Bonechi, C; Figura, N; Santucci, A; Rossi, C

    2009-11-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative/adjuvant approaches for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori using biologically active compounds, especially antioxidants from plants. In the present work, we tested the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of hydro-alcoholic extracts from Colorino, Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon grape cultivars against H. pylori G21 (cagA-negative, cagA-) and 10K, (cagApositive, cagA+) clinical isolates. We determined the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) by incubating strain suspensions in Brucella broth with fetal bovine serum and samples at different concentrations in a final volume of 100 microl in a microaerobic atmosphere. After incubation, subcultures were carried out on Brucella agar plates which were incubated for 3-5 days in a microaerobic environment. The lowest concentration in broth, where the subculture on agar showed complete absence of growth, was considered the MBC.The Colorino extract showed the highest antibacterial activity against G21 strain (MBC=1.35 mg/ml), while Sangiovese and Carbernet MBCs were 4.0 mg/ml ca. H. pylori 10K was only susceptible to Colorino after 48 hours (MBC = 3.57 mg/ml). Resveratrol exhibited the highest antibacterial activity. interestingly, the most pathogenic strain (10K) was less susceptible to both the grape extracts and the isolated compounds. These results suggest that the administration of grape extracts and wine constituents, in addition to antibiotics, might be useful in the treatment of H. pylori infection. Should the reduced susceptibility of 10K strain be extended to all the cagA+ H. pylori isolates, which are endowed with cancer promoter activity, this observation may help explain why the organisms expressing CagA are more closely associated with atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinoma development.

  16. Helicobacter pylori cag-Pathogenicity island-dependent early immunological response triggers later precancerous gastric changes in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Tobias; Loell, Eva; Mueller, Susanna; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Stolte, Manfred; Haas, Rainer; Rieder, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori, carrying a functional cag type IV secretion system (cag-T4SS) to inject the Cytotoxin associated antigen (CagA) into gastric cells, is associated with an increased risk for severe gastric diseases in humans. Here we studied the pathomechanism of H. pylori and the role of the cag-pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) for the induction of gastric ulcer and precancerous conditions over time (2-64 weeks) using the Mongolian gerbil model. Animals were challenged with H. pylori B128 (WT), or an isogenic B128DeltacagY mutant-strain that produces CagA, but is unable to translocate it into gastric cells. H. pylori colonization density was quantified in antrum and corpus mucosa separately. Paraffin sections were graded for inflammation and histological changes verified by immunohistochemistry. Physiological and inflammatory markers were quantitated by RIA and RT-PCR, respectively. An early cag-T4SS-dependent inflammation of the corpus mucosa (4-8 weeks) occurred only in WT-infected animals, resulting in a severe active and chronic gastritis with a significant increase of proinflammatory cytokines, mucous gland metaplasia, and atrophy of the parietal cells. At late time points only WT-infected animals developed hypochlorhydria and hypergastrinemia in parallel to gastric ulcers, gastritis cystica profunda, and focal dysplasia. The early cag-PAI-dependent immunological response triggers later physiological and histopathological alterations towards gastric malignancies.

  17. Helicobacter pylori cag-Pathogenicity island-dependent early immunological response triggers later precancerous gastric changes in Mongolian gerbils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wiedemann

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori, carrying a functional cag type IV secretion system (cag-T4SS to inject the Cytotoxin associated antigen (CagA into gastric cells, is associated with an increased risk for severe gastric diseases in humans. Here we studied the pathomechanism of H. pylori and the role of the cag-pathogenicity island (cag-PAI for the induction of gastric ulcer and precancerous conditions over time (2-64 weeks using the Mongolian gerbil model. Animals were challenged with H. pylori B128 (WT, or an isogenic B128DeltacagY mutant-strain that produces CagA, but is unable to translocate it into gastric cells. H. pylori colonization density was quantified in antrum and corpus mucosa separately. Paraffin sections were graded for inflammation and histological changes verified by immunohistochemistry. Physiological and inflammatory markers were quantitated by RIA and RT-PCR, respectively. An early cag-T4SS-dependent inflammation of the corpus mucosa (4-8 weeks occurred only in WT-infected animals, resulting in a severe active and chronic gastritis with a significant increase of proinflammatory cytokines, mucous gland metaplasia, and atrophy of the parietal cells. At late time points only WT-infected animals developed hypochlorhydria and hypergastrinemia in parallel to gastric ulcers, gastritis cystica profunda, and focal dysplasia. The early cag-PAI-dependent immunological response triggers later physiological and histopathological alterations towards gastric malignancies.

  18. "We are part of a family". Benefits and limitations of community ART groups (CAGs) in Thyolo, Malawi: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, Umberto; Baert, Saar; Nundwe, Spencer; Bwanali, Andy; Zamadenga, Bote; Metcalf, Carol A; Bygrave, Helen; Daho, Sarah; Ohler, Liesbet; Chibwandira, Brown; Kanyimbo, Kennedy

    2017-03-28

    In 2012 Community ART Groups (CAGs), a community-based model of antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery were piloted in Thyolo District, Malawi as a way to overcome patient barriers to accessing treatment, and to decrease healthcare workers' workload. CAGs are self-formed groups of patients on ART taking turns to collect ART refills for all group members from the health facility. We conducted a qualitative study to assess the benefits and challenges of CAGs from patients' and healthcare workers' (HCWs) perspectives. Data were collected by means of 15 focus group discussions, 15 individual in-depth interviews, and participant observation in 2 health centres. The 94 study participants included CAG members, ART patients eligible for CAGs who remained in conventional care, former CAG members who returned to conventional care and HCWs responsible for providing HIV care. Patient participants were purposively selected from ART registers, taking into account age and gender. Narratives were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated from Chichewa to English. Data were analyzed through a thematic analysis. Patients and HCWs spoke favourably about the practical benefits of CAGs. Patient benefits included a reduced frequency of clinic visits, resulting in reduced transportation costs and time savings. HCW benefits included a reduced workload. Additionally peer support was perceived as an added value of the groups allowing not only sharing of the logistical constraints of drugs refills, but also enhanced emotional support. Identified barriers to joining a CAG included a lack of information on CAGs, unwillingness to disclose one's HIV status, change of residence and conflicts among CAG members. Participants reported that HIV-related stigma persists and CAGs were seen as an effective strategy to reduce exposure to discriminatory labelling by community members. In this setting, patients and HCWs perceived CAGs to be an acceptable model of ART delivery. Despite addressing important

  19. Influence of H. pylori CagA Coupled with Alcohol Consumption on Cytokine Profiles in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Baoge; Han, Xinghai; Ren, Guangying; Jia, Yiguo; Liu, Yuanxun; Su, Jiliang; Wang, Zhongdong; Wang, Yafei; Wang, Hui; Pan, Jindun; Liu, Li-Li; Hu, Wen-Juan

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) coupled with chronic alcohol ingestion on cytokine profiles.A total of 215 male subjects were divided into the following 4 groups: 130 alcohol H pylori CagA-negative consumers (CagA-) (group A), 50 alcohol H pylori CagA-positive consumers (CagA+) (group B), 24 nonalcohol H pylori CagA-negative consumers (group C), and 11 nonalcohol H pylori CagA-positive consumers (group D). The serum CagA, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, E-selectin, adiponectin (ADP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs).After adjusting for age and mean alcohol drinking history, a multivariable linear regression analysis revealed that the mean daily alcohol consumption, IL-6, TNF-α, and ADP levels were significantly increased with increases in the serum CagA concentrations (P = 0.008, P = 0.000, P = 0.000, and P = 0.006, respectively). The serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels of group A were significantly lower than those of group B (all P = 0.000). Furthermore, the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels of groups A and C were significantly lower than those of group D (all P = 0.000), and the serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels of group C were significantly lower than those of group B (all P = 0.000). The serum ADP and E-selectin levels of groups B and D were significantly higher than those of group A (P = 0.000). The serum ADP levels of group B were significantly higher than those of group C (P = 0.000), and the serum ADP and E-selectin levels of group C were significantly lower than those of group D (P = 0.000 and P = 0.005, respectively). Finally, the serum TNF-α levels of groups B, C, and D were significantly higher than those of group A (all P = 0.000), and the serum TNF-α levels of group C were significantly higher than those of group D (P = 0.005).In

  20. H. pylori virulence factor CagA increases intestinal cell proliferation by Wnt pathway activation in a transgenic zebrafish model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T. Neal

    2013-05-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, and infection with strains carrying the virulence factor CagA significantly increases this risk. To investigate the mechanisms by which CagA promotes carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing CagA ubiquitously or in the anterior intestine. Transgenic zebrafish expressing either the wild-type or a phosphorylation-resistant form of CagA exhibited significantly increased rates of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and showed significant upregulation of the Wnt target genes cyclinD1, axin2 and the zebrafish c-myc ortholog myca. Coexpression of CagA with a loss-of-function allele encoding the β-catenin destruction complex protein Axin1 resulted in a further increase in intestinal proliferation. Coexpression of CagA with a null allele of the key β-catenin transcriptional cofactor Tcf4 restored intestinal proliferation to wild-type levels. These results provide in vivo evidence of Wnt pathway activation by CagA downstream of or in parallel to the β-catenin destruction complex and upstream of Tcf4. Long-term transgenic expression of wild-type CagA, but not the phosphorylation-resistant form, resulted in significant hyperplasia of the adult intestinal epithelium. We further utilized this model to demonstrate that oncogenic cooperation between CagA and a loss-of-function allele of p53 is sufficient to induce high rates of intestinal small cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, establishing the utility of our transgenic zebrafish model in the study of CagA-associated gastrointestinal cancers.

  1. Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  2. CagA and VacA Helicobacter Pylori Antibodies in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Suriani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with different genotypes of virulent Helicobacter pylori strains (cytotoxin-associated gene A [CagA]-and/or vacuolating cytotoxin A [VacA]-positive can play a role in the development of atrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU and gastric cancer (GC.

  3. Influence of Dietary Factors on Helicobacter pylori and CagA Seroprevalence in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Yordanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the association between some dietary factors and prevalence of H. pylori infection or strain virulence in 294 adult asymptomatic blood donors. Methods. Seroprevalence was evaluated using ELISA. Logistic regression was used. Results. Anti-H. pylori IgG prevalence was 72.4%, and CagA IgG seroprevalence was 49.3%. In the multivariate analyses, the frequent (>5 days per week honey consumption was associated with both reduced H. pylori seroprevalence OR, 0.68 with 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.473–0.967 and reduced CagA IgG seroprevalence OR, 0.65 with 95% CI, 0.486–0859. Frequent (>5 days per week yoghurt consumption also was associated with lower H. pylori virulence of the strains (CagA IgG OR, 0.56 with 95% CI, 0.341–0.921. Smoking and consumption of the other dietary factors resulted in no significant differences in the prevalence of H. pylori IgG and CagA IgG within the subject groups. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report revealing reverse associations between honey or yoghurt consumption and CagA IgG prevalence as well as between frequent honey consumption and lower prevalence of the H. pylori infection. Regular honey and yoghurt consumption can be of value as a supplement in the control of H. pylori therapy.

  4. Prevalence of infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strains among children and adolescents in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Juliana Ghisleni de; Ferreira, Cristina Helena Targa; Camerin, Anna Carolina Saraiva; Rota, Cláudia Augustin; Meurer, Luíse; Silveira, Themis Reverbel da

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has a worldwide distribution, but the prevalence of infection, virulence factors, and clinical presentation vary widely according to the studied population. In Brazil, a continental country composed of several ethnicities and cultural habits, the behavior of infection also appears to vary, as many other studies have shown. Describe the prevalence of infection with cagA-positive H. pylori strains in a group of children and adolescents who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul. Fifty-four gastric biopsy specimens of children and adolescents with H. pylori infection demonstrated by histology, urease test and molecular analysis were tested for the presence of cagA positive H. pylori strains by the polymerase chain reaction method. The prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori was 29.6% (95% confidence interval, 18 to 43.6%). There were no statistically significant differences in clinical or demographic characteristics or in the endoscopic and histological features of patients infected with cagA-positive strains as compared with those infected by cagA-negative strains. he study showed a low prevalence of infection with cagA-positive H. pylori strains among children and adolescents who underwent EGD in southern Brazil, in comparison to studies conducted with children from other regions of Brazil. There was no association between the presence of cagA-positive strains and more severe clinical presentations in the studied sample.

  5. RNA FISH for detecting expanded repeats in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a widely used technique for detecting transcripts in fixed cells and tissues. Many variants of RNA FISH have been proposed to increase signal strength, resolution and target specificity. The current variants of this technique facilitate the detection of the subcellular localization of transcripts at a single molecule level. Among the applications of RNA FISH are studies on nuclear RNA foci in diseases resulting from the expansion of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats present in different single genes. The partial or complete retention of mutant transcripts forming RNA aggregates within the nucleoplasm has been shown in multiple cellular disease models and in the tissues of patients affected with these atypical mutations. Relevant diseases include, among others, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) with CUG repeats, Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) with CAG repeats, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) with CGG repeats, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) with CCUG repeats, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) with GGGGCC repeats and spinocerebellar ataxia type 32 (SCA32) with GGCCUG. In this article, we summarize the results obtained with FISH to examine RNA nuclear inclusions. We provide a detailed protocol for detecting RNAs containing expanded CAG and CUG repeats in different cellular models, including fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells and murine and human neuronal progenitors. We also present the results of the first single-molecule FISH application in a cellular model of polyglutamine disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a lateral flow immunoassay strip for rapid detection of CagA antigen of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Cebrail

    2015-01-01

    About half of the world populations are known to be infected with Helicobacter pylori. The CagA antigen secreting strains provoke severe mucosal damages and act as a risk factor for the development of peptic ulceration and gastric cancer. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strip was developed based on sandwich format for rapid detection of CagA antigen of H. pylori using gold conjugated monoclonal antibody. This LFIA strip will provide a good aid in the diagnosis of CagA-secreting H. pylori within 10 min instead of time consuming, expensive and laborious invasive approaches.

  7. The Middle Fragment of Helicobacter pylori CagA Induces Actin Rearrangement and Triggers Its Own Uptake into Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Tohidpour

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxin-associated gene product A (CagA is a major virulence factor secreted by Helicobacter pylori. CagA activity in the gastric epithelium is associated with higher risk of gastric cancer development. Bacterial type IV secretion system (T4SS-mediated translocation of CagA into the cytosol of human epithelial cells occurs via a poorly understood mechanism that requires CagA interaction with the host membrane lipid phosphatidylserine (PS and host cell receptor integrin α5β1. Here we have characterized the isolated recombinant middle fragment of CagA (CagA-M that contains the positively-charged PS-binding region (aa 613–636 and a putative β1 integrin binding site, but lacks the EPIYA region, secretion signal peptide and the CagA multimerization motif. We show that CagA-M, when immobilized on latex beads, is capable of binding to, and triggering its own uptake into, gastric epithelial cells in the absence of infection with cagA-positive H. pylori. Using site-directed mutagenesis, fluorescent and electron microscopy, and highly-specific inhibitors, we demonstrate that the cell-binding and endocytosis-like internalization of CagA-M are dependent on (1 binding to PS; (2 β1 integrin activity; and (3 actin dynamics. Interaction of CagA-M with the host cells is accompanied by the development of long filopodia-like protrusions (macrospikes. This novel morphology is different from the hummingbird phenotype induced by the translocation of full-length CagA. The determinants within CagA-M and within the host that are important for endocytosis-like internalization into host cells are very similar to those observed for T4SS-mediated internalization of full-length CagA, suggesting that the latter may involve an endocytic pathway.

  8. Family Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...... polymorphism as a way to overcome this problem. Family polymorphism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta, a generalized version of Beta, and the source code of this implementation is available under GPL....

  9. Molecular chaperones enhance the degradation of expanded polyglutamine repeat androgen receptor in a cellular model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, CK; Andriola, IFM; Kampinga, HH; Merry, DE

    2002-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is one of a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases caused by a polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion, and is caused by an expansion within exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The family of polyglutamine diseases is

  10. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Rasekh, Abdorrahman; Mombeini, Hayat; Konar, Elham

    2015-01-01

    .... In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12...

  11. Evidence of linkage disequilibrium between schizophrenia and the SCA1 CAG repeat on chromosome 6p23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Sun, Cui-E; Diehl, S.R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Schizophrenia and the closely related phenotype schizoaffective disorder are severe mental illnesses that affect >1.0% of the population. The major role that genetic factors contribute to disease susceptibility is very well established. Schizophrenia appears to be a highly complex and heterogeneous disorder, however, and gene-mapping efforts also face challenges in assigning diagnoses and in delineating the disease`s phenotypic boundary. Several recently reported studies indicate that a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene may reside on the distal short arm of chromosome 6. Wang et al. reported a strong suggestion of linkage to chromosome 6pter-p22, using a resource based on 186 Irish families that was developed by K. S, Kendler, D. Walsh and colleagues, and one of us (S.R.D.), as described elsewhere. In that study, locus D6S260 gave the highest pairwise LOD score, 3.5, allowing for locus heterogeneity. Analysis with D6S260 and the distal locus F13A1 yielded a multipoint LOD score of 3.9, which maximized by allowing for locus heterogeneity and assuming that 50% of families are linked to this region. Nonparametric affected-pedigree-member analyses also supported this finding. Several other groups have recently reported additional evidence suggesting linkage to this region, both in an expanded collection of Irish families and in families from a variety of other geographic locations. However, none of these studies succeed in narrowing the location of the putative disease gene beyond the {approximately}30-cM region first identified by Wang et al. 44 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Short QTc Interval in Males with Klinefelter Syndrome-Influence of CAG Repeat Length, Body Composition, and Testosterone Replacement Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Inger Norlyk; Skakkebaek, Anne; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundKlinefelter syndrome (KS) is a sex chromosomal aneuploidy (47,XXY) affecting 1/660 males. Based on findings in Turner syndrome, we hypothesized that electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities would be present in males with KS. ObjectiveTo investigate ECGs in males with KS and compare with co...

  13. [Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori CagA-producing strains within families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, O V; Kurilovich, S A; Maliutina, S K; Krotov, S A; Krotova, V A; Shumakova, O V

    2004-01-01

    During prophylactic examination of blood sera taken from the members of 59 families by the enzyme immunoassay, antibodies to H. pylori and CagA protein were determined. As shown in this study, the children of non-infected mothers proved to be infected in 6.3% of cases and the children of infected mothers, in 72.1% of cases (p < 0.001). The children of non-infected fathers were H. pylori-positive in 71.4% and those of infected fathers, in 58.4% of cases. The CagA status was found to coincide in mothers and their children (p = 0.01), but not in fathers and their children. These data indicate that children acquire H. pylori infection from the members of their family, mainly from their mothers.

  14. Preparation and properties of antibacterial TiO2@C/Ag core-shell composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, San-Xiang; Tan, Shao-Zao; Chen, Jing-Xing; Liu, Ying-Liang; Yuan, Ding-Sheng

    2009-08-01

    An environment-friendly hydrothermal method was used to prepare TiO2@C core-shell composite using TiO2 as core and sucrose as carbon source. TiO2@C served as a support for the immobilization of Ag by impregnation in silver nitrate aqueous solution. The chemical structures and morphologies of TiO2@C and TiO2@C/Ag composite were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. The antibacterial properties of the TiO2@C/Ag core-shell composite against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were examined by the viable cell counting method. The results indicate that silver supported on the surface of TiO2@C shows excellent antibacterial activity.

  15. Helicobacter pylori modulates host cell responses by CagT4SS-dependent translocation of an intermediate metabolite of LPS inner core heptose biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Eugenia; Bats, Simon H.; Murillo, Tatiana; Speidel, Yvonne; Coombs, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Highly virulent Helicobacter pylori cause proinflammatory signaling inducing the transcriptional activation and secretion of cytokines such as IL-8 in epithelial cells. Responsible in part for this signaling is the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) that codetermines the risk for pathological sequelae of an H. pylori infection such as gastric cancer. The Cag type IV secretion system (CagT4SS), encoded on the cagPAI, can translocate various molecules into cells, the effector protein CagA, peptidoglycan metabolites and DNA. Although these transported molecules are known to contribute to cellular responses to some extent, a major part of the cagPAI-induced signaling leading to IL-8 secretion remains unexplained. We report here that biosynthesis of heptose-1,7-bisphosphate (HBP), an important intermediate metabolite of LPS inner heptose core, contributes in a major way to the H. pylori cagPAI-dependent induction of proinflammatory signaling and IL-8 secretion in human epithelial cells. Mutants defective in the genes required for synthesis of HBP exhibited a more than 95% reduction of IL-8 induction and impaired CagT4SS-dependent cellular signaling. The loss of HBP biosynthesis did not abolish the ability to translocate CagA. The human cellular adaptor TIFA, which was described before to mediate HBP-dependent activity in other Gram-negative bacteria, was crucial in the cagPAI- and HBP pathway-induced responses by H. pylori in different cell types. The active metabolite was present in H. pylori lysates but not enriched in bacterial supernatants. These novel results advance our mechanistic understanding of H. pylori cagPAI-dependent signaling mediated by intracellular pattern recognition receptors. They will also allow to better dissect immunomodulatory activities by H. pylori and to improve the possibilities of intervention in cagPAI- and inflammation-driven cancerogenesis. PMID:28715499

  16. DNA repair in the trinucleotide repeat disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lesley; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    Inherited diseases caused by unstable repeated DNA sequences are rare, but together represent a substantial cause of morbidity. Trinucleotide repeat disorders are severe, usually life-shortening, neurological disorders caused by nucleotide expansions, and most have no disease-modifying treatments. Longer repeat expansions are associated with genetic anticipation (ie, earlier disease onset in successive generations), although the differences in age at onset are not entirely accounted for by repeat length. Such phenotypic variation within disorders implies the existence of additional modifying factors in pathways that can potentially be modulated to treat disease. A genome-wide association study detected genetic modifiers of age at onset in Huntington's disease. Similar findings were seen in the spinocerebellar ataxias, indicating an association between DNA damage-response and repair pathways and the age at onset of disease. These studies also suggest that a common genetic mechanism modulates age at onset across polyglutamine diseases and could extend to other repeat expansion disorders. Genetic defects in DNA repair underlie other neurodegenerative disorders (eg, ataxia-telangiectasia), and DNA double-strand breaks are crucial to the modulation of early gene expression, which provides a mechanistic link between DNA repair and neurodegeneration. Mismatch and base-excision repair are important in the somatic expansion of repeated sequences in mouse models of trinucleotide repeat disorders, and somatic expansion of the expanded CAG tract in HTT correlates with age at onset of Huntington's disease and other trinucleotide repeat disorders. WHERE NEXT?: To understand the common genetic architecture of trinucleotide repeat disorders and any further genetic susceptibilities in individual disorders, genetic analysis with increased numbers of variants and sample sizes is needed, followed by sequencing approaches to define the phenotype-modifying variants. The findings must

  17. HA novel approach to investigate tissue-specific trinucleotide repeat instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boily Marie-Josee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Huntington's disease (HD, an expanded CAG repeat produces characteristic striatal neurodegeneration. Interestingly, the HD CAG repeat, whose length determines age at onset, undergoes tissue-specific somatic instability, predominant in the striatum, suggesting that tissue-specific CAG length changes could modify the disease process. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the tissue specificity of somatic instability may provide novel routes to therapies. However progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of sensitive high-throughput instability quantification methods and global approaches to identify the underlying factors. Results Here we describe a novel approach to gain insight into the factors responsible for the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Using accurate genetic knock-in mouse models of HD, we developed a reliable, high-throughput method to quantify tissue HD CAG repeat instability and integrated this with genome-wide bioinformatic approaches. Using tissue instability quantified in 16 tissues as a phenotype and tissue microarray gene expression as a predictor, we built a mathematical model and identified a gene expression signature that accurately predicted tissue instability. Using the predictive ability of this signature we found that somatic instability was not a consequence of pathogenesis. In support of this, genetic crosses with models of accelerated neuropathology failed to induce somatic instability. In addition, we searched for genes and pathways that correlated with tissue instability. We found that expression levels of DNA repair genes did not explain the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Instead, our data implicate other pathways, particularly cell cycle, metabolism and neurotransmitter pathways, acting in combination to generate tissue-specific patterns of instability. Conclusion Our study clearly demonstrates that multiple tissue factors reflect the level of

  18. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (pCTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inter simple sequence repeat analysis of genetic diversity of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper studied the genetic diversity of five cultivated pepper species using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis. The amplicons of 13 out of 15 designed primers were stable polymorphic and therefore were used as genetic biomarkers. 135 total clear bands were obtained, of which 102 were polymorphic bands ...

  20. Helicobacter pylori CagA triggers expression of the bactericidal lectin REG3γ via gastric STAT3 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Syin Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most of what is known about the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori cytotoxin, CagA, pertains to a much-vaunted role as a determinant of gastric inflammation and cancer. Little attention has been devoted to potential roles of CagA in the majority of H. pylori infected individuals not showing oncogenic progression, particularly in relation to host tolerance. Regenerating islet-derived (REG3γ encodes a secreted C-type lectin that exerts direct bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria in the intestine. Here, we extend this paradigm of lectin-mediated innate immunity, showing that REG3γ expression is triggered by CagA in the H. pylori-infected stomach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In human gastric mucosal tissues, REG3γ expression was significantly increased in CagA-positive, compared to CagA-negative H. pylori infected individuals. Using transfected CagA-inducible gastric MKN28 cells, we recapitulated REG3γ induction in vitro, also showing that tyrosine phosphorylated, not unphosphorylated CagA triggers REG3γ transcription. In concert with induced REG3γ, pro-inflammatory signalling downstream of the gp130 cytokine co-receptor via the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3 and transcription of two cognate ligands, interleukin(IL-11 and IL-6, were significantly increased. Exogenous IL-11, but not IL-6, directly stimulated STAT3 activation and REG3γ transcription. STAT3 siRNA knockdown or IL-11 receptor blockade respectively abrogated or subdued CagA-dependent REG3γ mRNA induction, thus demonstrating a requirement for uncompromised signalling via the IL-11/STAT3 pathway. Inhibition of the gp130-related SHP2-(Ras-ERK pathway did not affect CagA-dependent REG3γ induction, but strengthened STAT3 activation as well as augmenting transcription of mucosal innate immune regulators, IL-6, IL-8 and interferon-response factor (IRF1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support a model of CagA-directed REG3

  1. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Man [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Li, Fu-gang [Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China); Xie, Xi-sheng [Department of Nephrology, Second Clinical Medical Institution of North Sichuan Medical College (Nanchong Central Hospital), Nanchong City 637400 (China); Wang, Shao-qing [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Fan, Jun-ming, E-mail: junmingfan@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  2. Differences in Helicobacter pylori CagA tyrosine phosphorylation motif patterns between western and East Asian strains, and influences on interleukin-8 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, Richard H; Hale, James L; El-Omar, Emad M; Atherton, John C

    2008-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from East Asia have an 'East Asian' type of CagA that is more active and predominantly comprises a single type. Strains from other countries have a 'western' type of CagA, which is less active and comprises many different types generated by intragenomic recombination. Co-culture of AGS gastric epithelial cells with isolates of western strains that displayed microevolution in CagA showed that isolates with additional copies of the C motif induced significantly more interleukin (IL)-8 secretion. Co-culture of AGS cells with western and East Asian strains, each expressing CagA with a single copy of the C or D motif, showed that East Asian strains induced significantly more IL-8 secretion. Analysis of the different CagA types from data deposited in GenBank and from the literature showed that western CagA is significantly more likely to undergo duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation motif C than East Asian CagA is of the corresponding D motif. Taken together, the data suggest that the already highly active East Asian CagA with one D motif has no requirement to increase its virulence, whereas the less active western CagA displays flexibility in its capacity to increase its number of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs to become more virulent.

  3. Association of Mannose-Binding Lectin rs1800450 and Tumor Necrotic Factor-α rs1800620 Polymorphism with Helicobacter pylori in Type II Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Elnaz; Eslami, Behnaz; Aghahosseini, Parisa; Ahron, Fatemeh; Amininejad, Armagan; Mahmoodi, Sepideh; Satarpour, Hadis; Radmanesh, Nilofar; Rassi, Hossein

    2017-10-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the prevalent type of diabetes, including 90% of the cases world-wide. Helicobacter pylori plays a pathogenic role in the development of T2DM. The host genetic factors have a significant impact on the clinical outcome and anatomical distribution of H. pylori infection and polymorphisms in several genes such as tumor necrotic factor (TNF)-α and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and are considered to increase the risk for the development of T2DM. In this study, we investigate the prevalence rate of H. pylori infection and its relationship to MBL rs1800450 and TNF-α rs1800620 polymorphism in T2DM. In this case-control study, 174 patients with type II diabetes and 185 healthy controls were studied. Also, demographics, physical, and biochemical parameters were performed in all patients. The DNA extracted from blood specimens was amplified by H. pylori cagA-specific primers. The MBL rs1800450 and TNF-α rs1800620 genotyping were detected by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR). The results show that H. pylori cagA positivity was detected in 42.82% of the diabetic patients and in 22.16% of the control group, and H. pylori infection was closely correlated with MBL rs1800450 AA genotype and TNF-α rs1800620 GG genotype when compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, these two genotypes were strongly associated with H. pylori cagA(+) samples when compared with cagA(-) samples. In addition, the presence of H. pylori cagA(+) infection was significantly associated with the elevated serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In general, it can be concluded that molecular analysis of MBL rs1800450 AA genotype and TNF-α rs1800620 AA genotype is important in the early detection and treatment of T2DM with H. pylori cagA(+) infection.

  4. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sook Hyang; Kim, Yoo Chul [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. JP-3 gene polymorphism in a healthy population of Serbia and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Expansions of CTG repeats in JP-3 gene are associated with a phenotype similar to Huntington disease. These expan- sions are the cause of Huntington disease like-2 (HDL-2) phenotype. CTG repeats in JP-3 gene are polymorphic in healthy population. Analyses of CTG repeat polymorphism of JP-3 gene in various ...

  6. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms in Huntington's disease are modified by polymorphisms in catecholamine regulating enzyme genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, T; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Budtz-Jørgensen, E

    2016-01-01

    previously been shown in HD, and furthermore dopamine is thought to be implicated in cognition, behavioral and motor disturbances. A substantiated inverse correlation between motor onset and the elongated CAG repeat in the HTT has been established. This relation does not account for the full variability......Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, psychiatric, and cognitive manifestations. HD is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene but the exact pathogenesis remains unknown. Dopamine imbalance has...... of the motor onset, and efforts have been put into finding genetic modifiers of motor onset, however, mostly with unsuccessful outcome. In this study, we took an alternative approach focusing on symptom complexes and searched for modifiers of cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms in a well...

  7. Structure of even/odd trinucleotide repeat sequences modulates persistence of non-B conformations and conversion to duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Amalia Avila; Cattie, Douglas; Delaney, Sarah

    2011-05-31

    Expansion of trinucleotide repeats (TNR) has been implicated in the emergence of neurodegenerative diseases. Formation of non-B conformations such as hairpins by these repeat sequences during DNA replication and/or repair has been proposed as a contributing factor to expansion. In this work we employed a combination of fluorescence, chemical probing, optical melting, and gel shift assays to characterize the structure of a series of (CTG)(n) sequences and the kinetic parameters describing their interaction with a complementary sequence. Our structure-based experiments using chemical probing reveal that sequences containing an even or odd number of CTG repeats adopt stem-loop hairpins that differ from one another by the absence or presence of a stem overhang. Furthermore, we find that this structural difference dictates the rate at which the TNR hairpins convert to duplex with a complementary CAG sequence. Indeed, the rate constant describing conversion to (CAG)(10)/(CTG)(n) duplex is slower for sequences containing an even number of CTG repeats than for sequences containing an odd number of repeats. Thus, when both the CAG and CTG hairpins have an even number of the repeats, they display a longer lifetime relative to when the CTG hairpin has an odd number of repeats. The difference in lifetimes observed for these TNR hairpins has implications toward their persistence during DNA replication or repair events and could influence their predisposition toward expansion. Taken together, these results contribute to our understanding of trinucleotide repeats and the factors that regulate persistence of hairpins in these repetitive sequences and conversion to canonical duplex.

  8. Helicobacter pylori and cagA gene detected by polymerase chain reaction in gastric biopsies: correlation with histological findings, proliferation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Ramos Moreira Leite

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The virulence of Helicobacter pylori (HP in gastroduodenal disease is related to pathogenicity islands (cagPAI present in some strains. Infection with cagPAI induces IL-8 secretion, increases epithelial cell proliferation and may be important in carcinogenesis. Our objective was to detect HP and the cagA gene (cagPAI marker by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and to correlate these results to histological findings, epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective, at the Surgical and Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Hospital Sírio-Libanês. METHODS: DNA samples isolated from 164 gastric biopsies were used for HP detection by PCR. cagPAI+ was identified in HP+ cases by cagA gene amplification. All cases were submitted to immunohistochemistry to evaluate cell proliferation, and TUNEL to detect apoptosis. Statistical analysis was performed to compare results. RESULTS: HP was detected in 67.7% of the patients, with good correlation between HP infection and moderate to severe gastritis, gastric ulcer and MALT lymphoma. There was a correlation between cagPAI+ strains and severe gastric diseases including cancer. The risk of gastric ulcer, adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma was 8.8 times higher for cagPAI+ patients. cagPAI+ infection was related to higher proliferation rates. The proliferation/apoptosis index was significantly higher for cagPAI+ patients. CONCLUSION: Cell growth deregulation in cagPAI+ patients could be demonstrated by the difference in the proliferation index. We believe that this explains the carcinogenic role of Helicobacter pylori.

  9. Anti-CagA positivity in duodenal ulcer and functional dyspepsia patients infected with Helicobacter pylori and its effect on the outcome of eradication treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Nazlıgül

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: CagA positive H. pylori strains are considered to be more virulent than other strains. In this study, we aimed to investigate the rate of CagA positivity in duodenal ulcer (DU and functional dyspepsia (FD, and its effect on H. pylori eradication response.Materials and methods: The study was performed on H. pylori positive 60 patients with DU and 50 patients with FD, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. H. pylori infection was identified by histology. All patients received a quadriple therapy consisted of esomeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., colloidal bismuth subcitrate 600 mg b.i.d., tetracycline 500 mg q.i.d. and metronidazole 500 mg t.i.d. for 7 days. H.pylori status was rechecked using C14-urea breath test 6 weeks after the end of treatment to confirm cure. Specific IgG antibodies for CagA status were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Results: CagA positivities in the patients with DU and FD were calculated respectivily 70% and 68% (P>0.05. H. pylori was eradicated in 85.5% of the patients infected with CagA (+ strains, in 50% of those infected with CagA (- strains (P=0.001. The eradication rates were 95.2% and 55.6% in CagA positive and negative DU subgroups (P=0.001, and 73.5% and 43.8% in CagA positive and negative FD subgroups (P=0.04.Conclusion: CagA positivities were not different in duodenal ulcer and functional dyspepsia. CagA (+ strains was susceptible to the eradication treatment. The titres of serum anti-CagA antibodies may be used in the prediction of eradication outcome, and the modification of eradication therapy.

  10. Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) analysis of wild and cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... simple sequence repeat (ISSR) polymorphism in the genus Oryza. Theor. Appl. Genet. 100: 1311-1320. Kantety RV, Zeng X, Bennetzen JL, Zehr BE (1995). Assessment of genetic diversity in dent and popcorn (Zea mays L.) inbred lines using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) amplification. Mol. Breed.

  11. Trinucleotide repeat microsatellite markers for Black Poplar (Populus nigra L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Schoot, van der J.; Arens, P.; Vosman, B.

    2001-01-01

    Using an enrichment procedure, we have cloned microsatellite repeats from black poplar (Populus nigra L.) and developed primers for microsatellite marker analysis. Ten primer pairs, mostly for trinucleotide repeats, produced polymorphic fragments in P. nigra. Some of them also showed amplification

  12. Novel effects of Helicobacter pylori CagA on key genes of gastric cancer signal transduction: a comparative transfection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Farzam; Peerayeh, Shahin N; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Maghsoudi, Nader; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Siadat, Seyed D; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is now recognized as a worldwide problem. Helicobacter pylori CagA is the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified in relation to human cancer. Helicobacter pylori CagA is noted for structural diversity in its C-terminal region (contains EPIYA motifs), with which CagA interacts with numerous host cell proteins. Deregulation of host signaling by translocated bacterial proteins provides a new aspect of microbial-host cell interaction. The aim of this study is to compare the cellular effects of two different CagA EPIYA motifs on identified signaling pathways involve in gastric carcinogenesis. To investigate the effects of CagA protein carboxyl region variations on the transcription of genes involved in gastric epithelial carcinogenesis pathways, the eukaryotic vector carrying the cagA gene (ABC and ABCCC types) was transfected into gastric cancer cell line. The 42 identified key genes of signal transduction involved in gastric cancer were analyzed at the transcription level by real-time PCR. The results of real-time PCR provide us important clue that the ABCCC oncoprotein variant can change the fate of the cell completely different from ABC type. In fact, these result proposed that the ABCCC type can induce the intestinal metaplasia, IL-8, perturbation of Crk adaptor proteins, anti-apoptotic effect and carcinogenic effect more significantly than ABC type. These data support our hypothesis of a complex interaction of host cell and these two different H. pylori effector variants that determines host cellular fate. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The cagE gene sequence as a diagnostic marker to identify JP2 and non-JP2 highly leukotoxic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf; Åberg, Carola Høglund

    2017-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, and with systemic infections such as endocarditis. The cagE gene encodes a ≈39-kDa putative exotoxin expressed by A. actinomycetemcomitans. The prevalence of cagE, and its significance in periodontal disease...... in the risk assessment of the development of periodontal attachment loss in young individuals....

  14. Helicobacter pylori CagA and IL-1β Promote the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Arévalo-Romero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the third cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered the most important risk factor, mainly by the activity of its virulence factor CagA. H. pylori/CagA-induced chronic inflammation triggers a series of gastric lesions of increased severity, starting with gastritis and ending with cancer. IL-1β has been associated with tumor development and invasiveness in different types of cancer, including gastric cancer. Currently, it is not clear if there is an association between CagA and IL-1β at a cellular level. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IL-1β and CagA on MCF-10A nontransformed cells. We found evidence that both CagA and IL-1β trigger the initiation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition characterized by β-catenin nuclear translocation, increased expression of Snail1 and ZEB1, downregulation of CDH1, and morphological changes during MCF-10A acini formation. However, only CagA induced MMP9 activity and cell invasion. Our data support that IL-1β and CagA target the β-catenin pathway, with CagA leading to acquisition of a stage related to aggressive tumors.

  15. Computer Simulation Studies of CTG Triplet Repeat Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaiah, Jayendran. C.; Lynch, Joshua

    1998-03-01

    Long segments of CTG trinucleotide repeats in human DNA are correlated with a class of neurological diseases (myotonic dystrophy, fragile-X syndrome, and Kenndy's disease). These diseases are characterized by genetic anticipation and are thought to arise from replication errors caused by unusual conformations of CTG repeat segments. We have studied the properties of a single short segment of double starnded DNA with CTG repeats in 0.5 M sodium chloride solution with molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations are carried out in the micro canonical ensemble using an all-atom force field with CHARMM parameters. The TIPS3 water model is used to simulate a molecular solvent. Electrostatic interactions are calculated by Ewald summation and the equations of motion integrated using a Verlet algorithm in conjunction with SHAKE constrained dynamics to maintain bond lengths. The simulation of CTG repeat sequence is compared with a control system containing CAG triplet repeats to determine possible differencesin the conformation and elasticity of the two sequences.

  16. Seropositivity to Helicobacter pylori and CagA protein in schoolchildren of different ages living in urban and rural areas in southern Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjova, T; Grünberg, H; Oona, M; Maaroos, H I; Nilsson, I; Wadström, T; Covacci, A; Uibo, R

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate Helicobacter pylori and CagA seropositivity in a non-selected group of schoolchildren in southern Estonia, with reference to previous studies where high seroprevalence to H. pylori (87%) and anti-CagA positivity (63%) in an adult population from the same region were found. A total of 421 schoolchildren selected haphazardly from a random population (n = 1018, ages 9, 12 or 15 years) and living in urban or rural areas. H. pylori status was determined by evaluation of IgG antibodies against cell surface proteins of H. pylori, strain CCUG 17874, using standard ELISA. Anti-CagA IgGs were determined by ELISA using a recombinant fragment of CagA (CCUG 17874) as solid-phase antigen. Absorbance values > 0.3 (405 nm) were taken as a CagA-positive result based on a study of 25 sera from H. pylori-negative children. Of the 421 subjects, 235 (56%) were H. pylori-ELISA positive, and 109 out of the 235 (46%) were anti-CagA positive. Neither H. pylori nor CagA positivity were significantly different in girls and boys, or in children aged 9, 12 or 15 years. The H. pylori prevalence rate (118/181, 65%) as well as CagA positivity (64/181, 35%) in rural areas were higher compared with those in towns (117/240, 49% and 54/240, 22%, respectively; P = 0.001 and P = 0.005). Of schoolchildren living in southern Estonia, 56% were seropositive to H. pylori. Half of them had anti-CagA antibodies. Schoolchildren living in rural areas were infected significantly more often with CagA-seropositive strains compared with those living in towns.

  17. Local Immune Homeostasis of Gastric Mucosa in Chronic CagA-positive Hр-associated Gastritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Ye. Abaturov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deal with study of lymphocyte-macrophage link of the gastric mucosa local immunity in Hр-associated chronic gastritis, taking into account the presence of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA Hр through a standard morphological examination according to the Modified Sydney System and immunohistochemical studies of biopsy specimens.

  18. MicroRNAs Up-Regulated by CagA of Helicobacter pylori Induce Intestinal Metaplasia of Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongliang; Jiang, Qiaoli; Lou, Xiaojun; Ji, Xiaowei; Wen, Zhenzhen; Wu, Jia; Tao, Haiying; Jiang, Tingting; He, Wei; Wang, Caihua; Du, Qin; Zheng, Shu; Mao, Jianshan; Huang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    CagA of Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium-derived oncogenic protein closely associated with the development of gastric cancers. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of widespread non-coding RNAs, many of which are involved in cell growth, cell differentiation and tumorigenesis. The relationship between CagA protein and miRNAs is unclear. Using mammalian miRNA profile microarrays, we found that miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 expression was up-regulated in CagA-transformed cells, miRNA-1290 was up-regulated in an Erk1/2-dependent manner, and miRNA-584 was activated by NF-κB. miRNA-584 sustained Erk1/2 activities through inhibition of PPP2a activities, and miRNA-1290 activated NF-κB by knockdown of NKRF. Foxa1 was revealed to be an important target of miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290. Knockdown of Foxa1 promoted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition significantly. Overexpression of miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 induced intestinal metaplasia of gastric epithelial cells in knock-in mice. These results indicate that miRNA-584 and miRNA-1290 interfere with cell differentiation and remodel the tissues. Thus, the miRNA pathway is a new pathogenic mechanism of CagA. PMID:22536353

  19. VacA, CagA, IceA and OipA Genotype Status of Helicobacter pylori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the state of vacA, cagA, oipA and iceA genotypes of H. pylori isolated from gastric biopsy samples of dogs. Methods: A total of 240 gastric biopsy samples were taken from 240 dogs using gastric endoscope. All the samples were cultured and H. pylori-positive samples were analyzed for the presence ...

  20. Polymorphic Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, João Filipe; Greenberg, Michael; Igarashi, Atsushi; Pierce, Benjamin C.

    Manifest contracts track precise properties by refining types with predicates - e.g., {x : Int |x > 0 } denotes the positive integers. Contracts and polymorphism make a natural combination: programmers can give strong contracts to abstract types, precisely stating pre- and post-conditions while hiding implementation details - for example, an abstract type of stacks might specify that the pop operation has input type {x :α Stack |not ( empty x )} . We formalize this combination by defining FH, a polymorphic calculus with manifest contracts, and establishing fundamental properties including type soundness and relational parametricity. Our development relies on a significant technical improvement over earlier presentations of contracts: instead of introducing a denotational model to break a problematic circularity between typing, subtyping, and evaluation, we develop the metatheory of contracts in a completely syntactic fashion, omitting subtyping from the core system and recovering it post facto as a derived property.

  1. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori vacA Genotypes and cagA Gene in Dental Plaque of Asymptomatic Mexican Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cantú, Alejandra; Urbina-Ríos, Cynthia Sofía; García-Martínez, Martha Elena; Torre-Martínez, Hilda H. H.

    2017-01-01

    The variability in Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes has been related to the progression of the gastrointestinal disease; also the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity has been associated with periodontal disease in adults, but, in children without dyspeptic symptoms, little is known about this. We evaluated the prevalence of H. pylori and the presence of vacA/cagA genotypes in the oral cavity of Mexican children without dyspeptic symptoms. The gingival status was measured, and dental plaque samples (n = 100) were taken. 38% of children were positive for H. pylori 16S rRNA gene by qPCR. A significant association between H. pylori oral infection and gingival status was observed (P < 0.001). In 34.6% (9/26) of mild gingivitis cases, s1m2 genotype was found, while s1m1 was typed in 50% (3/6) of moderate gingivitis. The cagA prevalence among H. pylori-positive children was 80.8% (21/26), 83.3% (5/6), and 16.7% (1/6) of cases of mild gingivitis, moderate gingivitis, and nongingivitis, respectively (P < 0.001). The s1m1/cagA+ combinational genotype was the most detected in children with gingivitis. Our results suggest that the prevalence of H. pylori and detection of vacA/cagA genotypes-associated gastrointestinal disease in the oral cavity could be related to the progression of gingivitis in asymptomatic children. PMID:29226140

  2. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori vacA Genotypes and cagA Gene in Dental Plaque of Asymptomatic Mexican Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Mendoza-Cantú

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The variability in Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes has been related to the progression of the gastrointestinal disease; also the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity has been associated with periodontal disease in adults, but, in children without dyspeptic symptoms, little is known about this. We evaluated the prevalence of H. pylori and the presence of vacA/cagA genotypes in the oral cavity of Mexican children without dyspeptic symptoms. The gingival status was measured, and dental plaque samples (n=100 were taken. 38% of children were positive for H. pylori 16S rRNA gene by qPCR. A significant association between H. pylori oral infection and gingival status was observed (P<0.001. In 34.6% (9/26 of mild gingivitis cases, s1m2 genotype was found, while s1m1 was typed in 50% (3/6 of moderate gingivitis. The cagA prevalence among H. pylori-positive children was 80.8% (21/26, 83.3% (5/6, and 16.7% (1/6 of cases of mild gingivitis, moderate gingivitis, and nongingivitis, respectively (P<0.001. The s1m1/cagA+ combinational genotype was the most detected in children with gingivitis. Our results suggest that the prevalence of H. pylori and detection of vacA/cagA genotypes-associated gastrointestinal disease in the oral cavity could be related to the progression of gingivitis in asymptomatic children.

  3. DNMT 1 maintains hypermethylation of CAG promoter specific region and prevents expression of exogenous gene in fat-1 transgenic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunrong; Shang, Xueying; Cheng, Lei; Yang, Lei; Liu, Xuefei; Bai, Chunling; Wei, Zhuying; Hua, Jinlian; Li, Guangpeng

    2017-01-01

    Methylation is an important issue in gene expression regulation and also in the fields of genetics and reproduction. In this study, we created fat-1 transgenic sheep, investigated the fine-mapping and the modulatory mechanisms of promoter methylation. Sheep fetal fibroblasts were transfected by pCAG-fat1-IRES-EGFP. Monoclonal cell line was screened as nuclear donor and carried out nuclear transfer (441 transgenic cloned embryos, 52 synchronism recipient sheep). Six offsprings were obtained. Expressions of exogenous genes fat-1 and EGFP were detectable in 10 examined tissues and upregulated omega-3 fatty acid content. Interestingly, more or less EGFP negative cells were detectable in the positive transgenic fetal skin cells. EGFP negative and positive cells were sorted by flow cytometry, and their methylation status in the whole promoter region (1701 nt) were investigated by bisulphate sequencing. The fine-mapping of methylation in CAG promoter were proposed. The results suggested that exogenous gene expression was determined by the methylation status from 721-1346 nt and modulated by methylation levels at 101, 108 and 115 nt sites in CAG promoter. To clarify the regulatory mechanism of methylation, examination of four DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) demonstrated that hypermethylation of CAG promoter is mainly maintained by DNMT 1 in EGFP negative cells. Furthermore, investigation of the cell surface antigen CD34, CD45 and CD166 indicated that EGFP positive and negative cells belong to different types. The present study systematically clarified methylation status of CAG promoter in transgenic sheep and regulatory mechanism, which will provide research strategies for gene expression regulation in transgenic animals.

  4. CEACAM6 is upregulated by Helicobacter pylori CagA and is a biomarker for early gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Supriya; Samanta, Animesh; Sharma, Neel; Tan, Kar Tong; Yang, Henry; Voon, Dominic C.; Pang, Brendan; Teh, Ming; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Chang, Young-Tae; Yong, Wei Peng; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ho, Khek Yu; Tan, Patrick; Soong, Richie; Koeffler, Phillip H.; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of gastric cancers saves lives, but remains a diagnostic challenge. In this study, we aimed to identify cell-surface biomarkers of early gastric cancer. We hypothesized that a subset of plasma membrane proteins induced by the Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA will be retained in early gastric cancers through non-oncogene addiction. An inducible system for expression of CagA was used to identify differentially upregulated membrane protein transcripts in vitro. The top hits were then analyzed in gene expression datasets comparing transcriptome of gastric cancer with normal tissue, to focus on markers retained in cancer. Among the transcripts enriched upon CagA induction in vitro, a significant elevation of CEACAM6 was noted in gene expression datasets of gastric cancer. We used quantitative digital immunohistochemistry to measure CEACAM6 protein levels in tissue microarrays of gastric cancer. We demonstrate an increase in CEACAM6 in early gastric cancers, when compared to matched normal tissue, with an AUC of 0.83 for diagnostic validity. Finally, we show that a fluorescently conjugated CEACAM6 antibody binds avidly to freshly resected gastric cancer xenograft samples and can be detected by endoscopy in real time. Together, these results suggest that CEACAM6 upregulation is a cell surface response to H. pylori CagA, and is retained in early gastric cancers. They highlight a novel link between CEACAM6 expression and CagA in gastric cancer, and suggest CEACAM6 to be a promising biomarker to aid with the fluorescent endoscopic diagnosis of early neoplastic lesions in the stomach. PMID:27421133

  5. Molecular interactions between MUC1 epithelial mucin, β-catenin, and CagA proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eGuang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-8-driven neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa is pathognomonic of persistent Helicobacter pylori infection. Our prior study showed that ectopic over-expression of MUC1 in human AGS gastric epithelial cells reduced H. pylori-stimulated IL-8 production compared with cells expressing MUC1 endogenously. Conversely, Muc1 knockout (Muc1-/- mice displayed an increased level of transcripts encoding the keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, the murine equivalent of human IL-8, in gastric mucosa compared with Muc1(+/+ mice during experimental H. pylori infection. The current study tested the hypothesis that a decreased IL-8 level observed following MUC1 over-expression is mediated through the ability of MUC1 to associate with β-catenin, thereby inhibiting H. pylori-induced β-catenin nuclear translocation. Increased neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected Muc1(-/- mice was observed compared with Muc1(+/+ wild type littermates, thus defining the functional consequences of increased KC expression in the Muc1-null animals. Protein co-immunoprecipitation (coIP studies using lysates of untreated or H. pylori-treated AGS cells demonstrated that (a MUC1 formed a coIP complex with β-catenin and CagA, (b MUC1 over-expression reduced CagA/β-catenin coIP, and (c in the absence of MUC1 over-expression, H. pylori infection increased the nuclear level of β-catenin, (d whereas MUC1 over-expression decreased bacteria-driven β-catenin nuclear localization. These results suggest that manipulation of MUC1 expression in gastric epithelia may be an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit H. pylori-dependent IL-8 production, neutrophil infiltration, and stomach inflammation.

  6. The bacterial virulence factor CagA induces microbial dysbiosis that contributes to excessive epithelial cell proliferation in the Drosophila gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffani Alvey Jones

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota facilitate many aspects of human health and development, but dysbiotic microbiota can promote hyperplasia and inflammation and contribute to human diseases such as cancer. Human patients infected with the gastric cancer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori have altered microbiota; however, whether dysbiosis contributes to disease in this case is unknown. Many H. pylori human disease phenotypes are associated with a potent virulence protein, CagA, which is translocated into host epithelial cells where it alters cell polarity and manipulates host-signaling pathways to promote disease. We hypothesized that CagA alone could contribute to H. pylori pathogenesis by inducing microbial dysbiosis that promotes disease. Here we use a transgenic Drosophila model of CagA expression to genetically disentangle the effects of the virulence protein CagA from that of H. pylori infection. We found that expression of CagA within Drosophila intestinal stem cells promotes excess cell proliferation and is sufficient to alter host microbiota. Rearing CagA transgenic flies germ-free revealed that the dysbiotic microbiota contributes to cell proliferation phenotypes and also elicits expression of innate immune components, Diptericin and Duox. Further investigations revealed interspecies interactions are required for this dysbiotic CagA-dependent microbiota to promote proliferation in CagA transgenic and healthy control Drosophila. Our model establishes that CagA can alter gut microbiota and exacerbate cell proliferation and immune phenotypes previously attributed to H. pylori infection. This work provides valuable new insights into the mechanisms by which interactions between a specific virulence factor and the resident microbiota can contribute to the development and progression of disease.

  7. The significance of IL-1β +3953C>T, IL-6 -174G>C and -596G>A, TNF-α -308G>A gene polymorphisms and 86 bp variable number tandem repeat polymorphism of IL-1RN in bronchopulmonary dysplasia in infants born before 32 weeks of gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Szpecht

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is a chronic lung disease that affects primarily preterm infants. Genetic factors are also taken into consideration in the pathogenesis of BPD. Genetic predispositions to higher production of inflammation mediators seem to be crucial. Material and methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible relationship between polymorphisms: interleukin-1β +3953 C>T, interleukin-6 -174 G>C and -596 G>A, tumour necrosis factor -308 G>A and interleukin-1RN VNTR 86bp and the occurrence of BPD in a population of 100 preterm infants born from singleton pregnancy, before 32+0 weeks of gestation, exposed to antenatal steroids therapy, and without congenital abnormalities.  Results : In the study population BPD was diagnosed in 36 (36% newborns. Among the studied polymorphisms we found the higher prevalence for BPD developing of the following genotypes: 1/2 (OR 1.842 [0.673-5.025] and 2/2 IL-1RN (OR 1.75 [0.418-6.908] 86bpVNTR; GC (2.222 [0.658-8.706] and CC IL-6 -174G>C (1.6 [0.315-8.314] and GA (2.753 [0.828-10.64] and AA (1.5 [0.275-8.067] IL-6 -596G>A, GA 1.509 (0.515-4.301 TNF-α -308G>A. However, these finding were not statistically significant.  Conclusions : Genetic factors are undeniably involved in the pathogenesis of BPD. In the times of individualised therapy finding genes responsible for BPD might allow the development of new treatment strategies. A new way of specific therapy could ensure the reduction of complications connected with BPD and treatment costs.

  8. Prognostic significance of genetic polymorphisms in disease progression and survival in prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy

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    Tsung-Yi Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that androgens and their receptors regulate normal prostate growth and mediate prostate cancer development. Androgen deprivation therapy is the most commonly used treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Although the therapy is initially effective, progression of the disease to castration-resistant prostate cancer is almost inevitable, leading to treatment failure. Despite the existence of current clinical parameters, new biomarkers are urgently needed to improve the prognosis. Some molecules and DNA-based genetic biomarkers are under investigation as potential prognostic factors. The advancement in molecular cytogenetic research, such as genome-wide association for single-nucleotide polymorphisms, has made possible the detection of genetic mutations. In this study, a literature search from August 1985 to April 2013 was performed through the PubMed database using the keywords “genetic polymorphisms”, “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”. The results revealed that several genome-wide association studies (such as rs16901979, rs7931342, HSD17B4, rs6162 in the CYP17A1, rs4243229 and rs7201637 in the HSD17B2, rs1062577 in the ESR1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, rs2939244 in the ARRDC3, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs6504145 in the SKAP1, rs7830611 in the FBXO32, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs12529 in the AKR1C3, rs16934641 in the BNC2, rs3763763 in the TACC2, rs2051778 in the ALPK1, and rs3763763 in the TACC2, AR, ESR1, and ESR2 and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in important pathways (such as androgen signal, biosynthesis, metabolism, androgen receptor binding site, response element, androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism length, and estrogen receptor-binding sites involved in prostate cancer occurrence and mechanism could serve as candidate biomarkers for the early detection of castration-resistant prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy. Additional investigations are required to decipher precisely the gene

  9. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

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    Sahara Shu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori strains found in Southeast Asia and examined their association with gastroduodenal disease. Methods To determine the cagA status, cagA EPIYA motifs, and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 previous reports for 1,281 H. pylori strains detected from several Southeast Asian countries. Results The respective frequencies of cagA-positive and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotypes among examined subjects were 93% (1,056/1,133, 98% (1,010/1,033, 58% (581/1,009, and 96% (248/259, respectively. Stratification showed significant variation in the frequencies of cagA status and vacA genotypes among countries and the individual races residing within each respective country. The frequency of the vacA m-region genotype in patients infected with East Asian-type strains differed significantly between the northern and southern areas of Vietnam (p vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.12, p = 0.046 and 2.83, 1.50-5.34, p = 0.001, respectively in the examined Southeast Asian populations. Conclusions Both Western- and East Asian-type strains of H. pylori are found in Southeast Asia and are predominantly cagA-positive and vacA s1 type. In Southeast Asia, patients infected with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains have an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease. Thus, testing for this genotype and the presence of cagA may have clinical usefulness.

  10. Frecuencia de los genotipos babA2, oipA y cagE de Helicobacter pylori en pacientes colombianos con enfermedades gastroduodenales.

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    Andrés Javier Quiroga

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La infección con Helicobacter pylori está asociada con el desarrollo de diferentes enfermedades gastroduodenales. Varios genes de virulencia de H. pylori se han relacionado con mayor riesgo de enfermedad gástrica. Objetivos. El propósito de este trabajo fue determinar las posibles asociaciones entre la presencia de los genes vacA, cagA, cagE, babA2 y oipA en aislamientos de H. pylori de pacientes colombianos y las diferentes consecuencias clínicas de la infección. Materiales y métodos. Mediante PCR se evaluaron los genotipos cagA, vacA, cagE, oipA y babA2 en 166 aislamientos de H. pylori provenientes de 50 pacientes con úlcera péptica, 39 con gastritis crónica no atrófica, 26 con gastritis crónica atrófica, 26 con metaplasia intestinal y 25 con adenocarcinoma gástrico. Resultados. La frecuencia de los genotipos cagA, cagE, babA2 y oipA fue de 73%, 75%, 48% y 74%, respectivamente. El 64% (100/157 de los aislamientos presentó el genotipo citotóxico vacAs1m1/cagA positivo/cagE positivo. Se observó una mayor frecuencia de cepas citotóxicas en pacientes con cáncer (84%, metaplasia (91% y úlcera (81% en comparación con pacientes con gastritis no atrófica (50% (p=0,002, 0,008 y 0,007, respectivamente. La frecuencia de oipA y babA2 fue mayor en cepas citotóxicas que en cepas no citotóxicas (oipA: 81% vs. 52%, p=0,003; babA2: 58% vs. 12%, p=0,000. No se observaron diferencias significativas en la frecuencia de los genes oipA o babA2 solos o en asociación con vacA y cagA/cagE y las diferentes enfermedades gastroduodenales. Conclusiones. No se encontraron evidencias que sugieran que los genes babA2 u oipA puedan servir como marcadores de ulcerogénesis o carcinogénesis en esta población, solos o en asociación con cagA, cagE o vacA.

  11. XRCC7 rs#7003908 Polymorphism and Helicobacter pylori Infection-Related Gastric Antrum Adenocarcinoma

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    Chao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 7 (XRCC7 plays a key role in DNA repair that protects against genetic instability and carcinogenesis. To determine whether XRCC7 rs#7003908 polymorphism (XRCC7P is associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-related gastric antrum adenocarcinoma (GAA risk, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study, including 642 patients with pathologically confirmed GAA and 927 individually matched controls without any evidence of tumours or precancerous lesions, among Guangxi population. Increased risks of GAA were observed for individuals with cagA positive (odds ratio (OR 6.38; 95% confidence interval (CI 5.03–8.09. We also found that these individuals with the genotypes of XRCC7 rs#7003908 G alleles (XRCC7-TG or -GG featured increasing risk of GAA (ORs 2.80 and 5.13, resp., compared with the homozygote of XRCC7 rs#7003908 T alleles (XRCC7-TT. GAA risk, moreover, did appear to differ more significantly among individuals featuring cagA-positive status, whose adjusted ORs (95% CIs were 15.74 (10.89–22.77 for XRCC7-TG and 38.49 (22.82–64.93 for XRCC7-GG, respectively. Additionally, this polymorphism multiplicatively interacted with XRCC3 codon 241 polymorphism with respect to HCC risk (ORinteraction=1.49. These results suggest that XRCC7P may be associated with the risk of Guangxiese GAA related to cagA.

  12. Instability of repeated DNAs during transformation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Vera I; Klysik, Elzbieta A; Rosche, William A; Sinden, Richard R

    2002-05-22

    Escherichia coli has provided an important model system for understanding the molecular basis for genetic instabilities associated with repeated DNA. Changes in triplet repeat length during growth following transformation in E. coli have been used as a measure of repeat instability. However, very little is known about the molecular and biological changes that may occur on transformation. Since only a small proportion of viable cells become competent, uncertainty exists regarding the nature of these transformed cells. To establish whether the process of transformation can be inherently mutagenic for certain DNA sequences, we used a genetic assay in E. coli to compare the frequency of genetic instabilities associated with transformation with those occurring in plasmid maintained in E. coli. Our results indicate that, for certain DNA sequences, bacterial transformation can be highly mutagenic. The deletion frequency of a 106 bp perfect inverted repeat is increased by as much as a factor of 2 x 10(5) following transformation. The high frequency of instability was not observed when cells stably harboring plasmid were rendered competent. Thus, the process of transformation was required to observe the instability. Instabilities of (CAG).(CTG) repeats are also dramatically elevated upon transformation. The magnitude of the instability is dependent on the nature and length of the repeat. Differences in the methylation status of plasmid used for transformation and the methylation and restriction/modification systems present in the bacterial strain used must also be considered in repeat instability measurements. Moreover, different E. coli genetic backgrounds show different levels of instability during transformation.

  13. Relationship of interleukin-1B gene promoter region polymorphism with Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Ivy Bastos; Vianna, Júlia Silveira; Halicki, Priscila Cristina Bartolomeu; Lara, Caroline; Tadiotto, Thássia Fernanda; da Silva Maciel, João Batista; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; von Groll, Andrea; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida

    2015-09-29

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. The severity of damage is determined by the interplay between environmental/behavioral factors, bacterial pathogenicity genes and host genetic polymorphisms that can influence the secretion levels of inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, this study aimed to identify polymorphisms in the IL-1B and IL-1RN genes and their associations with H. pylori infection, cagA gene of H. pylori, and gastroduodenal diseases. Gastric biopsy samples from 151 patients infected with H. pylori and 76 uninfected individuals were analyzed. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by histology and PCR. Polymorphisms at positions -511, -31 and +3954 of the IL-1B gene were detected by PCR-RFLP, and an analysis of the VNTR polymorphism of the IL-1RN gene was performed by PCR. It was observed that the presence of the T/T genotype at position -511 and the C/C genotype at position -31 were associated with H. pylori infection and with an increased risk of gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients. Additionally, strains from patients H. pylori-positive carrying the cagA gene was significantly related with the T/T genotype at position -511 of IL-1B.  No association of polymorphisms at position +3954 of IL-1B and in the IL-1RN with H. pylori infection and with risk of severe gastric diseases was found. We demonstrated that polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-1B gene (at positions -511 and -31) are associated with an enhanced risk of H. pylori infection as well as gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients.

  14. High diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer.

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    Yolanda López-Vidal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008, and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003. A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036. A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003. Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work.

  15. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V. [Hematological Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A. [Shemyakin Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Y chromosome polymorphisms of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-10

    Feb 10, 2017 ... individual camels. In addition, a TG repeat in the USP9Y gene was identified as the first polymorphic microsatellite in the camel Y chromosome, whereas microsatellites based on bovine sequences were not detected. The frequency of each allele varied among different populations.For the Nanjiang, Hexi ...

  17. A novel multiplex analysis of filaggrin polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldgaard, Michael; Szecsi, Pal B; Carlsen, Berit C

    2012-01-01

    The filaggrin protein is expressed as profilaggrin mainly in stratum granulosum cells of the epidermis. The profilaggrin gene codes for 10-12 filaggrin repeats. The filaggrin protein is important for skin barrier function. Filaggrin deficiency due to functional null-polymorphisms affects 8-10% of...

  18. Genetic diversity among sorghum landraces and polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) are playing an important role in molecular breeding. This investigation was undertaken to study the genetic diversity among local sorghum accessions from two different agro-ecological zones of Burkina Faso and to assess the polymorphism within local improved varieties ...

  19. Helicobacter pylori counteracts the apoptotic action of its VacA toxin by injecting the CagA protein into gastric epithelial cells.

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    Amanda Oldani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is responsible for gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers but is also a high risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. The most pathogenic H. pylori strains (i.e., the so-called type I strains associate the CagA virulence protein with an active VacA cytotoxin but the rationale for this association is unknown. CagA, directly injected by the bacterium into colonized epithelium via a type IV secretion system, leads to cellular morphological, anti-apoptotic and proinflammatory effects responsible in the long-term (years or decades for ulcer and cancer. VacA, via pinocytosis and intracellular trafficking, induces epithelial cell apoptosis and vacuolation. Using human gastric epithelial cells in culture transfected with cDNA encoding for either the wild-type 38 kDa C-terminal signaling domain of CagA or its non-tyrosine-phosphorylatable mutant form, we found that, depending on tyrosine-phosphorylation by host kinases, CagA inhibited VacA-induced apoptosis by two complementary mechanisms. Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA prevented pinocytosed VacA to reach its target intracellular compartments. Unphosphorylated CagA triggered an anti-apoptotic activity blocking VacA-induced apoptosis at the mitochondrial level without affecting the intracellular trafficking of the toxin. Assaying the level of apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells infected with wild-type CagA(+/VacA(+H. pylori or isogenic mutants lacking of either CagA or VacA, we confirmed the results obtained in cells transfected with the CagA C-ter constructions showing that CagA antagonizes VacA-induced apoptosis. VacA toxin plays a role during H. pylori stomach colonization. However, once bacteria have colonized the gastric niche, the apoptotic action of VacA might be detrimental for the survival of H. pylori adherent to the mucosa. CagA association with VacA is thus a novel, highly ingenious microbial strategy to locally protect its

  20. Specific Serum Immunoglobulin G Response to Urease and CagA Antigens of Helicobacter pylori in Infected Children and Adults in a Country with High Prevalence of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Onofre

    2002-01-01

    Few studies have analyzed the immune response to Helicobacter pylori CagA and urease antigens across age groups in the same population. The aim of this study was to analyze the serologic immunoglobulin G (IgG) response to CagA and urease proteins in children and adults with gastrointestinal symptoms and belonging to the same population and similar socioeconomic levels. The serologic response was studied in 352 children and 293 adults with gastrointestinal symptoms. IgG antibodies against CagA and urease were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using highly purified recombinant antigens. H. pylori infection was defined as a positive result in a serologic assay using whole-cell H. pylori extracts as the antigen. We found, in H. pylori-positive children, a seroprevalence of 46.9% to CagA and 16.2% to urease, whereas in H. pylori-positive adults, a seroprevalence of 78.9% to CagA and 59% to urease was found. In children, the magnitude of the response to CagA was significantly higher and the response to urease was significantly lower than those in adults. The kinetics of serologic response to CagA and to urease across age groups was contrastably different. Whereas CagA is a strong immunogen, urease is a poor immunogen during natural infection. These differences in the humoral response may be important for the short-term or long-term outcome of the infection. These results add to our knowledge of the epidemiology of H. pylori infection. PMID:11777836

  1. Quantitative Detection and Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori from Stool using Droplet Digital PCR Reveals Variation in Bacterial Loads that Correlates with cagA Virulence Gene Carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Sarah; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Gonzalez, Paula; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Cortes, Bernal; Larson, Ann; Fang, Ferric C; Salama, Nina R

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies of the carcinogenic stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori have been limited by the lack of noninvasive detection and genotyping methods. We developed a new stool-based method for detection, quantification, and partial genotyping of H. pylori using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), which allows for increased sensitivity and absolute quantification by PCR partitioning. Stool-based ddPCR assays for H. pylori 16S gene detection and cagA virulence gene typing were tested using a collection of 50 matched stool and serum samples from Costa Rican volunteers and 29 H. pylori stool antigen-tested stool samples collected at a US hospital. The stool-based H. pylori 16S ddPCR assay had a sensitivity of 84% and 100% and a specificity of 100% and 71% compared to serology and stool antigen tests, respectively. The stool-based cagA genotyping assay detected cagA in 22 (88%) of 25 stools from CagA antibody-positive individuals and four (16%) of 25 stools from CagA antibody-negative individuals from Costa Rica. All 26 of these samples had a Western-type cagA allele. Presence of serum CagA antibodies was correlated with a significantly higher load of H. pylori in the stool. The stool-based ddPCR assays are a sensitive, noninvasive method for detection, quantification, and partial genotyping of H. pylori. The quantitative nature of ddPCR-based H. pylori detection revealed significant variation in bacterial load among individuals that correlates with presence of the cagA virulence gene. These stool-based ddPCR assays will facilitate future population-based epidemiologic studies of this important human pathogen. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Association of the CagA gene positive Helicobacter pylori and tissue levels of interleukin-17 and interleukin-8 in gastric ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fakhry, Ashraf A; El-Daker, Medhat A; Badr, Rawia I; El-Nady, Ghada M; Mesbah, Maggie R; Youssef, Tamer; Arafa, Mohammad; Arafa, Mona; El-Naggar, Mohammed M

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that CagA gene positive Helicobacter pylori (CagA+ H. pylon) induces severe gastric mucosal inflammation. On the other hand, Interleukin (IL)-17 is known to stimulate IL-8 release by the gastric epithelial cells which facilitates chemotaxis of neutrophils through an IL-8-dependent mechanism. The aim of the study is to determine the role of IL-17 and IL-8 in the development of gastritis and gastric ulcer in H. pylori infected patients. Mucosal biopsy samples were obtained from the ulcer site of gastric mucosa of 28 patients with gastric ulcer (GU), 27 with gastritis and 8 controls subjects without gastritis or ulcers. Infection with H. pylori of patients and controls was assessed by a rapid urease test, histological examination and culture. Measurement of the tissue levels of IL-17 and IL-8 were assayed by ELISA. H. pylori cagA gene was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of the 28 patients with GU, 18 (64.2%) patients were positive for H. pylori infection, while 13 (48.1%) patients with gastritis and none of the controls were positive for H. pylori infection The CagA gene was detected in 12 (66.6%) in H. pylori GU patients, and 7 (53.8%) H. pylori positive gastritis. IL-17 was significantly higher in GU-CagA+ve H. pylori compared to GU-CagA- H. pylori (P H. pylori) was significantly higher compared to gastritis--CagA- H. pylori- (P H. pylori is associated with induction of mucosal injury. Also, IL-8 and IL-17 plays a role in the development of GU and gastritis especially in CagA+ H. pylori.

  3. Detection of Helicobacter pylori vacA, cagA and iceA1 virulence genes associated with gastric diseases in Egyptian patients

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    Ahmed El-Shenawy

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, the main genotype combinations in the studied Egyptian patients were; vacAs2m2/iceA1, vacAs1m1/cagA, mostly associated with gastritis, and vacAs1/cagA/icA, mainly in PUD. The less virulent (s2, s2m2 H. pylori genotypes were found in patients aged over 43 years.

  4. [Studies on the CTA/CTG trinucleotide repeats of ATXN8OS gene in Chinese Hans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junling; Zhang, Shen; Xu, Qian; Li, Xiaohui; Song, Xingwang; Jiang, Hong; Shen, Lu; Yan, Xinxiang; Pan, Qian; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha

    2008-10-01

    To study the normal range of (CTA/CTG)n repeats of ATXN8OS gene in Chinese Hans, and the frequency of ATXN8OS (CTA/CTG)n repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia(SCA) patients in Mainland China. The (CTA/CTG)n repeats of ATXN8OS gene were detected using fluorescence-PCR, 8% denaturing polyacrylamide gel and capillary electrophoresis technique in 132 SCA patients in whom CAG expansion at the SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, SCA7, SCA12, SCA17 and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy(DRPLA) loci has been excluded, and 261 healthy controls. There were no obvious abnormal changes of the (CTA/CTG)n repeats of ATXN8OS gene in the 132 SCA patients. Thirty-five SCA patients were homozygotes (26.5%), and the range of CTA/CTG repeat number was 17 to 47 (24.20+/-4.57), among which 18 repeats appeared most frequently. In 261 normal controls, 70 were homozygotes (26.8%), and the range of the CTA/CTG repeat number was from 12 to 43 (24.04+/-4.53), among which 18 repeats was the most frequent. SCA8 is a rare subtype of SCA in Mainland China. The low prevalence of SCA8 seems to be correlated with the low frequency of large (CTA/CTG)n copy number alleles in Chinese population.

  5. Cyclic RGD peptides interfere with binding of the Helicobacter pylori protein CagL to integrins αVβ3 and α5β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradi, Jens; Huber, Sylwia; Gaus, Katharina; Mertink, Felix; Royo Gracia, Soledad; Strijowski, Ulf; Backert, Steffen; Sewald, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori that may cause different gastric diseases exploits integrins for infection of gastric cells. The H. pylori protein CagL present on the outer region of the type IV secretion pilus contains an RGD sequence (-Arg-Gly-Asp-) that enables binding to cells presenting integrins α5β1 and αVβ3. This interaction can be inhibited with conformationally designed cyclic RGD peptides derived from the CagL epitope -Ala-Leu-Arg-Gly-Asp-Leu-Ala-. The inhibition of the CagL-αVβ3 interaction by different RGD peptides strongly suggests the importance of the RGD motif for CagL binding. CagL point mutants (RAD, RGA) show decreased affinity to integrin αVβ3. Furthermore, structure-activity relationship studies with cyclic RGD peptides in a spatial screening approach show the distinct influence of the three-dimensional arrangement of RGD motif on the ability to interfere with this interaction. Resulting from these studies, similar structural requirements for the CagL epitope as previously suggested for other ligands of integrin αVβ3 are proposed.

  6. Proteomic characterization of Helicobacter pylori CagA antigen recognized by child serum antibodies and its epitope mapping by peptide array.

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    Junko Akada

    Full Text Available Serum antibodies against pathogenic bacteria play immunologically protective roles, and can be utilized as diagnostic markers of infection. This study focused on Japanese child serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, a chronically-infected gastric bacterium which causes gastric cancer in adults. Serological diagnosis for H. pylori infection is well established for adults, but it needs to be improved for children. Serum samples from 24 children, 22 H. pylori (Hp-positive and 2 Hp-negative children, were used to catalogue antigenic proteins of a Japanese strain CPY2052 by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblot and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 24 proteins were identified as candidate antigen proteins. Among these, the major virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA was the most reactive antigen recognized by all the Hp-positive sera even from children under the age of 3 years. The major antigenic part of CagA was identified in the middle region, and two peptides containing CagA epitopes were identified using a newly developed peptide/protein-combined array chip method, modified from our previous protein chip method. Each of the epitopes was found to contain amino acid residue(s unique to East Asian CagA. Epitope analysis of CagA indicated importance of the regional CagA antigens for serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in children.

  7. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from northeastern Brazil with upper gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyssa Quezado de Figueiredo Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastric inflammation and significantly increases the risk of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease and distal gastric carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from a Brazilian region where there is a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to investigate vacA mosaicism and cagA status in the gastric mucosa of 134 H. pylori-positive patients, including 76 with gastritis: 28 with peptic ulcer disease and 30 with gastric cancer. The s1m1 variant was the predominant vacA genotype observed, whereas the s1 allele was more frequently observed in patients with more severe diseases associated with H. pylori infection [p = 0.03, odds ratio (OR = 5.72, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.15-38.60]. Furthermore, all of the s1 alleles were s1b. Mixed vacA m1/m2 strains were found more frequently in patients with gastric cancer and a cagA-positive status was significantly associated with gastric cancer (p = 0.016, OR = 10.36, 95% CI = 1.35-217.31. Patients with gastric cancer (21/21, 100%, p = 0.006 or peptic ulcers (20/21, 95%, p = 0.02 were more frequently colonised by more virulent H. pylori strains compared to gastritis patients (41/61, 67.2%. In conclusion, in the northeastern of Brazil, which is one of the regions with the highest prevalence of gastric cancer in the country, infection with the most virulent H. pylori strains, carrying the cagA gene and s1m1 vacA alleles, predominates and is correlated with more severe H. pylori-associated diseases.

  8. Burden of hospital admission and repeat angiography in angina pectoris patients with and without coronary artery disease: a registry-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Jespersen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate risk of hospitalization due to cardiovascular disease (CVD and repeat coronary angiography (CAG in stable angina pectoris (SAP with no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD versus obstructive CAD, and asymptomatic reference individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed 11,223 patients with no prior CVD having a first-time CAG in 1998-2009 due to SAP symptoms and 5,695 asymptomatic reference individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study through registry linkage for 7.8 years (median. In recurrent event survival analysis, patients with SAP had 3-4-fold higher risk of hospitalization for CVD irrespective of CAG findings and cardiovascular comorbidity. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios(95%CI for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries was 3.0(2.5-3.5, for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 3.9(3.3-4.6 and for 1-3-vessel disease 3.6-4.1(range(all P<0.001. Mean accumulated hospitalization time was 3.5(3.0-4.0(days/10 years follow-up in reference individuals and 4.5(3.8-5.2/7.0(5.4-8.6/6.7(5.2-8.1/6.1(5.2-7.4/8.6(6.6-10.7 in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries/angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD/1-, 2-, and 3-vessel disease, respectively (all P<0.05, age-adjusted. SAP symptoms predicted repeat CAG with multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries being 2.3(1.9-2.9, for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 5.5(4.4-6.8 and for obstructive CAD 6.6-9.4(range(all P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with SAP symptoms and angiographically normal coronary arteries or angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD suffer from considerably greater CVD burdens in terms of hospitalization for CVD and repeat CAG compared with asymptomatic reference individuals even after adjustment for cardiac risk factors and exclusion of cardiovascular comorbidity as cause. Contrary to common perception, excluding obstructive CAD by CAG in such

  9. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and the Gingerols Inhibit the Growth of Cag A+ Strains of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahady, Gail B.; Pendland, Susan L.; Yun, Gina S.; Lu, Zhi-Zhen; Stoia, Adina

    2013-01-01

    Background Ginger root (Zingiber officinale) has been used traditionally for the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments such as motion sickness, dyspepsia and hyperemesis gravidarum, and is also reported to have chemopreventative activity in animal models. The gingerols are a group of structurally related polyphenolic compounds isolated from ginger and known to be the active constituents. Since Helicobacter pylori (HP) is the primary etiological agent associated with dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease and the development of gastric and colon cancer, the anti-HP effects of ginger and its constituents were tested in vitro. Materials and Methods A methanol extract of the dried powdered ginger rhizome, fractions of the extract and the isolated constituents, 6-,8-, 10-gingerol and 6-shogoal, were tested against 19 strains of HP, including 5 CagA+ strains. Results The methanol extract of ginger rhizome inhibited the growth of all 19 strains in vitro with a minimum inhibitory concentration range of 6.25–50 µg/ml. One fraction of the crude extract, containing the gingerols, was active and inhibited the growth of all HP strains with an MIC range of 0.78 to 12.5 µg/ml and with significant activity against the CagA+ strains. Conclusion These data demonstrate that ginger root extracts containing the gingerols inhibit the growth of H. pylori CagA+ strains in vitro and this activity may contribute to its chemopreventative effects. PMID:14666666

  10. The mismatch repair system protects against intergenerational GAA repeat instability in a Friedreich ataxia mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzatizadeh, Vahid; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Sandi, Madhavi; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Te Riele, Hein; Pook, Mark A

    2012-04-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a dynamic GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene. Studies of mouse models for other trinucleotide repeat (TNR) disorders have revealed an important role of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in TNR instability. To explore the potential role of MMR proteins on intergenerational GAA repeat instability in FRDA, we have analyzed the transmission of unstable GAA repeat expansions from FXN transgenic mice which have been crossed with mice that are deficient for Msh2, Msh3, Msh6 or Pms2. We find in all cases that absence of parental MMR protein not only maintains transmission of GAA expansions and contractions, but also increases GAA repeat mutability (expansions and/or contractions) in the offspring. This indicates that Msh2, Msh3, Msh6 and Pms2 proteins are not the cause of intergenerational GAA expansions or contractions, but act in their canonical MMR capacity to protect against GAA repeat instability. We further identified differential modes of action for the four MMR proteins. Thus, Msh2 and Msh3 protect against GAA repeat contractions, while Msh6 protects against both GAA repeat expansions and contractions, and Pms2 protects against GAA repeat expansions and also promotes contractions. Furthermore, we detected enhanced occupancy of Msh2 and Msh3 proteins downstream of the FXN expanded GAA repeat, suggesting a model in which Msh2/3 dimers are recruited to this region to repair mismatches that would otherwise produce intergenerational GAA contractions. These findings reveal substantial differences in the intergenerational dynamics of expanded GAA repeat sequences compared with expanded CAG/CTG repeats, where Msh2 and Msh3 are thought to actively promote repeat expansions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MAO-A promoter polymorphism and idiopathic pulmonary arterial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with its transcriptional activity (Sabol et al. 1998). The four-repeat pVNTR yields higher expression levels of a re- porter gene than three repeats, in vitro. The MAOA-VNTR polymorphism has been mainly associated with neurologi- cal disorders such as panic disorder, anorexia nervosa etc. (Urwin et al. 2003; Guindalini et al.

  12. Distribution and Evolution of CTG Repeats at the Myotonin Protein Kinase Gene in Human Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Deka, Ranjan; Majumder, Partha P.; Shriver, Mark D.; Stivers, David N.; Zhong, Yixi; Yu, Ling M.; Barrantes-Mesén, Ramiro; Yin, Shih-Jiun; Miki, Tetsuro; Hundrieser, Joachim; Bunker, Clareann H.; McGarvey, Stephen T.; Sakallah, Sameer; Ferrell, Robert E.; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    1996-01-01

    Artículo científico -- Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud. 1996 We have analyzed the CTG repeat length and the neighboring Alu insertion/deletion (+/-) polymorphism in DNA samples from 16 ethnically and geographically diverse human populations to understand the evolutionary dynamics of the myotonic dystrophy-associated CTG repeat. Our results show that the CTG repeat length is variable in human populations. Although the (CTG)5 repeat is the most common allele in the majority of populati...

  13. Cytomolecular discrimination of the Am chromosomes of Triticum monococcum and the A chromosomes of Triticum aestivum using microsatellite DNA repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Mária; Mikó, Péter; Farkas, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Molnár, István

    2017-02-01

    The cytomolecular discrimination of the Am- and A-genome chromosomes facilitates the selection of wheat-Triticum monococcum introgression lines. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the commonly used DNA probes Afa family, 18S rDNA and pSc119.2 showed that the more complex hybridisation pattern obtained in T. monococcum relative to bread wheat made it possible to differentiate the Am and A chromosomes within homoeologous groups 1, 4 and 5. In order to provide additional chromosomal landmarks to discriminate the Am and A chromosomes, the microsatellite repeats (GAA)n, (CAG)n, (CAC)n, (AAC)n, (AGG)n and (ACT)n were tested as FISH probes. These showed that T. monococcum chromosomes have fewer, generally weaker, simple sequence repeat (SSR) signals than the A-genome chromosomes of hexaploid wheat. A differential hybridisation pattern was observed on 6Am and 6A chromosomes with all the SSR probes tested except for the (ACT)n probe. The 2Am and 2A chromosomes were differentiated by the signals given by the (GAA)n, (CAG)n and (AAC)n repeats, while only (GAA)n discriminated the chromosomes 3Am and 3A. Chromosomes 7Am and 7A could be differentiated by the lack of (GAA)n and (AGG)n signals on 7A. As potential landmarks for identifying the Am chromosomes, SSR repeats will facilitate the introgression of T. monococcum chromatin into wheat.

  14. Study of simple sequence repeat (SSR) polymorphism for biotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... To provide ready to use markers for back ground selection in marker assisted breeding of rice, we used. GPP 2 as donor parent for xa13, Xa21, Gm4 resistance to bacterial blight, gall midge and NLR 145 as another donor parent for Pi-kh gene resistance to blast and JGL 1798 as recurrent parent was.

  15. Short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms in Turkish population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    AmpFlSTR Profiler Plus PCR products were analyzed on ABI PrismTM 377 DNA sequencer. The. GeneScan-500 (ROX) internal lane size standard was used. Statistical analysis. The exact test was used to verify whether the genotypic dis- tribution at each locus was in conformity with Hardy-. Weinberg equilibrium (Guo et al.

  16. Polymorphism of the simple sequence repeat (AAC)5 in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-04

    Dec 4, 2013 ... Carvalho A., Guedes-Pinto H. and Lima-Brito J. 2011b Intergenic spacer length variants in old Portuguese bread wheat cultivars. J. Genet. 90, 203–208. Castilho A., Vershinin A. and Heslop-Harrison J. S. 2000 Repetitive. DNA and the chromosomes in the genome of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis). Ann. Bot.

  17. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers in the evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA samples of six hybrids of Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens were analyzed with ten inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers, which produced 52 polymorphic bands out of 87 bands with polymorphism average of 60%. ISSR patterns scored five distinguishable species-specific bands; two for C.

  18. Evaluation of genetic diversity in rice using simple sequence repeats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dendrogram revealed 8 major distinct clusters. Higher range of similarity values for related genotypes using simple sequence repeats (SSR) provides greater confidence for the assessment of genetic diversity and relationships. The polymorphism information content (PIC) value for the SSR loci ranged from 0.36 to 0.98.

  19. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers were developed through data mining of 3,803 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) previously published. A total of 144 di- to penta-type SSRs were identified and they were screened for polymorphism between two turnip cultivars, 'Tsuda' and 'Yurugi Akamaru'. Out of 90 EST-SSRs for ...

  20. Comparative effectiveness of inter-simple sequence repeat and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iisr

    2013-10-10

    Oct 10, 2013 ... whereas RAPD markers showed segregation based on geographical location as well as species based. Key words: Garcinia, genetic diversity, inter-simple sequence repeats, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, principal component analysis. INTRODUCTION. Garcinia is a large genus with 240 species ...

  1. Use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for screening blue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings suggest the need for caution to be taken during introduction of exotic germplasm and recognize the value of resistance trait to susceptible Brazilian germplasm when breeding for blue disease resistance. Key words: Cotton blue disease, cotton single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), simple sequence repeat

  2. TALEN-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair of CTG Trinucleotide Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Mosbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansions involving CTG/CAG triplets are responsible for several neurodegenerative disorders, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington’s disease. Because expansions trigger the disease, contracting repeat length could be a possible approach to gene therapy for these disorders. Here, we show that a TALEN-induced double-strand break was very efficient at contracting expanded CTG repeats in yeast. We show that RAD51, POL32, and DNL4 are dispensable for double-strand break repair within CTG repeats, the only required genes being RAD50, SAE2, and RAD52. Resection was totally abolished in the absence of RAD50 on both sides of the break, whereas it was reduced in a sae2Δ mutant on the side of the break containing the longest repeat tract, suggesting that secondary structures at double-strand break ends must be removed by the Mre11-Rad50 complex and Sae2. Following the TALEN double-strand break, single-strand annealing occurred between both sides of the repeat tract, leading to repeat contraction.

  3. Chemokines and antimicrobial peptides have a cag-dependent early response to Helicobacter pylori infection in primary human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Pascale; Paris, Isabelle; Garcia, Magali; Tran, Cong Tri; Cremniter, Julie; Garnier, Martine; Faure, Jean-Pierre; Barthes, Thierry; Boneca, Ivo G; Morel, Franck; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Burucoa, Christophe; Bodet, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection systematically causes chronic gastric inflammation that can persist asymptomatically or evolve toward more severe gastroduodenal pathologies, such as ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) of H. pylori allows translocation of the virulence protein CagA and fragments of peptidoglycan into host cells, thereby inducing production of chemokines, cytokines, and antimicrobial peptides. In order to characterize the inflammatory response to H. pylori, a new experimental protocol for isolating and culturing primary human gastric epithelial cells was established using pieces of stomach from patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy. Isolated cells expressed markers indicating that they were mucin-secreting epithelial cells. Challenge of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori B128 underscored early dose-dependent induction of expression of mRNAs of the inflammatory mediators CXCL1 to -3, CXCL5, CXCL8, CCL20, BD2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In AGS cells, significant expression of only CXCL5 and CXCL8 was observed following infection, suggesting that these cells were less reactive than primary epithelial cells. Infection of both cellular models with H. pylori B128ΔcagM, a cag PAI mutant, resulted in weak inflammatory-mediator mRNA induction. At 24 h after infection of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori, inflammatory-mediator production was largely due to cag PAI substrate-independent virulence factors. Thus, H. pylori cag PAI substrate appears to be involved in eliciting an epithelial response during the early phases of infection. Afterwards, other virulence factors of the bacterium take over in development of the inflammatory response. Using a relevant cellular model, this study provides new information on the modulation of inflammation during H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Human gastrin mRNA expression up-regulated by Helicobacter pylori CagA through MEK/ERK and JAK2-signaling pathways in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianjiang; Xie, Yuan; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Shu; Li, Yu

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori-cytotoxin-associated protein A (CagA) and gastrin are believed to play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis, but their interaction has been incompletely clear. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1/cagA and a luciferase reporter vector pGL/gastrin promoter, and then co-transfected them into gastric cancer AGS and SGC-7901 cells. The two kinds of gastric cancer cells were, respectively, infected with cagA-positive H. pylori NCTC11637, and then the gastrin promoter activity and gastrin mRNA level were detected with a Dual-Luciferase reporter assay system and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Next, after the MEK/ERK and JAK2-signaling pathway inhibitors, U0126 and AG490, were used to treat the two cell lines, or the ERK1 and JAK2 genes were knocked down by siRNAs (small interference RNAs) in the two cell lines, the gastrin promoter activity and gastrin mRNA level were observed again. The results indicated that CagA could activate the gastrin promoter and up-regulate gastrin mRNA expression in AGS and SGC-7901 cells, but these effects could be inhibited by the inhibitors U0126 and AG490, and the CagA-induced gastrin mRNA expression was down-regulated in the cells whose ERK1 or JAK2 gene was knocked down. Gastrin promoter may be the transcriptional target of CagA, and CagA activates the gastrin promoter to up-regulate gastrin mRNA expression through the MEK/ERK and JAK1-signaling pathway in gastric cancer cells.

  5. Prevalence and Correlation with Clinical Diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotype among Gastric Patients from Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n=169, chronic gastritis (GIs, gastric ulcer (GU, and gastric cancer (GC were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A total of 141 (84% cases were found positive for H. pylori by 16S rRNA and ureA. GC showed high H. pylori infection (93% compared with GIs (72% and GU (84%. The vacAs1am1 was highly found in GC (40% and GU (36%, vacAs1am2 in GIs (33%, vacAs1bm1 (14% and vacAs1bm2 (8% in GU cases, and s2m1 in normal cases (33%, while vacAs1cm1 showed low frequency in GIs (2% and GU (3% and GC showed negative result. The East-Asian cagA strain was highly observed in GC (43%, as compared to GIs (41% and GU (20%. The East-Asian cagA/vacAs1am1 was significantly higher in GC (23% than in GU (22% and GIs (145 patients. The East-Asian type cagA with vacAs1a and vacAm1 is the most predominant genotype in H. pylori strains of Northeast China.

  6. American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics Standards and Guidelines for Clinical Genetics Laboratories, 2014 edition: technical standards and guidelines for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Lora; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2014-12-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disease of mid-life onset caused by expansion of a polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG) repeat. Variable penetrance for alleles carrying 36-39 repeats has been noted, but the disease appears fully penetrant when the repeat numbers are >40. An abnormal CAG repeat may expand, contract, or be stably transmitted when passed from parent to child. Assays used to diagnose Huntington disease must be optimized to ensure the accurate and unambiguous quantitation of CAG repeat length. This document provides an overview of Huntington disease and methodological considerations for Huntington disease testing. Examples of laboratory reports are also included.

  7. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  8. Development of simple sequence repeat markers in cymbopogon species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Verma, Vijeshwar; Shahi, Ashok Kumar; Qazi, Gulam Nab; Balyan, Harindra Singh

    2007-03-01

    The genus Cymbopogon comprises about 140 species, which produce characteristic aromatic essential oils. However, the phenotypic identification of species of Cymbopogon has been difficult as a result of widespread occurrence of natural variants, which differ in ploidy levels and chemotaxonomic complexities. Therefore, we have developed a set of simple sequence repeat markers from a genomic library of Cymbopogon jwarancusa to help in the precise identification of the species (including accessions) of Cymbopogon. For this purpose, we isolated 16 simple sequence repeat containing genomic deoxyribonucleic acid clones of C. jwarancusa, which contained a total of 32 simple sequence repeats with a range of 1 to 3 simple sequence repeats per clone. The majority (68.8%) of the 32 simple sequence repeats comprised dinucleotide repeat motifs followed by simple sequence repeats with trinucleotide (21.8%) and other higher order repeat motifs. Eighteen (81.8%) of the 22 designed primers for the above simple sequence repeats amplified products of expected sizes, when tried with genomic DNA of C. jwarancusa, the source species. Thirteen (72.2%) of the 18 functional primers detected polymorphism among the three species of Cymbopogon (C. flexuosus, C. pendulus and C. jwarancusa) and amplified a total of 95 alleles (range 1-18 alleles) with a PIC value of 0.44 to 0.96 per simple sequence repeat. Thus, the higher allelic range and high level of polymorphism demonstrated by the newly developed simple sequence repeat markers are likely to have many applications such as in improvement of essential oil quality by authentication of Cymbopogon species and varieties and mapping or tagging the genes controlling agronomically important traits of essential oils, which can further be utilized in marker assisted breeding.

  9. The Gastric Mucosa from Patients Infected with CagA+ or VacA+ Helicobacter pylori Has a Lower Level of Dual Oxidase-2 Expression than Uninfected or Infected with CagA-/VacA- H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqian; Zhou, Yunfeng; Zheng, Yufeng; Guo, Hong; Gao, Lei; Chen, Pan; Feng, Dandan; Wu, Lijuan; Yang, Moli; Qi, Yanli; Guo, Hao; Chang, Yongchao; Chu, Fong-Fong; Gao, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a well-recognized gastroduodenal pathogen and class I carcinogen. Dual oxidase-2 (DUOX2), a member of NADPH oxidase family, has several critical physiological functions, including thyroid hormone biosynthesis and host mucosal defense. To investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on DUOX2 gene expression in human stomach. The biopsies were obtained from patients who underwent endoscopic diagnosis. The patient serum was assayed for two virulence factors of H. pylori, CagA IgG and VacA. The inflammation in gastric mucosa was analyzed with histology. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect the expression of three members of NADPH oxidase, NOX1, NOX2, and DUOX2, as well as lactoperoxidase (LPO) in the gastric mucosa. NOX2, DUOX2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) protein levels were quantified by Western blots or immunohistochemistry. The H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa had more severe inflammation than uninfected samples. However, the expression of DUOX2 mRNA and protein was lower in gastric mucosa of patients with H. pylori infection compared to the uninfected. Among the H. pylori-infected patients, those having CagA IgG or VacA in the serum had lower DUOX2 expression levels than those infected with H. pylori without either virulence factor. The NOX2 and MPO levels were higher in those patients infected with H. pylori irrespective of the virulence factors than those uninfected patients. NOX1 and LPO mRNA were undetectable in the gastric mucosa. CagA+ or VacA+ H. pylori in the stomach of patients may suppress DUOX2 expression to promote its own survival. Increased NOX2 could not eliminate H. pylori infection.

  10. Associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA de Helicobacter pylori e úlcera duodenal em crianças no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashour Abdussalam Ali Ramadam

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori é o principal agente de gastrite em seres humanos e fator de risco para úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. A evolução da infecção está relacionada a diversos fatores, inclusive bacterianos, como presença de cagA e genótipo s1-m1 do vacA, associados com o desenvolvimento de úlcera e adenocarcinoma gástrico. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA em H. pylori isolado de crianças e relacionar os achados com a doença apresentada pelo paciente. Foram estudadas 65 crianças (24 com úlcera duodenal e 41 sem úlcera gástrica ou duodenal. A pesquisa de cagA e de alelos do vacA foi feita por PCR em amostras da bactéria isoladas do estômago dos pacientes. Infecção mista foi identificada em dez (15,4% crianças. Entre os pacientes com monoinfecção, o alelo s1 foi detectado em amostras isoladas de 40 (72,7%, e o m1 em 34 (61,8%. CagA foi identificado em H. pylori isolado de 38 (69,1% pacientes. Foi observada associação entre presença de cagA e de genótipo s1-m1 (p = 10-7 e entre cagA e padrão s1-m1 com úlcera duodenal (p = 0,073 e p = 0,037, respectivamente. Em conclusão, infecção mista por H. pylori é comum em crianças brasileiras, e amostras da bactéria apresentando o alelo s1 e cagA são as mais prevalentes no nosso meio. A concomitância do alelo s1 do vacA e de cagA foi freqüentemente observada, e a associação de amostras positivas de s1 e de cagA com úlcera duodenal foi confirmada neste trabalho.

  11. Relevance of Helicobacter pylori vacA 3'-end Region Polymorphism to Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, Seyedeh Zahra; Latifi-Navid, Saeid; Mohammadi, Shiva; Zahri, Saber; Bakhti, Fatemeh Sadat; Feizi, Farideh; Yazdanbod, Abbas; Siavoshi, Farideh

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes play an important role in the pathogenesis of severe gastrointestinal disease. We identified a novel polymorphic site in the 3'-end region of H. pylori vacA gene, denoted by c1/-c2 (c1: with deletion of 15 bp), and examined associations of this and the previous four sites as well as cagA status with gastroduodenal diseases, in a total of 217 Iranian H. pylori isolates. Histopathologic evaluations were performed and patients with gastric cancer (GC) were further classified based on the anatomic site of tumor, including cardia and noncardia GC, and the histopathologic type of tumor, including intestinal- and diffuse-type GC. The vacA m1, i1, d1, c1, and cagA genotypes were significantly associated with an increased risk of GC, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 4.29 (2.03-9.08), 6.11 (2.63-14.19), 3.18 (1.49-6.76), 15.13 (5.86-39.01), and 2.59 (1.09-6.12), respectively. The vacA c1 genotype had an increased age- and sex-adjusted risk for GC by the multiple logistic regression analysis; the OR was 38.32 (95% CI, 6.60-222.29). This association was independent of and larger than the associations of the m-, i-, and d-type of vacA or cagA status with GC. No significant correlation was found between s1, whether independently or in combination, and the risk of GC or peptic ulcer disease (PUD). The vacA i1 and cagA genotypes were linked to an increased risk of PUD; the OR (95% CI) was 2.80 (1.45-5.40) and 2.62 (1.23-5.61), respectively. The presence of both the vacA i1 and cagA genotypes further increased the risk of PUD; the OR was 5.20 (95% CI, 1.92-14.03). The H. pylori vacA c1 genotype might therefore be one of the strongest risk predictors of GC in male patients aged ≥55 in Iran. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Helicobacter pylori CagA activates NF-κB by targeting TAK1 for TRAF6-mediated Lys 63 ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Acacia; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Tsang, Ying-Hung N; Li, Jiang-Dong; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Peek, Richard M; Blanke, Steven R; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by the cag pathogenicity island-dependent upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, which is largely mediated by the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB. However, the cag pathogenicity island-encoded proteins and cellular signalling molecules that are involved in H. pylori-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory response remain unclear. Here, we show that H. pylori virulence factor CagA and host protein transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) are essential for H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB. CagA physically associates with TAK1 and enhances its activity and TAK1-induced NF-κB activation through the tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-mediated, Lys 63-linked ubiquitination of TAK1. These findings show that polyubiquitination of TAK1 regulates the activation of NF-κB, which in turn is used by H. pylori CagA for the H. pylori-induced inflammatory response. PMID:19820695

  13. Rebamipide attenuates Helicobacter pylori CagA-induced self-renewal capacity via modulation of β-catenin signaling axis in gastric cancer-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Woo; Noh, Yu Na; Hwang, Won Chan; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2016-08-01

    Rebamipide, a mucosal-protective agent, is used clinically for treatment of gastritis and peptic ulcers induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) which is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Although rebamipide is known to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells, the action mechanisms of rebamipide in gastric carcinogenesis remains elusive. Here, we show that rebamipide suppresses H. pylori CagA-induced β-catenin and its target cancer-initiating cells (C-IC) marker gene expression via upregulation of miRNA-320a and -4496. Rebamipide attenuated in vitro self-renewal capacity of H. pylori CagA-infected gastric C-IC via modulation of miRNA-320a/-4496-β-catenin signaling axis. Moreover, rebamipide enhanced sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs in CagA-expressed gastric C-IC. Furthermore, rebamipide suppressed tumor-initiating capacity of gastric C-IC, probably via suppression of CagA-induced C-IC properties. These data provide novel insights for the efficacy of rebamipide as a chemoprotective drug against H. pylori CagA-induced carcinogenic potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 3'-UTR SIRF: A database for identifying clusters of short interspersed repeats in 3' untranslated regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Matthew T

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short (~5 nucleotides interspersed repeats regulate several aspects of post-transcriptional gene expression. Previously we developed an algorithm (REPFIND that assigns P-values to all repeated motifs in a given nucleic acid sequence and reliably identifies clusters of short CAC-containing motifs required for mRNA localization in Xenopus oocytes. Description In order to facilitate the identification of genes possessing clusters of repeats that regulate post-transcriptional aspects of gene expression in mammalian genes, we used REPFIND to create a database of all repeated motifs in the 3' untranslated regions (UTR of genes from the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC. The MGC database includes seven vertebrate species: human, cow, rat, mouse and three non-mammalian vertebrate species. A web-based application was developed to search this database of repeated motifs to generate species-specific lists of genes containing specific classes of repeats in their 3'-UTRs. This computational tool is called 3'-UTR SIRF (Short Interspersed Repeat Finder, and it reveals that hundreds of human genes contain an abundance of short CAC-rich and CAG-rich repeats in their 3'-UTRs that are similar to those found in mRNAs localized to the neurites of neurons. We tested four candidate mRNAs for localization in rat hippocampal neurons by in situ hybridization. Our results show that two candidate CAC-rich (Syntaxin 1B and Tubulin β4 and two candidate CAG-rich (Sec61α and Syntaxin 1A mRNAs are localized to distal neurites, whereas two control mRNAs lacking repeated motifs in their 3'-UTR remain primarily in the cell body. Conclusion Computational data generated with 3'-UTR SIRF indicate that hundreds of mammalian genes have an abundance of short CA-containing motifs that may direct mRNA localization in neurons. In situ hybridization shows that four candidate mRNAs are localized to distal neurites of cultured hippocampal neurons. These data suggest that

  15. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kass, D.H. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  16. Sublocalization of seven human simple sequence repeat polymorphic markers: D5S349, D5S351, and D5S355 to 5q11. 2-q13. 1, D5S350 to 5p13. 1-p14, D5S35s to 5q31. 2-q33. 1, D5S353 to 5q33. 2-qter, and D5S354 to 5q13. 2-q15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrington, J.A.; Wasmuth, J.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Seven highly informative human simple sequence repeat polymorphisms that map to human chromosome 5 have been sublocalized using a panel of somatic cell hybrids that retain naturally occurring deletions (4, 7). Simple sequence repeats are useful in the construction of high-resolution maps of the human genome because they are highly polymorphic and easily typed by the polymerase chain reaction (2, 9, 10, 11). The presence or absence of each of the seven simple sequence repeats, D5S349, D5S350, D5S351, D5S352, D5S353, D5S354, and D5S355, in a panel of somatic cell hybrids was determined using the polymerase chain reaction. The sequence of the PCR primer sets was previously reported by Hudson et al. Each PCR was carried out in a total volume of 25 PI using 0.2 pg DNA in 67 mM Tris-HCI (pH 8.3),6.7 mM MgCl[sub 2], 16.6 mM ammonium sulfate, 10 mM [beta]-mercaptoethanol, 1.25 mM each dNTP, 25 pmol each primer, and I unit of Thermos aquaticus DNA polymerase. The initial denaturation was at 94[degrees]R C for 1.5 min and the annealing temperatures ranged from 57 to 67[degrees]R C. Figure 1 depicts the chromosome 5 natural deletion mapping panel and the location of the markers. D5S350 was present in all hybrid cell lines except HHW1124 and HHW764 (SRO p13.1-p14). D5S349, D5S351, and D5S355 were absent in HHW1064 and HHW1124 and present in all other cell lines (SROq11.2-q13.1).D5S354 was absent in HHW1124 and present in all other cell lines (SRO q13.2-q15). D5S352 was present in all cell lines (SRO q31.2-q33.1), and D5S353 was present in all cell lines except HHW1138 (SRO q33.2-qter). 11 refs., 1 fig.

  17. The cagE gene sequence as a diagnostic marker to identify JP2 and non-JP2 highly leukotoxic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf; Åberg, Carola Høglund

    2017-01-01

    , has not yet been thoroughly evaluated. In the present study, the role of the cagE gene as a diagnostic marker has been investigated. We have used PCR, and whole genome sequencing data to determine the prevalence of cagE in A. actinomycetemcomitans based on analysis of (i) 249 isolates, collected...... b strains, including both JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes. We therefore propose that cagE has a potential to be used as a PCR-based gene marker for the identification of a virulent and highly leukotoxic group of serotype b strains, including both JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes. This might be of importance...

  18. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotype diversity and interferon gamma expression in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carrillo, D N; Atrisco-Morales, J; Hernández-Pando, R; Reyes-Navarrete, S; Betancourt-Linares, R; Cruz-del Carmen, I; Illades Aguiar, B; Román-Román, A; Fernández-Tilapa, G

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main risk factor for the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. In H. pylori-infected individuals, the clinical result is dependent on various factors, among which are bacterial components, the immune response, and environmental influence. To compare IFN-γ expression with the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer. Ninety-five patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 20 with gastric cancer were included in the study. Three gastric biopsies were taken; one was used for the molecular detection and genotyping of H. pylori; another was fixed in absolute alcohol and histologic sections were made for determining IFN-γ expression through immunohistochemistry. No differences were found in the cells that expressed IFN-γ between the patients with chronic gastritis (median percentage of positive cells: 82.6% in patients without H. pylori and 82% in infected persons) and those with gastric cancer (70.5% in H. pylori-negative patients and 78.5% in infected persons). IFN-γ expression was 69% in chronic gastritis patients infected with H. pylori vacAs2m2/cagA⁻ it was 86.5% in patients infected with H. pylori vacAs1m2/cagA⁻, 86.5% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁻, and 82% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁺. Similar data were found in the patients with gastric cancer. IFN-γ expression varied depending on the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotype, but not in accordance with the presence of chronic gastritis or gastric cancer.

  19. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequency of vacA, cagA and babA2 virulence markers in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from Mexican patients with chronic gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrete Erasmo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with chronic gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Three major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the vacuolating toxin (VacA, the cytotoxin-associated gene product (CagA and the adhesion protein BabA2. Since considerable geographic diversity in the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors has been reported, the aim of this work was to establish the H. pylori and vacA, cagA and babA2 gene status in 238 adult patients, from a marginal urban area of Mexico, with chronic gastritis. Methods H. pylori was identified in cultures of gastric biopsies by nested PCR. vacA and cagA genes were detected by multiplex PCR, whereas babA2 gene was identified by conventional PCR. Results H. pylori-positive biopsies were 143 (60.1%. All H. pylori strains were vacA+; 39.2% were cagA+; 13.3% were cagA+ babA2+ and 8.4% were babA2+. Mexican strains examined possessed the vacA s1, m1 (43.4%, s1, m2 (24.5%, s2, m1 (20.3% and s2, m2 (11.9% genotypes. Conclusion These results show that the Mexican patients suffering chronic gastritis we have studied had a high incidence of infection by H. pylori. Forty four percent (63/143 of the H. pylori strains analyzed in this work may be considered as highly virulent since they possessed two or three of the virulence markers analyzed: vacA s1 cagA babA2 (9.8%, 14/143, vacA s1 babA2 (4.9%, 7/143, and vacA s1 cagA (29.4%, 42/143. However, a statistically significant correlation was not observed between vacAs1, cagA and babA2 virulence markers (χ2 test; P > 0.05.

  1. Cloning and Characterization of Expanded CAG-Repeat Containing Sequence(s): Identification of Candidate Breast Cancer Predisposition (Gene(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    by projects (DAMD1 7-99- 1-9302 and DAMD17-02-1-0499) from Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, which is managed by the U.S. Army...McCombie WR, de la Bastide M, Dedhia N, Blocker H, Hornischer K, Nordsiek G, Agarwala R, Aravind L, Bailey JA, Bateman A, Batzoglou S, Birney E, Bork P...23. Reid SJ, van Roon-Mom WM, Wood PC, Rees MI, Owen MJ, Faull RL, Dragunow M, Snell RG. TBP, a polyglutamine tract containing protein, accumulates

  2. Marked Phenotypic Heterogeneity Associated with Expansion of a CAG Repeat Sequence at the Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph Disease Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Cancel, Géraldine; Abbas, Nacer; Stevanin, Giovanni; Dürr, Alexandra; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Néri, Christian; Duyckaerts, Charles; Penet, Christiane; Cann, Howard M.; Agid, Yves; Brice, Alexis

    1995-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and ...

  3. Characterization of virulence genes cagA and vacA in Helicobacter Pylori and their prevalence in gastrointestinal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Neves, Daniel Locatelli; do Nascimento, Aguinaldo José; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori infection was determined using cultures of gastric biopsy samples of patients attended at the academic hospital of the Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. Molecular methods were used to characterize the cagA and vacA genes from bacterial isolates associated with different diseases presented by patients. Out of a total of 81, forty-two gastric biopsy samples tested were positive for H. pylori, with a prevalence of 51.9%. No significant difference was found with regard to the gender (p=0.793) and age (p=0.183) of the patients. Genotype s1m1 vacA gene was found in 67% of the cases of peptic ulcer investigated (p=1.0), despite the limited number of patients with this disease (n=3). A correlation between the presence of less virulent strains (s2m2) and reflux esophagitis was found in the majority of the cases (45%), but without statistical significance. An association between the prevalence of cagA gene, found in 92% of isolates, and peptic ulcer was not observed (p=1.0), suggesting that this gene cannot be considered a specific marker of severity in our environment. The results reinforce the importance of conducting regional studies and the need to characterize H. pylori virulence genes associated with different diseases. PMID:24031754

  4. Instability of CTG Repeats is Governed by the Position of a DNA Base Lesion through Base Excision Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zunzhen; Liu, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions and deletions are associated with human neurodegeneration and cancer. However, their underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated that CAG repeat expansions can be initiated by oxidative DNA base damage and fulfilled by base excision repair (BER), suggesting active roles for oxidative DNA damage and BER in TNR instability. Here, we provide the first evidence that oxidative DNA damage can induce CTG repeat deletions along with limited expansions in human cells. Biochemical characterization of BER in the context of (CTG)20 repeats further revealed that repeat instability correlated with the position of a base lesion in the repeat tract. A lesion located at the 5′-end of CTG repeats resulted in expansion, whereas a lesion located either in the middle or the 3′-end of the repeats led to deletions only. The positioning effects appeared to be determined by the formation of hairpins at various locations on the template and the damaged strands that were bypassed by DNA polymerase β and processed by flap endonuclease 1 with different efficiency. Our study indicates that the position of a DNA base lesion governs whether TNR is expanded or deleted through BER. PMID:23468897

  5. CTCF cis-regulates trinucleotide repeat instability in an epigenetic manner: a novel basis for mutational hot spot determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell T Libby

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available At least 25 inherited disorders in humans result from microsatellite repeat expansion. Dramatic variation in repeat instability occurs at different disease loci and between different tissues; however, cis-elements and trans-factors regulating the instability process remain undefined. Genomic fragments from the human spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 locus, containing a highly unstable CAG tract, were previously introduced into mice to localize cis-acting "instability elements," and revealed that genomic context is required for repeat instability. The critical instability-inducing region contained binding sites for CTCF -- a regulatory factor implicated in genomic imprinting, chromatin remodeling, and DNA conformation change. To evaluate the role of CTCF in repeat instability, we derived transgenic mice carrying SCA7 genomic fragments with CTCF binding-site mutations. We found that CTCF binding-site mutation promotes triplet repeat instability both in the germ line and in somatic tissues, and that CpG methylation of CTCF binding sites can further destabilize triplet repeat expansions. As CTCF binding sites are associated with a number of highly unstable repeat loci, our findings suggest a novel basis for demarcation and regulation of mutational hot spots and implicate CTCF in the modulation of genetic repeat instability.

  6. Repeated Infections in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... he/she have ear tubes?What are the dangers of my child’s repeated infections?Should my child ... affect you or your baby through your breast milk.December 2017December 2017familydoctor.org editorial staffHip Problems in ...

  7. Structural basis for triplet repeat disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1999-01-01

    Motivation: Over a dozen major degenerative disorders, including myotonic distrophy, Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome result from unstable expansions of particular trinucleotides. Remarkably, only some of all the possible triplets, namely CAG/CTG, CGG/CCG and GAA/TTC, have been...

  8. Allowing repeat winners

    OpenAIRE

    Marco D. Huesch; Richard Brady

    2010-01-01

    Unbiased lotteries seem the least unfair and simplest procedures to allocate scarce indivisible resources to those with equal claims. But, when lotteries are repeated, it is not immediately obvious whether prior winners should be included or excluded. As in design questions surrounding single-shot lotteries, considerations of self-interest and distributive social preferences may interact. We investigate preferences for allowing participation of earlier winners in sequential lotteries. We foun...

  9. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  10. The importance of vacA, cagA, and iceA genotypes of Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arents, NLA; van Zwet, AA; Thijs, JC; Kooistra-Smid, AMD; van Slochteren, KR; Degener, JE; Kleibeuker, JH; van Doorn, LJ

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between the presence of H. pylori virulence factors and clinical outcome in H. pylori infected patients. METHODS: DNA was isolated from an antral biopsy sample and vacA, cagA, and iceA genotype were determined by PCR and a reverse hybridization technique in 183

  11. Removal of phenanthrene in aqueous solution containing photon competitors by TiO2-C-Ag film supported on fiberglass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramírez, Denisse Fabiola; Ávila-Pérez, Pedro; Torres-Bustillos, Luis G; Aguilar-López, Ricardo; Montes-Horcasitas, María C; Esparza-García, Fernando J; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2017-07-03

    Surface interactions with pollutants and photons are key factors that affect the applications of TiO2 in environmental remediation. In this study, the solubilizing agents dimethylsulfoxide and polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, which act as photon competitors, had no effect on the photocatalytic activity of TiO2-C-Ag film in phenanthrene (PHE) removal. Fiberglass with TiO2-C-Ag coating removed 91.1 ± 5.2 and 99.7 ± 0.4% of PHE in treatments using UVA (365-465 nm) and UVC (254 nm) irradiation, respectively. The use of fiberglass as a support increased the superficial area, thus allowing PHE sorption. C and Ag, which are electrically active impurities in TiO2, enhanced its photocatalytic activity and thus the attraction of the pollutant to its surface. The use of high-frequency UV light (UVC) decreased the amount of carbon species deposited on the TiO2CAg film surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the TiO2-C-Ag film revealed extensive oxidation of the carbon deposited on the film under UVC light and loss of electrons from Ag clusters by conversion of Ag(0) to Ag(3+).

  12. Polymorphism in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    the classic cases of polymorphism at ambient conditions in the energetic field are TNT, HMX , and CL20 (Fig. 1). TNT [2,4,6-trinitrotoluene] is known...2008 NRL REVIEW 71 Polymorphism in Energetic Materials J.R. Deschamps,1 D.A. Parrish,1 and R.J. Butcher2 1Laboratory for Structure of Matter...2Department of Chemistry, Howard University Polymorphism often occurs in energetic materials. Differences in the forms range from conformational changes in

  13. Systematic analysis of phosphotyrosine antibodies recognizing single phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs in CagA of Western-type Helicobacter pylori strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Lind

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infections is determined by multiple host-pathogen interactions that may develop to chronic gastritis, and sometimes peptic ulcers or gastric cancer. Highly virulent strains encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS that delivers the effector protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at EPIYA-sequence motifs, called A, B and C in Western-type strains, by members of the oncogenic Src and Abl host kinases. Phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs mediate interactions of CagA with host signaling factors--in particular various SH2-domain containing human proteins--thereby hijacking multiple downstream signaling cascades. Observations of tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA are mainly based on the use of commercial phosphotyrosine antibodies, which originally were selected to detect phosphotyrosines in mammalian proteins. Systematic studies of phosphorylated EPIYA-motif detection by the different antibodies would be very useful, but are not yet available. To address this issue, we synthesized phospho- and non-phosphopeptides representing each predominant Western CagA EPIYA-motif, and determined the recognition patterns of seven different phosphotyrosine antibodies in Western blots, and also performed infection studies with diverse representative Western H. pylori strains. Our results show that a total of 9-11 amino acids containing the phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs are necessary and sufficient for specific detection by these antibodies, but revealed great variability in sequence recognition. Three of the antibodies recognized phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs A, B and C similarly well; whereas preferential binding to phosphorylated motif A and motifs A and C was found with two and one antibodies, respectively, and the seventh anti-phosphotyrosine antibody did not recognize any phosphorylated EPIYA-motif. Controls showed that none of the antibodies recognized the corresponding non

  14. Relationship between New Allelic Types of Helicobacter pylori vacA Gene and cagA Status and Risk of GU or DU in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Bakhti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Several studies have described VacA and CagA as the two important virulence determinants of Helicobacter pylori, which are associated with gastric ulcer (GU and duodenal ulcer (DU. The aim of present study was to determine the associations of the i and d regions genotypes of H. pylori vacA gene and cagA status with GU and DU risk. Methods: A total of 177 isolates were cultured from the biopsies of Iranian patients with different geographic origins and genotyped. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: Frequency of the vacA i1, i2, i1i2, d1, and d2 alleles and cagA in all patients was 42.9%, 55.4%, 1.7%, 41.8%, 58.2% and 68.4%, respectively. There was a significant difference between the frequencies of vacA i1 in isolates from GU than those from non-atrophic gastritis (p<0.05. When the GU was considered as a dependant factor by the multiple logistic regression analysis, the vacA i1 genotype was significantly associated with the age- and sex-adjusted risk for GU (p=0.006, odds ratio [OR]=3.56 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.45–8.75. Statistical analysis showed no significant association between vacA d genotype and digestive diseases. After controlling for age and sex variables, the cagA genotype remained in the final model when the DU was considered as a dependant factor by the the multiple logistic regression analysis (p=0.021, OR=3.77 95% CI=1.22-11.60. Conclusion: We have proposed that the H. pylori vacA i1 and cagA genotypes could be considered as benefit biomarkers for prediction of risk of GU and DU in Iran, respectively.

  15. Higher frequency of cagA EPIYA-C Phosphorylation Sites in H. pylori strains from first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queiroz Dulciene MM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the prevalence of more virulent H. pylori genotypes in relatives of gastric cancer patients and in patients without family histories of gastric cancer. Methods We evaluated prospectively the prevalence of the infection by more virulent H. pylori strains in 60 relatives of gastric cancer patients comparing the results with those obtained from 49 patients without family histories of gastric cancer. H. pylori status was determined by the urease test, histology and presence of H. pylori ureA. The cytotoxin associated gene (cagA, the cagA-EPIYA and vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA were typed by PCR and the cagA EPIYA typing was confirmed by sequencing. Results The gastric cancer relatives were significant and independently more frequently colonized by H. pylori strains with higher numbers of CagA-EPIYA-C segments (OR = 4.23, 95%CI = 1.53–11.69 and with the most virulent s1m1 vacA genotype (OR = 2.80, 95%CI = 1.04–7.51. Higher numbers of EPIYA-C segments were associated with increased gastric corpus inflammation, foveolar hyperplasia and atrophy. Infection by s1m1 vacA genotype was associated with increased antral and corpus gastritis. Conclusions We demonstrated that relatives of gastric cancer patients are more frequently colonized by the most virulent H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes, which may contribute to increase the risk of gastric cancer.

  16. Patrón de los motivos EPIYA de cepas cubanas de Helicobacter pylori positivas para CagA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lino E. Torres

    2012-03-01

    Conclusión. La mayoría de los aislamientos cubanos presentaron las combinaciones de motivos EPIYA menos virulentas (ABC. Los resultados del empleo de los nuevos cebadores y el análisis de la secuenciación, confirmaron que todas las cepas estudiadas portaban el gen cagA de tipo occidental. Ninguno de los patrones específicos de EPIYA se asoció con úlcera péptica. Este es el primer reporte que muestra la distribución de los motivos EPIYA en los aislamientos de H. pylori de la región del Caribe.   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v32i1.453

  17. Ideal geometries in the military architecture of F. di Giorgio Martini. The defence system fortress-tower of Cagli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Clini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  The subject of the military architecture was widely studied and analyzed by the architect Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1501, who created important defensive works in the duchy of Montefeltro. A defensive line connects a series of medieval villages of the Marches: b Between the Martini’s fortifications, Cagli has still a fortified tower perfectly preserved and some traces of the fortress. The analysis conducted on them involves the information inferable by the essay, by historical surveys and the recent laser scanner survey. The aim of the research was to identify the generating geometry of the architecture: taking the precepts of Vitruvius, in the Renaissance period geometry was synonymous with proportion, order and symmetry. Two are subjects: the first one is the in-depth knowledge of the tower through the digital data obtained from the point cloud, the other one is the reconstruction of a global image of the complex tower-fortress.

  18. Genetic modifiers of Mendelian disease: Huntington's disease and the trinucleotide repeat disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmans, Peter A; Massey, Thomas H; Jones, Lesley

    2017-10-01

    In the decades since the genes and mutations associated with the commoner Mendelian disorders were first discovered, technological advances in genetic analysis have made finding genomic variation a much less onerous task. Recently, the global efforts to collect subjects with Mendelian disorders, to better define the disorders and to empower appropriate clinical trials, along with improved genetic technologies, have allowed the identification of genetic variation that does not cause disease, but substantially modifies disease presentation. The advantage of this is it identifies biological pathways and molecules, that, if modified in people, might alter disease presentation. In Huntington's disease (HD), caused by an expanded CAG repeat tract in HTT, genetic variation has been uncovered that is associated with change in the onset or progression of disease. Some of this variation lies in genes that are part of the DNA damage response, previously suggested to be important in modulating expansion of the repeat tract in germline and somatic cells. The genetic evidence implicates a DNA damage response-related pathway in modulating the pathogenicity of the repeat tracts in HD, and possibly, in other trinucleotide repeat disorders. These findings offer new targets for drug development in these currently intractable disorders. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  20. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  1. Typing polymorphic recursion

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Lucília Camarão de; Camarão, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses some advantages of supporting polymorphic recursión in programming languages and describes a decidable type inference algorithm for typing polymorphic and possibly mutually recursive definitions, using Haskell to provide an executable high level specification of the algorithm.

  2. Triplet-repeat microsatellites shared among hard and soft pines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutil, B L; Williams, C G

    2001-01-01

    Vascular plant species have shown a low level of microsatellite conservation compared to many animal species. Finding trans-specific microsatellites for plants may be improved by using a priori knowledge of genome organization. Fifteen triplet-repeat microsatellites from hard pine (Pinus taeda L.) were tested for trans-specific amplification across seven hard pines (P. palustris Mill., P. echinata Mill., P. radiata D. Don., P. patula Schiede et Deppe, P. halepensis Mill., P. kesiya Royle), a soft pine (P. strobus L.), and Picea rubens Sargent. Seven of 15 microsatellites had trans-specific amplification in both hard and soft pine subgenera. Two P. taeda microsatellites had conserved flanking regions and repeat motifs in all seven hard pines, soft pine P. strobus, and P. rubens. Perfect triplet-repeat P. taeda microsatellites appear to be better candidates for trans-specific polymorphism than compound microsatellites. Not all perfect triplet-repeat microsatellites were conserved, but all conserved microsatellites had perfect repeat motifs. Persistent microsatellites PtTX2123 and PtTX3020 had highly conserved flanking regions and a conserved repeat motif composition with variable repeat unit numbers. Using trinucleotide microsatellites improved trans-specific microsatellite recovery among hard and soft pine species.

  3. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  4. Transferability of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers Developed in Litchi chinensis to Blighia sapida (Sapindaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ekué, Marius; Gailing, Oliver; Finkeldey,Reiner

    2009-01-01

    Ackee (Blighia sapida, Sapindaceae) is a multipurpose fruit tree species of high economic importance, native to the Guinean forests of West Africa, and belongs to the same family as that of lychee (Litchi chinensis). In this study, a set of 12 primer pairs for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) previously developed for lychee has been evaluated for polymorphism in 16 ackee trees from different populations. Seven primer pairs have been found to be transferable, and four have revealed polymorphisms...

  5. Highly sensitive MicroRNA 146a detection using a gold nanoparticle-based CTG repeat probing system and isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Binh Huy; Seo, Young Jun

    2018-01-25

    We have developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based CTG repeat probing system displaying high quenching capability and combined it with isothermal amplification for the detection of miRNA 146a. This method of using a AuNP-based CTG repeat probing system with isothermal amplification allowed the highly sensitive (14 aM) and selective detection of miRNA 146a. A AuNP-based CTG repeat probing system having a hairpin structure and a dT F fluorophore exhibited highly efficient quenching because the CTG repeat-based stable hairpin structure imposed a close distance between the AuNP and the dT F residue. A small amount of miRNA 146a induced multiple copies of the CAG repeat sequence during rolling circle amplification; the AuNP-based CTG repeat probing system then bound to the complementary multiple-copy CAG repeat sequence, thereby inducing a structural change from a hairpin to a linear structure with amplified fluorescence. This AuNP-based CTG probing system combined with isothermal amplification could also discriminate target miRNA 146a from one- and two-base-mismatched miRNAs (ORN 1 and ORN 2, respectively). This simple AuNP-based CTG probing system, combined with isothermal amplification to induce a highly sensitive change in fluorescence, allows the detection of miRNA 146a with high sensitivity (14 aM) and selectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alu repeats: A source for the genesis of primate microsatellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcot, S.S.; Batzer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wang, Zhenyuan [Marshfield Medical Research Foundation, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    As a result of their abundance, relatively uniform distribution, and high degree of polymorphism, microsatellites and minisatellites have become valuable tools in genetic mapping, forensic identity testing, and population studies. In recent years, a number of microsatellite repeats have been found to be associated with Alu interspersed repeated DNA elements. The association of an Alu element with a microsatellite repeat could result from the integration of an Alu element within a preexisting microsatellite repeat. Alternatively, Alu elements could have a direct role in the origin of microsatellite repeats. Errors introduced during reverse transcription of the primary transcript derived from an Alu {open_quotes}master{close_quote} gene or the accumulation of random mutations in the middle A-rich regions and oligo(dA)-rich tails of Alu elements after insertion and subsequent expansion and contraction of these sequences could result in the genesis of a microsatellite repeat. We have tested these hypotheses by a direct evolutionary comparison of the sequences of some recent Alu elements that are found only in humans and are absent from nonhuman primates, as well as some older Alu elements that are present at orthologous positions in a number of nonhuman primates. The origin of {open_quotes}young{close_quotes} Alu insertions, absence of sequences that resemble microsatellite repeats at the orthologous loci in chimpanzees, and the gradual expansion of microsatellite repeats in some old Alu repeats at orthologous positions within the genomes of a number of nonhuman primates suggest that Alu elements are a source for the genesis of primate microsatellite repeats. 48 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. accessions with sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), two advanced molecular markers for genetic research in grass and forage, were used to analyze the genetic diversity among 44 accessions of cocksfoot collected from seven countries and regions. 21 SRAP primer combinations ...

  8. (SSR) markers that are polymorphic between cultivars in Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl user 1

    2012-02-07

    Feb 7, 2012 ... Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers were developed through data mining of 3,803 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) previously published. A total of 144 di- to penta-type SSRs were identified and they were screened for polymorphism between two turnip cultivars, 'Tsuda' and 'Yurugi Akamaru'. Out.

  9. Identification of forty-five gene-derived polymorphic microsatellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Chen M., Gao L., Zhang W., You H., Sun Q. and Chang Y. 2013 Identification of forty-five gene-derived polymorphic microsatellite loci for the sea cucumber ... China in the 1980s and sea cucumber aquaculture has been developing rapidly in recent .... Repeated DNA extraction and PCR did not result in any improvement in.

  10. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  11. Repeated judgment sampling: Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Muller-Trede

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the boundaries of the recent result that eliciting more than one estimate from the same person and averaging these can lead to accuracy gains in judgment tasks. It first examines its generality, analysing whether the kind of question being asked has an effect on the size of potential gains. Experimental results show that the question type matters. Previous results reporting potential accuracy gains are reproduced for year-estimation questions, and extended to questions about percentage shares. On the other hand, no gains are found for general numerical questions. The second part of the paper tests repeated judgment sampling's practical applicability by asking judges to provide a third and final answer on the basis of their first two estimates. In an experiment, the majority of judges do not consistently average their first two answers. As a result, they do not realise the potential accuracy gains from averaging.

  12. Allowing repeat winners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco D. Huesch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Unbiased lotteries seem the least unfair and simplest procedures to allocate scarce indivisible resources to those with equal claims. But, when lotteries are repeated, it is not immediately obvious whether prior winners should be included or excluded. As in design questions surrounding single-shot lotteries, considerations of self-interest and distributive social preferences may interact. We investigate preferences for allowing participation of earlier winners in sequential lotteries. We found a strong preference for exclusion, both in settings where subjects were involved, and those where they were not. Subjects who answered questions about both settings did not differ in their tendency to prefer exclusion. Stated rationales significantly predicted choice but did not predict switching of choices between the two settings.

  13. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) site in Bacillus anthracis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqi; Wang, Dongshu; Feng, Erling; Wang, Bingxiang; Hui, Yiming; Han, Shaobo; Jiao, Lei; Liu, Xiankai; Wang, Hengliang

    2014-11-04

    To investigate the polymorphism of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in Bacillu santhracis and the application to molecular typing based on the polymorphism of CRISPR in B. anthracis. We downloaded the whole genome sequence of 6 B. anthracis strains and extracted the CRISPR sites. We designed the primers of CRISPR sites and amplified the CRISPR fragments in 193 B. anthracis strains by PCR and sequenced these fragments. In order to reveal the polymorphism of CRISPR in B. anthracis, wealigned all the extracted sequences and sequenced results by local blasting. At the same time, we also analyzed the CRISPR sites in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. We did not find any polymorphism of CRISPR in B. anthracis. The molecular typing approach based on CRISPR polymorphism is not suitable for B. anthracis, but it is possible for us to distinguish B. anthracis from B. cereus and B. thuringiensis.

  14. Polymorphic Embedding of DSLs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Christian; Ostermann, Klaus; Rendel, Tillmann

    2008-01-01

    propose polymorphic embedding of DSLs, where many different interpretations of a DSL can be provided as reusable components, and show how polymorphic embedding can be realized in the programming language Scala. With polymorphic embedding, the static type-safety, modularity, composability and rapid......The influential pure embedding methodology of embedding domain-specific languages (DSLs) as libraries into a general-purpose host language forces the DSL designer to commit to a single semantics. This precludes the subsequent addition of compilation, optimization or domain-specific analyses. We...

  15. Molecular Identification of Date Palm Cultivars Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalifah, Nasser S; Shanavaskhan, A E

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity in the total number of date palm cultivars across the world is pointing toward the necessity for an enumerative study using standard morphological and molecular markers. Among molecular markers, DNA markers are more suitable and ubiquitous to most applications. They are highly polymorphic in nature, frequently occurring in genomes, easy to access, and highly reproducible. Various molecular markers such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), simple sequence repeats (SSR), inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers have been successfully used as efficient tools for analysis of genetic variation in date palm. This chapter explains a stepwise protocol for extracting total genomic DNA from date palm leaves. A user-friendly protocol for RAPD analysis and a table showing the primers used in different molecular techniques that produce polymorphisms in date palm are also provided.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 promoter polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Yang, Wei; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Zhao, Hui; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K; Shaw, Gary M

    2015-09-01

    Spina bifida is the most common form of neural tube defects (NTDs). Etiologies of NTDs are multifactorial, and oxidative stress is believed to play a key role in NTD development. Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, has multiple protective properties including mediating antioxidant processes, making it an ideal candidate for study. The inducible HO isoform (HO-1) has two functional genetic polymorphisms: (GT)n dinucleotide repeats and A(-413)T SNP (rs2071746), both of which can affect its promoter activity. However, no study has investigated a possible association between HO-1 genetic polymorphisms and risk of NTDs. This case-control study included 152 spina bifida cases (all myelomeningoceles) and 148 non-malformed controls obtained from the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program reflecting births during 1990 to 1999. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and amplified fragment length polymorphisms/restriction fragment length polymorphisms using genomic DNA extracted from archived newborn blood spots. Genotype and haplotype frequencies of two HO-1 promoter polymorphisms between cases and controls were compared. For (GT)n dinucleotide repeat lengths and the A(-413)T SNP, no significant differences in allele frequencies or genotypes were found. Linkage disequilibrium was observed between the HO-1 polymorphisms (D': 0.833); however, haplotype analyses did not show increased risk of spina bifida overall or by race/ethnicity. Although, an association was not found between HO-1 polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida, we speculate that the combined effect of low HO-1 expression and exposures to known environmental oxidative stressors (low folate status or diabetes), may overwhelm antioxidant defenses and increase risk of NTDs and warrants further study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Polymorphisms in folate pathway and pemetrexed treatment outcome in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goricar, Katja; Kovac, Viljem; Dolzan, Vita

    2014-06-01

    A combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin has been shown to improve the outcome in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), however, there is a great heterogeneity in treatment response among patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in folate pathway and transporter genes on pemetrexed treatment outcome in Slovenian patients with MPM. MPM patients treated with pemetrexed in the course of a prospective randomized clinical trial were genotyped for nineteen polymorphisms in five genes of folate pathway and six transporter genes. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of polymorphisms on treatment efficacy and toxicity, while Cox regression was used to determine their influence on progression-free and overall survival. Patients with at least one polymorphic MTHFD1 rs2236225 allele had a significantly lower response rate (p = 0.005; odds ratio [OR] = 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.03-0.54) and shorter progression-free survival (p = 0.032; hazard ratio [HR] = 3.10; 95% CI = 1.10-8.74) than non-carriers. Polymorphisms in transporter genes did not influence survival; however, several were associated with toxicity. Liver toxicity was significantly lower in carriers of polymorphic ABCC2 rs2273697 (p = 0.028; OR = 0.23; 95% CI = 0.06-0.85), SLCO1B1 rs4149056 (p = 0.028; OR = 0.23; 95% CI = 0.06-0.85) and rs11045879 (p = 0.014; OR = 0.18; 95% CI = 0.05-0.71) alleles compared to non-carriers, as well as in patients with SLCO1B1 GCAC haplotype (p = 0.048; OR = 0.17; 95% CI = 0.03-0.98). Gastrointestinal toxicity was much more common in patients with polymorphic ABCC2 rs717620 allele (p = 0.004; OR = 10.67; 95% CI = 2.15-52.85) and ABCC2 CAG haplotype (p = 0.006; OR = 5.67; 95% CI = 1.64-19.66). MTHFD1 polymorphism affected treatment response and survival, while polymorphisms in ABCC2 and SLCO1B1 transporter genes influenced the risk for toxicity. These polymorphisms could serve as potential markers of

  18. Porcine (GT)n sequences: structure and association with dispersed and tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, K; Jung, M; Chen, Y; Geldermann, H

    1994-05-01

    Loci containing (GT)n repeats were isolated from three different plasmid libraries with inserts of porcine genomic DNA between 140 and 200, 200 and 300, and 350 and 400 bp. Sequencing showed that the average repeat length and the fraction of perfect repeats were increased in the libraries containing longer inserts (> or = 200 bp). The polymorphism of (GT)n loci containing at least 10 repeat units was analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction and an automated DNA sequencer. Nearly all tested loci are polymorphic and can therefore be used as marker loci for gene mapping and for other applications. The (GT)n loci were categorized into three classes: (1) loci containing the (GT)n repeats associated with a SINE element, (2) loci containing the (GT)n repeats associated with one or more other simple repeats, and (3) loci containing (GT)n as the only detected repetitive element. At most loci of the first class, the (GT)n repeat was in a fixed configuration adjacent to the 3' end of the SINE. The findings support the notion of clustering of different repeat types in the mammalian genome.

  19. Apolipoprotein CIII polymorphism and triglyceride levels of a Japanese population living in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Parzianello

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein CIII (apo-CIII participates in the regulation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism. Several polymorphic sites have been detected within and around the apo-CIII gene. Here, we examined the relationship between apo-CIII SstI polymorphism (CC, CG, GG genotypes and plasma triglyceride (TG levels in a group of 159 Japanese individuals living in Southern Brazil. The sample was divided into a group of Japanese descendants (N = 51 with high TG (HTG; >200 mg/dL and a group of Japanese descendants (N = 108 with normal TG (NTG; <200 mg/dL. TG and total cholesterol levels were analyzed by an enzymatic method using the Labtest-Diagnostic kit and high- and low-density lipoproteins by a direct method using the Labtest-Diagnostic kit and DiaSys Diagnostic System International kit, respectively. A 428-bp sequence of apo-CIII gene was amplified using oligonucleotide primers 5' GGT GAC CGA TGG CTT CAG TTC CCT GA 3' and 5' CAG AAG GTG GAT AGA GCG CTG GCC T 3'. The PCR products were digested with a restriction endonuclease SstI. Rare G allele was highly prevalent in our study population (0.416 compared to Caucasians (0.00-0.11. G allele was almost two times more prevalent in the HTG group compared to the NTG group (P < 0.001. The genotype distribution was consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a significant association between rare G allele and HTG in Japanese individuals living in Southern Brazil as indicated by one-way ANOVA, P < 0.05.

  20. Clonación y expresión de un fragmento recombinante del gen cagA de Helicobacter pylori y su evaluación preliminar en el serodiagnóstico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidice González

    2013-12-01

    100 % y 92,7 %, respectivamente. Conclusiones. El fragmento de la proteína CagA del estudio puede constituir una herramienta útil para el diagnóstico serológico de la infección por cepas de H. pylori positivas para CagA. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v33i4.1678

  1. A meta-analysis of CAG (cytarabine, aclarubicin, G-CSF regimen for the treatment of 1029 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guoqing

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The regimen of cytarabine, aclarubicin and G-CSF (CAG has been widely used in China and Japan for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. We searched literature on CAG between 1995 and 2010 and performed a meta-analysis to determine its overall efficacy using a random-effects or fixed-effects model. Thirty five trials with a total of 1029 AML (n = 814 and MDS (n = 215 patients were included for analysis. The CR rate of AML (57.9% was significantly higher than that of MDS (45.7% (p 0.05. The CR rate was also significantly higher in patients with favorable (64.5% and intermediate (69.6% karyotypes than those with unfavorable one (29.5% (p

  2. Associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA de Helicobacter pylori e úlcera duodenal em crianças no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Ashour Abdussalam Ali Ramadam; Gusmão Valquíria Ribeiro de; Magalhães Paula Prazeres; Collares Guilherme Birchal; Mendes Edilberto Nogueira; Queiroz Dulciene Maria de Magalhães; Rocha Gifone Aguiar; Rocha Andreia Maria Camargos; Carvalho Anfrisina Sales Teles

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori é o principal agente de gastrite em seres humanos e fator de risco para úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. A evolução da infecção está relacionada a diversos fatores, inclusive bacterianos, como presença de cagA e genótipo s1-m1 do vacA, associados com o desenvolvimento de úlcera e adenocarcinoma gástrico. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA em H. pylori isolado de crianças e relacionar os achados com a doença apresentada pelo pac...

  3. [Gene polymorphisms in the dihydrofolate reductase ( dhfr ) and dihydropteroate synthase ( dhps ) genes and structural modelling of the dhps gene in Colombian isolates of Toxoplasma gondii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Liliana Jazmín; Duque, Sofía; López, Miryam Consuelo; Moncada, Diego; Molina, Diego; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique; Gunturiz, María Luz

    2014-01-01

    There are no reports describing polymorphisms in target genes of anti- Toxoplasma drugs in South American isolates. This study sought to perform cloning and sequencing of the dihydrofolate reductase ( dhfr ) and dihydropteroate-synthase ( dhps ) genes of the reference Rh strain and two Colombian isolates of Toxoplasma gondii . Two isolates were obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis. A DNA extraction technique and PCR assay for the dhfr and dhps genes were standardized, and the products of amplification were cloned into Escherichia coli and sequenced. One polymorphism (A « G) was found at position 235 of exon 2 in the dhps gene. In addition, two polymorphisms (G « C) at positions 259 and 260 and one polymorphism (T « G) at position 371 within exon 4 of the dhps gene were detected. In this last exon, a bioinformatic analysis revealed a non-synonymous polymorphism in the coding region that could lead to the substitution of Glu (CAA or CAG) for His (encoded by codons AAU or AAC). A structural model of the T. gondii DHPS protein was calculated, and the results revealed modifications in secondary structure due to mutations. The methods described in this study can be used as a tool to search for polymorphisms in samples from patients with different clinical manifestations of toxoplasmosis and to examine their relationship with the therapeutic response.

  4. [Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors vacA and cagA in individuals from two regions in Colombia with opposing risk for gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Esperanza; Martínez, Teresa; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The overall prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is high in Colombia; however, in the country´s Andean region, gastric cancer rates far surpass those in coastal areas. Helicobacter pylori genotypes cagA positive and vacA s1 and m1 are associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. To compare the distribution of H. pylori genotypes associated with virulence in two regions in Colombia with opposing risk for gastric cancer. Four hundred and one gastric antral biopsies were obtained and analyzed from 401 individuals diagnosed with non-atrophic gastritis, atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia: 256 came from the high-risk area cities of Tunja and Bogotá, and 145 from the low-risk area cities of Barranquilla, Santa Marta and Cartagena. Genotyping of virulence genes vacA and cagA was performed by PCR. No difference was observed in the frequency of H. pylori infection between the two areas (77.3% vs 77.9 %, p=non significant, ns). The presence of cagA was higher in the low-risk area (77.9% vs. 69.2 %, p=ns). The vacA s1 allele was also more prevalent in the low-risk area (61.8 % vs 72.0 %, p=ns). The vacA m1 allele was more prevalent in the high-risk area (57.2 % vs 42.8 %, p=ns). The cagA positive s1m1 combination was also more frequent in the low-risk area (48.9% vs 38.9%, p=ns). The differences in the risk of gastric cancer in these two geographic areas cannot be explained by differences in the prevalence of infection by H. pylori or by differences in the virulence of circulating strains.

  5. Nucleotide excision repair and the 26S proteasome function together to promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, Claire; Lahue, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underpins a number of inheritable neurological human disorders. Multiple mechanisms are thought to contribute to the expansion process. The incorrect processing of the repeat tract by DNA repair proteins can drive this mutation process forward, as expansions are suppressed following ablation of certain repair factors in mouse models and cell models of disease. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one repair pathway implicated in TNR instability, although most previous work focussed on TNR contractions, not expansions. Here we investigated the role of NER in modulating expansions of threshold-length (CTG·CAG) repeats in yeast. We show that both the global genome and transcription-coupled repair subpathways promote expansions of threshold-length TNRs. Furthermore, NER works with the 26S proteasome to drive expansions, based on analysis of double mutants defective in both pathways, and of Rad23, a protein involved in both NER and the shuttling of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome. This work provides the first evidence that both subpathways of NER can promote threshold-length TNR expansions and that NER interacts with the proteasome to drive expansions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  7. CAG Expansions Are Genetically Stable and Form Nontoxic Aggregates in Cells Lacking Endogenous Polyglutamine Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Zurawel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins containing polyglutamine (polyQ regions are found in almost all eukaryotes, albeit with various frequencies. In humans, proteins such as huntingtin (Htt with abnormally expanded polyQ regions cause neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD. To study how the presence of endogenous polyQ aggregation modulates polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we expressed polyQ expanded Htt fragments (polyQ Htt in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In stark contrast to other unicellular fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. pombe is uniquely devoid of proteins with more than 10 Q repeats. We found that polyQ Htt forms aggregates within S. pombe cells only with exceedingly long polyQ expansions. Surprisingly, despite the presence of polyQ Htt aggregates in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, no significant growth defect was observed in S. pombe cells. Further, PCR analysis showed that the repetitive polyQ-encoding DNA region remained constant following transformation and after multiple divisions in S. pombe, in contrast to the genetic instability of polyQ DNA sequences in other organisms. These results demonstrate that cells with a low content of polyQ or other aggregation-prone proteins can show a striking resilience with respect to polyQ toxicity and that genetic instability of repetitive DNA sequences may have played an important role in the evolutionary emergence and exclusion of polyQ expansion proteins in different organisms.

  8. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  9. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  10. Serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) polymorphisms and compulsive buying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, E J; Magee, H J; Dill-Devor, R M; Gabel, J; Black, D W

    1999-04-16

    We examined a panel of 21 patients diagnosed with compulsive buying for two DNA sequence polymorphisms found in the gene that encodes the serotonin transport (5-HTT). One polymorphism, found in the promoter region of the 5-HTT gene, involves a 44-base pair (bp) deletion, and the other, found in the second intron, is due to variable numbers of a repeat sequence. We also typed a panel of 38 psychiatrically normal controls for both 5-HH markers. When compared to this control panel, no significant differences were seen for either 5-HTT marker among the compulsive buyers.

  11. X-Chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in the Turkish population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the importance and utility of polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) found on the human X chromosome and to provide the first allelic frequency data of X-STR (X chromosomal) loci in the Turkish population. Blood samples were taken from unrelated individuals (135 males and 129 ...

  12. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  13. Androgen receptor and monoamine oxidase polymorphism in wild bonobos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Cintia; Furuichi, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Ryu, Heungjin; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-12-01

    Androgen receptor gene (AR), monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and monoamine oxidase B gene (MAOB) have been found to have associations with behavioral traits, such as aggressiveness, and disorders in humans. However, the extent to which similar genetic effects might influence the behavior of wild apes is unclear. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ), AR glycine repeat (ARG), MAOA intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MAin2) and MAOB intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MBin2) in 32 wild bonobos, Pan paniscus, and compared them with those of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and humans. We found that bonobos were polymorphic on the four loci examined. Both loci MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos showed a higher diversity than in chimpanzees. Because monoamine oxidase influences aggressiveness, the differences between the polymorphisms of MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos and chimpanzees may be associated with the differences in aggression between the two species. In order to understand the evolution of these loci and AR, MAOA and MAOB in humans and non-human primates, it would be useful to conduct future studies focusing on the potential association between aggressiveness, and other personality traits, and polymorphisms documented in bonobos.

  14. Flanking Variation Influences Rates of Stutter in Simple Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August E. Woerner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been posited that the longest uninterrupted stretch (LUS of tandem repeats, as defined by the number of exactly matching repeating motif units, is a better predictor of rates of stutter than the parental allele length (PAL. While there are cases where this hypothesis is likely correct, such as the 9.3 allele in the TH01 locus, there can be situations where it may not apply as well. For example, the PAL may capture flanking indel variations while remaining insensitive to polymorphisms in the repeat, and these haplotypic changes may impact the stutter rate. To address this, rates of stutter were contrasted against the LUS as well as the PAL on different flanking haplotypic backgrounds. This study shows that rates of stutter can vary substantially depending on the flanking haplotype, and while there are cases where the LUS is a better predictor of stutter than the PAL, examples to the contrary are apparent in commonly assayed forensic markers. Further, flanking variation that is 7 bp from the repeat region can impact rates of stutter. These findings suggest that non-proximal effects, such as DNA secondary structure, may be impacting the rates of stutter in common forensic short tandem repeat markers.

  15. Occupational COPD and HMOX1 repeats in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Else; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Steffensen, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dinucleotide repeats (GT)n in the 5’prime promoter region of the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene modulate the gene expression. Long repeats might affect occurrence of COPD. We aimed to investigate associations of the HMOX1 polymorphism of (GT)n repeats to occurrence of COPD.......Methods: This population based cohort included 4703 Danes aged 45-84 of Northern European descents. COPD was defined by LLN: 2.5th FEV1/FVC and FEV1 centiles. The occupational exposures were defined as years with vapour, gas, dust or fume (VGDF) exposure. The HMOX1 repeat was genotyped by fragment analysis and capillary......, analyses are attempted replicated in a younger Danish cohort aged 20-44.Results: A HMOX1 (GT)n genotype was present in 4423 participants and distributed as S/S 12%, S/M 42%, M/M 35%, S/L 4%, M/L 7% and L/L 0.1%. The crude association between COPD and at least one long GT repeat (S/L, M/L, L/L) GT genotype...

  16. Decreased Rate of Evolution in Y Chromosome STR Loci of Increased Size of the Repeat Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järve, Mari; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Rootsi, Siiri; Help, Hela; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Kivisild, Toomas; Sanchez, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Polymorphic Y chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) have been widely used in population genetic and evolutionary studies. Compared to di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats, STRs with longer repeat units occur more rarely and are far less commonly used. Principal Findings In order to study the evolutionary dynamics of STRs according to repeat unit size, we analysed variation at 24 Y chromosome repeat loci: 1 tri-, 14 tetra-, 7 penta-, and 2 hexanucleotide loci. According to our results, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats have approximately two times lower repeat variance and diversity than tri- and tetranucleotide repeats, indicating that their mutation rate is about half of that of tri- and tetranucleotide repeats. Thus, STR markers with longer repeat units are more robust in distinguishing Y chromosome haplogroups and, in some cases, phylogenetic splits within established haplogroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Y chromosome STRs of increased repeat unit size have a lower rate of evolution, which has significant relevance in population genetic and evolutionary studies. PMID:19789645

  17. Alu repeats as markers for human population genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bazan, H. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Medical Center] [and others

    1993-09-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 97.9% nucleotide identity with each other and an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence. HS Alu family members are thought to be derived from a single source ``master`` gene, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 in. and 3 in. unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allows the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of an Alu repeat. Individual HS Alu sequences were found to be either monomorphic or dimorphic for the presence or absence of each repeat. The monomorphic HS Alu family members inserted in the human genome after the human/great ape divergence (which is thought to have occurred 4--6 million years ago), but before the radiation of modem man. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem man (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project as well. HS Alu family member insertion dimorphism differs from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) because individuals share HS Alu family member insertions based upon identity by descent from a common ancestor as a result of a single event which occurred one time within the human population. The VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times within a population and are identical by state only.

  18. Helicobacter pylori: focus on CagA and VacA major virulence factors Helicobacter pylori: enfoque sobre los factores de virulencia CagA y VacA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available After colonizing the human gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori can remain within the host for years and even decades, and is associated with several, highly significant gastric pathologies. In Mexico, the seroprevalence at 1 year of age is 20% and the estimated increment in seropositivity per year is 5% for children aged 1-10 years. More than 80% of adults are infected by the time they are 18-20 years old. Bacterial virulence factors have been proposed for H. pylori, such as urease, flagella, heat-shock protein, lipopolysaccharide, adhesions, vacuolating cytotoxin, cag pathogenicity island and the cytotoxin-associated protein, the latter being the most studied mechanism to date.Después de colonizar la mucosa gástrica humana, Helicobacter pylori puede permanecer por años e incluso décadas en el humano, y se asocia a varias patologías gástricas. En México, la seroprevalencia estimada es de 20% en niños de un año de edad, con una tasa de incremento en seropositividad de 5% anual durante los primeros 10 años de vida hasta alcanzar 80% en adultos jóvenes entre los 18 y 20 años de edad. Los factores bacterianos de virulencia propuestos para H. pylori son ureasa, flagelos, proteínas de choque térmico, lipopolisacárido, adhesinas, citotoxina vacuolizante, isla de patogenicidad y la proteína asociada a la citoxina; este último factor es el más estudiado hasta la fecha.

  19. Symptomatic subependymoma with nuclear polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, A; Ahyai, A; Hori, A

    1987-01-01

    Two patients with symptomatic subependymomas are described. Histologically prominent cellular polymorphism was revealed. The existence of subependymoma with unusually marked polymorphism of the tumor cells should be taken into consideration in diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) for the genotyping of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are DNA sequences composed of a succession of repeats (23- to 47-bp long) separated by unique sequences called spacers. Polymorphism can be observed in different strains of a species and may be used for genotyping. We describe protocols and bioinformatics tools that allow the identification of CRISPRs from sequ